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Sample records for low-mass stars revisited

  1. Spectroscopic Observations of Nearby Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vican, Laura; Zuckerman, B. M.; Rodriguez, D.

    2014-01-01

    Young low-mass stars are known to be bright in X-ray and UV due to a high level of magnetic activity. By cross-correlating the GALEX Catalog with the WISE and 2MASS Point Source Catalogs, we have identified more than 2,000 stars whose UV excesses suggest ages in the 10-100 Myr range. We used the Shane 3-m telescope at Lick Observatory on Mount Hamilton, California to observe some of these 2,000 stars spectroscopically. We measured the equivalent width of lithium at 6708 A absorption and H-alpha emission lines. Out of a total of 122 stars observed with the Kast grating spectrometer, we find that roughly 10% have strong lithium absorption features. The high percentage of stars with lithium present is further evidence of the importance of UV emission as a youth indicator for low-mass stars. In addition, we used high-resolution spectra obtained with the Hamilton echelle spectrograph to determine radial velocities for several UV-bright stars. These radial velocities will be useful for the calculation of Galactic UVW space velocities for determination of possible moving group membership. This work is supported by NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program award NNX12AH37G to RIT and UCLA and Chilean FONDECYT grant 3130520 to Universidad de Chile. This submission presents work for the GALNYSS project and should be linked to abstracts submitted by David Rodriguez, Laura Vican, and Joel Kastner.

  2. Olivier Chesneau's Work on Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagadec, E.

    2015-12-01

    During his too short career, Olivier Chesneau pioneered the study of the circumstellar environments of low mass evolved stars using very high angular resolution techniques. He applied state of the art high angular resolution techniques, such as optical interferometry and adaptive optics imaging, to the the study of a variety of objects, from AGB stars to Planetary Nebulae, via e.g. Born Again stars, RCB stars and Novae. I present here an overview of this work and most important results by focusing on the paths he followed and key encounters he made to reach these results. Olivier liked to work in teams and was very strong at linking people with complementary expertises to whom he would communicate his enthusiasm and sharp ideas. His legacy will live on through the many people he inspired.

  3. Pseudocepheids. III - The low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggen, O. J.

    1986-04-01

    Light and color curves in four-color, H-beta, and (RI) photometric systems are presented for 20 low-mass pseudocepheids. Members of the Wolf 630 group and the cluster M67 are used to establish the positions of both variable and nonvariable giants with near solar abundance in the luminosity-temperature plane for old disk population stars, while members of Omega Cen and of Kapteyn's Star Group are used for the low metal abundance halo giants. The low-mass pseudocepheids discussed are divided into two main categories, based on the amplitude of light variation. The smaller amplitude stars, characterized by R CrB and RY Sgr in the old disk population, show the R CrB syndrome of occasional deep light minima, as does UW Cen. The small amplitude variables in the halo population, BL Tel and LN Hya, do not show the R CrB syndrome and their periods are longer than those of old disk stars. Large amplitude variables, with periods ranging from 10 to 150 days, are all halo objects with stability of period and form of light curve an obvious function of the period. Cen and BL Tel are members of Kapteyn's Star Group, and the spectroscopic orbital elements of the latter indicate a mass near 0.5 solar mass for the pseudocepheid and 1 solar mass for the late-type giant companion. Far-infrared observations are important in exploring the correlations between the presence and character of circumstellar dust shells and other post-AGB star parameters.

  4. Evolutionary models of rotating low mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Luiz Themystokliz Sanctos

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated the combined effects of rotation and internal angular momentum redistribution on the structure and evolution of low mass stars, from the pre-main sequence to the main sequence phase. As a tool for that study, the ATON stellar evolutionary code (Mazzitelli 1989; Ventura et al. 1998) has been modified in order to include those effects. Rotation was implemented according to the equipotential technique developed by Kippenhahn & Thomas (1970) and later improved by Endal & Sofia (1976). Angular momentum redistribution in radiative regions was modeled through an advection-diffusion partial differential equation based on the framework originally introduced by Chaboyer & Zahn (1992), which is based on the sole assumption of stronger turbulent transport in the horizontal direction than in the vertical one. The diffusion coefficient of this equation is obtained from characteristic lengths and velocities of typical rotation-induced hydrodynamical instabilities. This improved code was used to compute a series of rotating low mass stellar models (with masses ranging from 1.2Modot down to 0.6 Modot). Regarding the structural (hydrostatic) effects of rotation, the general features of these models show that rotating stars behave as if they were non-rotating stars of slightly lower masses, in accordance with previous results by other researchers. A study of this mass-lowering effect for the considered range of masses shows that rotation decreases lithium depletion while the star is fully convective but increases it as soon as the star develops a radiative core. The net effect is a enhanced lithium depletion, in disagreement with observational data which suggest that faster rotators in young open clusters experience less lithium depletion. Angular momentum redistribution in the considered models is very effective in smoothing their internal angular velocity profile as soon as the star reaches the zero age main sequence, but fails to reproduce the flat solar

  5. Habitable Zones Around Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Kasting, J. F.; Ramirez, R.

    2011-09-01

    Classically, the circumstellar habitable zone (HZ) is defined as the region inside which a terrestrial mass planet, with adequate supplies of carbon, water, and internal heat, can sustain liquid water on its surface (Kasting et al. 1993). A conservative estimate for the width of the HZ in our Solar system is 0.93-1.48 AU, assuming that the inner edge is limited by water loss and the outer edge is determined by the maximum greenhouse limit for a dense CO2 atmosphere. These numbers are revisions of ones published by Kasting et al. (1993), based on new climate modeling results. Kasting et al. obtained HZ boundaries for stars with effective temperatures between 3700 K and 7200 K--limits that do not include main-sequence M-dwarfs. In this study we use an updated 1-D radiative-convective, cloud-free climate model to estimate the width of the HZ around these low mass stars. Significant improvements in our climate model include: (1) updated collision-induced absorption coefficients for CO2 (critical for dense CO2 atmospheres at the outer edge) and (2) a revised Rayleigh scattering coefficient for H2O (important for water loss at the inner edge). Assuming Earth-like planets with CO2/H2O/N2 atmospheres, the width of the HZ is 0.24-0.44 AU around an early M star (Teff = 3600 K) and 0.05-0.09 AU for a late M star (Teff = 2800 K). As our model does not include the radiative effects of clouds, the actual HZ boundaries may extend further in both directions than our conservative estimates. Nonetheless, current ground-based surveys (e.g., the MEARTH project) and future space-based characterization missions (e.g., JWST/TPF) may be able to use these HZ boundaries to help guide their efforts to find habitable planets around main-sequence stars. (We acknowledge funding from NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory, supported by NASA under cooperative agreement NNH05ZDA001C.)

  6. 30 Doradus: The Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinnecker, H.; Brandl, B.; Brandner, W.; Moneti, A.; Hunter, D.

    We have obtained HST/NICMOS H-band images of the central 1'x1' field around the R136 starburst cluster in the 30 Doradus HII region, in an attempt to reveal the presence (or absence) of a low-mass stellar population (M < 1 Mo). We will discuss the fascinating prospect of 30 Dor/R136 being a proto-globular cluster and a template starburst unit. At the time of writing, we are still working to determine which method and photometry package is best suited to our 0.15" NICMOS images, which are characterised by extreme crowding in the cluster center and a peculiar and slightly undersampled NICMOS PSF. The main difficulty with the PSF is identifying the many "dots" that appear outside the Airy ring as PSF features and not as faint stars. Prelimininary analysis suggests that the H-band luminosity function rises at least until H = 20 (2 Mo). We have detected numerous stars with 20.0 < H < 22.5 (the latter corresponding to 0.4 Mo) beyond about 7" from the cluster centre, but we have not yet determined the completeness in that magnitude range, and we are not yet in a position to make a statement about the shape of the H-band luminosity function there. We have combined our infrared data with the optical WFPC2 images of Hunter et al. (1995) to produce a VIH 3-colour image of the central 30" x 30" area. The result clearly shows unexpected patches of extinction, with one patch only about 5" from the cluster core.

  7. Aging jets from low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, J. A.; Chen, W. P.

    1994-01-01

    An extended faint optical jet is associated with the compact emission region plus faint star known as HH 55. HH 55 is located in the Lupus 2 cloud 2 min SW of the well studied T Tauri star RU Lupi. The HH 55 jet extends 55 sec N and 35 sec S in PA 160 deg. The HH 55 star is an emission line star of spectral type M3.5. Its image in the emission lines of H-alpha and (S II) is slightly elongated by 2 sec - 3 sec to the S but in continuum light is symmetrical and pointlike ((full width at half maximum) (FWHM) = 1.7 sec). The star and jet have several features in common with the star and jet known as Sz 102 = Th 28 in the nearby Lupus 3 cloud. We suggest that these objects are representative of the late evolutionary stage of the HH jet-outflow phenomenon and point out that such objects may be quite common although difficult to detect. With L(sub bol) approximately = 0.005 solar luminosity, and log T(sub e) approximately = 3.5, the HH 55 star is close to the main sequence and evolutionary tracks suggest an age of 3 x 10(exp 7) yr.

  8. Low Mass Star Formation in the Norma Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, B.; Nielbock, M.

    2008-12-01

    A small filamentary cloud in Norma hosts a number of young low-mass stars in various stages of evolution, from visible Hα emission stars to embedded sources detected only in the sub-millimeter regime. The best known source is V346 Nor, an FU Orionis star that brightened in the early 1980s. The morphology of the cloud complex and an apparent age gradient along the cloud suggests that star formation in this region was triggered by an external event.

  9. The evolution of very low mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, L. A.; Rappaport, S. A.; Joss, P. C.

    1986-01-01

    The results of numerical evolutionary calculations for stars with masses in the range of 0.01-0.10 solar mass are presented. The stellar models by which these stars are followed from the early stages of contraction through deuterium burning to the very late stages of degenerate cooling at ages comparable to that of the Galaxy are described, and the methodology used to investigate the major uncertainties in the input physics are discussed. It is found that, for brown dwarfs with masses substantially below the end of the hydrogen-burning main sequence, the evolution of the effective temperature and bolometric luminosity are fairly well determined, despite the residual uncertainties in the input physics. In particular, the evolution is remarkably insensitive to the choice of the atmospheric opacity law at low temperatures and to the amount of mismatch in specific entropy across the stellar envelope. The minimum mass for a star to attain main-sequence status is moderately sensitive to the assumed input physics, particularly the surface boundary conditions.

  10. Coronal structure of low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Pauline; Jardine, Moira; Donati, Jean-François; Morin, Julien; Vidotto, Aline

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the change in stellar magnetic topology across the fully convective boundary and its effects on coronal properties. We consider both the magnitude of the open flux that influences angular momentum loss in the stellar wind and X-ray emission measure. We use reconstructed maps of the radial magnetic field at the stellar surface and the potential-field source surface method to extrapolate a 3D coronal magnetic field for a sample of early-to-mid M dwarfs. During the magnetic reconstruction process it is possible to force a solution towards field geometries that are symmetric or antisymmetric about the equator but we demonstrate that this has only a modest impact on the coronal tracers mentioned above. We find that the dipole component of the field, which governs the large-scale structure, becomes increasingly strong as the stellar mass decreases, while the magnitude of the open (wind-bearing) magnetic flux is proportional to the magnitude of the reconstructed magnetic flux. By assuming a hydrostatic and isothermal corona, we calculate X-ray emission measures (in magnitude and rotational modulation) for each star and, using observed stellar densities as a constraint, we reproduce the observed X-ray saturation at Ro≤ 0.1. We find that X-ray rotational modulation is not a good indicator of magnetic structure as it shows no trend with Rossby number but can be useful in discriminating between different assumptions on the field geometry.

  11. Exploring The Wide Main Sequence of Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pewett, Tiffany; Henry, T. J.; Hosey, A. D.; Jao, W.; Lepine, S.; Riedel, A. R.; Winters, J. G.; RECONS Team

    2014-01-01

    The RECONS (REsearch Consortium On Nearby Stars, www.recons.org) team has compiled photometric and astrometric data on over 3000 stars with trigonometric parallaxes placing them within 25 parsecs, allowing for an accurate representation of the H-R Diagram from A stars through M stars. We find that the main sequence is widest, by up to 2.5 full magnitudes in Mv, in the region of low mass K and M dwarf stars. This corresponds to a factor of almost 10 in luminosity among stars of the same temperature, but a detailed understanding of the causes of this range remains elusive. Given that temperature and radius determine the observed luminosity of a star, stars with identical temperatures must have radii differing by up to a factor of three to account for the width of the main sequence. In order to determine the underlying causes of the different radii, we have embarked on a project to measure the variability, rotation, ages, and metallicities of a large sample of the nearest low mass stars. We are comparing these stars to known young stars and cool subdwarfs in the same temperature slices to map the complex interplay of these many factors. Here we present our initial findings from the photometric variability data and first spectroscopic results. This effort is supported by the NSF through grants AST-0908402 and AST-1109445, and via observations made possible by the SMARTS Consortium.

  12. Age discrimination among motions of low mass stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upgren, A. R.

    Motions of low mass dwarf stars have become much better known than was the case when the concept of the basic solar motion was introduced. The group motions which they define show that older stars have mean motions directed inward towards the galactic center, as well as the well-known mean motion in the direction opposite to that of galactic rotation, when compared to younger stars. This radial motion difference is revealed among stars divided according to their emission intensities as well as kinematical age related parameters.

  13. LOW-MASS STAR FORMATION TRIGGERED BY EARLY SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiaki, Gen; Yoshida, Naoki; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    We study the formation of low-mass and extremely metal-poor stars in the early universe. Our study is motivated by the recent discovery of a low-mass (M {sub *} {<=} 0.8 M {sub Sun }) and extremely metal-poor (Z {<=} 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} Z {sub Sun }) star in the Galactic halo by Caffau et al. We propose a model that early supernova (SN) explosions trigger the formation of low-mass stars via shell fragmentation. We first perform one-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the evolution of an early SN remnant. We show that the shocked shell undergoes efficient radiative cooling and then becomes gravitationally unstable to fragment and collapse in about a million years. We then follow the thermal evolution of the collapsing fragments using a one-zone code. Our one-zone calculation treats chemistry and radiative cooling self-consistently in low-metallicity gas. The collapsing gas cloud evolves roughly isothermally, until it cools rapidly by dust continuum emission at the density 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. The cloud core then becomes unstable and fragments again. We argue that early SNe can trigger the formation of low-mass stars in the extremely metal-poor environment as Caffau et al. discovered recently.

  14. Fundamental Properties of Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Allard, France; Blake, Cullen H.; Bonnefoy, M.; Cody, Ann Marie; Kraus, Adam; Day-Jones, A. C.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2009-02-16

    Precise measurements of the fundamental properties of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs are key to understanding the physics underlying their formation and evolution. While there has been great progress over the last decade in studying the bulk spectrophotometric properties of low-mass objects, direct determination of their masses, radii, and temperatures have been very sparse. Thus, theoretical predictions of low-mass evolution and ultracool atmospheres remain to be rigorously tested. The situation is alarming given that such models are widely used, from the determination of the low-mass end of the initial mass function to the characterization of exoplanets.An increasing number of mass, radius, and age determinations are placing critical constraints on the physics of low-mass objects. A wide variety of approaches are being pursued, including eclipsing binary studies, astrometric-spectroscopic orbital solutions, interferometry, and characterization of benchmark systems. In parallel, many more systems suitable for concerted study are now being found, thanks to new capabilities spanning both the very widest (all-sky surveys) and very narrowest (diffraction-limited adaptive optics) areas of the sky. This Cool Stars 15 splinter session highlighted the current successes and limitations of this rapidly growing area of precision astrophysics.

  15. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  16. Resolving the Discrepancy of Low-Mass Stars with IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddle, Andrew; Kraus, Adam L.

    2015-01-01

    Observed properties of low-mass stars (M < 0.8 solar msses) have been found to be in disagreement with stellar models, the observed radii being inflated and the observed temperatures being too low. To study this discrepancy, we are observing a sample of low-mass eclipsing binaries using the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory as well as the LCOGT network to increase the number of well-characterized systems. We are also using IGRINS, a new high resolution (R=40,000) IR (H+K) spectrograph on the 2.7-m HJST, to measure the fundamental stellar parameters (Teff, R, M, abundances, activity) of a sample of eclipsing binaries consisting of two low-mass components. Finally, to calibrate these eclipsing binaries, we are observing a temperature calibration sample of single M dwarfs with precise temperature measurements from interferometry and a metallicity calibration sample of M dwarfs in wide binaries with solar-type stars. Relationships between these parameters will help us better understand the discrepancy between models and observed properties of low-mass stars.

  17. Angular Momentum Evolution in Young Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzón, G.; de La Reza, R.

    2006-06-01

    During the last decades, the study of rotation in young low mass stars has been one of the more active areas in the field of stellar evolution. Many theoretical efforts have been made to understand the angular momentum evolution and our picture now, reveals the main role of the stellar magnetic field in all pre-main sequence stage (Ghosh & Lamb 1979, ApJ, 234, 296; Cameron & Campbell 1993, A&A, 274, 309; Cameron & Campbell 1995, A&A, 298, 133; Kúker, Henning, & Rúdiger 2003, ApJ, 589, 397; Matt & Pudritz 2005, MNRAS, 356, 167). The mean rotation of most of the cool low mass stars remains roughly constant during the T Tauri stage. This can be explained by the disc locking scenario. This paradigm suggest that star start out as CTTS with periods of 4-14 days, perhaps locked to their disc, and that this disc is eventually lost mainly by accretion. At the current time, it is not clear that this is true for all low mass stars. Some authors have questioned its validity for stars less massive than 0.5 solar masses. Although the reality may eventually turn out to be considerably more complex, a simple consideration of the effects of and limits on disc locking of young low mass stars seems necessary.We have investigated the exchange of angular momentum between a low mass star and an accretion disc during the Hayashi Track (Pinzón, Kúker, & de la Reza 2005, in preparation) and also along the first 100Myr of stellar evolution. The model incorporates changes in the star's moment of inertia, magnetic field strength (Elstner & Rúdiger 2000, A&A, 358, 612), angular momentum loss by a magnetic wind and an exponential decrease of the accretion rate. The lifetime of the accretion disc is a free parameter in our model. The resulting rotation rates are in agreement with observed vsin and photometric periods for young stars belonging to co-moving groups and open young clusters.

  18. Where are the Low-mass Population III Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Sudo, Kae; Yokoi, Shingo; Hasegawa, Kenji; Tominaga, Nozomu; Susa, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    We study the number and the distribution of low-mass Population III (Pop III) stars in the Milky Way. In our numerical model, hierarchical formation of dark matter minihalos and Milky-Way-sized halos are followed by a high-resolution cosmological simulation. We model the Pop III formation in H2 cooling minihalos without metal under UV radiation of the Lyman–Werner bands. Assuming a Kroupa initial mass function (IMF) from 0.15 to 1.0 M ⊙ for low-mass Pop III stars, as a working hypothesis, we try to constrain the theoretical models in reverse by current and future observations. We find that the survivors tend to concentrate on the center of halo and subhalos. We also evaluate the observability of Pop III survivors in the Milky Way and dwarf galaxies, and constraints on the number of Pop III survivors per minihalo. The higher latitude fields require lower sample sizes because of the high number density of stars in the galactic disk, the required sample sizes are comparable in the high- and middle-latitude fields by photometrically selecting low-metallicity stars with optimized narrow-band filters, and the required number of dwarf galaxies to find one Pop III survivor is less than 10 at <100 kpc for the tip of red giant stars. Provided that available observations have not detected any survivors, the formation models of low-mass Pop III stars with more than 10 stars per minihalo are already excluded. Furthermore, we discuss the way to constrain the IMF of Pop III stars at a high mass range of ≳10 M ⊙.

  19. The APOGEE Low-Mass Star Ancillary Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Cullen; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Terrien, Ryan; Crepp, Justin R.; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Allende-Prieto, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    As a high-resolution, near-infrared, fiber-fed instrument, APOGEE presents a unique opportunity to obtain multi-epoch radial velocity measurements of a large number of low-mass stars. These observations will reveal unseen companions, improving our understanding of stellar multiplicity at the bottom of the Main Sequence, and may even identify candidate sub-stellar companions. These same data contains an unprecedented wealth of information about the kinematics, rotation, and metallicities of these stars. I will describe the status of our Ancillary Science program, and ongoing efforts to get the best possible radial velocity precision from the APOGEE data.

  20. Angular momentum transport within evolved low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cantiello, Matteo; Bildsten, Lars; Paxton, Bill; Mankovich, Christopher; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen

    2014-06-10

    Asteroseismology of 1.0-2.0 M {sub ☉} red giants by the Kepler satellite has enabled the first definitive measurements of interior rotation in both first ascent red giant branch (RGB) stars and those on the helium burning clump. The inferred rotation rates are 10-30 days for the ≈0.2 M {sub ☉} He degenerate cores on the RGB and 30-100 days for the He burning core in a clump star. Using the Modules for Experiments in Stellar Evolution code, we calculate state-of-the-art stellar evolution models of low mass rotating stars from the zero-age main sequence to the cooling white dwarf (WD) stage. We include transport of angular momentum due to rotationally induced instabilities and circulations, as well as magnetic fields in radiative zones (generated by the Tayler-Spruit dynamo). We find that all models fail to predict core rotation as slow as observed on the RGB and during core He burning, implying that an unmodeled angular momentum transport process must be operating on the early RGB of low mass stars. Later evolution of the star from the He burning clump to the cooling WD phase appears to be at nearly constant core angular momentum. We also incorporate the adiabatic pulsation code, ADIPLS, to explicitly highlight this shortfall when applied to a specific Kepler asteroseismic target, KIC8366239.

  1. COUNTING LOW-MASS STARS IN INTEGRATED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Charlie; Van Dokkum, Pieter

    2012-03-01

    Low-mass stars (M {approx}< 0.4 M{sub Sun }) are thought to comprise the bulk of the stellar mass of galaxies but they constitute only of order 1 percent of the bolometric luminosity of an old stellar population. Directly estimating the number of low-mass stars from integrated flux measurements of old stellar systems is therefore possible but very challenging, given the numerous variables that can affect the light at the percent level. Here we present a new population synthesis model created specifically for the purpose of measuring the low-mass initial mass function (IMF) down to {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun} for metal-rich stellar populations with ages in the range 3-13.5 Gyr. Our fiducial model is based on the synthesis of three separate isochrones, and a combination of optical and near-IR empirical stellar libraries in order to produce integrated light spectra over the wavelength interval 0.35 {mu}m < {lambda} < 2.4 {mu}m at a resolving power of R Almost-Equal-To 2000. New synthetic stellar atmospheres and spectra have been computed in order to model the spectral variations due to changes in individual elemental abundances including C, N, Na, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and generic {alpha} elements. We demonstrate the power of combining blue spectral features with surface gravity-sensitive near-IR features in order to simultaneously constrain the low-mass IMF, stellar population age, metallicity, and abundance pattern from integrated light measurements. Finally, we show that the shape of the low-mass IMF can also be directly constrained by employing a suite of surface gravity-sensitive spectral features, each of which is most sensitive to a particular mass interval.

  2. Outer Atmospheres of Low Mass Stars — Flare Characteristics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-04-01

    We compare the coronal properties during flares on active low mass stars CN Leonis, AB Doradus A and Proxima Centauri observed with XMM-Newton. From the X-ray data we analyze the temporal evolution of temperature, emission measure and coronal abundance. The nature of these flares are with secondary events following the first flare peak in the light curve, raising the question regarding the involved magnetic structure. We infer from the plasma properties and the geometry of the flaring structure that the flare originates from a compact arcade rather than in a single loop.

  3. Thermohaline mixing in evolved low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantiello, M.; Langer, N.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Thermohaline mixing has recently been proposed to occur in low-mass red giants, with large consequence for the chemical yields of low-mass stars. Aims: We investigate the role of thermohaline mixing during the evolution of stars between 1 M_⊙ and 3 M_⊙, in comparison with other mixing processes acting in these stars. Methods: We use a stellar evolution code which includes rotational mixing, internal magnetic fields and thermohaline mixing. Results: We confirm that during the red giant stage, thermohaline mixing has the potential to decrease the abundance of 3He, which is produced earlier on the main sequence. In our models we find that this process is working on the RGB only in stars with initial mass M ⪉ 1.5 M_⊙. Moreover we report that thermohaline mixing is also present during core He-burning and beyond, and has the potential to change the surface abundances of AGB stars. While we find rotational and magnetic mixing to be negligible compared to the thermohaline mixing in the relevant layers, the interaction of thermohaline motions with the differential rotation may be essential to establish the timescale of thermohaline mixing in red giants. Conclusions: To explain the surface abundances observed at the bump in the luminosity function, the speed of the mixing process needs to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than in our models. However it is not clear if thermohaline mixing is the only physical process responsible for these surface-abundance anomalies. Therefore it is not possible at this stage to calibrate the efficiency of thermohaline mixing against the observations.

  4. Mass-luminosity relation of low mass stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkov, O. Yu.; Piskunov, A. E.; Shpil'Kina, D. A.

    1997-04-01

    The data on dynamic masses and multicolor photometry of 56 M-type components of binary/multiple systems was collected. Critical evaluation of late type stars bolometric correction scales have been performed. Our refined and reduced data is compared with published empirical and theoretical mass-luminosity relations. Our data does not exclude the existence of a step-like feature at M_V_=12mag. The best agreement between observations and theoretical models is found for recent calculations of D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994ApJS...90..467D) with Alexander opacities. We conclude that present-day knowledge of the mass-luminosity relation at faintest magnitudes is not sufficient for making definite conclusions on the initial mass function of low mass stars.

  5. Dust discs around low-mass main-sequence stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolstencroft, R. D.; Walker, Helen J.

    1988-01-01

    The current understanding of the formation of circumstellar disks as a natural accompaniment to the process of low-mass star formation is examined. Models of the thermal emission from the dust disks around the prototype stars Alpha Lyr, Alpha PsA, Beta Pic, and Epsilon Eri are discussed, which indicate that the central regions of three of these disks are almost devoid of dust within radii ranging between 17 and 26 AU, with the temperature of the hottest zone lying between about 115 and 210 K. One possible explanation of the dust-free zones is the presence of a planet at the inner boundary of each cloud which sweeps up grains crossing its orbit.

  6. Empirical Isochrones for Low Mass Stars in Nearby Young Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Gregory J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2015-07-01

    Absolute ages of young stars are important for many issues in pre-main-sequence stellar and circumstellar evolution but long have been recognized as difficult to derive and calibrate. In this paper, we use literature spectral types and photometry to construct empirical isochrones in Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams for low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the η Cha, ɛ Cha, and TW Hya Associations and the β Pic and Tuc-Hor Moving Groups. A successful theory of pre-main-sequence evolution should match the shapes of the stellar loci for these groups of young stars. However, when comparing the combined empirical isochrones to isochrones predicted from evolutionary models, discrepancies lead to a spectral type (mass) dependence in stellar age estimates. Improved prescriptions for convection and boundary conditions in the latest models of pre-main-sequence evolution lead to a significantly improved correspondence between empirical and model isochrones, with small offsets at low temperatures that may be explained by observational uncertainties or by model limitations. Independent of model predictions, linear fits to combined stellar loci of these regions provide a simple empirical method to order clusters by luminosity with a reduced dependence on spectral type. Age estimates calculated from various sets of modern models that reproduce Li depletion boundary ages of the β Pic Moving Group also imply a ˜4 Myr age for the low mass members of the Upper Sco OB Association, which is younger than the 11 Myr age that has been recently estimated for intermediate and high mass members.

  7. The naked T Tauri stars - The low-mass pre-main sequence unveiled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.

    1987-01-01

    The search for low-mass premain-sequence (PMS) stars associated with X-ray sources in regions of star formation is discussed. The survey to date has revealed at least 30 low-mass PMS stars in the Tau-Aur region, and a comparable number in Oph. These stars are the naked T Tau stars, unveiled versions of the well-known classical T Tau stars. The properties of these newly discovered PMS stars and their relation to the classical T Tau stars are discussed, and it is concluded that the naked T Tau stars are the true low-mass PMS stars, and that the observable characteristics defining the classical T Tau stars are due to the interaction of an underlying, fairly normal star with a dominant circumstellar environment. The impact the naked T Tau stars are likely to have on models of the PMS evolution of low-mass stars is considered.

  8. H2, CO and Dust Emission Around Low Mass Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We model the thermal balance, the chemistry, and the radiative transfer in dusty disks orbiting young, low mass stars. These models are motivated by observations of infrared and ultraviolet transitions of H2 from protoplanetary disks, as well as millimeter and submillimeter observations of other molecules such as CO, and infrared continuum observations of the dust. The dust grains are heated primarily by the stellar radiation and the infrared radiation field produced by the dust itself. The gas is heated by collisions with warmer dust grains, X-rays from the region close to the stellar surface, UV (ultraviolet) pumping of hydrogen molecules, and the grain photoelectric heating mechanism initiated by UV photons from the central star. We treat cases where the gas to dust ratio is high, because the dust has settled to the midplane and coagulated into relatively large objects. We discuss situations in which the infrared emission from H2 can be detected, and how the comparison of the observations with our models can deduce physical parameters such as the mass and the density and temperature distribution of the gas.

  9. H2, CO and Dust Emission Around Low Mass Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, David; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We model the thermal balance, the chemistry, and the radiative transfer in dusty disks orbiting young, low mass stars. These models are motivated by observations of infrared and ultraviolet transitions of H2 from protoplanetary disks, as well as millimeter and submillimeter observations of other molecules such as CO, and infrared continuum observations of the dust. The dust grains are heated primarily by the stellar radiation and the infrared radiation field produced by the dust itself. The gas is heated by collisions with warmer dust grains, X-rays from the region close to the stellar surface, UV pumping of hydrogen molecules, and the grain photoelectric heating mechanism initiated by UV photons from the central star. We treat cases where the gas to dust ratio is high, because the dust has settled to the midplane and coagulated into relatively large objects. We discuss situations in which the infrared emission from H2 can be detected, and how the comparison of the observations with our models can deduce physical parameters such as the mass and the density and temperature distribution of the gas.

  10. Atmospheres of Quiescent Low-Mass Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Platon; Medin, Zachary; Calder, Alan; Lattimer, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the neutron stars in quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries are important for determining their masses and radii which can lead to powerful constraints on the dense matter nuclear equation of state. The interpretation of these sources is complex and their spectra differ appreciably from blackbodies. Further progress hinges on reducing the uncertainties stemming from models of neutron star atmospheres. We present a suite of low-temperature neutron star atmospheres of different chemical compositions (pure H and He). Our models are constructed over a range of temperatures [log(T/1 K)=5.3, 5.6, 5.9, 6.2, 6.5] and surface gravities [log(g/1 cm/s2)=14.0, 14.2, 14.4, 14.6]. We generated model atmospheres using zcode - a radiation transfer code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. In order to facilitate analytic studies, we developed three-parameter fits to our models, and also compared them to diluted blackbodies in the energy range of 0.4-5 keV (CXO/MGE). From the latter, we extract color-correction factors (fc), which represent the shift of the spectra as compared to a blackbody with the same effective temperature. These diluted blackbodies are also useful for studies of photspheric expansion X-ray bursts. We provide a comparison of our models to previous calculations using the McGill Planar Hydrogen Atmosphere Code (McPHAC). These results enhance our ability to interpret thermal emission from neutron stars and to constrain the mass-radius relationship of these exotic objects.This research was supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-87ER40317 and by resources at the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University. This research was carried out in part under the auspices of the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy at Los Alamos National Laboratory and supported by Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  11. The role of low-mass star clusters in forming the massive stars in DR 21

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the young low-mass pre-main sequence (PMS) stellar population associated with the massive star-forming region DR 21 by using archival X-ray Chandra observations and by complementing them with existing optical and infrared (IR) surveys. The Chandra observations have revealed for the first time a new highly extincted population of PMS low-mass stars previously missed in observations at other wavelengths. The X-ray population exhibits three main stellar density peaks, coincident with the massive star-forming regions, being the DR 21 core the main peak. The cross-correlated X-ray/IR sample exhibits a radial `Spokes-like' stellar filamentary structure that extends from the DR 21 core towards the northeast. The near-IR data reveal a centrally peaked structure for the extinction, which exhibits its maximum in the DR 21 core and gradually decreases with the distance to the N-S cloud axis and to the cluster centre. We find evidence of a global mass segregation in the full low-mass stellar cluster, and of a stellar age segregation, with the youngest stars still embedded in the N-S cloud, and more evolved stars more spatially distributed. The results are consistent with the scenario where an elongated overall potential well created by the full low-mass stellar cluster funnels gas through filaments feeding stellar formation. Besides the full gravitational well, smaller scale local potential wells created by dense stellar sub-clusters of low-mass stars are privileged in the competition for the gas of the common reservoir, allowing the formation of massive stars. We also discuss the possibility that a stellar collision in the very dense stellar cluster revealed by Chandra in the DR 21 core is the origin of the large-scale and highly energetic outflow arising from this region.

  12. New light on dark stars. Red dwarfs, low-mass stars, brown dwarfs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. N.; Hawley, S. L.

    This book presents a comprehensive discussion of both the astrophysical structure of individual M dwarf and brown dwarf star, and their collective statistical properties as a Galactic stellar population. The first section of the book discusses M dwarfs and brown dwarfs as individual objects - their observational properties, formation, internal structure and atmospheres. The second section deals with M dwarfs from the Galactic perspective - the number of stars, their possible contribution to dark matter and the missing mass and their use as probes of the stellar populations that make up our Galaxy. Contents: (1) Astronomical concepts. (2) Basic observational properties of low-mass dwarfs. (3) The structure, formation and evolution of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. (4) The photosphere. (5) Stellar activity. (6) A Galactic structure primer. (7) The stellar luminosity function. (8) The mass function. (9) Brown dwarfs: new light on dark stars. (10) Extrasolar planets. (11) M dwarfs in the Galactic halo. Appendix: The 8 parsec sample.

  13. Very low mass stars and white dwarfs in NGC 6397

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paresce, Francesco; De Marchi, Guido; Romaniello, Martino

    1995-01-01

    Deep Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images in wide bands centered at 606 and 802 nm were taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) 4.6 min from the center of the galactic globular cluster NGC 6397. The images were used to accurately position approximately 2120 stars detected in the field on a color magnitude diagram down to a limiting magnitude m(sub 814) approximately = m(sub I) approximately = 26 determined reliably and solely by counting statistics. A white dwarf sequence and a rich, narrow cluster main sequence are detected for the first time, the latter stretching from m(sub 814) = 18.5 to m(sub 814) = 24.0 where it becomes indistinguishable from the field population. Two changes of slope of the main sequence at m(sub 814) approximately = 20 and m(sub 814) approximately = 22.5 are evident. The corresponding luminosity function increases slowly from M(sub 814) approximately = 6.5 to 8.5 are expected from ground-based observations but then drops sharply from there dwon to the measurement limit. The corresponding mass function obtained bu using the only presently available mass-luminosity function for the cluster's metallicity rises to a plateau between approximately 0.25 and approximately 0.15 solar mass, but drops toward the expected mass limit of the normal hydrogen burning main sequence at approximately 0.1 solar mass. This result is in clear contrast to that obtained from the ground and implies either a substantial modification of the cluster's initial mass function due to dynamical evolution in its lifetime, or that very low mass stars are not produced in any dynamically significant amount by clusters of this type. The white dwarf sequence is in reasonable agreement with a cooling sequence of models of mass 0.5 solar mass at the canonical distance of NGC 6397 with a scatter that is most likely due to photometric errors, but may also reflect real differences in mass or chemical composition. Contamination from unresolved galaxies, which cannot be

  14. Terrestrial Planet Formation around Low-Mass Stars: Effect of the Mass of Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshino, Shoichi; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2015-12-01

    The Kepler space telescope has detected several thousand planets and candidates.Their central stars are mainly FGK-type stars.It is difficult to observe M-stars by using visible light since M-stars have their peak radiation in the infrared region.However, recently there are several survey projects for planets around M-stars such as the InfraRed Doppler (IRD) survey of the Subaru telescope.Therefore it is expected that the number of planets around M-stars will increase in the near future.The habitable zone of M-stars is closer to the stars than that of G-stars.For this reason, the possibility of finding habitable planets is expected to be higher.Here we study the formation of close-in terrestrial planets by giant impacts of protoplanets around low-mass stars by using N-body simulations.An important parameter that controls formation processes is the ratio between the physical radius of a planet and its Hill radius, which decreases with the stellar mass.We systematically change the mass of the central stars and investigate its effects on terrestrial planet formation.We find that the mass of the maximum planet decreases with the mass of central stars, while the number of planets in the system increases.We also find that the orbital separation of adjacent planets normalized by their Hill radius increases with the stellar mass.

  15. Radiative and Kinetic Feedback by Low-Mass Primordial Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Daniel; Hueckstaedt, Robert M.; McConkie, Thomas O.

    2010-03-01

    Ionizing UV radiation and supernova (SN) flows amidst clustered minihalos at high redshift regulated the rise of the first stellar populations in the universe. Previous studies have addressed the effects of very massive primordial stars on the collapse of nearby halos into new stars, but the absence of the odd-even nucleosynthetic signature of pair-instability SNe in ancient metal-poor stars suggests that Population III stars may have been less than 100 M sun. We extend our earlier survey of local UV feedback on star formation to 25-80 M sun stars and include kinetic feedback by SNe for 25-40 M sun stars. We find radiative feedback to be relatively uniform over this mass range, primarily because the larger fluxes of more massive stars are offset by their shorter lifetimes. Our models demonstrate that prior to the rise of global UV backgrounds, Lyman-Werner (LW) photons from nearby stars cannot prevent halos from forming new stars. These calculations also reveal that violent dynamical instabilities can erupt in the UV radiation front enveloping a primordial halo, but that they ultimately have no effect on the formation of a star. Finally, our simulations suggest that relic H II regions surrounding partially evaporated halos may expel LW backgrounds at lower redshifts, allowing stars to form that were previously suppressed. We provide fits to radiative and kinetic feedback on star formation for use in both semianalytic models and numerical simulations.

