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Sample records for low-risk variants fgfr2

  1. Expression of the FGFR2 mesenchymal splicing variant in epithelial cells drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Ranieri, Danilo; Rosato, Benedetta; Nanni, Monica; Magenta, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The FGFRs are receptor tyrosine kinases expressed by tissue-specific alternative splicing in epithelial IIIb or mesenchymal IIIc isoforms. Deregulation of FGF/FGFR signaling unbalances the epithelial-stromal homeostasis and may lead to cancer development. In the epithelial-context, while FGFR2b/KGFR acts as tumor suppressor, FGFR2c appears to play an oncogenic role. Based on our recent observation that the switching of FGFR2b versus FGFR2c induces EMT, here we investigated the biological outcome of the ectopic expression of FGFR2c in normal human keratinocytes. Morphological analysis showed that, differently from FGFR2b overexpression, the forced expression and activation of FGFR2c drive the epithelial cells to acquire a mesenchymal-like shape and actin reorganization. Moreover, the appearance of invasiveness and anchorage-independent growth ability in FGFR2c transfected keratinocytes was consistent with the potential tumorigenic role proposed for this receptor variant. Biochemical and molecular approaches revealed that the observed phenotypic changes were accompanied by modulation of EMT biomarkers and indicated the involvement of EMT transcription factors and miRs. Finally, the analysis of the expression pattern of discriminating markers strongly suggested that activation of FGFR2c triggers a process corresponding to the initiation of the pathological type III EMT, but not to the more physiological type II EMT occurring during FGFR2b-mediated wound healing. PMID:26713601

  2. FGFR2 variants and breast cancer risk: fine-scale mapping using African American studies and analysis of chromatin conformation.

    PubMed

    Udler, Miriam S; Meyer, Kerstin B; Pooley, Karen A; Karlins, Eric; Struewing, Jeffery P; Zhang, Jinghui; Doody, David R; MacArthur, Stewart; Tyrer, Jonathan; Pharoah, Paul D; Luben, Robert; Bernstein, Leslie; Kolonel, Laurence N; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Ursin, Giske; Press, Michael F; Brennan, Paul; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Odefrey, Fabrice; Shen, Chen-Yang; Wu, Pei-Ei; Wang, Hui-Chun; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Ponder, Bruce A J; Haiman, Christopher A; Malone, Kathleen E; Dunning, Alison M; Ostrander, Elaine A; Easton, Douglas F

    2009-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified FGFR2 as a breast cancer (BC) susceptibility gene in populations of European and Asian descent, but a causative variant has not yet been conclusively identified. We hypothesized that the weaker linkage disequilibrium across this associated region in populations of African ancestry might help refine the set of candidate-causal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously identified by our group. Eight candidate-causal SNPs were evaluated in 1253 African American invasive BC cases and 1245 controls. A significant association with BC risk was found with SNP rs2981578 (unadjusted per-allele odds ratio = 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.41, P(trend) = 0.02), with the odds ratio estimate similar to that reported in European and Asian subjects. To extend the fine-mapping, genotype data from the African American studies were analyzed jointly with data from European (n = 7196 cases, 7275 controls) and Asian (n = 3901 cases, 3205 controls) studies. In the combined analysis, SNP rs2981578 was the most strongly associated. Five other SNPs were too strongly correlated to be excluded at a likelihood ratio of < 1/100 relative to rs2981578. Analysis of DNase I hypersensitive sites indicated that only two of these map to highly accessible chromatin, one of which, SNP rs2981578, has previously been implicated in up-regulating FGFR2 expression. Our results demonstrate that the association of SNPs in FGFR2 with BC risk extends to women of African American ethnicity, and illustrate the utility of combining association analysis in datasets of diverse ethnic groups with functional experiments to identify disease susceptibility variants. PMID:19223389

  3. Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus: Putative Functional Variants Differentially Bind FOXA1 and E2F1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Kerstin B.; O’Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carlebur, Saskia; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Prathalingham, Radhika; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; de Santiago, Ines; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias, Jose I.; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dur, Christina C.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Ditsch, Nina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Dörk, Thilo; Helbig, Sonja; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har; Phuah, Sze-Yee; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hartef; Eriksson, Kimael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Lim, Wei-Yen; Buhari, Shaik A.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Fostira, Florentia; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ERα to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease. PMID:24290378

  4. Identification of Functional Variants for Cleft Lip with or without Cleft Palate in or near PAX7, FGFR2, and NOG by Targeted Sequencing of GWAS Loci

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J.; Taub, Margaret A.; Liu, Huan; Steinberg, Karyn Meltz; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Zhang, Qunyuan; Carlson, Jenna C.; Hetmanski, Jacqueline B.; Wang, Hang; Larson, David E.; Fulton, Robert S.; Kousa, Youssef A.; Fakhouri, Walid D.; Naji, Ali; Ruczinski, Ingo; Begum, Ferdouse; Parker, Margaret M.; Busch, Tamara; Standley, Jennifer; Rigdon, Jennifer; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Scott, Alan F.; Wehby, George L.; Christensen, Kaare; Czeizel, Andrew E.; Deleyiannis, Frederic W.-B.; Schutte, Brian C.; Wilson, Richard K.; Cornell, Robert A.; Lidral, Andrew C.; Weinstock, George M.; Beaty, Terri H.; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) for nonsyndromic orofacial clefts have identified multiple strongly associated regions, the causal variants are unknown. To address this, we selected 13 regions from GWASs and other studies, performed targeted sequencing in 1,409 Asian and European trios, and carried out a series of statistical and functional analyses. Within a cluster of strongly associated common variants near NOG, we found that one, rs227727, disrupts enhancer activity. We furthermore identified significant clusters of non-coding rare variants near NTN1 and NOG and found several rare coding variants likely to affect protein function, including four nonsense variants in ARHGAP29. We confirmed 48 de novo mutations and, based on best biological evidence available, chose two of these for functional assays. One mutation in PAX7 disrupted the DNA binding of the encoded transcription factor in an in vitro assay. The second, a non-coding mutation, disrupted the activity of a neural crest enhancer downstream of FGFR2 both in vitro and in vivo. This targeted sequencing study provides strong functional evidence implicating several specific variants as primary contributory risk alleles for nonsyndromic clefting in humans. PMID:25704602

  5. FGFR2 risk SNPs confer breast cancer risk by augmenting oestrogen responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Thomas M.; Castro, Mauro A.A.; de Santiago, Ines; Fletcher, Michael N.C.; Halim, Silvia; Prathalingam, Radhika; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Meyer, Kerstin B.

    2016-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) locus is consistently the top hit in genome-wide association studies for oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. Yet, its mode of action continues to be controversial. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to demonstrate that signalling via FGFR2 counteracts cell activation by oestrogen. In the presence of oestrogen, the oestrogen receptor (ESR1) regulon (set of ESR1 target genes) is in an active state. However, signalling by FGFR2 is able to reverse the activity of the ESR1 regulon. This effect is seen in multiple distinct FGFR2 signalling model systems, across multiple cells lines and is dependent on the presence of FGFR2. Increased oestrogen exposure has long been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We therefore hypothesized that risk variants should reduce FGFR2 expression and subsequent signalling. Indeed, transient transfection experiments assaying the three independent variants of the FGFR2 risk locus (rs2981578, rs35054928 and rs45631563) in their normal chromosomal context show that these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) map to transcriptional silencer elements and that, compared with wild type, the risk alleles augment silencer activity. The presence of risk variants results in lower FGFR2 expression and increased oestrogen responsiveness. We thus propose a molecular mechanism by which FGFR2 can confer increased breast cancer risk that is consistent with oestrogen exposure as a major driver of breast cancer risk. Our findings may have implications for the clinical use of FGFR2 inhibitors. PMID:27236187

  6. FGFR2 risk SNPs confer breast cancer risk by augmenting oestrogen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Thomas M; Castro, Mauro A A; de Santiago, Ines; Fletcher, Michael N C; Halim, Silvia; Prathalingam, Radhika; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2016-08-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) locus is consistently the top hit in genome-wide association studies for oestrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancer. Yet, its mode of action continues to be controversial. Here, we employ a systems biology approach to demonstrate that signalling via FGFR2 counteracts cell activation by oestrogen. In the presence of oestrogen, the oestrogen receptor (ESR1) regulon (set of ESR1 target genes) is in an active state. However, signalling by FGFR2 is able to reverse the activity of the ESR1 regulon. This effect is seen in multiple distinct FGFR2 signalling model systems, across multiple cells lines and is dependent on the presence of FGFR2. Increased oestrogen exposure has long been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We therefore hypothesized that risk variants should reduce FGFR2 expression and subsequent signalling. Indeed, transient transfection experiments assaying the three independent variants of the FGFR2 risk locus (rs2981578, rs35054928 and rs45631563) in their normal chromosomal context show that these single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) map to transcriptional silencer elements and that, compared with wild type, the risk alleles augment silencer activity. The presence of risk variants results in lower FGFR2 expression and increased oestrogen responsiveness. We thus propose a molecular mechanism by which FGFR2 can confer increased breast cancer risk that is consistent with oestrogen exposure as a major driver of breast cancer risk. Our findings may have implications for the clinical use of FGFR2 inhibitors. PMID:27236187

  7. FGFR2c-mediated ERK-MAPK activity regulates coronal suture development.

    PubMed

    Pfaff, Miles J; Xue, Ke; Li, Li; Horowitz, Mark C; Steinbacher, Derek M; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P

    2016-07-15

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) signaling is critical for proper craniofacial development. A gain-of-function mutation in the 2c splice variant of the receptor's gene is associated with Crouzon syndrome, which is characterized by craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial vault sutures, leading to craniofacial maldevelopment. Insight into the molecular mechanism of craniosynostosis has identified the ERK-MAPK signaling cascade as a critical regulator of suture patency. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of FGFR2c-induced ERK-MAPK activation in the regulation of coronal suture development. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function Fgfr2c mutant mice have overlapping phenotypes, including coronal synostosis and craniofacial dysmorphia. In vivo analysis of coronal sutures in loss-of-function and gain-of-function models demonstrated fundamentally different pathogenesis underlying coronal suture synostosis. Calvarial osteoblasts from gain-of-function mice demonstrated enhanced osteoblastic function and maturation with concomitant increase in ERK-MAPK activation. In vitro inhibition with the ERK protein inhibitor U0126 mitigated ERK protein activation levels with a concomitant reduction in alkaline phosphatase activity. This study identifies FGFR2c-mediated ERK-MAPK signaling as a key mediator of craniofacial growth and coronal suture development. Furthermore, our results solve the apparent paradox between loss-of-function and gain-of-function FGFR2c mutants with respect to coronal suture synostosis. PMID:27034231

  8. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function.

    PubMed

    Walker, K A; Ikeda, Y; Zabbarova, I; Schaefer, C M; Bushnell, D; De Groat, W C; Kanai, A; Bates, C M

    2015-04-15

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2(BM-/-)). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2(BM-/-) bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  9. Role of FGFR2-signaling in the pathogenesis of acne

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    It is the purpose of this review to extend our understanding of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-2b-signaling network in the pathogenesis of acne. A new concept of the role of FGFR2b-signaling in dermal-epithelial interaction for skin appendage formation, pilosebaceous follicle homeostasis, comedogenesis, sebaceous gland proliferation and lipogenesis is presented. The FGFR2-gain-of-function mutations in Apert syndrome and unilateral acneiform nevus are most helpful model diseases pointing the way to androgen-dependent dermalepithelial FGFR2-signaling in acne. Androgen-mediated upregulation of FGFR2b-signaling in acne-prone skin appears to be involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. In organotypic skin cultures, keratinocyte-derived interleukin-1α stimulated fibroblasts to secrete FGF7 which stimulated FGFR2b-mediated keratinocyte proliferation. Postnatal deletion of FGFR2b in mice resulted in severe sebaceous gland atrophy. The importance of FGFR2b in sebaceous gland physiology is further supported by the mode of action of anti-acne agents which have been proposed to attenuate FGFR2b-signaling. Downregulation of FGFR2b-signaling by isotretinoin explains its therapeutic effect in acne. Downregulation of FGFR2b-signaling during the first trimester of pregnancy disturbs branched morphogenesis and explains retinoid embryotoxicity. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), the mediator of growth hormone during puberty, intracts with androgen-dependent FGFR2b-signaling and links androgen- and FGF-mediated signal transduction important in sebaceous gland homeostasis. The search for a follicular defect in the dermalepithelial regulation of growth factor-signaling in acne-prone skin appears to be a most promising approach to clarify the pathogenesis of acne. PMID:20436882

  10. Fgfr2 is integral for bladder mesenchyme patterning and function

    PubMed Central

    Walker, K. A.; Ikeda, Y.; Zabbarova, I.; Schaefer, C. M.; Bushnell, D.; De Groat, W. C.; Kanai, A.

    2015-01-01

    While urothelial signals, including sonic hedgehog (Shh), drive bladder mesenchyme differentiation, it is unclear which pathways within the mesenchyme are critical for its development. Studies have shown that fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr)2 is necessary for kidney and ureter mesenchymal development. The objective of the present study was to determine the role of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme. We used Tbx18cre mice to delete Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme (Fgfr2BM−/−). We performed three-dimensional reconstructions, quantitative real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, immunolabeling, ELISAs, immunoblot analysis, void stain on paper, ex vivo bladder sheet assays, and in vivo decerebrated cystometry. Compared with control bladders, embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5) Fgfr2BM−/− bladders had thin muscle layers with less α-smooth muscle actin and thickened lamina propria with increased collagen type Ia and IIIa that intruded into the muscle. The reciprocal changes in mutant layer thicknesses appeared partly due to a cell fate switch. From postnatal days 1 to 30, Fgfr2BM−/− bladders demonstrated progressive muscle loss and increased collagen expression. Postnatal Fgfr2BM−/− bladder sheets exhibited decreased agonist-mediated contractility and increased passive stretch tension versus control bladder sheets. Cystometry revealed high baseline and threshold pressures and shortened intercontractile intervals in Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Mechanistically, whereas Shh expression appeared normal, mRNA and protein readouts of hedgehog activity were increased in E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− versus control bladders. Moreover, E16.5 Fgfr2BM−/− bladders exhibited higher levels of Cdo and Boc, hedgehog coreceptors that enhance sensitivity to Shh, compared with control bladders. In conclusion, loss of Fgfr2 in the bladder mesenchyme leads to abnormal bladder morphology and decreased compliance and contractility. PMID:25656370

  11. FGFR2 mutation in 46,XY sex reversal with craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Fam, Stefan; Ono, Makoto; Li, Li; Zhao, Liang; Ryan, Janelle; Lai, Raymond; Katsura, Yukako; Rossello, Fernando J; Koopman, Peter; Scherer, Gerd; Bartsch, Oliver; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P; Harley, Vincent R

    2015-12-01

    Patients with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis (GD) exhibit genital anomalies, which range from hypospadias to complete male-to-female sex reversal. However, a molecular diagnosis is made in only 30% of cases. Heterozygous mutations in the human FGFR2 gene cause various craniosynostosis syndromes including Crouzon and Pfeiffer, but testicular defects were not reported. Here, we describe a patient whose features we would suggest represent a new FGFR2-related syndrome, craniosynostosis with XY male-to-female sex reversal or CSR. The craniosynostosis patient was chromosomally XY, but presented as a phenotypic female due to complete GD. DNA sequencing identified the FGFR2c heterozygous missense mutation, c.1025G>C (p.Cys342Ser). Substitution of Cys342 by Ser or other amino acids (Arg/Phe/Try/Tyr) has been previously reported in Crouzon and Pfeiffer syndrome. We show that the 'knock-in' Crouzon mouse model Fgfr2c(C342Y/C342Y) carrying a Cys342Tyr substitution displays XY gonadal sex reversal with variable expressivity. We also show that despite FGFR2c-Cys342Tyr being widely considered a gain-of-function mutation, Cys342Tyr substitution in the gonad leads to loss of function, as demonstrated by sex reversal in Fgfr2c(C342Y/-) mice carrying the knock-in allele on a null background. The rarity of our patient suggests the influence of modifier genes which exacerbated the testicular phenotype. Indeed, patient whole exome analysis revealed several potential modifiers expressed in Sertoli cells at the time of testis determination in mice. In summary, this study identifies the first FGFR2 mutation in a 46,XY GD patient. We conclude that, in certain rare genetic contexts, maintaining normal levels of FGFR2 signaling is important for human testis determination. PMID:26362256

  12. Tissue-specific roles of Fgfr2 in development of the external genitalia

    PubMed Central

    Gredler, Marissa L.; Seifert, Ashley W.; Cohn, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital anomalies frequently occur in organs that undergo tubulogenesis. Hypospadias is a urethral tube defect defined by mislocalized, oversized, or multiple openings of the penile urethra. Deletion of Fgfr2 or its ligand Fgf10 results in severe hypospadias in mice, in which the entire urethral plate is open along the ventral side of the penis. In the genital tubercle, the embryonic precursor of the penis and clitoris, Fgfr2 is expressed in two epithelial populations: the endodermally derived urethral epithelium and the ectodermally derived surface epithelium. Here, we investigate the tissue-specific roles of Fgfr2 in external genital development by generating conditional deletions of Fgfr2 in each of these cell types. Conditional deletion of Fgfr2 results in two distinct phenotypes: endodermal Fgfr2 deletion causes mild hypospadias and inhibits maturation of a complex urethral epithelium, whereas loss of ectodermal Fgfr2 results in severe hypospadias and absence of the ventral prepuce. Although these cell type-specific mutants exhibit distinctive genital anomalies, cellular analysis reveals that Fgfr2 regulates epithelial maturation and cell cycle progression in the urethral endoderm and in the surface ectoderm. The unexpected finding that ectodermal deletion of Fgfr2 results in the most severe hypospadias highlights a major role for Fgfr2 in the developing genital surface epithelium, where epithelial maturation is required for maintenance of a closed urethral tube. These results demonstrate that urethral tubulogenesis, prepuce morphogenesis, and sexually dimorphic patterning of the lower urethra are controlled by discrete regions of Fgfr2 activity. PMID:26081573

  13. Association between rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene and the risk of breast cancer in Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Zamora, Efrén; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Ziv, Elad; Romieu, Isabelle; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Ángeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Pérez-Rodríguez, Edelmiro; Vidal-Millán, Silvia; Fejerman, Laura; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The rs2981582 single nucleotide polymorphism in the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 gene has been consistently associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene on the risk of breast cancer and its interaction with non-genetic risk factors. Methods A population based case control study was conducted in Mexico. Data from 687 cases and 907 controls were analyzed. Results The T allele of the rs2981582 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (OR per allele =1.24, 95% CI 1.06 – 1.46). There was also an interaction between this polymorphism and alcohol consumption (p = 0.043); the effect of alcohol consumption on the risk of breast cancer varied according to the allelic variants of the rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene: OR = 3.97 (95% CI 2.10 – 7.49), OR = 2.01 (95% CI 1.23 − 3.29) and OR = 1.21 (95% CI 0.48 − 3.05) for genotypes CC, CT and TT, respectively. Conclusions This is the first study exploring the association between rs2981582 polymorphism in the FGFR2 gene and breast cancer risk in Mexican women. The interaction found may be of great public health interest, since alcohol consumption is a modifiable breast cancer risk factor. Therefore, replication of this finding is of foremost importance. PMID:24054997

  14. Antitumor effects and molecular mechanisms of ponatinib on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hee; Kwak, Yeonui; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and 5 mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocked anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs. PMID:26574622

  15. Switching addictions between HER2 and FGFR2 in HER2-positive breast tumor cells: FGFR2 as a potential target for salvage after lapatinib failure

    SciTech Connect

    Azuma, Koichi; Tsurutani, Junji; Sakai, Kazuko; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Fujisaka, Yasuhito; Takeda, Masayuki; Watatani, Masahiro; Arao, Tokuzo; Satoh, Taroh; Okamoto, Isamu; Kurata, Takayasu; Nishio, Kazuto; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2011-04-01

    Highlights: {yields} A lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cell line, UACC812 (UACC812/LR), was found to harbor amplification of the FGFR2 gene. {yields} Inhibition of the molecule by a specific inhibitor of FGFR dramatically induced growth inhibition accompanied by cell death. {yields} Immunohistochemical analysis of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer demonstrated an association between FGFR2 expression and poor outcome for lapatinib-containing chemotherapy. -- Abstract: Agents that target HER2 have improved the prognosis of patients with HER2-amplified breast cancers. However, patients who initially respond to such targeted therapy eventually develop resistance to the treatment. We have established a line of lapatinib-resistant breast cancer cells (UACC812/LR) by chronic exposure of HER2-amplified and lapatinib-sensitive UACC812 cells to the drug. The mechanism by which UACC812/LR acquired resistance to lapatinib was explored using comprehensive gene hybridization. The FGFR2 gene in UACC812/LR was highly amplified, accompanied by overexpression of FGFR2 and reduced expression of HER2, and a cell proliferation assay showed that the IC{sub 50} of PD173074, a small-molecule inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase, was 10,000 times lower in UACC812/LR than in the parent cells. PD173074 decreased the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and substantially induced apoptosis in UACC812/LR, but not in the parent cells. FGFR2 appeared to be a pivotal molecule for the survival of UACC812/LR as they became independent of the HER2 pathway, suggesting that a switch of addiction from the HER2 to the FGFR2 pathway enabled cancer cells to become resistant to HER2-targeted therapy. The present study is the first to implicate FGFR in the development of resistance to lapatinib in cancer, and suggests that FGFR-targeted therapy might become a promising salvage strategy after lapatinib failure in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

  16. Novel Molecular Pathways Elicited by Mutant FGFR2 May Account for Brain Abnormalities in Apert Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Erika; Fanganiello, Roberto D.; Sunaga, Daniele Y.; Zhou, Xueyan; Holmes, Gregory; Rocha, Katia M.; Alonso, Nivaldo; Matushita, Hamilton; Wang, Yingli; Jabs, Ethylin W.; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita

    2013-01-01

    Apert syndrome (AS), the most severe form craniosynostosis, is characterized by premature fusion of coronal sutures. Approximately 70% of AS patients carry S252W gain-of-function mutation in FGFR2. Besides the cranial phenotype, brain dysmorphologies are present and are not seen in other FGFR2-asociated craniosynostosis, such as Crouzon syndrome (CS). Here, we hypothesized that S252W mutation leads not only to overstimulation of FGFR2 downstream pathway, but likewise induces novel pathological signaling. First, we profiled global gene expression of wild-type and S252W periosteal fibroblasts stimulated with FGF2 to activate FGFR2. The great majority (92%) of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were divergent between each group of cell populations and they were regulated by different transcription factors. We than compared gene expression profiles between AS and CS cell populations and did not observe correlations. Therefore, we show for the first time that S252W mutation in FGFR2 causes a unique cell response to FGF2 stimulation. Since our gene expression results suggested that novel signaling elicited by mutant FGFR2 might be associated with central nervous system (CNS) development and maintenance, we next investigated if DEGs found in AS cells were also altered in the CNS of an AS mouse model. Strikingly, we validated Strc (stereocilin) in newborn Fgfr2S252W/+ mouse brain. Moreover, immunostaining experiments suggest a role for endothelial cells and cerebral vasculature in the establishment of characteristic CNS dysmorphologies in AS that has not been proposed by previous literature. Our approach thus led to the identification of new target genes directly or indirectly associated with FGFR2 which are contributing to the pathophysiology of AS. PMID:23593218

  17. Targeting FGFR2 with alofanib (RPT835) shows potent activity in tumour models.

    PubMed

    Tsimafeyeu, Ilya; Ludes-Meyers, John; Stepanova, Evgenia; Daeyaert, Frits; Kochenkov, Dmitry; Joose, Jean-Baptiste; Solomko, Eliso; Van Akene, Koen; Peretolchina, Nina; Yin, Wei; Ryabaya, Oxana; Byakhov, Mikhail; Tjulandin, Sergei

    2016-07-01

    Alofanib (RPT835) is a novel selective allosteric inhibitor of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We showed previously that alofanib could bind to the extracellular domain of FGFR2 and has an inhibitory effect on FGF2-induced phoshphorylation of FRS2α. In the present study, we further showed that alofanib inhibited phosphorylation of FRS2α with the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 7 and 9 nmol/l in cancer cells expressing different FGFR2 isoforms. In a panel of four cell lines representing several tumour types (triple-negative breast cancer, melanoma, and ovarian cancer), alofanib inhibited FGF-mediated proliferation with 50% growth inhibition (GI50) values of 16-370 nmol/l. Alofanib dose dependently inhibited the proliferation and migration of human and mouse endothelial cells (GI50 11-58 nmol/l) compared with brivanib and bevacizumab. Treatment with alofanib ablated experimental FGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. In a FGFR-driven human tumour xenograft model, oral administration of alofanib was well tolerated and resulted in potent antitumour activity. Importantly, alofanib was effective in FGFR2-expressing models. These results show that alofanib is a potent FGFR2 inhibitor and provide strong rationale for its evaluation in patients with FGFR2-driven cancers. PMID:27136102

  18. Molecular analysis of exons 8, 9 and 10 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene in two families with index cases of Apert Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Gualberto; Barrera, Alejandro; Ospina, Sandra; Prada, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Apert syndrome (AS) is a craniosynostosis condition caused by mutations in the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. Clinical features include cutaneous and osseous symmetric syndactily in hands and feet, with variable presentations in bones, brain, skin and other internal organs. Methods: Members of two families with an index case of Apert Syndrome were assessed to describe relevant clinical features and molecular analysis (sequencing and amplification) of exons 8, 9 and 10 of FGFR2 gen. Results: Family 1 consists of the mother, the index case and half -brother who has a cleft lip and palate. In this family we found a single FGFR2 mutation, S252W, in the sequence of exon 8. Although mutations were not found in the study of the patient affected with cleft lip and palate, it is known that these diseases share signaling pathways, allowing suspected alterations in shared genes. In the patient of family 2, we found a sequence variant T78.501A located near the splicing site, which could interfere in this process, and consequently with the protein function. PMID:26600631

  19. Molecular analysis of FGFR 2 and associated clinical observations in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying; Gao, Hongbin; Ai, Siming; Eswarakumar, Jacob V.P.; Li, Tao; Liu, Bingqian; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Yuhua; Liu, Xialin; Li, Yonghao; Ni, Yao; Chen, Jiangna; Lin, Zhuoling; Liang, Xiaoling; Jin, Chenjin; Huang, Xinhua; Lu, Lin; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome, a dominantly inherited disorder and the most common type of craniosynostosis syndrome, is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene, and characterized by craniosynostosis, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis, midface hypoplasia and a curved, beak-like nose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome and to characterize the associated clinical features. Two families underwent complete ophthalmic examination, and three patients in two families were diagnosed with Crouzon syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of peripheral blood samples, which were collected from the family members and 200 unrelated control subjects from the same population. Exons 8 and 10 of the FGFR 2 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction analysis and were directly sequenced. Ophthalmic examinations, including best-corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp examination, fundus examination and Computerized Tomography scans, and physical examinations were performed to exclude systemic diseases. These patients were affected with shallow orbits and ocular proptosis, accompanied by midface hypoplasia, craniosynostosis, strabismus or papilloedema, with clinically normal hands and feet. A heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.811-812insGAG (p.273insGlu) in exon 8 was identified in the affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals in family 1. In family 2, another heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.842A>G (P.Tyr281Cys or Y281C), in exon 8 was identified in the affected boy and his mother, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals. Although FGFR 2 gene mutations and polymorphisms have been reported in various ethnic groups, particularly in the area of osteology, the present study reported for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the

  20. Novel mutation detection of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, FGFR2IIIa, FGFR2IIIb, FGFR2IIIc, FGFR3, FGFR4 gene for craniosynostosis: A prospective study in Asian Indian patient

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Malhotra, Arun; Samantaray, Jyotish Chandra; Dwivedi, Sadananda; Das, Sambhunath

    2015-01-01

    Background: Craniosynostosis (CS) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition classically combining craniosynostosis and non-syndromic craniosynostosis with digital anomalies of the hands and feet. The majority of cases are caused by heterozygous mutations in the third immunoglobulin-like domain (IgIII) of FGFR2, whilst a larger number of cases can be attributed to mutations outside this region of the protein. Aims: To find out the FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3 and FGFR4 gene in craniosynostosis syndrome. Settings and Design: A hospital based prospective study. Materials and Methods: Prospective analysis of clinical records of patients registered in CS clinic from December 2007 to January 2015 was done in patients between 4 months to 13 years of age. We have performed genetic findings in a three generation Indian family with Craniosynostosis syndrome. Results: We report for the first time the clinical and genetic findings in a three generation Indian family with Craniosynostosis syndrome caused by a heterozygous missense mutation, Thr 392 Thr and ser 311 try, located in the IgII domain of FGFR2. FGFR 3 and 4 gene basis syndrome was eponymously named. Genetic analysis demonstrated that 51/56 families to be unrelated. In FGFR3 gene 10/TM location of 1172 the nucleotide changes C>A, Ala 391 Glu 19/56 and Exon-19, 5q35.2 at conserved linker region the changes occurred pro 246 Arg in 25/56 families. Conclusions: Independent genetic origins, but phenotypic similarities in the 51 families add to the evidence supporting the theory of selfish spermatogonial selective advantage for this rare gain-of-function FGFR2 mutation. PMID:26557159

  1. Ectrodactyly and Lethal Pulmonary Acinar Dysplasia Associated with Homozygous FGFR2 Mutations Identified by Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Christopher P; Nataren, Nathalie J; Klingler-Hoffmann, Manuela; Schwarz, Quenten; Chong, Chan-Eng; Lee, Young K; Bruno, Damien L; Lipsett, Jill; McPhee, Andrew J; Schreiber, Andreas W; Feng, Jinghua; Hahn, Christopher N; Scott, Hamish S

    2016-09-01

    Ectrodactyly/split hand-foot malformation is genetically heterogeneous with more than 100 syndromic associations. Acinar dysplasia is a rare congenital lung lesion of unknown etiology, which is frequently lethal postnatally. To date, there have been no reports of combinations of these two phenotypes. Here, we present an infant from a consanguineous union with both ectrodactyly and autopsy confirmed acinar dysplasia. SNP array and whole-exome sequencing analyses of the affected infant identified a novel homozygous Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) missense mutation (p.R255Q) in the IgIII domain (D3). Expression studies of Fgfr2 in development show localization to the affected limbs and organs. Molecular modeling and genetic and functional assays support that this mutation is at least a partial loss-of-function mutation, and contributes to ectrodactyly and acinar dysplasia only in homozygosity, unlike previously reported heterozygous activating FGFR2 mutations that cause Crouzon, Apert, and Pfeiffer syndromes. This is the first report of mutations in a human disease with ectrodactyly with pulmonary acinar dysplasia and, as such, homozygous loss-of-function FGFR2 mutations represent a unique syndrome. PMID:27323706

  2. Bent bone dysplasia (BBD)-FGFR2 type: the radiologic manifestations in early gestation.

    PubMed

    Handa, Atsuhiko; Okajima, Yuka; Izumi, Noriko; Yamanaka, Michiko; Kurihara, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Bent bone dysplasia-fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 type (BBD-FGFR2) is a recently identified skeletal dysplasia caused by specific FGFR2 mutations, characterized by craniosynostosis and prenatal bowing of the long bones. Only a few cases have been published. We report an affected fetus terminated at 21 weeks of gestation. The clinical and radiologic manifestations mostly recapitulate previous descriptions; however we suggest additional hallmarks of this disorder in early gestation. These hallmarks include distinctive short, thick clavicles and wavy ribs, as well as vertebral bodies that showed striking anteroposterior shortening. Femoral fractures were also present in our case. Although craniosynostosis is a hallmark of the disease, clinicians should be aware that craniosynostosis might not be readily apparent on plain films early in gestation. PMID:26446305

  3. FGFR2 Is Amplified in the NCI-H716 Colorectal Cancer Cell Line and Is Required for Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Anjili; Ware, Christopher; Davis, Lenora; Gazdar, Adi; Pan, Bo-Sheng; Lutterbach, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant kinase activation resulting from mutation, amplification, or translocation can drive growth and survival in a subset of human cancer. FGFR2 is amplified in breast and gastric cancer, and we report here the first characterization of FGFR2 gene amplification in colorectal cancer in the NCI-H716 colorectal cancer cell line. FGFR2 is highly expressed and activated in NCI-H716 cells, and FGFR selective small molecule inhibitors or FGFR2 shRNA strongly inhibited cell viability in vitro, indicating “addiction” of NCI-H716 cells to FGFR2. NCI-H716 growth in a xenograft model was also inhibited by an FGFR small molecule inhibitor. FGFR2 was required for activation of multiple downstream signaling proteins including AKT, ERK, S6RP and NFKB. Inhibition of downstream kinases such as AKT or ERK alone had modest effects on proliferation, whereas combined inhibition of AKT and ERK signaling resulted in a loss of viability similar to FGFR2 inhibition. We identified elevated FGFR2 expression in a small subset of primary colorectal cancer, however FGFR2 amplification was not observed. Although FGFR2 amplification is not common in primary colon cancer or lymph node and liver metastases, other subsets of colorectal cancer such as ascites, from which the NCI-H716 cell line was derived, have yet to be tested. These results suggest that emerging FGFR inhibitor therapeutics may have efficacy in a subset of colon cancer driven by FGFR2 amplification. PMID:24968263

  4. FGFR2 signaling underlies p63 oncogenic function in squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Matthew R.; Wilson, Catherine; Ory, Benjamin; Rothenberg, S. Michael; Faquin, William; Mills, Alea A.; Ellisen, Leif W.

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors drive many human cancers, yet identifying and therapeutically targeting the resulting deregulated pathways has proven difficult. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common and lethal human cancer, and relatively little progress has been made in improving outcomes for SCC due to a poor understanding of its underlying molecular pathogenesis. While SCCs typically lack somatic oncogene-activating mutations, they exhibit frequent overexpression of the p53-related transcription factor p63. We developed an in vivo murine tumor model to investigate the function and key transcriptional programs of p63 in SCC. Here, we show that established SCCs are exquisitely dependent on p63, as acute genetic ablation of p63 in advanced, invasive SCC induced rapid and dramatic apoptosis and tumor regression. In vivo genome-wide gene expression analysis identified a tumor-survival program involving p63-regulated FGFR2 signaling that was activated by ligand emanating from abundant tumor-associated stroma. Correspondingly, we demonstrate the therapeutic efficacy of extinguishing this signaling axis in endogenous SCCs using the clinical FGFR2 inhibitor AZD4547. Collectively, these results reveal an unanticipated role for p63-driven paracrine FGFR2 signaling as an addicting pathway in human cancer and suggest a new approach for the treatment of SCC. PMID:23867503

  5. miR-494 inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis by targeting FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, XIAOJUAN; ZHOU, YUN; CHEN, YU; YU, FENG

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been reported to be key regulators in numerous types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of miR-494 in ovarian cancer. Expression of miR-494 was analyzed in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). miR-494 mimic or negative control was transiently transfected into A2780 and SKOV3 cell lines. A cell counting kit-8 assay was performed to assess the effects of miR-494 on cell proliferation, and flow cytometry was used to evaluate the apoptotic rate. The target gene of miR-494 was detected by luciferase assay. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) was identified using RT-qPCR and western blotting. In the present study, decreased expression of miR-494 was observed in ovarian cancer samples and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-494 inhibited ovarian cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Additional investigation indicated that FGFR2 was a direct target of miR-494. Taken together, the results of the present study suggested that miR-494 suppressed ovarian cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis via targeting FGFR2. PMID:27313773

  6. The role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) in differentiation of bovine spermatogonial stem cells (SCC)

    PubMed Central

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The receptors 1 and 2 of fibroblast growth factor (FGFR1 and FGFR2, respectively) have been observed in all types of testicular cells. Culture on extracellular matrix (ECM) has been observed to lead to initiation of differentiation in spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). The present study was carried out to investigate whether FGFR1 and FGFR2 play a role in SSCs differentiation. Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured on ECM-coated or uncoated (control) plates for 12 days. The gene expression of THY1, cKIT, FGFR1 and FGFR2 was evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results related to the gene expression of markers of with undifferentiated (THY1) and differentiated (cKIT) spermatogonia implicated stimulation of self-renewal and differentiation in cells cultured on ECM-coated and uncoated plates, respectively (p < 0.05). Concomitantly, the expression of FGFR2 increased during culture in the ECM group (p < 0.05), whereas it did not change in the control group (p > 0.05). As a result, the gene expression of FGFR2 was greater in the ECM than control group (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, FGFR1 expression did not change during culture in the control and ECM groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study revealed the potential role of FGFR2 in differentiation of SSCs during culture on ECM. PMID:27482360

  7. FGF/FGFR2 Signaling Regulates the Generation and Correct Positioning of Bergmann Glia Cells in the Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Matheus, Friederike; Simeone, Antonio; Hölter, Sabine M.; Kühn, Ralf; Weisenhorn, Daniela M. Vogt.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Prakash, Nilima

    2014-01-01

    The normal cellular organization and layering of the vertebrate cerebellum is established during embryonic and early postnatal development by the interplay of a complex array of genetic and signaling pathways. Disruption of these processes and of the proper layering of the cerebellum usually leads to ataxic behaviors. Here, we analyzed the relative contribution of Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated signaling to cerebellar development in conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice. We show that during embryonic mouse development, Fgfr2 expression is higher in the anterior cerebellar primordium and excluded from the proliferative ventricular neuroepithelium. Consistent with this finding, conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice display the most prominent defects in the anterior lobules of the adult cerebellum. In this context, FGFR2-mediated signaling is required for the proper generation of Bergmann glia cells and the correct positioning of these cells within the Purkinje cell layer, and for cell survival in the developing cerebellar primordium. Using cerebellar microexplant cultures treated with an FGFR agonist (FGF9) or antagonist (SU5402), we also show that FGF9/FGFR-mediated signaling inhibits the outward migration of radial glia and Bergmann glia precursors and cells, and might thus act as a positioning cue for these cells. Altogether, our findings reveal the specific functions of the FGFR2-mediated signaling pathway in the generation and positioning of Bergmann glia cells during cerebellar development in the mouse. PMID:24983448

  8. The role of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) in differentiation of bovine spermatogonial stem cells (SCC).

    PubMed

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    The receptors 1 and 2 of fibroblast growth factor (FGFR1 and FGFR2, respectively) have been observed in all types of testicular cells. Culture on extracellular matrix (ECM) has been observed to lead to initiation of differentiation in spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs). The present study was carried out to investigate whether FGFR1 and FGFR2 play a role in SSCs differentiation. Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured on ECM-coated or uncoated (control) plates for 12 days. The gene expression of THY1, cKIT, FGFR1 and FGFR2 was evaluated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results related to the gene expression of markers of with undifferentiated (THY1) and differentiated (cKIT) spermatogonia implicated stimulation of self-renewal and differentiation in cells cultured on ECM-coated and uncoated plates, respectively (p < 0.05). Concomitantly, the expression of FGFR2 increased during culture in the ECM group (p < 0.05), whereas it did not change in the control group (p > 0.05). As a result, the gene expression of FGFR2 was greater in the ECM than control group (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, FGFR1 expression did not change during culture in the control and ECM groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the present study revealed the potential role of FGFR2 in differentiation of SSCs during culture on ECM. PMID:27482360

  9. Craniofacial divergence by distinct prenatal growth patterns in Fgfr2 mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Differences in cranial morphology arise due to changes in fundamental cell processes like migration, proliferation, differentiation and cell death driven by genetic programs. Signaling between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) affect these processes during head development and mutations in FGFRs result in congenital diseases including FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes. Current research in model organisms focuses primarily on how these mutations change cell function local to sutures under the hypothesis that prematurely closing cranial sutures contribute to skull dysmorphogenesis. Though these studies have provided fundamentally important information contributing to the understanding of craniosynostosis conditions, knowledge of changes in cell function local to the sutures leave change in overall three-dimensional cranial morphology largely unexplained. Here we investigate growth of the skull in two inbred mouse models each carrying one of two gain-of-function mutations in FGFR2 on neighboring amino acids (S252W and P253R) that in humans cause Apert syndrome, one of the most severe FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes. We examine late embryonic skull development and suture patency in Fgfr2 Apert syndrome mice between embryonic day 17.5 and birth and quantify the effects of these mutations on 3D skull morphology, suture patency and growth. Results We show in mice what studies in humans can only infer: specific cranial growth deviations occur prenatally and worsen with time in organisms carrying these FGFR2 mutations. We demonstrate that: 1) distinct skull morphologies of each mutation group are established by E17.5; 2) cranial suture patency patterns differ between mice carrying these mutations and their unaffected littermates; 3) the prenatal skull grows differently in each mutation group; and 4) unique Fgfr2-related cranial morphologies are exacerbated by late embryonic growth patterns. Conclusions Our analysis of

  10. Suramin blocks interaction between human FGF1 and FGFR2 D2 domain and reduces downstream signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zong-Sian; Liu, Che Fu; Fu, Brian; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-09-01

    The extracellular portion of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor2 D2 domain (FGFR2 D2) interacts with human fibroblast growth factor 1 (hFGF1) to activate a downstream signaling cascade that ultimately affects mitosis and differentiation. Suramin is an antiparasiticdrug and a potent inhibitor of FGF-induced angiogenesis. Suramin has been shown to bind to hFGF1, and might block the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. Here, we titrated hFGF1 with FGFR2 D2 and suramin to elucidate their interactions using the detection of NMR. The docking results of both hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 domain and hFGF1-suramin complex were superimposed. The results indicate that suramin blocks the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. We used the PyMOL software to show the hydrophobic interaction of hFGF1-suramin. In addition, we used a Water-soluble Tetrazolium salts assay (WST1) to assess hFGF1 bioactivity. The results will be useful for the development of new antimitogenic activity drugs. PMID:27387234

  11. Formononetin, a novel FGFR2 inhibitor, potently inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in preclinical models

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhen Feng; Chen, Che; Liu, Jia Yun; Wu, Guan Nan; Yao, Xue Quan; Liu, Fu Kun; Li, Gang; Shen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified formononetin as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities. Formononetin demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, formononetin suppressed FGF2-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of formononetin on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that formononetin suppressed FGF2-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (Akt) signaling. Moreover, formononetin directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer, formononetin showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Moreover, formononetin enhanced the effect of VEGFR2 inhibitor sunitinib on tumor growth inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that formononetin targets the FGFR2-mediated Akt signaling pathway, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:26575424

  12. Differential effects of FGFR2 mutations on syndactyly and cleft palate in Apert syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Slaney, S. F.; Oldridge, M.; Hurst, J. A.; Moriss-Kay, G. M.; Hall, C. M.; Poole, M. D.; Wilkie, A. O.

    1996-01-01

    Apert syndrome is a distinctive human malformation characterized by craniosynostosis and severe syndactyly of the hands and feet. It is caused by specific missense substitutions involving adjacent amino acids (Ser252Trp or Pro253Arg) in the linker between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We have developed a simple PCR assay for these mutations in genomic DNA, based on the creation of novel (SfiI) and (BstUI) restriction sites. Analysis of DNA from 70 unrelated patients with Apert syndrome showed that 45 had the Ser252Trp mutation and 25 had the Pro253Arg mutation. Phenotypic differences between these two groups of patients were investigated. Significant differences were found for severity of syndactyly and presence of cleft palate. The syndactyly was more severe with the Pro253Arg mutation, for both the hands and the feet. In contrast, cleft palate was significantly more common in the Ser252Trp patients. No convincing differences were found in the prevalence of other malformations associated with Apert syndrome. We conclude that, although the phenotype attributable to the two mutations is very similar, there are subtle differences. The opposite trends for severity of syndactyly and cleft palate in relation to the two mutations may relate to the varying patterns of temporal and tissue-specific expression of different fibroblast growth factors, the ligands for FGFR2. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8651276

  13. Differential effects of FGFR2 mutations on syndactyly and cleft palate in Apert syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Slaney, S.F.; Oldridge, M.; Wilkie, A.O.M.

    1996-05-01

    Apert syndrome is a distinctive human malformation characterized by craniosynostosis and severe syndactyly of the hands and feet. It is caused by specific missense substitutions involving adjacent amino acids (Ser252Trp or Pro253Arg) in the linker between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We have developed a simple PCR assay for these mutations in genomic DNA, based on the creation of novel SfiI and BstUI restriction sites. Analysis of DNA from 70 unrelated patients with Apert syndrome showed that 45 had the Ser252Trp mutation and 25 had the Pro253Arg mutation. Phenotypic differences between these two groups of patients were investigated. Significant differences were found for severity of syndactyly and presence of cleft palate. The syndactyly was more severe with the Pro253Arg mutation, for both the hands and the feet. In contrast, cleft palate was significantly more common in the Ser252Trp patients. No convincing differences were found in the prevalence of other malformations associated with Apert syndrome. We conclude that, although the phenotype attributable to the two mutations is very similar, there are subtle differences. The opposite trends for severity of syndactyly and cleft palate in relation to the two mutations may relate to the varying patterns of temporal and tissue-specific expression of different fibroblast growth factors, the ligands for FGFR2. 54 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. HER2, MET and FGFR2 oncogenic driver alterations define distinct molecular segments for targeted therapies in gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y J; Shen, D; Yin, X; Gavine, P; Zhang, T; Su, X; Zhan, P; Xu, Y; Lv, J; Qian, J; Liu, C; Sun, Y; Qian, Z; Zhang, J; Gu, Y; Ni, X

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastric cancer (GC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Since the approval of trastuzumab, targeted therapies are emerging as promising treatment options for the disease. This study aimed to explore the molecular segmentation of several known therapeutics targets, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), MET and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), within GC using clinically approved or investigational kits and scoring criteria. Knowledge of how these markers are segmented in the same cohort of GC patients could improve future clinical trial designs. Methods: Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and FISH methods, overexpression and amplification of HER2, FGFR2 and MET were profiled in a cohort of Chinese GC samples. The correlations between anti-tumour sensitivity and the molecular segments of HER2, MET and FGFR2 alterations were further tested in a panel of GC cell lines and the patient-derived GC xenograft (PDGCX) model using the targeted inhibitors. Results: Of 172 GC patients, positivity for HER2, MET and FGFR2 alternations was found in 23 (13.4%), 21 (12.2%) and 9 (5.2%) patients, respectively. Positivity for MET was found in 3 of 23 HER2-positive GC patients. Co-positivity for FGFR2 and MET was found in 1 GC patient, and amplification of the two genes was found in different tumour cells. Our study in a panel of GC cell lines showed that in most cell lines, amplification or high expression of a particular molecular marker was mutually exclusive and in vitro sensitivity to the targeted agents lapatinib, PD173074 and crizotinib was only observed in cell lines with the corresponding high expression of the drugs' target protein. SGC031, an MET-positive PDGCX mouse model, responded to crizotinib but not to lapatinib or PD173074. Conclusions: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, MET and FGFR2 oncogenic driver alterations (gene amplification and overexpression) occur in three largely distinct molecular segments in GC. A

  15. Expression pattern of FGFR2, Grb2 and Plcγ1 acts as a novel prognostic marker of recurrence recurrence-free survival in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Timsah, Zahra; Berrout, Jonathan; Suraokar, Milind; Behrens, Carmen; Song, Juhee; Lee, J Jack; Ivan, Cristina; Gagea, Mihai; Shires, Michael; Hu, Xin; Vallien, Courtney; Kingsley, Charles V; Wistuba, IgnacioI; Ladbury, John E

    2015-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is characterized by complex biology involving alterations at the genomic and protein expression levels. FGFR2 mutation and/or amplification are key drivers of disease progression and drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These genetic alterations drive oncogenic downstream signalling due to the deregulated activity of the receptor. We have previously reported that wild type FGFR2 provides a binding site for which two proteins, Grb2 and Plcγ1, compete in a concentration-dependent manner. Metastasis and invasion ensue when Plcγ1 prevails on the receptor giving rise to oncogenic outcome in the absence of gene mutation/deletion. The effect of this signalling mechanism on FGFR2-driven lung adenocarcinoma has not previously been considered. In this study we show that fluctuation in the combinatorial expression levels of FGFR2, Grb2 and Plcγ1 modulates cell invasive properties, tumor formation and is linked to recurrence-free survival in 150 lung adenocarcinoma patients. High levels of expression of FGFR2 and Plcγ1 in a low background of Grb2 significantly correlates with poor prognosis. On the other hand, low levels of expression of FGFR2 and Plcγ1 in a high background of Grb2 correlates with favourable prognosis. This study defines the expression pattern of FGFR2, Plcγ1 and Grb2 as a novel prognostic marker in human lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, consideration of the Grb2 and Plcγ1-mediated mechanism of FGFR2 regulation will enhance the therapeutic targeting of aberrant FGFR2 activity to provide the much-needed improvement to the treatment regimen of this high mortality disease. PMID:26693065

  16. Impaired motor coordination and disrupted cerebellar architecture in Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 double knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Karen Müller; Williamson, Theresa L.; Schwartz, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling determines the size of the cerebral cortex by regulating the amplification of radial glial stem cells, and participates in the formation of midline glial structures. We show that Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 double knockouts (FGFR DKO) generated by Cre mediated recombination driven by the human GFAP promoter (hGFAP) have reduced cerebellar size due to reduced proliferation of radial glia and other glial precursors in late embryonic and neonatal FGFR DKO mice. The proliferation of granule cell progenitors (GCPs) in the EGL was also reduced, leading to reduced granule cell numbers. Furthermore, both inward migration of granule cells into the inner granule cell layer (IGL) and outward migration of GABA interneurons into the molecular layer (ML) were arrested, disrupting layer and lobular morphology. Purkinje neurons and their dendrites, which were not targeted by Cre mediated recombination of Fgf receptors, were also misplaced in FGFR DKO mice, possibly as a consequence of altered Bergmann glia orientation or reduced granule cell number. Our findings indicate a dual role for FGFR signaling in cerebellar morphogenesis. The first role is to amplify the number of granule neuron precursors in the external granular layer and glial precursor cells throughout the cerebellum. The second is to establish the correct Bergmann glia morphology, which is crucial for granule cell migration. The disrupted cerebellar size and laminar architecture resulting from loss of FGFR signaling impairs motor learning and coordination in FGFR DKO mice. PMID:22578469

  17. FGFR2 is overexpressed in myxoid liposarcoma and inhibition of FGFR signaling impairs tumor growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Künstlinger, Helen; Fassunke, Jana; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Brors, Benedikt; Heydt, Carina; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wardelmann, Eva; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-08-21

    Myxoid liposarcomas account for more than one third of liposarcomas and about 10% of all adult soft tissue sarcomas. The tumors are characterized by specific chromosomal translocations leading to the chimeric oncogenes FUS-DDIT3 or EWS1R-DDIT3. The encoded fusion proteins act as aberrant transcription factors. Therefore, we implemented comparative expression analyses using whole-genome microarrays in tumor and fat tissue samples. We aimed at identifying differentially expressed genes which may serve as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers or as therapeutic targets. Microarray analyses revealed overexpression of FGFR2 and other members of the FGF/FGFR family. Overexpression of FGFR2 was validated by qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis in primary tumor samples. Treatment of the myxoid liposarcoma cell lines MLS 402 and MLS 1765 with the FGFR inhibitors PD173074, TKI258 (dovitinib) and BGJ398 as well as specific siRNAs reduced cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and delayed cell migration. Combination of FGFR inhibitors with trabectedin further increased the effect. Our study demonstrates overexpression of FGFR2 and a functional role of FGFR signaling in myxoid liposarcoma. As FGFR inhibition showed effects on proliferation and cell migration and induced apoptosis in vitro, our data indicate the potential use of FGFR inhibitors as a targeted therapy for these tumors. PMID:26036639

  18. FGFR2 is overexpressed in myxoid liposarcoma and inhibition of FGFR signaling impairs tumor growth in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Künstlinger, Helen; Fassunke, Jana; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Brors, Benedikt; Heydt, Carina; Ihle, Michaela Angelika; Mechtersheimer, Gunhild; Wardelmann, Eva; Büttner, Reinhard; Merkelbach-Bruse, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas account for more than one third of liposarcomas and about 10% of all adult soft tissue sarcomas. The tumors are characterized by specific chromosomal translocations leading to the chimeric oncogenes FUS-DDIT3 or EWS1R-DDIT3. The encoded fusion proteins act as aberrant transcription factors. Therefore, we implemented comparative expression analyses using whole-genome microarrays in tumor and fat tissue samples. We aimed at identifying differentially expressed genes which may serve as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers or as therapeutic targets. Microarray analyses revealed overexpression of FGFR2 and other members of the FGF/FGFR family. Overexpression of FGFR2 was validated by qPCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis in primary tumor samples. Treatment of the myxoid liposarcoma cell lines MLS 402 and MLS 1765 with the FGFR inhibitors PD173074, TKI258 (dovitinib) and BGJ398 as well as specific siRNAs reduced cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and delayed cell migration. Combination of FGFR inhibitors with trabectedin further increased the effect. Our study demonstrates overexpression of FGFR2 and a functional role of FGFR signaling in myxoid liposarcoma. As FGFR inhibition showed effects on proliferation and cell migration and induced apoptosis in vitro, our data indicate the potential use of FGFR inhibitors as a targeted therapy for these tumors. PMID:26036639

  19. Association analyses of FGFR2 gene polymorphisms with femoral neck bone mineral density in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan-Shan; Yang, Tie-Lin; Yan, Han; Rong, Zheng-Qin; Chen, Jia-Bin; Hao, Ruo-Han; Chen, Xiao-Feng; Guo, Yan

    2015-04-01

    Femoral neck (FN) bone mineral density (BMD) is the most important risk phenotype for osteoporosis and has been used as a reference standard for describing osteoporosis. Identification of genetic variations associated with FN BMD may provide potential targets for therapeutic studies. Given the important biological role of FGFR2 gene involved in bone, we tested the associations between FGFR2 polymorphisms and FN BMD in 1,300 Chinese Han subjects. Of the 28 total SNPs, 2 SNPs, namely rs11200014 and rs1078806, were significantly associated with FN BMD under dominant model (P = 0.0014 and 0.0012, respectively) after conservative Bonferroni correction. The two SNPs were in complete linkage disequilibrium. In addition, haplotype-based association tests identified two haplotypes significantly associated with FN BMD, including one haplotype in block 4 where the two SNPs located. However, different from previous studies in white older men, we did not detect any significant association in sex-stratified analyses. In summary, our findings suggest that the FGFR2 gene may play an important role in variation in FN BMD in Chinese Han population, independent of gender effects. Further studies performed in multiple and large samples are needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism and pathophysiology of osteoporosis. PMID:25300516

  20. The IgLON Family Member Negr1 Promotes Neuronal Arborization Acting as Soluble Factor via FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Pischedda, Francesca; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    IgLON proteins are GPI anchored adhesion molecules that control neurite outgrowth. In particular, Negr1 down-regulation negatively influences neuronal arborization in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we found that the metalloprotease ADAM10 releases Negr1 from neuronal membrane. Ectodomain shedding influences several neuronal mechanisms, including survival, synaptogenesis, and the formation of neurite trees. By combining morphological analysis and virus-mediated selective protein silencing in primary murine cortical neurons, we found that pharmacologically inhibition of ADAM10 results in an impairment of neurite tree maturation that can be rescued upon treatment with soluble Negr1. Furthermore, we report that released Negr1 influences neurite outgrowth in a P-ERK1/2 and FGFR2 dependent manner. Together our findings suggest a role for Negr1 in regulating neurite outgrowth through the modulation of FGFR2 signaling pathway. Given the physiological and pathological role of ADAM10, Negr1, and FGFR2, the regulation of Negr1 shedding may play a crucial role in sustaining brain function and development. PMID:26793057

  1. Conditional Gene Inactivation Reveals Roles for Fgf10 and Fgfr2 in Establishing a Normal Pattern of Epithelial Branching in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Abler, Lisa L.; Mansour, Suzanne L.; Sun, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) signaling through FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) is required for lung initiation. While studies indicate that Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are also important at later stages of lung development, their roles in early branching events remain unclear. We addressed this question through conditional inactivation of both genes in mouse subsequent to lung initiation. Inactivation of Fgf10 in lung mesenchyme resulted in smaller lobes with a reduced number of branches. Inactivation of Fgfr2 in lung epithelium resulted in disruption of lobes and small epithelial outgrowths that arose arbitrarily along the main bronchi. In both mutants, there was an increase in cell death. Also, the expression patterns of key signaling molecules implicated in branching morphogenesis were altered and a proximal lung marker was expanded distally. Our results indicate that both Fgf10 and Fgfr2 are required for a normal branching program and for proper proximal-distal patterning of the lung. PMID:19618463

  2. The expression of keratinocyte growth factor receptor (FGFR2-IIIb) correlates with the high proliferative rate of HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Nikoletta; Bata-Csörgo, Zsuzsanna; Kopasz, Norbert; Szeg, Csilla; Pivarcsi, Andor; Koreck, Andrea; Dobozy, Attila; Kemény, Lajos; Széll, Márta

    2006-08-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor receptor (KGFR = FGFR2-IIIb) is a tyrosine kinase receptor expressed by keratinocytes, which mediates the effects of fibroblast growth factors (FGF). There are contradictory data in the literature regarding the role of FGFR2-IIIb during the proliferation/differentiation programme of keratinocytes. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether overexpression of FGFR2-IIIb may have a role in the regulation of keratinocyte proliferation. We analysed the expression of FGFR2-IIIb in an in vitro HaCaT model system representing different stages of proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses demonstrated a correlation between FGFR2-IIIb mRNA and protein expression and the proportion of cells in S/G2/M phase in synchronized HaCaT keratinocytes and thus with proliferation activity (r = 0.96). After treatment with the antipsoriatic drug, dithranol, FGFR2-IIIb is downregulated dose dependently both at mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, when the rate of proliferation is decreased by the lack of cell attachment to the culturing surface, FGFR2-IIIb mRNA (P = 0.0315) and protein expressions were also reduced (P = 0.0242), while a differentiation marker, keratin 10, mRNA (P = 0.0003) and protein levels (P = 0.001) were increased (r = -0.92). Based on our results we conclude that FGFR2-IIIb expression in HaCaT keratinocytes corresponds with the proliferative activation of the cells and is not related to the differentiation programme. PMID:16842598

  3. Multiple receptor tyrosine kinase activation attenuates therapeutic efficacy of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 inhibitor AZD4547 in FGFR2 amplified gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Liu, Xinyang; Wu, Zheng; Geng, Ruixuan; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Dai, Congqi; Liu, Rujiao; Zhang, Qunling; Li, Wenhua; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-targeted therapy has attracted considerable attention as novel anticancer agents in gastric cancer (GC). However, intrinsic or acquired drug resistance has emerged as a major challenge to their clinical use. In this study, we demonstrated that several receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), including EGFR, HER3 and MET, activations contributed to AZD4547 (a selective FGFR2 inhibitor) hyposensitivity in FGFR2 amplified GC cells. The rescue effect was abrogated by inhibiting these RTKs with their targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). In addition, synergy in growth inhibition was observed when the GC cells were treated with a combination of AZD4547 and cetuximab (an EGFR monoclonal antibody) both in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, tissue microarray analysis revealed that these resistance-conferring RTKs were highly expressed in FGFR2 positive GC patients. Taken together, these observations demonstrated RTKs including EGFR, HER3 and MET activations as novel mechanisms of hyposensitivity to AZD4547. It will be clinically valuable to investigate the involvement of RTK-mediated signaling in intrinsicor acquired resistance to FGFR2 TKIs in GC. A combination targeted therapeutic strategy may be recommended for treating FGFR2 amplified GC patients with these RTK activations. PMID:25576915

  4. Molecular analysis of FGFR 2 and associated clinical observations in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Gao, Hongbin; Ai, Siming; Eswarakumar, Jacob V P; Li, Tao; Liu, Bingqian; Jiang, Hongye; Liu, Yuhua; Liu, Xialin; Li, Yonghao; Ni, Yao; Chen, Jiangna; Lin, Zhuoling; Liang, Xiaoling; Jin, Chenjin; Huang, Xinhua; Lu, Lin; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-09-01

    Crouzon syndrome, a dominantly inherited disorder and the most common type of craniosynostosis syndrome, is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene, and characterized by craniosynostosis, shallow orbits, ocular proptosis, midface hypoplasia and a curved, beak‑like nose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR 2) gene in two Chinese families with Crouzon syndrome and to characterize the associated clinical features. Two families underwent complete ophthalmic examination, and three patients in two families were diagnosed with Crouzon syndrome. Genomic DNA was extracted from leukocytes of peripheral blood samples, which were collected from the family members and 200 unrelated control subjects from the same population. Exons 8 and 10 of the FGFR 2 gene were amplified using polymerase chain reaction analysis and were directly sequenced. Ophthalmic examinations, including best‑corrected visual acuity, slit‑lamp examination, fundus examination and Computerized Tomography scans, and physical examinations were performed to exclude systemic diseases. These patients were affected with shallow orbits and ocular proptosis, accompanied by midface hypoplasia, craniosynostosis, strabismus or papilloedema, with clinically normal hands and feet. A heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.811‑812insGAG (p.273insGlu) in exon 8 was identified in the affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals in family 1. In family 2, another heterozygous FGFR 2 missense mutation, c.842A>G (P.Tyr281Cys or Y281C), in exon 8 was identified in the affected boy and his mother, but not in the unaffected family members or the normal control individuals. Although FGFR 2 gene mutations and polymorphisms have been reported in various ethnic groups, particularly in the area of osteology, the present study reported for the first time, to the best of

  5. Inhibited Wnt Signaling Causes Age-Dependent Abnormalities in the Bone Matrix Mineralization in the Apert Syndrome FGFR2S252W/+ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Chen, Peng; Chen, Lin; Weng, Tujun; Zhang, Shichang; Zhou, Xia; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Luchuan

    2015-01-01

    Apert syndrome (AS) is a type of autosomal dominant disease characterized by premature fusion of the cranial sutures, severe syndactyly, and other abnormalities in internal organs. Approximately 70% of AS cases are caused by a single mutation, S252W, in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). Two groups have generated FGFR2 knock-in mice Fgfr2S252W/+ that exhibit features of AS. During the present study of AS using the Fgfr2S252W/+ mouse model, an age-related phenotype of bone homeostasis was discovered. The long bone mass was lower in 2 month old mutant mice than in age-matched controls but higher in 5 month old mutant mice. This unusual phenotype suggested that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), which are vital to maintain bone homeostasis, might be involved. BMSCs were isolated from Fgfr2S252W/+ mice and found that S252W mutation could impair osteogenic differentiation BMSCs but enhance mineralization of more mature osteoblasts. A microarray analysis revealed that Wnt pathway inhibitors SRFP1/2/4 were up-regulated in mutant BMSCs. This work provides evidence to show that the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is inhibited in both mutant BMSCs and osteoblasts, and differentiation defects of these cells can be ameliorated by Wnt3a treatment. The present study suggested that the bone abnormalities caused by deregulation of Wnt pathway may underlie the symptoms of AS. PMID:25693202

  6. Transient Inhibition of FGFR2b-ligands signaling leads to irreversible loss of cellular β-catenin organization and signaling in AER during mouse limb development.