  16. An infrared search for low-mass companions of stars near the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skrutskie, M. F.; Forrest, W. J.; Shure, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Using a CCD camera on the IRTF telescope on Mauna Kea, a search was conducted for low-mass companions to stars in the solar neighborhood. The K band (2.2 microns) survey includes 55 condidates closer than 12 pc, as well as eight stars in the Pleiades star cluster. Due to the saturation of the primary star image, the survey was insensitive to companions within about 2 arcsec of the primary star. The survey detected a single low-mass candidate object, a companion to the star Gliese 569, which lies near or below the hydrogen-burning mass limit and resembles extremely low-mass stars similar to VB 10 and LHS 2924.

  17. A Review in Mixed Chemistry of Low Mass Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.

    2015-12-01

    During the late stages of their evolution, Sun-like stars bring the products of nuclear burning to the surface. Although there is a chemical dichotomy between oxygen-rich and carbon-rich evolved stars, the dredge-up itself has never been directly observed. In the last three decades, however, a few stars have been shown to display both carbon- and oxygen-rich material in their circumstellar envelopes. These phenomena is seen in both Galactic Disk and Bulge planetary nebulae. For the Galactic Disk objects the mixed chemistry phenomenon is best explained through a recent dredge-up of carbon produced by nucleosynthesis inside the star during the Asymptotic Giant Branch that changed the surface chemistry of the star. On the contrary, we conclude that the mixed chemistry phenomenon occurring in the Galactic Bulge planetary nebulae is best explained through hydrocarbon chemistry in an ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated, dense torus.

  18. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-12

    M-dwarf stars--hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun--are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere. PMID:26560298

  19. A quest for activity cycles in low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vida, K.; Kriskovics, L.; Oláh, K.

    2013-11-01

    Long-term photometric measurements in a sample of ultrashort-period (P≈0.5 days or less) single and binary stars of different interior structures are analysed. A loose correlation exists between the rotational rate and cycle lengths of active stars, regardless of their evolutionary state and the corresponding physical parameters. The shortest cycles are expected for the fastest rotators of the order of 1-2 years, which is reported in this paper.

  20. Constraining X-ray-Induced Photoevaporation of Protoplanetary Disks Orbiting Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzi, Kristina M.; Kastner, Joel H.; Rodriguez, David; Principe, David A.; Vican, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Low-mass, pre-main sequence stars possess intense high-energy radiation fields as a result of their strong stellar magnetic activity. This stellar UV and X-ray radiation may have a profound impact on the lifetimes of protoplanetary disks. We aim to constrain the X-ray-induced photoevaporation rates of protoplanetary disks orbiting low-mass stars by analyzing serendipitous XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray observations of candidate nearby (D < 100 pc), young (age < 100 Myr) M stars identified in the GALEX Nearby Young-Star Survey (GALNYSS).

  1. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Dittmann, Jason A.; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A.; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C.; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-01

    M-dwarf stars—hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun—are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere.

  2. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  3. Finding X-ray Coronal Cycles in Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Guenther, Hans Moritz; Auchettl, Katie

    2015-01-01

    We seek to increase the number of stars known to have an X-ray coronal cycle. Four stars (including the Sun) are known to experience periodic long-term coronal flux variability but the statistics are not superb. In this analysis, we analyze four stellar sources that have been observed frequently by Chandra and XMM-Newton over the last ~11 years. These four sources were the brightest among numerous stellar point sources within the Chandra Deep Field South. Solar flares can dramatically increase the flux measured for our stars on short time intervals and, in observations with insufficient time coverage, can be confused for the maximum of the stars' magnetic cycles (if they have one). We have discarded times where solar proton flares are detected in the data. We utilize an APEC model, which represents the coronal plasma, to fit our stellar spectra. As our sources are very faint, we do not subtract the background, but instead we fit the background and source spectra simultaneously. We use the chi-squared statistic to evaluate the confidence of our fits. We present four light curves which suggest that a long-term X-ray flux variability similar to our Sun (the solar X-ray flux can vary by a factor of 10 over ~11 years) is not present in these stellar sources. None of our stars experienced a flux variability exceeding a factor of 3 over an 11 year time scale but one of the four stars in our sample exhibits short term variability over a one year period. However, our stellar sources are too faint to conclusively state that the flux remains constant throughout all epochs.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation REU and Department of Defense AS-SURE programs under NSF Grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  4. High-redshift galaxies and low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkins, Stephen M.; Stanway, Elizabeth R.; Bremer, Malcolm N.

    2014-03-01

    The sensitivity available to near-infrared surveys has recently allowed us to probe the galaxy population at z ≈ 7 and beyond. The existing Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) Infrared Camera (VIRCam) instruments allow deep surveys to be undertaken well beyond 1 μm - a capability that will be further extended with the launch and commissioning of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). As new regions of parameter space in both colour and depth are probed, new challenges for distant galaxy surveys are identified. In this paper, we present an analysis of the colours of L- and T-dwarf stars in widely used photometric systems. We also consider the implications of the newly identified Y-dwarf population - stars that are still cooler and less massive than T-dwarfs for both the photometric selection and spectroscopic follow-up of faint and distant galaxies. We highlight the dangers of working in the low-signal-to-noise regime, and the potential contamination of existing and future samples. We find that Hubble/WFC3 and VISTA/VIRCam Y-drop selections targeting galaxies at z ˜ 7.5 are vulnerable to contamination from T- and Y-class stars. Future observations using JWST, targeting the z ˜ 7 galaxy population, are also likely to prove difficult without deep medium-band observations. We demonstrate that single emission line detections in typical low-signal-to-noise spectroscopic observations may also be suspect, due to the unusual spectral characteristics of the cool dwarf star population.

  5. The First Stars: A Low-Mass Formation Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We perform numerical simulations of the growth of a Population III stellar system under photodissociating feedback. We start from cosmological initial conditions at z = 100, self-consistently following the formation of a minihalo at z = 15 and the subsequent collapse of its central gas to high densities. The simulations resolve scales as small as approx. 1 AU, corresponding to gas densities of 10(exp 16)/cu cm. Using sink particles to represent the growing protostars, we evolve the stellar system for the next 5000 yr. We find that this emerging stellar group accretes at an unusually low rate compared with minihalos which form at earlier times (z = 20-30), or with lower baryonic angular momentum. The stars in this unusual system will likely reach masses ranging from <1Stellar Mass to approx. 5 Stellar Mass by the end of their main-sequence lifetimes, placing them in the mass range for which stars will undergo an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. Based upon the simulation, we predict the rare existence of Population III stars that have survived to the present day and have been enriched by mass overflow from a previous AGB companion.

  6. On the Rotational Evolution of Young Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siess, Lionel; Livio, Mario

    1997-12-01

    Observations of young clusters indicate that a significant fraction of solar-type stars are rotating very slowly, with equatorial velocities less than 10 km s-1. So far, models have failed to reproduce a sufficiently large proportion of these stars on the zero-age main sequence. On the basis of the idea that the mixing length in convection theories could depend on the size of the convective zone (Canuto & Mazzitelli), we examine the influence of a varying mixing-length parameter α on the rotational evolution of solar-type stars. A decreasing α (owing to evolution) in the mixing-length theory (MLT) leads to a slower contraction rate and to a larger stellar moment of inertia. The stellar spin-up is consequently reduced, and this helps to increase the number of very slow rotators present in young clusters. We also investigate the possibility that α could depend on the rotation rate, and show the consequences of this parameterization for the lithium surface abundance.

  7. The first stars: A low-mass formation mode

    SciTech Connect

    Stacy, Athena; Bromm, Volker

    2014-04-10

    We perform numerical simulations of the growth of a Population III stellar system under photodissociating feedback. We start from cosmological initial conditions at z = 100, self-consistently following the formation of a minihalo at z = 15 and the subsequent collapse of its central gas to high densities. The simulations resolve scales as small as ∼1 AU, corresponding to gas densities of 10{sup 16} cm{sup –3}. Using sink particles to represent the growing protostars, we evolve the stellar system for the next 5000 yr. We find that this emerging stellar group accretes at an unusually low rate compared with minihalos which form at earlier times (z = 20-30), or with lower baryonic angular momentum. The stars in this unusual system will likely reach masses ranging from <1 M {sub ☉} to ∼5 M {sub ☉} by the end of their main-sequence lifetimes, placing them in the mass range for which stars will undergo an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. Based upon the simulation, we predict the rare existence of Population III stars that have survived to the present day and have been enriched by mass overflow from a previous AGB companion.

  8. Detection of pedestal features in dark clouds - Evidence for formation of low mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frerking, M. A.; Langer, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    To assess whether B335 is unique among dark clouds or whether CO-12 pedestal features are quite common, 180 opacity class 5 and 6 Lynds clouds were surveyed. From this set of data, three additional sources were found to have pedestal features. These suggest the presence of embedded low-mass stars, though a hot differentially rotating disk cannot be excluded for B335. Estimates of the mass-loss rate required to produce stellar winds consistent with observations are comparable with mass-loss rates for T Tauri stars. Further, the pedestal feature formation rate is similar to the local low-mass star formation rate.

  9. Spectroscopy and photometry for low-mass stars in Praesepe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Scott D.; Stauffer, John R.; Prosser, Charles F.; Herter, Terry

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained spectral types, H alpha equivalent widths, and optical photometry for a small sample of late K and M dwarf candidate members of the Praesepe open cluster. At least for the small sample of stars we have observed, all of the Paesepe members later than M2 have H alpha in emission. The chromospheric activity of the Praesepe satrs is essentially the same as that for Hyades members of the same mass, as expected since the two clusters are thought to be the same age.

  10. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Dittmann, Jason; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michael; Jehin, Emmanuel; Stark, Antony; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christoph; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno; Udry, Stéphane; Wunsche, Anael

    2015-12-01

    Results from Kepler indicate that M dwarfs host, on average, at least 1.4 planets between 0.5 and 1.5 Earth radii per star. Yet, the closest small planets known to transit M dwarfs have been too distant to allow Doppler measurements of their masses or spectroscopic studies of their atmospheres. Here, we announce a new planet discovered by the MEarth-South observatory, an Earth-size planet transiting an M dwarf that is only 12 pc away. The density of the planet, determined from radial velocity observations with HARPS, is consistent with an Earth-like rock/iron composition. With an equilibrium temperature of 530K (assuming a Bond albedo of 0.3), this planet is cooler than most other rocky planets with measured densities. Although too hot to be habitable, it is cool enough that it may have retained a substantial atmosphere over its lifetime. Thanks to the star's proximity and its diminutive size of only 1/5th the radius of the Sun, this new world likely provides the first opportunity for our community to spectroscopically examine the atmosphere of a terrestrial exoplanet. We estimate that JWST could secure high signal-to-noise spectra of the planet's atmosphere, both in transmission during transit and in emission at secondary eclipse.

  11. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    VLT Observations of an Unusual Stellar System Reinhold Häfner of the Munich University Observatory (Germany) is a happy astronomer. In 1988, when he was working at a telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory, he came across a strange star that suddenly vanished off the computer screen. He had to wait for more than a decade to get the full explanation of this unusual event. On June 10-11, 1999, he observed the same star with the first VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope (ANTU) and the FORS1 astronomical instrument at Paranal [1]. With the vast power of this new research facility, he was now able to determine the physical properties of a very strange stellar system in which two planet-size stars orbit each other. One is an exceedingly hot white dwarf star , weighing half as much as the Sun, but only twice as big as the Earth. The other is a much cooler and less massive red dwarf star , one-and-a-half times the size of planet Jupiter. Once every three hours, the hot star disappears behind the other, as seen from the Earth. For a few minutes, the brightness of the system drops by a factor of more than 250 and it "vanishes" from view in telescopes smaller than the VLT. A variable star named NN Serpentis ESO PR Photo 30a/99 ESO PR Photo 30a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 468 pix - 152k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 936 pix - 576k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2304 x 2695 pix - 4.4M] Caption to ESO PR Photo 30a/99 : The sky field around the 17-mag variable stellar system NN Serpentis , as seen in a 5 sec exposure through a V(isual) filter with VLT ANTU and FORS1. It was obtained just before the observation of an eclipse of this unsual object and served to centre the telescope on the corresponding sky position. The field shown here measures 4.5 x 4.5 armin 2 (1365 x 1365 pix 2 ; 0.20 arcsec/pix). The field is somewhat larger than that shown in Photo 30b/99 and has the same orientation to allow comparison: North is about 20° anticlockwise from the top and East is 90° clockwise from that direction. The

  12. Nucleosynthesis in Low Mass Very Metal Poor AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serenelli, A.

    The evolution of a 1.5 M⊙, Z= 10-5 stellar model has been followed starting at the ZAMS up to the thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) phase. Calculations were done using the LPCODE [1], to which some changes were done. The most important and relevant to this work is the incorporation of a full nuclear network from H to Po, comprising about 525 isotopes and 910 nuclear reactions, appropriate for the computation of the s-process occurring in AGB stars. Convection is treated according to the mixing length theory (λMLT = 1.7) and convective mixing as a diffusive process. Diffusive overshooting is also included according to [2] and the free parameter f adopted is 0.015. Mass loss is given by the Reimers formula, with the parameter η = 1.

  13. A Vanishing Star Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-07-01

    VLT Observations of an Unusual Stellar System Reinhold Häfner of the Munich University Observatory (Germany) is a happy astronomer. In 1988, when he was working at a telescope at the ESO La Silla observatory, he came across a strange star that suddenly vanished off the computer screen. He had to wait for more than a decade to get the full explanation of this unusual event. On June 10-11, 1999, he observed the same star with the first VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope (ANTU) and the FORS1 astronomical instrument at Paranal [1]. With the vast power of this new research facility, he was now able to determine the physical properties of a very strange stellar system in which two planet-size stars orbit each other. One is an exceedingly hot white dwarf star , weighing half as much as the Sun, but only twice as big as the Earth. The other is a much cooler and less massive red dwarf star , one-and-a-half times the size of planet Jupiter. Once every three hours, the hot star disappears behind the other, as seen from the Earth. For a few minutes, the brightness of the system drops by a factor of more than 250 and it "vanishes" from view in telescopes smaller than the VLT. A variable star named NN Serpentis ESO PR Photo 30a/99 ESO PR Photo 30a/99 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 468 pix - 152k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 936 pix - 576k] [High-Res - JPEG: 2304 x 2695 pix - 4.4M] Caption to ESO PR Photo 30a/99 : The sky field around the 17-mag variable stellar system NN Serpentis , as seen in a 5 sec exposure through a V(isual) filter with VLT ANTU and FORS1. It was obtained just before the observation of an eclipse of this unsual object and served to centre the telescope on the corresponding sky position. The field shown here measures 4.5 x 4.5 armin 2 (1365 x 1365 pix 2 ; 0.20 arcsec/pix). The field is somewhat larger than that shown in Photo 30b/99 and has the same orientation to allow comparison: North is about 20° anticlockwise from the top and East is 90° clockwise from that direction. The

  14. Kinematics Of Low-mass Stars In The Vicinity Of The Sun From The SUPERBLINK Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corin, Elysa; Lepine, S.; Jordan, C.; Patton, K.; Zaiats, M.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the kinematics of low-mass red dwarfs in the vicinity of the Sun using a new database of Northern Hemisphere stars with proper motions between ."04-."15/yr, identified in the SUPERBLINK survey. We have isolated stars at high Galactic northern latitudes and analyzed their projected motions in the UV velocity plane. Groups and streams of stars that are moving together in the Galaxy are qualitatively identified. It is demonstrated that low-mass stars have motions largely consistent with those of higher-mass (Sun-like) stars in the Solar vicinity. We investigate possible evidence of metallicity variations between stars associated with the Hercules, Hyades, and Sirius streams, using infrared photometry from 2MASS.

  15. R-mode Instability of Low-mass Bare Strange Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun-mei, Pi; Shu-hua, Yang

    2016-04-01

    The r-mode instability window of low-mass strange stars is studied using the modified bag model of strange quark matter and reasonable sets of parameters. The results show that the ultimate spin frequency of strange stars increases with the decreasing stellar mass, and the highest spin frequency (716 Hz) of pulsars observed sofar can be explained by the bare strange stars with a mass lower than about 0.1∼0.2 M⊙, depending on the selected parameters.

  16. Herschel photometry of disks around low-mass stars in the R CrA cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M.; Henning, Thomas; Liu, Yao; Wolf, Sebastian E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: yliu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: yliu@pmo.ac.cn

    2014-11-01

    We report photometric results from a subset of a Herschel-PACS program to observe cool dust in disks around low-mass stars as a complement to our earlier program to measure far-infrared emission from brown dwarfs. In this latest study we observed five low-mass objects in the nearby R Corona Australis region and detected at least three at 70 μm. Using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code we have investigated the disk masses and geometry based on detailed spectral energy distribution (SED) modeling, and we compare these new results to those from our earlier larger sample of brown dwarfs. In particular, our SED analysis for these five objects shows again that disk geometries of brown dwarfs or low-mass stars are generally similar to their higher mass counterparts like T Tauri disks, but the range of disk mass extends to well below the value found in T Tauri stars.

  17. Revisiting XENON100's constraints (and signals?) for low-mass dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan

    2013-09-01

    Although observations made with the CoGeNT and CDMS experiments have been interpreted as possible signals of low-mass ( ∼ 7–10 GeV) dark matter particles, constraints from the XENON100 collaboration appear to be incompatible with this hypothesis, at least at face value. In this paper, we revisit XENON100's constraint on dark matter in this mass range, and consider how various uncertainties and assumptions made might alter this conclusion. We also note that while XENON100's two nuclear recoil candidates each exhibit very low ratios of ionization-to-scintillation signals, making them difficult to attribute to known electronic or neutron backgrounds, they are consistent with originating from dark matter particles in the mass range favored by CoGeNT and CDMS. We argue that with lower, but not implausible, values for the relative scintillation efficiency of liquid xenon (L{sub eff}), and the suppression of the scintillation signal in liquid xenon at XENON100's electric field (S{sub nr}), these two events could consistently arise from dark matter particles with a mass and cross section in the range favored by CoGeNT and CDMS. If this interpretation is correct, we predict that the LUX experiment, with a significantly higher light yield than XENON100, should observe dark matter induced events at an observable rate of ∼ 3–24 per month.

  18. RADIUS-DEPENDENT ANGULAR MOMENTUM EVOLUTION IN LOW-MASS STARS. I

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, Ansgar; Mohanty, Subhanjoy

    2012-02-10

    Angular momentum evolution in low-mass stars is determined by initial conditions during star formation, stellar structure evolution, and the behavior of stellar magnetic fields. Here we show that the empirical picture of angular momentum evolution arises naturally if rotation is related to magnetic field strength instead of to magnetic flux and formulate a corrected braking law based on this. Angular momentum evolution then becomes a strong function of stellar radius, explaining the main trends observed in open clusters and field stars at a few Gyr: the steep transition in rotation at the boundary to full convection arises primarily from the large change in radius across this boundary and does not require changes in dynamo mode or field topology. Additionally, the data suggest transient core-envelope decoupling among solar-type stars and field saturation at longer periods in very low mass stars. For solar-type stars, our model is also in good agreement with the empirical Skumanich law. Finally, in further support of the theory, we show that the predicted age at which low-mass stars spin down from the saturated to unsaturated field regimes in our model corresponds remarkably well to the observed lifetime of magnetic activity in these stars.

  19. A Systematic Search for Low-mass Field Stars with Large Infrared Excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, Christopher; West, Andrew A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a systematic search for low-mass field stars exhibiting extreme infrared (IR) excesses. One potential cause of the IR excess is the collision of terrestrial worlds. Our input stars are from the Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) catalog. Candidate stars are then selected based on large deviations (3σ) between their measured Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) 12 μm flux and their expected flux (as estimated from stellar models). We investigate the stellar mass and time dependence for stars showing extreme IR excesses, using photometric colors from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Galactic height as proxies for mass and time, respectively. Using a Galactic kinematic model, we estimate the completeness for our sample as a function of line-of-sight through the Galaxy, estimating the number of low-mass stars that should exhibit extreme IR excesses within a local volume. The potential for planetary collisions to occur over a large range of stellar masses and ages has serious implications for the habitability of planetary systems around low-mass stars.

  20. Low-Mass Field Stars with Infrared Excesses: Potential Signatures of Planetary Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew

    This proposed study will investigate the occurrence of mid-infrared (MIR) excesses—found in WISE data—in low-mass field stars. These MIR excesses are interpreted as dust reprocessed star-light, occurring when terrestrial planetary bodies collide. These systems serve as an important signatures of terrestrial planet formation and evolution (or destruction). This proposal builds off the results of a pilot study (Theissen & West 2014) conducted using WISE, 2MASS, and SDSS observations. This study used MIR observations from WISE to identify 175 spectroscopically confirmed low-mass stars exhibiting excess MIR flux over expected stellar photospheric levels. Theissen & West (2014) investigated other explanations for stars exhibiting excess MIR flux. Accounting for any possible contaminants, 175 stars were found with MIR excesses, and a low probability of MIR excesses being attributable to a contaminating source. Through investigation of the disk luminosities and approximate stellar ages estimated from spectroscopic tracers, it was determined the most likely cause of the excess MIR flux is a large abundance of circumstellar material, likely caused by collisions between planetary bodies. The pilot study was limited by its small sample size (175 stars) and incompleteness due to the SDSS spectroscopic target selection. Our proposed study will use a photometrically selected sample to create a more complete and statistically significant sample of low-mass stars exhibiting MIR excesses. The first objective of this proposal will be to construct a photometric catalog of low-mass stars, combining WISE, 2MASS, and SDSS photometry. To differentiate stars from other point-like sources of similar color (e.g. red galaxies), we will use proper motions. The large time baselines between WISE, 2MASS, and SDSS observations (~9-12 years) allow us to compute reliable proper motions for millions of photometric low-mass stars contained within the combined WISE+2MASS+SDSS dataset (estimated to

  1. Pre-protostellar and low-mass star forming clouds in Cepheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolić, Silvana

    2004-12-01

    The structure of this monograph is as follows: a general overview of the interstellar medium is given in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 deals with basic molecular structure, line radiation, and molecular clouds in general; in Chapter 4 principles of star-formation are given, with an emphasis on low-mass stars; chemistry is discussed in Chapter 5, in Chapters 6-10 results of the research papers are presented.

  2. Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During the five-year period, our study of "Relativistic Astrophysics in Black Hole and Low-Mass Neutron Star X-ray Binaries" has been focused on the following aspects: observations, data analysis, Monte-Carlo simulations, numerical calculations, and theoretical modeling. Most of the results of our study have been published in refereed journals and conference presentations.

  3. The Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) Catalog and Low-Mass Field Stars with Warm Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, Christopher; West, Andrew A.; Dhital, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    We present the Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS) catalog of proper motion selected low-mass stars from SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE. These surveys provide a time baseline of ~12 years for sources found in all three surveys, and a precision better than 10 mas/year.The MoVeRS catalog is augmented with proper motions from SDSS+USNO-B and the full sample contains 8,735,004 photometric point-sources selected based on colors and their significant (2σ) proper motions. This catalog will be useful for finding new low-mass common proper motion systems, along with providing a large input catalog for numerous studies of low-mass stars. In addition, we use the MoVeRS catalog to present a preliminary sample of low-mass field stars exhibiting signatures of warm dust (mid-infrared excesses). Such systems are thought to originate from collisions of terrestrial planets, raising even more questions about the habitability of planetary systems around low-mass stars.

  4. X-ray sources in regions of star formation. 5: The low mass stars of the Upper Scorpius association

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Brown, Alexander; Myers, Philip C.

    1994-01-01

    We report followup investigations of Einstein x-ray observations of the Upper Scorpius OB association. We identify 28 low mass pre-main sequence stars as counterparts of x-ray sources in the approximately = 7 square degrees of the OB association observed. Based on kinematics and lithium abundances, these stars are low mass members of the OB association. We use optical spectra and optical and near-IR photometry to determine the stellar luminosities, effective temperatures, masses, and ages. We show that the bolometric corrections and effective temperatures of the G and K stars are consistent with those of subgiants. The low mass stars have isochronal ages of 1-2 Myr, depending on the choice of evolutionary models, with very small dispersion (sigma approximately = 1 Myr). This age is significantly younger than the 5-6 Myr found for the more massive B stars. The small dispersion in stellar ages, less than 10% the sound-crossing time of the association, suggests that star formation was triggered. We present two scenarios for star formation in this association. In the two-episode scenario, formation of the low mass stars was triggered by a supernova explosion, and the low mass stars form quickly, with high efficiency. Alternatively, high and low mass star formation was all initiated at the same time, some 5-6 Myr ago, and the apparent systematic age difference is an artifact of how the isochrones are dated. The effect of the supernova is to terminate mass accretion and yield an apparently coeval population. We show that the incompleteness in the x-ray sampling is about 65%, and is strongly dependent on stellar mass. After correction for incompleteness, we estimate there are about 2000 low mass members (stellar mass less than 2 solar mass) of this association. The mass function in this association is indistinguishable from that of the field. The ratio of naked to classical T Tauri stars is much larger than in Tau-Aur, and may be attributable to the local environment. We

  5. Measuring the extent of convective cores in low-mass stars using Kepler data: toward a calibration of core overshooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deheuvels, S.; Brandão, I.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Ballot, J.; Michel, E.; Cunha, M. S.; Lebreton, Y.; Appourchaux, T.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Our poor understanding of the boundaries of convective cores generates large uncertainties on the extent of these cores and thus on stellar ages. The detection and precise characterization of solar-like oscillations in hundreds of main-sequence stars by CoRoT and Kepler has given the opportunity to revisit this problem. Aims: Our aim is to use asteroseismology to consistently measure the extent of convective cores in a sample of main-sequence stars whose masses lie around the mass limit for having a convective core. Methods: We first tested and validated a seismic diagnostic that was proposed to probe the extent of convective cores in a model-dependent way using the so-called r010 ratios, which are built with l = 0 and l = 1 modes. We applied this procedure to 24 low-mass stars chosen among Kepler targets to optimize the efficiency of this diagnostic. For this purpose, we computed grids of stellar models with both the Cesam2k and mesa evolution codes, where the extensions of convective cores were modeled either by an instantaneous mixing or as a diffusion process. Results: We found that 10 stars in our sample are in fact subgiants. Among the other targets, were able to unambiguously detect convective cores in eight stars, and we obtained seismic measurements of the extent of the mixed core in these targets with a good agreement between the Cesam2k and mesa codes. By performing optimizations using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, we then obtained estimates of the amount of extra mixing beyond the core that is required in Cesam2k to reproduce seismic observations for these eight stars, and we showed that this can be used to propose a calibration of this quantity. This calibration depends on the prescription chosen for the extra mixing, but we found that it should also be valid for the code mesa, provided the same prescription is used. Conclusions: This study constitutes a first step toward calibrating the extension of convective cores in low-mass stars

  6. Measuring the extent of convective cores in low-mass stars using Kepler data: toward a calibration of core overshooting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deheuvels, S.; Brandão, I.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Ballot, J.; Michel, E.; Cunha, M. S.; Lebreton, Y.; Appourchaux, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Our poor understanding of the boundaries of convective cores generates large uncertainties on the extent of these cores and thus on stellar ages. The detection and precise characterization of solar-like oscillations in hundreds of main-sequence stars by CoRoT and Kepler has given the opportunity to revisit this problem. Aims: Our aim is to use asteroseismology to consistently measure the extent of convective cores in a sample of main-sequence stars whose masses lie around the mass limit for having a convective core. Methods: We first tested and validated a seismic diagnostic that was proposed to probe the extent of convective cores in a model-dependent way using the so-called r010 ratios, which are built with l = 0 and l = 1 modes. We applied this procedure to 24 low-mass stars chosen among Kepler targets to optimize the efficiency of this diagnostic. For this purpose, we computed grids of stellar models with both the Cesam2k and mesa evolution codes, where the extensions of convective cores were modeled either by an instantaneous mixing or as a diffusion process. Results: We found that 10 stars in our sample are in fact subgiants. Among the other targets, were able to unambiguously detect convective cores in eight stars, and we obtained seismic measurements of the extent of the mixed core in these targets with a good agreement between the Cesam2k and mesa codes. By performing optimizations using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, we then obtained estimates of the amount of extra mixing beyond the core that is required in Cesam2k to reproduce seismic observations for these eight stars, and we showed that this can be used to propose a calibration of this quantity. This calibration depends on the prescription chosen for the extra mixing, but we found that it should also be valid for the code mesa, provided the same prescription is used. Conclusions: This study constitutes a first step toward calibrating the extension of convective cores in low-mass stars

  7. Reducing Radius and Temperature Uncertainties for Low-Mass Kepler Objects of Interest With Proxy Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Justin; Ballard, S.

    2014-01-01

    The number of exoplanets known to exist around low-mass stars is rising steadily, and we now know that these stars are the most likely to host small planets. The opportunities for the characterization of small planets (and eventually the search for biomarkers in their atmospheres) are bolstered for those that orbit small stars. The small size of their host star boosts the detectability of exoplanetary signatures, from their transit depths to their radial velocity amplitudes. The next generation of telescopes such as JWST and TESS will be well-poised to conduct such studies, but maximizing their return depends crucially upon understanding the population of planets identified around low-mass stars within the existing Kepler sample. Unfortunately, the empirical metrics and synthetic spectra that allow for the characterization of cooler and hotter spectral types, respectively, breaks down for stars in the spectral range between M1 and K5, making it difficult to determine which exoplanets are the best ones to study more closely with future instruments. Since the vast majority of exoplanets are discovered and characterized by the effect they produce on their host stars, these uncertainties in stellar parameters result in large uncertainties for the radii and temperatures of its planets. We describe our program to reduce these uncertainties for a sample of planet candidates discovered by the Kepler Space Telescope by applying the radii and temperatures of nearby "proxy" stars, which have had their radii measured directly with interferometry, to our target stars. We use spectral typing software to identify suitable proxy stars. We show that by applying the parameters of proxy stars to our target stars, the uncertainties in stellar temperature and radius can be reduced. Finally, we validate our findings by comparing them with the size, temperature, and metallicity determined from near-infrared spectra of our target stars.

  8. The effect of starspots on the radii of low-mass pre-main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. J.; Jeffries, R. D.

    2014-07-01

    A polytropic model is used to investigate the effects of dark photospheric spots on the evolution and radii of magnetically active, low-mass (M < 0.5 M⊙), pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars. Spots slow the contraction along Hayashi tracks and inflate the radii of PMS stars by a factor of (1 - β)-N compared to unspotted stars of the same luminosity, where β is the equivalent covering fraction of dark starspots and N ≃ 0.45 ± 0.05. This is a much stronger inflation than predicted by Spruit & Weiss for main-sequence stars with the same β, where N ˜ 0.2-0.3. These models have been compared to radii determined for very magnetically active K- and M-dwarfs in the young Pleiades and NGC 2516 clusters, and the radii of tidally locked, low-mass eclipsing binary components. The binary components and zero-age main-sequence K-dwarfs have radii inflated by ˜10 per cent compared to an empirical radius-luminosity relation that is defined by magnetically inactive field dwarfs with interferometrically measured radii; low-mass M-type PMS stars, that are still on their Hayashi tracks, are inflated by up to ˜40 per cent. If this were attributable to starspots alone, we estimate that an effective spot coverage of 0.35 < β < 0.51 is required. Alternatively, global inhibition of convective flux transport by dynamo-generated fields may play a role. However, we find greater consistency with the starspot models when comparing the loci of active young stars and inactive field stars in colour-magnitude diagrams, particularly for the highly inflated PMS stars, where the large, uniform temperature reduction required in globally inhibited convection models would cause the stars to be much redder than observed.

  9. Low-mass spiral galaxies with little molecular gas and prodigious star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenney, Jeffrey D.; Young, Judith S.

    1988-01-01

    A comparison of CO and H I properties is used here to demonstrate that many CO-poor low-mass Virgo spiral galaxies are rich in atomic gas, which implies that the lack of CO emission from them is due, at least partly, to a lack of molecular gas. Despite the paucity of molecular gas, these H I-rich, CO-poor, low-mass spiral galaxies are undergoing extensive massive star formation. A column density of 10 to the 21st nuclei/sq cm is a necessary but insufficient condition for the creation of an H2-dominated interstellar medium.

  10. Studies of low-mass star formation with the large deployable reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollenbach, D. J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1984-01-01

    Estimates are made of the far-infrared and submillimeter continuum and line emission from regions of low mass star formation. The intensity of this emission is compared with the sensitivity of the large deployable reflector (LDR), a large space telescope designed for this wavelength range. The proposed LDR is designed to probe the temperature, density, chemical structure, and the velocity field of the collapsing envelopes of these protostars. The LDR is also designed to study the accretion shocks on the cores and circumstellar disks of low-mass protostars, and to detect shock waves driven by protostellar winds.

  11. Suppression of accretion on to low-mass Population III stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Jarrett L.; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2011-05-01

    Motivated by recent theoretical work suggesting that a substantial fraction of Population (Pop) III stars may have had masses low enough for them to survive to the present day, we consider the role that the accretion of metal-enriched gas may have had in altering their surface composition, thereby disguising them as Pop II stars. We demonstrate that if weak, solar-like winds are launched from low-mass Pop III stars formed in the progenitors of the dark matter halo of the Galaxy, then such stars are likely to avoid significant enrichment via accretion of material from the interstellar medium. We find that at early times accretion is easily prevented if the stars are ejected from the central regions of the haloes in which they form, either by dynamical interactions with more massive Pop III stars or by violent relaxation during halo mergers. While accretion may still take place during passage through sufficiently dense molecular clouds at later times, we find that the probability of such a passage is generally low (≲0.1), assuming that stars have velocities of the order of the maximum circular velocity of their host haloes and accounting for the orbital decay of merging haloes. In turn, due to the higher gas density required for accretion on to stars with higher velocities, we find an even lower probability of accretion (˜10-2) for the subset of Pop III stars formed at z > 10, which are more quickly incorporated into massive haloes than stars formed at lower redshift. While there is no a priori reason to assume that low-mass Pop III stars do not have solar-like winds, without them surface enrichment via accretion is likely to be inevitable. We briefly discuss the implications that our results hold for stellar archaeology.

  12. The low-mass classic Algol-type binary UU Leo revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-Gui

    2013-12-01

    New multi-color photometry of the eclipsing binary UU Leo, acquired from 2010 to 2013, was carried out by using the 60-cm and 85-cm telescopes at the Xinglong station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. With the updated Wilson-Devinney code, the photometric solution was derived from BVR light curves. The results imply that UU Leo is a semi-detached Algol-type binary, with a mass ratio of q = 0.100(±0.002). The change in orbital period was reanalyzed based on all available eclipsing times. The O - C curve could be described by an upward parabola superimposed on a quasi-sinusoidal curve. The period and semi-amplitudes are Pmod = 54.5(±1.1) yr and A = 0.0273d(±0.0015d), which may be attributed to the light-time effect via the presence of an invisible third body. The long-term period increases at a rate of dP/dt = +4.64(±0.14) × 10-7d yr-1, which may be interpreted by the conserved mass being transferred from the secondary to the primary. With mass being transferred, the low-mass Algol-type binary UU Leo may evolve into a binary system with a main sequence star and a helium white dwarf.

  13. The coronal temperatures of low-mass main-sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, C. P.; Güdel, M.

    2015-06-01

    Aims: We study the X-ray emission of low-mass main-sequence stars to derive a reliable general scaling law between coronal temperature and the level of X-ray activity. Methods: We collect ROSAT measurements of hardness ratios and X-ray luminosities for a large sample of stars to derive which stellar X-ray emission parameter is most closely correlated with coronal temperature. We calculate average coronal temperatures for a sample of 24 low-mass main-sequence stars with measured emission measure distributions (EMDs) collected from the literature. These EMDs are based on high-resolution X-ray spectra measured by XMM-Newton and Chandra. Results: We confirm that there is one universal scaling relation between coronal average temperature and surface X-ray flux, FX, that applies to all low-mass main-sequence stars. We find that coronal temperature is related to FX by T̅cor = 0.11 FX0.26, where T̅cor is in MK and FX is in erg s-1 cm-2.

  14. The discovery of low-mass pre-main-sequence stars in Cepheus OB3b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo, M.; Naylor, T.; Jeffries, R. D.; Drew, J. E.

    2003-05-01

    We report the discovery of a low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stellar population in the younger subgroup of the Cepheus OB3 association, Cep OB3b, using UBVI CCD photometry and follow-up spectroscopy. The optical survey covers approximately 1300 arcmin2 on the sky and gives a global photometric and astrometric catalogue for more than 7000 objects. The location of a PMS population is well defined in a V versus (V-I) colour-magnitude diagram. Multifibre spectroscopic results for optically selected PMS candidates confirm the T Tauri nature for 10 objects, with equal numbers of classical TTS (CTTS) and weak-line TTS (WTTS). There are six other objects that we classify as possible PMS stars. The newly discovered TTS stars have masses in the range ~0.9-3.0 Msolar and ages from <1 to nearly 10 Myr, based on the Siess, Dufour & Forestini isochrones. Their location close to the O and B stars of the association (especially the O7n star) demonstrates that low-mass star formation is indeed possible in such an apparently hostile environment dominated by early-type stars and that the latter must have been less effective in eroding the circumstellar discs of their lower-mass siblings compared with other OB associations (e.g. λ-Ori). We attribute this to the nature of the local environment, speculating that the bulk of molecular material, which shielded low-mass stars from the ionizing radiation of their early-type siblings, has only recently been removed.