    PubMed

    Danopoulos, Soula; Parsa, Sara; Al Alam, Denise; Tabatabai, Reza; Baptista, Sheryl; Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Wheeler, Matthew; Barreto, Guillermo; Braun, Thomas; Li, Xiaokun; Hajihosseini, Mohammad K; Bellusci, Saverio

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate limbs develop through coordinated series of inductive, growth and patterning events. Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b) signaling controls the induction of the Apical Ectodermal Ridge (AER) but its putative roles in limb outgrowth and patterning, as well as in AER morphology and cell behavior have remained unclear. We have investigated these roles through graded and reversible expression of soluble dominant-negative FGFR2b molecules at various times during mouse limb development, using a doxycycline/transactivator/tet(O)-responsive system. Transient attenuation (≤ 24 hours) of FGFR2b-ligands signaling at E8.5, prior to limb bud induction, leads mostly to the loss or truncation of proximal skeletal elements with less severe impact on distal elements. Attenuation from E9.5 onwards, however, has an irreversible effect on the stability of the AER, resulting in a progressive loss of distal limb skeletal elements. The primary consequences of FGFR2b-ligands attenuation is a transient loss of cell adhesion and down-regulation of P63, β1-integrin and E-cadherin, and a permanent loss of cellular β-catenin organization and WNT signaling within the AER. Combined, these effects lead to the progressive transformation of the AER cells from pluristratified to squamous epithelial-like cells within 24 hours of doxycycline administration. These findings show that FGFR2b-ligands signaling has critical stage-specific roles in maintaining the AER during limb development. PMID:24167544

  7. Transient Inhibition of FGFR2b-Ligands Signaling Leads to Irreversible Loss of Cellular β-Catenin Organization and Signaling in AER during Mouse Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Reza; Baptista, Sheryl; Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Wheeler, Matthew; Barreto, Guillermo; Braun, Thomas; Li, Xiaokun; Hajihosseini, Mohammad K.; Bellusci, Saverio

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate limbs develop through coordinated series of inductive, growth and patterning events. Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b) signaling controls the induction of the Apical Ectodermal Ridge (AER) but its putative roles in limb outgrowth and patterning, as well as in AER morphology and cell behavior have remained unclear. We have investigated these roles through graded and reversible expression of soluble dominant-negative FGFR2b molecules at various times during mouse limb development, using a doxycycline/transactivator/tet(O)-responsive system. Transient attenuation (≤24 hours) of FGFR2b-ligands signaling at E8.5, prior to limb bud induction, leads mostly to the loss or truncation of proximal skeletal elements with less severe impact on distal elements. Attenuation from E9.5 onwards, however, has an irreversible effect on the stability of the AER, resulting in a progressive loss of distal limb skeletal elements. The primary consequences of FGFR2b-ligands attenuation is a transient loss of cell adhesion and down-regulation of P63, β1-integrin and E-cadherin, and a permanent loss of cellular β-catenin organization and WNT signaling within the AER. Combined, these effects lead to the progressive transformation of the AER cells from pluristratified to squamous epithelial-like cells within 24 hours of doxycycline administration. These findings show that FGFR2b-ligands signaling has critical stage-specific roles in maintaining the AER during limb development. PMID:24167544

  8. BRAF kinase inhibitor exerts anti-tumor activity against breast cancer cells via inhibition of FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong Xin; Jin, Wen Jun; Yang, Sheng; Ji, Cun Li

    2016-01-01

    Most anti-angiogenic therapies currently being evaluated in clinical trials targetvascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway; however, the tumor vasculature can acquire resistance to VEGF-targeted therapy by shifting to other angiogenesis mechanisms. Therefore, other potential therapeutic agents that block non-VEGF angiogenic pathways need to be evaluated. Here we identified BRAF kinase inhibitor, vemurafenibas an agent with potential anti-angiogenic and anti-breast cancer activities. Vemurafenib demonstrated inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). In ex vivo and in vivo angiogenesis assays, vemurafenib suppressed bFGF-induced microvessel sprouting of rat aortic rings and angiogenesis in vivo. To understand the underlying molecular basis, we examined the effects of vemurafenib on different molecular components in treated endothelial cell, and found that vemurafenib suppressed bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 and protein kinase B (AKT). Moreover, vemurafenib directly inhibited proliferation and blocked the oncogenic signaling pathways in breast cancer cell. In vivo, using xenograft models of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231, vemurafenib showed growth-inhibitory activity associated with inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. Taken together, our results indicate that vemurafenib targets the FGFR2-mediated AKT signaling pathway in endothelial cells, leading to the suppression of tumor growth and angiogenesis. PMID:27293997

  9. Diffuse-type gastric cancer cells switch their driver pathways from FGFR2 signaling to SDF1/CXCR4 axis in hypoxic tumor microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Haruhito; Yashiro, Masakazu; Fukuoka, Tatsunari; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Morisaki, Tamami; Kasashima, Hiroaki; Masuda, Go; Noda, Satoru; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-12-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) have been considered to play an important role for tumor progression of cancer. Solid tumors contain heterogeneous distribution of oxygen in their microenvironments. This study investigated the growth signaling of gastric cancer (GC) cells in focus on the interaction with CAFs and GC cells under normoxia and hypoxia. Four diffuse-type GC cell lines, two intestinal-type GC cell lines and three CAF cell lines were used. Cells were examined for expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) and stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF1) by RT-PCR, western blot, ELISA and immunohistochemical staining of xenografted tumors. GC cell proliferation was examined under hypoxia in the presence or absence of CAFs, a FGFR2 inhibitor, a CXCR4 inhibitor and HIF1α siRNA. Proliferation of diffuse-type GC cells, but not intestinal-type GC cells, was significantly increased by CAFs. CXCR4 expression by diffuse-type GC cells was significantly increased in hypoxia, while FGFR2 expression was decreased. CXCR4 expression was correlated with hypoxic microenvironment of xenografted tumor, but FGFR2 expression was not. FGFR2 inhibition significantly decreased the growth-stimulating activity of CAFs for diffuse-type GC cells in normoxia. In contrast, CXCR4 inhibition significantly decreased the growth-stimulating activity of CAFs in hypoxia. SDF1 production by CAFs was increased in hypoxia, while cancer cells did not produce SDF1. HIF1 siRNA significantly decreased both CXCR4 expression by diffuse-type GC cells and SDF1 production by CAFs. These findings suggest that diffuse-type GC cells might switch their driver pathways from FGFR2 signaling to SDF1/CXCR4 axis through HIF1 in hypoxic tumor microenvironments. PMID:26385890

  10. A novel mutation (a886g) in exon 5 of FGFR2 in members of a family with Crouzon phenotype and plagiocephaly.

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger, D; Collmann, H; Schmalenberger, B; Müller, U

    1997-01-01

    We identified a novel mutation in members of a family with signs of Crouzon syndrome and plagiocephaly. In affected members of the family an A-->G transition was found at position 886 in exon 5 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) gene. The base change results in the replacement of a lysine by glutamic acid in Ig-like loop III of FGFR2. The unusual finding of plagiocephaly in these Crouzon patients may either be the result of the type of mutation or because of genetic and environmental factors that affect the phenotype in addition to the mutated FGF receptor. Images PMID:9152842

  11. Kinase domain activation of FGFR2 yields high-grade lung adenocarcinoma sensitive to a pan-FGFR inhibitor in a mouse model of NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Tchaicha, Jeremy H.; Akbay, Esra A.; Altabef, Abigail; Mikse, Oliver R.; Kikuchi, Eiki; Rhee, Kevin; Liao, Rachel G.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Sholl, Lynette M.; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2 (FGFR2) are present in 4-5% of patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Amplification and mutations in FGFR genes have been identified in patients with NSCLC and clinical trials are testing the efficacy of anti-FGFR therapies. FGFR2 and other FGFR kinase family gene alterations have been found in both lung squamous cell carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma though mouse models of FGFR driven lung cancers have not been reported. Here, we generated a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) of NSCLC driven by a kinase domain mutation in FGFR2. Combined with p53 ablation, primary grade III/IV adenocarcinoma was induced in the lung epithelial compartment exhibiting locally invasive and pleiotropic tendencies largely made up of multinucleated cells. Tumors were acutely sensitive to pan-FGFR inhibition. This is the first FGFR2-driven lung cancer GEMM, which can be applied across different cancer indications in a preclinical setting. PMID:25035393

  12. Antitumor effect of FGFR inhibitors on a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft mouse model endogenously expressing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Ding, Xiwei; Wang, Shaoqing; Moser, Catherine D; Shaleh, Hassan M; Mohamed, Essa A; Chaiteerakij, Roongruedee; Allotey, Loretta K; Chen, Gang; Miyabe, Katsuyuki; McNulty, Melissa S; Ndzengue, Albert; Barr Fritcher, Emily G; Knudson, Ryan A; Greipp, Patricia T; Clark, Karl J; Torbenson, Michael S; Kipp, Benjamin R; Zhou, Jie; Barrett, Michael T; Gustafson, Michael P; Alberts, Steven R; Borad, Mitesh J; Roberts, Lewis R

    2016-09-28

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a highly lethal cancer with limited therapeutic options. Recent genomic analysis of cholangiocarcinoma has revealed the presence of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) fusion proteins in up to 13% of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). FGFR fusions have been identified as a novel oncogenic and druggable target in a number of cancers. In this study, we established a novel cholangiocarcinoma patient derived xenograft (PDX) mouse model bearing an FGFR2-CCDC6 fusion protein from a metastatic lung nodule of an iCCA patient. Using this PDX model, we confirmed the ability of the FGFR inhibitors, ponatinib, dovitinib and BGJ398, to modulate FGFR signaling, inhibit cell proliferation and induce cell apoptosis in cholangiocarcinoma tumors harboring FGFR2 fusions. In addition, BGJ398 appeared to be superior in potency to ponatinib and dovitinib in this model. Our findings provide a strong rationale for the investigation of FGFR inhibitors, particularly BGJ398, as a therapeutic option for cholangiocarcinoma patients harboring FGFR2 fusions. PMID:27216979

  13. C1GALT1 overexpression promotes the invasive behavior of colon cancer cells through modifying O-glycosylation of FGFR2.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ji-Shiang; Huang, John; Lin, Yo-Chuen; Huang, Miao-Juei; Lee, Po-Huang; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Liang, Jin-Tung; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-04-30

    Core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) transfers galactose (Gal) to N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to form Galβ1,3GalNAc (T antigen). Aberrant O-glycans, such as T antigen, are commonly found in colorectal cancer. However, the role of C1GALT1 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we showed that C1GALT1 was frequently overexpressed in colorectal tumors and is associated with poor survival. C1GALT1 overexpression promoted cell survival, migration, invasion, and sphere formation as well as tumor growth and metastasis of colon cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of C1GALT1 with small interference (si) RNA was sufficient to suppress these malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we are the first to show that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 2 carried O-glycans in colon cancer cells. Mechanistic investigations showed that C1GALT1 modified the O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhanced bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 as well as increased bFGF-mediated malignant phenotypes. In addition, BGJ398, a selective inhibitor of FGFR, blocked the effects of C1GALT1. These findings suggest that C1GALT1 overexpression modifies O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhances its phosphorylation to promote the invasive behavior and cancer stem-like property in colon cancer cells, indicating a critical role of O-glycosylation in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24758762

  14. Kinase domain activation of FGFR2 yields high-grade lung adenocarcinoma sensitive to a Pan-FGFR inhibitor in a mouse model of NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Tchaicha, Jeremy H; Akbay, Esra A; Altabef, Abigail; Mikse, Oliver R; Kikuchi, Eiki; Rhee, Kevin; Liao, Rachel G; Bronson, Roderick T; Sholl, Lynette M; Meyerson, Matthew; Hammerman, Peter S; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2014-09-01

    Somatic mutations in FGFR2 are present in 4% to 5% of patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Amplification and mutations in FGFR genes have been identified in patients with NSCLCs, and clinical trials are testing the efficacy of anti-FGFR therapies. FGFR2 and other FGFR kinase family gene alterations have been found in both lung squamous cell carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma, although mouse models of FGFR-driven lung cancers have not been reported. Here, we generated a genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) of NSCLC driven by a kinase domain mutation in FGFR2. Combined with p53 ablation, primary grade 3/4 adenocarcinoma was induced in the lung epithelial compartment exhibiting locally invasive and pleiotropic tendencies largely made up of multinucleated cells. Tumors were acutely sensitive to pan-FGFR inhibition. This is the first FGFR2-driven lung cancer GEMM, which can be applied across different cancer indications in a preclinical setting. PMID:25035393

  15. C1GALT1 overexpression promotes the invasive behavior of colon cancer cells through modifying O-glycosylation of FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ji-Shiang; Huang, John; Lin, Yo-Chuen; Huang, Miao-Juei; Lee, Po-Huang; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Liang, Jin-Tung; Huang, Min-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Core 1 β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) transfers galactose (Gal) to N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to form Galβ1,3GalNAc (T antigen). Aberrant O-glycans, such as T antigen, are commonly found in colorectal cancer. However, the role of C1GALT1 in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we showed that C1GALT1 was frequently overexpressed in colorectal tumors and is associated with poor survival. C1GALT1 overexpression promoted cell survival, migration, invasion, and sphere formation as well as tumor growth and metastasis of colon cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of C1GALT1 with small interference (si) RNA was sufficient to suppress these malignant phenotypes in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we are the first to show that fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) 2 carried O-glycans in colon cancer cells. Mechanistic investigations showed that C1GALT1 modified the O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhanced bFGF-triggered activation of FGFR2 as well as increased bFGF-mediated malignant phenotypes. In addition, BGJ398, a selective inhibitor of FGFR, blocked the effects of C1GALT1. These findings suggest that C1GALT1 overexpression modifies O-glycans on FGFR2 and enhances its phosphorylation to promote the invasive behavior and cancer stem-like property in colon cancer cells, indicating a critical role of O-glycosylation in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. PMID:24758762

  16. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng

  17. FGFR2IIIb-MAPK Activity Is Required for Epithelial Cell Fate Decision in the Lower Müllerian Duct.

    PubMed

    Terakawa, Jumpei; Rocchi, Altea; Serna, Vanida A; Bottinger, Erwin P; Graff, Jonathan M; Kurita, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    Cell fate of lower Müllerian duct epithelium (MDE), to become uterine or vaginal epithelium, is determined by the absence or presence of ΔNp63 expression, respectively. Previously, we showed that SMAD4 and runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) were independently required for MDE to express ΔNp63. Here, we report that vaginal mesenchyme directs vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE through paracrine activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor-MAPK pathway. In the developing reproductive tract, FGF7 and FGF10 were enriched in vaginal mesenchyme, whereas FGF receptor 2IIIb was expressed in epithelia of both the uterus and vagina. When Fgfr2 was inactivated, vaginal MDE underwent uterine cell fate, and this differentiation defect was corrected by activation of MEK-ERK pathway. In vitro, FGF10 in combination with bone morphogenetic protein 4 and activin A (ActA) was sufficient to induce ΔNp63 in MDE, and ActA was essential for induction of RUNX1 through SMAD-independent pathways. Accordingly, inhibition of type 1 receptors for activin in neonatal mice induced uterine differentiation in vaginal epithelium by down-regulating RUNX1, whereas conditional deletion of Smad2 and Smad3 had no effect on vaginal epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, vaginal epithelial cell fate in MDE is induced by FGF7/10-MAPK, bone morphogenetic protein 4-SMAD, and ActA-RUNX1 pathway activities, and the disruption in any one of these pathways results in conversion from vaginal to uterine epithelial cell fate. PMID:27164167

  18. Influenza Virus Infects Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells of the Distal Lung: Impact on Fgfr2b-Driven Epithelial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Quantius, Jennifer; Schmoldt, Carole; Vazquez-Armendariz, Ana I.; Becker, Christin; El Agha, Elie; Wilhelm, Jochen; Morty, Rory E.; Vadász, István; Mayer, Konstantin; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Fink, Ludger; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Bellusci, Saverio; Herold, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Influenza Virus (IV) pneumonia is associated with severe damage of the lung epithelium and respiratory failure. Apart from efficient host defense, structural repair of the injured epithelium is crucial for survival of severe pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell mediated regenerative responses are not well characterized. In particular, the impact of IV infection on lung stem cells and their regenerative responses remains elusive. Our study demonstrates that a highly pathogenic IV infects various cell populations in the murine lung, but displays a strong tropism to an epithelial cell subset with high proliferative capacity, defined by the signature EpCamhighCD24lowintegrin(α6)high. This cell fraction expressed the stem cell antigen-1, highly enriched lung stem/progenitor cells previously characterized by the signature integrin(β4)+CD200+, and upregulated the p63/krt5 regeneration program after IV-induced injury. Using 3-dimensional organoid cultures derived from these epithelial stem/progenitor cells (EpiSPC), and in vivo infection models including transgenic mice, we reveal that their expansion, barrier renewal and outcome after IV-induced injury critically depended on Fgfr2b signaling. Importantly, IV infected EpiSPC exhibited severely impaired renewal capacity due to IV-induced blockade of β-catenin-dependent Fgfr2b signaling, evidenced by loss of alveolar tissue repair capacity after intrapulmonary EpiSPC transplantation in vivo. Intratracheal application of exogenous Fgf10, however, resulted in increased engagement of non-infected EpiSPC for tissue regeneration, demonstrated by improved proliferative potential, restoration of alveolar barrier function and increased survival following IV pneumonia. Together, these data suggest that tropism of IV to distal lung stem cell niches represents an important factor of pathogenicity and highlight impaired Fgfr2b signaling as underlying mechanism. Furthermore, increase of alveolar Fgf10

  19. Influenza Virus Infects Epithelial Stem/Progenitor Cells of the Distal Lung: Impact on Fgfr2b-Driven Epithelial Repair.

    PubMed

    Quantius, Jennifer; Schmoldt, Carole; Vazquez-Armendariz, Ana I; Becker, Christin; El Agha, Elie; Wilhelm, Jochen; Morty, Rory E; Vadász, István; Mayer, Konstantin; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Fink, Ludger; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Li, Xiaokun; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen; Bellusci, Saverio; Herold, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    Influenza Virus (IV) pneumonia is associated with severe damage of the lung epithelium and respiratory failure. Apart from efficient host defense, structural repair of the injured epithelium is crucial for survival of severe pneumonia. The molecular mechanisms underlying stem/progenitor cell mediated regenerative responses are not well characterized. In particular, the impact of IV infection on lung stem cells and their regenerative responses remains elusive. Our study demonstrates that a highly pathogenic IV infects various cell populations in the murine lung, but displays a strong tropism to an epithelial cell subset with high proliferative capacity, defined by the signature EpCamhighCD24lowintegrin(α6)high. This cell fraction expressed the stem cell antigen-1, highly enriched lung stem/progenitor cells previously characterized by the signature integrin(β4)+CD200+, and upregulated the p63/krt5 regeneration program after IV-induced injury. Using 3-dimensional organoid cultures derived from these epithelial stem/progenitor cells (EpiSPC), and in vivo infection models including transgenic mice, we reveal that their expansion, barrier renewal and outcome after IV-induced injury critically depended on Fgfr2b signaling. Importantly, IV infected EpiSPC exhibited severely impaired renewal capacity due to IV-induced blockade of β-catenin-dependent Fgfr2b signaling, evidenced by loss of alveolar tissue repair capacity after intrapulmonary EpiSPC transplantation in vivo. Intratracheal application of exogenous Fgf10, however, resulted in increased engagement of non-infected EpiSPC for tissue regeneration, demonstrated by improved proliferative potential, restoration of alveolar barrier function and increased survival following IV pneumonia. Together, these data suggest that tropism of IV to distal lung stem cell niches represents an important factor of pathogenicity and highlight impaired Fgfr2b signaling as underlying mechanism. Furthermore, increase of alveolar Fgf10

  20. Morphological comparison of the craniofacial phenotypes of mouse models expressing the Apert FGFR2 S252W mutation in neural crest- or mesoderm-derived tissues

    PubMed Central

    Heuzé, Yann; Singh, Nandini; Basilico, Claudio; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Holmes, Greg; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2014-01-01

    Bones of the craniofacial skeleton are derived from two distinct cell lineages, cranial neural crest and mesoderm, and articulate at sutures and synchondroses which represent major bone growth sites. Premature fusion of cranial suture(s) is associated with craniofacial dysmorphogenesis caused in part by alteration in the growth potential at sutures and can occur as an isolated birth defect or as part of a syndrome, such as Apert syndrome. Conditional expression of the Apert FGFR2 S252W mutation in mesoderm was previously shown to be necessary and sufficient to cause coronal craniosynostosis. Here we used micro computed tomography images of mice expressing the Apert mutation constitutively in either mesoderm or neural crest to quantify craniofacial shape variation and suture fusion patterns, and to identify shape changes in craniofacial bones derived from the lineage not expressing the mutation, referred to here as secondary shape changes. Our results show that at postnatal day 0: (i) conditional expression of the FGFR2 S252W mutation in neural crest-derived tissues causes a more severe craniofacial phenotype than when expressed in mesoderm-derived tissues; and (ii) both mesoderm- and neural crest-specific mouse models display secondary shape changes. We also show that premature suture fusion is not necessarily dependent on the expression of the FGFR2 S252W mutation in the sutural mesenchyme. More specifically, it appears that suture fusion patterns in both mouse models are suture-specific resulting from a complex combination of the influence of primary abnormalities of biogenesis or signaling within the sutures, and timing. PMID:24632501

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF-2) and Its Receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 May Be Putative Biomarkers of Malignant Transformation of Potentially Malignant Oral Lesions into Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Seema; Goel, Madhu Mati; Makker, Annu; Bhatia, Vikram; Chandra, Saumya; Kumar, Sandeep; Agarwal, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    There are several factors like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, genetic alterations, mutational factors that are involved in malignant transformation of potentially malignant oral lesions (PMOLs) to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) is one of the prototypes of the large family of growth factors that bind heparin. FGF-2 induces angiogenesis and its receptors may play a role in synthesis of collagen. FGFs are involved in transmission of signals between the epithelium and connective tissue, and influence growth and differentiation of a wide variety of tissue including epithelia. The present study was undertaken to analyze expression of FGF-2 and its receptors FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 in 72 PMOLs, 108 OSCC and 52 healthy controls, and their role in risk assessment for malignant transformation of Leukoplakia (LKP) and Oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) to OSCC. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3. IHC results were validated by Real Time PCR. Expression of FGF-2, FGFR-2 and FGFR-3 was upregulated from PMOLs to OSCC. While 90% (9/10) of PMOLs which showed malignant transformation (transformed) expressed FGF-2, only 24.19% cases (15/62) of PMOLs which were not transformed (untransformed) to OSCC expressed FGF-2. Similarly, FGFR-2 expression was seen in 16/62 (25.81%) of untransformed PMOLs and 8/10 (80%) cases of transformed PMOLs. FGFR-3 expression was observed in 23/62 (37.10%) cases of untransformed PMOLs and 6/10 (60%) cases of transformed PMOLs. A significant association of FGF-2 and FGFR-2 expression with malignant transformation from PMOLs to OSCC was observed both at phenotypic and molecular level. The results suggest that FGF-2 and FGFR-2 may be useful as biomarkers of malignant transformation in patients with OSMF and LKP. PMID:26465941

  2. miR-223 Regulates Adipogenic and Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Through a C/EBPs/miR-223/FGFR2 Regulatory Feedback Loop.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaohui; Gao, Yifei; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Fang; Guo, Fei; Chang, Ailing; Li, Xiaoxia; Wang, Baoli

    2015-05-01

    Several miRNAs have recently been identified to regulate adipocyte or osteoblast differentiation or both. In this study, miR-223 was found to be involved in the reciprocal regulation of adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation. miR-223 was induced in primary cultured mouse marrow stromal cell, mesenchymal line C3H10T1/2 and stromal line ST2 after adipogenic treatment. Conversely, it was reduced in preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 after osteogenic treatment. Supplementing miR-223 levels using synthetic miR-223 mimics significantly suppressed the growth of the C3H10T1/2 and ST2 cells and induced the progenitor cells to fully differentiate into adipocytes, along with induction of adipocyte-specific transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα), and marker genes aP2 and adipsin. By contrast, depletion of the endogenous miR-223 using synthetic miR-223 inhibitor repressed the progenitor cells to differentiate. The effects of miR-223 on adipocyte formation from ST2 cells were also demonstrated by using lentivirus that overexpresses miR-223. Conversely, supplementing miR-223 blocked ST2 to differentiate into osteoblasts. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (Fgfr2), a critical regulator of osteoblast, was shown to be a direct target of miR-223 by using dual luciferase reporter assay. Knockdown of Fgfr2 in C3H10T1/2 downregulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and upregulated expression of C/EBPα and dramatically enhanced the differentiation of the cells into adipocytes. Further investigation of mechanisms that control miR-223 expression demonstrated that C/EBPs induced miR-223 expression through binding to the promoter regions of the miR-223. Taken together, our study provides evidences that miR-223 regulates adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation through a novel C/EBPs/miR-223/FGFR2 regulatory feedback loop. PMID:25641499

  3. Dynamic morphological changes in the skulls of mice mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from gain-of-function mutation of FGFR2 (P253R)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaolan; Weng, Tujun; Sun, Qidi; Su, Nan; Chen, Zhi; Qi, Huabing; Jin, Ming; Yin, Liangjun; He, Qifen; Chen, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Apert syndrome is caused mainly by gain-of-function mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. We have generated a mouse model (Fgfr2+/P253R) mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 Pro253Arg mutation using the knock-in approach. This mouse model in general has the characteristic skull morphology similar to that in humans with Apert syndrome. To characterize the detailed changes of form in the overall skull and its major anatomic structures, euclidean distance matrix analysis was used to quantitatively compare the form and growth difference between the skulls of mutants and their wild-type controls. There were substantial morphological differences between the skulls of mutants and their controls at 4 and 8 weeks of age (P<0.01). The mutants showed shortened skull dimensions along the rostrocaudal axis, especially in their face. The width of the frontal bone and the distance between the two orbits were broadened mediolaterally. The neurocrania were significantly increased along the dorsoventral axis and slightly increased along the mediolateral axis, and also had anteriorly displayed opisthion along the rostrocaudal axis. Compared with wild-type, the mutant mandible had an anteriorly displaced coronoid process and mandibular condyle along the rostrocaudal axis. We further found that there was catch-up growth in the nasal bone, maxilla, zygomatic bone and some regions of the mandible of the mutant skulls during the 4–8-week interval. The above-mentioned findings further validate the Fgfr2+/P253R mouse strain as a good model for human Apert syndrome. The changes in form characterized in this study will help to elucidate the mechanisms through which the Pro253Arg mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 affects craniofacial development and causes Apert syndrome. PMID:20557404

  4. Dynamic morphological changes in the skulls of mice mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from gain-of-function mutation of FGFR2 (P253R).

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaolan; Weng, Tujun; Sun, Qidi; Su, Nan; Chen, Zhi; Qi, Huabing; Jin, Ming; Yin, Liangjun; He, Qifen; Chen, Lin

    2010-08-01

    Apert syndrome is caused mainly by gain-of-function mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. We have generated a mouse model (Fgfr2(+/P253R)) mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 Pro253Arg mutation using the knock-in approach. This mouse model in general has the characteristic skull morphology similar to that in humans with Apert syndrome. To characterize the detailed changes of form in the overall skull and its major anatomic structures, euclidean distance matrix analysis was used to quantitatively compare the form and growth difference between the skulls of mutants and their wild-type controls. There were substantial morphological differences between the skulls of mutants and their controls at 4 and 8 weeks of age (P < 0.01). The mutants showed shortened skull dimensions along the rostrocaudal axis, especially in their face. The width of the frontal bone and the distance between the two orbits were broadened mediolaterally. The neurocrania were significantly increased along the dorsoventral axis and slightly increased along the mediolateral axis, and also had anteriorly displayed opisthion along the rostrocaudal axis. Compared with wild-type, the mutant mandible had an anteriorly displaced coronoid process and mandibular condyle along the rostrocaudal axis. We further found that there was catch-up growth in the nasal bone, maxilla, zygomatic bone and some regions of the mandible of the mutant skulls during the 4-8-week interval. The above-mentioned findings further validate the Fgfr2(+/P253R) mouse strain as a good model for human Apert syndrome. The changes in form characterized in this study will help to elucidate the mechanisms through which the Pro253Arg mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 affects craniofacial development and causes Apert syndrome. PMID:20557404

  5. Reduced Fgf10/Fgfr2 and androgen receptor (AR) in anorectal malformations male rats induced by di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP): A study on the local and systemic toxicology of DBP.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-Tao; Xu, Hong-Li; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Wood, Kristofer; Li, En-Hui; Sun, Wen-Lan; Yuan, Quan; Xu, Dong-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Wei; Xia, Shu-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Previous study have demonstrated that not only the anorectal development but also the general conditions of anorectal malformations (ARMs) male rats are severely affected by di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) maternal exposure. However, the mechanisms underlying DBP-induced congenital defects remain elusive. Reportedly, Fgf10/Fgfr2 and androgen receptor (AR) are pivotal for the development of multiple organs. In this study, we therefore investigated the expression of Fgf10/Fgfr2 together with AR in the terminal rectum and multiple organs of ARM male rats induced by in utero exposure to DBP. DBP was administered to pregnant rats to establish the model and the incidence of ARMs in male offspring was 39.5%. On postnatal day(PND)1, the gross photograph and histopathological staining confirmed the abnormal manifestations in these organs of newborn ARMs. Decreased anogenital distance, body weight and serum testosterone level were observed in ARM male offspring. The reduced expression of Fgf10/Fgfr2 mRNA and protein was seen in terminal rectum and kidney, spleen, liver, heart in ARM male rats, whereas the reduced expression of AR was only observed in the kidney and terminal rectum. Our findings suggest the potential involvement of altered Fgf10/Fgfr2 signaling and AR in pathogenesis of local and systemic development defects in ARMs male rats induce by DBP. PMID:26514922

  6. Overexpression of FGFR2 contributes to inherent resistance to MET inhibitors in MET-amplified patient-derived gastric cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    LIU, KAI; SONG, XILIN; ZHU, MEIRONG; MA, HENG

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most malignant diseases and one of the leading causes of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Although advances have been made in surgical techniques, perioperative management and the combined use of surgery with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, patients with advanced stage gastric cancer continue to face poor outcomes. Furthermore, it was reported that MET gene amplification and overexpression predicted the sensitivity to MET inhibitors in gastric cancer. However, the identification of drug-resistant tumors has encouraged the pre-emptive elucidation of the possible mechanisms of clinical resistance. The current study assessed a number of patient-derived gastric cancer models with MET amplification and overexpression, including CNGAS028. The tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis (using single nucleotide polymorphism 6.0 and human genome U133 arrays) followed by western blotting. The results demonstrated that CNGAS028 xenograft tumors did not respond to treatment with a selective MET inhibitor. Additional analysis indicated that FGFR2 overexpression contributed to the resistance to MET inhibitors. Furthermore, treatment with a combination of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 and MET inhibitors inhibited the growth of CNGAS028 xenograft tumors in vivo. In conclusion, the current results aid in understanding the mechanism of inherent resistance to selective MET inhibitors as well as provide important information for patient selection and clinical treatment strategies. PMID:26622787

  7. Analysis of 10 independent samples provides evidence for association between schizophrenia and a SNP flanking fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)

    PubMed Central

    O’Donovan, M.C.; Norton, N.; Williams, H.; Peirce, T.; Moskvina, V.; Nikolov, I.; Hamshere, M.; Carroll, L.; Georgieva, L.; Dwyer, S; Holmans, P.; Marchini, J. L.; Spencer, C.C.A.; Howie, B.; Leung, H-T.; Giegling, I.; Hartmann, A.M.; Möller, H.-J.; Morris, D.W.; Shi, Y.; Feng, G.; Hoffmann, P.; Propping, P.; Vasilescu, C.; Maier, W.; Rietschel, M.; Zammit, S.; Schumacher, J.; Quinn, E.M.; Schulze, T.G.; Iwata, N.; Ikeda, M.; Darvasi, A.; Shifman, S.; He, L.; Duan, J.; Sanders, A.R.; Levinson, D.F.; Adolfsson, R.; Ösby, U.; Terenius, Lars; Jönsson, Erik G; Cichon, S.; Nöthen, M. M.; Gill, M.; Corvin, A.P.; Rujescu, D.; Gejman, P.V.; Kirov, G.; Craddock, N.; Williams, N.M.; Owen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    We and others have previously reported linkage to schizophrenia on chromosome 10q25-q26 but, to date, a susceptibility gene in the region has not been identified. We examined data from 3606 SNPs mapping to 10q25-q26 that had been typed in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of schizophrenia (479 UK cases/2937 controls). SNPs with p<0.01 (n=40) were genotyped in an additional 163 UK cases and those markers that remained nominally significant at p<0.01 (n=22) were genotyped in replication samples from Ireland, Germany and Bulgaria consisting of a total of 1664 cases with schizophrenia and 3541 controls. Only one SNP, rs17101921, was nominally significant after meta-analyses across the replication samples and this was genotyped in an additional six samples from the US/Australia, Germany, China, Japan, Israel and Sweden (n= 5142 cases/ 6561 controls). Across all replication samples, the allele at rs17101921 that was associated in the GWAS showed evidence for association independent of the original data (OR 1.17 (95% CI 1.06-1.29), p=0.0009). The SNP maps 85kb from the nearest gene encoding fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) making this a potential susceptibility gene for schizophrenia. PMID:18813210

  8. Fibroblast growth factor-2 maintains a niche-dependent population of self-renewing highly potent non-adherent mesenchymal progenitors through FGFR2c.

    PubMed

    Di Maggio, Nunzia; Mehrkens, Arne; Papadimitropoulos, Adam; Schaeren, Stefan; Heberer, Michael; Banfi, Andrea; Martin, Ivan

    2012-07-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are a heterogeneous population of multipotent progenitors currently under investigation for a variety of applications in regenerative medicine. While self-renewal of stem cells in different tissues has been demonstrated to be regulated by specialized microenvironments called niches, it is still unclear whether a self-renewing niche also exists for MSC. Here, we show that primary human BM cultures contain a population of intrinsically non-adherent mesenchymal progenitors (NAMP) with features of more primitive progenitors than the initially adhering colony-forming units-fibroblast (CFU-f). In fact, NAMP could generate an adherent progeny: (a) enriched with early mesenchymal populations (CD146+, SSEA-1+, and SSEA-4+); (b) with significantly greater proliferation and multilineage differentiation potential in vitro; and (c) capable of threefold greater bone formation in vivo than the corresponding CFU-f. Upon serial replating, NAMP were able to regenerate and expand in suspension as non-adherent clonogenic progenitors, while also giving rise to an adherent progeny. This took place at the cost of a gradual loss of proliferative potential, shown by a reduction in colony size, which could be completely prevented when NAMP were expanded on the initially adhering BM fraction. Mechanistically, we found that NAMP crucially depend on fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 signaling through FGFR2c for their survival and expansion. Furthermore, NAMP maintenance depends at least in part on humoral signals distinct from FGF-2. In conclusion, our data show a niche/progenitor organization in vitro, in which the BM adherent fraction provides a self-renewing microenvironment for primitive NAMP. PMID:22495904

  9. Computational mouse atlases and their application to automatic assessment of craniofacial dysmorphology caused by the Crouzon mutation Fgfr2C342Y

    PubMed Central

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Darvann, Tron A; Hermann, Nuno V; Oubel, Estanislao; Ersbøll, Bjarne K; Frangi, Alejandro F; Larsen, Per; Perlyn, Chad A; Morriss-Kay, Gillian M; Kreiborg, Sven

    2007-01-01

    Crouzon syndrome is characterized by premature fusion of sutures and synchondroses. Recently, the first mouse model of the syndrome was generated, having the mutation Cys342Tyr in Fgfr2c, equivalent to the most common human Crouzon/Pfeiffer syndrome mutation. In this study, a set of micro-computed tomography (CT) scannings of the skulls of wild-type mice and Crouzon mice were analysed with respect to the dysmorphology caused by Crouzon syndrome. A computational craniofacial atlas was built automatically from the set of wild-type mouse micro-CT volumes using (1) affine and (2) non-rigid image registration. Subsequently, the atlas was deformed to match each subject from the two groups of mice. The accuracy of these registrations was measured by a comparison of manually placed landmarks from two different observers and automatically assessed landmarks. Both of the automatic approaches were within the interobserver accuracy for normal specimens, and the non-rigid approach was within the interobserver accuracy for the Crouzon specimens. Four linear measurements, skull length, height and width and interorbital distance, were carried out automatically using the two different approaches. Both automatic approaches assessed the skull length, width and height accurately for both groups of mice. The non-rigid approach measured the interorbital distance accurately for both groups while the affine approach failed to assess this parameter for both groups. Using the full capability of the non-rigid approach, local displacements obtained when registering the non-rigid wild-type atlas to a non-rigid Crouzon mouse atlas were determined on the surface of the wild-type atlas. This revealed a 0.6-mm bending in the nasal region and a 0.8-mm shortening of the zygoma, which are similar to characteristics previously reported in humans. The most striking finding of this analysis was an angulation of approximately 0.6 mm of the cranial base, which has not been reported in humans. Comparing

  10. 40 CFR 266.109 - Low risk waste exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Low risk waste exemption. 266.109... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Burned in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces § 266.109 Low risk...

  11. 40 CFR 266.109 - Low risk waste exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low risk waste exemption. 266.109... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Burned in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces § 266.109 Low risk...

  12. 40 CFR 266.109 - Low risk waste exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Low risk waste exemption. 266.109... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Burned in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces § 266.109 Low risk...

  13. 40 CFR 266.109 - Low risk waste exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Low risk waste exemption. 266.109... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Burned in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces § 266.109 Low risk...

  14. 40 CFR 266.109 - Low risk waste exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Low risk waste exemption. 266.109... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SPECIFIC HAZARDOUS WASTES AND SPECIFIC TYPES OF HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Hazardous Waste Burned in Boilers and Industrial Furnaces § 266.109 Low risk...

  15. Panel Endorses Active Monitoring for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An independent panel convened this week by NIH has concluded that many men with localized, low-risk prostate cancer should be closely monitored, permitting treatment to be delayed until warranted by disease progression. However, monitoring strategies—such

  16. Control of HIF-1{alpha} and vascular signaling in fetal lung involves cross talk between mTORC1 and the FGF-10/FGFR2b/Spry2 airway branching periodicity clock.

    PubMed

    Scott, C L; Walker, D J; Cwiklinski, E; Tait, C; Tee, A R; Land, S C

    2010-10-01

    Lung development requires coordinated signaling between airway and vascular growth, but the link between these processes remains unclear. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) can amplify hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) vasculogenic activity through an NH(2)-terminal mTOR binding (TOS) motif. We hypothesized that this mechanism coordinates vasculogenesis with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-10/FGF-receptor2b/Spry2 regulator of airway branching. First, we tested if the HIF-1α TOS motif participated in epithelial-mesenchymal vascular signaling. mTORC1 activation by insulin significantly amplified HIF-1α activity at fetal Po(2) (23 mmHg) in human bronchial epithelium (16HBE14o-) and induced vascular traits (Flk1, sprouting) in cocultured human embryonic lung mesenchyme (HEL-12469). This enhanced activation of HIF-1α by mTORC1 was abolished on expression of a HIF-1α (F99A) TOS-mutant and also suppressed vascular differentiation of HEL-12469 cocultures. Next, we determined if vasculogenesis in fetal lung involved regulation of mTORC1 by the FGF-10/FGFR2b/Spry2 pathway. Fetal airway epithelium displayed distinct mTORC1 activity in situ, and its hyperactivation by TSC1(-/-) knockout induced widespread VEGF expression and disaggregation of Tie2-positive vascular bundles. FGF-10-coated beads grafted into fetal lung explants from Tie2-LacZ transgenic mice induced localized vascular differentiation in the peripheral mesenchyme. In rat fetal distal lung epithelial (FDLE) cells cultured at fetal Po(2), FGF-10 induced mTORC1 and amplified HIF-1α activity and VEGF secretion without induction of ERK1/2. This was accompanied by the formation of a complex between Spry2, the cCBL ubiquitin ligase, and the mTOR repressor, TSC2, which abolished GTPase activity directed against Rheb, the G protein inducer of mTORC1. Thus, mTORC1 links HIF-1α-driven vasculogenesis with the FGF-10/FGFR2b/Spry2 airway branching periodicity regulator. PMID:20622121

  17. High and Low Risk Self-Disclosure in Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchor, Kenneth N.

    This study examined the occurrence of high and low risk self-disclosure in 12 therapy groups. Eight groups were conducted for clients served by a community mental health center on an out-patient basis, and four groups were composed of extremely maladjusted in-patient clients at a state hospital. The Group Interaction Profile, an instrument which…

  18. MS ANTWERPEN: Emergency Management Training for Low-Risk Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohschneider, Stefan; Gerdes, Jurgen

    2004-01-01

    Emergency management training programs have been developed mostly for trainees from high-risk environments such as aviation or the chemical industry. This article describes a training program for staff members from low-risk environments such as hospitals or hotels, where the awareness of potential dangers is usually low and emergency plans are…

  19. Cellulase variants

    SciTech Connect

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  20. Aggressive thyroid cancer in low-risk age population

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, I.B.; Bowden, J.; Luk, S.C.; Simpson, J.A.

    1987-12-01

    Seventy-eight patients under the age of 40 (low-risk patients) who had undergone surgical treatment for well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma were referred from 1979 to 1986 to our hospital for adjuvant therapy. A subgroup of 37 patients, 14 with apparent aggressive cancer, was studied. This study group consisted of 27 female and 10 male patients with mixed papillary and follicular cancer, who ranged in age from 11 to 40 years. Nodal disease occurred in 27 (73%) patients and invasiveness in 30 (81%) patients and involved multiple areas in 9 (24%) patients. Recurrence occurred in 14 (38%) patients and visceral metastases occurred in eight (22%) patients. All patients underwent appropriate surgery, but microscopic residual disease was seen in 15 patients and gross residual disease in seven patients, so that 31 patients underwent iodine-131 therapy, and 17 of these patients also underwent external radiation therapy. Three patients died of their disease, whereas 24 (65%) patients are free of disease and 9 (24%) patients are alive with disease. An additional 7 (19%) patients were initially seen in the fifth to seventh decade after decades of neglected thyroid disease, which culminated in residual cancer and death. Although low-risk categorization for thyroid cancer appears valid, its rigid application in support of conservative treatment may lead to inadequate primary treatment and underdiagnosis of cancer in thyroid nodule disease in the low-risk age population.

  1. Syndromes with very low risk of acute prolonged seizures.

    PubMed

    Bast, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The provision of rescue medication is an important component in the treatment of epilepsy. An intervention within five to ten minutes in the case of an acute prolonged seizure may preserve the patient from status epilepticus (SE). However, the risk of convulsive SE (CSE) differs markedly between patients depending on individual factors. This report summarizes the literature on risk factors for CSE in children with epilepsy and adolescents, and discusses the hypothesis that some electroclinical syndromes engender a very low risk of CSE. The most important risk factor for SE is the history of a previous event. The longer a patient lives without SE, the lower the risk will be. CSE occurs significantly less frequently in idiopathic epilepsies compared to epilepsies with symptomatic or unknown aetiology. It is very rarely observed in patients with (non-encephalopathic) idiopathic generalised epilepsies, i.e. childhood absence epilepsy or juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. However, non-compliance or inappropriate treatment may trigger CSE in these syndromes. A very low risk can be assumed for children with Rolandic epilepsy, while CSE occurs in a considerable percentage of patients with Panayiotopoulos syndrome. Although the risk of CSE in otherwise normal children with cryptogenic focal epilepsy is uncertain, it is presumably low under successful continuous medication. In conclusion, the choice for or against the prescription of rescue medication remains an individual decision. Consequently, for several electroclinical syndromes, a per se provision of rescue medication does not appear justified. PMID:25322851

  2. High-Dose Radiation May Be No Better for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Radiation May Be No Better for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Study finds no benefits in disease progression, survival ... doses of radiation may not benefit low-risk prostate cancer patients, a new review suggests. "In the field ...

  3. 7 CFR 3052.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 3052.530 Section... ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following... periods) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance...

  4. 38 CFR 41.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk... a low-risk auditee. An auditee, which meets all of the following conditions for each of the... low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with § 41.520: (a)...

  5. 38 CFR 41.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk... a low-risk auditee. An auditee, which meets all of the following conditions for each of the... low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with § 41.520: (a)...

  6. 7 CFR 3052.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 3052.530 Section... ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following... periods) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance...

  7. 48 CFR 1352.237-71 - Security processing requirements-low risk contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.237-71 Security processing requirements—low risk contracts. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110-70(c), insert the following clause: Security Processing Requirements—Low Risk Contracts (APR 2010) (a... requirements-low risk contracts. 1352.237-71 Section 1352.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  8. 7 CFR 3052.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 3052.530 Section... ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following... periods) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance...

  9. 7 CFR 3052.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 3052.530 Section... ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following... periods) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance...

  10. 38 CFR 41.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk... a low-risk auditee. An auditee, which meets all of the following conditions for each of the... low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with § 41.520: (a)...

  11. 38 CFR 41.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk... a low-risk auditee. An auditee, which meets all of the following conditions for each of the... low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with § 41.520: (a)...

  12. 48 CFR 1352.237-71 - Security processing requirements-low risk contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.237-71 Security processing requirements—low risk contracts. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110-70(c), insert the following clause: Security Processing Requirements—Low Risk Contracts (APR 2010) (a... requirements-low risk contracts. 1352.237-71 Section 1352.237-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  13. Episiotomy in Low-Risk Deliveries: Physician Factors

    PubMed Central

    Arroll, Bruce; Giles, Anne; Sheps, Samuel B.

    1990-01-01

    From 376 randomly selected nulliparous women who delivered at the Grace Hospital in 1986, we selected 133 low-risk women and performed a retrospective chart review to ascertain the episiotomy rate for physicians by sex, years since graduation, and specialty status. There was a statistically significant difference between the rate for specialists (65%) and general practitioners (38%). A non-significant difference was found between male physicians (41%) and female physicians (56%) and between physicians who had graduated within 15 years (42%) and those who graduated more than 15 years ago (52%). Subgroup analysis of the general practitioner data revealed different patterns for male and female physicians according to their graduation cohort. PMID:21233977

  14. Expanding the mutation spectrum in 182 Spanish probands with craniosynostosis: identification and characterization of novel TCF12 variants.

    PubMed

    Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Berges-Soria, Julia; Barroso, Eva; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Pérez-Carrizosa, Virginia; Benito-Sanz, Sara; López-Messa, Eva; Santos, Fernando; García-Recuero, Ignacio I; Romance, Ana; Ballesta-Martínez, Juliana María; López-González, Vanesa; Campos-Barros, Ángel; Cruz, Jaime; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Sánchez Del Pozo, Jaime; Lapunzina, Pablo; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Heath, Karen E

    2015-07-01

    Craniosynostosis, caused by the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures, can be classified into non-syndromic or syndromic and by which sutures are affected. Clinical assignment is a difficult challenge due to the high phenotypic variability observed between syndromes. During routine diagnostics, we screened 182 Spanish craniosynostosis probands, implementing a four-tiered cascade screening of FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1. A total of 43 variants, eight novel, were identified in 113 (62%) patients: 104 (92%) detected in level 1; eight (7%) in level 2 and one (1%) in level 3. We subsequently screened additional genes in the probands with no detected mutation: one duplication of the IHH regulatory region was identified in a patient with craniosynostosis Philadelphia type and five variants, four novel, were identified in the recently described TCF12, in probands with coronal or multisuture affectation. In the 19 Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) individuals in whom a variant was detected, 15 (79%) carried a TWIST1 variant, whereas four (21%) had a TCF12 variant. Thus, we propose that TCF12 screening should be included for TWIST1 negative SCS patients and in patients where the coronal suture is affected. In summary, a molecular diagnosis was obtained in a total of 119/182 patients (65%), allowing the correct craniosynostosis syndrome classification, aiding genetic counselling and in some cases provided a better planning on how and when surgical intervention should take place and, subsequently the appropriate clinical follow up. PMID:25271085

  15. 29 CFR 99.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 99.530 Section 99.530... Auditors § 99.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following conditions...) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with §...

  16. 29 CFR 99.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 99.530 Section 99.530... Auditors § 99.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following conditions...) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with §...

  17. 29 CFR 99.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 99.530 Section 99.530... Auditors § 99.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following conditions...) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with §...

  18. 29 CFR 99.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 99.530 Section 99.530 Labor... Auditors § 99.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following conditions...) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with §...

  19. 29 CFR 99.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 99.530 Section 99.530 Labor... Auditors § 99.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee which meets all of the following conditions...) shall qualify as a low-risk auditee and be eligible for reduced audit coverage in accordance with §...

  20. 48 CFR 1352.237-71 - Security processing requirements-low risk contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.237-71 Security processing requirements—low risk contracts. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110-70(c), insert the following clause: Security Processing Requirements—Low Risk Contracts (APR 2010) (a... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security...

  1. 48 CFR 1352.237-71 - Security processing requirements-low risk contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.237-71 Security processing requirements—low risk contracts. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110-70(c), insert the following clause: Security Processing Requirements—Low Risk Contracts (APR 2010) (a... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security...

  2. 38 CFR 41.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 41.530 Section 41.530 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 41.530 Criteria for a low-risk auditee. An auditee,...

  3. Current approaches in the management of low risk Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Giulino-Roth, Lisa; Keller, Frank G; Hodgson, David C; Kelly, Kara M

    2015-06-01

    The outcome for children and adolescents with low risk Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is excellent, with event-free survival >85% and overall survival >95%. Historically, however, treatment has come at the cost of significant long-term toxicity from chemotherapy, radiation or a combination of these. Recent treatment strategies have focused on maintaining high event-free and overall survival while minimizing the use of therapy associated with late effects. The strategies used to achieve this vary greatly among paediatric cooperative groups and there is no one standard treatment for children with low risk HL. This review summaries recent clinical trials in paediatric low risk HL and addresses some of the important considerations when comparing trials, including differences in the definition of low risk HL, differences in outcome among histological subtypes and varying approaches to reduce or eliminate radiation therapy. Recommendations are provided for the treatment of children with low risk HL outside the setting of a clinical trial. PMID:25824371

  4. 48 CFR 1352.237-71 - Security processing requirements-low risk contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.237-71 Security processing requirements—low risk contracts. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110... (DCII), FBI Fingerprint (FBIF), and the FBI Information Management Division (FBIN). (5) In addition,...

  5. Unexpected complications of low-risk pregnancies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Danilack, Valery A.; Nunes, Anthony P.; Phipps, Maureen G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determining appropriate sites of care for any type of medical issue assumes successful matching of patient risks to facility capabilities and resources. In obstetrics, predicting patients who will have a need for additional resources beyond routine obstetric and neonatal care is difficult. Women without prenatal risk factors and their newborns may experience unexpected complications during delivery or postpartum. In this study, we report the risk of unexpected maternal and newborn complications among pregnancies without identified prenatal risk factors. STUDY DESIGN We conducted a cross-sectional investigation utilizing US natality data to analyze 10 million birth certificate records from 2011 through 2013. We categorized pregnancies as low risk (no prenatal risk factors) or high risk (at least 1 prenatal risk factor) according to 19 demographic, medical, and pregnancy characteristics. We evaluated 21 individual unexpected or adverse intrapartum and postpartum outcomes in addition to a composite indicator of any adverse outcome. RESULTS Among 10,458,616 pregnancies, 38% were identified as low risk and 62% were identified as high risk for unexpected complications. At least 1 unexpected complication was indicated on the birth certificate for 46% of all pregnancies, 29% of low-risk pregnancies, and 57% of high-risk pregnancies. While the risk for unexpected or adverse outcomes was greatly reduced for the low-risk group compared to the high-risk group overall and for several of the individual outcomes, low-risk pregnancies had higher risks of vacuum delivery, forceps delivery, meconium staining, and chorioamnionitis compared to high-risk pregnancies. CONCLUSION Of births, 29% identified to be low risk had an unexpected complication that would require nonroutine obstetric or neonatal care. Additionally, for select outcomes, risks were higher in the low-risk group compared to the group with identified risk factors. This information is important for planning

  6. Coronary revascularization in "high" versus "low-risk" patients: The role of myocardial protection.

    PubMed Central

    Olinger, G N; Po, J; Maloney, J V; Mulder, D G; Buckberg, G D

    1975-01-01

    Postoperative mortality, infarction, and need for inotropic support are reportedly increased following myocardial revascularization in "high-risk" patients. We believe these complications result from inadequate protection of the compromised myocardium and should not occur with greater frequency in "high-risk" than "Low-risk" patients if the heart is optimally protected during the entire course of the operative procedure. Results following revascularization in 50 consecutive "low-risk" and 50 consecutive "high-risk" patients were analyzed. One or more of the followin factors were present in the "high-risk" group: ventricular dysfunction--ejection fraction less than 0.4, preinfarction angina, evolving infarction, recent infarction (less than 2 weeks), and refractory ventricular tachyarrhythmia. The following principles were used in all patients to minimize ischemic injury: 1) avoidance of pre-bypass hypo- or hypertension, 2) limitation of ischemic arrest to less than 12 minutes, 3) avoidance of ventricular fibrillation, and 4) prolongation of total bypass as necessary to repay the myocardial oxygen debt. Postoperative inotropic support was required in 10% of "high" and 10% of "low-risk" patients, new postoperative infarction developed in 10% of "high" vs. 10% "low-risk" patients; death occurred in 2% of "high" vs. 4% "low-risk" patients. These results are comparable and indicate that optimum myocardial protection allows safe revascularization in the "high-risk" patient. PMID:1164057

  7. Divorcing Diagnosis From Treatment: Contemporary Management of Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Allison S.; Punnen, Sanoj

    2013-01-01

    Today, the majority of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer will present with low-risk features of the disease. Because prostate cancer often takes an insidious course, it is debated whether the majority of these men require radical treatment and the accompanying derangement of quality of life domains imposed by surgery, radiation, and hormonal therapy. Investigators have identified various selection criteria for "insignificant disease," or that which can be monitored for disease progression while safely delaying radical treatment. In addition to the ideal definition of low risk, a lack of randomized trials comparing the various options for treatment in this group of men poses a great challenge for urologists. Early outcomes from active surveillance cohorts support its use in carefully selected men with low-risk disease features, but frequent monitoring is required. Patient selection and disease monitoring methods will require refinement that will likely be accomplished through the increased use of biomarkers and specialized imaging techniques. PMID:23878682

  8. Insights and clinical questions about the active surveillance of low-risk papillary thyroid microcarcinomas [Review].

    PubMed

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Oda, Hitomi; Miyauchi, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Over 20 years ago, two Japanese institutions initiated an active surveillance policy for papillary microcarcinomas (PMCs) without high-risk features (such as clinical lymph node and distant metastases) and suspected trachea or recurrent laryngeal nerve invasion. Since the most recent American Thyroid Association (ATA) guidelines adopt active surveillance as a therapy option for low-risk PMCs, the number of institutions worldwide carrying out this policy can be expected to increase. However, before adopting an active surveillance strategy, some important clinical questions must be considered. In this review, conceivable clinical questions with our answers based on the present accumulation of low-risk PMC surveillance data are presented. PMID:26632168

  9. Dispositional Empathy in High- and Low-Risk Parents for Child Physical Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Albeniz, A.; de Paul, Joaquin

    2003-01-01

    Parents identified as either at high risk (n=36) or low-risk (n=38) for child physical abuse were assessed for dispositional empathy. High-risk parents showed lower total scores on the Hogan Empathy Scale and the Questionnaire Measure of Emotional Empathy. They also scored higher on the Interpersonal Reactivity Index "personal distress" dimension.…

  10. Gender Differences in Empathy in Parents at High- and Low-Risk of Child Physical Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez-Albeniz, A.; de Paul, Joaquin

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The present research was designed to study empathy in high-risk parents for child physical abuse. The main objective was to study if high-risk mothers and fathers, compared to low-risk mothers and fathers, presented more Personal distress, less Perspective-taking, less Empathic concern and a deficit in dispositional empathy toward…

  11. Communicating HIV Results to Low-Risk Individuals: Still Hazy After All These Years.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Katrina M; Brase, Gary L

    2015-01-01

    Revised Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations on HIV testing now promote testing of most risk groups. However, positive results for low-risk individuals are more likely to be false positives than for high-risk individuals, making clear communication of test results even more imperative. In a study, we evaluated current counseling of low-risk test recipients via a sample of 29 HIV hotline counselors from U.S. state and national hotlines. 100% of counselors interviewed failed to provide an accurate conditional HIV risk for low-risk women, but were more likely than a 1998 German sample to report that false positives could occur. In a second study, undergraduates read idealized transcripts of interviews with HIV counselors and computed conditional risk for a low-risk individual. The natural frequency format offered a small but significant improvement in conditional reasoning, comparable to the effect of numerical literacy. Applications for ecologically valid numerical presentations of risk and implications for numeracy are discussed. PMID:26149160

  12. Treatment patterns among Canadian men diagnosed with localized low-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, C.; Tran, K.; Rahal, R.; Porter, G.; Fung, S.; Louzado, C.; Liu, J.; Bryant, H.