  15. Southern Very Low Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in Wide Binary and Multiple Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, José Antonio

    2007-09-01

    The results of the Königstuhl survey in the Southern Hemisphere are presented. I have searched for common proper motion companions to 173 field very low mass stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types >M5.0 V and magnitudes J<~14.5 mag. I have measured for the first time the common proper motion of two new wide systems containing very low mass components, Königstuhl 2 AB and 3 A-BC. Together with Königstuhl 1 AB and 2M 0126-50 AB, they are among the widest systems in their respective classes (r=450-11,900 AU). I have determined the minimum frequency of field wide multiples (r>100 AU) with late-type components at 5.0%+/-1.8% and the frequency of field wide late-type binaries with mass ratios q>0.5 at 1.2%+/-0.9%. These values represent a key diagnostic of evolution history and low-mass star and brown dwarf formation scenarios. In addition, the proper motions of 62 field very low mass dwarfs are measured here for the first time.

  16. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O. Silva, Hector; Berti, Emanuele; Sotani, Hajime

    2016-03-01

    Compact objects such as neutron stars are ideal astrophysical laboratories to test our understanding of the fundamental interactions in the regime of supranuclear densities, unachievable by terrestrial experiments. Despite recent progress, the description of matter (i.e., the equation of state) at such densities is still debatable. This translates into uncertainties in the bulk properties of neutron stars, masses and radii for instance. Here we will consider low-mass neutron stars. Such stars are expected to carry important information on nuclear matter near the nuclear saturation point. It has recently been shown that the masses and surface redshifts of low-mass neutron stars smoothly depend on simple functions of the central density and of a characteristic parameter η associated with the choice of equation of state. Here we extend these results to slowly-rotating and tidally deformed stars and obtain empirical relations for various quantities, such as the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment and ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love numbers, and rotational apsidal constants. We discuss how these relations might be used to constrain the equation of state by future observations in the electromagnetic and gravitational-wave spectra.

  17. THE RADIUS DISCREPANCY IN LOW-MASS STARS: SINGLE VERSUS BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Spada, F.; Demarque, P.; Kim, Y.-C.; Sills, A.

    2013-10-20

    A long-standing issue in the theory of low-mass stars is the discrepancy between predicted and observed radii and effective temperatures. In spite of the increasing availability of very precise radius determinations from eclipsing binaries and interferometric measurements of radii of single stars, there is no unanimous consensus on the extent (or even the existence) of the discrepancy and on its connection with other stellar properties (e.g., metallicity, magnetic activity). We investigate the radius discrepancy phenomenon using the best data currently available (accuracy ∼< 5%). We have constructed a grid of stellar models covering the entire range of low-mass stars (0.1-1.25 M{sub ☉}) and various choices of the metallicity and mixing length parameter, α. We used an improved version of the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code, implementing surface boundary conditions based on the most up-to-date PHOENIX atmosphere models. Our models are in good agreement with others in the literature and improve and extend the low mass end of the Yale-Yonsei isochrones. Our calculations include rotation-related quantities, such as moments of inertia and convective turnover timescales, useful in studies of magnetic activity and rotational evolution of solar-like stars. Consistent with previous works, we find that both binaries and single stars have radii inflated by about 3% with respect to the theoretical models; among binaries, the components of short orbital period systems are found to be the most deviant. We conclude that both binaries and single stars are comparably affected by the radius discrepancy phenomenon.

  18. Candidate Very-Low-Mass Companions to Nearby Stars Found in the WISE Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mennen, Anne; Dutcher, D.; Lepine, S.; Faherty, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the identification in the Wide-Field Survey Explorer (WISE) preliminary release of 36 probable very-low-mass companions to nearby stars from the SUPERBLINK proper motion catalogue. We examined all WISE sources within one arcminute of a subset of 156,000 SUPERBLINK stars with proper motions between 0.040 and 0.015 seconds of arc per year, photometric distances within 100 parsecs, and positions at least seven degrees from the galactic plane. Using proper motions calculated by comparing the WISE positions of the sources to those of their counterparts in the 2MASS Catalogue, we identified all WISE sources sharing a common proper motion with the SUPERBLINK star. We eliminated all sources detected in the Palomar Sky Survey blue plates, keeping only those red enough to be low-mass or brown dwarf companions. We used WISE and 2MASS colors to select only objects consistent with being M, L, or T dwarfs, leaving only 36 likely companions. Based on their color and assumed distances, we estimate the 36 low-mass companions to be either late M or early L dwarfs. Follow-up spectroscopic observations will be required for confirmation and formal spectral classification of the companions. We acknowledge the American Museum of Natural History and the National Science Foundation for their support.

  19. Hydrogen Burning in Low Mass Stars Constrains Scalar-Tensor Theories of Gravity.

    PubMed

    Sakstein, Jeremy

    2015-11-13

    The most general scalar-tensor theories of gravity predict a weakening of the gravitational force inside astrophysical bodies. There is a minimum mass for hydrogen burning in stars that is set by the interplay of plasma physics and the theory of gravity. We calculate this for alternative theories of gravity and find that it is always significantly larger than the general relativity prediction. The observation of several low mass red dwarf stars therefore rules out a large class of scalar-tensor gravity theories and places strong constraints on the cosmological parameters appearing in the effective field theory of dark energy. PMID:26613428

  20. Two new pulsating low-mass pre-white dwarfs or SX Phoenicis stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corti, M. A.; Kanaan, A.; Córsico, A. H.; Kepler, S. O.; Althaus, L. G.; Koester, D.; Sánchez Arias, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The discovery of pulsations in low-mass stars opens an opportunity to probe their interiors and determine their evolution by employing the tools of asteroseismology. Aims: We aim to analyse high-speed photometry of SDSS J145847.02+070754.46 and SDSS J173001.94+070600.25 and discover brightness variabilities. In order to locate these stars in the Teff - log g diagram, we fit optical spectra (SDSS) with synthetic non-magnetic spectra derived from model atmospheres. Methods: To carry out this study, we used the photometric data we obtained for these stars with the 2.15 m telescope at CASLEO, Argentina. We analysed their light curves and applied the discrete Fourier transform (FT) to determine the pulsation frequencies. Finally, we compare both stars in the Teff - log g diagram, with two known pre-white dwarfs and seven pulsating pre-ELM white dwarf stars, δ Scuti, and SX Phe stars Results: We report the discovery of pulsations in SDSS J145847.02+070754.46 and SDSS J173001.94+070600.25. We determine their effective temperature and surface gravity to be Teff = 7972 ± 200 K, log g = 4.25 ± 0.5 and Teff = 7925 ± 200 K, log g = 4.25 ± 0.5, respectively. With these parameters, these new pulsating low-mass stars can be identified with either ELM white dwarfs (with ~0.17 M⊙) or more massive SX Phe stars. We identified pulsation periods of 3278.7 and 1633.9 s for SDSS J145847.02+070754.46 and a pulsation period of 3367.1 s for SDSS J173001.94+070600.25. These two new objects, together with those of Maxted et al. (2013, 2014), indicate the possible existence of a new instability domain towards the late stages of evolution of low-mass white dwarf stars, although their identification with SX Phe stars cannot be discarded. Visiting Astronomer, Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba, and San Juan.

  1. The low-mass star and sub-stellar populations of the 25 Orionis group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downes, Juan José; Briceño, César; Mateu, Cecilia; Hernández, Jesús; Vivas, Anna Katherina; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; Allen, Lori

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of a survey of the low-mass star and brown dwarf population of the 25 Orionis group. Using optical photometry from the CIDA (Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía `Francisco J. Duarte', Mérida, Venezuela) Deep Survey of Orion, near-IR photometry from the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy and low-resolution spectroscopy obtained with Hectospec at the MMT telescope, we selected 1246 photometric candidates to low-mass stars and brown dwarfs with estimated masses within 0.02 ≲ M/M⊙ ≲ 0.8 and spectroscopically confirmed a sample of 77 low-mass stars as new members of the cluster with a mean age of ˜7 Myr. We have obtained a system initial mass function of the group that can be well described by either a Kroupa power-law function with indices α3 = -1.73 ± 0.31 and α2 = 0.68 ± 0.41 in the mass ranges 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.08 and 0.08 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.5, respectively, or a Scalo lognormal function with coefficients m_c=0.21^{+0.02}_{-0.02} and σ = 0.36 ± 0.03 in the mass range 0.03 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 0.8. From the analysis of the spatial distribution of this numerous candidate sample, we have confirmed the east-west elongation of the 25 Orionis group observed in previous works, and rule out a possible southern extension of the group. We find that the spatial distributions of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in 25 Orionis are statistically indistinguishable. Finally, we found that the fraction of brown dwarfs showing IR excesses is higher than for low-mass stars, supporting the scenario in which the evolution of circumstellar discs around the least massive objects could be more prolonged.

  2. Current Advances in the Computational Simulation of the Formation of Low-Mass Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R I; Inutsuka, S; Padoan, P; Tomisaka, K

    2005-10-24

    Developing a theory of low-mass star formation ({approx} 0.1 to 3 M{sub {circle_dot}}) remains one of the most elusive and important goals of theoretical astrophysics. The star-formation process is the outcome of the complex dynamics of interstellar gas involving non-linear interactions of turbulence, gravity, magnetic field and radiation. The evolution of protostellar condensations, from the moment they are assembled by turbulent flows to the time they reach stellar densities, spans an enormous range of scales, resulting in a major computational challenge for simulations. Since the previous Protostars and Planets conference, dramatic advances in the development of new numerical algorithmic techniques have been successfully implemented on large scale parallel supercomputers. Among such techniques, Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics have provided frameworks to simulate the process of low-mass star formation with a very large dynamic range. It is now feasible to explore the turbulent fragmentation of molecular clouds and the gravitational collapse of cores into stars self-consistently within the same calculation. The increased sophistication of these powerful methods comes with substantial caveats associated with the use of the techniques and the interpretation of the numerical results. In this review, we examine what has been accomplished in the field and present a critique of both numerical methods and scientific results. We stress that computational simulations should obey the available observational constraints and demonstrate numerical convergence. Failing this, results of large scale simulations do not advance our understanding of low-mass star formation.

  3. On the formation redshift of Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies at intermediate redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Jesus; Rodriguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Pacifici, Camilla; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stéphane; Gil de Paz, Armando; Barro, Guillermo; Gomez-Guijarro, Carlos; Villar, Víctor

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) hierarchical models predict that low-mass systems merged to form massive galaxies (building block paradigm; Dekel & Silk 1986); (2) dwarf systems might have been responsible for the reionization of the Universe (Wyithe & Loeb 2006); (3) theoretical models are particularly sensitive to the density of low-mass systems at diferent redshifts (Mamon et al. 2011), being one of the key science cases for the future E-ELT (Evans et al. 2013). While the history of low-mass dark matter halos is relatively well understood, the formation history of dwarf galaxies is still poorly reproduced by the models due to the distinct evolution of baryonic and dark matter.We present constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of low-mass Star-Forming Galaxies (LMSFGs; 7.3 < log M∗/Mo < 8.0, at 0.3 < zspec < 0.9) selected by photometric stellar mass and apparent magnitude. The SFHs were obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach (Pacifici et al. 2012) that (1) consistently combines photometric (HST and ground-based multi-broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines from VLT and GTC spectroscopy) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time.The median SFH of our LMSFGs appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ˜0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for dwarf SFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for a slightly more massive secondary sample 8.0 < log M∗/Mo < 9.1).This is a pilot study for future surveys on dwarf galaxies at high redshift.

  4. Age-dating Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies at intermediate redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Jesus; Rodriguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Pacifici, Camilla; Tresse, Laurence; Charlot, Stéphane; Gil de Paz, Armando; Barro, Guillermo; Gomez-Guijarro, Carlos; Villar, Víctor

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) hierarchical models predict that low-mass systems merged to form massive galaxies (building block paradigm; Dekel & Silk 1986); (2) dwarf systems might have been responsible for the reionization of the Universe (Wyithe & Loeb 2006); (3) theoretical models are particularly sensitive to the density of low-mass systems at diferent redshifts (Mamon et al. 2011), being one of the key science cases for the future E-ELT (Evans et al. 2013). While the history of low-mass dark matter halos is relatively well understood, the formation history of dwarf galaxies is still poorly reproduced by the models due to the distinct evolution of baryonic and dark matter.We present physical properties and constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of low-mass Star-Forming Galaxies (LMSFGs; 7.3 < log M∗/Mo < 8.0, at 0.3 < zspec < 0.9) selected by photometric stellar mass and apparent magnitude. The SFHs were obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach (Pacifici et al. 2012) that (1) consistently combines photometric (HST and ground-based multi-broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines from VLT and GTC spectroscopy) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time.The median SFH of our LMSFGs appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ˜0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for dwarf SFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for a slightly more massive secondary sample 8.0 < log M∗/Mo < 9.1).

  5. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0 - 1.1~M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. (2014) recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of nonrotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. (2014) to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  6. Low-mass neutron stars: universal relations, the nuclear symmetry energy and gravitational radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Sotani, Hajime; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The lowest neutron star masses currently measured are in the range 1.0-1.1 M⊙, but these measurement have either large uncertainties or refer to isolated neutron stars. The recent claim of a precisely measured mass M/M⊙ = 1.174 ± 0.004 (Martinez et al. 2015) in a double neutron star system suggests that low-mass neutron stars may be an interesting target for gravitational-wave detectors. Furthermore, Sotani et al. recently found empirical formulas relating the mass and surface redshift of non-rotating neutron stars to the star's central density and to the parameter η ≡ (K0L2)1/3, where K0 is the incompressibility of symmetric nuclear matter and L is the slope of the symmetry energy at saturation density. Motivated by these considerations, we extend the work by Sotani et al. to slowly rotating and tidally deformed neutron stars. We compute the moment of inertia, quadrupole moment, quadrupole ellipticity, tidal and rotational Love number and apsidal constant of slowly rotating neutron stars by integrating the Hartle-Thorne equations at second order in rotation, and we fit all of these quantities as functions of η and of the central density. These fits may be used to constrain η, either via observations of binary pulsars in the electromagnetic spectrum, or via near-future observations of inspiralling compact binaries in the gravitational-wave spectrum.

  7. Distributed low-mass star formation in the IRDC G34.43+00.24

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Arce, Héctor G.; Offner, Stella; Kassis, Marc; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Guzmán, Andrés E.; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2014-08-20

    We have used deep near-infrared observations with adaptive optics to discover a distributed population of low-mass protostars within the filamentary Infrared Dark Cloud G34.43+00.24. We use maps of dust emission at multiple wavelengths to determine the column density structure of the cloud. In combination with an empirically verified model of the magnitude distribution of background stars, this column density map allows us to reliably determine overdensities of red sources that are due to embedded protostars in the cloud. We also identify protostars through their extended emission in the K band, which comes from excited H{sub 2} in protostellar outflows or reflection nebulosity. We find a population of distributed low-mass protostars, suggesting that low-mass protostars may form earlier than, or contemporaneously with, high-mass protostars in such a filament. The low-mass protostellar population may also produce the narrow line-width SiO emission observed in some clouds without high-mass protostars. Finally, we use a molecular line map of the cloud to determine the virial parameter per unit length along the filament and find that the highest mass protostars form in the most bound portion of the filament, as suggested by theoretical models.

  8. The Sodium Doublets as Youth Indicators for Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlieder, J. E.; Fielding, D.; Lepine, S.; Rice, E.; Tomasino, R.; Simon, M.; Shara, M. M.

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the use of the Na I doublets at 5890 and 5896 Å (the Fraunhofer D lines) and 8183 and 8195 Å as gravity indicators for stars of late K and M spectral type. As is well known, the equivalent widths (EWs) of these doublets increase with photospheric log(g). We show that the EWs of members of the β Pictoris moving group (BPMG) (age 10-20 Myr) lie between the EWs of giants and main sequence stars based on the analysis of approx. 200 spectra collected with the MDM 1.3-meter McGraw-Hill telescope and the SMARTS 1.5-meter telescope. We find the Na D lines are useful age indicators for low mass BPMG candidates earlier than M2 and the 8200 Å doublet becomes useful for stars later than M4. The EWs of the Na doublets may therefore be used to establish low gravity, hence youth, among low mass stars in general.

  9. Predicting and Disentangling Stellar Variability in Quiet Stars: Implications for Low-mass Planet Confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegla, Heather; Watson, Chris; Stassun, Keivan; Shelyag, Sergiy; Mathioudakis, Mihalis; Bastien, Fabienne; Pepper, Josh

    2015-08-01

    Stellar variability is one of the main limiting factors in the detection and confirmation of low-mass planets. Even for magnetically quiet stars, astrophysical noise could be present at the 10m/s level. For these stars we demonstrate, using Kepler and GALEX data, that it may be possible to use photometric variability to predict the RV noise. Such a relationship creates a filtering mechanism to prioritize planetary candidates in transit surveys that are ideal for RV follow-up. Going beyond this, we use 3D magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to create Sun-as-a-star observations, focusing on stellar surface magneto-convection. Using these model observations we have identified correlations between the stellar line shape, brightness, and RV variability. We demonstrate that photometric observations may be key in disentangling stellar and planetary induced RV signals. Disentangling these signals allows us to reach the 10 cm/s noise level in our model star, indicating significant promise for the confirmation of low-mass planet candidates in the future.

  10. SHIELD: The Star Formation Law in Extremely Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Yaron; McNichols, Andrew; Cannon, John M.; SHIELD Team

    2016-01-01

    The "Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs" (SHIELD) is a multiwavelength, legacy-class observational study of 12 low-mass dwarf galaxies discovered in Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey data products. Here we analyze the relationships between HI and star formation in these systems using multi-configuration, high spatial (~300 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution HI observations from the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, Hα imaging from the WIYN 3.5m telescope, and archival GALEX far-ultraviolet imaging. We compare the locations and intensities of star formation with the properties of the neutral ISM. We quantify the degree of local co-spatiality between star forming regions and regions of high HI column densities using the Kennicutt-Schmidt (K-S) relation. The values of the K-S index N vary considerably from system to system; because no single galaxy is representative of the sample, we instead focus on the narratives of the individual galaxies and their complex distribution of gaseous and stellar components. At the extremely faint end of the HI mass function, these systems are dominated by stochastic fluctuations in their interstellar media, which governs whether or not they show signs of recent star formation.Support for this work was provided by NSF grant AST-1211683 to JMC at Macalester College.

  11. DETECTING PLANETS AROUND VERY LOW MASS STARS WITH THE RADIAL VELOCITY METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, A.; Bean, J. L.; Dreizler, S.; Seifahrt, A.; Huber, K. F.; Czesla, S.

    2010-02-10

    The detection of planets around very low-mass stars with the radial velocity (RV) method is hampered by the fact that these stars are very faint at optical wavelengths where the most high-precision spectrometers operate. We investigate the precision that can be achieved in RV measurements of low mass stars in the near-infrared (NIR) Y-, J-, and H-bands, and we compare it to the precision achievable in the optical assuming comparable telescope and instrument efficiencies. For early-M stars, RV measurements in the NIR offer no or only marginal advantage in comparison with optical measurements. Although they emit more flux in the NIR, the richness of spectral features in the optical outweighs the flux difference. We find that NIR measurement can be as precise as optical measurements in stars of spectral type {approx}M4, and from there the NIR gains in precision toward cooler objects. We studied potential calibration strategies in the NIR finding that a stable spectrograph with a ThAr calibration can offer enough wavelength stability for m s{sup -1} precision. Furthermore, we simulate the wavelength-dependent influence of activity (cool spots) on RV measurements from optical to NIR wavelengths. Our spot simulations reveal that the RV jitter does not decrease as dramatically toward longer wavelengths as often thought. The jitter strongly depends on the details of the spots, i.e., on spot temperature and the spectral appearance of the spot. At low temperature contrast ({approx}200 K), the jitter shows a decrease toward the NIR up to a factor of 10, but it decreases substantially less for larger temperature contrasts. Forthcoming NIR spectrographs will allow the search for planets with a particular advantage in mid- and late-M stars. Activity will remain an issue, but simultaneous observations at optical and NIR wavelengths can provide strong constraints on spot properties in active stars.

  12. Complex organic molecules during low-mass star formation: Pilot survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Öberg, Karin I.; Graninger, Dawn; Lauck, Trish

    2014-06-10

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) are known to be abundant toward some low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), but how these detections relate to typical COM abundance are not yet understood. We aim to constrain the frequency distribution of COMs during low-mass star formation, beginning with this pilot survey of COM lines toward six embedded YSOs using the IRAM 30 m Telescope. The sample was selected from the Spitzer c2d ice sample and covers a range of ice abundances. We detect multiple COMs, including CH{sub 3}CN, toward two of the YSOs, and tentatively toward a third. Abundances with respect to CH{sub 3}OH vary between 0.7% and 10%. This sample is combined with previous COM observations and upper limits to obtain a frequency distributions of CH{sub 3}CN, HCOOCH{sub 3}, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}CHO. We find that for all molecules more than 50% of the sample have detections or upper limits of 1%-10% with respect to CH{sub 3}OH. Moderate abundances of COMs thus appear common during the early stages of low-mass star formation. A larger sample is required, however, to quantify the COM distributions, as well as to constrain the origins of observed variations across the sample.

  13. The outburst and nature of young eruptive low mass stars in dark clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninan, J. P.; Ojha, D. K.; Bhatt, B. C.; Mallick, K. K.; Tej, A.; Sahu, D. K.; Ghosh, S. K.; Mohan, V.

    The FU Orionis (FUor) or EX Orionis (EXor) phenomenon has attracted increasing attention in recent years and is now accepted as a crucial element in the early evolution of low-mass stars. FUor and EXor eruptions of young stellar objects (YSOs) are caused by strongly enhanced accretion from the surrounding disk. FUors display optical outbursts of ˜ 4 mag or more and last for several decades, whereas EXors show smaller outbursts (Δm ˜ 2 - 3 mag) that last from a few months to a few years and may occur repeatedly. Therefore, FUor/EXor eruptions represent a rare but very important phenomenon in early stellar evolution, during which a young low-mass YSO brightens by up to several optical magnitudes. Hence, long-term observations of this class of eruptive variables are important to design theoretical models of low-mass star formation. In this paper, we present recent results from our long-term monitoring observations of three rare types of eruptive young variables with the 2-m Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT) and the 2-m IUCAA Girawali Observatory (IGO) telescope.

  14. A M2FS Spectroscopic Study of Low-mass Young Stars in Orion OB1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleida, Catherine C.; Briceno, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria; Mateo, Mario L.; Hernandez, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of pre-main sequence stars in the ~4-10 Myr range provide a window into the decline of the accretion phase of stars and the formation of planets. Nearby star clusters and stellar associations allow for the study of these young stellar populations all the way down to the lowest mass members. One of the best examples of nearby 4-10 Myr old stellar populations is the Orion OB1 association. The CIDA Variability Survey of Orion OB1 (CVSO - Briceño et al. 2001) has used the variability properties of low-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars to identify hundreds of K and M-type stellar members of the Orion OB1 association, a number of them displaying IR-excess emission and thought to be representative of more evolved disk-bearing young stars. Characterizing these young, low-mass objects using spectroscopy is integral to understanding the accretion phase in young stars. We present preliminary results of a spectroscopic survey of candidate and confirmed Orion OB1 low-mass members taken during November 2014 and February 2014 using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber Spectrograph (M2FS), a PI instrument on the Magellan Clay Telescope (PI: M. Matteo). Target fields located in the off-cloud regions of Orion were identified in the CVSO, and observed using the low and high-resolution modes of M2FS. Both low and high-resolution spectra are needed in order to confirm membership and derive masses, ages, kinematics and accretion properties. Initial analysis of these spectra reveal many new K and M-type members of the Orion OB1 association in these low extinction, off-cloud areas. These are the more evolved siblings of the youngest stars still embedded in the molecular clouds, like those in the Orion Nebula Cluster. With membership and spectroscopic indicators of accretion we are building the most comprehensive stellar census of this association, enabling us to derive a robust estimate of the fraction of young stars still accreting at a various ages, a key constraint for the end of

  15. Reevaluating the Mass-Radius Relation for Low-mass, Main-sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian

    2012-09-01

    We examine the agreement between the observed and theoretical low-mass (<0.8 M ⊙) stellar main-sequence mass-radius relationship by comparing detached eclipsing binary (DEB) data with a new, large grid of stellar evolution models. The new grid allows for a realistic variation in the age and metallicity of the DEB population, characteristic of the local galactic neighborhood. Overall, our models do a reasonable job of reproducing the observational data. A large majority of the models match the observed stellar radii to within 4%, with a mean absolute error of 2.3%. These results represent a factor of two improvement compared to previous examinations of the low-mass mass-radius relationship. The improved agreement between models and observations brings the radius deviations within the limits imposed by potential starspot-related uncertainties for 92% of the stars in our DEB sample.

  16. Hydrodynamics of winds from irradiated companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavani, Marco; London, Richard

    1993-01-01

    We study the hydrodynamics of evaporative winds driven by X-rays and/or soft gamma-rays irradiating the outer layers of companion stars in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). We consider several irradiating fluxes and spectra for LMXBs with white dwarf and main-sequence companion stars. The thermal structure of the base of the coronal region, the position of the sonic point, and the value of the mass-loss rate are calculated in the case of spherical geometry. We consider photospheric and coronal heating from both X-ray photoionization and Compton scattering of X-rays and soft gamma-rays with energy about 1 MeV possibly irradiating the companion star in LMXBs. Evaporative winds may play a relevant role for the evolution of a special class of radiation-driven LMXBs, and this study is a step toward a quantitative understanding of the mechanism driving LMXB evolution.

  17. The effect of star-spots on the ages of low-mass stars determined from the lithium depletion boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, R. J.; Jeffries, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    In a coeval group of low-mass stars, the luminosity of the sharp transition between stars that retain their initial lithium and those at slightly higher masses in which Li has been depleted by nuclear reactions, the lithium depletion boundary (LDB), has been advanced as an almost model-independent means of establishing an age scale for young stars. Here, we construct polytropic models of contracting pre-main sequence stars (PMS) that have cool, magnetic star-spots blocking a fraction β of their photospheric flux. Star-spots slow the descent along Hayashi tracks, leading to lower core temperatures and less Li destruction at a given mass and age. The age, τLDB, determined from the luminosity of the LDB, LLDB, is increased by a factor of (1 - β)-E compared to that inferred from unspotted models, where E ≃ 1 + dlog τLDB/dlog LLDB and has a value ˜0.5 at ages <80 Myr, decreasing to ˜0.3 for older stars. Spotted stars have virtually the same relationship between K-band bolometric correction and colour as unspotted stars, so this relationship applies equally to ages inferred from the absolute K magnitude of the LDB. Low-mass PMS stars do have star-spots, but the appropriate value of β is highly uncertain with a probable range of 0.1 < β < 0.4. For the smaller β values, our result suggests a modest systematic increase in LDB ages that is comparable with the maximum levels of theoretical uncertainty previously claimed for the technique. The largest β values would however increase LDB ages by 20-30 per cent and demand a re-evaluation of other age estimation techniques calibrated using LDB ages.

  18. Revealing the Chamaeleon: Young, low-mass stars surrounding eta and epsilon Chamaeleontis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    The deep southern sky surrounding the Chamaeleon dark clouds is abundant with pre-main sequence stars of various ages. Because of their youth (5-10 Myr) and proximity (d~100 pc), members of the open cluster eta Chamaeleontis and the nearby epsilon Chamaeleontis Association are ideal laboratories to study the formation and evolution of extrasolar planetary systems. To better understand their role as potential planet hosts, this thesis explores the formation, dynamical evolution, accretion and disk properties of both groups' low-mass members. The notable lack of low-mass stars in the young open cluster eta Cha has long been puzzling. Two possible explanations have been suggested; a top-heavy initial mass function or dynamical evolution, which preferentially ejected the low-mass members. Previous efforts to find these stars several degrees from the cluster core have been unsuccessful. By undertaking a wider (95 sq deg) photometric and proper motion survey with extensive follow-up spectroscopy, we have identified eight low-mass stars that were ejected from eta Cha over the past 5-10 Myr. Comparison with recent simulations shows our results are consistent with a dynamical origin for the current configuration of the cluster, without the need to invoke an initial mass function deficient in low-mass objects. Two of the dispersed members exhibited strong, variable H-alpha emission during our observations, including a star which had an event suggestive of accretion from a circumstellar disk. New infrared photometry confirms the presence of the disk. This star demonstrates that infrequent, episodic accretion can continue at low levels long after most disks around `old' pre-main sequence stars have dissipated. Another two confirmed non-members are slightly older than the cluster, but are only 42 arcseconds apart and share similar kinematics and distances. We show that they almost certainly form a wide (4000-6000 AU) ~10 Myr-old binary at 100-150 pc. The system is one of the

  19. Fundmental Parameters of Low-Mass Stars, Brown Dwarfs, and Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montet, Benjamin; Johnson, John A.; Bowler, Brendan; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in evolutionary models of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, these models remain poorly constrained by observations. In order to test these predictions directly, masses of individual stars must be measured and combined with broadband photometry and medium-resolution spectroscopy to probe stellar atmospheres. I will present results from an astrometric and spectroscopic survey of low-mass pre-main sequence binary stars to measure individual dynamical masses and compare to model predictions. This is the first systematic test of a large number of stellar systems of intermediate age between young star-forming regions and old field stars. Stars in our sample are members of the Tuc-Hor, AB Doradus, and beta Pictoris moving groups, the last of which includes GJ 3305 AB, the wide binary companion to the imaged exoplanet host 51 Eri. I will also present results of Spitzer observations of secondary eclipses of LHS 6343 C, a T dwarf transiting one member of an M+M binary in the Kepler field. By combining these data with Kepler photometry and radial velocity observations, we can measure the luminosity, mass, and radius of the brown dwarf. This is the first non-inflated brown dwarf for which all three of these parameters have been measured, providing the first benchmark to test model predictions of the masses and radii of field T dwarfs. I will discuss these results in the context of K2 and TESS, which will find additional benchmark transiting brown dwarfs over the course of their missions, including a description of the first planet catalog developed from K2 data and a program to search for transiting planets around mid-M dwarfs.

  20. Angular momentum transport efficiency in post-main sequence low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spada, F.; Gellert, M.; Arlt, R.; Deheuvels, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Using asteroseismic techniques, it has recently become possible to probe the internal rotation profile of low-mass (≈1.1-1.5 M⊙) subgiant and red giant stars. Under the assumption of local angular momentum conservation, the core contraction and envelope expansion occurring at the end of the main sequence would result in a much larger internal differential rotation than observed. This suggests that angular momentum redistribution must be taking place in the interior of these stars. Aims: We investigate the physical nature of the angular momentum redistribution mechanisms operating in stellar interiors by constraining the efficiency of post-main sequence rotational coupling. Methods: We model the rotational evolution of a 1.25M⊙ star using the Yale Rotational stellar Evolution Code. Our models take into account the magnetic wind braking occurring at the surface of the star and the angular momentum transport in the interior, with an efficiency dependent on the degree of internal differential rotation. Results: We find that models including a dependence of the angular momentum transport efficiency on the radial rotational shear reproduce very well the observations. The best fit of the data is obtained with an angular momentum transport coefficient scaling with the ratio of the rotation rate of the radiative interior over that of the convective envelope of the star as a power law of exponent ≈3. This scaling is consistent with the predictions of recent numerical simulations of the Azimuthal Magneto-Rotational Instability. Conclusions: We show that an angular momentum transport process whose efficiency varies during the stellar evolution through a dependence on the level of internal differential rotation is required to explain the observed post-main sequence rotational evolution of low-mass stars.

  1. Discovery of a low-mass companion to the F7V star HD 984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshkat, T.; Bonnefoy, M.; Mamajek, E. E.; Quanz, S. P.; Chauvin, G.; Kenworthy, M. A.; Rameau, J.; Meyer, M. R.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Lannier, J.; Delorme, P.

    2015-11-01

    We report the discovery of a low-mass companion to the nearby (d = 47 pc) F7V star HD 984. The companion is detected 0.19 arcsec away from its host star in the L' band with the Apodized Phase Plate on NaCo/Very Large Telescope and was recovered by L'-band non-coronagraphic imaging data taken a few days later. We confirm the companion is comoving with the star with SINFONI integral field spectrograph H + K data. We present the first published data obtained with SINFONI in pupil-tracking mode. HD 984 has been argued to be a kinematic member of the 30 Myr-old Columba group, and its HR diagram position is not altogether inconsistent with being a zero-age main sequence star of this age. By consolidating different age indicators, including isochronal age, coronal X-ray emission, and stellar rotation, we independently estimate a main-sequence age of 115 ± 85 Myr (95 per cent CL) which does not rely on this kinematic association. The mass of directly imaged companions are usually inferred from theoretical evolutionary tracks, which are highly dependent on the age of the star. Based on the age extrema, we demonstrate that with our photometric data alone, the companion's mass is highly uncertain: between 33 and 96 MJup (0.03-0.09 M⊙) using the COND evolutionary models. We compare the companion's SINFONI spectrum with field dwarf spectra to break this degeneracy. Based on the slope and shape of the spectrum in the H band, we conclude that the companion is an M6.0 ± 0.5 dwarf. The age of the system is not further constrained by the companion, as M dwarfs are poorly fit on low-mass evolutionary tracks. This discovery emphasizes the importance of obtaining a spectrum to spectral type companions around F-stars.

  2. Very Low-Mass Stars with Extremely Low Metallicity in the Milky Way's Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Wako; Beers, Timothy C.; Suda, Takuma; Honda, Satoshi; Lee, Young Sun

    2016-08-01

    Large surveys and follow-up spectroscopic studies in the past few decades have been providing chemical abundance data for a growing number of very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-2) stars. Most of them are red giants or main-sequence turn-off stars having masses near 0.8 solar masses. Lower mass stars with extremely low metallicity ([Fe/H] <-3) are yet to be explored. Our high-resolution spectroscopic study for very metal-poor stars found with SDSS has identified four cool main-sequence stars with [Fe/H] <-2.5 among 137 objects (Aoki et al. 2013). The effective temperatures of these stars are 4500-5000 K, corresponding to a mass of around 0.5 solar masses. Our standard analysis of the high-resolution spectra based on 1D-LTE model atmospheres has obtained self-consistent chemical abundances for these objects, assuming small values of micro-turbulent velocities compared with giants and turn-off stars. The low temperature of the atmospheres of these objects enables us to measure their detailed chemical abundances. Interestingly, two of the four stars have extreme chemical-abundance patterns: one has the largest excesses of heavy neutron-capture elements associated with the r-process abundance pattern known to date (Aoki et al. 2010), and the other exhibits low abundances of the α-elements and odd-Z elements, suggested to be signatures of the yields of very massive stars (> 100 solar masses; Aoki et al. 2014). Although the sample size is still small, these results indicate the potential of very low-mass stars as probes to study the early stages of the Milky Way's halo formation.

  3. Very Low Mass Stars with Extremely Low Metallicity in the Milky Way's Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Wako; Beers, Timothy C.; Takuma, Suda; Honda, Satoshi; Lee, Young Sun

    2015-08-01

    Large surveys and follow-up spectroscopic studies in the past few decades have been providing chemical abundance data for a growing number of very metal-poor ([Fe/H] <-2) stars. Most of them are red giants or main-sequence turn-off stars having masses near 0.8 solar masses. Lower mass stars with extremely low metallicity ([Fe/H] <-3) have yet to be well explored. Our high-resolution spectroscopic study for very metal-poor stars found with SDSS has identified four cool main-sequence stars with [Fe/H] <-2.5 among 137 objects (Aoki et al. 2013, AJ, 145, 13). The effective temperatures of these stars are 4500--5000 K, corresponding to a mass of around 0.5 solar masses. Our standard analysis of the high-resolution spectra based on 1D-LTE model atmospheres have obtained self-consistent chemical abundances for these objects, assuming small values of micro-turbulent velocities compared with giants and turn-off stars. The low temperature of the atmospheres of these objects enables us to measure their detailed chemical abundances. Interestingly, two of the four stars have extreme chemical abundance patterns: one has the largest excesses of heavy neutron-capture elements associated with the r-process abundance pattern known to date (Aoki et al. 2010, ApJL 723, L201), and the other exhibits low abundances of the alpha-elements and odd-Z elements, suggested to be the signatures of the yields of very massive stars ( >100 solar masses; Aoki et al. 2014, Science 345, 912). Although the sample size is still small, these results indicate the potential of very low-mass stars as probes to study the early stages of the Milky Way's halo formation.

  4. Low-Mass Star Formation and the Initial Mass Function in Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, Kevin Lee

    I have used optical and near-infrared spectroscopy and imaging to measure spectral types and luminosities for young (/tau<10 Myr), embedded (AV=0[-]50), low-mass (0.1-1 Msolar) stars in three nearby (d<300 pc) clusters: L1495E, IC 348, and ρ Ophiuchi. In conjunction with theoretical evolutionary tracks, I have derived the star formation history and initial mass function for each stellar population. A large number of brown dwarf candidates have been identified in the photometry, several of which are confirmed through spectroscopy. Finally, I have measured the frequency and survival times of circumstellar disks and investigated the photometric and spectroscopic properties of protostars. In S 2, I apply observational tests to the available sets of evolutionary models for low-mass stars, concluding that the calculations of D'Antona & Mazzitelli are preferred for the range of masses and ages considered here. In S 3 and S 4, I examine in detail the spectroscopic characteristics and substellar nature of two brown dwarf candidates. The study then expands to include the populations within the clusters L1495E (S 5), IC 348 (S 6), and ρ Ophiuchi (S 7). In S 8, I briefly discuss the past, present, and future of scientific research related to this thesis.

  5. New circumstellar disk candidates around young low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucher, Anne; Lafrenière, David; Gagné, Jonathan; Malo, Lison; Doyon, Rene

    2015-12-01

    It is now common knowledge that circumstellar disks are signposts of past or ongoing planetary system formation. Their presence and their properties, in relation to those of their host star, also bear valuable information about the process of star formation itself. To address these questions, we started a project to uncover new circumstellar disks around newly identified low mass star and brown dwarf candidates in nearby young kinematic associations. Being near the stellar/substellar mass boundary, these hosts - and their potential disks - are particularly interesting to study both star and planet formation. We used a least squares approach to fit synthetic spectra to the observed photometric data of each star, covering from 0.8 µm up to 22 µm, and then identified candidates showing a significant excess compared to the best fits. We then carefully looked at the data for these candidates to filter out those biased by contaminants or other artefacts. We ended up with a list of 4 young stars and brown dwarfs strongly suspected of being surrounded by a disk. Here we will present our search method and some properties of our newly identified disk-bearing candidates.