    2015-01-01

    In general, guideline-recommended treatment options for men with low-risk prostate cancer (pca) include active surveillance, radical prostatectomy, and external-beam radiation therapy or brachytherapy. Because of the concern about overdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of pca, patients with low-risk disease are increasingly being managed with active surveillance. Using data from six provincial cancer registries, we examined treatment patterns within a year of a diagnosis of localized low-risk pca, and we assessed differences by age. Of patients diagnosed in 2010 in four of the six reporting provinces, most received surgery or radiation therapy within 1 year of diagnosis. Depending on the province, either surgery or radiation therapy was the most commonly used primary treatment. In the other two provinces, most patients had no record of treatment within a year of diagnosis. Examining treatment patterns by age demonstrated a lesser likelihood of receiving surgery or radiation therapy within 1 year of diagnosis among men more than 75 years of age than among men 75 years of age or younger (no record of treatment in 69.1% and 46.3% respectively). In conclusion, we observed interprovincial and age-specific variations in the patterns of care for men with low-risk pca. The findings presented in this report are intended to identify opportunities for improvement in clinical practice that could lead to improved care and experience. PMID:26715876

  13. 7 CFR 3052.530 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 3052.530 Section 3052.530 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052.530 Criteria for a...

  14. 2 CFR 200.520 - Criteria for a low-risk auditee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Criteria for a low-risk auditee. 200.520... OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GUIDANCE Reserved UNIFORM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, COST PRINCIPLES...-risk auditee. An auditee that meets all of the following conditions for each of the preceding two...

  15. High- and Low-Risk Self-Disclosure in Group Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchor, Kenneth N.

    1979-01-01

    Findings indicate that it is both feasible and important to draw a distinction between high- and low-risk self-revelation in group psychotherapy. Vulnerability of members appears to be perceived as a function of the amount and quality of their own self-disclosing utterances. Institutionalized patients may be less capable of appropriate…

  16. AKI in Low-Risk versus High-Risk Patients in Intensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Sileanu, Florentina E.; Murugan, Raghavan; Lucko, Nicole; Clermont, Gilles; Kane-Gill, Sandra L.; Handler, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives AKI in critically ill patients is usually part of multiorgan failure. However, nonrenal organ failure may not always precede AKI and patients without evidence of these organ failures may not be at low risk for AKI. This study examined the risk and outcomes associated with AKI in critically ill patients with and without cardiovascular or respiratory organ failures at presentation to the intensive care unit (ICU). Design, setting, participants, & measurements A large, academic medical center database, with records from July 2000 through October 2008, was used and the authors identified a low-risk cohort as patients without cardiovascular and respiratory organ failures defined as not receiving vasopressor support or mechanical ventilation within the first 24 hours of ICU admission. AKI was defined using Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria. The primary end points were moderate to severe AKI (stages 2–3) and risk-adjusted hospital mortality. Results Of 40,152 critically ill patients, 44.9% received neither vasopressors nor mechanical ventilation on ICU day 1. Stages 2–3 AKI occurred less frequently in the low-risk patients versus high-risk patients within 24 hours (14.3% versus 29.1%) and within 1 week (25.7% versus 51.7%) of ICU admission. Patients developing AKI in both risk groups had higher risk of death before hospital discharge. However, the adjusted odds of hospital mortality were greater (odds ratio, 2.99; 95% confidence interval, 2.62 to 3.41) when AKI occurred in low-risk patients compared with those with respiratory or cardiovascular failures (odds ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.09 to 1.3); interaction P<0.001. Conclusions Patients admitted to ICU without respiratory or cardiovascular failure have a substantial likelihood of developing AKI. Although survival for low-risk patients is better than for high-risk patients, the relative increase in mortality associated with AKI is actually greater for low-risk

  17. Histone variants and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, Steven; Smith, M Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Histones package and compact DNA by assembling into nucleosome core particles. Most histones are synthesized at S phase for rapid deposition behind replication forks. In addition, the replacement of histones deposited during S phase by variants that can be deposited independently of replication provide the most fundamental level of chromatin differentiation. Alternative mechanisms for depositing different variants can potentially establish and maintain epigenetic states. Variants have also evolved crucial roles in chromosome segregation, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, and other processes. Investigations into the evolution, structure, and metabolism of histone variants provide a foundation for understanding the participation of chromatin in important cellular processes and in epigenetic memory. PMID:25561719

  18. Necrotizing fasciitis of anterior abdominal wall following cesarean section in a low-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Chhetry, Manisha; Banerjee, Basudeb; Subedi, Shanti; Koirala, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a mono-microbial post-cesarean necrotizing fasciitis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a low-risk healthy woman who presented with acute fulminant infection, sepsis and features of multi-organ dysfunction syndrome on sixth post-operative day. Aggressive management with multiple surgical debridement and supportive therapy was the key to favorable outcome in this case. PMID:27402541

  19. Necrotizing fasciitis of anterior abdominal wall following cesarean section in a low-risk patient

    PubMed Central

    Chhetry, Manisha; Banerjee, Basudeb; Subedi, Shanti; Koirala, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a mono-microbial post-cesarean necrotizing fasciitis caused by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, in a low-risk healthy woman who presented with acute fulminant infection, sepsis and features of multi-organ dysfunction syndrome on sixth post-operative day. Aggressive management with multiple surgical debridement and supportive therapy was the key to favorable outcome in this case. PMID:27402541

  20. Testing of Low-Risk Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Ezra A.; Kirk, J. Douglas; Bluemke, David A.; Diercks, Deborah; Farkouh, Michael E.; Garvey, J. Lee; Kontos, Michael C.; McCord, James; Miller, Todd D.; Morise, Anthony; Newby, L. Kristin; Ruberg, Frederick L.; Scordo, Kristine Anne; Thompson, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The management of low-risk patients presenting to emergency departments is a common and challenging clinical problem entailing 8 million emergency department visits annually. Although a majority of these patients do not have a life-threatening condition, the clinician must distinguish between those who require urgent treatment of a serious problem and those with more benign entities who do not require admission. Inadvertent discharge of patients with acute coronary syndrome from the emergency department is associated with increased mortality and liability, whereas inappropriate admission of patients without serious disease is neither indicated nor cost-effective. Clinical judgment and basic clinical tools (history, physical examination, and electrocardiogram) remain primary in meeting this challenge and affording early identification of low-risk patients with chest pain. Additionally, established and newer diagnostic methods have extended clinicians' diagnostic capacity in this setting. Low-risk patients presenting with chest pain are increasingly managed in chest pain units in which accelerated diagnostic protocols are performed, comprising serial electrocardiograms and cardiac injury markers to exclude acute coronary syndrome. Patients with negative findings usually complete the accelerated diagnostic protocol with a confirmatory test to exclude ischemia. This is typically an exercise treadmill test or a cardiac imaging study if the exercise treadmill test is not applicable. Rest myocardial perfusion imaging has assumed an important role in this setting. Computed tomography coronary angiography has also shown promise in this setting. A negative accelerated diagnostic protocol evaluation allows discharge, whereas patients with positive findings are admitted. This approach has been found to be safe, accurate, and cost-effective in low-risk patients presenting with chest pain. PMID:20660809

  1. Identification and Characteristics of Low-Risk Survivors of an Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Tisminetzky, Mayra; Gurwitz, Jerry; Chen, Han-Yang; Erskine, Nathaniel; Yarzebski, Jorge; Gore, Joel; Lessard, Darleen; Goldberg, Robert

    2016-05-15

    There are limited contemporary data available describing the characteristics of patients who neither died nor were readmitted to the hospital during the first year after hospital discharge for an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in comparison with those who died and/or were readmitted to the hospital during this high-risk period. Residents of the Worcester, Massachusetts, metropolitan area discharged after an AMI from 3 central Massachusetts hospitals on a biennial basis from 2001 to 2011 comprised the study population. The average age of this population (n = 4,268) was 69 years, 62% were men, and 92% were white. From 2001 to 2011, 43.5% of patients were classified as low-risk survivors of an AMI, 12.3% died, and 44.2% did not die but had at least 1 rehospitalization during the subsequent year. The proportion of low-risk survivors increased from 42.6% to 46.4%, whereas the proportion of those who died within a year after hospital discharge decreased from 14.3% to 10.5%, respectively, during the years under study. After adjusting for several patient characteristics, younger (≤65 years) persons, men, those who were married, those who did not present with multimorbidities, and patients who did not develop in-hospital clinical complications were more likely to be classified as a low-risk AMI survivor. Identifying low-risk survivors of an AMI may help health care providers to focus more intensive efforts and interventions on those at higher risk for dying and/or being readmitted to the hospital during the postdischarge transition period after an AMI. PMID:27013386

  2. Interspecialty differences in the obstetric care of low-risk women.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, R A; Dobie, S A; Hart, L G; Schneeweiss, R; Gould, D; Raine, T R; Benedetti, T J; Pirani, M J; Perrin, E B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined differences among obstetricians, family physicians, and certified nurse-midwives in the patterns of obstetric care provided to low-risk patients. METHODS: For a random sample of Washington State obstetrician-gynecologists, family physicians, and certified nurse-midwives, records of a random sample of their low-risk patients beginning care between September 1, 1988, and August 31, 1989, were abstracted. RESULTS: Certified nurse-midwives were less likely to use continuous electronic fetal monitoring and had lower rates of labor induction or augmentation than physicians. Certified nurse-midwives also were less likely than physicians to use epidural anesthesia. The cesarean section rate for patients of certified nurse-midwives was 8.8% vs 13.6% for obstetricians and 15.1% for family physicians. Certified nurse-midwives used 12.2% fewer resources. There was little difference between the practice patterns of obstetricians and family physicians. CONCLUSIONS: The low-risk patients of certified nurse-midwives in Washington State received fewer obstetrical interventions than similar patients cared for by obstetrician-gynecologists or family physicians. These differences are associated with lower cesarean section rates and less resource use. PMID:9096532

  3. Upgrading and upstaging of low-risk prostate cancer among Korean patients: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Insang; Lim, Donghoon; Jeong, Young Beom; Park, Seung Chol; Noh, Jun Hwa; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Kang, Taek Won

    2015-01-01

    Only 54% of prostate cancer cases in Korea are localized compared with 82% of cases in the US. Furthermore, half of Korean patients are upgraded after radical prostatectomy (41.6%-50.6%). We investigated the risk factors for upgrading and/or upstaging of low-risk prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 1159 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy at five hospitals in Honam Province. Preoperative data on standard clinicopathological parameters were collected. The radical prostatectomy specimens were graded and staged and we defined a "worsening prognosis" as a Gleason score ≥ 7 or upstaging to ≥ pT3. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess factors associated with postoperative pathological upstaging. Among the 1159 patients, 324 were classified into the clinically low-risk group, and 154 (47.5%) patients were either upgraded or upstaged. The multivariable analysis revealed that the preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen level (odds ratio [OR], 1.131; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.007-1.271; P= 0.037), percent positive biopsy core (OR: 1.018; 95% CI: 1.002-1.035; P= 0.032), and small prostate volume (≤30 ml) (OR: 2.280; 95% CI: 1.351-3.848; P= 0.002) were predictive of a worsening prognosis. Overall, 47.5% of patients with low-risk disease were upstaged postoperatively. The current risk stratification criteria may be too relaxed for our study cohort. PMID:25578934

  4. Prognosis of Low-Risk Young Women Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Stacey M; Teleten, Aleksander; Li, Zhongmin; Venugopal, Sandhya; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2016-01-01

    Identification of patients at low risk presenting to the emergency department with chest pain is a continuing challenge. We examined a cohort of low-risk women with negative cardiac injury markers, electrocardiogram with normal results, and clinical stability. We hypothesized that these patients can be safely and accurately managed in a chest pain unit (CPU), may not require predischarge cardiac testing, and have an excellent short-term prognosis. The primary end point was major cardiovascular events during index admission or follow-up. Mean age of the 403 women was 42 ± 4.3 years (30 to 50 years). No patient had a cardiovascular event in the CPU, and none of the 321 patients followed for 6 months had a late cardiovascular event. Most (211, 52%) did not receive predischarge cardiac testing. The remaining 192 patients (48%) had predischarge exercise treadmill test, stress imaging, or cardiac catheterization. Of those patients who underwent treadmill testing, almost 90% had no exercise-induced chest pain and approximately 50% had functional capacity 8 to 14 METs. In addition, 166 patients (41%) were discharged from the CPU after <2 hours and 21% (n = 86) within 2 to 8 hours. In conclusion, this group of low-risk women was safely and accurately managed in the CPU and discharged promptly. There were no cardiac events on index admission or 6-month follow-up, and in most patients, predischarge cardiac testing was unnecessary. PMID:26552512

  5. Nonvisible tumors on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging does not predict low-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Koo, Kyo Chul; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Byung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether multiparametric MRI could help predict the diagnosis of low-risk prostate cancer (PCA). Methods We retrospectively analyzed consecutive 623 patients with PCA who underwent multiparametric MRI before radical prostatectomy(RP). High-resolution T1- and T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic precontrast and postcontrast image sequences were obtained for each patient. Of the 623 patients, 177(28.4%) exhibited non visible tumors on MRI of clinical stage T1c. The imaging results were compared with the pathological findings with respect to both stage and Gleason scores (GS). Results Of the 177 prostatectomy patients with non visible tumors on MRI, pathological findings resulted in the upgrading of 49(27.7%) patients to a sum of GS 7 or more. 101(57.1%) patients exhibited tumor volumes greater than 0.5cc. The biochemical recurrence rate was significantly higher in the pathological upgraded group compared with the nonupgraded group after a mean follow-up time of 29 months. In the multiple logistic analysis, non visible tumor on MRI was not a significant predictor of low-risk PCA. Conclusions Even though cancer foci were not visualized by postbiopsy MRI, the pathological tumor volumes and extent of GS upgrading were relatively high. Therefore, nonvisible tumors by multiparametric MRI do not appear to be predictive of low-risk PCA. PMID:26779459

  6. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  7. Are urban safety-net hospitals losing low-risk Medicaid maternity patients?

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, D J; Hadley, J; Freeman, V G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine data on Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity cases to address four questions: (1) Did safety-net hospitals' share of Medicaid patients decline while their shares of self-pay/charity-care patients increased from 1991 to 1994? (2) Did Medicaid patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals decline during 1991-94? (3) Did self-pay/charity patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals increase during 1991-94? (4) Did the change in Medicaid patients' use of safety-net hospitals differ for low- and high-risk patients? STUDY DESIGN: We use hospital discharge data to estimate logistic regression models of hospital choice for low-risk and high-risk Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity patients for 25 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in five states for the years 1991 and 1994. We define low-risk patients as discharges without comorbidities and high-risk patients as discharges with comorbidities that may substantially increase hospital costs, length of stay, or morbidity. The five states are California, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York. The MSAs in the analysis are those with at least one safety-net hospital and a population of 500,000 or more. This study also uses data from the 1990 Census and AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals. The regression analysis estimates the change between 1991 and 1994 in the relative odds of a Medicaid or self-pay/charity patient using a safety-net hospital. We explore whether this change in the relative odds is related to the risk status of the patient. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The findings suggest that competition for Medicaid patients increased from 1991 to 1994. Over time, safety-net hospitals lost low-risk maternity Medicaid patients while services to high-risk maternity Medicaid patients and self-pay/charity maternity patients remained concentrated in safety-net hospitals. IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY: Safety-net hospitals use Medicaid patient revenues and public subsidies that are based on Medicaid

  8. Antiplatelet therapy versus observation in low-risk essential thrombocythemia with a CALR mutation

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Larrán, Alberto; Pereira, Arturo; Guglielmelli, Paola; Hernández-Boluda, Juan Carlos; Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Ferrer-Marín, Francisca; Samah, Alimam; Griesshammer, Martin; Kerguelen, Ana; Andreasson, Bjorn; Burgaleta, Carmen; Schwarz, Jiri; García-Gutiérrez, Valentín; Ayala, Rosa; Barba, Pere; Gómez-Casares, María Teresa; Paoli, Chiara; Drexler, Beatrice; Zweegman, Sonja; McMullin, Mary F.; Samuelsson, Jan; Harrison, Claire; Cervantes, Francisco; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Besses, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The role of antiplatelet therapy as primary prophylaxis of thrombosis in low-risk essential thrombocythemia has not been studied in randomized clinical trials. We assessed the benefit/risk of low-dose aspirin in 433 patients with low-risk essential thrombocythemia (271 with a CALR mutation, 162 with a JAK2V617F mutation) who were on antiplatelet therapy or observation only. After a follow up of 2215 person-years free from cytoreduction, 25 thrombotic and 17 bleeding episodes were recorded. In CALR-mutated patients, antiplatelet therapy did not affect the risk of thrombosis but was associated with a higher incidence of bleeding (12.9 versus 1.8 episodes per 1000 patient-years, P=0.03). In JAK2V617F-mutated patients, low-dose aspirin was associated with a reduced incidence of venous thrombosis with no effect on the risk of bleeding. Coexistence of JAK2V617F-mutation and cardiovascular risk factors increased the risk of thrombosis, even after adjusting for treatment with low-dose aspirin (incidence rate ratio: 9.8; 95% confidence interval: 2.3–42.3; P=0.02). Time free from cytoreduction was significantly shorter in CALR-mutated patients with essential thrombocythemia than in JAK2V617F-mutated ones (median time 5 years and 9.8 years, respectively; P=0.0002) and cytoreduction was usually necessary to control extreme thrombocytosis. In conclusion, in patients with low-risk, CALR-mutated essential thrombocythemia, low-dose aspirin does not reduce the risk of thrombosis and may increase the risk of bleeding. PMID:27175028

  9. Quick identification of febrile neonates with low risk for serious bacterial infection: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Marom, R; Sakran, W; Antonelli, J; Horovitz, Y; Zarfin, Y; Koren, A; Miron, D

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the possible usefulness of simple and quick criteria for identifying febrile neonates with low risk for serious bacterial infection (SBI). Design All febrile neonates who were admitted between August 1998 and August 2003 to the Pediatric Emergency Department, HaEmek Medical Center, Afula, Israel, and to the Poriya Hospital, Tiberias, Israel, were included in the study. The recommended evaluation of each neonate included details of medical history and a complete physical examination, including blood culture, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), white cell count (WBC), and analysis and culture of urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Other tests were carried out as necessary. Patients who met all the following criteria were considered to have low risk for SBI: (1) unremarkable medical history; (2) good appearance; (3) no focal physical signs of infection; (4) ESR <30 mm at the end of the first hour; (5) WBC 5000–15 000/mm3; (6) a normal urine analysis by the dipstick method. Results Complete data were available for 386 neonates. SBI was documented in 108 (28%) neonates, of whom 14% had a urinary tract infection, 9.3% had acute otitis media, 2.3% had pneumonia, 1.3% had cellulitis, 0.5% had bacterial meningitis and 0.5% had bacterial gastroenteritis. The overall incidence of SBI was 1 in 166 (0.6%) neonates who fulfilled the criteria compared with 107 in 220 (48.6%) in the neonates who did not fulfil the criteria (p<0.001). The negative predictive value for SBI of the combination of the low‐risk criteria was 99.4% (95% confidence interval 99.35% to 99.45%). Conclusions Fulfilment of the criteria for low risk might be a reliable and useful tool for excluding SBI in febrile neonates. PMID:17185424

  10. Unilateral Prostate Cancer Cannot be Accurately Predicted in Low-Risk Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Isbarn, Hendrik; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.; Vogel, Susanne

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Hemiablative therapy (HAT) is increasing in popularity for treatment of patients with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). The validity of this therapeutic modality, which exclusively treats PCa within a single prostate lobe, rests on accurate staging. We tested the accuracy of unilaterally unremarkable biopsy findings in cases of low-risk PCa patients who are potential candidates for HAT. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 243 men with clinical stage {<=}T2a, a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration of <10 ng/ml, a biopsy-proven Gleason sum of {<=}6, and a maximum of 2 ipsilateral positive biopsy results out of 10 or more cores. All men underwent a radical prostatectomy, and pathology stage was used as the gold standard. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were tested for significant predictors of unilateral, organ-confined PCa. These predictors consisted of PSA, %fPSA (defined as the quotient of free [uncomplexed] PSA divided by the total PSA), clinical stage (T2a vs. T1c), gland volume, and number of positive biopsy cores (2 vs. 1). Results: Despite unilateral stage at biopsy, bilateral or even non-organ-confined PCa was reported in 64% of all patients. In multivariable analyses, no variable could clearly and independently predict the presence of unilateral PCa. This was reflected in an overall accuracy of 58% (95% confidence interval, 50.6-65.8%). Conclusions: Two-thirds of patients with unilateral low-risk PCa, confirmed by clinical stage and biopsy findings, have bilateral or non-organ-confined PCa at radical prostatectomy. This alarming finding questions the safety and validity of HAT.

  11. Epiphora after radioactive iodine therapy in a low-risk patient.

    PubMed

    Song, Heesung; Jeong, Jinho; Ju Koh, Myeong

    2015-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that radioactive iodine therapy (RIT) is very useful for ablating remnant thyroid tissue or metastatic lesions after total thyroidectomy in well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Epiphora as a result of lacrimal drainage system obstruction is a rare complication of RIT. Previous studies have shown that most patients with epiphora after RIT are old ages, females, and with high cumulative radioactive iodine dose. Here, we report on a case of epiphora with low-risk factors including young ages, male, and 5.5-GBq (150-mCi) dose in the first RIT. PMID:25674875

  12. Behavioral factors explaining the low risk for cervical carcinoma in Utah Mormon women.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J W; Sanborn, J S; Slattery, M L

    1995-03-01

    We used data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Utah from 1984 to 1987 to determine whether the low incidence of cervical carcinoma in Mormon women can be explained by adherence to their religious teachings, which proscribe smoking and extramarital sexual relations. Mormon women had substantially lower risk for cervical carcinoma than non-Mormons [odds ratio (OR) = 0.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.28-0.54]; this low risk was confined to those who attended church frequently. The protective effect disappeared after controlling for differences in age, sexual behavior, and smoking (OR = 1.22; 95% CI = 0.80-1.87). PMID:7742409

  13. Mucopolysaccharidosis: A New Variant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primrose, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a possibly new variant of mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by progressive mental and motor deficiency, bone abnormalities, a generalized skin lesion, and abnormal mucopolysaccharides in the urine as seen in a 20-year-old female. (DB)

  14. Normal Variants in Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Bryg, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Echocardiography is a powerful and convenient tool used routinely in the cardiac evaluation of many patients. Improved resolution and visualization of cardiac anatomy has led to the discovery of many normal variant structures that have no known pathologic consequence. Importantly, these findings may masquerade as pathology prompting unnecessary further evaluation at the expense of anxiety, cost, or potential harm. This review provides an updated and comprehensive collection of normal anatomic variants on both transthoracic and transesophageal imaging. PMID:27612473

  15. Low serial serum neopterin does not predict low risk for chronic renal graft rejection.

    PubMed

    Müller, T; Orgler, A; Bidmon, B; Arbeiter, K; Balzar, E; Ruffingshofer, D; Aufricht, C

    2001-01-01

    Research has provided new and potent immunosuppressants which can potentially stop ongoing rejection. Subclinical rejection is a particular problem in the pediatric age group and early identification of children at risk is of the utmost importance. Neopterin has been previously shown to be a non-specific but sensitive marker for immunologic activity. In this study we hypothesized that low serum neopterin in the 1st year after transplantation predicts a low risk of chronic rejection. We retrospectively analyzed serial neopterin data obtained beyond the early postoperative period in 21 children and correlated the peak and average with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) loss during the subsequent years (P = 0.63, NS, r = 0.10). Our results show that serum neopterin did not differ between the majority of children who developed chronic transplant dysfunction and children with stable transplant function beyond the early post-transplant period. Thus serum neopterin failed to delineate a low-risk population who might be spared more invasive diagnostic procedures such as protocol biopsy. PMID:11198595

  16. "The More the Better" Paradox of Antenatal Ultrasound Examinations in Low-Risk Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Chiossi, Giuseppe; Palomba, Stefano; Balduzzi, Sara; Costantine, Maged M; Falbo, Angela I; La Sala, Giovanni B

    2016-06-01

    Objective To investigate whether different antenatal care models could account for differences in operative delivery rates and adverse neonatal outcomes among low-risk pregnant women, and to identify independent variables associated with delivery modes and adverse neonatal outcomes. Study design Retrospective cohort from a single center of singleton, term, live births between January 2012 and June 2014. Rates of cesarean deliveries, operative vaginal deliveries, and neonatal morbidities were analyzed among women followed by private obstetrician-gynecologists versus national health system providers (certified nurse midwifes supervised by obstetrician-gynecologists), and adjusted for potential confounders. Results Among the 2,831 women in our cohort, obstetric and neonatal outcomes were independent of obstetric providers. After we controlled for confounders, private patients having more than four antenatal ultrasound examinations were more likely to undergo cesarean delivery than public patients with four or fewer sonographic assessments (five to eight prenatal scans: relative risk ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-8; nine or more prenatal scans: relative risk ratio, 4.1; 95% CI 1.2-14). Conclusions Multiple prenatal ultrasound examinations in low-risk obstetric populations appear to be an independent and potentially modifiable risk factor for cesarean deliveries. PMID:26862726

  17. Measurement of ethical behavior in leisure among high- and low-risk adolescents.

    PubMed

    Widmer, M A; Ellis, G D; Trunnell, E P

    1996-01-01

    Based on Aristotelian ethics, an "Adolescent Ethical Behavior in Leisure Scale" (AEBLS) was developed. Sixty-two items were created and reviewed by a panel of experts for content-related evidence of validity. Two validity studies were then conducted. In Study 1, data from 419 high- and low-risk adolescents were used to examine correlations between the AEBLS scores and measures of substance use, school bonding, and dispositional leisure boredom. All hypotheses about relations between these variables and the AEBLS were supported. In Study 2, an experiment was conducted to assess construct-related evidence of validity. Seventy-one adolescents completed the AEBLS and evaluated images of sensory and cortical recreation activities to which they were exposed. Consistent with the hypotheses, significant positive correlations were found between the AEBLS and evaluation of cortical activities, and significant negative correlations were found between the AEBLS and evaluation of sensory activities. Results support the use of AEBLS scores to discriminate between ethical leisure behaviors of high- and low-risk adolescents. PMID:8726898

  18. Wide Variation Found In Hospital Facility Costs For Maternity Stays Involving Low-Risk Childbirth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Gariepy, Aileen; Lundsberg, Lisbet S; Sheth, Sangini S; Pettker, Christian M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Illuzzi, Jessica L

    2015-07-01

    Childbirth is the leading cause of hospital admission in the United States, yet there has been little research on variation in hospital costs associated with childbirth. Using data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we characterized the variation in estimated facility costs of hospitalizations for low-risk childbirth across US hospitals. We found that the average estimated facility cost per maternity stay ranged from $1,189 to $11,986 (median: $4,215), with a 2.2-fold difference between the 10th and 90th percentiles. Estimated facility costs were higher at hospitals with higher rates of cesarean delivery or serious maternal morbidity. Hospitals having government or nonprofit ownership; being a rural hospital; and having relatively low volumes of childbirths, low proportions of childbirths covered by Medicaid, and long stays also had significantly higher costs. The large variation in estimated facility cost for low-risk childbirths among hospitals suggests that hospital practices might be an important contributor to variation in cost and that there may be opportunities for cost reduction. The safe reduction of cesarean deliveries, increasing the coordination of care, and emphasizing value of care through new payment and delivery systems reforms may help reduce hospital costs and cost variation associated with childbirth in the United States. PMID:26153317

  19. Atlas of Computed Tomography Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhns, L.R.; Seeger, J.

    1983-01-01

    Atlas of Computed Tomography Variants is unique in that, while others of its kind may include plain film, roentgen variants, it concentrates solely on CT images of variants which may simulate disease. Organized into four regions, it presents dicussions covering CT variants of the skull, neck and spine; thorax; abdomen; and extremities-featuring a section on the head.