  6. Low mass star and brown dwarf formation in the Orion B molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Joanna Lisa

    I present an extensive near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic survey of young, low mass objects in the Orion B molecular cloud. Results of this survey are used to investigate the shape of the low mass initial mass function (IMF) and examine the stellar and substellar populations of three young clusters in Orion B, ultimately placing observational constraints on models of brown dwarf formation. Classical star formation theory predicts that the minimum mass required for the birth of a star is roughly one solar mass. However, studies of Galactic field stars have revealed many smaller objects, including significant populations of sub-solar mass stars (M[Asymptotically = to]0.2-0.3[Special characters omitted.] ) and brown dwarfs (M<0.08[Special characters omitted.] ). The origin of these objects remains an unsolved problem in modern astrophysics. Using FLAMINGOS on the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1 and 4 meter telescopes, I have completed a new J, H , and K -band imaging survey of ~6 square degrees of Orion B and compiled a new library of ~200 JH spectra of M stars in the young clusters NGC 2024, NGC 2068, and NGC 2071. I combine the photometry and spectroscopy to construct Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, inferring masses and ages for cluster members using pre-main sequence evolutionary models. Median ages, substellar disk frequencies, IMFs, and the abundance of brown dwarfs ( R ss ) are determined and the spatial distribution of M stars is discussed. The results show the IMF peaks for the Orion B clusters (M peak [Asymptotically = to]0.2-0.3[Special characters omitted.] ) are consistent with each other but different from isolated star forming regions such as Taurus. There is also evidence for a dependence of the peak mass on local gas density. A significant fraction of brown dwarfs are shown to have an infrared excess, indicative of circumsubstellar disks. Finally, I find that the R ss is not universal but varies from region to region. After examining the

  7. Neutron star masses and radii from quiescent low-mass x-ray binaries

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.; Steiner, Andrew W. E-mail: steiner3@uw.edu

    2014-04-01

    We perform a systematic analysis of neutron star radius constraints from five quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries and examine how they depend on measurements of their distances and amounts of intervening absorbing material, as well as their assumed atmospheric compositions. We construct and calibrate to published results a semi-analytic model of the neutron star atmosphere which approximates these effects for the predicted masses and radii. Starting from mass and radius probability distributions established from hydrogen-atmosphere spectral fits of quiescent sources, we apply this model to compute alternate sets of probability distributions. We perform Bayesian analyses to estimate neutron star mass-radius curves and equation of state (EOS) parameters that best-fit each set of distributions, assuming the existence of a known low-density neutron star crustal EOS, a simple model for the high-density EOS, causality, and the observation that the neutron star maximum mass exceeds 2 M {sub ☉}. We compute the posterior probabilities for each set of distance measurements and assumptions about absorption and composition. We find that, within the context of our assumptions and our parameterized EOS models, some absorption models are disfavored. We find that neutron stars composed of hadrons are favored relative to those with exotic matter with strong phase transitions. In addition, models in which all five stars have hydrogen atmospheres are found to be weakly disfavored. Our most likely models predict neutron star radii that are consistent with current experimental results concerning the nature of the nucleon-nucleon interaction near the nuclear saturation density.

  8. Ultraviolet and X-ray Activity and Flaring on Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential “biomarker” gases. We present results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, an ongoing study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d < 15 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30 - 2000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on old (age > 1 Gyr) planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their lack of flare activity at visible wavelengths. We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on “optically inactive” M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  9. IDENTIFYING THE YOUNG LOW-MASS STARS WITHIN 25 pc. II. DISTANCES, KINEMATICS, AND GROUP MEMBERSHIP

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-10

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of {approx}<300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of {approx}<25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young ({approx}<3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and {beta} Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages {approx}<150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event.

  10. The Water Content of Exo-earths in the Habitable Zone around Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs Dirk; Ciesla, Fred; Pascucci, Ilaria; apai, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of low-mass M dwarf stars have become the focus of many astronomical studies: they are more easily accessible to detection and characterization than their counterparts around sunlike stars. The habitability of these planets, however, faces a number of challenges, including inefficient or negligible water delivery during accretion. To understand the water content of planets in and around the habitable zone, simulations of the final stages of planet formation are necessary.We present detailed accretion simulations of wet and dry planetary embryos around a range of stellar masses. We focus on different pathways of delivering water from beyond the snow line to terrestrial planets in the habitable zone. We explore the impact of using either asteroid-like or comet-like bodies, and the effects of a dispersion in snow line locations. We derive the probability distribution of water abundances for terrestrial sized planets in the habitable zone.While these models predict that the bulk of terrestrial planets in the habitable zones of M stars will be dry, a small fraction receives earth-like amounts of water. Given their larger numbers and higher planet occurrence rates, this population of water-enriched worlds in the habitable zone of M stars may equal that around sun-like stars in numbers.References:Ciesla, Mulders et al. 2015Mulders et al. ApJ subm.

  11. Models of very-low-mass stars, brown dwarfs and exoplanets

    PubMed Central

    Allard, F.; Homeier, D.; Freytag, B.

    2012-01-01

    Within the next few years, GAIA and several instruments aiming to image extrasolar planets will be ready. In parallel, low-mass planets are being sought around red dwarfs, which offer more favourable conditions, for both radial velocity detection and transit studies, than solar-type stars. In this paper, the authors of a model atmosphere code that has allowed the detection of water vapour in the atmosphere of hot Jupiters review recent advances in modelling the stellar to substellar transition. The revised solar oxygen abundances and cloud model allow the photometric and spectroscopic properties of this transition to be reproduced for the first time. Also presented are highlight results of a model atmosphere grid for stars, brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets. PMID:22547243

  12. Three micron spectroscopy of low-mass pre-main-sequence stars

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shuji; Nagata, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Masuo; Yamamoto, Tetsuo Kyoto Univ. Tokyo Univ. Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Sagamihara )

    1990-08-01

    Low-resolution spectra were obtained of 16 premain-sequence stars, and ice-band features are detected in young T Tauri stars (TTSs) and in low-mass protostars. The TTSs have an ice band optical depth tau(ice) of 0.1-0.4. The tau(ice) for objects in the Taurus dark cloud decreases progressively from protostars to TTSs. The apparent color temperatures of the continuum spectra are 800-1200 K for protostars and 1100-1500 K for TTSs. The color temperatures of the continuum increase to 1200-2000K after correcting the protostar spectra for foreground extinction. This common temperature range in both young TTSs and protostars suggests that the inner boundary of the circumstellar disk is determined by the sublimation of refractory grains. 39 refs.

  13. Models of very-low-mass stars, brown dwarfs and exoplanets.

    PubMed

    Allard, F; Homeier, D; Freytag, B

    2012-06-13

    Within the next few years, GAIA and several instruments aiming to image extrasolar planets will be ready. In parallel, low-mass planets are being sought around red dwarfs, which offer more favourable conditions, for both radial velocity detection and transit studies, than solar-type stars. In this paper, the authors of a model atmosphere code that has allowed the detection of water vapour in the atmosphere of hot Jupiters review recent advances in modelling the stellar to substellar transition. The revised solar oxygen abundances and cloud model allow the photometric and spectroscopic properties of this transition to be reproduced for the first time. Also presented are highlight results of a model atmosphere grid for stars, brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets. PMID:22547243

  14. Tracing the origin of warm water emission through the stages of low-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm Persson, Magnus; Jorgensen, Jes K.; Coutens, Audrey; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    Water is a crucial molecule in the physics and chemistry of star- and planet formation, but its evolution from cold cores to disks is still poorly constrained. The gas-phase abundance of water varies between cold and warm regions up to a factor of 105 and this abundance variation makes water an excellent diagnostic of the physical structure in these sources.The origin of the warm water emission in deeply-embedded low-mass protostars is still debated, however. Current options include the innermost envelope (‘hot corino’), heated by the luminosity from the central protostar; a young disk heated by shocks related to ongoing accretion or the warm disk surface layers heated radiatively by the young star. Determining the location and kinematics of the warm water is important because it provides insights into whether water, and the locked up complex organics, actually moves from the outer envelope into the disk, and if so, whether it enters the disk mostly as gas or ice. Evolutionary models suggest that water and complex species enter the disk mostly as ice but this is so far unconfirmed observationally.Thus, in our collaboration we are undertaking a study of warm water in low-mass protostars. So far we have obtained interferometric maps of several isotopologues of water toward four deeply-embedded (i.e. Class 0) low-mass protostars with PdBI and ALMA. The detected water emission is compact toward the Class 0 sources, and a significant source of uncertainty in determining the abundances is the poorly constrained physical structure in the inner regions. Thus we try to constrain this physical structure by fitting simple disk models to the dust continuum visibilities that are left after subtracting a model of the spherical envelope. Furthermore we estimate upper limits to the warm water content toward the Class I protostars TMC-1A and L1527 from observations with PdBI.In this talk I will summarize our ongoing work in tracing the warm water emission through the various

  15. An Astrometric Companion to the Nearby Metal-Poor, Low-Mass Star LHS 1589

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lépine, Sébastien; Rich, R. Michael; Shara, Michael M.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Skemer, Andrew

    2007-10-01

    We report the discovery of a companion to the high proper motion star LHS 1589, a nearby high-velocity, low-mass subdwarf. The companion (LHS 1589B) is located 0.224''+/-0.004'' to the southwest of the primary (LHS 1589A), and is 0.5 mag fainter than the primary in the Ks band. The pair was resolved with the IRCAL infrared camera at Lick Observatory, operating with the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system. A low-resolution spectrum of the unresolved pair obtained at the MDM observatory shows the source to be consistent with a cool subdwarf of spectral subtype sdK7.5. A photometric distance estimate places the metal-poor system at a distance d=81+/-18 pc from the Sun. We also measure a radial velocity Vrad=67+/-8 km s-1, which, together with the proper motion and estimated distance, suggests that the pair is roaming the inner Galactic halo on a highly eccentric orbit. With a projected orbital separation s=18.1+/-4.8 AU, and a crude estimate of the system's total mass, we estimate the orbital period of the system to be in the range 75 yr low-mass stars. Based on observations performed with the Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics system at the Lick Observatory, operated by the University of California system. Based on observations conducted at the MDM observatory, operated jointly by the University of Michigan, Dartmouth College, the Ohio State University, Columbia University, and the University of Ohio.

  16. The High-Energy Radiation Environment of Planets around Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya; Miles, Brittany; Barman, Travis; Peacock, Sarah

    2015-12-01

    Low-mass stars are the dominant planet hosts averaging about one planet per star. Many of these planets orbit in the canonical habitable zone (HZ) of the star where, if other conditions allowed, liquid water may exist on the surface.A planet’s habitability, including atmospheric retention, is strongly dependent on the star’s ultraviolet (UV) emission, which chemically modifies, ionizes, and even erodes the atmosphere over time including the photodissociation of important diagnostic molecules, e.g. H2O, CH4, and CO2. The UV spectral slope of a low-mass star can enhance atmospheric lifetimes, and increase the detectability of biologically generated gases. But, a different slope may lead to the formation of abiotic oxygen and ozone producing a false-positive biosignature for oxygenic photosynthesis. Realistic constraints on the incident UV flux over a planet’s lifetime are necessary to explore the cumulative effects on the evolution, composition, and fate of a HZ planetary atmosphere.NASA’s Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) provides a unique data set with which to study the broadband UV emission from many hundreds of M dwarfs. The GALEX satellite has imaged nearly 3/4 of the sky simultaneously in two UV bands: near-UV (NUV; 175-275 nm) and far-UV (FUV; 135-175 nm). With these data these, we are able to calculate the mean UV emission and its level of variability at these wavelengths over critical planet formation and evolution time scales to better understand the probable conditions in HZ planetary atmospheres.In the near future, dedicated CubeSats (miniaturized satellites for space research) to monitor M dwarf hosts of transiting exoplanets will provide the best opportunity to measure their UV variability, constrain the probabilities of detecting habitable (and inhabited) planets, and provide the correct context within which to interpret IR transmission and emission spectroscopy of transiting exoplanets.

  17. The atomic and molecular content of disks around very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Herczeg, G.; Carr, J. S.; Bruderer, S.

    2013-12-20

    There is growing observational evidence that disk evolution is stellar-mass-dependent. Here, we show that these dependencies extend to the atomic and molecular content of disk atmospheres. We analyze a unique dataset of high-resolution Spitzer/IRS spectra from eight very low mass star and brown dwarf disks. We report the first detections of Ne{sup +}, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and tentative detections of H{sub 2}O toward these faint and low-mass disks. Two of our [Ne II] 12.81 μm emission lines likely trace the hot (≥5000 K) disk surface irradiated by X-ray photons from the central stellar/sub-stellar object. The H{sub 2} S(2) and S(1) fluxes are consistent with arising below the fully or partially ionized surface traced by the [Ne II] emission in gas at ∼600 K. We confirm the higher C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/HCN flux and column density ratio in brown dwarf disks previously noted from low-resolution IRS spectra. Our high-resolution spectra also show that the HCN/H{sub 2}O fluxes of brown dwarf disks are on average higher than those of T Tauri disks. Our LTE modeling hints that this difference extends to column density ratios if H{sub 2}O lines trace warm ≥600 K disk gas. These trends suggest that the inner regions of brown dwarf disks have a lower O/C ratio than those of T Tauri disks, which may result from a more efficient formation of non-migrating icy planetesimals. An O/C = 1, as inferred from our analysis, would have profound implications on the bulk composition of rocky planets that can form around very low mass stars and brown dwarfs.

  18. On the effects of Cosmions upon the structure and evolution of very low mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, E. E.; Griest, K.; Rosner, R.; Wang, J.

    1989-01-01

    A number of recent studies have suggested that cosmions, or WIMPS, may play an important role in the energetics of the solar interior; in particular, it has been argued that these hypothetical particles may transport sufficient energy within the nuclear-burning solar core so as to depress the solar core temperature to the point of resolving the solar neutrino problem. Solutions to the solar neutrino problem have proven themselves to be quite nonunique, so that it is of some interest whether the cosmion solution can be tested in some independent manner. It is argued that if cosmions solve the solar neutrino problem, then they must also play an important role in the evolution of low mass main sequence stars; and, second, that if they do so, then a simple (long mean free path) model for the interaction of cosmions with baryons leads to changes in the structure of the nuclear-burning core which may be in principal observable. Such changes include suppression of a fully-convective core in very low mass main sequence stars; and a possible thermal runaway in the core of the nuclear burning region. Some of these changes may be directly observable, and hence may provide independent constraints on the properties of the cosmions required to solve the solar neutrino problem, perhaps even ruling them out.

  19. The structure of accretion discs around low-mass young stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaume, R.

    2003-07-01

    It is nowadays widely accepted that low mass star formation initiated from a molecular cloud undergoes a phase where the central object is surrounded by a disc, in which planets may form later. The study of such a disc mainly aims at the understanding of the evolutionary sequence of star formation and of planet formation. Radiative transfer in this disc is of high importance, for it is heated by viscous dissipation or stellar irradiation for instance. The production and transportation of thermal energy in this disc therefore conditions its chemical and physical properties inside. It has countless consequences in terms of structure. I shall present a study of the discs based on a deep analytical description of the radiative transfer and a delay of the numerical implementation. This method allows a better grasp on processes and physical conditions in these objects. I shall constrain model parameters and establish a new diagnosis combining the spectral energy distribution and the visibilities obtained with optical long-baseline interferometers. The former observable is a well known technique, and the latter new and promising: it provides information at the scale of one astronomical unit for the closest star forming regions. I shall start a generalisation of the analytical studies of the radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres, with two striking discrepancies: viscous heating occurs everywhere in the disc and the surface is illuminated by the star. I apply this formalism in a numerical simulation of a disc heated by viscosity alone. I then develop a simplified version of this transfer in a two-layer disc: the surface is heated by the interior and by the star, and the interior by viscosity and by the surface. This simplification allow to derive a simplified analytical description of the physical conditions in a disc heated by the two processes mentioned above. I shall tackle the interpretation of observations in the end. I shall of the possibilities brought by

  20. Gyrochronology of Low-mass Stars - Age-Rotation-Activity Relations for Young M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Benjamin; Shkolnik, E.; Skiff, B.

    2014-01-01

    New rotation periods for 34 young <300 Myr), early-M dwarfs within 25 parsecs were measured using photometric data collected with telescopes at Lowell Observatory during 2012 and 2013. An additional 25 rotation periods for members of the same sample were found in the literature. Ages were derived from Hα and X-ray emission, lithium absorption, surface gravity, and kinematic association of members of known young moving groups (YMGs). We compared rotation periods with the estimated ages as well as indicators of magnetic activity, with the intention of strengthening age-rotation-activity relations and assessing the possible use of gyrochronology in young, low-mass stars. We compared ages and rotation periods of our target stars to cluster members spanning 1-600 Myr. Rotation periods at every age exhibit a large scatter, with values typically ranging from 0.2 to 15 days. This suggests that gyrochronology for individual field stars will not be possible without a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms that govern angular momentum evolution. Yet, on average, the data still support the predicted trends for spin-up during contraction and spin-down on the main sequence, with the turnover occurring at around 150 Myr for early Ms. This suggests that rotation period distributions can be helpful in evaluating the ages of coeval groups of stars. Many thanks to the National Science Foundation for their support through the Research Experience for Undergraduates Grant AST- 1004107.

  1. Variability in young very low mass stars: two surprises from spectrophotometric monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, I.; Scholz, A.; Eislöffel, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present simultaneous photometric and spectroscopic observations of seven young and highly variable M dwarfs in star-forming regions in Orion, conducted in four observing nights with FOcal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph2 at European Southern Observatory/VLT. All seven targets show significant photometric variability in the I band, with amplitudes between 0.1-0.8 mag, The spectra, however, remain remarkably constant, with spectral type changes less than 0.5 subtypes. Thus, the brightness changes are not caused by veiling that `fills in' absorption features. Three objects in the σ Ori cluster (age ˜3 Myr) exhibit strong Hα emission and Hα variability, in addition to the continuum variations. Their behaviour is mostly consistent with the presence of spots with temperature of ˜300 K above the photosphere and filling factors between 0.2-0.4, in contrast to typical hotspots observed in more massive stars. The remaining targets near ɛ Ori, likely to be older, show eclipse-like light curves, no significant Hα activity and are better represented by variable extinction due to circumstellar material. Interestingly, two of them show no evidence of infrared excess emission. Our study shows that high-amplitude variability in young very low mass stars can be caused by different phenomena than in more massive T Tauri stars and can persist when the disc has disappeared and accretion has ceased.

  2. An IRAS Hires study of low mass star formation in the Taurus molecular ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, Susan; Surace, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    The Taurus molecular cloud supposedly has no star clusters but only isolated star formation. However, the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) shows us that a small star cluster is currently forming in Taurus. Most of the sources are deeply embedded and are probably low-mass protostars. We use High Resolution (HiRes) images of the IRAS data from the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) to look for additional infrared members of the cluster. We also investigate the question of whether the infrared emission matches predictions for protostellar sources by examining whether the dust emission is resolved on scales of one arcminute (approx. 10(exp 17) cm). With the exception of a luminous visible star, HD 29647, we find that the sources L1527, TMC1A, TMC1, TMC1C, tMR1, and IC2087 are unresolved in the HiRes images at 60 microns. Further analysis of IC2087 shows that it is unresolved at all four IRAS wavelengths.

  3. Near infrared photometric and optical spectroscopic study of 22 low mass star clusters embedded in nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2008-02-01

    Aims:Among the star clusters in the Galaxy, those embedded in nebulae represent the youngest group, which has only recently been explored. The analysis of a sample of 22 candidate embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII environments is presented. Methods: We employed optical spectroscopic observations of stars in the directions of the clusters carried out at CASLEO (Argentina) together with near infrared photometry from the 2MASS catalogue. Our analysis is based on source surface density, colour-colour diagrams and on theoretical pre-main sequence isochrones. We take into account the field star contamination by carrying out a statistical subtraction. Results: The studied objects have the characteristics of low mass systems. We derive their fundamental parameters. Most of the cluster ages are younger than 2 Myr. The studied embedded stellar systems in reflection nebulae and/or HII region complexes do not have stars of spectral types earlier than B. The total stellar masses locked in the clusters are in the range 20-220 M⊙. They are found to be gravitationally unstable and are expected to dissolve in a timescale of a few Myr. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  4. Photometric and spectroscopic study of low mass embedded star clusters in reflection nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, J. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2005-02-01

    An analysis of the candidate embedded stellar systems in the reflection nebulae vdBH-RN 26, vdBH-RN} 38, vdBH-RN} 53a, GGD 20, ESO 95-RN 18 and NGC 6595 is presented. Optical spectroscopic data from CASLEO (Argentina) in conjunction with near infrared photometry from the 2MASS Point Source Catalogue were employed. The analysis is based on source surface density, colour-colour and colour-magnitude diagrams together with theoretical pre-main sequence isochrones. We take into account the field population affecting the analysis by carrying out a statistical subtraction. The fundamental parameters for the stellar systems were derived. The resulting ages are in the range 1-4 Myr and the objects are dominated by pre-main sequence stars. The observed masses locked in the clusters are less than 25 M⊙. The studied systems have no stars of spectral types earlier than B, indicating that star clusters do not necessarily evolve through an HII region phase. The relatively small locked mass combined with the fact that they are not numerous in catalogues suggests that these low mass clusters are not important donors of stars to the field populations. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  5. Intrinsic Lyα Profile Reconstructions of the MUSCLES Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngblood, Allison A.; France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.

    2015-12-01

    UV stellar radiation can significantly impact planetary atmospheres through heating and photochemistry, even regulating production of potential biomarkers. Cool stars emit the majority of their UV radiation in the form of emission lines, and the incident UV radiation on close-in habitable-zone planets is significant. Lyα (1215.67 Å) dominates the 912 - 3200 Å spectrum of cool stars, but strong absorption from the interstellar medium (ISM) makes direct observations of the intrinsic Lyα emission of even nearby stars challenging. The MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems) has completed observations of 7 M and 4 K stars hosting exoplanets (d < 22 pc). We have reconstructed the intrinsic Lyα profiles using an MCMC technique and used the results to estimate the extreme ultraviolet (100 - 911 Å) spectrum. We also present empirical relations between Lyα and chromospheric UV metal lines, e.g., Mg II, for use when ISM absorption prevents direct measurement of Lyα. The spectra presented here will be made publicly available through MAST to support exoplanet atmosphere modeling.

  6. Low mass binary neutron star mergers : gravitational waves and neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; SXS Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present numerical simulations of low mass binary neutron star mergers (1 . 2M⊙ - 1 . 2M⊙) with the SpEC code for a set of three nuclear-theory based, finite temperature equations of state. The merger remnant is a massive neutron star which is either permanently stable or long-lived. We focus on the post-merger gravitational wave signal, and on neutrino-matter interactions in the merger remnant. We show that the frequency peaks of the post-merger gravitational wave signal are in good agreement with predictions obtained from simulations using a simpler treatment of gravity. We then estimate the neutrino emission of the remnant using a neutrino leakage scheme and, in one case, compare these results with a gray two-moment neutrino transport scheme. We confirm the complex geometry of the neutrino emission, also observed in previous simulations with neutrino leakage, and show explicitly the presence of important differences in the neutrino luminosity, disk composition, and outflow properties between the neutrino leakage and transport schemes. We discuss the impact of our results on our ability to measure the neutron star equation of state, and on the post-merger electromagnetic signal and r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron star mergers. Einstein Fellow.

  7. Very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs from 2MASS and DENIS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, T.

    2MASS (Two Micron All Sky Survey) and DENIS (DEep Near-Infrared survey of the Southern sky) will provide a sample of very low mass stars that is complete to a distance of 50 pc, even for the latest M star currently known. This compares with the current completeness out to 5 - 10 pc. This sample will contain 1,000 to 10,000 times more M stars than currently cataloged. This catalog will be free from proper motion selection effects and will not be limited by the completeness of optical magnitude studies. Evidence from several square degrees of proto-camera data processed and examined to date, shows that roughly 1 source is found in every square degree that has no counterpart on a POSS I plate. The first of these sources was found to be a binary system with component stars of roughly equal brightness having an M6 - M7 combined spectrum. The author discusses the effectiveness of these surveys for detecting brown dwarfs.

  8. Radial velocities of very low mass stars and candidate brown dwarf members of the Hyades and Pleiades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Liebert, James; Giampapa, Mark; Macintosh, Bruce; Reid, Neill; Hamilton, Donald

    1994-01-01

    We have determined H alpha equivalent widths and radial velocities with 1 sigma accuracies of approximately 5 km s(exp -1) for approximately 20 candidate very low mass members of the Hyades and Pleiades clusters. The radial velocities for the Hyades sample suggest that nearly all of these stars are indeed highly probable members of the Hyades. The faintest stars in the Hyades sample have masses of order 0.1 solar mass. We also obtained radial velocities for four candidate very low mass members of the Pleiades and two objects that are candidate BD Pleiads. All of these stars have apparent V magnitudes fainter than the Hyades stars we observed, and the resultant radial velocity accuracy is worse. We believe that the three brighter stars are indeed likely very low mass stellar members of the Pleiades, whereas the status of the two brown dwarf candidates is uncertain. The Hyades stars we have observed and the three Pleiades very low mass stars are the lowest mass members of any open cluster whose membership has been confirmed by radial velocities and whose chromospheric activity has been measured. We see no change in chromospheric activity at the boundary where stars are expected to become fully convective (M approximately equals 0.3 solar mass) in either cluster. In the Pleiades, however, there may be a decrease in chromospheric activity for stars with (V-I)(sub K) greater than 3.5 (M less than or equal to 0.1 solar mass).

  9. Modeling the Submillimeter Dust Continuum Emission from Nearby Low Mass Star Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirley, Y. L.; Young, C. H.; Evans, N. J., II; Rawlings, J. M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Current theories of a low mass star formation predict the evolution of the density distribution, n({r}, t), temperature distribution, T({r}, t), and the velocity field ,{v}({r}, t), of the envelope of protostellar cores with time. Optically thin dust emission at submillimeter wavelengths provides a powerful diagnostic to constrain the envelope density and temperature structure. In this study, thirty-nine low mass cores were mapped with SCUBA at 850 and 450 μ m on the JCMT during sixteen nights between January 1998 and February 2000. The sources were selected from the earliest phases (pre-T Tauri) in the proposed evolutionary scheme for low mass protostars (6 Pre-protostellar Cores (PPCs), 15 Class 0, 18 Class I) with luminosities indicative of low mass star formation (Lbol < 50 Lsun) and with distances less than 450 pc. High signal-to-noise maps allowed azimuthally averaged radial profiling out to 60 arcseconds from the continuum centroid. The similarities and differences in the submillimeter continuum emission properties of the envelopes of PPCs, Class 0, and Class I sources on 103 to 104 AU scales are summarized. We have modeled the normalized radial intensity distributions and spectral energy distributions (SED) for sixteen sources from the SCUBA survey (3 PPCs, 7 Class 0, and 6 Class I) using a one dimensional radiative transfer code (Egan, Leung, & Spagna 1988) with internal heating from a central protostar (Class 0 and I objects) and external heating from the interstellar radiation field (all objects) to calculate the dust temperature distribution. Power law, Bonnor-Ebert, Shu inside-out collapse, and Plummer density distributions were tested to match the observed normalized radial profiles and observed SED simultaneously. Realistic beam profiles and chopping were used to simulate the observations. We find Bonnor-Ebert spheres with central densities of 105 to 106 cm-3 reproduce the PPC radial profiles while power law models (n(r) ~ r-p, p = 1.1 - 2

  10. Physical properties of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z <1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Pacifici, C.; Tresse, L.; Charlot, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.

    2015-05-01

    In this poster we present the physical properties of a sample of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z<1). We selected a population of dwarf galaxies because dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) they resemble the first structures that hierarchical models predict to form first in the Universe (Dekel & Silk 1986) and that are responsible for the reionization process (Bouwens et al. 2012); and (2) the way or epoch they form and how they evolve are still open questions of modern astrophysics. We selected the sample on the CDFS field. Photometry (40 bands, from UV to far-IR) and preliminary photometric redshifts and stellar masses were obtained from RAINBOW database (Pérez-González et al. 2008). Morphology fom Griffith et al. (2012). Main selection was done by stellar mass, selecting those galaxies with stellar mass M_*<10^8 {M}_⊙. Spectroscopic redshifts were obtained from deep (4 h) MOS spectroscopy with the VIMOS spectrograph at VLT. The average spectrum is characterized by a faint, blue and flat continuum and strong emission lines, revealing that the systems are dominated by an undergoing star formation burst. SFRs and stellar masses are consistent with the SF main-squence over a 2 dex range. More massive objects show higher SFRs than low-mass objects, following the SF main sequence. Distant dwarfs and BCDs follow the overall star-forming sequence in the excitation-luminosity diagram, populating the high excitation, low metallicity and high strength region.

  11. Photometry and membership for low mass stars in the young open cluster NGC 2516

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Thurston, M. R.; Hambly, N. C.

    2001-09-01

    We present the results of a 0.86 square degree CCD photometric survey of the open cluster NGC 2516, which has an age of about 150 Myr and may have a much lower metallicity than the similarly-aged Pleiades. Our BVI_c survey of cluster members is complete to V =~ 20 and is used to select a preliminary catalogue of 1254 low mass (0.2stars from the literature, we investigate the cluster binarity, luminosity and mass function, mass segregation and total mass. We find a binary fraction of 26+/-5 percent, for A to M-type systems with mass ratios between 0.6 and 1, which is very similar to the Pleiades. The mass function is metallicity and evolutionary-model dependent, but consistent with a Salpeter-like law (dN/dlog M~ M-alpha , alpha =+1.47+/-0.11 or alpha =+1.67+/-0.11 for the solar and half-solar metallicity models of Siess et al. \\cite{siess00}, and alpha =+1.58+/-0.10 for the solar metallicity models of D'Antona & Mazzitelli \\cite{dantona97}), for 0.7low mass stars in unresolved binary systems with mass ratios less than 0.6. The falling mass function of NGC 2516 at lower masses seems inconsistent with the much flatter mass functions derived from comparable data in the Pleiades and field populations. This deficit of lower mass, fainter stars is also seen in the observed luminosity function. We rule out incompleteness as the cause of this discrepancy, but demonstrate that mass segregation is clearly present

  12. A HERSCHEL SURVEY OF COLD DUST IN DISKS AROUND BROWN DWARFS AND LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Paul M.; Evans, Neal J. II; Henning, Thomas; Liu Yao; Wolf, Sebastian; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Pascucci, Ilaria E-mail: nje@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: wolf@astrophysik.uni-kiel.de E-mail: yliu@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: christophe.pinte@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr E-mail: pascucci@lpl.arizona.edu

    2012-08-10

    We report the complete photometric results from our Herschel study which is the first comprehensive program to search for far-infrared emission from cold dust around young brown dwarfs (BDs). We surveyed 50 fields containing 51 known or suspected BDs and very low mass stars that have evidence of circumstellar disks based on Spitzer photometry and/or spectroscopy. The objects with known spectral types range from M3 to M9.5. Four of the candidates were subsequently identified as extragalactic objects. Of the remaining 47 we have successfully detected 36 at 70 {mu}m and 14 at 160 {mu}m with signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) greater than 3, as well as several additional possible detections with low S/N. The objects exhibit a range of [24]-[70] {mu}m colors suggesting a range in mass and/or structure of the outer disk. We present modeling of the spectral energy distributions of the sample and discuss trends visible in the data. Using two Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes we investigate disk masses and geometry. We find a very wide range in modeled total disk masses from less than 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} up to 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} with a median disk mass of the order of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun }, suggesting that the median ratio of disk mass to central object mass may be lower than for T Tauri stars. The disk scale heights and flaring angles, however, cover a range consistent with those seen around T Tauri stars. The host clouds in which the young BDs and low-mass stars are located span a range in estimated age from {approx}1-3 Myr to {approx}10 Myr and represent a variety of star-forming environments. No obvious dependence on cloud location or age is seen in the disk properties, though the statistical significance of this conclusion is not strong.

  13. Low mass binary neutron star mergers: Gravitational waves and neutrino emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucart, Francois; Haas, Roland; Duez, Matthew D.; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Roberts, Luke; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Lippuner, Jonas; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Scheel, Mark A.

    2016-02-01

    Neutron star mergers are among the most promising sources of gravitational waves for advanced ground-based detectors. These mergers are also expected to power bright electromagnetic signals, in the form of short gamma-ray bursts, infrared/optical transients powered by r-process nucleosynthesis in neutron-rich material ejected by the merger, and radio emission from the interaction of that ejecta with the interstellar medium. Simulations of these mergers with fully general relativistic codes are critical to understand the merger and postmerger gravitational wave signals and their neutrinos and electromagnetic counterparts. In this paper, we employ the Spectral Einstein Code to simulate the merger of low mass neutron star binaries (two 1.2 M⊙ neutron stars) for a set of three nuclear-theory-based, finite temperature equations of state. We show that the frequency peaks of the postmerger gravitational wave signal are in good agreement with predictions obtained from recent simulations using a simpler treatment of gravity. We find, however, that only the fundamental mode of the remnant is excited for long periods of time: emission at the secondary peaks is damped on a millisecond time scale in the simulated binaries. For such low mass systems, the remnant is a massive neutron star which, depending on the equation of state, is either permanently stable or long lived (i.e. rapid uniform rotation is sufficient to prevent its collapse). We observe strong excitations of l =2 , m =2 modes, both in the massive neutron star and in the form of hot, shocked tidal arms in the surrounding accretion torus. We estimate the neutrino emission of the remnant using a neutrino leakage scheme and, in one case, compare these results with a gray two-moment neutrino transport scheme. We confirm the complex geometry of the neutrino emission, also observed in previous simulations with neutrino leakage, and show explicitly the presence of important differences in the neutrino luminosity, disk

  14. Mass-Luminosity Relationship and Lithium Depletion for Very Low Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles; Baraffe, Isabelle; Plez, Bertrand

    1996-03-01

    We derive mass-luminosity relationships for very low mass stars (0.06 < m/M⊙ < 0.6) for different metallicities. Calculations are conducted with the different nongray atmosphere models presently available to illustrate the uncertainties in the stellar models. The theoretical mass-magnitude relation reproduces accurately the observed relationship in the V band (Henry & McCarthy) but still underestimates the flux in the K band by ~0.5 mag, a consequence of the still inaccurate water opacities. Calculations based on the gray approximation are shown to yield incorrect results over the entire mass range of interest. We also show that the fate of objects near the hydrogen-burning limit depends significantly on the treatment of the atmosphere. Nongray effects yield cooler and less luminous objects for a given mass near the stellar/substellar transition, and thus a lower hydrogen-burning minimum mass, m ~ 0.07 M⊙, for solar metallicity. The depletion of lithium along evolution is considered in detail, and we give age versus lithium-abundance relations that provide useful guides to determine the mass and the age of spectroscopically observed low-mass objects.

  15. Do circumstellar disks regulate rotation in young very low mass stars and brown dwarfs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Ledesma, M. V.; Mundt, R.; Eislöffel, J.

    Rotational studies at a variety of ages and masses are important for con- straining the angular momentum evolution of young stellar objects. Of particular interest are the very low mass (VLM) stars and brown dwarfs (BDs), because of the significant lack of known rotational periods in that mass range. We present results of an extensive rotational study in the Orion Nebula Clus- ter from where 487 new rotational periods were measured. In order to inves- tigate a rotation-disk correlation, we derived near infrared (NIR) excesses (from IJHK photometry) for a sample of 732 very low mass periodic vari- ables. We found a highly significant rotation-disk correlation for objects with masses between 0.4-0.075 M , in which objects with NIR excess tend to rotate slower than objects without NIR excess. Interestingly we found no corre- lation in the substellar regime. We discuss possible scenarios which may explain the lack of rotation-disk connection in the substellar mass regime.

  16. A pulsation search among young brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Ann Marie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2014-12-01

    In 2005, Palla and Baraffe proposed that brown dwarfs (BDs) and very-low-mass stars (VLMSs; < 0.1 solar masses) may be unstable to radial oscillations during the pre-main-sequence deuterium burning phase. With associated periods of one to four hours, this potentially new class of pulsation offers unprecedented opportunities to probe the interiors and evolution of low-mass objects in the 1-15 million year age range. Following up on reports of short-period variability in young clusters, we designed a high-cadence photometric monitoring campaign to search for deuterium-burning pulsation among a sample of 348 BDs and VLMSs in the four young clusters σ Orionis, Chamaeleon I, IC 348, and Upper Scorpius. In the resulting light curves we achieved sensitivity to periodic signals of amplitude several millimagnitudes, on timescales from 15 minutes to two weeks. Despite the exquisite data quality, we failed to detect any periodicities below seven hours. We conclude that D-burning pulsations are not able to grow to observable amplitudes in the early pre-main sequence. In spite of the nondetection, we did uncover a rich set of variability behavior—both periodic and aperiodic—on day to week timescales. We present new compilations of variable sources from our sample, as well as three new candidate cluster members in Chamaeleon I.