  20. Genetic polymorphisms in the cytokine genes and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in low-risk non-Asians of USA

    PubMed Central

    Ognjanovic, Simona; Yuan, Jian-Min; Chaptman, Ann K.; Fan, Yunhua; Yu, Mimi C.

    2009-01-01

    Polymorphisms in cytokine genes responsible for inflammatory and immune responses are associated with risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in high-risk Chinese population. Similar data in low-risk populations are lacking. A population-based case–control study of HCC was conducted including 120 HCC patients and 230 matched control subjects of non-Asian residents in Los Angeles County, California. Genetic variants in the interferon γ (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-18 genes were determined by Taqman assays. The logistic regression method was used to analyze the data. For T helper (Th) 1 genes (IFNγ, IL-6 and IL-12), relative to the putative high-activity genotypes, individual low-activity genotypes were associated with statistically non-significant increases in HCC risk. The odds ratio (OR) was 1.53 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.53–4.39] for three versus zero low-activity genotypes. For Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10), low- versus high-activity genotypes were associated with statistically non-significant decreases in HCC risk. The OR was 0.64 (95% CI = 0.27–1.55) for two versus zero low-activity genotypes. When the Th1 and Th2 genotypes were examined simultaneously, the highest level of risk was observed in individuals jointly possessing the highest number of low-activity Th1 genotypes and the lowest number of low-activity Th2 genotypes. There was a roughly doubling of risk between these two extreme genetic profiles, which did not reach statistical significance (OR = 1.98, 95% CI = 0.50–7.84, P = 0.08). In contrast to high-risk Chinese, Th1 and Th2 genotypes did not impact in a major way on risk of HCC in USA non-Asians. PMID:19126646

  1. Intelligence indices in people with a high/low risk for developing Huntington's disease.

    PubMed Central

    de Boo, G M; Tibben, A; Lanser, J B; Jennekens-Schinkel, A; Hermans, J; Vegter-van der Vlis, M; Roos, R A

    1997-01-01

    Intelligence in 20 presymptomatic subjects with an increased risk (> 95%) for carrying the gene for Huntington's disease (HD) was studied in a prospective, case-control, single blind study. No significant differences between the groups were detected for intelligence indices and subtest scores (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale). The high level of the performance IQ and the significant discrepancy between performance IQ and verbal IQ found in both the high risk and the low risk groups contrasted with our expectations based on anamnestic information, general clinical opinion, and the results of previously conducted studies. We propose that psychosocial circumstances could explain the test results and discuss the consequences of our findings for clinical genetics practice. PMID:9222964

  2. Elective amniocentesis in low-risk pregnancies: decision making in the era of information and uncertainty.

    PubMed Central

    Lesser, Y; Rabinowitz, J

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Rational choice theory was applied to explain women's use of amniocentesis. Variables included knowledge about prenatal diagnostics, attitudes, and emotional preferences. METHODS: Using structured instruments at 9 to 14 and at 29 to 34 weeks' gestation, we interviewed 232 Israeli women who had low-risk pregnancies. RESULTS: Women who had elective amniocentesis (n = 39) were more knowledgeable about prenatal diagnostics, risks of invasive procedures, and probability of fetal abnormality in high maternal age; had fewer children; and had less favorable attitudes toward parenthood than those who had medically indicated amniocentesis (n = 57) and those who did not have amniocentesis (n = 136). CONCLUSIONS: The use and possible overuse of amniocentesis were associated with having more information about prenatal diagnostics and definite emotional preferences. PMID:11291381

  3. Cellular transformation by human papillomaviruses: Lessons learned by comparing high- and low-risk viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Roman, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses (PVs) has been appreciated since the 1930s yet the mechanisms of virally-mediated cellular transformation are still being revealed. Reasons for this include: a) the oncoproteins are multifunctional, b) there is an ever-growing list of cellular interacting proteins, c) more than one cellular protein may bind to a given region of the oncoprotein, and d) there is only limited information on the proteins encoded by the corresponding non-oncogenic PVs. The perspective of this review will be to contrast the activities of the viral E6 and E7 proteins encoded by the oncogenic human PVs (termed high-risk HPVs) to those encoded by their non-oncogenic counterparts (termed low-risk HPVs) in an attempt to sort out viral life cycle-related functions from oncogenic functions. The review will emphasize lessons learned from the cell culture studies of the HPVs causing mucosal/genital tract cancers. PMID:22284986

  4. Mycosis Fungoides Variants.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Escala, M Estela; González, Belén Rubio; Guitart, Joan

    2014-06-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that usually manifests as patches and plaques with a propensity for nonphotoexposed areas. MF is a common mimicker of inflammatory and infectious skin diseases, because it can be manifested with a wide variety of clinical and pathologic presentations. These atypical presentations of MF may be difficult to diagnose, requiring a high level of suspicion and careful clinicopathologic correlation. Within this array of clinical presentations, the World Health Organization classification recognizes 3 MF variants: folliculotropic MF, pagetoid reticulosis, and granulomatous slack skin. These 3 variants, as well as hypopigmented MF, are addressed in this article. PMID:26837197

  5. Prospective Validation of Modified NEXUS Cervical Spine Injury Criteria in Low-risk Elderly Fall Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tran, John; Jeanmonod, Donald; Agresti, Darin; Hamden, Khalief; Jeanmonod, Rebecca K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The National Emergency X-radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) criteria are used extensively in emergency departments to rule out C-spine injuries (CSI) in the general population. Although the NEXUS validation set included 2,943 elderly patients, multiple case reports and the Canadian C-Spine Rules question the validity of applying NEXUS to geriatric populations. The objective of this study was to validate a modified NEXUS criteria in a low-risk elderly fall population with two changes: a modified definition for distracting injury and the definition of normal mentation. Methods This is a prospective, observational cohort study of geriatric fall patients who presented to a Level I trauma center and were not triaged to the trauma bay. Providers enrolled non-intoxicated patients at baseline mental status with no lateralizing neurologic deficits. They recorded midline neck tenderness, signs of trauma, and presence of other distracting injury. Results We enrolled 800 patients. One patient fall event was excluded due to duplicate enrollment, and four were lost to follow up, leaving 795 for analysis. Average age was 83.6 (range 65–101). The numbers in parenthesis after the negative predictive value represent confidence interval. There were 11 (1.4%) cervical spine injuries. One hundred seventeen patients had midline tenderness and seven of these had CSI; 366 patients had signs of trauma to the face/neck, and 10 of these patients had CSI. Using signs of trauma to the head/neck as the only distracting injury and baseline mental status as normal alertness, the modified NEXUS criteria was 100% sensitive (CI [67.9–100]) with a negative predictive value of 100 (98.7–100). Conclusion Our study suggests that a modified NEXUS criteria can be safely applied to low-risk elderly falls. PMID:27330655

  6. [Variant of Bacillus anthracoides].

    PubMed

    Galanina, L A; Bekhtereva, M N; Kraĭnova, O A

    1979-01-01

    A comparative study of the Bacillus anthracoides culture and its variant has shown that the latter differs drastically from the parent culture in the shape and consistence of colonies, the size of spores and vegetative cells, the rate of spore germination in MPB, and the resistence to steam treatment and chloroactive disinfectants. PMID:423806

  7. First-line chemotherapy in low-risk gestational trophoblastic neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Alazzam, Mo’iad; Tidy, John; Hancock, Barry W; Osborne, Raymond; Lawrie, Theresa A

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an update of a Cochrane review that was first published in Issue 1, 2009. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) is a rare but curable disease arising in the fetal chorion during pregnancy. Most women with low-risk GTN will be cured by evacuation of the uterus with or without single-agent chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy regimens vary between treatment centres worldwide and the comparable benefits and risks of these different regimens are unclear. Objectives To determine the efficacy and safety of first-line chemotherapy in the treatment of low-risk GTN. Search methods In September 2008, we electronically searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL Issue 3, 2008), MEDLINE and EMBASE. In addition, we searched online trial registers, conference proceedings and reference lists of identified studies. We re-ran these searches in February 2012 for this updated review. Selection criteria For the original review, we included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and non-RCTs that compared first-line chemotherapy for the treatment of low-risk GTN. For this updated version of the review, we included only RCTs. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data to a pre-designed data extraction form. Meta-analysis was performed by pooling the risk ratio (RR) of individual trials. Main results We included five moderate to high quality RCTs (517 women) in the updated review. These studies all compared methotrexate with dactinomycin. Three studies compared weekly intramuscular (IM) methotrexate with bi-weekly pulsed intravenous (IV) dactinomycin (393 women), one study compared five-day IM methotrexate with bi-weekly pulsed IV dactinomycin (75 women) and one study compared eight-day IM methotrexate-folinic acid (MTX-FA) with five-day IV dactinomycin (49 women). Overall, dactinomycin was associated

  8. Antenatal Care Utilisation and Content between Low-Risk and High-Risk Pregnant Women

    PubMed Central

    Yeoh, Ping Ling; Hornetz, Klaus; Dahlui, Maznah

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of antenatal care is to monitor and improve the wellbeing of the mother and foetus. The World Health Organization recommends risk-oriented strategy that includes: (i) routine care to all women, (ii) additional care for women with moderately severe diseases and complications, (iii) specialised obstetrical and neonatal care for women with severe diseases and complications. Antenatal care is concerned with adequate care in order to be effective. Measurement for adequacy of antenatal care often applies indexes that assess initiation of care and number of visits. In addition, adequacy of care content should also be assessed. Results of studies in developed settings demonstrate that women without risk factors use antenatal services more frequently than recommended. Such over-utilisation is problematic for low-resourced settings. Moreover, studies show that a substantial proportion of high-risk women had utilisation or content of care below the recommended standard. Yet studies in developing countries have seldom included a comparison between low-risk and high-risk women. The purpose of the study was therefore to assess adequacy of care and pregnancy outcomes for the different risk groups. Methods A retrospective study using a multistage sampling technique, at public-funded primary health care clinics was conducted. Antenatal utilisation level was assessed using a modified Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilisation index that measures the timing for initiation of care and observed-to-expected visits ratio. Adequacy of antenatal care content assessed compliance to routine care based on the local guidelines. Results Intensive or “adequate-plus” antenatal care utilisation as defined by the modified index was noted in over half of the low-risk women. On the other hand, there were 26% of the high-risk women without the expected intensive utilisation. Primary- or non-educated high-risk women were less likely to have a higher antenatal care utilisation

  9. Comparing variation in hospital rates of cesarean delivery among low-risk women using 3 different measures.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Joanne C; Kozhimannil, Katy B; McDermott, Patricia; Saade, George R; Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2016-02-01

    This report describes the development of a measure of low-risk cesarean delivery by the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). Safely lowering the cesarean delivery rate is a priority for maternity care clinicians and health care delivery systems. Therefore, hospital quality assurance programs are increasingly tracking cesarean delivery rates among low-risk pregnancies. Two commonly used definitions of "low risk" are available, the Joint Commission (JC) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) measures, but these measures are not clinically comprehensive. We sought to refine the definition of the low-risk cesarean delivery rate to enhance the validity of the metric for quality measurement. We created this refined definition-called the SMFM definition-and compared it to the JC and AHRQ measures using claims-based data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample of >863,000 births in 612 hospitals. Using these definitions, we calculated means and interquartile ranges (25th-75th percentile range) for hospital low-risk cesarean delivery rates, stratified by hospital size, teaching status, urban/rural location, and payer mix. Across all hospitals, the mean low-risk cesarean delivery rate was lowest for the SMFM definition (12.65%), but not substantially different from the JC and AHRQ measures (13.12% and 13.29%, respectively). We empirically examined the SMFM definition to ensure its validity and utility. This refined definition performs similarly to existing measures and has the added advantage of clinical perspective, enhanced face validity, and ease of use. PMID:26593970

  10. Periodontal disease and some adverse perinatal outcomes in a cohort of low risk pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of periodontal disease (PD) in pregnancy with some adverse perinatal outcomes. Method This cohort study included 327 pregnant women divided in groups with or without PD. Indexes of plaque and gingival bleeding on probing, probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and gingival recession were evaluated at one periodontal examination below 32 weeks of gestation. The rates of preterm birth (PTB), low birth weight (LBW), small for gestational age (SGA) neonates and prelabor rupture of membranes (PROM) were evaluated using Risk Ratios (95%CI) and Population Attributable Risk Fractions. Results PD was associated with a higher risk of PTB (RRadj. 3.47 95%CI 1.62-7.43), LBW (RRadj. 2.93 95%CI 1.36-6.34) and PROM (RRadj. 2.48 95%CI 1.35-4.56), but not with SGA neonates (RR 2.38 95%CI 0.93 - 6.10). Conclusions PD was a risk factor for PT, LBW and PROM among Brazilian low risk pregnant women. PMID:21047427

  11. Brain changes in older adults at very low risk for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fjell, Anders M; McEvoy, Linda; Holland, Dominic; Dale, Anders M; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has a slow onset, so it is challenging to distinguish brain changes in healthy elderly persons from incipient AD. One-year brain changes with a distinct frontotemporal pattern have been shown in older adults. However, it is not clear to what extent these changes may have been affected by undetected, early AD. To address this, we estimated 1-year atrophy by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 132 healthy elderly persons who had remained free of diagnosed mild cognitive impairment or AD for at least 3 years. We found significant volumetric reductions throughout the brain. The sample was further divided into low-risk groups based on clinical, biomarker, genetic, or cognitive criteria. Although sample sizes varied, significant reductions were observed in all groups, with rates and topographical distribution of atrophy comparable to that of the full sample. Volume reductions were especially pronounced in the default mode network, closely matching the previously described frontotemporal pattern of changes in healthy aging. Atrophy in the hippocampus predicted change in memory, with no additional default mode network contributions. In conclusion, reductions in regional brain volumes can be detected over the course of 1 year even in older adults who are unlikely to be in a presymptomatic stage of AD. PMID:23658162

  12. Strategies for obstacle crossing in older adults with high and low risk of falling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hui-Fen; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Chang, Wei-Ning; Renn, Jenn-Huei; Wu, Hong-Wen

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Tripping is a frequent cause of falls among aging adults. Appropriate limb movements while negotiating obstacles are critical to trip avoidance. The aim of our study was to investigate the mechanics of obstacle crossing in older adults at low or high risk of falling. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty community-dwelling adults aged ≥55 years, were evaluated with the Tinetti Balance and Gait scale and classified as being at high or low risk of falling. Between-group comparisons of kinematics were evaluated for obstacle heights of 10%, 20%, and 30% of leg length. [Results] The high-risk group demonstrated greater toe-obstacle clearance of the leading leg. Increasing obstacle height led to increased maximal toe-obstacle clearance, toe-obstacle distance, and shortened swing phase of the leading limb. Adaptation of clearance height was greater for the trailing leg. Individuals at high risk of falling demonstrated less symmetry between the leading and trailing legs and a narrower step width, features that increase the likelihood of tripping. [Conclusion] Kinematic parameters of obstacle clearance, including the symmetry index described in our study, could provide clinicians with a quick screening tool to identify patients at risk of falling and to evaluate outcomes of training programs. PMID:27313384

  13. Strategies for obstacle crossing in older adults with high and low risk of falling

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui-Fen; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Chang, Wei-Ning; Renn, Jenn-Huei; Wu, Hong-Wen

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Tripping is a frequent cause of falls among aging adults. Appropriate limb movements while negotiating obstacles are critical to trip avoidance. The aim of our study was to investigate the mechanics of obstacle crossing in older adults at low or high risk of falling. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty community-dwelling adults aged ≥55 years, were evaluated with the Tinetti Balance and Gait scale and classified as being at high or low risk of falling. Between-group comparisons of kinematics were evaluated for obstacle heights of 10%, 20%, and 30% of leg length. [Results] The high-risk group demonstrated greater toe-obstacle clearance of the leading leg. Increasing obstacle height led to increased maximal toe-obstacle clearance, toe-obstacle distance, and shortened swing phase of the leading limb. Adaptation of clearance height was greater for the trailing leg. Individuals at high risk of falling demonstrated less symmetry between the leading and trailing legs and a narrower step width, features that increase the likelihood of tripping. [Conclusion] Kinematic parameters of obstacle clearance, including the symmetry index described in our study, could provide clinicians with a quick screening tool to identify patients at risk of falling and to evaluate outcomes of training programs. PMID:27313384

  14. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2013-02-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  15. Variants of glycoside hydrolases

    DOEpatents

    Teter, Sarah; Ward, Connie; Cherry, Joel; Jones, Aubrey; Harris, Paul; Yi, Jung

    2011-04-26

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent glycoside hydrolase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 21, 94, 157, 205, 206, 247, 337, 350, 373, 383, 438, 455, 467, and 486 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, and optionally further comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2 a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 8, 22, 41, 49, 57, 113, 193, 196, 226, 227, 246, 251, 255, 259, 301, 356, 371, 411, and 462 of amino acids 1 to 513 of SEQ ID NO: 2, wherein the variants have glycoside hydrolase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant glycoside hydrolases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  16. Variants of callous-unemotional conduct problems in a community sample of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Kostas A; Demetriou, Chara A; Kimonis, Eva R

    2013-07-01

    Callous-unemotional traits are believed to be a childhood precursor to psychopathy, and among youth with conduct problems they designate those showing a particularly severe, stable, and aggressive pattern of antisocial behavior. Youth with callous-unemotional traits are a heterogeneous population and, analogous to adults with psychopathy, research suggests that lower anxious primary and high-anxious secondary variants exist. Using a community sample of 2,306 Greek-Cypriot adolescents (M age = 16 years; 49.7 % female), the first aim of the study was to examine whether variants of callous-unemotional traits could be identified using latent profile analysis of scores on measures of callous-unemotional traits, conduct problems, and anxiety. Additional aims of the study were to compare the identified clusters on external measures theorized to distinguish them (i.e., self-esteem, narcissism, impulsivity, sensation seeking and proactive/reactive aggression) and social factors relevant to adolescent development. Results indicated that, in addition to low risk (i.e., low scores on callous-unemotional traits, conduct problems, and anxiety) and anxious (i.e., high scores on anxiety, low scores on callous-unemotional traits and conduct problems) subgroups, two groups of youth scoring high on callous-unemotional traits and conduct problems were identified. High-anxious secondary callous-unemotional variants were distinguished by lower self-esteem in combination with greater narcissism, aggression, and markedly higher conduct problems, whereas lower anxious primary variants showed higher self-esteem. Secondary callous-unemotional variants also reported greater susceptibility to peer pressure and popularity striving than primary variants. Both variants exhibited poorer outcomes relative to low risk and anxious youth, although anxious youth reported lower self-esteem and higher impulsivity and reactive aggression scores in comparison with low risk youth. Findings integrate two

  17. A Comparative Study of Two Groups of Sex Offenders Identified as High and Low Risk on the Static-99

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coxe, Ray; Holmes, William

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify possible differences between high- and low-risk sex offenders. The subjects included 285 sex offenders on probation. They were evaluated with the Static-99, Abel Assessment, Raven's, and MMPI-2. A criminal history review identified the number of prior offenses and the age/sex category in the index offense.…

  18. LUGH, the Proposed Mercury Express Mission, as an Ideal, Current, Low-Cost, Low-Risk Option for Mercury Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Lawlor, S. McKenna; Curtis, S.; Marr, G.; Giles, B.

    2000-01-01

    We propose an ESA Flexi Mission, LUGH, Mercury Express Mission, an extremely fast, low cost, low risk, high return, three-platform, multiple flyby mission which would provide data which are unique and complimentary to recently selected long lead time Mercury missions.

  19. Arguments against Chemoprophylaxis in Areas at Low Risk for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Armengaud

    1995-03-01

    Chemoprophylaxis of malaria prevents the disease not the infection (suppressive chemoprophylaxis) with "high levels of confusion and low levels of compliance." The magnitude of danger of contracting malaria for travelers varies in several endemic zones. In West Africa, without prophylaxis, malaria is estimated to have an incidence of 1.4% per person per month. In South and Central America, the incidence is 0.05 and 0.01% per month, respectively. In Asia, the transmission and percentage of infection due to Plasmodium falciparum is much lower. The dangers of chemoprophylaxis in an area at low risk for chloroquine resistant P. falciparum are a reality. Incompletely active drugs change clinical manifestations, and changes in clinical manifestations delay the establishment of a correct diagnosis. The rate of adverse events is 15-20%, and hospitalization due to side effects of prophylaxis occurs in one in 10,000 travelers. Neuropsychiatric side effects have been reported with both mefloquine and chloroquine. A false sense of security can hinder a physician practicing in a nonendemic area from thinking of malaria when a traveler returns with fever. To complicate the picture, in many countries, there is an emerging drug resistance in P. falciparum as well as an emerging chloroquine resistance in P. vivax strains (20% in New Guinea and Irian Jaya). In short, no available chemoprophylaxis is free from toxicity, and its efficacy is never 100%. Alternatives to conventional chemoprophylaxis are encouraged in areas of low morbidity of malaria. In areas where P. vivax occurs primarily, and when the risk of serious side effects from chemoprophylaxis outweighs the risk of life threatening P. falciparum infection, there are four alternative strategies.2,3 The first strategy is that the traveler avoid mosquito bites. With a compulsive attitude, a high degree of protection can be realized with the proper use of pyrethrum-impregnated mosquito netting, topical DEET-containing insect

  20. Applicator-guided volumetric-modulated arc therapy for low-risk endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cilla, Savino; Macchia, Gabriella; Sabatino, Domenico; Digesù, Cinzia; Deodato, Francesco; Piermattei, Angelo; De Spirito, Marco; Morganti, Alessio G.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report the feasibility of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in the postoperative irradiation of the vaginal vault. Moreover, the VMAT technique was compared with 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and fixed-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), in terms of target coverage and organs at risk sparing. The number of monitor units and the delivery time were analyzed to score the treatment efficiency. All plans were verified in a dedicated solid water phantom using a 2D array of ionization chambers. Twelve patients with endometrial carcinoma who underwent radical hystero-adenexectomy and fixed-field IMRT treatments were retrospectively included in this analysis; for each patient, plans were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, homogeneity index, and conformity indexes. All techniques met the prescription goal for planning target volume coverage, with VMAT showing the highest level of conformity at all dose levels. VMAT resulted in significant reduction of rectal and bladder volumes irradiated at all dose levels compared with 3D-CRT. No significant differences were found with respect to IMRT. Moreover, a significant improvement of the dose conformity was reached by VMAT technique not only at the 95% dose level (0.74 vs. 0.67 and 0.62) but also at 50% and 75% levels of dose prescription. In addition, VMAT plans showed a significant reduction of monitor units by nearly 28% with respect to IMRT, and reduced treatment time from 11 to <3 minutes for a single 6-Gy fraction. In conclusion, VMAT plans can be planned and carried out with high quality and efficiency for the irradiation of vaginal vault alone, providing similar or better sparing of organs at risk to fixed-field IMRT and resulting in the most efficient treatment option. VMAT is currently our standard approach for radiotherapy of low-risk endometrial cancer.

  1. Transient ischaemic attacks: which patients are at high (and low) risk of serious vascular events?

    PubMed Central

    Hankey, G J; Slattery, J M; Warlow, C P

    1992-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the important prognostic factors at presentation which identify patients with transient ischaemic attacks (TIA) who are at high risk (and low risk) of serious vascular events and to derive a prediction model (equation) for each of the major vascular outcome events. A cohort of 469 TIA patients referred to a University hospital, without prior stroke, were evaluated prospectively and followed up over a mean period of 4.1 years (range 1-10 years). The major outcome events of interest were 1) stroke 2) coronary event and 3) stroke, myocardial infarction or vascular death (whichever occurred first). Prognostic factors and their hazard ratios were identified by means of the Cox proportional hazards multiple regression analysis. The significant adverse prognostic factors (in order of strength of association) for stroke were an increasing number of TIAs in the three months before presentation, increasing age, peripheral vascular disease, left ventricular hypertrophy and TIAs of the brain (compared with the eye); the prognostic factors for coronary event were increasing age, ischaemic heart disease, male sex, and a combination of carotid and vertebrobasilar TIAs at presentation; and for stroke, myocardial infarction or vascular death they were increasing age, peripheral vascular disease, increasing number of TIAs in the three months before presentation, male sex, a combination of carotid and vertebrobasilar TIAs at presentation, TIAs of the brain (compared with the eye), left ventricular hypertrophy and the eye), left ventricular hypertrophy and the eye), left ventricular hypertrophy and the presence of residual neurological signs after the TIA. Prediction models (equations) of both the relative risk and absolute risk of each of the major outcome events were produced, based on the presence or level of the significant prognostic factors and their hazard. Before it can be concluded that our equations accurately predict prognosis and

  2. A Low Risk Strategy for the Exploration of Near-Earth Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Rob R.

    2011-01-01

    The impetus for asteroid exploration is scientific, political, and pragmatic. The notion of sending human explorers to asteroids is not new. Piloted missions to these primitive bodies were first discussed in the 1960s, pairing Saturn V rockets with enhanced Apollo spacecraft to explore what were then called "Earth-approaching asteroids." Two decades ago, NASA's Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) also briefly examined the possibility of visiting these small celestial bodies. Most recently, the U.S. Human Space Flight Review Committee (the second Augustine Commission) suggested that near-Earth objects (NEOs) represent a target-rich environment for exploration via the "Flexible Path" option. However, prior to seriously considering human missions to NEOs, it has become clear that we currently lack a robust catalog of human accessible targets. The majority of the NEOs identified by a study team across several NASA centers as "human-accessible" are probably too small and have orbits that are too uncertain to consider mounting piloted expeditions to these small worlds. The first step in developing such a catalog is, therefore, to complete a space-based NEO survey. The resulting catalog of candidate NEOs would then be transformed into a matrix of opportunities for robotic and human missions for the next several decades. This initial step of a space-based NEO survey first is the linchpin to laying the foundation of a low-risk architecture to venture out and explore these primitive bodies. We suggest such a minimalist framework architecture from 1) extensive ground-based and precursor spacecraft investigations (while applying operational knowledge from science-driven robotic missions), 2) astronaut servicing of spacecraft operating at geosynchronous Earth orbit to retain essential skills and experience, and 3) applying the sum of these skills, knowledge and experience to piloted missions to NEOs.