  17. Quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlione, A.; Aguilera, D. N.; Pons, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. We monitored the quiescent thermal emission from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries after active periods of intense activity in X-rays (outbursts). Aims: The theoretical modeling of the thermal relaxation of the neutron star crust may be used to establish constraints on the crust composition and transport properties, depending on the astrophysical scenarios assumed. Methods: We numerically simulated the thermal evolution of the neutron star crust and compared them with inferred surface temperatures for five sources: MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260, XTE J1701-462, EXO 0748-676 and IGR J17480-2446. Results: We find that the evolution of MXB 1659-29, KS 1731-260 and EXO 0748-676 can be well described within a deep crustal cooling scenario. Conversely, we find that the other two sources can only be explained with models beyond crustal cooling. For the peculiar emission of XTE J1701-462 we propose alternative scenarios such as residual accretion during quiescence, additional heat sources in the outer crust, and/or thermal isolation of the inner crust due to a buried magnetic field. We also explain the very recent reported temperature of IGR J17480-2446 with an additional heat deposition in the outer crust from shallow sources.

  18. Electromagnetic pulse from supernovae. [model for old low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colgate, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Upper and lower limits to the radiated electromagnetic pulse from a supernova are calculated assuming that the mass fraction of the matter expanding inside the dipole magnetic field shares energy and maintains the pressure balance in the process. A supernova model is described in which the explosion occurs in old low-mass stars containing less than 10% hydrogen in their ejecta and a remnant neutron star is produced. The analysis indicates that although the surface layer of a star of 1 g/cu thickness may be shock-accelerated to an energy factor of about 100 and may expand into the vacuum with an energy factor approaching 10,000, the equatorial magnetic field will retard this expansion so that the inner, more massive ejecta layers will effectively accelerate the presumed canonical dipole magnetic field to greater velocities than would the surface layer alone. A pulse of 10 to the 46th power ergs in a width of about 150 cm will result which will not be affected by circumstellar matter or electron self-radiation effects. It is shown that interstellar matter will attenuate the pulse, but that charge separation may reduce the attenuation and allow a larger pulse to escape.

  19. Scaled up low-mass star formation in massive star-forming cores in the G333 giant molecular cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiles, B.; Lo, N.; Redman, M. P.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Burton, M. G.; Bronfman, L.

    2016-06-01

    Three bright molecular line sources in G333 have recently been shown to exhibit signatures of infall. We describe a molecular line radiative transfer (RT) modelling process which is required to extract the infall signature from Mopra and Nanten2 data. The observed line profiles differ greatly between individual sources but are reproduced well by variations upon a common unified model where the outflow viewing angle is the most significant difference between the sources. The models and data together suggest that the observed properties of the high-mass star-forming regions such as infall, turbulence and mass are consistent with scaled-up versions of the low-mass case with turbulent velocities that are supersonic and an order of magnitude larger than those found in low-mass star-forming regions. Using detailed RT modelling, we show that the G333 cores are essentially undergoing a scaled-up version of low-mass star formation. This is an extension of earlier work in that the degree of infall and the chemical abundances are constrained by the RT modelling in a way that is not practical with a standard analysis of observational data. We also find high velocity infall and high infall mass rates, possibly suggesting accelerated collapse due to external pressure. Molecular depletion due to freeze-out on to dust grains in central regions of the cores is suggested by low molecular abundances of several species. Strong evidence for a local enhancement of 13C-bearing species towards the outflow cloud cores is discussed, consistent with the presence of shocks caused by the supersonic motions within them.

  20. Multi-fibre optical spectroscopy of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in Upper Scorpius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Dobbie, P. D.; Hambly, N. C.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Knowledge of the mass function in open clusters constitutes one way to critically examine the formation mechanisms proposed to explain the existence of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Aims: The aim of the project is to determine as accurately as possible the shape of the mass function across the stellar/substellar boundary in the young (5 Myr) and nearby (d = 145 pc) Upper Sco association. Methods: We have obtained multi-fibre intermediate-resolution (R ~ 1100) optical (~5750-8800 Å) spectroscopy of 94 photometric and proper motion selected low-mass star and brown dwarf candidates in Upper Sco with the AAOmega spectrograph on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Results: We have estimated the spectral types and measured the equivalent widths of youth (Hα) and gravity (Na I and K I) diagnostic features to confirm the spectroscopic membership of about 95% of the photometric and proper motion candidates extracted from 6.5 square degrees surveyed in Upper Sco by the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Galactic Clusters Survey (GCS). We also detect lithium in the spectra with the highest signal-to-noise, consolidating our conclusions about their youth. Furthermore, we derive an estimate of the efficiency of the photometric and proper motion selections used in our earlier studies using spectroscopic data obtained for a large number of stars falling into the instrument's field-of-view. We have estimated the effective temperatures and masses for each new spectroscopic member using the latest evolutionary models available for low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Combining the current optical spectroscopy presented here with near-infrared spectroscopy obtained for the faintest photometric candidates, we confirm the shape and slope of our earlier photometric mass function. The luminosity function drawn from the spectroscopic sample of 113 USco members peaks at around M6 and is flat at later spectral type. We may detect the presence of the M7/M8 gap in the luminosity

  1. Energy generation in convective shells of low mass, low metallicity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, G. . Dept. of Astronomy); Lattanzio, J.C. )

    1989-11-10

    We report on the non-negligible energy generation from the {sup 13}C neutron source and neutron capture reactions in low mass, low metallicity AGB stars. About 10{sup 4} L{sub {circle dot}} are generated within the thermal pulse convective shell by the combination of the {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O rate and the sum of the Y(Z,A)(n,{gamma})Y(Z,A + 1) reactions and beta decays. The inclusion of this energy source in an AGB thermal pulse evolution is shown to alter the evolution of the convective shell boundaries, and, hence, how the {sup 13}C is ingested into the convective shell. Also, the duration of the pulse itself is reduced by the additional energy input. The nucleosynthetic consequences are discussed for these evolutionary changes. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  2. The Formation of Low-mass Binary Star Systems Via Turbulent Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella S. R.; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Klein, Richard I.

    2010-12-01

    We characterize the infall rate onto protostellar systems forming in self-gravitating radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. Using two dimensionless parameters to determine the disks' susceptibility to gravitational fragmentation, we infer limits on protostellar system multiplicity and the mechanism of binary formation. We show that these parameters give robust predictions even in the case of marginally resolved protostellar disks. We find that protostellar systems with radiation feedback predominately form binaries via turbulent fragmentation, not disk instability, and predict that turbulent fragmentation is the dominant channel for binary formation for low-mass stars. We clearly demonstrate that systems forming in simulations including radiative feedback have fundamentally different parameters than those in purely hydrodynamics simulations.

  3. The Search for Low-mass Companions of B Stars in the Carina Nebula Cluster Trumpler 16

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Nancy Remage; DeGioia-Eastwood, Kathleen; Gagné, Marc; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Wolk, Scott; Nazé, Yaël; Corcoran, Michael; Oskinova, Lida; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Wang, Junfeng; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed lists of likely B3-A0 stars (called "late B" stars) in the young cluster Trumpler 16. The following criteria were used: location within 3' of η Car, an appropriate V and B - V combination, and proper motion (where available). Color and magnitude cuts have been made assuming an E(B - V) = 0.55 mag ± 0.1, which is a good approximation close to the center of Trumpler 16. These lists have been cross-correlated with X-ray sources found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project. Previous studies have shown that only very rarely (if at all) do late main-sequence B stars produce X-rays. We present evidence that the X-ray-detected sources are binaries with low-mass companions, since stars less massive than 1.4 M sun are strong X-ray sources at the age of the cluster. Both the median X-ray energies and X-ray luminosities of these sources are in good agreement with values for typical low-mass coronal X-ray sources. We find that 39% of the late B stars based on a list with proper motions have low-mass companions. Similarly, 32% of a sample without proper motions have low-mass companions. We discuss the X-ray detection completeness. These results on low-mass companions of intermediate-mass stars are complementary to spectroscopic and interferometric results and probe new parameter space of low-mass companions at all separations. They do not support a steeply rising distribution of mass ratios to low masses for intermediate-mass (5 M sun) primaries, such as would be found by random pairing from the initial mass function. Based on observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  4. Identifying the Young Low-mass Stars within 25 pc. II. Distances, Kinematics, and Group Membership

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Liu, Michael C.; Bowler, Brendan P.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Boss, Alan P.; Reid, I. Neill; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-10-01

    We have conducted a kinematic study of 165 young M dwarfs with ages of lsim300 Myr. Our sample is composed of stars and brown dwarfs with spectral types ranging from K7 to L0, detected by ROSAT and with photometric distances of lsim25 pc assuming that the stars are single and on the main sequence. In order to find stars kinematically linked to known young moving groups (YMGs), we measured radial velocities for the complete sample with Keck and CFHT optical spectroscopy and trigonometric parallaxes for 75 of the M dwarfs with the CAPSCam instrument on the du Pont 2.5 m Telescope. Due to their youthful overluminosity and unresolved binarity, the original photometric distances for our sample underestimated the distances by 70% on average, excluding two extremely young (lsim3 Myr) objects found to have distances beyond a few hundred parsecs. We searched for kinematic matches to 14 reported YMGs and identified 10 new members of the AB Dor YMG and 2 of the Ursa Majoris group. Additional possible candidates include six Castor, four Ursa Majoris, two AB Dor members, and one member each of the Her-Lyr and β Pic groups. Our sample also contains 27 young low-mass stars and 4 brown dwarfs with ages lsim150 Myr that are not associated with any known YMG. We identified an additional 15 stars that are kinematic matches to one of the YMGs, but the ages from spectroscopic diagnostics and/or the positions on the sky do not match. These warn against grouping stars together based only on kinematics and that a confluence of evidence is required to claim that a group of stars originated from the same star-forming event. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, the du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Subaru Telescope. The Keck Observatory is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial

  5. Direct imaging search for planets around low-mass stars and spectroscopic characterization of young exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan Peter

    Low--mass stars between 0.1--0.6 M⊙ are the most abundant members our galaxy and may be the most common sites of planet formation, but little is known about the outer architecture of their planetary systems. We have carried out a high-contrast adaptive imaging search for gas giant planets between 1--13 MJup around 122 newly identified young M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood ( ≲ 35 pc). Half of our targets are younger than 145 Myr, and 90% are younger than 580 Myr. After removing 39 resolved stellar binaries, our homogeneous sample of 83 single young M dwarfs makes it the largest imaging search for planets around low--mass stars to date. Our H- and K- band coronagraphic observations with Subaru/HiCIAO and Keck/NIRC2 achieve typical contrasts of 9--13 mag and 12--14 mag at 100, respectively, which corresponds to limiting masses of ˜1--10 M Jup at 10--30 AU for most of our sample. We discovered four brown dwarfs with masses between 25--60 MJup at projected separations of 4--190 AU. Over 100 candidate planets were discovered, nearly all of which were found to be background stars from follow-up second epoch imaging. Our null detection of planets nevertheless provides strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of giant planets around M dwarfs. Assuming circular orbits and a logarithmically-flat power law distribution in planet mass and semi--major axis of the form d 2N=(dloga dlogm) infinity m0 a0, we measure an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 8.8% and 12.6% for 1--13 MJup companions between 10--100 AU for hot start and cold start evolutionary models, respectively. For massive gas giant planets in the 5--13 M Jup range like those orbiting HR 8799, GJ 504, and beta Pictoris, we find that fewer than 5.3% (7.8%) of M dwarfs harbor these planets between 10--100 AU for a hot start (cold start) formation scenario. Our best constraints are for brown dwarf companions; the frequency of 13--75 MJup companions between (de--projected) physical

  6. SLOAN LOW-MASS WIDE PAIRS OF KINEMATICALLY EQUIVALENT STARS (SLoWPoKES): A CATALOG OF VERY WIDE, LOW-MASS PAIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Dhital, Saurav; Stassun, Keivan G.; West, Andrew A.; Bochanski, John J.

    2010-06-15

    We present the Sloan Low-mass Wide Pairs of Kinematically Equivalent Stars (SLoWPoKES), a catalog of 1342 very-wide (projected separation {approx}>500 AU), low-mass (at least one mid-K to mid-M dwarf component) common proper motion pairs identified from astrometry, photometry, and proper motions in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A Monte Carlo-based Galactic model is constructed to assess the probability of chance alignment for each pair; only pairs with a probability of chance alignment {<=}0.05 are included in the catalog. The overall fidelity of the catalog is expected to be 98.35%. The selection algorithm is purposely exclusive to ensure that the resulting catalog is efficient for follow-up studies of low-mass pairs. The SLoWPoKES catalog is the largest sample of wide, low-mass pairs to date and is intended as an ongoing community resource for detailed study of bona fide systems. Here, we summarize the general characteristics of the SLoWPoKES sample and present preliminary results describing the properties of wide, low-mass pairs. While the majority of the identified pairs are disk dwarfs, there are 70 halo subdwarf (SD) pairs and 21 white dwarf-disk dwarf pairs, as well as four triples. Most SLoWPoKES pairs violate the previously defined empirical limits for maximum angular separation or binding energies. However, they are well within the theoretical limits and should prove very useful in putting firm constraints on the maximum size of binary systems and on different formation scenarios. We find a lower limit to the wide binary frequency (WBF) for the mid-K to mid-M spectral types that constitute our sample to be 1.1%. This frequency decreases as a function of Galactic height, indicating a time evolution of the WBF. In addition, the semi-major axes of the SLoWPoKES systems exhibit a distinctly bimodal distribution, with a break at separations around 0.1 pc that is also manifested in the system binding energy. Compared with theoretical predictions for the

  7. Thermohaline mixing and the photospheric composition of low-mass giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachlin, F. C.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Althaus, L. G.

    2011-09-01

    Aims: By means of numerical simulations and different recipes, we test the efficiency of thermohaline mixing as a process to alter the surface abundances in low-mass giant stars. Methods: We compute full evolutionary sequences of red giant branch stars close to the luminosity bump by including state-of-the-art composition transport prescriptions for the thermohaline mixing regimes. In particular, we adopt a self-consistent double-diffusive convection theory that allows handling both instabilities that arise when thermal and composition gradients compete against each other and a very recent empirically motivated and parameter-free asymptotic scaling law for thermohaline composition transport. Results: In agreement with previous works, we find that, during the red giant stage, a thermohaline instability sets in shortly after the hydrogen burning shell (HBS) encounters the chemical discontinuity left behind by the first dredge-up. We also find that the thermohaline unstable region, which initially appears on the exterior wing of the HBS, is unable to reach the outer convective envelope, with the consequence that no mixing of elements occurs that produces a noncanonical modification of the stellar surface abundances. Also in agreement with previous works, we find that artificially increasing the mixing efficiency of thermohaline regions makes it possible to connect both unstable regions, thus affecting the photospheric composition. However, we find that to reproduce the observed abundances of red giant branch stars close to the luminosity bump, thermohaline mixing efficiency has to be artificially increased by about four orders of magnitude from what is predicted by recent 3D numerical simulations of thermohaline convection close to astrophysical environments. From this we conclude that the chemical abundance anomalies of red giant stars cannot be explained on the basis of thermohaline mixing alone.

  8. Coronal Activity in Low-Mass Pre-Main Sequence Stars: NGC 2264

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tebbe, H. J.; Patten, B. M.

    2000-01-01

    We present the preliminary results of an analysis of ROSAT images in the region of the populous young (age approx. 3 Myr) star-forming region NGC 2264. The cluster was imaged with the ROSAT HRI in two sets of pointings -- one set near the central region of the cluster, centered on the star LW Mon, and the other set in the southern part of the cluster, centered near the star V428 Mon, just south of the Cone Nebula. In total 113 unique X-ray sources have been identified in the ROSAT images with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 3. The limiting luminosities (log Lx(ergs/sec)) for 3-sigma detections are estimated to be 30.18, 30.23, and 30.08 for the northern field, southern field, and overlap region between the two fields respectively. Extensive optical photometry, classification spectroscopy, and proper motions, obtained from recent ground-based surveys of this region, were used to identify the most likely optical counterpart to each X-ray source. Although most of our X-ray selected sample appears to be associated with NGC 2264 members, we find that the vast majority of the cluster membership was undetected in the ROSAT HRI survey. The X-ray cumulative luminosity function for solar-mass stars in NGC 2264 shows that most of the low-mass members probably have X-ray luminosities similar to those seen for the X-ray brightest members of older clusters such as IC 2391/IC 2602 (age approx. 50 Myr) and the Pleiades (age approx. 100 Myr). This research was funded in part by the SAO Summer Intern Program and NASA grant NAG5-8120.

  9. The temperature and chronology of heavy-element synthesis in low-mass stars.

    PubMed

    Neyskens, P; Van Eck, S; Jorissen, A; Goriely, S; Siess, L; Plez, B

    2015-01-01

    Roughly half of the heavy elements (atomic mass greater than that of iron) are believed to be synthesized in the late evolutionary stages of stars with masses between 0.8 and 8 solar masses. Deep inside the star, nuclei (mainly iron) capture neutrons and progressively build up (through the slow-neutron-capture process, or s-process) heavier elements that are subsequently brought to the stellar surface by convection. Two neutron sources, activated at distinct temperatures, have been proposed: (13)C and (22)Ne, each releasing one neutron per α-particle ((4)He) captured. To explain the measured stellar abundances, stellar evolution models invoking the (13)C neutron source (which operates at temperatures of about one hundred million kelvin) are favoured. Isotopic ratios in primitive meteorites, however, reflecting nucleosynthesis in the previous generations of stars that contributed material to the Solar System, point to higher temperatures (more than three hundred million kelvin), requiring at least a late activation of (22)Ne (ref. 1). Here we report a determination of the s-process temperature directly in evolved low-mass giant stars, using zirconium and niobium abundances, independently of stellar evolution models. The derived temperature supports (13)C as the s-process neutron source. The radioactive pair (93)Zr-(93)Nb used to estimate the s-process temperature also provides, together with the pair (99)Tc-(99)Ru, chronometric information on the time elapsed since the start of the s-process, which we determine to be one million to three million years. PMID:25567282

  10. X-ray and Optical Studies of Low--Mass Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, J. M.

    1994-02-01

    Weak--line T Tauri stars (WTTS) are low--mass pre--main sequence (PMS) stars which lack both the strong emission lines and the infra--red (IR) excesses typical of classical T Tauri stars (CTTS). Most of them have been discovered on the basis of their solar--like X--ray emission. In this work, X--ray data from the ROSAT all-sky survey in the Chamaeleon (Cha) and the Orion star forming regions (SFR's), and from one ROSAT pointed observation in the Cha I dark cloud, were used to determine the number of WTTS, to investigate their spatial distribution, and to study their physical properties and their X--ray emission. The total number of X-ray sources detected in the ROSAT survey is 820 in Orion (~450 square degrees), and 181 in Chamaeleon (~200 square degrees). Fifty four X--ray sources were detected in the ROSAT pointed observation in Cha I. Cross correlation of the X-ray positions with those of catalogued objects in the Simbad database gives about 30% of coincidences in the two SFR's. These counterparts are mainly extragalactic objects, HD, HR or SAO stars, CTTS, and a few WTTS known from previous EINSTEIN observations. For the remaining sources, a programme of spectroscopic observations has been conducted. These observations led to the identification of 85 and 58 new WTTS in the Chamaeleon and Orion SFR's respectively. For the Chamaeleon SFR, the spectroscopic identification of the survey sources is complete, while for the Orion SFR there are about 470 sources still to be investigated. Eighty percent of the sources from the pointed observation in Cha I have been identified. In addition, optical and near IR photometric observations of a sub--sample of the new WTTS were carried out. The spectral energy distributions of these stars are very similar to those of normal stars of the same spectral type. The effective temperature and the stellar luminosity were derived in order to place the sub--sample of WTTS in the H--R diagram. By comparison with the theoretical

  11. The effects of rotation on the surface composition and yields of low mass AGB stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallo, S.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.

    Over the past 20 years, stellar evolutionary models have been strongly improved in order to reproduce with reasonable accuracy both photometric and spectroscopic observations. Notwithstanding, the majority of these models do not take into account macroscopic phenomena, like rotation and/or magnetic fields. Their explicit treatment could modify stellar physical and chemical properties. One of the most interesting problems related to stellar nucleosynthesis is the behavior of the s-process spectroscopic indexes ([hs/ls] and [Pb/hs]) in Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars. In this contribution we show that, for a fixed metallicity, rotation can lead to a spread in the [hs/ls] and [Pb/hs] in low-mass AGB stars. In particular, we demonstrate that the Eddington-Sweet and the Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instabilities may have enough time to smear the 13C-pocket (the major neutron source) and the 14N-pocket (the major neutron poison). In fact, a different overlap between these pockets leads to a different neutrons-to-seeds ratio, with important consequences on the corresponding s-process distributions. Possible consequences on the chemical evolution of Galactic globular clusters are discussed.

  12. Miniature MMIC Low Mass/Power Radiometer Modules for the 180 GHz GeoSTAR Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Tanner, Alan; Pukala, David; Lambrigtsen, Bjorn; Lim, Boon; Mei, Xiaobing; Lai, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and demonstrated miniature 180 GHz Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) radiometer modules that have low noise temperature, low mass and low power consumption. These modules will enable the Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer (GeoSTAR) of the Precipitation and All-weather Temperature and Humidity (PATH) Mission for atmospheric temperature and humidity profiling. The GeoSTAR instrument has an array of hundreds of receivers. Technology that was developed included Indium Phosphide (InP) MMIC Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) and second harmonic MMIC mixers and I-Q mixers, surface mount Multi-Chip Module (MCM) packages at 180 GHz, and interferometric array at 180 GHz. A complete MMIC chip set for the 180 GHz receiver modules (LNAs and I-Q Second harmonic mixer) was developed. The MMIC LNAs had more than 50% lower noise temperature (NT=300K) than previous state-of-art and MMIC I-Q mixers demonstrated low LO power (3 dBm). Two lots of MMIC wafers were processed with very high DC transconductance of up to 2800 mS/mm for the 35 nm gate length devices. Based on these MMICs a 180 GHz Multichip Module was developed that had a factor of 100 lower mass/volume (16x18x4.5 mm3, 3g) than previous generation 180 GHz receivers.

  13. An ALMA survey for disks orbiting low-mass stars in the TW Hya Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.; van der Plas, Gerrit; Kastner, Joel H.; Schneider, Adam C.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mardones, Diego; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Principe, David

    2015-10-01

    We carried out an ALMA survey of 15 confirmed or candidate low-mass (<0.2 M⊙) members of the TW Hya Association (TWA) with the goal of detecting molecular gas in the form of CO emission, as well as of providing constraints on continuum emission due to cold dust. Our targets have spectral types of M4-L0 and hence represent the extreme low end of the TWA's mass function. Our ALMA survey has yielded detections of 1.3 mm continuum emission around 4 systems (TWA 30B, 32, 33, and 34), suggesting the presence of cold dust grains. All continuum sources are unresolved. TWA 34 further shows 12CO(2-1) emission whose velocity structure is indicative of Keplerian rotation. Among the sample of known ~7-10 Myr-old star/disk systems, TWA 34, which lies just ~50 pc from Earth, is the lowest mass star thus far identified as harboring cold molecular gas in an orbiting disk.

  14. Class I methanol masers in low-mass star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalenskii, S. V.; Kurtz, S.; Bergman, P.

    2013-02-01

    Results of observations of Class I methanol masers in regions of low-mass star formation (MMIL) are summarized and analyzed. Four masers were detected at 44, 84, and 95 GHz towards "chemically active" bipolar outflows in the low-mass star-forming regions NGC1333 I4A, NGC 1333 I2A, HH 25, and L1157. Another maser was found at 36 GHz towards a similar outflow in NGC 2023. Thus, all the detected MMILs are associated with chemically active outflows. The brightness temperatures of the strongest 44-GHz maser spots in NGC 1333 I4A, HH 25, and L1157 exceed 2000 K, whereas the brightness temperature in NGC 1333 I2A is only 176 K, although a rotational-diagram analysis shows that this last source is also amaser. The flux densities of the newly detectedmasers are no higher than 18 Jy, and are much lower than those of strong masers in regions of high-mass star formation (MMIH). The MMIL luminosities match the maser luminosity-protostar luminosity relation established earlier for MMIHs. No MMIL variability was detected in 2004-2011. The radial velocities of the newly detected masers are close to the systemic velocities of the associated regions, except for NGC 2023, where the maser radial velocity is lower than the systemic velocity by approximately 3.5 km/s. Thus, the main MMILproperties are similar to those of MMIHs. MMILs are likely to be an extension of the MMIH population toward lower luminosities of both the masers and the associated young stellar objects. The results of VLA observations of MMILs can be explained using a turbulent-cloud model, which predicts that compact maser spots can arise in extended sources because the coherence lengths along some directions randomly appear to be longer than the mean coherence length in a turbulent velocity field. However, one must assume that the column density of methanol towardM1, the strongest maser in L1157, is appreciably higher than the mean column density of the clump B0a where the maser arises. The shape of the maser lines

  15. Identifying low-mass members of nearby star clusters using proper motion & color selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitts, Mark A.

    I present a combined kinematic and photometric search for new, low-mass (m ≤ 0.2 M⊙ ) members of nearby (d < 300 pc) star clusters. Using both proper motion and color criteria, a total of 33 low-mass objects have been newly recognized as members of the Taurus, Praesepe, and Pleiades clusters. In addition, 18 potential cluster members are noted, and 4 members are recovered from previous member searches. Multi-epoch imaging was performed using i-band Megacam observations unique to this study, combined with archival CFH telescope data in the optical I and Z bands. Near-infrared detections were also acquired from the 2MASS survey. The imaging data were processed using the Pan-STARRS IPP data pipeline software in order to provide high-precision relative astrometry, from which proper motions were extracted. Low-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopy from the IRTF telescope gives confirmation on the membership status of the selected candidates. The addition of proper motion criteria to complement the often-used color selection allows for a more effective identification of low-mass cluster members whose broadband spectral features are similar to the bulk of galactic field objects lying along the line-of-sight. Culling the candidates using proper motion also significantly reduces the amount of candidates that require spectroscopic follow-up, even in the NIR color-space with the highest levels of field contamination. Comparison of the search results to a galactic field model by Robin et al. (2003) provides strong evidence that brighter member candidates in Taurus (i < 17) found to be of mid-M spectral types are highly likely to be clusters members rather than field dwarfs. While the addition of new members to the Praesepe and Pleiades clusters are minor compared to the current known population, there is suggestive evidence that the mass function of Taurus is significantly lacking in mid-M dwarfs, and in fact may actually resemble the mass functions of other similarly

  16. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY ON LOW-MASS STARS IN ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Juan Carlos; Ribas, Ignasi; Jordi, Carme; Baraffe, Isabelle; Chabrier, Gilles

    2010-07-20

    In recent years, analyses of eclipsing binary systems have unveiled differences between the observed fundamental properties of low-mass stars and those predicted by stellar structure models. Particularly, radius and effective temperatures computed from models are {approx}5%-10% lower and {approx}3%-5% higher than observed, respectively. These discrepancies have been attributed to different factors, notably the high levels of magnetic activity present on these stars. In this paper, we test the effect of magnetic activity both on models and on the observational analysis of eclipsing binaries using a sample of such systems with accurate fundamental properties. Regarding stellar models, we have found that unrealistically high spot coverages need to be assumed to reproduce the observations. Tests considering metallicity effects and missing opacities on models indicate that these are not able to explain the radius discrepancies observed. With respect to the observations, we have tested the effect of several spot distributions on the light curve analysis. Our results show that spots cause systematic deviations on the stellar radii derived from light curve analysis when mainly distributed over the stellar poles. Assuming the existence of polar spots, overall agreement between models and observations is reached when {approx}35% spot coverage is considered on stellar models. Such spot coverage induces a systematic deviation in the radius determination from the light curve analysis of {approx}3% and is also compatible with the modulations observed on the light curves of these systems. Finally, we have found that the effect of activity or rotation on convective transport in partially radiative stars may also contribute to the explanation of the differences seen in some of the systems with shorter orbital periods.

  17. Interactions Between Forming Stars and Dense Gas in a Small Low Mass Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladd, Edwin F.; Wong, T.; Bourke, T. L.; Thompson, K. L.

    2011-05-01

    We present observations of dense gas and outflow activity in the Cederblad 110 region of the Chamaleleon I Dark Cloud. The region contains eight forming low mass stars in evolutionary stages ranging from Class 0 to Class II/III crowded into a 0.2 pc region with high surface density (Σ_YSO 150 pc^-2). The analysis of our N2H+ (J=1-0) maps indicates the presence of 15 solar masses of dense (n 10^5 cm^-3) gas in this region, much of which is unstable against gravitational collapse. The most unstable material is located near the Class 0 source MMS 1. Smaller column densities of more stable dense gas are found toward the region's Class I sources. Little or no dense gas is colocated with the Class II and III sources in the region. The outflow from the Class I source IRS 4 is interacting with the dense core associated with MMS 1. The molecular component of the outflow appears to be deflected by the densest part of the core, after which it plows through some of the lower column density portions of the core. The working surface at the head of the outflow lobe can be seen in the enhanced velocity dispersion of the dense gas. The Class III source IRS 2 may also be influencing the dense gas in the region. A dust temperature gradient across the core is consistent with warming from the 3.4 Lo source, and a sharp gradient in dense gas column density may be caused by winds from this source. Taken together, our data indicate that this region has been producing several young stars in the recent past, and that sources which began forming first are interacting with the remaining dense gas in the region, thereby influencing current and future star formation activity.

  18. Low-Mass Star Formation and the Initial Mass Function in IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Rieke, G. H.; Lada, C. J.; Lada, E. A.

    1998-11-01

    We have performed deep infrared and optical spectroscopy of virtually the entire stellar population within the 5' × 5' core of IC 348, measuring K (2.2 μm) band and optical spectral types that are in good agreement. We have also identified several sources that may be substellar depending on the choice of temperature scales and evolutionary tracks, with three particularly late-type objects (M7.5-M8) that are likely bonafide brown dwarfs. In conjunction with the theoretical evolutionary tracks of D'Antona & Mazzitelli, the H-R diagram indicates a spread in ages from 0.5 to 10 Myr, with most of the core star formation occurring in the last 3 Myr. Using K-band imaging to provide a completeness correction to the spectroscopic sample, we arrive at an initial mass function (IMF) that matches that of Miller & Scalo from 0.25 to 3 M⊙. The IMF appears to fall slowly from 0.25 M⊙ to the hydrogen burning limit, slightly below the IMF of Miller & Scalo, which is flat in logarithmic units (as compared to slopes of ~1.35 and -2.6 for Salpeter and Scalo). Correction for unresolved binary systems could steepen the slope of the low-mass IMF by about 0.5, which implies a single-star IMF that is roughly flat below 0.25 M⊙. The low-mass IMF in IC 348 is similar to that derived in studies of most other young clusters, implying that the IMF does not vary dramatically among clusters of differing environments; however, the derived IMF is dependent on the evolutionary tracks and the detailed shape of the IMF should be viewed with caution until these models are tested against observations, particularly at low masses (<0.3 M⊙) and young ages (<10 Myr). Hα and Brγ emission strengths are consistent with predictions of magnetospheric accretion models of Muzerolle, Calvet, & Hartmann for accretion rates of 10-9-10-8 M⊙ yr-1. Combining our data with the Hα measurements of Herbig, we find that ~25% of stars within the core of IC 348 and younger than 3 Myr exhibit signatures of disks

  19. Identification and characterization of low mass stars and brown dwarfs using Virtual Observatory tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aberasturi, Miriam

    2015-11-01

    Context: Two thirds of the stars in our galactic neighborhood (d < 10 pc) are M-dwarfs which also constitute the most common stellar objects in the Milky Way. This property, combined with their small stellar masses and radii, increases the likelihood of detecting terrestrial planets through radial velocity and transit techniques, making them very adequate targets for the exoplanet hunting projects. Nevertheless, M dwarfs have associated different observational difficulties. They are cool objects whose emission radiation peaks at infrared wavelengths and, thus, with a low surface brightness in the optical range. Also, the photometric variability as well as the significant chromospheric activity hinder the radial velocity and transit determinations. It is necessary, therefore, to carry out a detailed characterization of M-dwarfs before building a shortlist with the best possible candidates for exoplanet searches. Brown dwarfs (BDs) are self-gravitating objects that do not get enough mass to maintain a sufficiently high temperature in their core for stable hydrogen fusion. They represent the link between low-mass stars and giant planets. Due to their low temperatures, BDs emit significant flux at mid-infrared wavelength which makes this range very adequate to look for this type of objects. The Virtual Observatory (VO) is an international initiative designed to help the astronomical community in the exploitation of the multi-wavelength information that resides in data archives. In the last years the Spanish Virtual Observatory is conducting a number of projects focused on the study of substellar objects taking advantage of Virtual Observatory tools for an easy data access and analysis of large area surveys. This is the framework where this thesis has been carried out. This dissertation addresses three problems in the framework of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, namely, the search for brown dwarf candidates crossmatching catalogues (Chapter 4), the search for nearby

  20. Statistics of Low-Mass Companions to Stars: Implications for Their Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Black, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    One of the more significant results from observational astronomy over the past few years has been the detection, primarily via radial velocity studies, of low-mass companions (LMCs) to solar-like stars. The commonly held interpretation of these is that the majority are "extrasolar planets" whereas the rest are brown dwarfs, the distinction made on the basis of apparent discontinuity in the distribution of M sin i for LMCs as revealed by a histogram. We report here results from statistical analysis of M sin i, as well as of the orbital elements data for available LMCs, to rest the assertion that the LMCs population is heterogeneous. The outcome is mixed. Solely on the basis of the distribution of M sin i a heterogeneous model is preferable. Overall, we find that a definitive statement asserting that LMCs population is heterogeneous is, at present, unjustified. In addition we compare statistics of LMCs with a comparable sample of stellar binaries. We find a remarkable statistical similarity between these two populations. This similarity coupled with marked populational dissimilarity between LMCs and acknowledged planets motivates us to suggest a common origin hypothesis for LMCs and stellar binaries as an alternative to the prevailing interpretation. We discuss merits of such a hypothesis and indicate a possible scenario for the formation of LMCs.

  1. GMRT detections of low-mass young stars at 323 and 608 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainsworth, Rachael E.; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Green, David A.; Coughlan, Colm P.; Ray, Tom P.

    2016-06-01

    We present the results of a pathfinder project conducted with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to investigate protostellar systems at low radio frequencies. The goal of these investigations is to locate the break in the free-free spectrum where the optical depth equals unity in order to constrain physical parameters of these systems, such as the mass of the ionized gas surrounding these young stars. We detect all three target sources, L1551 IRS 5 (Class I), T Tau and DG Tau (Class II), at frequencies 323 and 608 MHz (wavelengths 90 and 50 cm, respectively). These are the first detections of low-mass young stellar objects at such low frequencies. We combine these new GMRT data with archival information to construct the spectral energy distributions for each system and find a continuation of the optically thin free-free spectra extrapolated from higher radio frequencies to 323 MHz for each target. We use these results to place limits on the masses of the ionized gas and average electron densities associated with these young systems on scales of ˜1000 au. Future observations with higher angular resolution at lower frequencies are required to constrain these physical parameters further.

  2. THE Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign DOUBLET AS AN AGE INDICATOR IN LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Simon, Michal; Lepine, Sebastien; Rice, Emily; Fielding, Drummond; Tomasino, Rachael E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de E-mail: erice@amnh.org E-mail: tomas1r@cmich.edu

    2012-05-15

    We investigate the use of the gravity sensitive neutral sodium (Na I) doublet at 8183 Angstrom-Sign and 8195 Angstrom-Sign (Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign doublet) as an age indicator for M dwarfs. We measured the Na doublet equivalent width (EW) in giants, old dwarfs, young dwarfs, and candidate members of the {beta} Pic moving group using medium-resolution spectra. Our Na 8200 A doublet EW analysis shows that the feature is useful as an approximate age indicator in M-type dwarfs with (V - K{sub s}) {>=} 5.0, reliably distinguishing stars older and younger than 100 Myr. A simple derivation of the dependence of the Na EW on temperature and gravity supports the observational results. An analysis of the effects of metallicity shows that this youth indicator is best used on samples with similar metallicity. The age estimation technique presented here becomes useful in a mass regime where traditional youth indicators are increasingly less reliable, is applicable to other alkali lines, and will help identify new low-mass members in other young clusters and associations.

  3. Determination of mass and orbital parameters of a low-mass star HD 213597B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Priyanka; Deshpande, Rohit; Dixit, Vaibhav; Roy, Arpita; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Anandarao, B. G.; Hebb, Leslie; Janardhan, P.

    2014-08-01

    HD 213597 is an eclipsing binary system which was detected by the STEREO spacecraft and was speculated to host a low-mass stellar companion. We used high-resolution spectroscopy with the 10-m Hobby-Eberly Telescope and the 1.2-m telescope in Mount Abu for radial velocity (RV) measurements of this source. We performed aperture photometry for this star on the STEREO archival data and thereby confirm the transit signature. We also did follow-up ground-based photometry with a 10-inch telescope from Mt Abu. The spectroscopic RV semi-amplitude of the primary (33.39 km s-1) indicates that the secondary is an M dwarf making the system a short period F+M eclipsing binary. These RVs along with the inclination derived from our combined photometric analysis (i = 84.9°), enable us to estimate the mass of the secondary as MB ˜ 0.286 M⊙ and radius as RB ˜ 0.344 R⊙ using an estimated mass MA ˜ 1.3 M⊙ and radius RB ˜ 1.97 R⊙ of the primary. Our spectral analysis returned the following parameters: Teff = 6625 ± 121 K, [Fe/H] = -0.095 ± 0.08 and log g = 3.72 ± 0.22 for the primary. When log g is constrained to a value of 3.96, we derive Teff = 6753 ± 52 K and [Fe/H] = -0.025 ± 0.05.

  4. Wide Low-Mass Tertiary Companions of Binary Star Systems as a Test of Star Formation Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Allen, P.

    2012-01-01

    We will present the status of a common proper motion search for wide low-mass stellar and sub-stellar companions to known white dwarf-M dwarf binary systems. I-band observations were made using the 31" NURO telescope at Lowell Observatory. Candidate companions are selected using astrometry from our own data and 2MASS photometry. We have begun to spectroscopically confirm candidates that pass our selection criteria. The ultimate goal of the search is to test star formation theories which predict that close binary systems form by transferring angular momentum to a third companion. To this end, we will model the physical companion population and perform Bayesian statistical analysis to determine the best-fit population model to our data. Here we will present our spectroscopically confirmed companions as well as the preliminary results of our population models and statistical analysis.