  3. Portrayal of Alcohol Consumption in Movies and Drinking Initiation in Low-Risk Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, James D.; Hunt, Kate; Sweeting, Helen; Engels, Rutger C.M.E.; Scholte, Ron H.J.; Mathis, Federica; Florek, Ewa; Morgenstern, Matthis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the hypothesis that exposure to alcohol consumption in movies affects the likelihood that low-risk adolescents will start to drink alcohol. METHODS: Longitudinal study of 2346 adolescent never drinkers who also reported at baseline intent to not to do so in the next 12 months (mean age 12.9 years, SD = 1.08). Recruitment was carried out in 2009 and 2010 in 112 state-funded schools in Germany, Iceland, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, and Scotland. Exposure to movie alcohol consumption was estimated from 250 top-grossing movies in each country in the years 2004 to 2009. Multilevel mixed-effects Poisson regressions assessed the relationship between baseline exposure to movie alcohol consumption and initiation of trying alcohol, and binge drinking (≥ 5 consecutive drinks) at follow-up. RESULTS: Overall, 40% of the sample initiated alcohol use and 6% initiated binge drinking by follow-up. Estimated mean exposure to movie alcohol consumption was 3653 (SD = 2448) occurrences. After age, gender, family affluence, school performance, TV screen time, personality characteristics, and drinking behavior of peers, parents, and siblings were controlled for, exposure to each additional 1000 movie alcohol occurrences was significantly associated with increased relative risk for trying alcohol, incidence rate ratio = 1.05 (95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.08; P = .003), and for binge drinking, incidence rate ratio = 1.13 (95% confidence interval, 1.06–1.20; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Seeing alcohol depictions in movies is an independent predictor of drinking initiation, particularly for more risky patterns of drinking. This result was shown in a heterogeneous sample of European youths who had a low affinity for drinking alcohol at the time of exposure. PMID:24799536

  4. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  5. Costing Alternative Birth Settings for Women at Low Risk of Complications: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Scarf, Vanessa; Catling, Christine; Viney, Rosalie; Homer, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background There is demand from women for alternatives to giving birth in a standard hospital setting however access to these services is limited. This systematic review examines the literature relating to the economic evaluations of birth setting for women at low risk of complications. Methods Searches of the literature to identify economic evaluations of different birth settings of the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EconLit, Business Source Complete and Maternity and Infant care. Relevant English language publications were chosen using keywords and MeSH terms between 1995 and 2015. Inclusion criteria included studies focussing on the comparison of birth setting. Data were extracted with respect to study design, perspective, PICO principles, and resource use and cost data. Results Eleven studies were included from Australia, Canada, the Netherlands, Norway, the USA, and the UK. Four studies compared costs between homebirth and the hospital setting and the remaining seven focussed on the cost of birth centre care and the hospital setting. Six studies used a cost-effectiveness analysis and the remaining five studies used cost analysis and cost comparison methods. Eight of the 11 studies found a cost saving in the alternative settings. Two found no difference in the cost of the alternative settings and one found an increase in birth centre care. Conclusions There are few studies that compare the cost of birth setting. The variation in the results may be attributable to the cost data collection processes, difference in health systems and differences in which costs were included. A better understanding of the cost of birth setting is needed to inform policy makers and service providers. PMID:26891444

  6. Familial aggregation of cancer in Laredo, Texas: a generally low-risk Mexican-American population.

    PubMed

    Weiss, K M; Chakraborty, R; Smouse, P E; Buchanan, A V; Strong, L C

    1986-01-01

    Genealogies for the Mexican-American city of Laredo, Texas, have been assembled by computer from individual civil and church records of birth, marriage, and death. Documentation is available on vital events in the lives of over 300,000 individuals, about 80% of the city population from 1870-1981. These data were collected to determine the degree to which death from cancer is more clustered in families than would be expected by chance alone; methods specific to this data base have been developed to accomplish this task. A statistically significant excess of familial cancer was observed overall when all cancer sites were pooled, but no evidence was observed for excess familial risk at single sites except for breast cancer and perhaps for ovarian cancer. The excess of breast cancer risk is comparable to that observed in other populations. A few site-combinations manifest excess familial risk, most notably those involving and dominated by breast cancer and certain digestive system sites. We do not confirm the degree of familiarity observed elsewhere for cancers of the lung, colorectum, stomach, or other sites in this generally low-risk population. Even where we find evidence of excess risk, the degree of excess is small and the number of multiply affected families too small to test etiologic models by segregation analysis. The absence of excess familial risk does not appear to be due to inadequate numbers of cases, since breast cancer is familial with no more occurrences in Laredo than other sites. These results differ to some extent from those found in a similar study of Utah Mormons, but it is unclear whether this is because of differences in risk patterns or statistical properties of the analytic methods used in the two studies. PMID:3710137

  7. Preoperative Laboratory Testing in Patients Undergoing Elective, Low-Risk Ambulatory Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Benarroch-Gampel, Jaime; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Duncan, Casey B.; Brown, Kimberly M.; Han, Yimei; Townsend, Courtney M.; Riall, Taylor S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Routine preoperative laboratory testing for ambulatory surgery is not recommended. Methods Patients who underwent elective hernia repair (N = 73,596) were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database (2005–2010). Patterns of preoperative testing were examined. Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with testing and postoperative complications. Results A total of 46,977 (63.8%) patients underwent testing, with at least one abnormal test recorded in 61.6% of patients. In patients with no NSQIP comorbidities (N = 25,149) and no clear indication for testing, 54% received at least one test. In addition, 15.3% of tested patients underwent laboratory testing the day of the operation. In this group, surgery was done despite abnormal results in 61.6% of same day tests. In multivariate analyses, testing was associated with older age, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) class >1, hypertension, ascites, bleeding disorders, systemic steroids, and laparoscopic procedures. Major complications (reintubation, pulmonary embolus, stroke, renal failure, coma, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, bleeding, or death) occurred in 0.3% of patients. After adjusting for patient and procedure characteristics, neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative complications. Conclusions Preoperative testing is overused in patients undergoing low-risk, ambulatory surgery. Neither testing nor abnormal results were associated with postoperative outcomes. On the basis of high rates of testing in healthy patients, physician and/or facility preference and not only patient condition currently dictate use. Involvement from surgical societies is necessary to establish guidelines for preoperative testing. PMID:22868362

  8. Outcomes associated with planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Eileen K.; Cappelletti, Adriana; Reitsma, Angela H.; Simioni, Julia; Horne, Jordyn; McGregor, Caroline; Ahmed, Rashid J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have shown that planned home birth is associated with a decreased likelihood of intrapartum intervention with no difference in neonatal outcomes compared with planned hospital birth. The purpose of our study was to evaluate different birth settings by comparing neonatal mortality, morbidity and rates of birth interventions between planned home and planned hospital births in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We used a provincial database of all midwifery-booked pregnancies between 2006 and 2009 to compare women who planned home birth at the onset of labour to a matched cohort of women with low-risk pregnancies who had planned hospital births attended by midwives. We conducted subgroup analyses by parity. Our primary outcome was stillbirth, neonatal death (< 28 d) or serious morbidity (Apgar score < 4 at 5 min or resuscitation with positive pressure ventilation and cardiac compressions). Results: We compared 11 493 planned home births and 11 493 planned hospital births. The risk of our primary outcome did not differ significantly by planned place of birth (relative risk [RR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68–1.55). These findings held true for both nulliparous (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.62–1.73) and multiparous women (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.49–2.05). All intrapartum interventions were lower among planned home births. Interpretation: Compared with planned hospital birth, planned home birth attended by midwives in a jurisdiction where home birth is well-integrated into the health care system was not associated with a difference in serious adverse neonatal outcomes but was associated with fewer intrapartum interventions. PMID:26696622

  9. Effectiveness of routine ultrasonography in detecting fetal structural abnormalities in a low risk population.

    PubMed Central

    Chitty, L S; Hunt, G H; Moore, J; Lobb, M O

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To review the efficacy of routine prenatal ultrasonography for detecting fetal structural abnormalities. DESIGN--Retrospective study of the ultrasonographic findings and outcome of all pregnancies in women scanned in 1988-9. SETTING--Maternity ultrasonography department of a district general hospital. SUBJECTS--8785 fetuses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Correlation of prenatal ultrasonographic findings with outcome in the neonate. RESULTS--8733 babies were born during 1988-9, and 52 pregnancies were terminated after a fetal malformation was identified. 8432 (95%) of the fetuses were examined by ultrasonography in the second trimester. 130 fetuses (1.5%) were found to have an abnormality at birth or after termination of pregnancy, 125 of which had been examined in the second trimester. In 93 cases the abnormality was detected before 24 weeks (sensitivity 74.4%, 95% confidence interval to 66.7% to 82.1%. Two false positive diagnoses occurred, in both cases the pregnancies were not terminated and apparently normal infants were born. This gives a specificity of 99.98% (99.9% to 99.99%). The positive predictive value of ultrasonography in the second trimester was 97.9% (92.6% to 99.7%). Of the 125 abnormalities, 87 were lethal or severely disabling; 72 of the 87 were detected by the routine screening programme (sensitivity 82.8%, 73.2% to 90.0%). CONCLUSION--Routine fetal examination by ultrasonography in a low risk population detects many fetal structural abnormalities but can present several dilemmas in counselling. PMID:1747613

  10. Does Preendoscopy Rockall Score Safely Identify Low Risk Patients following Upper Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Matthew R.; Murray, Iain A.; Schultz, Michael; McLeod, Peter; O'Donnell, Nathan; Norton, Heather; Baines, Chelsea; Fawcett, Emily; Fesaitu, Terry; Leung, Hin; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Salleh, Adibah; Zhang, Wei; García, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To determine if preendoscopy Rockall score (PERS) enables safe outpatient management of New Zealanders with upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage (UGIH). Methods. Retrospective analysis of adults with UGIH over 59 consecutive months. PERS, diagnosis, demographics, need for endoscopic therapy, transfusion or surgery and 30-day mortality and 14-day rebleeding rate, and sensitivity and specificity of PERS for enabling safe discharge preendoscopy were calculated. Results. 424 admissions with UGIH. Median age was 74.3 years (range 19–93 years), with 55.1% being males. 30-day mortality was 4.6% and 14-day rebleeding rate was 6.0%. Intervention was required in 181 (46.6%): blood transfusion (147 : 37.9%), endoscopic intervention (75 : 19.3%), and surgery (8 : 2.1%). 42 (10.8%) had PERS = 0 with intervention required in 15 (35.7%). Females more frequently required intervention, OR 1.73 (CI: 1.12–2.69). PERS did not predict intervention but did predict 30-day mortality: each point increase equated to an increase in mortality of OR 1.46 (CI: 1.11–1.92). Taking NSAIDs/aspirin reduced 30-day mortality, OR 0.22 (CI: 0.08–0.60). Conclusion. PERS identifies 10.8% of those with UGIH as low risk but 35.7% required intervention or died. It has a limited role in assessing these patients and should not be used to identify those suitable for outpatient endoscopy. PMID:26089867

  11. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Bastos Gonçalves, F; Baderkhan, H; Verhagen, H J M; Wanhainen, A; Björck, M; Stolker, R J; Hoeks, S E; Mani, K

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR from 2000 to 2011 at three vascular centres (in 2 countries), who had two imaging examinations (postoperative and after 6–18 months), were included. Maximum diameter, complications and secondary interventions during follow-up were registered. Patients were categorized according to early sac dynamics. The primary endpoint was freedom from late complications. Secondary endpoints were freedom from secondary intervention, postimplant rupture and direct (type I/III) endoleaks. Results Some 597 EVARs (71·1 per cent of all EVARs) were included. No shrinkage was observed in 284 patients (47·6 per cent), moderate shrinkage (5–9 mm) in 142 (23·8 per cent) and major shrinkage (at least 10 mm) in 171 patients (28·6 per cent). Four years after the index imaging, the rate of freedom from complications was 84·3 (95 per cent confidence interval 78·7 to 89·8), 88·1 (80·6 to 95·5) and 94·4 (90·1 to 98·7) per cent respectively. No shrinkage was an independent risk factor for late complications compared with major shrinkage (hazard ratio (HR) 3·11; P < 0·001). Moderate compared with major shrinkage (HR 2·10; P = 0·022), early postoperative complications (HR 3·34; P < 0·001) and increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm baseline diameter (HR 1·02; P = 0·001) were also risk factors for late complications. Freedom from secondary interventions and direct endoleaks was greater for patients with major sac shrinkage. Conclusion Early change in aneurysm sac diameter is a strong predictor of late complications after EVAR. Patients with major sac shrinkage have a very low risk of complications for up to 5 years. This parameter may be used to tailor postoperative surveillance. PMID:24752772

  12. Identification of Patients at Very Low Risk of Local Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Sally L.; Truong, Pauline T.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and pathological factors that identify groups of women with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year risk of local recurrence (LR) ≤1.5% after breast-conserving therapy (BCS) plus whole-breast radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Study subjects were 5974 patients ≥50 years of age whose cancer was diagnosed between 1989 and 2006, and were referred with pT1 pN0 invasive breast cancer treated with BCS and RT. Cases of 5- and 10-year LR were examined using Kaplan-Meier methods. Recursive partitioning analysis was performed in patients treated with and without endocrine therapy to identify combinations of factors associated with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5%. Results: The median follow-up was 8.61 years. Median age was 63 years of age (range, 50 to 91). Overall 5-year LR was 1.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2%-1.9%) and 10-year LR was 3.4% (95% CI, 2.8%-4.0%). Of 2830 patients treated with endocrine therapy, patient subsets identified with 5-year LR ≤1.5% included patients with grade 1 histology (n=1038; LR, 0.2%; 95% CI, 0%-0.5%) or grade 2 histology plus ≥60 years of age (n=843; LR, 0.5%; 95% CI, 0%-1.0%). Ten-year LR for these groups were 0.8% (95% CI, 0.1%-1.6%) and 0.9% (95% CI, 0.2%-1.6%), respectively. Of 3144 patients treated without endocrine therapy, patients with grade 1 histology plus clear margins had 5-year LR ≤1.5% (n=821; LR, 0.6%; 95% CI, 0.1%-1.2%). Ten-year LR for this group was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.0%-3.4%). Conclusions: Histologic grade, age, margin status, and use of endocrine therapy identified 45% of a population-based cohort of female patients over age 50 with stage I breast cancer with a 5-year LR risk ≤1.5% after BCS plus RT. Prospective study is needed to evaluate the safety of omitting RT in patients with such a low risk of LR.

  13. Impact of Relative Contraindications to Home Management in Emergency Department Patients with Low-Risk Pulmonary Embolism

    PubMed Central

    Drenten, Carrieann E.; Huang, Jie; Morley, J. Eileen; Anderson, Megan L.; Reed, Mary E.; Nishijima, Daniel K.; Liu, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Studies of adults presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute pulmonary embolism (PE) suggest that those who are low risk on the PE Severity Index (classes I and II) can be managed safely without hospitalization. However, the impact of relative contraindications to home management on outcomes has not been described. Objectives: To compare 5-day and 30-day adverse event rates among low-risk ED patients with acute PE without and with outpatient ineligibility criteria. Methods: We conducted a retrospective multicenter cohort study of adults presenting to the ED with acute low-risk PE between 2010 and 2012. We evaluated the association between outpatient treatment eligibility criteria based on a comprehensive list of relative contraindications and 5-day adverse events and 30-day outcomes, including major hemorrhage, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and all-cause mortality. Measurements and Main Results: Of 423 adults with acute low-risk PE, 271 (64.1%) had no relative contraindications to outpatient treatment (outpatient eligible), whereas 152 (35.9%) had at least one contraindication (outpatient ineligible). Relative contraindications were categorized as PE-related factors (n = 112; 26.5%), comorbid illness (n = 42; 9.9%), and psychosocial barriers (n = 19; 4.5%). There were no 5-day events in the outpatient-eligible group (95% upper confidence limit, 1.7%) and two events (1.3%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1–5.0%) in the outpatient-ineligible group (P = 0.13). At 30 days, there were five events (two recurrent venous thromboemboli and three major bleeding events) in the outpatient-eligible group (1.8%; 95% CI, 0.7–4.4%) compared with nine in the ineligible group (5.9%; 95% CI, 2.7–10.9%; P < 0.05). This difference remained significant when controlling for PE severity class. Conclusions: Nearly two-thirds of adults presenting to the ED with low-risk PE were potentially eligible for outpatient therapy. Relative

  14. The Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor.

    PubMed

    McLaren, William; Gil, Laurent; Hunt, Sarah E; Riat, Harpreet Singh; Ritchie, Graham R S; Thormann, Anja; Flicek, Paul; Cunningham, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    The Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor is a powerful toolset for the analysis, annotation, and prioritization of genomic variants in coding and non-coding regions. It provides access to an extensive collection of genomic annotation, with a variety of interfaces to suit different requirements, and simple options for configuring and extending analysis. It is open source, free to use, and supports full reproducibility of results. The Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor can simplify and accelerate variant interpretation in a wide range of study designs. PMID:27268795

  15. How to avoid venous thromboembolism in women at increased risk--with special focus on low-risk periods.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Pelle G; von Känel, Roland

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of mortality during Western women's fertile life. Although half of thromboembolic events occur during times of low-risk situations, almost all our knowledge is focused on medical thromboprophylaxis during high-risk situations. Thus, since we only use medical thromboprophylaxis at high-risk periods, lifestyle advice could be an attractive complement both during high- and low-risk situations. The knowledge of how lifestyle factors affect VTE risk has grown in recent years, and women at high risk are often highly motivated to make changes in order to reduce their risk. This review is focused on modifiable risk factors for VTE and advice that may be given to women at increased risk of VTE. PMID:26117664

  16. Group B streptococcal opacity variants.

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, S H; Cole, R L; Wessels, M R; Corwin, M D; Kamanga-Sollo, E; Hayes, S F; Cieplak, W; Swanson, J

    1992-01-01

    Colony opacity variants were detected for type III group B streptococci (GBS). Transparent colonies predominate in the parent GBS, with occasional colonies having opaque portions. Two stable opaque variants (1.1 and 1.5) were compared with three transparent clones (1.2, 1.3, and 1.4). All grew well on blood agar and on GC medium, but variant 1.1 failed to grow on Todd-Hewitt medium. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that colony opacity correlated with bacterial aggregation status, with opaque variants forming longer and more organized chains. Opaque-transparent switches were observed in both directions for most variants, with transparent to opaque noted most frequently, but 1.5 did not switch at all. Switching of the opacity phenotype was observed both in vitro and in neonatal mice. Relationships between colony opacity and several cell surface phenomena were explored. (i) Opaque variant 1.1 had two surface proteins (46 and 75 kDa) that were either unique or greatly overexpressed. (ii) Variant 1.1 was deficient in type III polysaccharide, while 1.5 lacked group B antigen. Diminished capsular polysaccharide of variant 1.1 was reflected in reduced negative electrophoretic mobility and in increased buoyant density. (iii) Transparent variant colonies growing closest to a penicillin disk were opaque, but colonial variants did not differ in their sensitivity to penicillin. These data indicate that GBS can exist in both opaque and transparent forms, with opaque appearance occurring by multiple routes. Opaque variants grow poorly on Todd-Hewitt medium generally used for isolation of GBS, so any possible relationships between opacity variation and pathogenesis of GBS infection are unknown. Images PMID:1592825

  17. Phenylketonuria variants in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Since mass screening of the newborn population for phenylketonuria (PKU) by the Guthrie test was begun in Ontario in July 1965 many variants of PKU have been recognized in the 96 to 97% screened. Seventy-one cases of classic PKU were detected (four were missed). Of 48 cases of persistent hyperphenylalaninemia discovered, 18 were classified as atypical PKU and 30 as persistent benign hyperphenylalaninemia. Numerous infants with transient hyperphenylalaninemia (initial values over 10 mg/dl in 12), in many instances the result of transient neonatal tyrosinemia, were discovered. There was a slight predominance of males. Serum phenylalanine values of up to 15 mg/dl seemed to be harmless to the developing brain. A survey of 67 247 adults in the general population revealed 1 person with PKU and 1 with persistent benign hyperphenylalaninemia; both had normal intelligence quotients. Of 1548 mothers of retarded children tested, none had hyperphenylalaninemia. PMID:953933

  18. Variants of windmill nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Dong; Shin, Hae Kyung; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Hyo-Jung; Zee, David S

    2016-07-01

    Windmill nystagmus is characterized by a clock-like rotation of the beating direction of a jerk nystagmus suggesting separate horizontal and vertical oscillators, usually 90° out of phase. We report oculographic characteristics in three patients with variants of windmill nystagmus in whom the common denominator was profound visual loss due to retinal diseases. Two patients showed a clock-like pattern, while in the third, the nystagmus was largely diagonal (in phase or 180° out of phase) but also periodically changed direction by 180°. We hypothesize that windmill nystagmus is a unique manifestation of "eye movements of the blind." It emerges when the central structures, including the cerebellum, that normally keep eye movements calibrated and gaze steady can no longer perform their task, because they are deprived of the retinal image motion that signals a need for adaptive recalibration. PMID:27159990

  19. Narrowing Resection of Parametrial Tissues Is Feasible in Low-Risk Cases of Stage IA2-IB1 Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Lian; Liu, Xiao-Xia; Cao, Guan-Shu; Ju, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is the standard surgical treatment for patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer, but the wide excision increases the complications. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the feasibility of narrowing resection of parametrial tissues in stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospectively analyzed the pathological and clinical data of patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in OB/GYN Hospital, Fudan University, China from Jan 2008 to Dec 2011. The affected factors of parametrial metastases and outcomes were discussed. The single factor analysis was made with χ2 test, and the relationship of the resection width of parametrial tissues and the patients' outcomes was analyzed with χ2 test and log-rank. P-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: There were 31 cases recurred, 26 cases died of cervical cancer in 513 patients during the follow-up period (from 2 months to 66 months, averaged 39 months). The low-risk factors included diameter of tumor ≤2cm, depth of cervical myometrial invasion<1/2 and without lymph vascular involvement. There were no parametrial metastases in cases with all three low-risk factors. Whether the resection width of parametrial tissues ≥3cm or not had no statistically significant effect on progression free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) of low-risk patients. D2-40 and CD31 were related with parametrial metastases, but not with recurrence or outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The resection width of parametrial tissues has no effect on PFS and OS of low-risk patients, and narrowing resection of parametrial tissues (<3cm) is feasible. PMID:27471564

  20. Eating disorders "mental health literacy" in low risk, high risk and symptomatic women: implications for health promotion programs.

    PubMed

    Mond, Jonathan M; Hay, Phillipa J; Paxton, Susan J; Rodgers, Bryan; Darby, Anita; Nillson, Jodi; Quirk, Frances; Owen, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Attitudes and beliefs concerning the nature and treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN) were compared among young adult women at low risk of an eating disorder (n = 332), at high risk (n = 83), or already showing symptoms (n = 94). Participants completed a self-report questionnaire that included a measure of eating disorder symptoms. A vignette of a fictional person suffering from BN was presented, followed by a series of questions addressing the nature and treatment of the problem described. High-risk and symptomatic participants were more likely than low-risk participants to report that they would not approach anyone for advice or help, were they to have BN or a similar problem, because they would not want anyone to know. Symptomatic participants were more likely to believe that someone with BN would be discriminated against, more likely to consider bulimic behaviors to be acceptable, and more likely to view BN as being common among women in the community, than low-risk participants, participants in the high-risk group being intermediate on each of these questions. The findings suggest that the attitudes and beliefs of individuals with eating disorder symptoms differ systematically from those of individuals at high risk, but who do not yet have symptoms, and from those at low risk. They also indicate specific attitudes and beliefs that may need to be addressed in prevention and early intervention programs. The potential benefits of assessing individuals' attitudes and beliefs concerning the nature and treatment of eating-disordered behaviour and tailoring program content accordingly may be worthy of investigation. PMID:20603729

  1. Evidence that putative ADHD low risk alleles at SNAP25 may increase the risk of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Carroll, L S; Kendall, K; O'Donovan, M C; Owen, M J; Williams, N M

    2009-10-01

    Synaptosomal Associated Protein 25 kDa (SNAP25) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia by numerous neuropathological studies and genetic variation at SNAP25 has been reported to be associated with ADHD. Expression levels of the putative schizophrenia susceptibility gene DTNBP1 has been shown to influence the levels of SNAP25 in vitro. We undertook directed mutation screening of SNAP25 in UK schizophrenic cases followed by direct association analysis of all variants identified and identified known exonic SNPs that showed evidence for association (rs3746544 P = 0.004 OR = 1.26, rs8636 P = 0.003 OR = 1.27), although these SNPs are highly correlated (r(2) > 0.99). We additionally genotyped a further 31 tag SNPs spanning the SNAP25 locus and identified several independent SNPs that were nominally associated with schizophrenia (strongest association at rs3787283, P = 0.006, OR = 1.25) however, due to the number of tests performed no SNP met experiment-wise significance (minimum permuted P-value = 0.1). Post hoc analysis revealed that the SNPs nominally associated with schizophrenia (rs3787283, rs3746544) were the same as those previously demonstrated to be associated with ADHD but with the opposite alleles, allowing the intriguing hypothesis that genetic variation at SNAP25 may be differentially associated with both schizophrenia and ADHD. PMID:19132710

  2. Compliance with stress testing in patients discharged from the emergency department following a diagnosis of low-risk chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kent; Prabhala, Shreyas

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine rates of compliance with outpatient stress testing in patients with a diagnosis of low-risk chest pain, reasons for non-compliance and incidence of adverse cardiac events (ACE). Methods This was a prospective study of 79 patients who were discharged from the emergency department with low-risk chest pain. Patients were followed-up by phone interview. Results 36.7% of patients completed EST within 30 days, 2.5% of patients completed their EST within the recommended 72 h. A lack of time was the most common reason for non-compliance and was seen in 32.0% of patients. 20% of ESTs were cancelled by the primary care physician (PCP). 12% of patients were non-compliant, as they believed the pain to be non-cardiac. There were no documented ACEs in the study. Conclusions Compliance with EST is poor in patients with low-risk chest pain. Non-compliance is related to a number of factors including work commitments, cancellation of studies by the PCP and patients beliefs about the nature of their chest pain. PMID:27326183

  3. Alternative versus standard packages of antenatal care for low-risk pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dowswell, Therese; Carroli, Guillermo; Duley, Lelia; Gates, Simon; Gülmezoglu, A Metin; Khan-Neelofur, Dina; Piaggio, Gilda GP

    2014-01-01

    Background The number of visits for antenatal (prenatal) care developed without evidence of how many visits are necessary. The content of each visit also needs evaluation. Objectives To compare the effects of antenatal care programmes with reduced visits for low-risk women with standard care. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (April 2010), reference lists of articles and contacted researchers in the field. Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing a reduced number of antenatal visits, with or without goal-oriented care, with standard care. Data collection and analysis Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data independently. Main results We included seven trials (more than 60,000 women): four in high-income countries with individual randomisation; three in low- and middle-income countries with cluster randomisation (clinics as the unit of randomisation). The number of visits for standard care varied, with fewer visits in low- and middle- income country trials. In studies in high-income countries, women in the reduced visits groups, on average, attended between 8.2 and 12 times. In low- and middle- income country trials, many women in the reduced visits group attended on fewer than five occasions, although in these trials the content as well as the number of visits was changed, so as to be more ‘goal oriented’. Perinatal mortality was increased for those randomised to reduced visits rather than standard care, and this difference was borderline for statistical significance (five trials; risk ratio (RR) 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00 to 1.31). In the subgroup analysis, for high-income countries the number of deaths was small (32/5108), and there was no clear difference between the groups (2 trials; RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.45 to 1.80); for low- and middle-income countries perinatal mortality was significantly higher in the reduced visits group (3 trials RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.01 to 1

  4. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2013-09-24

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  5. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOEpatents

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-09-09

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the cellobiohydrolase variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the cellobiohydrolase variants.

  6. Cellobiohydrolase variants and polynucleotides encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Wogulis, Mark

    2014-10-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent cellobiohydrolase II. The present invention also relates to polynucleotides encoding the variants; nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides; and methods of using the variants.

  7. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  8. The role of genetic breast cancer susceptibility variants as prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Fasching, Peter A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Cox, Angela; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E; Karn, Thomas; Broeks, Annegien; van Leeuwen, Flora E; van't Veer, Laura J; Udo, Renate; Dunning, Alison M; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Shah, Mitul; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Apicella, Carmel; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Seynaeve, Caroline; Huijts, Petra E A; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B; Rauh, Claudia; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Andrulis, Irene L; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Nickels, Stefan; Dörk, Thilo; Schiekel, Maria; Bremer, Michael; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Hooning, Maartje J; Martens, John W M; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Couch, Fergus J; Stevens, Kristen N; Olson, Janet E; Kosel, Matthew; Cross, Simon S; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Reed, Malcolm W R; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lambrechts, Diether; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; van Limbergen, Erik; Benitez, Javier; Milne, Roger L; Zamora, M Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Loris, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rajaraman, Preetha; Schonfeld, Sara J; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Devilee, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W; Slamon, Dennis J; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Figueroa, Jonine D; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Easton, Douglas F; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2012-09-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies identified 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated these and 62 other SNPs for their prognostic relevance. Confirmed BC risk SNPs rs17468277 (CASP8), rs1982073 (TGFB1), rs2981582 (FGFR2), rs13281615 (8q24), rs3817198 (LSP1), rs889312 (MAP3K1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs13387042 (2q35), rs4973768 (SLC4A7), rs6504950 (COX11) and rs10941679 (5p12) were genotyped for 25 853 BC patients with the available follow-up; 62 other SNPs, which have been suggested as BC risk SNPs by a GWAS or as candidate SNPs from individual studies, were genotyped for replication purposes in subsets of these patients. Cox proportional hazard models were used to test the association of these SNPs with overall survival (OS) and BC-specific survival (BCS). For the confirmed loci, we performed an accessory analysis of publicly available gene expression data and the prognosis in a different patient group. One of the 11 SNPs, rs3803662 (TOX3) and none of the 62 candidate/GWAS SNPs were associated with OS and/or BCS at P<0.01. The genotypic-specific survival for rs3803662 suggested a recessive mode of action [hazard ratio (HR) of rare homozygous carriers=1.21; 95% CI: 1.09-1.35, P=0.0002 and HR=1.29; 95% CI: 1.12-1.47, P=0.0003 for OS and BCS, respectively]. This association was seen similarly in all analyzed tumor subgroups defined by nodal status, tumor size, grade and estrogen receptor. Breast tumor expression of these genes was not associated with prognosis. With the exception of rs3803662 (TOX3), there was no evidence that any of the SNPs associated with BC susceptibility were associated with the BC survival. Survival may be influenced by a distinct set of germline variants from those influencing susceptibility. PMID:22532573

  9. The role of genetic breast cancer susceptibility variants as prognostic factors

    PubMed Central

    Fasching, Peter A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Cox, Angela; Nevanlinna, Heli; Bojesen, Stig E.; Karn, Thomas; Broeks, Annegien; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; van 't Veer, Laura J.; Udo, Renate; Dunning, Alison M.; Greco, Dario; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Shah, Mitul; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Sherman, Mark; Lissowska, Jolanta; Seynaeve, Caroline; Huijts, Petra E.A.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ekici, Arif B.; Rauh, Claudia; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Mulligan, Anna-Marie; Glendon, Gord; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Liu, Jianjun; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Eilber, Ursula; Nickels, Stefan; Dörk, Thilo; Schiekel, Maria; Bremer, Michael; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Couch, Fergus J.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Olson, Janet E.; Kosel, Matthew; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Miron, Alexander; John, Esther M.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lambrechts, Diether; Dieudonne, Anne-Sophie; Hatse, Sigrid; van Limbergen, Erik; Benitez, Javier; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Pérez, José Ignacio Arias; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Loris, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Rajaraman, Preetha; Schonfeld, Sara J.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Devilee, Peter; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas F.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies identified 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk. We investigated these and 62 other SNPs for their prognostic relevance. Confirmed BC risk SNPs rs17468277 (CASP8), rs1982073 (TGFB1), rs2981582 (FGFR2), rs13281615 (8q24), rs3817198 (LSP1), rs889312 (MAP3K1), rs3803662 (TOX3), rs13387042 (2q35), rs4973768 (SLC4A7), rs6504950 (COX11) and rs10941679 (5p12) were genotyped for 25 853 BC patients with the available follow-up; 62 other SNPs, which have been suggested as BC risk SNPs by a GWAS or as candidate SNPs from individual studies, were genotyped for replication purposes in subsets of these patients. Cox proportional hazard models were used to test the association of these SNPs with overall survival (OS) and BC-specific survival (BCS). For the confirmed loci, we performed an accessory analysis of publicly available gene expression data and the prognosis in a different patient group. One of the 11 SNPs, rs3803662 (TOX3) and none of the 62 candidate/GWAS SNPs were associated with OS and/or BCS at P<0.01. The genotypic-specific survival for rs3803662 suggested a recessive mode of action [hazard ratio (HR) of rare homozygous carriers=1.21; 95% CI: 1.09–1.35, P=0.0002 and HR=1.29; 95% CI: 1.12–1.47, P=0.0003 for OS and BCS, respectively]. This association was seen similarly in all analyzed tumor subgroups defined by nodal status, tumor size, grade and estrogen receptor. Breast tumor expression of these genes was not associated with prognosis. With the exception of rs3803662 (TOX3), there was no evidence that any of the SNPs associated with BC susceptibility were associated with the BC survival. Survival may be influenced by a distinct set of germline variants from those influencing susceptibility. PMID:22532573

  10. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Clancy, Brian Gorre

    2008-08-19

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  11. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2015-07-14

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  12. Variants of beta-glucosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2014-10-07

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  13. Variants of beta-glucosidase

    DOEpatents

    Fidantsef, Ana; Lamsa, Michael; Gorre-Clancy, Brian

    2009-12-29

    The present invention relates to variants of a parent beta-glucosidase, comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 703 of amino acids 1 to 842 of SEQ ID NO: 2 or corresponding to positions 142, 183, 266, and 705 of amino acids 1 to 844 of SEQ ID NO: 70, wherein the variant has beta-glucosidase activity. The present invention also relates to nucleotide sequences encoding the variant beta-glucosidases and to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the nucleotide sequences.