  5. Planets Around Low-mass Stars (PALMS). V. Age-dating Low-mass Companions to Members and Interlopers of Young Moving Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Liu, Michael C.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Mann, Andrew W.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Hinkley, Sasha; Crepp, Justin R.; Johnson, John Asher; Howard, Andrew W.; Flagg, Laura; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Aller, Kimberly M.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Best, William M. J.; Kotson, Michael C.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Baranec, Christoph; Riddle, Reed; Law, Nicholas M.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Wahhaj, Zahed; Biller, Beth A.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-06-01

    We present optical and near-infrared adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of 13 ultracool (>M6) companions to late-type stars (K7-M4.5), most of which have recently been identified as candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs; 8-120 Myr) in the literature. Three of these are new companions identified in our AO imaging survey, and two others are confirmed to be comoving with their host stars for the first time. The inferred masses of the companions (˜10-100 MJup) are highly sensitive to the ages of the primary stars; therefore we critically examine the kinematic and spectroscopic properties of each system to distinguish bona fide YMG members from old field interlopers. The new M7 substellar companion 2MASS J02155892-0929121 C (40-60 MJup) shows clear spectroscopic signs of low gravity and, hence, youth. The primary, possibly a member of the ˜40 Myr Tuc-Hor moving group, is visually resolved into three components, making it a young low-mass quadruple system in a compact (≲100 AU) configuration. In addition, Li i λ6708 absorption in the intermediate-gravity M7.5 companion 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B provides unambiguous evidence that it is young (≲200 Myr) and resides below the hydrogen-burning limit. Three new close-separation (<1″) companions (2MASS J06475229-2523304 B, PYC J11519+0731 B, and GJ 4378 Ab) orbit stars previously reported as candidate YMG members, but instead are likely old (≳1 Gyr) tidally locked spectroscopic binaries without convincing kinematic associations with any known moving group. The high rate of false positives in the form of old active stars with YMG-like kinematics underscores the importance of radial velocity and parallax measurements to validate candidate young stars identified via proper motion and activity selection alone. Finally, we spectroscopically confirm the cool temperature and substellar nature of HD 23514 B, a recently discovered M8 benchmark brown dwarf orbiting the dustiest-known member of the

  6. Identification and characterization of low mass stars and brown dwarfs using Virtual Observatory tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aberasturi, Miriam

    2015-11-01

    Context: Two thirds of the stars in our galactic neighborhood (d < 10 pc) are M-dwarfs which also constitute the most common stellar objects in the Milky Way. This property, combined with their small stellar masses and radii, increases the likelihood of detecting terrestrial planets through radial velocity and transit techniques, making them very adequate targets for the exoplanet hunting projects. Nevertheless, M dwarfs have associated different observational difficulties. They are cool objects whose emission radiation peaks at infrared wavelengths and, thus, with a low surface brightness in the optical range. Also, the photometric variability as well as the significant chromospheric activity hinder the radial velocity and transit determinations. It is necessary, therefore, to carry out a detailed characterization of M-dwarfs before building a shortlist with the best possible candidates for exoplanet searches. Brown dwarfs (BDs) are self-gravitating objects that do not get enough mass to maintain a sufficiently high temperature in their core for stable hydrogen fusion. They represent the link between low-mass stars and giant planets. Due to their low temperatures, BDs emit significant flux at mid-infrared wavelength which makes this range very adequate to look for this type of objects. The Virtual Observatory (VO) is an international initiative designed to help the astronomical community in the exploitation of the multi-wavelength information that resides in data archives. In the last years the Spanish Virtual Observatory is conducting a number of projects focused on the study of substellar objects taking advantage of Virtual Observatory tools for an easy data access and analysis of large area surveys. This is the framework where this thesis has been carried out. This dissertation addresses three problems in the framework of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs, namely, the search for brown dwarf candidates crossmatching catalogues (Chapter 4), the search for nearby

  7. Young Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in IC 348

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.

    1999-11-01

    I present new results from a continuing program to identify and characterize the low-mass stellar and substellar populations in the young cluster IC 348 (0.5-10 Myr). Optical spectroscopy has revealed young objects with spectral types as late as M8.25. The intrinsic J-H and H-K colors of these sources are dwarflike, whereas the R-I and I-J colors appear intermediate between the colors of dwarfs and giants. Furthermore, the spectra from 6500 to 9500 Å are reproduced well with averages of standard dwarf and giant spectra, suggesting that such averages should be used in the classification of young late-type sources. An H-R diagram is constructed for the low-mass population in IC 348 (K6-M8). The presumably coeval components of the young quadruple system GG Tau (White et al.) and the locus of stars in IC 348 are used as empirical isochrones to test the theoretical evolutionary models. The calculations of Burrows et al. do not appear to be consistent with the data at these earliest stages of stellar evolution. There is fair agreement between the data and the model isochrones of D'Antona & Mazzitelli, except near the hydrogen-burning limit. The agreement cannot be improved by changing the conversion between spectral types and effective temperatures. On the other hand, for the models of Baraffe et al., an adjustment of the temperature scale to progressively warmer temperatures at later M types, intermediate between dwarfs and giants, brings all components of GG Tau onto the same model isochrone and gives the population of IC 348 a constant age and age spread as a function of mass. When other observational constraints are considered, such as the dynamical masses of GM Aur, DM Tau, and GG Tau A, the models of Baraffe et al. are the most consistent with observations of young systems. With compatible temperature scales, the models of both D'Antona & Mazzitelli and Baraffe et al. suggest that the hydrogen-burning mass limit occurs near M6 at ages of <~10 Myr. Thus, several

  8. Brown dwarfs and low-mass stars in the Pleiades and Praesepe: membership and binarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinfield, D. J.; Dobbie, P. D.; Jameson, R. F.; Steele, I. A.; Jones, H. R. A.; Katsiyannis, A. C.

    2003-07-01

    We present near-infrared J-, H- and K-band photometry and optical spectroscopy of low-mass star and brown dwarf (BD) candidates in the Pleiades and Praesepe open clusters. We flag non-members from their position in K, I-K and J, J-K colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), and J-H, H-K two-colour diagrams. In general, the dust-free NextGen model isochrones of the Lyon Group fit the K, I-K CMDs well for stars with I-K~ 1.5-3.5. However, Pleiades stars with K~= 10.5-13 (MK~= 5-7.5) are rather redder than the isochrones. We also identify this effect amongst αPer sources from the literature, but find no evidence of it for field stars from the literature. The NextGen isochrones fit the J, J-K CMDs of both clusters very well in this photometric range. It is possible that the I-K colour of youthful stars is affected by the presence of magnetic activity. The Lyon Group's Dusty isochrones fit both K, I-K and K, J-K Pleiades CMDs well for I-K~= 4.3-6/J-K~= 1.1-1.4. In between these colour ranges the Pleiades cluster sequence comprises three portions. Starting at the bluer side, there is a gap where very few sources are found (the gap size is ΔI~ 0.5, ΔJ~ΔK~ 0.3), probably resulting from a sharp local drop in the magnitude-mass relation. Then the sequence is quite flat from I-K~ 3.5-4. Finally, the sequence turns over and drops down to join the Dusty isochrone. We also compare model atmosphere colours to the two-colour diagrams of the clusters. The NextGen models are seen to be ~0.1 too blue in H-K and ~0.1 too red in J-H for Teff > 4000 K. However, they are in reasonable agreement with the data at Teff~ 3200 K. For Teff~ 2800-3150 K, the colours of Pleiades and Praesepe sources are significantly different, where Praesepe sources are ~0.1 bluer in J-H and up to ~0.1 redder in H-K. These differences could result from gravity-sensitive molecular opacities. Cooler Praesepe sources then agree well with the dusty models, suggesting that dust is beginning to form in Praesepe sources

  9. THE LUMINOSITY AND MASS FUNCTIONS OF LOW-MASS STARS IN THE GALACTIC DISK. II. THE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Covey, Kevin R.; West, Andrew A.; Reid, I. Neill; Golimowski, David A.

    2010-06-15

    We report on new measurements of the luminosity function (LF) and mass function (MF) of field low-mass dwarfs derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 photometry. The analysis incorporates {approx}15 million low-mass stars (0.1 M{sub sun}< M < 0.8 M{sub sun}), spread over 8400 deg{sup 2}. Stellar distances are estimated using new photometric parallax relations, constructed from ugriz photometry of nearby low-mass stars with trigonometric parallaxes. We use a technique that simultaneously measures Galactic structure and the stellar LF from 7 < M{sub r} < 16. We compare the LF to previous studies and convert to an MF using the mass-luminosity relations of Delfosse et al. The system MF, measured over -1.0< log M/M{sub sun} <-0.1, is well described by a lognormal distribution with M{sub o} = 0.25 M{sub sun}. We stress that our results should not be extrapolated to other mass regimes. Our work generally agrees with prior low-mass stellar MFs and places strong constraints on future theoretical star formation studies.

  10. Overcooled haloes at z ≥ 10: a route to form low-mass first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Joaquin; Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown by Shchekinov and Vasiliev (SV06) that HD molecules can be an important cooling agent in high redshift z ≥ 10 haloes if they undergo mergers under specific conditions so suitable shocks are created. Here, we build upon Prieto et al. who studied in detail the merger-generated shocks, and show that the conditions for HD cooling can be studied by combining these results with a suite of dark matter only simulations. We have performed a number of dark matter only simulations from cosmological initial conditions inside boxes with sizes from 1 to 4 Mpc. We look for haloes with at least two progenitors of which at least one has mass M ≥ Mcr(z), where Mcr(z) is the SV06 critical mass for HD overcooling. We find that the fraction of overcooled haloes with mass between Mcr(z) and 100.2Mcr(z), roughly below the atomic cooling limit, can be as high as ˜0.6 at z ≈ 10 depending on the merger mass ratio. This fraction decreases at higher redshift reaching a value ˜0.2 at z ≈ 15. For higher masses, i.e. above 100.2Mcr(z) up to 100.6Mcr(z), above the atomic cooling limit, this fraction rises to values ≳ 0.8 until z ≈ 12.5. As a consequence, a non-negligible fraction of high redshift z ≳ 10 mini-haloes can drop their gas temperature to the cosmic microwave background temperature limit allowing the formation of low-mass stars in primordial environments.

  11. Direct measurements of the fundamental properties of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, Trent J.

    2010-10-01

    [approximate]2 at a given mass, which means that model-based substellar mass determinations (e.g., for directly imaged extrasolar planets and the low-mass initial mass function) may be systematically overestimating the masses. (3) We have employed our large sample of binary orbits to carry out a novel test of the earliest evolutionary stages, by using the distribution of orbital eccentricities to distinguish between competing models of brown dwarf formation.

  12. Magnetic inhibition of convection and the fundamental properties of low-mass stars. I. Stars with a radiative core

    SciTech Connect

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian E-mail: brian.chaboyer@dartmouth.edu

    2013-12-20

    Magnetic fields are hypothesized to inflate the radii of low-mass stars—defined as less massive than 0.8 M {sub ☉}—in detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs). We investigate this hypothesis using the recently introduced magnetic Dartmouth stellar evolution code. In particular, we focus on stars thought to have a radiative core and convective outer envelope by studying in detail three individual DEBs: UV Psc, YY Gem, and CU Cnc. Our results suggest that the stabilization of thermal convection by a magnetic field is a plausible explanation for the observed model-radius discrepancies. However, surface magnetic field strengths required by the models are significantly stronger than those estimated from observed coronal X-ray emission. Agreement between model predicted surface magnetic field strengths and those inferred from X-ray observations can be found by assuming that the magnetic field sources its energy from convection. This approach makes the transport of heat by convection less efficient and is akin to reduced convective mixing length methods used in other studies. Predictions for the metallicity and magnetic field strengths of the aforementioned systems are reported. We also develop an expression relating a reduction in the convective mixing length to a magnetic field strength in units of the equipartition value. Our results are compared with those from previous investigations to incorporate magnetic fields to explain the low-mass DEB radius inflation. Finally, we explore how the effects of magnetic fields might affect mass determinations using asteroseismic data and the implication of magnetic fields on exoplanet studies.

  13. Magnetic Inhibition of Convection and the Fundamental Properties of Low-mass Stars. I. Stars with a Radiative Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic fields are hypothesized to inflate the radii of low-mass stars—defined as less massive than 0.8 M ⊙—in detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs). We investigate this hypothesis using the recently introduced magnetic Dartmouth stellar evolution code. In particular, we focus on stars thought to have a radiative core and convective outer envelope by studying in detail three individual DEBs: UV Psc, YY Gem, and CU Cnc. Our results suggest that the stabilization of thermal convection by a magnetic field is a plausible explanation for the observed model-radius discrepancies. However, surface magnetic field strengths required by the models are significantly stronger than those estimated from observed coronal X-ray emission. Agreement between model predicted surface magnetic field strengths and those inferred from X-ray observations can be found by assuming that the magnetic field sources its energy from convection. This approach makes the transport of heat by convection less efficient and is akin to reduced convective mixing length methods used in other studies. Predictions for the metallicity and magnetic field strengths of the aforementioned systems are reported. We also develop an expression relating a reduction in the convective mixing length to a magnetic field strength in units of the equipartition value. Our results are compared with those from previous investigations to incorporate magnetic fields to explain the low-mass DEB radius inflation. Finally, we explore how the effects of magnetic fields might affect mass determinations using asteroseismic data and the implication of magnetic fields on exoplanet studies.

  14. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). II. A LOW-MASS COMPANION TO THE YOUNG M DWARF GJ 3629 SEPARATED BY 0.''2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-09-01

    We present the discovery of a 0.''2 companion to the young M dwarf GJ 3629 as part of our high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets around low-mass stars with the Keck-II and Subaru telescopes. Two epochs of imaging confirm that the pair is comoving and reveal signs of orbital motion. The primary exhibits saturated X-ray emission which, together with its UV photometry from GALEX, points to an age younger than {approx}300 Myr. At these ages the companion lies below the hydrogen burning limit with a model-dependent mass of 46 {+-} 16 M{sub Jup} based on the system's photometric distance of 22 {+-} 3 pc. Resolved YJHK photometry of the pair indicates a spectral type of M7 {+-} 2 for GJ 3629 B. With a projected separation of 4.4 {+-} 0.6 AU and an estimated orbital period of 21 {+-} 5 yr, GJ 3629 AB is likely to yield a dynamical mass in the next several years, making it one of only a handful of brown dwarfs to have a measured mass and an age constrained from the stellar primary.

  15. Herschel/PACS view of disks around low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in the TW Hydrae association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Gong, Munan; Allers, Katelyn N.; Brown, Joanna M.; Kraus, Adam L.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted Herschel/PACS observations of five very low-mass stars or brown dwarfs located in the TW Hya association with the goal of characterizing the properties of disks in the low stellar mass regime. We detected all five targets at 70 μm and 100 μm and three targets at 160 μm. Our observations, combined with previous photometry from 2MASS, WISE, and SCUBA-2, enabled us to construct spectral energy distributions (SEDs) with extended wavelength coverage. Using sophisticated radiative transfer models, we analyzed the observed SEDs of the five detected objects with a hybrid fitting strategy that combines the model grids and the simulated annealing algorithm and evaluated the constraints on the disk properties via the Bayesian inference method. The modeling suggests that disks around low-mass stars and brown dwarfs are generally flatter than their higher mass counterparts, but the range of disk mass extends to well below the value found in T Tauri stars, and the disk scale heights are comparable in both groups. The inferred disk properties (i.e., disk mass, flaring, and scale height) in the low stellar mass regime are consistent with previous findings from large samples of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars. We discuss the dependence of disk properties on their host stellar parameters and find a significant correlation between the Herschel far-IR fluxes and the stellar effective temperatures, probably indicating that the scaling between the stellar and disk masses (i.e., Mdisk ∝ M⋆) observed mainly in low-mass stars may extend down to the brown dwarf regime. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. PLANETS AROUND LOW-MASS STARS (PALMS). IV. THE OUTER ARCHITECTURE OF M DWARF PLANETARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets and brown dwarfs (≳1 M {sub Jup}) around 122 newly identified nearby (≲40 pc) young M dwarfs. Half of our targets are younger than 135 Myr and 90% are younger than the Hyades (620 Myr). After removing 44 close stellar binaries (implying a stellar companion fraction of >35.4% ± 4.3% within 100 AU), 27 of which are new or spatially resolved for the first time, our remaining sample of 78 single M dwarfs makes this the largest imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars (0.1-0.6 M {sub ☉}) to date. Our H- and K-band coronagraphic observations with Keck/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO achieve typical contrasts of 12-14 mag and 9-13 mag at 1'', respectively, which correspond to limiting planet masses of 0.5-10 M {sub Jup} at 5-33 AU for 85% of our sample. We discovered four young brown dwarf companions: 1RXS J235133.3+312720 B (32 ± 6 M {sub Jup}; L0{sub −1}{sup +2}; 120 ± 20 AU), GJ 3629 B (64{sub −23}{sup +30} M {sub Jup}; M7.5 ± 0.5; 6.5 ± 0.5 AU), 1RXS J034231.8+121622 B (35 ± 8 M {sub Jup}; L0 ± 1; 19.8 ± 0.9 AU), and 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B (43 ± 9 M {sub Jup}; M8.0 ± 0.5; 190 ± 20 AU). Over 150 candidate planets were identified; we obtained follow-up imaging for 56% of these but all are consistent with background stars. Our null detection of planets enables strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of long-period giant planets around single M dwarfs. We infer an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 10.3% and 16.0% for 1-13 M {sub Jup} planets between 10-100 AU for hot-start and cold-start (Fortney) evolutionary models, respectively. Fewer than 6.0% (9.9%) of M dwarfs harbor massive gas giants in the 5-13 M {sub Jup} range like those orbiting HR 8799 and β Pictoris between 10-100 AU for a hot-start (cold-start) formation scenario. The frequency of brown dwarf (13-75 M {sub Jup}) companions to single

  17. The Initial Mass Function of Low-Mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs in Young Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Rieke, G. H.; Young, Erick T.; Cotera, Angela S.; Chen, H.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Schneider, Glenn; Thompson, Rodger I.

    2000-09-01

    We have obtained images of the Trapezium Cluster (140''×140'' 0.3 pc×0.3 pc) with the Hubble Space Telescope Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Combining these data with new ground-based K-band spectra (R=800) and existing spectral types and photometry, we have constructed an H-R diagram and used it and other arguments to infer masses and ages. To allow comparison with the results of our previous studies of IC 348 and ρ Oph, we first use the models of D'Antona & Mazzitelli. With these models, the distributions of ages of comparable samples of stars in the Trapezium, ρ Oph, and IC 348 indicate median ages of ~0.4 Myr for the first two regions and ~1-2 Myr for the latter. The low-mass initial mass functions (IMFs) in these sites of clustered star formation are similar over a wide range of stellar densities (ρ Oph, n=0.2-1×103 pc-3 IC 348, n=1×103 pc-3 Trapezium, n=1-5×104 pc-3) and other environmental conditions (e.g., presence or absence of OB stars). With current data, we cannot rule out modest variations in the substellar mass functions among these clusters. We then make the best estimate of the true form of the IMF in the Trapezium by using the evolutionary models of Baraffe et al. and an empirically adjusted temperature scale and compare this mass function to recent results for the Pleiades and the field. All of these data are consistent with an IMF that is flat or rises slowly from the substellar regime to about 0.6 Msolar and then rolls over into a power law that continues from about 1 Msolar to higher masses with a slope similar to or somewhat larger than the Salpeter value of 1.35. For the Trapezium, this behavior holds from our completeness limit of ~0.02 Msolar and probably, after a modest completeness correction, even from 0.01-0.02 Msolar. These data include ~50 likely brown dwarfs. We test the predictions of theories of the IMF against (1) the shape of the IMF, which is not log-normal, in clusters and the field, (2) the

  18. Star Formation in Low Mass Magnetized Cores: The Formation of Disks and Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffin, Dennis F.

    2012-10-01

    Protostellar discs are generally thought to drive molecular outflows and jets observed in star forming regions, but there has been some debate as to how they form. The details of the driving and collimation of outflows help determine how much mass is cleared out and how much energy is fed back into the surroundings. Recently it has been argued that the magnetic brake is so strong that early protostellar disks cannot form. We have performed 3D ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of collapsing Bonnor-Ebert spheres, employing sink particles within an AMR grid and using a cooling function to model radiative cooling of the gas. This allows us to follow the formation and early evolution of the accretion disc (2-8)×10^4 years further into the Class 0 phase of its evolution. We form a rotationally dominated disc with a radius of 100 AU embedded inside a transient, unstable, flattened, rotating structure extending out to 2000 AU. The inner disc becomes unstable to a warping instability due to the magnetic structure of the outflow, warping 30 deg with respect to the rotation-axis by the end of the simulation. The disc is unstable to a Parker instability and sheds magnetic loops, degrading the orientation of the mean threading field. This reduces and locally reverses the magnetic braking torque of the large scale field back upon the disc. The reduction of magnetic braking allows a nearly Keplerian disc to form and may be the key way in which low mass stellar systems produce rotationally dominated discs. We discuss the relevance of our disc misalignment concerning the formation of mis-aligned hot Jupiters. Protostellar outflows are implicated in clearing mass from collapsing cores, and limiting the final mass of newly formed stars. The details of the driving and collimation of outflows help determine how much mass is cleared out and how much energy is fed back into the surroundings. The simulations generate outflows which are precessing, kinked, contain internal

  19. Planets around Low-mass Stars (PALMS). IV. The Outer Architecture of M Dwarf Planetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a high-contrast adaptive optics imaging search for giant planets and brown dwarfs (gsim1 M Jup) around 122 newly identified nearby (lsim40 pc) young M dwarfs. Half of our targets are younger than 135 Myr and 90% are younger than the Hyades (620 Myr). After removing 44 close stellar binaries (implying a stellar companion fraction of >35.4% ± 4.3% within 100 AU), 27 of which are new or spatially resolved for the first time, our remaining sample of 78 single M dwarfs makes this the largest imaging search for planets around young low-mass stars (0.1-0.6 M ⊙) to date. Our H- and K-band coronagraphic observations with Keck/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO achieve typical contrasts of 12-14 mag and 9-13 mag at 1'', respectively, which correspond to limiting planet masses of 0.5-10 M Jup at 5-33 AU for 85% of our sample. We discovered four young brown dwarf companions: 1RXS J235133.3+312720 B (32 ± 6 M Jup; L0+2-1; 120 ± 20 AU), GJ 3629 B (64+30-23 M Jup; M7.5 ± 0.5; 6.5 ± 0.5 AU), 1RXS J034231.8+121622 B (35 ± 8 M Jup; L0 ± 1; 19.8 ± 0.9 AU), and 2MASS J15594729+4403595 B (43 ± 9 M Jup; M8.0 ± 0.5; 190 ± 20 AU). Over 150 candidate planets were identified; we obtained follow-up imaging for 56% of these but all are consistent with background stars. Our null detection of planets enables strong statistical constraints on the occurrence rate of long-period giant planets around single M dwarfs. We infer an upper limit (at the 95% confidence level) of 10.3% and 16.0% for 1-13 M Jup planets between 10-100 AU for hot-start and cold-start (Fortney) evolutionary models, respectively. Fewer than 6.0% (9.9%) of M dwarfs harbor massive gas giants in the 5-13 M Jup range like those orbiting HR 8799 and β Pictoris between 10-100 AU for a hot-start (cold-start) formation scenario. The frequency of brown dwarf (13-75 M Jup) companions to single M dwarfs between 10-100 AU is 2.8+2.4-1.5%. Altogether we find that giant planets, especially massive ones, are rare

  20. Formation and detection of Earth mass planets around low mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Ryan; Laughlin, Gregory

    2009-07-01

    We investigate an in situ formation scenario for Earth-mass terrestrial planets in short-period, potentially habitable orbits around low-mass stars (M∗ < 0.3M⊙). We then investigate the feasibility of detecting these Earth-sized planets. We find that such objects can feasibly be detected by a ground-based transit survey if their formation frequency is high and if correlated noise can be controlled to sub-milli-magnitude levels. Our simulations of terrestrial planet formation follow the growth of planetary embryos in an annular region spanning 0.036 AU ⩽ a ⩽ 0.4 AU around a fiducial M7 (0.12M⊙) primary. Initial distributions of planetary embryos are calculated using the semi-analytic evolutionary model outlined by Chambers [Chambers, J., 2006. Icarus 180, 496-513]. This model specifies how planetary embryos grow to the stage where the largest embryo masses lie in the 1024 g ⩽Membryo ⩽ 5 ×1026 g range (corresponding to the close of the so-called oligarchic growth phase). We then model the final phases of terrestrial planet assembly by allowing the embryos to interact with one another via a full N-body integration using the Mercury code. The final planetary system configurations produced in the simulations generally consist of 3-5 planets with masses of order 0.1- 1.0M⊕ in or near the habitable zone of the star. We explore a range of disk masses (0.2M⊕ to 3.3M⊕) to illuminate the role disk mass plays in our results. With a high occurrence fraction or fortunate alignments, transits by the planet formed in our simulations could be marginally detected with modest telescopes of aperture 1 m or smaller around the nearest M-dwarf stars. To obtain a concrete estimate of the detectability of the planets arising in our simulations, we present a detailed Monte-Carlo transit detection simulation incorporating sky observability, local weather, a target list of around 200 nearby M-dwarfs, and a comprehensive photometric noise model. We adopt a baseline 1

  1. Identifying the Young Low-mass Stars within 25 pc. I. Spectroscopic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya; Liu, Michael C.; Reid, I. Neill

    2009-07-01

    We have completed a high-resolution (R ≈ 60,000) optical spectroscopic survey of 185 nearby M dwarfs identified using ROSAT data to select active, young objects with fractional X-ray luminosities comparable to or greater than Pleiades members. Our targets are drawn from the NStars 20 pc census and the Moving-M sample with distances determined from parallaxes or spectrophotometric relations. We limited our sample to 25 pc from the Sun, prior to correcting for pre-main-sequence overluminosity or binarity. Nearly half of the resulting M dwarfs are not present in the Gliese catalog and have no previously published spectral types. We identified 30 spectroscopic binaries (SBs) from the sample, which have strong X-ray emission due to tidal spin-up rather than youth. This is equivalent to a 16% SB fraction, with at most a handful of undiscovered SBs. We estimate upper limits on the age of the remaining M dwarfs using spectroscopic youth indicators such as surface gravity-sensitive indices (CaH and K I). We find that for a sample of field stars with no metallicity measurements, a single CaH gravity index may not be sufficient, as higher metallicities mimic lower gravity. This is demonstrated in a subsample of metal-rich radial velocity (RV) standards, which appear to have low surface gravity as measured by the CaH index, yet show no other evidence of youth. We also use additional youth diagnostics such as lithium absorption and strong Hα emission to set more stringent age limits. Eleven M dwarfs with no Hα emission or absorption are likely old (>400 Myr) and were caught during an X-ray flare. We estimate that our final sample of the 144 youngest and nearest low-mass objects in the field is less than 300 Myr old, with 30% of them being younger than 150 Myr and four very young (lap10 Myr), representing a generally untapped and well-characterized resource of M dwarfs for intensive planet and disk searches. Based on observations collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory and

  2. UM 625 REVISITED: MULTIWAVELENGTH STUDY OF A SEYFERT 1 GALAXY WITH A LOW-MASS BLACK HOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ning; Dong Xiaobo; Yang Huan; Wang Junxian; Ho, Luis C. E-mail: xbdong@ustc.edu.cn

    2013-06-10

    UM 625, previously identified as a narrow-line active galactic nucleus (AGN), actually exhibits broad H{alpha} and H{beta} lines whose width and luminosity indicate a low black hole (BH) mass of 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }. We present a detailed multiwavelength study of the nuclear and host galaxy properties of UM 625. Analysis of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations suggests that this system contains a heavily absorbed and intrinsically X-ray weak ({alpha}{sub ox} = -1.72) nucleus. Although not strong enough to qualify as radio loud, UM 625 does belong to a minority of low-mass AGNs detected in the radio. The broadband spectral energy distribution constrains the bolometric luminosity to L{sub bol} Almost-Equal-To (0.5-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} and L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} Almost-Equal-To 0.02-0.15. A comprehensive analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Hubble Space Telescope images shows that UM 625 is a nearly face-on S0 galaxy with a prominent, relatively blue pseudobulge (Sersic index n = 1.60) that accounts for {approx}60% of the total light in the R band. The extended disk is featureless, but the central {approx}150-400 pc contains a conspicuous semi-ring of bright, blue star-forming knots, whose integrated ultraviolet luminosity suggests a star formation rate of {approx}0.3 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. The mass of the central BH roughly agrees with the value predicted from its bulge velocity dispersion but is significantly lower than that expected from its bulge luminosity.

  3. The variation of the tidal quality factor of convective envelopes of rotating low-mass stars along their evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.

    2015-12-01

    More than 1500 exoplanets have been discovered around a large diversity of host stars (from M- to A-type stars). Tidal dissipation in their convective envelope is a key actor that shapes the orbital architecture of short-period systems and that still remains unknown. Using a simplified two-layer assumption and grids of stellar models, we compute analytically an equivalent modified tidal quality factor, which is proportional to the inverse of the frequency-averaged dissipation due to the viscous friction applied by turbulent convection on tidal waves. It leads the conversion of their kinetic energy into heat and tidal evolution of orbits and spin. During their Pre-Main-Sequence, all low-mass stars have a decrease of the equivalent modified tidal quality factor for a fixed angular velocity of their convective envelope. Next, it evolves on the Main Sequence to an asymptotic value that is minimum for 0.6M_⊙ K-type stars and that increases by several orders of magnitude with increasing stellar mass. Finally, the rotational evolution of low-mass stars strengthens tidal dissipation during the Pre-Main-Sequence.

  4. Metallicities of Low Mass Inefficient Star Forming Dwarfs in S4G: Testing the Closed Box Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Myles; Stirewalt, Sabrina; Sheth, Kartik; de Swardt, Bonita; Walter, Donald

    2015-03-01

    Low mass dwarf galaxies are the most numerous extragalactic population in the Local Universe. Many gas-rich dwarfs appear to be forming stars less efficiently than normal, massive disk galaxies and are therefore important laboratories for the study of star formation. Here we present new observations using the Palomar Double Spectrograph for 19 dwarf galaxies from the S4G Survey with the lowest stellar to HI mass ratios. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate a wide range of metallicities which vary by as much as 0.5 dex in a single galaxy in different star forming regions. Such a dispersion in metallicities favors an open box model and the results suggest a varied star formation history, possibly induced via minor mergers and accretion. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory(NRAO), National Science Foundation(NSF), and the National Astronomy Consortium (NAC) Cville Cohort. Additional support was provided by NSF Awards AST-0750814 and AST-1358913 to South Carolina State University.

  5. Photometric monitoring of open clusters: Low-mass eclipsing binary stars and the stellar mass-luminosity-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, Leslie

    2006-06-01

    This thesis describes a photometric monitoring survey of Galactic star clusters designed to detect low-mass eclipsing binary star systems through variations in their relative lightcurves. The aim is to use cluster eclipsing binaries to measure the masses and radii of M-dwarf stars with ages and metallicities known from studies of brighter cluster stars. This information will provide an improved calibration of the mass-luminosity-radius relation for low-mass stars, be used to test stellar structure and evolution models, and help quantify the contribution of low-mass stars to the global mass census in the Galaxy. The survey is designed to detect eclipse events in stars of ~0.3 M_sun and consists of 600 Gbytes of raw imaging data on six open clusters with a range of ages (~ 0.15 - 4 Gyr) and metallicites (~ -0.2 - 0.0 dex). The clusters NGC 1647 and M 35 contain excellent candidate systems showing eclipse like variations in brightness and photometry consistent with cluster membership. The analysis of these clusters and the eclipsing M-dwarf stars detected in them are presented. Analysis of the candidate system in NGC 1647 confirms the object as a newly discovered M-dwarf eclipsing binary in the cluster with compenent masses of M 1 = 0.47 ± 0.05[Special characters omitted.] and M 2 = 0.19 ± 0.02[Special characters omitted.] . The small mass ratio ( M 2 / M 1 ) and low secondary mass of this object provide an unprecedented opportunity to test stellar models. We find that no stellar evolution models are consistent with all the properties of both M-dwarf stars in the eclipsing binary. The candidate in M 35 has been confirmed as an M-dwarf eclipsing binary, and the masses of the individual components are estimated to be M 1 ~ 0.25 M_sun and M 2 ~ 0.15 M_sun . Additional high resolution spectroscopic and photometric observations, for which we have applied and been awarded time, are necessary to accurately derive the intrinsic properties of the individual stellar

  6. The Formation and Evolution of Young Low-mass Stars within Halos with High Concentration of Dark Matter Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanellas, Jordi; Lopes, IlíDio

    2009-11-01

    The formation and evolution of low-mass stars within dense halos of dark matter (DM) leads to evolution scenarios quite different from the classical stellar evolution. As a result of our detailed numerical work, we describe these new scenarios for a range of DM densities on the host halo, for a range of scattering cross sections of the DM particles considered, and for stellar masses from 0.7 to 3 M sun. For the first time, we also computed the evolution of young low-mass stars in their Hayashi track in the pre-main-sequence phase and found that, for high DM densities, these stars stop their gravitational collapse before reaching the main sequence, in agreement with similar studies on first stars. Such stars remain indefinitely in an equilibrium state with lower effective temperatures (|ΔT eff|>103 K for a star of one solar mass), the annihilation of captured DM particles in their core being the only source of energy. In the case of lower DM densities, these protostars continue their collapse and progress through the main-sequence burning hydrogen at a lower rate. A star of 1 M sun will spend a time period greater than the current age of the universe consuming all the hydrogen in its core if it evolves in a halo with DM density ρχ = 109 GeV cm-3. We also show the strong dependence of the effective temperature and luminosity of these stars on the characteristics of the DM particles and how this can be used as an alternative method for DM research.

  7. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Temporally- and Spectrally-Resolved Irradiance from Low-mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Youngblood, Allison; Linsky, Jeffrey; MUSCLES Treasury Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to near-UV; 5 - 3200 Ang) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential "biomarker" gases. It has been shown that the atmospheric signatures of potentially habitable planets around low-mass stars may be significantly different from planets orbiting Sun-like stars owing to the different UV spectral energy distribution. I will present results from a panchromatic survey (Hubble/Chandra/XMM/optical) of M and K dwarf exoplanet hosts, the MUSCLES Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems). We reconstruct the Lyman-alpha and extreme-UV (100-900 Ang) radiation lost to interstellar attenuation and create 5 Angstrom to 5 micron stellar irradiance spectra; these data will be publically available as a High-Level Science Product on MAST. We find that all low-mass exoplanet host stars exhibit significant chromospheric/transition region/coronal emission -- no "UV inactive" M dwarfs are observed. The F(far-UV)/F(near-UV) flux ratio, a driver for possible abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, increases by ~3 orders of magnitude as the habitable zone moves inward from 1 to 0.1 AU, while the incident far-UV (912 - 1700 Ang) and XUV (5 - 900 Ang) radiation field strengths decrease by factors of a few across this range. Far-UV flare activity is common in 'optically inactive' M dwarfs; statistics from the entire sample indicate that large UV flares (E(300 - 1700 Ang) >= 10^31 erg) occur several times per day on typical M dwarf exoplanet hosts.

  8. The Connection Between Rotation, Circumstellar Disks, and Accretion Among Low-Mass Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, Keivan Guadalupe

    2000-07-01

    Circumstellar disks have come to be seen as dominant players in the rotational evolution of low-mass stars during the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase. In fact, most rotational evolution models today rely chiefly on magnetic disk-locking to successfully connect the rotational properties of T Tauri stars (TTS) to those of zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) stars. The principal aim of this dissertation is to summarize recent observations (Stassun et al. 1999; Stassun et al. 2000) that challenge this picture of disk-regulated PMS rotational evolution. We present photometrically derived rotation periods for 254 stars in an area 40 × 80 arcmin centered on the Orion Nebula. We show that these stars are likely members of the young (~106 yr) Orion OBIc/d association. The rotation period distribution we determine, sensitive to periods 0.1 < Prot < 8 days, shows a sharp cutoff for periods Prot < 0.5 days, corresponding to breakup velocity for these stars; a population of stars rotating near breakup is already present at 1 Myr. Above 0.5 days the distribution is consistent with a uniform distribution; we do not find evidence for a ``gap" of periods at 4--5 days. We find signatures of active accretion among stars at all periods; active accretion does not occur preferentially among slow rotators in our sample. We find no correlation between rotation period and the presence of near-infrared signatures of circumstellar disks. We do not find compelling agreement between our observations and the requirements of the disk-locking hypothesis. We use near-IR photometry to argue that inner cavities in TTS disks are typically much smaller than allowed by theory for the regulation of stellar angular momentum. We further use mid-IR (primarily 10 microns) photometry to confirm that TTS lacking near-IR excesses do not harbor disks with large inner truncation radii. With a few exceptions, stars in our sample lacking near-IR excesses do not possess disks, truncated or otherwise. Evidently, many young

  9. A project to unveil the population of Low-Mass Star-Forming Galaxies of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, Jesus; Rodriguez-Muñoz, Lucía; Tresse, Laurence; Pacifici, Camilla; Charlot, Stéphane; Gil de Paz, Armando; Gomez-Guijarro, Carlos; Villar, Víctor; Barro, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies play a key role in galaxy formation and evolution: (1) hierarchical models predict that low-mass systems merged to form massive galaxies (building block paradigm; Dekel & Silk 1986); (2) dwarf systems might have been responsible for the reionization of the Universe (Wyithe & Loeb 2006); (3) theoretical models are particularly sensitive to the density of low-mass systems at diferent redshifts (Mamon et al. 2011), being one of the key science cases for the future E-ELT (Evans et al. 2013). While the history of low-mass dark matter halos is relatively well understood, the formation history of dwarf galaxies is still poorly reproduced by the models due to the distinct evolution of baryonic and dark matter.We present constraints on the star formation histories (SFHs) of a sample of low-mass Star-Forming Galaxies (LMSFGs; 7.3 < log M∗/Mo < 8.0, at 0.3 < zspec < 0.9) selected by photometric stellar mass and apparent magnitude. The SFHs were obtained through the analysis of their spectral energy distributions using a novel approach (Pacifici et al. 2012) that (1) consistently combines photometric (HST and ground-based multi-broadband) and spectroscopic (equivalent widths of emission lines from VLT and GTC spectroscopy) data, and (2) uses physically motivated SFHs with non-uniform variations of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time.The median SFH of our LMSFGs appears to form 90% of the median stellar mass inferred for the sample in the ˜0.5-1.8 Gyr immediately preceding the observation. These results suggest a recent stellar mass assembly for dwarf SFGs, consistent with the cosmological downsizing trends. We find similar median SFH timescales for a slightly more massive secondary sample 8.0 < log M∗/Mo < 9.1).This is a pilot study for future surveys on dwarf galaxies at high redshift.

  10. The Specific Star Formation Rate and Stellar Mass Fraction of Low-mass Central Galaxies in Cosmological Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Reese, V.; Colín, P.; González-Samaniego, A.; Valenzuela, O.; Firmani, C.; Velázquez, H.; Ceverino, D.

    2011-08-01

    By means of cosmological N-body + hydrodynamics simulations of galaxies in the context of the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) scenario we explore the specific star formation rates (SSFR = SFR/Ms , Ms is the stellar mass) and stellar mass fractions (Fs ≡ Ms /Mh , Mh is the halo mass) for sub-M* field galaxies at different redshifts (0 <~ z <~ 1.5). Distinct low-mass halos (2.5 <~ Mh /1010 M sun <~ 50 at z = 0) were selected for the high-resolution re-simulations. The Hydrodynamics Adaptive Refinement Tree (ART) code was used and some variations of the sub-grid parameters were explored. Most simulated galaxies, specially those with the highest resolutions, have significant disk components and their structural and dynamical properties are in reasonable agreement with observations of sub-M* field galaxies. However, the SSFRs are 5-10 times smaller than the averages of several (compiled and homogenized here) observational determinations for field blue/star-forming galaxies at z < 0.3 (at low masses, most observed field galaxies are actually blue/star forming). This inconsistency seems to remain even at z ~ 1-1.5, although it is less drastic. The Fs of simulated galaxies increases with Mh as semi-empirical inferences show. However, the values of Fs at z ≈ 0 are ~5-10 times larger in the simulations than in the inferences; these differences increases probably to larger factors at z ~ 1-1.5. The inconsistencies reported here imply that simulated low-mass galaxies (0.2 <~ Ms /109 M sun <~ 30 at z = 0) assembled their stellar masses much earlier than observations suggest. Our results confirm the predictions found by means of ΛCDM-based models of disk galaxy formation and evolution for isolated low-mass galaxies, and highlight that our understanding and implementation of astrophysics into simulations and models are still lacking vital ingredients.

  11. MINERVA-Red: A Census of Planets Orbiting the Nearest Low-mass Stars to the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Cullen; Johnson, John; Plavchan, Peter; Sliski, David; Wittenmyer, Robert A.; Eastman, Jason D.; Barnes, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recent results from Kepler and ground-based exoplanet surveys suggest that low-mass stars host numerous small planets. Since low-mass stars are intrinsically faint at optical wavelengths, obtaining the Doppler precision necessary to detect these companions remains a challenge for existing instruments. We describe MINERVA-Red, a project to use a dedicated, robotic, near-infrared optimized 0.7 meter telescope and a specialized Doppler spectrometer to carry out an intensive, multi-year campaign designed to reveal the planetary systems orbiting some of the closest stars to the Sun. The MINERVA-Red cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph is optimized for the 'deep red', between 800 nm and 900 nm, where these stars are relatively bright. The instrument is very compact and designed for the ultimate in Doppler precision by using single-mode fiber input. We describe the spectrometer and the status of the MINERVA-Red project, which is expected to begin routine operations at Whipple Observatory on Mt Hopkins, Arizona, in 2015.

  12. DISCOVERY OF A LOW-MASS COMPANION TO A METAL-RICH F STAR WITH THE MARVELS PILOT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, Scott W.; Ge Jian; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Lee, Brian; Cuong Nguyen, Duy; Morehead, Robert C.; Wan Xiaoke; Zhao Bo; Liu Jian; Guo Pengcheng; Kane, Stephen R.; Eastman, Jason D.; Siverd, Robert J.; Scott Gaudi, B.; Niedzielski, Andrzej; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Stassun, Keivan G.; Gary, Bruce; Wolszczan, Alex; Barnes, Rory

    2010-08-01

    We report the discovery of a low-mass companion orbiting the metal-rich, main sequence F star TYC 2949-00557-1 during the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) pilot project. The host star has an effective temperature T{sub eff} = 6135 {+-} 40 K, logg = 4.4 {+-} 0.1, and [Fe/H] = 0.32 {+-} 0.01, indicating a mass of M = 1.25 {+-} 0.09 M{sub sun} and R = 1.15 {+-} 0.15 R{sub sun}. The companion has an orbital period of 5.69449 {+-} 0.00023 days and straddles the hydrogen burning limit with a minimum mass of 64 M{sub J} , and thus may be an example of the rare class of brown dwarfs orbiting at distances comparable to those of 'Hot Jupiters'. We present relative photometry that demonstrates that the host star is photometrically stable at the few millimagnitude level on time scales of hours to years, and rules out transits for a companion of radius {approx}>0.8 R{sub J} at the 95% confidence level. Tidal analysis of the system suggests that the star and companion are likely in a double synchronous state where both rotational and orbital synchronization have been achieved. This is the first low-mass companion detected with a multi-object, dispersed, fixed-delay interferometer.

  13. Theoretical models of low-mass, pre-main sequence rotating stars. I. The effects on lithium depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, L. T. S.; D'Antona, F.; Mazzitelli, I.

    1999-01-01

    Rotating stellar models of 1.2 {{Msun}} down to 0.6 {{Msun}} have been computed to investigate the effects of rotation on the lithium depletion of low-mass, pre-main sequence stars. The models were generated under three different rotation laws (rigid body rotation, local conservation of angular momentum over the whole star, and local conservation of angular momentum in radiative zones and rigid body rotation in convective ones), no angular momentum loss and redistribution, and under two prescriptions for convection, namely the mixing length theory [MLT] and the turbulent convection introduced by Canuto & Mazzitelli (1991) [CM]. The general features of the rotating models are compatible with previous results by other authors. As for the lithium depletion, our results show that rotation decreases lithium depletion while the star is fully convective but increases it as soon as the star develops a radiative core, a result which is expected from the theory since rotating stars behave as non-rotating stars of lower mass and so must experience greater lithium depletion. The results hold for all three rotation laws assumed, but are specifically presented here for the case of rigid body rotation. This result shows that other physical mechanisms must play a role on the lithium depletion in the pre-main sequence, in order to explain the observational data on low-mass, pre-main sequence stars such as those from the Pleiades (García López et al. \\cite{gar:94}) and the α-Persei clusters (Balachandran et al. \\cite{bal:88}, \\cite{bal:96}).

  14. Rotation of low-mass stars - A new probe of stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Demarque, P.

    1990-01-01

    Models of stars of various masses and rotational parameters were developed and compared with observations of stars in open clusters of various ages in order to analyze the evolution of rotating stars from the early premain sequence to an age of 1.7 x 10 to the 9th yrs. It is shown that, for stars older than 10 to the 8th yrs and less massive than 1.1 solar mass, the surface rotation rates depend most strongly on the properties of the angular momentum loss. The trends of the currently available observations suggest that the rotation periods are a good indicator of the field-star ages.

  15. Observations of suspected low-mass post-T Tauri stars and their evolutionary status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mundt, R.; Walter, F. M.; Feigelson, E. D.; Finkenzeller, U.; Herbig, G. H.; Odell, A. P.

    1983-01-01

    The results of a study of five X-ray discovered weak emission pre-main-sequence stars in the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex are presented. All are of spectral type K7-M0, and about 1-2 mag above the main sequence. One is a double-lined spectroscopic binary, the first spectroscopic binary PMS star to be confirmed. The ages, masses, and radii of these stars as determined by photometry and spectroscopy are discussed. The difference in emission strength between these and the T Tauri stars is investigated, and it is concluded that these 'post-T Tauri' stars do indeed appear more evolved than the T Tauri stars, although there is no evidence of any significant difference in ages.

  16. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF THE {lambda} ORIONIS CLUSTER. II. DISKS AROUND SOLAR-TYPE AND LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Jesus; Morales-Calderon, Maria; Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, L.; Muzerolle, J.; Gutermuth, R.; Luhman, K. L.; Stauffer, J. E-mail: muzerol@stsci.ed

    2010-10-20

    We present IRAC/MIPS Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the solar-type and the low-mass stellar population of the young ({approx}5 Myr) {lambda} Orionis cluster. Combining optical and Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry, we identify 436 stars as probable members of the cluster. Given the distance (450 pc) and the age of the cluster, our sample ranges in mass from 2 M{sub sun} to objects below the substellar limit. With the addition of the Spitzer mid-infrared data, we have identified 49 stars bearing disks in the stellar cluster. Using spectral energy distribution slopes, we place objects in several classes: non-excess stars (diskless), stars with optically thick disks, stars with 'evolved disks' (with smaller excesses than optically thick disk systems), and 'transitional disk' candidates (in which the inner disk is partially or fully cleared). The disk fraction depends on the stellar mass, ranging from {approx}6% for K-type stars (R{sub C} - J < 2) to {approx}27% for stars with spectral-type M5 or later (R{sub C} - J>4). We confirm the dependence of disk fraction on stellar mass in this age range found in other studies. Regarding clustering levels, the overall fraction of disks in the {lambda} Orionis cluster is similar to those reported in other stellar groups with ages normally quoted as {approx}5 Myr.

  17. Extracting multipole moments of neutron stars from quasi-periodic oscillations in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshkayev, Kuantay; Rueda, Jorge; Muccino, Marco

    2015-06-01

    We consider the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations of low-mass X-ray binaries within the Hartle-Thorne spacetime. We show that the interpretation of the epicyclic frequencies of this spacetime with the observed kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations, within the Relativistic Precession Model, allows us to extract the total mass M, angular momentum J, and quadrupole moment Q of the compact object in a low-mass X-ray binary. We exemplify this fact by analyzing the data of the Z-source GX 5-1. We show that the extracted multipole structure of the compact component of this source deviates from the one expected from a Kerr black hole and instead it points to a neutron star explanation.

  18. Suzaku spectra of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yajuan; Zhang, Haotong; zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    We present the spectral analysis of the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1608-52 using data from four Suzaku observations in 2010 March. 4U 1608-52 is a transient atoll source, and the analyzed observations contain the “island” and “banana” states, corresponding transitional, and soft states. The spectra are fitted with the hybrid model for the soft states, which consists of two thermal components (a multicolor accretion disk and a single-temperature blackbody) plus a broken power law. The fitting results show that the continuum spectra evolve during the different states. Fe emission line is often detected in low-mass X-ray binary, however, no obviously Fe line is detected in the four observations of 4U 1608-52.

  19. The Turbulent Fragmentation Origin of Low-Mass Binary Star Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offner, Stella; Kratter, K. M.; Matzner, C. D.; Krumholz, M. R.; Klein, R. I.

    2011-01-01

    Using self-gravitating, radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we compare turbulent fragmentation and disk fragmentation as avenues for forming low-mass binary systems. We employ two dimensionless parameters to characterize the infall rate onto protostellar systems, describe disks' susceptability to fragmentation, and place limits on protostellar system multiplicity. While protostellar disks are predominatly stable in the presence of radiative feedback, purely hydrodynamic systems exhibit fundamentally different parameters and are strongly susceptible to disk fragmentation. Consequently, we find that turbulent fragmentation, occuring on thousand AU scales, is the more common mode of fragmentation and is likely responsible for producing most low-mass binary systems. Although fragmentation in young embedded protostellar disks cannot be directly imaged, turbulent fragmentation on these scales is potentially observable.

  20. Chemical Changes During Star Formation: High vs. Low-mass YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    An overview of recent single-dish surveys of molecular species at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths in a set of high- and low-mass young stellar objects will be presented. The importance of flexible radiative transfer tools for deriving reliable abundances will be emphasized. The temperature and density structures of the envelopes ---an essential ingredient in the analysis--- are constrained from observations of the dust continuum and CS excitation. In high mass objects, clear evidence is seen for abundance jumps of various molecules in the inner warm part of the envelopes. Systematic trends in the abundances and gas/solid ratios with enhanced dust and gas temperatures are found, which may be related to the evolutionary state of the objects. Recent results on combined ISO-SWS, ISO-LWS and SWAS observations of H2O are summarized. The results for high-mass objects will be compared with those for low-mass class 0 and I objects, with special emphasis on the deeply embedded IRAS 16293 -2422 protostar. Geometry appears to play a more important role in the analysis of data for low-mass objects. The observations are interpreted with detailed time-dependent chemical models using the inferred physical structure as input. The importance of freeze-out in the outer envelope as well as ice evaporation and high-temperature reactions in the inner envelope are discussed. See: astro-ph/0205457; astro-ph/0205292; astro-ph/0205068; astro-ph/0201317.

  1. A long history of star formation in a low mass stellar system, Leo T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cignoni, M.; Clementini, G.; Contreras Ramos, R.; Federici, L.; Ripepi, V.; Marconi, M.; Tosi, M.; Musella, I.

    Nearby star-forming dwarf galaxies with small masses and low metallicity offer insights into the cosmic history of galaxy assembly. In this framework, we present results from the first combined study of variable stars and star formation history of the Milky Way (MW) "Ultra-Faint" dwarf (UFD) galaxy Leo T, based on F606W and F814W multi-epoch archive observations obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We have detected 14 variable stars in the galaxy, including one fundamental-mode RR Lyrae star and 10 Anomalous Cepheids with periods shorter than 1 day, thus suggesting the occurrence of multiple star formation episodes in this UFD, one of which about 10 Gyr ago produced the RR Lyrae star. A quantitative analysis of the star formation history, based on the comparison of the observed color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with a library of artificially generated CMDs, confirms that Leo T has experienced a complex star formation history dominated by two enhanced periods about 1.5 and 8 Gyr ago, respectively.

  2. From Stars to Super-Planets: The Low-Mass IMF in the Young Cluster IC348

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Najita, Joan R.; Tiede, Glenn P.; Carr, John S.

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the low-mass population of the young cluster IC348 down to the deuterium-burning limit, a fiducial boundary between brown dwarf and planetary mass objects, using a new and innovative method for the spectral classification of late-type objects. Using photometric indices, constructed from HST/NICMOS narrow-band imaging, that measure the strength of the 1.9 micron water band, we determine the spectral type and reddening for every M-type star in the field, thereby separating cluster members from the interloper population. Due to the efficiency of our spectral classification technique, our study is complete from approximately 0.7 solar mass to 0.015 solar mass. The mass function derived for the cluster in this interval, dN/d log M alpha M(sup 0.5), is similar to that obtained for the Pleiades, but appears significantly more abundant in brown dwarfs than the mass function for companions to nearby sun-like stars. This provides compelling observational evidence for different formation and evolutionary histories for substellar objects formed in isolation vs. as companions. Because our determination of the IMF is complete to very low masses, we can place interesting constraints on the role of physical processes such as fragmentation in the star and planet formation process and the fraction of dark matter in the Galactic halo that resides in substellar objects.

  3. STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF A YOUNG SUPER-STAR CLUSTER IN NGC 4038/39: DIRECT DETECTION OF LOW-MASS PRE-MAIN SEQUENCE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Greissl, Julia; Meyer, Michael R.; Christopher, Micol H.; Scoville, Nick Z.

    2010-02-20

    We present an analysis of the near-infrared spectrum of a young massive star cluster in the overlap region of the interacting galaxies NGC 4038/39 using population synthesis models. Our goal is to model the cluster population as well as provide rough constraints on its initial mass function (IMF). The cluster shows signs of youth, such as thermal radio emission and strong hydrogen emission lines in the near-infrared. Late-type absorption lines are also present which are indicative of late-type stars in the cluster. The strength and ratio of these absorption lines cannot be reproduced through either late-type pre-main sequence (PMS) stars or red supergiants alone. Thus, we interpret the spectrum as a superposition of two star clusters of different ages, which is feasible since the 1'' spectrum encompasses a physical region of {approx}90 pc and radii of super-star clusters (SSCs) are generally measured to be a few parsecs. One cluster is young (<= 3 Myr) and is responsible for part of the late-type absorption features, which are due to PMS stars in the cluster, and the hydrogen emission lines. The second cluster is older (6 Myr-18 Myr) and is needed to reproduce the overall depth of the late-type absorption features in the spectrum. Both are required to accurately reproduce the near-infrared spectrum of the object. Thus, we have directly detected PMS objects in an unresolved SSC for the first time using a combination of population synthesis models and PMS tracks. This analysis serves as a testbed of our technique to constrain the low-mass IMF in young SSCs as well as an exploration of the star formation history of young UC H II regions.

  4. New BVI {sub C} photometry of low-mass pleiades stars: Exploring the effects of rotation on broadband colors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamai, Brittany L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Vrba, Frederick J.; Stauffer, John R.

    2014-08-01

    We present new BVI{sub C} photometry for 350 Pleiades proper motion members with 9 < V ≲ 17. Importantly, our new catalog includes a large number of K- and early M-type stars, roughly doubling the number of low-mass stars with well-calibrated Johnson/Cousins photometry in this benchmark cluster. We combine our new photometry with existing photometry from the literature to define a purely empirical isochrone at Pleiades age (≈100 Myr) extending from V = 9 to 17. We use the empirical isochrone to identify 48 new probable binaries and 14 likely nonmembers. The photometrically identified single stars are compared against their expected positions in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). At 100 Myr, the mid K and early M stars are predicted to lie above the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) having not yet reached the ZAMS. We find in the B – V versus V CMD that mid K and early M dwarfs are instead displaced below (or blueward of) the ZAMS. Using the stars' previously reported rotation periods, we find a highly statistically significant correlation between rotation period and CMD displacement, in the sense that the more rapidly rotating stars have the largest displacements in the B – V CMD.

  5. Testing Stellar Evolution Models: Absolute Dimensions of the Low-Mass Eclipsing Binary Star V651 Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Allison; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    We report accurate values of several key quantities for the low-mass, 0.9968096 day period, double-lined eclipsing binary V651 Cas. We determine accurate values for the masses, radii and temperatures of the primary and secondary as follows: M = 0.8553(81) solar masses, R = 0.957(17) solar radii, and effective temperature = 5733(100) K for the primary component, and M = 0.7564(48) solar masses, R = 0.771(15) solar radii, and effective temperature = 5113(105) for the secondary component, with formal uncertainties shown in parentheses. A comparison with the stellar evolution models from the Dartmouth Stellar Evolution Program suggests an age of 11(1) Gyr for a best-fit metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.2. While the isochrone mentioned correctly reproduces the measured radii and temperatures of the stars within the current uncertainties, we note that the secondary radius appears marginally larger and the temperature marginally cooler than models would predict. This is consistent with similar discrepancies found for other low-mass stars, generally accredited to surface activity. With further improvement in the measurement errors, and a spectroscopic measure of the metallicity, V651 Cas should be a valuable system for understanding the effects of magnetic activity on the global structure of low-mass stars and for providing guidance to improve stellar evolution models.This work was supported in part by the NSF REU and DoD ASSURE programs under NSF grant no. 1262851 and by the Smithsonian Institution.

  6. Membership, binarity and accretion among very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs of the σ Orionis cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, M. J.; Jeffries, R. D.; Naylor, Tim; Oliveira, J. M.; Maxted, P. F. L.

    2005-01-01

    Intermediate-resolution (R~ 7000) spectroscopy is presented for 76 photometrically selected very low-mass (0.04 < M < 0.3 Msolar) candidate members of the young cluster around σ Orionis (σ Ori). More than two-thirds appear to be genuine cluster members on the basis that they exhibit LiI 6708-Åabsorption, weak NaI 8183/8195 Åfeatures and a radial velocity consistent with the cluster mean. Photometric selection alone therefore appears to be very effective in identifying cluster members in this mass range. Only six objects appear to be certain non-members; however, a substantial subset of 13 candidates have ambiguous or contradictory indications of membership and lack Li absorption. Together with an observed spread in the equivalent width of the Li absorption feature in the cooler stars of our sample, this indicates that there may be deficiencies in our understanding of the formation of this line in cool, low-gravity objects. Four candidate binary cluster members are identified. Consideration of sampling and radial velocity measurement precision leads us to conclude that either the fraction of very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in small separation (a < 1 au) binary systems is larger than in field M-dwarfs, or the distribution of separations is much less skewed towards large separations. This conclusion hinges critically on the correct identification of the small number of binary candidates, although it remains significant even when only the candidate members displaying Li absorption are considered. Broadened Hα emission, indicative of circum(sub)stellar accretion discs is found in five or six of the candidate cluster members, three of which probably have substellar masses. The fraction of accretors (10 +/- 5 per cent) is similar to that found in stars of higher mass in the σ Ori cluster using Hα emission as a diagnostic, but much lower than found for very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs of younger clusters. The time-scale for accretion rates to drop to <~10

  7. A Molecular Disk Survey of Low-Mass Stars in the TW Hya Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, David R.; van der Plas, Gerrit; Kastner, Joel H.; Schneider, Adam C.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Mardones, Diego; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Principe, David

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out an ALMA Cycle 2 survey of 15 confirmed or candidate low-mass (<0.2M ⊙) members of the TW Hya Association (TWA) with the goal of detecting line emission from CO molecular gas and continuum emission from cold dust. Our targets have spectral types of M4-L0 and hence represent the extreme low end of the TWA's mass function. The survey has yielded a detection of 12CO(2-1) emission around TWA 34. This newly discovered ~10 Myr-old molecular gas disk lies just ~50pc from Earth.

  8. Characterizing the small scale structures in the earliest stages of low-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm Persson, Magnus; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Tobin, John; Harsono, Daniel; Jørgensen, Jes K.

    2015-08-01

    In deeply-embedded low-mass protostars, the density and temperature distribution in the inner few hundred AU’s are poorly constrained. In sources where the envelope is less massive, i.e. the Class I stage, disks with Keplerian rotation have been inferred using C18O lines. However, constraining the various disk characteristics turns out to be difficult even in this case. Continuum and molecular line observations of optically thin tracers at very high sensitivity and resolution are needed to constrain the density, temperature and kinematics. Ultimately the assumed structure affects the determination of molecular abundances.We are attempting to model high-resolution dust continuum radio-interferometric observations of a few deeply-embedded low-mass protostars with a power-law disk model embedded in a spherical envelope.We model the interferometric visibilities taken with either the Plateau de Bure Interferometer or the ALMA telescope, probing scales down to a few tens of AU in some cases. Given the assumptions, the study shows disk sizes in the deeply-embedded phase that could be slightly larger than typical found in the more evolved Class I sources. The fitting also highlights that models for the physical structure of the inner envelope, on 500-2000 AU scales, needs to be improved. With future high sensitivity observations, we could potentially also be able to constrain any vertical density and temperature structure. In this poster I will present the

  9. Under Pressure: Quenching Star Formation in Low-Mass Satellite Galaxies via Stripping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, Sean P.; Cooper, Michael C.; Pace, Andrew B.; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Bullock, James S.; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Wheeler, Coral

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies of galaxies in the local Universe, including those in the Local Group, find that the efficiency of environmental (or satellite) quenching increases dramatically at satellite stellar masses below ˜108~M⊙. This suggest a physical scale where quenching transitions from a slow "starvation" mode to a rapid "stripping" mode at low masses. We investigate the plausibility of this scenario using observed HI surface density profiles for a sample of 66 nearby galaxies as inputs to analytic calculations of ram-pressure and turbulent viscous stripping. Across a broad range of host properties, we find that stripping becomes increasingly effective at M★ ≲ 108 - 9~M⊙, reproducing the critical mass scale observed. However, for canonical values of the circumgalactic medium density (nhalo < 10-3.5 cm-3), we find that stripping is not fully effective; infalling satellites are, on average, stripped of only ≲ 40 - 60% of their cold gas reservoir, which is insufficient to match observations. By including a host halo gas distribution that is clumpy and therefore contains regions of higher density, we are able to reproduce the observed HI gas fractions (and thus the high quenched fraction and short quenching timescale) of Local Group satellites, suggesting that a host halo with clumpy gas may be crucial for quenching low-mass systems in Local Group-like (and more massive) host halos.

  10. Constraining the properties of neutron star crusts with the transient low-mass X-ray binary Aql X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterhouse, A. C.; Degenaar, N.; Wijnands, R.; Brown, E. F.; Miller, J. M.; Altamirano, D.; Linares, M.

    2016-03-01

    Aql X-1 is a prolific transient neutron star low-mass X-ray binary that exhibits an accretion outburst approximately once every year. Whether the thermal X-rays detected in intervening quiescent episodes are the result of cooling of the neutron star or due to continued low-level accretion remains unclear. In this work, we use Swift data obtained after the long and bright 2011 and 2013 outbursts, as well as the short and faint 2015 outburst, to investigate the hypothesis that cooling of the accretion-heated neutron star crust dominates the quiescent thermal emission in Aql X-1. We demonstrate that the X-ray light curves and measured neutron star surface temperatures are consistent with the expectations of the crust cooling paradigm. By using a thermal evolution code, we find that ≃1.2-3.2 MeV nucleon-1 of shallow heat release describes the observational data well, depending on the assumed mass-accretion rate and temperature of the stellar core. We find no evidence for varying strengths of this shallow heating after different outbursts, but this could be due to limitations of the data. We argue that monitoring Aql X-1 for up to ≃1 yr after future outbursts can be a powerful tool to break model degeneracies and solve open questions about the magnitude, depth, and origin of shallow heating in neutron star crusts.

  11. Constraining the low-mass Slope of the star formation sequence at 0.5 < z < 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Henry, Alaina; Rigby, Jane R.; Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbé, Ivo; Leja, Joel; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Nelson, Erica J.; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Brammer, Gabriel B.

    2014-11-10

    We constrain the slope of the star formation rate (SFR; log Ψ) to stellar mass (log M {sub *}) relation down to log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) = 8.4 (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) = 9.2) at z = 0.5 (z = 2.5) with a mass-complete sample of 39,106 star-forming galaxies selected from the 3D-HST photometric catalogs, using deep photometry in the CANDELS fields. For the first time, we find that the slope is dependent on stellar mass, such that it is steeper at low masses (log Ψ∝log M {sub *}) than at high masses (log Ψ∝(0.3-0.6)log M {sub *}). These steeper low-mass slopes are found for three different star formation indicators: the combination of the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR), calibrated from a stacking analysis of Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm imaging; β-corrected UV SFRs; and Hα SFRs. The normalization of the sequence evolves differently in distinct mass regimes as well: for galaxies less massive than log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 10 the specific SFR (Ψ/M {sub *}) is observed to be roughly self-similar with Ψ/M {sub *}∝(1 + z){sup 1.9}, whereas more massive galaxies show a stronger evolution with Ψ/M {sub *}∝(1 + z){sup 2.2-3.5} for log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) = 10.2-11.2. The fact that we find a steep slope of the star formation sequence for the lower mass galaxies will help reconcile theoretical galaxy formation models with the observations.

  12. Tidal inertial waves in differentially rotating convective envelopes of low-mass stars. I. Free oscillation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenel, M.; Baruteau, C.; Mathis, S.; Rieutord, M.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Star-planet tidal interactions may result in the excitation of inertial waves in the convective region of stars. In low-mass stars, their dissipation plays a prominent role in the long-term orbital evolution of short-period planets. Turbulent convection can sustain differential rotation in their envelopes with an equatorial acceleration (as in the Sun) or deceleration, which can modify the propagation properties of the waves. Aims: We explore in this first paper the general propagation properties of free linear inertial waves in a differentially rotating homogeneous fluid inside a spherical shell. We assume that the angular velocity background flow depends on the latitudinal coordinate alone, close to what is expected in the external convective envelope of low-mass stars. Methods: We use an analytical approach in the inviscid case to get the dispersion relation, from which we compute the characteristic trajectories along which energy propagates. This allows us to study the existence of attractor cycles and infer the different families of inertial modes. We also use high-resolution numerical calculations based on a spectral method for the viscous problem. Results: We find that modes that propagate in the whole shell (D modes) behave the same way as with solid-body rotation. However, another family of inertial modes exists (DT modes), which can only propagate in a restricted part of the convective zone. Our study shows that they are less common than D modes and that the characteristic rays and shear layers often focus towards a wedge - or point-like attractor. More importantly, we find that for non-axisymmetric oscillation modes, shear layers may cross a corotation resonance with a local accumulation of kinetic energy. Their damping rate scales very differently from the value we obtain for standard D modes, and we show an example where it is independent of viscosity (Ekman number) in the astrophysical regime in which it is small.

  13. Tidal inertial waves in differentially rotating convective envelopes of low-mass stars. I. Free oscillation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenel, M.; Baruteau, C.; Mathis, S.; Rieutord, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Star-planet tidal interactions may result in the excitation of inertial waves in the convective region of stars. In low-mass stars, their dissipation plays a prominent role in the long-term orbital evolution of short-period planets. Turbulent convection can sustain differential rotation in their envelopes with an equatorial acceleration (as in the Sun) or deceleration, which can modify the propagation properties of the waves. Aims: We explore in this first paper the general propagation properties of free linear inertial waves in a differentially rotating homogeneous fluid inside a spherical shell. We assume that the angular velocity background flow depends on the latitudinal coordinate alone, close to what is expected in the external convective envelope of low-mass stars. Methods: We use an analytical approach in the inviscid case to get the dispersion relation, from which we compute the characteristic trajectories along which energy propagates. This allows us to study the existence of attractor cycles and infer the different families of inertial modes. We also use high-resolution numerical calculations based on a spectral method for the viscous problem. Results: We find that modes that propagate in the whole shell (D modes) behave the same way as with solid-body rotation. However, another family of inertial modes exists (DT modes), which can only propagate in a restricted part of the convective zone. Our study shows that they are less common than D modes and that the characteristic rays and shear layers often focus towards a wedge - or point-like attractor. More importantly, we find that for non-axisymmetric oscillation modes, shear layers may cross a corotation resonance with a local accumulation of kinetic energy. Their damping rate scales very differently from the value we obtain for standard D modes, and we show an example where it is independent of viscosity (Ekman number) in the astrophysical regime in which it is small.

  14. Physical Properties of Young Brown Dwarfs and Very Low Mass Stars Inferred from High-resolution Model Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Barman, T.; Mclean, Ian S.; Prato, L.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    2010-01-01

    By comparing near-infrared spectra with atmospheric models, we infer the effective temperature, surface gravity, projected rotational velocity, and radial velocity for 21 very low mass stars and brown dwarfs. The unique sample consists of two sequences in spectral type from M6-M9, one of 5-10 Myr objects and one of >1 Gyr field objects. A third sequence is comprised of only ~M6 objects with ages ranging from <1 Myr to >1 Gyr. Spectra were obtained in the J band at medium (R ~ 2000) and high (R ~ 20,000) resolutions with NIRSPEC on the Keck II telescope. Synthetic spectra were generated from atmospheric structures calculated with the PHOENIX model atmosphere code. Using multi-dimensional least-squares fitting and Monte Carlo routines we determine the best-fit model parameters for each observed spectrum and note which spectral regions provide consistent results. We identify successes in the reproduction of observed features by atmospheric models, including pressure-broadened K I lines, and investigate deficiencies in the models, particularly missing FeH opacity, that will need to be addressed in order to extend our analysis to cooler objects. The precision that can be obtained for each parameter using medium- and high-resolution near-infrared spectra is estimated and the implications for future studies of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs are discussed.

  15. A LIKELY CLOSE-IN LOW-MASS STELLAR COMPANION TO THE TRANSITIONAL DISK STAR HD 142527

    SciTech Connect

    Biller, Beth; Benisty, Myriam; Chauvin, Gael; Olofsson, Johan; Pott, Joerg-Uwe; Mueller, Andre; Bonnefoy, Mickaeel; Henning, Thomas; Lacour, Sylvestre; Thebault, Philippe; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Tuthill, Peter; Crida, Aurelien

    2012-07-10

    With the uniquely high contrast within 0.''1 ({Delta}mag(L') = 5-6.5 mag) available using Sparse Aperture Masking with NACO at Very Large Telescope, we detected asymmetry in the flux from the Herbig Fe star HD 142527 with a barycenter emission situated at a projected separation of 88 {+-} 5 mas (12.8 {+-} 1.5 AU at 145 pc) and flux ratios in H, K, and L' of 0.016 {+-} 0.007, 0.012 {+-} 0.008, and 0.0086 {+-} 0.0011, respectively (3{sigma} errors), relative to the primary star and disk. After extensive closure-phase modeling, we interpret this detection as a close-in, low-mass stellar companion with an estimated mass of {approx}0.1-0.4 M{sub Sun }. HD 142527 has a complex disk structure, with an inner gap imaged in both the near and mid-IR as well as a spiral feature in the outer disk in the near-IR. This newly detected low-mass stellar companion may provide a critical explanation of the observed disk structure.

  16. Long duration X-ray flash from low mass population III stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakauchi, Daisuke; Suwa, Yudai; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    Recent numerical simulations suggest that the typical mass of a Population III (Pop III) star become ~ 40Msolar. We investigate if a Pop III star can raise a gamma ray burst (GRB) by considering the jet propagation in the stellar envelope for a 40Msolar Pop III model. We find that a relativistic jet launched from the central black hole pierces the stellar envelope, although a Pop III star has a large envelope since the mass loss is not expected for zero metallicity stars. Thus, a Pop III star can be the progenitor of a GRB. We predict that GRBs from 40Msolar Pop III progenitors have much longer duration ~ 105 sec, slightly lower luminosity ~6×1050 erg/sec and much softer spectrum peak energy ~ 5 keV than the local long GRBs. Therefore, observationally, we regard a Pop III GRB as a long duration X-ray flash. We can observe such Pop III GRBs using the future detector Lobster.

  17. Constraining Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Low Mass, Low Metallicity AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, P.; Marigo, P.; Girardi, L.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Bressan, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Weisz, D. R.; Williams, B. F.; Dolphin, A.; Aringer, B.

    2015-08-01

    The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. We present a detailed framework for constraining model luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars using resolved stellar populations. We show an example of this method that compares various TP-AGB mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). We find that models with more efficient pre-dust driven mass loss produce results consistent with observations, as opposed to more canonical mass-loss models. Efficient pre-dust driven mass-loss predicts, for [Fe/H] ≲ -1.2, that lower mass TP-AGB stars (M≲ 1 M⊙) must have lifetimes less than about 1.2 Myr.

  18. Tides and angular momentum redistribution inside low-mass stars hosting planets: a first dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Mathis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a general mathematical framework to model the internal transport of angular momentum in a star hosting a close-in planetary/stellar companion. By assuming that the tidal and rotational distortions are small and that the deposit/extraction of angular momentum induced by stellar winds and tidal torques are redistributed solely by an effective eddy-viscosity that depends on the radial coordinate, we can formulate the model in a completely analytic way. It allows us to compute simultaneously the evolution of the orbit of the companion and of the spin and the radial differential rotation of the star. An illustrative application to the case of an F-type main-sequence star hosting a hot Jupiter is presented. The general relevance of our model to test more sophisticated numerical dynamical models and to study the internal rotation profile of exoplanet hosts, submitted to the combined effects of tides and stellar winds, by means of asteroseismology are discussed.

  19. Magnetic Fields in Low-Mass Stars: An Overview of Observational Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiners, Ansgar

    2014-08-01

    Stellar magnetic dynamos are driven by rotation, rapidly rotating stars produce stronger magnetic fields than slowly rotating stars do. The Zeeman effect is the most important indicator of magnetic fields, but Zeeman broadening must be disentangled from other broadening mechanisms, mainly rotation. The relations between rotation and magnetic field generation, between Doppler and Zeeman line broadening, and between rotation, stellar radius, and angular momentum evolution introduce several observational biases that affect our picture of stellar magnetism. In this overview, a few of these relations are explicitly shown, and the currently known distribution of field measurements is presented.

  20. A theoretical study of acoustic glitches in low-mass main-sequence stars

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Kuldeep; Antia, H. M.; Basu, Sarbani; Mazumdar, Anwesh E-mail: antia@tifr.res.in E-mail: anwesh@tifr.res.in

    2014-10-20

    There are regions in stars, such as ionization zones and the interface between radiative and convective regions, that cause a localized sharp variation in the sound speed. These are known as 'acoustic glitches'. Acoustic glitches leave their signatures on the oscillation frequencies of stars, and hence these signatures can be used as diagnostics of these regions. In particular, the signatures of these glitches can be used as diagnostics for the position of the second helium ionization zone and that of the base of the envelope convection zone. With the help of stellar models, we study the properties of these acoustic glitches in main-sequence stars. We find that the acoustic glitch due to the helium ionization zone does not correspond to the dip in the adiabatic index Γ{sub 1} caused by the ionization of He II, but to the peak in Γ{sub 1} between the He I and He II ionization zones. We find that it is easiest to study the acoustic glitch that is due to the helium ionization zone in stars with masses in the range 0.9-1.2 M {sub ☉}.

  1. Radiative feedback by low-mass stars in the first generation

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Daniel James; Hueckstaedt, Robert; Mcconkie, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The survival of cosmological minihalos in both ionizing and Lyman-Werner (LW) UV fields from nearby and distant sources has attracted recent attention for its role in regulating the rise of stellar populations at high red-shifts. Numerical models suggest that the first stars form in isolation in small dark matter halos of {approx} 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} M{sub {circle_dot}} at z {approx} 20-30 and that they are very massive, 25-500 M{sub {circle_dot}}. These stars form large H II regions 2.5-5 kpc in radius capable of engulfing nearby halos. With the rise of Population III stars throughout the cosmos also comes a global LW background that sterilizes mini-halos of H{sub 2}, delaying or preventing new star formation in them. At high redshifts, ionizaing radiation is therefore relatively local while LW photons can originate from many megaparsects away because their energies lie below the ionization limit of H.

  2. The M-dwarfs in Multiples (MINMS) survey - I. Stellar multiplicity among low-mass stars within 15 pc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward-Duong, K.; Patience, J.; De Rosa, R. J.; Bulger, J.; Rajan, A.; Goodwin, S. P.; Parker, Richard J.; McCarthy, D. W.; Kulesa, C.

    2015-05-01

    We present a large-scale, volume-limited companion survey of 245 late-K to mid-M (K7-M6) dwarfs within 15 pc. Infrared adaptive optics (AO) data were analysed from the Very Large Telescope, Subaru Telescope, Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, and MMT Observatory to detect close companions to the sample from ˜ 1 to 100 au, while digitized wide-field archival plates were searched for wide companions from ˜ 100 to 10 000 au. With sensitivity to the bottom of the main sequence over a separation range of 3 to 10 000 au, multiple AO and wide-field epochs allow us to confirm candidates with common proper motions, minimize background contamination, and enable a measurement of comprehensive binary statistics. We detected 65 comoving stellar companions and find a companion star fraction of 23.5 ± 3.2 per cent over the 3 au to 10 000 au separation range. The companion separation distribution is observed to rise to a higher frequency at smaller separations, peaking at closer separations than measured for more massive primaries. The mass ratio distribution across the q = 0.2-1.0 range is flat, similar to that of multiple systems with solar-type primaries. The characterization of binary and multiple star frequency for low-mass field stars can provide crucial comparisons with star-forming environments and hold implications for the frequency and evolutionary histories of their associated discs and planets.

  3. IUE observations of rapidly rotating low-mass stars in young clusters - The relation between chromospheric activity and rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Theodore

    1990-01-01

    If the rapid spindown of low-mass stars immediately following their arrival on the ZAMS results from magnetic braking by coronal winds, an equally sharp decline in their chromospheric emission may be expected. To search for evidence of this effect, the IUE spacecraft was used to observe the chromospheric Mg II emission lines of G-M dwarfs in the nearby IC 2391, Alpha Persei, Pleiades, and Hyades clusters. Similar observations were made of a group of X-ray-selected 'naked' T Tauri stars in Taurus-Auriga. The existence of a decline in activity cannot be confirmed from the resulting data. However, the strength of the chromospheric emission in the Mg II lines of the cluster stars is found to be correlated with rotation rate, being strongest for the stars with the shortest rotation periods and weakest for those with the longest periods. This provides indirect support for such an evolutionary change in activity. Chromospheric activity may thus be only an implicit function of age.

  4. CONTINUED COOLING OF THE CRUST IN THE NEUTRON STAR LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARY KS 1731-260

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, Edward M.; Miller, Jon M.; Brown, Edward F.; Cumming, Andrew; Degenaar, Nathalie; Wijnands, Rudy

    2010-10-20

    Some neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries have very long outbursts (lasting several years) which can generate a significant amount of heat in the neutron star crust. After the system has returned to quiescence, the crust then thermally relaxes. This provides a rare opportunity to study the thermal properties of neutron star crusts, putting constraints on the thermal conductivity and hence the structure and composition of the crust. KS 1731-260 is one of only four systems where this crustal cooling has been observed. Here, we present a new Chandra observation of this source approximately eight years after the end of the last outburst and four years since the last observation. We find that the source has continued to cool, with the cooling curve displaying a simple power-law decay. This suggests that the crust has not fully thermally relaxed yet and may continue to cool further. A simple power-law decay is in contrast to theoretical cooling models of the crust, which predict that the crust should now have cooled to the same temperature as the neutron star core.

  5. Complex magnetic topology and strong differential rotation on the low-mass T Tauri star V2247 Oph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Skelly, M. B.; Bouvier, J.; Jardine, M. M.; Gregory, S. G.; Morin, J.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Dougados, C.; Ménard, F.; Unruh, Y.

    2010-03-01

    From observations collected with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we report the detection of Zeeman signatures on the low-mass classical T Tauri star (cTTS) V2247 Oph. Profile distortions and circular polarization signatures detected in photospheric lines can be interpreted as caused by cool spots and magnetic regions at the surface of the star. The large-scale field is of moderate strength and highly complex; moreover, both the spot distribution and the magnetic field show significant variability on a time-scale of only 1 week, as a likely result of strong differential rotation. Both properties make V2247 Oph very different from the (more massive) prototypical cTTS BP Tau; we speculate that this difference reflects the lower mass of V2247 Oph. During our observations, V2247 Oph was in a low-accretion state, with emission lines showing only weak levels of circular polarization; we nevertheless find that excess emission apparently concentrates in a mid-latitude region of a strong radial field, suggesting that it is the footpoint of an accretion funnel. The weaker and more complex field that we report on V2247 Oph may share similarities with those of very-low-mass late-M dwarfs and potentially explain why low-mass cTTSs rotate on average faster than intermediate-mass ones. These surprising results need confirmation from new independent data sets on V2247 Oph and other similar low-mass cTTSs. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France and the University of Hawaii. E-mail: donati@ast.obs-mip.fr (J-FD); mskelly@ast.obs-mip.fr (MBS); jerome.bouvier@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr (JB); mmj@st-andrews.ac.uk (MMJ); sg64@st-andrews.ac.uk (SGG); jmorin@ast.obs-mip.fr (JM); ghussain@eso.org (GAJH); catherine.dougados@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr (CD); francois

  6. Supernova dust formation and the grain growth in the early universe: the critical metallicity for low-mass star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaki, Gen; Marassi, Stefania; Nozawa, Takaya; Yoshida, Naoki; Schneider, Raffaella; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the condition for the formation of low-mass second-generation stars in the early Universe. It has been proposed that gas cooling by dust thermal emission can trigger fragmentation of a low-metallicity star-forming gas cloud. In order to determine the critical condition in which dust cooling induces the formation of low-mass stars, we follow the thermal evolution of a collapsing cloud by a one-zone semi-analytic collapse model. Earlier studies assume the dust amount in the local Universe, where all refractory elements are depleted on to grains, and/or assume the constant dust amount during gas collapse. In this paper, we employ the models of dust formation and destruction in early supernovae to derive the realistic dust compositions and size distributions for multiple species as the initial conditions of our collapse calculations. We also follow accretion of heavy elements in the gas phase on to dust grains, i.e. grain growth, during gas contraction. We find that grain growth well alters the fragmentation property of the clouds. The critical conditions can be written by the gas metallicity Zcr and the initial depletion efficiency fdep,0 of gas-phase metal on to grains, or dust-to-metal mass ratio, as (Zcr/10-5.5 Z⊙) = (fdep,0/0.18)-0.44 with small scatters in the range of Zcr = [0.06-3.2] × 10-5 Z⊙. We also show that the initial dust composition and size distribution are important to determine Zcr.

  7. The young low-mass star ISO-Oph-50: extreme variability induced by a clumpy, evolving circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Alexander; Mužić, Koraljka; Geers, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    ISO-Oph-50 is a young low-mass object in the ˜1 Myr old Ophiuchus star-forming region undergoing dramatic changes in its optical/near/mid-infrared brightness by 2-4 mag. We present new multi-band photometry and near-infrared spectra, combined with a synopsis of the existing literature data. Based on the spectroscopy, the source is confirmed as a mid-M dwarf, with evidence for ongoing accretion. The near-infrared light curves show large-scale variations, with 2-4 mag amplitude in the bands IJHK, with the object generally being bluer when faint. Near its brightest state, the object shows colour changes consistent with variable extinction of ΔAV ˜ 7 mag. High-cadence monitoring at 3.6 μm reveals quasi-periodic variations with a typical time-scale of 1-2 weeks. The best explanation for these characteristics is a low-mass star seen through circumstellar matter, whose complex variability is caused by changing inhomogeneities in the inner parts of the disc. When faint, the direct stellar emission is blocked; the near-infrared radiation is dominated by scattered light. When bright, the emission is consistent with a photosphere strongly reddened by circumstellar dust. Based on the available constraints, the inhomogeneities have to be located at or beyond ˜0.1 au distance from the star. If this scenario turns out to be correct, a major portion of the inner disc has to be clumpy, structured, and/or in turmoil. In its observational characteristics, this object resembles other types of young stellar objects with variability caused in the inner disc. Compared to other objects, however, ISO-Oph-50 is clearly an extreme case, given the large amplitude of the brightness and colour changes combined with the erratic behaviour. ISO-Oph-50 has been near its brightest state since 2013; further monitoring is highly encouraged.

  8. Modelling the ionosphere of gas-giant exoplanets irradiated by low-mass stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J.; Galand, M.; Unruh, Y.; Koskinen, T.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2015-10-01

    The composition and structure of the upper atmosphere of Extrasolar Giant Planets (EGPs) are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star from soft X-rays to Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) (0.1-10 nm). This emission depends on the activity level of the star, which is primarily determined by its age [1]. In this study, we focus upon EGPs orbiting K- and M-dwarf stars of different ages. XUV spectra for these stars are constructed using a coronal model [2]. These spectra are used to drive both a thermospheric [3] and an ionospheric model, providing densities of neutral and ion species. Ionisation is included through photo-ionisation and electronimpact processes. The former is calculated by solving the Lambert-Beer law, while the latter is calculated from a supra-thermal electron transport model [4]. Planets orbiting far from the star are found to undergo Jeans escape, whereas close-orbiting planets undergo hydrodynamic escape. The critical orbital distance of transition between the two regimes is dependent on the level of stellar activity. We also find that EGP ionospheres at all orbital distances considered (0.1-1 AU) and around all stars selected (eps Eri, AD Leo, AU Mic) are dominated by the long-lived H+ ion. In addition, planets in the Jeans escape regime also have a layer in which H3 + is the major ion at the base of the ionosphere. For fast-rotating planets, densities of short-lived H3 + undergo significant diurnal variations, their peak value being determined by the stellar X-ray flux. In contrast, densities of longer-lived H+ show very little day/night variability and their value is determined by the level of stellar EUV flux. The H3 + peak in EGPs in the hydrodynamic escape regime under strong stellar illumination is pushed to altitudes below the homopause, where this ion is likely to be destroyed through reactions with heavy species (e.g., hydrocarbons, water). Infrared emissions from H3 + shall also be discussed, as well as the impact of stellar

  9. EVOLUTION, NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND YIELDS OF LOW-MASS ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS AT DIFFERENT METALLICITIES. II. THE FRUITY DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Cristallo, S.; Dominguez, I.; Abia, C.; Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Gallino, R.; Di Rico, G.; Quintini, M.; Bisterzo, S.

    2011-12-01

    By using updated stellar low-mass stars models, we systematically investigate the nucleosynthesis processes occurring in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In this paper, we present a database dedicated to the nucleosynthesis of AGB stars: FRANEC Repository of Updated Isotopic Tables and Yields (FRUITY). An interactive Web-based interface allows users to freely download the full (from H to Bi) isotopic composition, as it changes after each third dredge-up (TDU) episode and the stellar yields the models produce. A first set of AGB models, having masses in the range 1.5 {<=}M/M{sub Sun} {<=} 3.0 and metallicities 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {<=} Z {<=} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2}, is discussed. For each model, a detailed description of the physical and the chemical evolution is provided. In particular, we illustrate the details of the s-process and we evaluate the theoretical uncertainties due to the parameterization adopted to model convection and mass loss. The resulting nucleosynthesis scenario is checked by comparing the theoretical [hs/ls] and [Pb/hs] ratios to those obtained from the available abundance analysis of s-enhanced stars. On the average, the variation with the metallicity of these spectroscopic indexes is well reproduced by theoretical models, although the predicted spread at a given metallicity is substantially smaller than the observed one. Possible explanations for such a difference are briefly discussed. An independent check of the TDU efficiency is provided by the C-stars luminosity function. Consequently, theoretical C-stars luminosity functions for the Galactic disk and the Magellanic Clouds have been derived. We generally find good agreement with observations.

  10. A super-Earth transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, David; Berta, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Burke, Christopher J; Nutzman, Philip; Buchhave, Lars A; Lovis, Christophe; Bonfils, Xavier; Latham, David W; Udry, Stéphane; Murray-Clay, Ruth A; Holman, Matthew J; Falco, Emilio E; Winn, Joshua N; Queloz, Didier; Pepe, Francesco; Mayor, Michel; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry

    2009-12-17

    A decade ago, the detection of the first transiting extrasolar planet provided a direct constraint on its composition and opened the door to spectroscopic investigations of extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Because such characterization studies are feasible only for transiting systems that are both nearby and for which the planet-to-star radius ratio is relatively large, nearby small stars have been surveyed intensively. Doppler studies and microlensing have uncovered a population of planets with minimum masses of 1.9-10 times the Earth's mass (M[symbol:see text]), called super-Earths. The first constraint on the bulk composition of this novel class of planets was afforded by CoRoT-7b (refs 8, 9), but the distance and size of its star preclude atmospheric studies in the foreseeable future. Here we report observations of the transiting planet GJ 1214b, which has a mass of 6.55M[symbol:see text]), and a radius 2.68 times Earth's radius (R[symbol:see text]), indicating that it is intermediate in stature between Earth and the ice giants of the Solar System. We find that the planetary mass and radius are consistent with a composition of primarily water enshrouded by a hydrogen-helium envelope that is only 0.05% of the mass of the planet. The atmosphere is probably escaping hydrodynamically, indicating that it has undergone significant evolution during its history. The star is small and only 13 parsecs away, so the planetary atmosphere is amenable to study with current observatories. PMID:20016595

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Planets Around Low-Mass Stars (PALMS). IV. (Bowler+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, B. P.; Liu, M. C.; Shkolnik, E. L.; Tamura, M.

    2015-02-01

    We carried out our observations at the Keck II 10m telescope with the facility near-infrared imaging camera NIRC2 using natural guide star adaptive optics (NGS-AO) between 2010 August and 2013 August (table 3). Our NGS-AO observations at the 8.2m Subaru Telescope were obtained with the AO188 adaptive optics system coupled with the High Contrast Instrument for the Subaru Next Generation Adaptive Optics (HiCIAO) imaging instrument. (2 data files).

  12. Ionization of the diffuse gas in galaxies: Hot low-mass evolved stars at work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Fajardo, N.; Morisset, C.; Stasinska, G.; Binette, L.

    2011-10-01

    The Diffuse Ionized Medium (DIG) is visible through its faint optical line emission outside classical HII regions (Reynolds 1971) and turns out to be a major component of the interstellar medium in galaxies. OB stars in galaxies likely represent the main source of ionizing photons for the DIG. However, an additional source is needed to explain the increase of [NII]/Hα, [SII]/Hα with galactic height.

  13. Millimeter continuum measurements of circumstellar dust around very young low-mass stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, S.; Chandler, C. J.; Andre, P.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the question of disk formation during the protostar phase. We build on the results of Keene and Masson (1990) whose analysis of L1551 showed the millimeter continuum emission comes from both an unresolved circumstellar component, i.e., a disk and an extended cloud core. We model the dust continuum emission from the cloud core and show how it is important at 1.3 mm but negligible at 2.7 mm. Combining new 2.7 mm Owens Valley Interferometer data of IRAS-Dense cores with data from the literature we conclude that massive disks are also seen toward a number of other sources. However, 1.3 mm data from the IRAM 30 m telescope for a larger sample shows that massive disks are relatively rare, occurring around perhaps 5% of young embedded stars. This implies that either massive disks occur briefly during the embedded phase or that relatively few young stars form massive disks. At 1.3 mm the median flux of IRAS-Dense cores is nearly the same as T Tauri stars in the sample of Beckwith et al. (1990). We conclude that the typical disk mass during the embedded phase is nearly the same or less than the typical disk mass during the T Tauri phase.

  14. Big Fish in Small Ponds: massive stars in the low-mass clusters of M83

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, J. E.; Calzetti, D.; McElwee, Sean; Chandar, R.; Elmegreen, B. G.; Kennicutt, R. C.; Kim, Hwihyun; Krumholz, Mark R.; Lee, J. C.; Whitmore, B.; O'Connell, R. W. E-mail: callzetti@astro.umass.edu

    2014-09-20

    We have used multi-wavelength Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 data of the starbursting spiral galaxy M83 in order to measure variations in the upper end of the stellar initial mass function (uIMF) using the production rate of ionizing photons in unresolved clusters with ages ≤ 8 Myr. As in earlier papers on M51 and NGC 4214, the uIMF in M83 is consistent with a universal IMF, and stochastic sampling of the stellar populations in the ∼<10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} clusters are responsible for any deviations in this universality. The ensemble cluster population, as well as individual clusters, also imply that the most massive star in a cluster does not depend on the cluster mass. In fact, we have found that these small clusters seem to have an over-abundance of ionizing photons when compared to an expected universal or truncated IMF. This also suggests that the presence of massive stars in these clusters does not affect the star formation in a destructive way.

  15. X-Shooter study of accretion in ρ-Ophiucus: very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manara, C. F.; Testi, L.; Natta, A.; Alcalá, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    We present new VLT/X-Shooter optical and near-infrared spectra of a sample of 17 candidate young low-mass stars and brown dwarfs located in the ρ-Ophiucus cluster. We derived the spectral type and extinction for all the targets, and then we determined their physical parameters. All the objects but one have M⋆≲0.6 M⊙, and eight have mass below or close to the hydrogen-burning limit. Using the intensity of various permitted emission lines present in their spectra, we determined the accretion luminosity and mass accretion rates (Ṁacc) for all the objects. When compared with previous works targeting the same sample, we find that, in general, these objects are not as strongly accreting as previously reported, and we suggest that the reason is our more accurate estimate of the photospheric parameters. We also compare our findings with recent works in other slightly older star-forming regions, such as Lupus, to investigate possible differences in the accretion properties, but we find that the accretion properties for our targets have the same dependence on the stellar and substellar parameters as in the other regions. This leads us to conclude that we do not find evidence for a different dependence of Ṁacc with M⋆ when comparing low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Moreover, we find a similar small (≲1 dex) scatter in the Ṁacc-M⋆ relation as in some of our recent works in other star-forming regions, and no significant differences in Ṁacc due to different ages or properties of the regions. The latter result suffers, however, from low statistics and sample selection biases in the current studies. The small scatter in the Ṁacc-M⋆ correlation confirms that mass accretion rate measurements in the literature based on uncertain photospheric parameters and single accretion indicators, such as the Hα width, can lead to a scatter that is unphysically large. Our studies show that only broadband spectroscopic surveys coupled with a detailed analysis of the

  16. Low-Mass Star Formation and the Initial Mass Function in the ρ Ophiuchi Cloud Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhman, K. L.; Rieke, G. H.

    1999-11-01

    We have obtained moderate-resolution (R=800-1200) K-band spectra for ~100 stars within and surrounding the cloud core of ρ Oph. We have measured spectral types and continuum veilings and have combined this information with results from new deep imaging. Using the latest evolutionary tracks of D'Antona & Mazzitelli to interpret the H-R diagram for ρ Oph, we infer ages ranging between 0.1 and 1 Myr for the class II and III sources (i.e., those that have emerged from their natal cocoons). A few stars may be slightly older. The initial mass function (IMF) peaks at about 0.4 Msolar and slowly declines to the hydrogen-burning limit with a slope of ~-0.5 in logarithmic units (Salpeter is +1.35). Our lower limits on the numbers of substellar objects demonstrate that the IMF probably does not fall more steeply below the hydrogen-burning limit, at least down to ~0.02 Msolar. The derived IMF is consistent with previous findings that the ρ Oph IMF is roughly flat from 0.05 to 1 Msolar. The exact shape of the mass function remains a function of the theoretical evolutionary tracks and, at the lowest masses, the conversion from spectral types to effective temperatures. We then make the first comparison of mass functions of stars and prestellar clumps measured in the same region. The similar behavior of the two mass functions in ρ Oph supports the suggestion of Motte et al. and Testi & Sargent that the stellar mass function in young clusters is a direct product of the process of cloud fragmentation. We have also studied the very young and often still embedded class I and flat-spectrum objects. After considering the effect of extinction on the SED classifications of the sample, we find that ~17% of the ρ Oph stars are class I, implying ~0.1 Myr for the lifetime of this stage. In spectra separated by 2 yr, we observe simultaneous variability in the Brγ emission and K-band continuum veiling for two stars, where the hydrogen emission is brighter in the more heavily veiled data

  17. Free inertial modes in differentially rotating convective envelopes of low-mass stars : numerical exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenel, M.; Baruteau, C.; Mathis, S.; Rieutord, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tidally-excited inertial waves in stellar convective regions are a key mechanism for tidal dissipation in stars and therefore the evolution of close-in binary or planetary systems. As a first step, we explore here the impact of latitudinal differential rotation on the properties of free inertial modes and identify the different families of modes. We show that they differ from the case of solid-body rotation. Using an analytical approach as well as numerical calculations, we conclude that critical layers --- where the Doppler-shifted frequency vanishes --- could play a very important role for tidal dissipation.

  18. Dark-matter halo mergers as a fertile environment for low-mass Population III star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovino, S.; Latif, M. A.; Grassi, T.; Schleicher, D. R. G.

    2014-07-01

    While Population III (Pop III) stars are typically thought to be massive, pathways towards lower mass Pop III stars may exist when the cooling of the gas is particularly enhanced. A possible route is enhanced HD cooling during the merging of dark-matter haloes. The mergers can lead to a high ionization degree catalysing the formation of HD molecules and may cool the gas down to the cosmic microwave background temperature. In this paper, we investigate the merging of mini-haloes with masses of a few 105 M⊙ and explore the feasibility of this scenario. We have performed three-dimensional cosmological hydrodynamics calculations with the ENZO code, solving the thermal and chemical evolution of the gas by employing the astrochemistry package KROME. Our results show that the HD abundance is increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the no-merging case and the halo cools down to ˜60 K triggering fragmentation. Based on Jeans estimates, the expected stellar masses are about 10 M⊙. Our findings show that the merging scenario is a potential pathway for the formation of low-mass stars.

  19. A Near-Infrared Search for Very Low Mass Companions to Stars within 10 pc of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golimowski, David

    1997-07-01

    Most stars are fainter and less massive than the Sun. Nevertheless, the luminosity function {LF} and mass-luminosity relation {MLR} for very-low- mass {VLM} stars {M < 0.2 Msun} remain poorly constrained. The best way to constrain these relations is a search for faint companions to nearby stars. Such a search has several advantages over field surveys, the most important of which are greater sensitivity to VLM objects and the availability of pre- cise parallaxes from which absolute luminosities and dynamic masses can be obtained. We propose a NICMOS snapshot search for VLM companions to 120 single stars within 10 pc of the Sun. This search will probe the previously unexplored circumstellar region lying between the search spaces of speckle searches {1-10 AU} and deep imaging searches {100-1000 AU}. With a 10 sigma detection limit of M_J 21.5 at 10 pc, we will detect objects at least 10 mag fainter than the empirical end of the main sequence and at least 6 mag fainter than the brown dwarf Gl 229B. Our ultimate goal is the largest, most sensitive, volume-limited search for VLM companions ever un- dertaken. The four colors selected for the search will permit unambiguous identification of VLM-companion candidates for follow-up observation. To- gether with the IR speckle and deep imaging surveys, our program will firmly establish both the LF for VLM companions at separations of 1-1000 AU and the multiplicity fraction of all stars within 10 pc.

  20. A UKIDSS-based search for low-mass stars and small stellar clumps in off-cloud parts of young star-forming regions *

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perger, M.; Lodieu, N.; Martín, E. L.; Barrado Y Navascués, D.

    2011-07-01

    The form and universality of the mass function of young and nearby star-forming regions is still under debate. Its relation to the stellar density, its mass peak and the dependency on most recent models shows significant differencies for the various regions and remains unclear up to date. We aim to get a more complete census of two of such regions. We investigate yet unexplored areas of Orion and Taurus-Auriga, observed by the UKIDSS survey. In the latter, we search for low-mass stars via photometric and proper motion criteria and signs for variability. In Orion, we search for small stellar clumps via nearest-neighbor methods. Highlights in Taurus would be the finding of the missing low-mass stars and the detection of a young cluster T dwarf. In Orion, we discovered small stellar associations of its OB1b and OB1c populations. Combined with what is known in literature, we will provide by this investigations a general picture of the results of the star-forming processes in large areas of Taurus and Orion and probe the most recent models. Based on data of the UKIRT (operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre on behalf of the Science and Technology Facilities Council of the U.K.) Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS).Supported by the Marie Curie Research Training Network `CONSTELLATION' under grant no. MRTN-CT-2006-035890.

  1. Accretion onto Planetary Mass Companions of Low-mass Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yifan; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Kraus, Adam L.; Metchev, Stanimir; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of accretion rates onto planetary mass objects may distinguish between different planet formation mechanisms, which predict different accretion histories. In this Letter, we use Hubble Space Telescope (HST)/WFC3 UVIS optical photometry to measure accretion rates onto three accreting objects, GSC 06214-00210 b, GQ Lup b, and DH Tau b, that are at the planet/brown dwarf boundary and are companions to solar mass stars. The excess optical emission in the excess accretion continuum yields mass accretion rates of 10-9-10-11 M ⊙ yr-1 for these three objects. Their accretion rates are an order of magnitude higher than expected from the correlation between mass and accretion rates measured from the UV excess, which is applicable if these wide planetary mass companions formed by protostellar core fragmentation. The high accretion rates and large separation from the central star demonstrate the presence of massive disks around these objects. Models for the formation and evolution of wide planetary mass companions should account for their large accretion rates. High ratios of Hα luminosity over accretion luminosity for objects with low accretion rates suggest that searches for Hα emission may be an efficient way to find accreting planets.

  2. Accurate Alpha Abundance and C/O of Low-mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyette, Mark; Muirhead, Philip; Mann, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    We investigate methods for measuring elemental abundances in M dwarf stars from high resolution (R>25,000), near-infrared spectra. With synthetic spectra from the BT-Settl model atmosphere library, we identify NIR features sensitive to enhancement of alpha elements (C, O, Mg, Si, S, Ca, and Ti) in M dwarfs. We also describe a method for measuring the amount of oxygen not bound in CO from molecular and atomic features in the NIR Y-band that, when combined with recently published methods of measuring carbon abundance in M dwarfs from K-band spectra, provides the ratio of carbon to oxygen (C/O). The ratio of carbon to oxygen is an important parameter for determining interior structures of exoplanets and processes that drive planet formation as evidenced by recent studies of the super Earth 55 Cnc e. We outline a potential observing program to empirically calibrate these methods via a sample of M dwarfs with widely-separated (5''-1500''), but associated, F, G or K-type binary companions. Once calibrated, we will apply these methods to a survey of nearby M dwarfs, including many stars that will be observed by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS).

  3. Coronal geometry at low mass-accretion rates from XMM and NuSTAR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuerst, F.; NuSTAR Binaries Team; NuSTAR AGN Team

    2016-06-01

    At very low Eddington luminosities the structure and physics of the accretion flow around a black hole are still debated, in particular in the inner most regions. By making sensitive measurements of the relativistic blurring of the X-ray reflection spectrum we investigate these physics, a task for which XMM-Newton, in combination with hard X-ray coverage provided by NuSTAR or Hitomi, is ideally suited and will continue to be unique for years to come. I will present results from XMM and NuSTAR observations of the radio-galaxy Cen A and of the X-ray binary GRS 1739-278 during the decline of its outburst. While Cen A shows a prominent iron line, the broad-band spectrum shows no evidence of reflection. This lack of reflection can best be explained by a jet origin of the hard X-rays or a significantly truncated accretion disk. The iron line can be self-consistently explained when assuming an optically thick torus surrounding the super-massive black-hole. The broad-band X-ray spectrum of GRS 1739-278 can be well described by a simple power-law or Comptonization continuum. A weak relativistic reflection model results in a small but significant improvement of the statistical quality of the fit. This relativistic model indicates a strongly truncated disk.

  4. Motion Verified Red Stars (MoVeRS): A Catalog of Proper Motion Selected Low-mass Stars from WISE, SDSS, and 2MASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theissen, Christopher A.; West, Andrew A.; Dhital, Saurav

    2016-02-01

    We present a photometric catalog of 8,735,004 proper motion selected low-mass stars (KML-spectral types) within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint, from the combined SDSS Data Release 10 (DR10), Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) point-source catalog (PSC), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) AllWISE catalog. Stars were selected using r - i, i - z, r - z, z - J, and z - W1 colors, and SDSS, WISE, and 2MASS astrometry was combined to compute proper motions. The resulting 3,518,150 stars were augmented with proper motions for 5,216,854 earlier type stars from the combined SDSS and United States Naval Observatory B1.0 catalog (USNO-B). We used SDSS+USNO-B proper motions to determine the best criteria for selecting a clean sample of stars. Only stars whose proper motions were greater than their 2σ uncertainty were included. Our Motion Verified Red Stars catalog is available through SDSS CasJobs and VizieR.

  5. The Star Formation Histories of Local Group Dwarf Galaxies. III. Characterizing Quenching in Low-mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2015-05-01

    We explore the quenching of low-mass galaxies (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 108 {{M}⊙ }) as a function of lookback time using the star formation histories (SFHs) of 38 Local Group dwarf galaxies. The SFHs were derived by analyzing color-magnitude diagrams of resolved stellar populations in archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 imaging. We find: (1) lower-mass galaxies quench earlier than higher-mass galaxies; (2) inside of Rvirial there is no correlation between a satellite’s current proximity to a massive host and its quenching epoch; and (3) there are hints of systematic differences in the quenching times of M31 and Milky Way (MW) satellites, although the sample size and uncertainties in the SFHs of M31 dwarfs prohibit definitive conclusions. Combined with results from the literature, we qualitatively consider the redshift evolution (z = 0-1) of the quenched galaxy fraction over ˜7 dex in stellar mass (104 ≲ {{M}\\star } ≲ 1011.5 {{M}⊙ }). The quenched fraction of all galaxies generally increases toward the present, with both the lowest and highest-mass systems exhibiting the largest quenched fractions at all redshifts. In contrast, galaxies between {{M}\\star } ˜ 108-1010 {{M}⊙ } have the lowest quenched fractions. We suggest that such intermediate-mass galaxies are the least efficient at quenching. Finally, we compare our quenching times with predictions for infall times for low-mass galaxies associated with the MW. We find that some of the lowest-mass satellites (e.g., CVn II, Leo IV) may have been quenched before infall, while higher-mass satellites (e.g., Leo I, Fornax) typically quench ˜1-4 Gyr after infall. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA constract NAS 5-26555.

  6. Investigating the burstiness of the star formation history of low-mass galaxies at intermediate redshifts with KECK/DEIMOS spectroscopy and CANDELS imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, Sandra M.; Rafelski, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The history of gas accretion, expulsion, and recycling, and star formation of low-mass galaxies (with stellar mass below 10^9 Msun) is thought to be stochastic and bursty. We combine the deep broad-band images of CANDELS and the high-resolution optical spectroscopy from Keck/DEIMOS surveys --- TKRS, DEEP2, DEEP3, and HALO7D --- to explore the star formation histories of low-mass galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.5≤z≤1.0). We study (1) the stellar mass (M)--gas-phase metallicity (Z) relation (MZR) and its scatter and (2) the ratio of star formation rates (SFRs) measured through FUV to that through Hβ (FUV--Hβ ratio). Our MZR sample is ˜20 times larger than those in previous studies beyond the local universe. This huge gain in sample size enables superior constraints on the MZR and its scatter in the low-mass regime. We find that the scatter of the MZR increases as mass decreases. For the FUV--Hβ ratio, we find that it increases with the decrease of mass and SFR. Both results can be explained by low-mass galaxies having a star formation history with more bursts than massive galaxies having. A simple model shows that the star formation occuring in starburst phases in low-mass galaxies is 5x higher than that in a constant star formation phase, while, for massive galaxies, the bursty phases of star formation is negligible. Finally, we find that our median FUV--Hβ ratio for low-mass galaxies is higher than that of local galaxies of the same mass, implying a redshift evolution.

  7. Magnetic inhibition of convection and the fundamental properties of low-mass stars. II. Fully convective main-sequence stars

    SciTech Connect

    Feiden, Gregory A.; Chaboyer, Brian E-mail: brian.chaboyer@dartmouth.edu

    2014-07-01

    We examine the hypothesis that magnetic fields are inflating the radii of fully convective main-sequence stars in detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs). The magnetic Dartmouth stellar evolution code is used to analyze two systems in particular: Kepler-16 and CM Draconis. Magneto-convection is treated assuming stabilization of convection and also by assuming reductions in convective efficiency due to a turbulent dynamo. We find that magnetic stellar models are unable to reproduce the properties of inflated fully convective main-sequence stars, unless strong interior magnetic fields in excess of 10 MG are present. Validation of the magnetic field hypothesis given the current generation of magnetic stellar evolution models therefore depends critically on whether the generation and maintenance of strong interior magnetic fields is physically possible. An examination of this requirement is provided. Additionally, an analysis of previous studies invoking the influence of star spots is presented to assess the suggestion that star spots are inflating stars and biasing light curve analyses toward larger radii. From our analysis, we find that there is not yet sufficient evidence to definitively support the hypothesis that magnetic fields are responsible for the observed inflation among fully convective main-sequence stars in DEBs.

  8. The Relationship Between Molecular Gas and Star Formation in Low-mass E/S0 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lisa H.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Baker, Andrew J.; Stark, David V.; Laine, Seppo

    2010-12-01

    We consider the relationship between molecular gas and star formation surface densities in 19 morphologically defined E/S0s with stellar mass lsim4 × 1010 M sun, paying particular attention to those found on the blue sequence in color versus stellar mass parameter space, where spiral galaxies typically reside. While some blue-sequence E/S0s must be young major-merger remnants, many low-mass blue-sequence E/S0s appear much less disturbed and may be experiencing the milder starbursts associated with inner-disk building as spirals (re)grow. For a sample of eight E/S0s (four blue, two mid, and two red sequence) whose CARMA CO(1-0), Spitzer MIPS 24 μm, and GALEX FUV emission distributions are spatially resolved on a 750 pc scale, we find roughly linear relationships between molecular gas and star formation surface densities within all galaxies, with power-law indices N = 0.6-1.9 (median 1.2). Adding 11 more blue-sequence E/S0s whose CO(1-0) emission is not as well resolved, we find that most of our E/S0s have global 1-8 kpc aperture-averaged molecular gas surface densities overlapping the range spanned by the disks and centers of spiral galaxies. While many of our E/S0s fall on the same Schmidt-Kennicutt relation as local spirals, ~80% (predominantly on the blue sequence) are offset toward apparently higher molecular gas star formation efficiency (i.e., shorter molecular gas depletion time). Possible interpretations of the elevated efficiencies include bursty star formation similar to that in local dwarf galaxies, H2 depletion in advanced starbursts, or simply a failure of the CO(1-0) emission to trace all of the molecular gas.

  9. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN LOW-MASS E/S0 GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Lisa H.; Vogel, Stuart N.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Baker, Andrew J.; Laine, Seppo

    2010-12-10

    We consider the relationship between molecular gas and star formation surface densities in 19 morphologically defined E/S0s with stellar mass {approx}<4 x 10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, paying particular attention to those found on the blue sequence in color versus stellar mass parameter space, where spiral galaxies typically reside. While some blue-sequence E/S0s must be young major-merger remnants, many low-mass blue-sequence E/S0s appear much less disturbed and may be experiencing the milder starbursts associated with inner-disk building as spirals (re)grow. For a sample of eight E/S0s (four blue, two mid, and two red sequence) whose CARMA CO(1-0), Spitzer MIPS 24 {mu}m, and GALEX FUV emission distributions are spatially resolved on a 750 pc scale, we find roughly linear relationships between molecular gas and star formation surface densities within all galaxies, with power-law indices N = 0.6-1.9 (median 1.2). Adding 11 more blue-sequence E/S0s whose CO(1-0) emission is not as well resolved, we find that most of our E/S0s have global 1-8 kpc aperture-averaged molecular gas surface densities overlapping the range spanned by the disks and centers of spiral galaxies. While many of our E/S0s fall on the same Schmidt-Kennicutt relation as local spirals, {approx}80% (predominantly on the blue sequence) are offset toward apparently higher molecular gas star formation efficiency (i.e., shorter molecular gas depletion time). Possible interpretations of the elevated efficiencies include bursty star formation similar to that in local dwarf galaxies, H{sub 2} depletion in advanced starbursts, or simply a failure of the CO(1-0) emission to trace all of the molecular gas.

  10. On 7LI Enrichment by Low-Mass Metal-Poor Red Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Reza, Ramiro; da Silva, Licio; Drake, Natalia A.; Terra, Marco A.

    2000-06-01

    First-ascent red giants with strong and very strong Li lines have just been discovered in globular clusters. Using the stellar internal prompt 7Li enrichment-mass-loss scenario, we explore the possibility of 7Li enrichment in the interstellar matter of the globular cluster M3 produced by these Li-rich giants. We found that enrichment as large as 70% or more compared to the initial 7Li content of M3 can be obtained during the entire life of this cluster. However, because M3 will cross into the Galactic plane several times, the new 7Li will be very probably removed by ram pressure into the disk. Globular clusters appear then as possible new sources of 7Li in the Galactic disk. It is also suggested that the known Na/Al variations in stars of globular clusters could be somehow related to the 7Li variations and that the cool bottom process mixing mechanism acting in the case of 7Li could also play a role in the case of Na and Al surface enrichments.