  14. Attitudes toward anticoagulant treatment among nonvalvular atrial fibrillation patients at high risk of stroke and low risk of bleed

    PubMed Central

    Crivera, Concetta; Nelson, Winnie W; Schein, Jeff R; Witt, Edward A

    2016-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with an increased risk of stroke. Anticoagulant (AC) therapies are effective at treating AF, but carry with them an increased risk of bleed. Research suggests that a large proportion of AF patients who have high risk of stroke and low risk of bleeding are not currently receiving AC treatment. The goal of this study was to understand the reasons why these patients do not engage in this potentially life-saving treatment. Method Through a self-report online survey, using validated instruments, 1,184 US adults who self-reported a diagnosis of AF were screened for the risk of stroke and bleed. Of these patients, 230 (19.4%) were at high risk of stroke, low risk of bleed, and not currently using an AC treatment, and were asked follow-up questions to assess their reasons for nontreatment, attitudes toward treatment, and attitudes toward dosing regimens. Results The most common reasons patients stopped AC treatment were concerns regarding bleeding (27.8%) and other medical concerns (26.6%), whereas the most common reason cited for not being prescribed an AC in the first place was the use of antiplatelet therapy as an alternative (57.1%). In both cases, potentially erroneous decisions regarding perceived stoke and/or bleeding risk were also a factor. Finally, the largest factors regarding attitudes toward treatment and dosing regimen were instructions from an authority figure (eg, physician, pharmacist) and ease of use, respectively. Conclusion Results suggest that many AF patients who are at high risk of stroke but at low risk of bleed may not be receiving AC due to potentially inaccurate beliefs about risk. This study also found that AF patients place trust in physicians above other factors such as cost when making treatment decisions. Increased education of patients by physicians on the risks and benefits may be a simple strategy to improve outcomes. PMID:27274206

  15. Effect of Meconium-Stained Amniotic Fluid on Perinatal Complications in Low-Risk Pregnancies at Term.

    PubMed

    Hiersch, Liran; Krispin, Eyal; Aviram, Amir; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Yogev, Yariv; Ashwal, Eran

    2016-03-01

    Objective This study aims to determine the impact of meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) in low-risk pregnancies at term on pregnancy outcome. Study Design A retrospective cohort study of women with MSAF during labor who delivered in a tertiary hospital at 37 to 41(+6) weeks of gestation (2007-2013). Exclusion criteria included: multiple gestations, noncephalic presentation, fetal structural/chromosomal anomalies, hypertensive disorders, diabetes, oligohydramnios, or small for gestational age. Pregnancy outcome of women with MSAF (N = 4,893) was compared with a control group of women without MSAF (N = 39,651). Neonatal respiratory morbidity was defined as the presence of any of the following: respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnea of the newborn, meconium aspiration syndrome, or need for ventilatory support. Results Overall, 10.9% of low-risk pregnancies at term were diagnosed with MSAF. Compared with the controls, women with MSAF had higher rates of nulliparity, gestational age at delivery ≥ 41 weeks, induction of labor, nonreassuring fetal heart rate, and operative deliveries. In multivariate analysis MSAF was associated with operative delivery (odds ratio [OR], 1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.63-2.09; p < 0.001), cesarean section (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.31-1.69; p < 0.001), respiratory morbidity (OR, 4.74; 95% CI, 3.87-5.82; p < 0.001), and increased risk for short-term neonatal morbidity. Conclusions MSAF is associated with a higher rate of adverse perinatal outcome even in low-risk pregnancies at term. PMID:26479168

  16. Molecular genotyping of HPV L1 gene in low-risk and high-risk populations in Bangkok

    PubMed Central

    Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan; Bamrungsak, Busara; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Maneekan, Pannamas; Kosoltanapiwat, Nathamon; Kalambaheti, Thareerat; Kelley, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections in Thailand are a public health concern but information on HPV infection in sex workers and men who have sex with men (MSM) is limited. The aim of this study was to measure the prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV among low- and high-risk, HIV-negative populations. Methods A total of 300 participants were categorized as general women, female sex workers, MSM, and MSM sex workers. HPV infections were identified by the Papanicolaou (Pap) test and nested-PCR. A phylogenetic analysis of partial HPV L1 genes was performed. Results Abnormal cytology was found in 5% of general women, 10% of female sex workers, 24% of MSM and 28% of MSM sex workers. HPV was detected in 9% of general women, 13% of female sex workers and 30% in both MSM and the MSM sex workers. The prevalence of HPV high-risk genotypes was significantly higher in female sex workers and MSM while low-risk genotypes and genital warts were significantly higher in MSM sex workers. Significantly more patients with genital warts and CIN I/AIN I harbored low-risk genotypes while those with CIN II/AIN II harbored high-risk genotypes. Conclusion High- and low-risk HPV genotypes persist in high-risk groups in Bangkok. Some genotypes infecting at-risk populations are not vaccine-preventable. These findings may help to elucidate the prevalence of HPV infections in Thailand and serve as the basis for additional investigations into risk factors for these populations. PMID:25763674

  17. Gene Variants Reduce Opioid Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Charts Emerging Trends and Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine ... a decreased risk for addiction to heroin or cocaine. The other linked variants in two genes— OPRM1 , ...

  18. Unusual variants of mycosis fungoides.

    PubMed

    Abeldaño, Alejandra; Arias, Mariana; Benedetti, Adriana; Ochoa, Karina; Maskin, Matías; Pellerano, Graciela; Kien, María Cristina; Chouela, Edgardo

    2011-01-01

    Unusual variants of mycosis fungoides (MF) differ substantially from the classical presentation, and most of them resemble other dermatologic diseases. The authors reviewed files of patients with MF who consulted our clinic between November 1995 and June 2010 to evaluate the relative frequency and clinical behavior of these variants. Among 98 patients with MF, 32 (32.65%) had unusual variants. The most common types included follicular MF (31.25%), hypopigmented MF (18.75%), poiquilodermic MF (15.6%), and erythrodermic MF (12.5%). Less common variants included unilesional MF, bullosa MF, ichthyosiform MF, granulomatous slack skin, and pigmented purpura-like MF. Progressive disease and MF-related death were most commonly associated with follicular MF, bullosa MF, and erythrodermic MF. PMID:21980706

  19. [Tubular rectum and colon resection. A new operative method for the removal of large adenomas and low-risk carcinomas].

    PubMed

    Gall, F P

    1982-08-01

    A new operative method for the removal of large sessile tubular or villous adenomas and small early carcinomas of the low risk type by a "tubular" colonic or rectal resection is described. The term "tubular" applies to a short segmental resection of the colon or rectum with complete preservation of the mesocolon or mesorectum and the marginal or superior hemorrhoidal artery. This tubular resection has been used by us since 1981 in 11 patients (7 adenomas, 3 adenocarcinomas and one carcinoid). There was no suture line leakage. No lethality and so far no recurrence. The advantages of this new operative technique over conventional methods are discussed in detail. PMID:7128268

  20. Clinical governance and research ethics as barriers to UK low-risk population-based health research?

    PubMed Central

    van Teijlingen, Edwin R; Douglas, Flora; Torrance, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Background Since the Helsinki Declaration was introduced in 1964 as a code of practice for clinical research, it has generally been agreed that research governance is also needed in the field of public health and health promotion research. Recently, a range of factors led to the development of more stringent bureaucratic procedures, governing the conduct of low-risk population-based health research in the United Kingdom. Methods Our paper highlights a case study of the application process to medical research ethics committees in the United Kingdom for a study of the promotion of physical activity by health care providers. The case study presented here is an illustration of the challenges in conducting low-risk population-based health research. Results Our mixed-methods approach involved a questionnaire survey of and semi-structured interviews with health professionals (who were all healthy volunteers). Since our study does not involve the participation of either patients or the general population, one would expect the application to the relevant research ethics committees to be a formality. This proved not to be the case! Conclusion Research ethics committees could be counter-productive, rather than protecting the vulnerable in the research process, they can stifle low-risk population-based health research. Research ethics in health services research is first and foremost the responsibility of the researcher(s), and we need to learn to trust health service researchers again. The burden of current research governance regulation to address the perceived ethical problems is neither appropriate nor adequate. Senior researchers/academics need to educate and train students and junior researchers in the area of research ethics, whilst at the same time reducing pressures on them that lead to unethical research, such as commercial funding, inappropriate government interference and the pressure to publish. We propose that non-invasive low-risk population-based health studies

  1. Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism–Based Noninvasive Prenatal Screening in a High-Risk and Low-Risk Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pergament, Eugene; Cuckle, Howard; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Banjevic, Milena; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Ryan, Allison; Hall, Megan P.; Dodd, Michael; Lacroute, Phil; Stosic, Melissa; Chopra, Nikhil; Hunkapiller, Nathan; Prosen, Dennis E.; McAdoo, Sallie; Demko, Zachary; Siddiqui, Asim; Hill, Matthew; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate performance of a single-nucleotide-polymorphism–based noninvasive prenatal screen for fetal aneuploidy in high-risk and low-risk populations upon single venopuncture. Methods One thousand sixty-four maternal blood samples from 7 weeks of gestation and beyond were included; one thousand fifty-one were within specifications, 518 (49.3%) low-risk. Cell-free DNA was amplified, sequenced, and analyzed using the Next-generation Aneuploidy Test Using SNPs algorithm. Samples were called as trisomies 21, 18, 13, or monosomy X, or euploid, and male or female. Results Nine hundred sixty-six samples (91.9%) successfully generated a cell-free DNA result. Among these, sensitivity was 100% for trisomy 21 (58/58, CI: 93.8–100%), trisomy 13 (12/12, CI: 73.5–100%), and fetal sex (358/358 female, CI:99.0–100%; 418/418 male, CI: 99.1–100%), 96.0% for trisomy 18 (24/25, CI: 79.7–99.9%), and 90% for monosomy X (9/10, CI: 55.5–99.8%). Specificity for trisomies 21 and 13 was 100% (905/905 [CI: 99.6–100%] and 953/953 [CI: 99.6–100%], respectively) and for trisomy 18 and monosomy X was 99.9% (938/939 [CI: 99.4–100%] and 953/954 [CI: 99.4–100%], respectively). However, 16% (20/125) of aneuploid samples did not return a result; 50% (10/20) had a fetal fraction below the 1.5th percentile of euploid pregnancies. Aneuploidy rate was significantly higher in these samples (p<0.001, odds ratio: 9.2, CI: 4.4–19.0). Sensitivity and specificity did not differ in low-risk and high-risk populations. Conclusions This noninvasive prenatal screen performed with high sensitivity and specificity in high-risk and low-risk cohorts. Aneuploid samples were significantly more likely to not return a result; the number of aneuploidy samples was especially increased among samples with low fetal fraction. This underscores the importance of redraws or, in rare cases, invasive procedures based on low fetal fraction. PMID:25004354

  2. Developing a DNA variant database.

    PubMed

    Fung, David C Y

    2008-01-01

    Disease- and locus-specific variant databases have been a valuable resource to clinical and research geneticists. With the recent rapid developments in technologies, the number of DNA variants detected in a typical molecular genetics laboratory easily exceeds 1,000. To keep track of the growing inventory of DNA variants, many laboratories employ information technology to store the data as well as distributing the data and its associated information to clinicians and researchers via the Web. While it is a valuable resource, the hosting of a web-accessible database requires collaboration between bioinformaticians and biologists and careful planning to ensure its usability and availability. In this chapter, a series of tutorials on building a local DNA variant database out of a sample dataset will be provided. However, this tutorial will not include programming details on building a web interface and on constructing the web application necessary for web hosting. Instead, an introduction to the two commonly used methods for hosting web-accessible variant databases will be described. Apart from the tutorials, this chapter will also consider the resources and planning required for making a variant database project successful. PMID:18453092

  3. The identification of high and low risk groups for colorectal cancer using rectal mucosal crypt cell production rate (CCPR).

    PubMed

    Rooney, P S; Clarke, P A; Gifford, K A; Hardcastle, J D; Armitage, N C

    1993-07-01

    Rectal mucosal proliferation was measured in 116 individuals using the metaphase arrest technique crypt cell production rate (CCPR). CCPR was found to be significantly elevated in individuals with adenomas (n = 42, CCPR = 13 cc c-1h-1, range 7-25 Cl 10-15) compared with normals (n = 21, CCPR = 10 cc c-1h-1 range 5-24 Cl 7-11, Mann-Whitney P = 0.001 z = 3.2). Mucosal proliferation was increased among individuals who were undergoing adenoma follow up but in whom no further adenomas were found (n = 37 CCPR = 12 range 5-26 cc c-1h-1 Cl 10-14) compared to controls (Mann-Whitney P = 0.01 z = 2.4) Proliferation in vegetarians i.e. low risk (n = 16) was similar to controls. Measurement of proliferative indices in rectal mucosa by the stathmokinetic technique CCPR can discriminate between high and low risk groups for colorectal cancer. PMID:8318409

  4. [Focal Laser Ablation and Photodynamic Vascular Therapy with soluble TOOKAD® in the treatment of low risk prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Escrig, J L; Casanova Ramón-Borja, J

    2016-07-01

    The increase of the diagnosis of low risk prostate cancer translates into a new clinical entity, for which active surveillance may not be always enough and conventional therapies are clearly overtreatment. Faced with the necessity of giving a therapeutic answer to these patients, and facilitated by the technological advances in the imaging field and new energy sources, the interest is centered in the clinical development of focal therapies as an alternative with minimal morbidity and oncologically safe. As a part of the review carried out in this monographic issue, this article focus on the features relative to the preclinical and clinical development of laser ablative therapy and the innovative photodynamic vascular therapy with soluble TOOKAD®. With this aim we performed an exhaustive bibliographic search, updated to February 2016, in the greater databases, including original articles and reviews in reference to the object of this review, without restrictions for year of publication. This article reviews the preclinical and clinical development of these innovative ablative techniques in the field of focal therapy for low risk prostate cancer. PMID:27416636

  5. Comparison of urologist reimbursement for managing patients with low-risk prostate cancer by active surveillance versus total prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, M; Eldefrawy, A; Katkoori, D; Antebi, E; Soloway, M S

    2010-12-01

    Active surveillance (AS) is an alternative to total prostatectomy (TP) in managing low-risk prostate cancer (PC). Our aim is to compare urologist reimbursement for managing low-risk PC by AS or TP. The urologist's reimbursement for TP includes the fee for the procedure and follow-up visits. For AS, our protocol involves digital rectal examination (DRE) and PSA testing every 3 months for first 2 years and every 6 months thereafter. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsies are performed yearly. Some urologists recommend spacing the biopsies by 1-3 years. Medicare reimbursement values were used. The urologist reimbursements for a follow-up visit, prostate biopsy, open TP and robotic TP are $72, $595, $1905 and $2939, respectively. We also corrected for a 15% chance of having TP after being on AS. The cumulative reimbursements from open TP and following the patient up to 10 years are approximately $2121 (1 year), $2265 (2 years), $2697 (5 years) and $3057 (10 years). For robotic TP, the urologist reimbursements are $3155 (1 year), $3259 (2 years), $3731 (5 years) and $4091 (10 years). For AS, the urologist reimbursements are $883 (1 year), $1766 (2 years), $4269 (5 years) and $7964 (10 years). The urologist reimbursement from AS and TP become nearly equal between 3 and 4 years follow-up, subsequently AS attains higher reimbursement. PMID:20838414

  6. Randomized trial of pragmatic education for low-risk COPD patients: impact on hospitalizations and emergency department visits

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Haamid H; Olson, Raymond H; Parenti, Connie M; Rector, Thomas S; Caldwell, Michael; Dewan, Naresh A; Rice, Kathryn L

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most interventions aimed at reducing hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have employed resource-intense programs in high-risk individuals. Although COPD is a progressive disease, little is known about the effectiveness of proactive interventions aimed at preventing hospitalizations and ED visits in the much larger population of low-risk (no known COPD-related hospitalizations or ED visits in the prior year) patients, some of whom will eventually become high-risk. Methods: We tested the effect of a simple educational and self-efficacy intervention (n = 2243) versus usual care (n = 2182) on COPD/breathing-related ED visits and hospitalizations in a randomized study of low-risk patients at three Veterans Affairs (VA) medical centers in the upper Midwest. Administrative data was used to track VA admissions and ED visits. A patient survey was used to determine health-related events outside the VA. Results: Rates of COPD-related VA hospitalizations in the education and usual care group were not significantly different (3.4 versus 3.6 admissions per 100 person-years, respectively; 95% CI of difference −1.3 to 1.0, P = 0.77). The much higher patient-reported rates of non-VA hospitalizations for breathing-related problems were lower in the education group (14.0 versus 19.0 per 100 person-years; 95% CI −8.6 to −1.4, P = 0.006). Rates of COPD-related VA ED visits were not significantly different (6.8 versus 5.3; 95% CI −0.1 to 3.0, P = 0.07), nor were non-VA ED visits (32.4 versus 36.5; 95% CI −9.3 to 1.1, P = 0.12). All-cause VA admission and ED rates did not differ. Mortality rates (6.9 versus 8.3 per 100 person-years, respectively; 95% CI −3.0 to 0.4, P = 0.13) did not differ. Conclusion: An educational intervention that is practical for large numbers of low-risk patients with COPD may reduce the rate of breathing-related hospitalizations. Further research that more

  7. A SIS reaction-diffusion-advection model in a low-risk and high-risk domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Jing; Kim, Kwang Ik; Lin, Zhigui; Zhu, Huaiping

    2015-11-01

    A simplified SIS model is proposed and investigated to understand the impact of spatial heterogeneity of environment and advection on the persistence and eradication of an infectious disease. The free boundary is introduced to model the spreading front of the disease. The basic reproduction number associated with the diseases in the spatial setting is introduced. Sufficient conditions for the disease to be eradicated or to spread are given. Our result shows that if the spreading domain is high-risk at some time, the disease will continue to spread till the whole area is infected; while if the spreading domain is low-risk, the disease may be vanishing or keep spreading depending on the expanding capability and the initial number of the infective individuals. The spreading speeds are also given when spreading happens, numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the impacts of the advection and the expanding capability on the spreading fronts.

  8. Relative effectiveness of comprehensive community programming for drug abuse prevention with high-risk and low-risk adolescents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, C A; Pentz, M A; Weber, M D; Dwyer, J H; Baer, N; MacKinnon, D P; Hansen, W B; Flay, B R

    1990-08-01

    This article reviews major risk factors for cigarette smoking, alcohol, and other drug abuse and promising community-based approaches to primary prevention. In a longitudinal experimental study, 8 representative Kansas City communities were assigned randomly to program (school, parent, mass media, and community organization) and control (mass media and community organization only) conditions. Programs were delivered at either 6th or 7th grade, and panels were followed through Grade 9 or 10. The primary findings were (a) significant reductions at 3 years in tobacco and marijuana use and (b) equivalent reductions for youth at different levels of risk. This study provides evidence that a comprehensive community program-based approach can prevent the onset of substance abuse and that the benefits are experienced equally by youth at high and low risk. PMID:2212182

  9. Isolated port-site metastasis after surgical staging for low-risk endometrioid endometrial cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    MAUTONE, DANIELE; DALL'ASTA, ANDREA; MONICA, MICHELA; GALLI, LETIZIA; CAPOZZI, VITO ANDREA; MARCHESI, FEDERICO; GIORDANO, GIOVANNA; BERRETTA, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Port-site metastases (PSMs) are well-known potential complications of laparoscopic surgery for gynaecologic malignancies. The present case study reports PSM following laparoscopic surgery for Stage IA Grade 1 endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC). The recurrence developed within 7 months following primary surgery and required surgical excision followed by adjuvant chemo-radio therapy. After 9 months, the patient remains disease-free. PSMs are rare complications following laparoscopic surgery. Amongst the 23 cases of endometrial cancer PSMs reported so far, only 4 followed EEC Stage IA Grade 1–2. The present study reports a rare case of PSM after Stage IA Grade 1 EEC. The clinical and prognostic relevance of PSMs has not been identified so far; and it is not known whether PSMs represent a local recurrence or a systemic recurrence. Surgeons should be aware that even low-risk EEC may be followed by PSMs and should take steps to prevent these rare recurrences. PMID:27347138

  10. The Effect of Parenting Style on Social Smiling in Infants at High and Low Risk for ASD.

    PubMed

    Harker, Colleen M; Ibañez, Lisa V; Nguyen, Thanh P; Messinger, Daniel S; Stone, Wendy L

    2016-07-01

    This study examined how parenting style at 9 months predicts growth in infant social engagement (i.e., social smiling) between 9 and 18 months during a free-play interaction in infants at high (HR-infants) and low (LR-infants) familial risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results indicated that across all infants, higher levels of maternal responsiveness were concurrently associated with higher levels of social smiling, while higher levels of maternal directiveness predicted slower growth in social smiling. When accounting for maternal directiveness, which was higher in mothers of HR-infants, HR-infants exhibited greater growth in social smiling than LR-infants. Overall, each parenting style appears to make a unique contribution to the development of social engagement in infants at high- and low-risk for ASD. PMID:27007726

  11. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Endometrial Cancers: Final Results of a Phase I Study

    SciTech Connect

    Macchia, Gabriella; Cilla, Savino M.P.; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Deodato, Francesco; Digesu, Cinzia; Caravatta, Luciana; Picardi, Vincenzo; Corrado, Giacomo; Piermattei, Angelo; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Scambia, Giovanni; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy (intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique) to the upper two thirds of the vagina in endometrial cancers with low risk of local recurrence. Patients and Methods: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had low-risk resected primary endometrial adenocarcinomas. Radiotherapy was delivered in 5 fractions over 1 week. The planning target volume was the clinical target volume plus 5 mm. The clinical target volume was defined as the upper two thirds of the vagina as evidenced at CT simulation by a vaginal radio-opaque device. The planning target volume was irradiated by a seven-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique, planned by the Plato Sunrise inverse planning system. A first cohort of 6 patients received 25 Gy (5-Gy fractions), and a subsequent cohort received 30 Gy (6-Gy fractions). The Common Toxicity Criteria scale, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: Twelve patients with endometrial cancer were enrolled. Median age was 58 years (range, 49-74 years). Pathologic stage was IB (83.3%) and IC (16.7%). Median tumor size was 30 mm (range, 15-50 mm). All patients completed the prescribed radiotherapy. No patient experienced a dose-limiting toxicity at the first level, and the radiotherapy dose was escalated from 25 to 30 Gy. No patients at the second dose level experienced dose-limiting toxicity. The most common Grade 2 toxicity was gastrointestinal, which was tolerable and manageable. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose of short-course radiotherapy was 30 Gy at 6 Gy per fraction. On the basis of this result, we are conducting a Phase II study with radiotherapy delivered at 30 Gy.

  12. Outcomes of Low-Risk Ductal Carcinoma In Situ in Southeast Asian Women Treated With Breast Conservation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Fuh Yong; Wang, Fuqiang; Chen, John Ju; Tan, Chiew Har; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of Southeast Asian (SEA) women with low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) treated with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and adjuvant radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart reviews of patients treated with BCS for DCIS from 1995 to 2011 were performed. Patients meeting the selection criteria from Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 5194 were included. Most patients received adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) consisting of whole-breast RT delivered to 50 Gy followed by a 10-Gy boost to the tumor bed. Results: Of 744 patients with pathologic diagnosis of pure DCIS identified, 273 met the selection criteria: low-intermediate grade (LIG), n=219; high grade (HG), n=54. Median follow-up for these patients was 60 months. There were 8 ipsilateral breast tumor recurrences (IBTRs) in total, 7 of which were DCIS. The estimated actuarial IBTR rates at 5 and 10 years for the entire cohort are 1.8% and 4.3%, respectively. Of the 219 patients with LIG DCIS, 210 received RT and 9 did not. There were 7 IBTRs in LIG DCIS, 2 among the 9 patients who did not receive RT. The IBTR rates in LIG DCIS at 5 and 10 years are 2.3% and 4.2%, respectively. All patients with HG DCIS received RT. There was only 1 IBTR occurring beyond 5 years, giving an estimated IBTR rate of 4.5% at 10 years. Conclusions: SEA women with screen-detected DCIS have exceedingly low rates of IBTR after BCS, comparable to that observed in reports of similar patients with low-risk DCIS treated with adjuvant radiation.

  13. Overweight Is a Major Contributor to Atherosclerosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients at Apparent Low Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sacre, Karim; Escoubet, Brigitte; Zennaro, Maria-Christina; Chauveheid, Marie-Paule; Gayat, Etienne; Papo, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the main cause of death in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We aimed to determine whether overweight (defined as a body mass index [BMI] > 25 kg/m2) contributed to subclinical atherosclerosis in SLE patients at low risk for CVD according to traditional factors. Wall thickness of the internal carotid artery (ICWT) measured at the carotid bulb and carotid plaques were assessed in 49 SLE patients asymptomatic for CVD and 49 controls matched on Framingham score. Factors associated to ICWT were identified and multivariate analysis was performed. SLE patients and controls displayed a low 10-year risk for CVD according to Framingham score (mean 1.9 ± 3.5 in SLE vs 1.8 ± 3.2% in controls, P = 0.37). ICWT (P < 0.001) and number of patients with carotid plaques (P = 0.015) were, however, higher in SLE patients as compared to controls. In multivariable analysis, SLE was an independent risk for a carotid atherosclerosis (OR [95% confidence interval, CI]: 3.53 [1.36–9.14]; P = 0.009). Older age, higher BMI, and higher Framingham score were associated with atherosclerosis in SLE patients in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, only the association with overweight remained significant (OR [95% CI]: 4.13 [1.02–16.75]; P = 0.047). Overweight is a major contributor to atherosclerosis in SLE patients at apparent low risk for CVD. PMID:26632902

  14. Different pituitary. beta. -endorphin and adrenal cortisol response to ethanol in individuals with high and low risk for future development of alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Gianoulakis, C.G.; Beliveau, D.; Angelogianni, P.; Meaney, M.; Thavundayil, J.; Tawar, V.; Dumas, M. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to investigate the activity of the adrenal gland and the pituitary {beta}-endorphin system in individuals from families with a 3 generation history of alcoholism, High Risk group, or from families without history of alcoholism, Low Risk group. On the day of testing, blood sample was taken at 9:00 a.m., then the subject drank a placebo drink or an ethanol solution. Additional blood samples were taken at 15, 45 and 120 minutes post-drink. Results indicated that individuals of the High Risk group had lower basal levels of {beta}-endorphin like immunoreactivity ({beta}-EPLIR) than individuals of the Low Risk group. The dose of 0.5 g ethanol/kg B.Wt. induced an induce an increase in the plasma content of {beta}-EPLIR of the High Risk group, but not of the Low Risk group. In the Low Risk group ethanol did not induce an increase above the 9:00 a.m. levels, however, it attenuated the {beta}-endorphin decrease overtime, observed following the placebo drink. Analysis of {beta}-endorphin-like peptides in the plasma of the High Risk group, with Sephadex G-75 chromatography indicated that the major component of the plasma {beta}-EPLIR was {beta}-lipotropin. Plasma cortisol levels, following ethanol intake, presented a small increase in the High Risk group but not in the Low Risk group.

  15. Sterile α Motif Domain Containing 9 Is a Novel Cellular Interacting Partner to Low-Risk Type Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia; Dupuis, Crystal; Tyring, Stephen K.; Underbrink, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Low-risk type human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 11 infection causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) and genital warts. RRP is the most common benign tumor of the larynx in children with frequent relapses. Repeated surgeries are often needed to improve vocal function and prevent life-threatening respiratory obstruction. Currently, there are no effective treatments available to completely eliminate these diseases, largely due to limited knowledge regarding their viral molecular pathogenesis. HPV E6 proteins contribute to cell immortalization by interacting with a variety of cellular proteins, which have been well studied for the high-risk type HPVs related to cancer progression. However, the functions of low-risk HPV E6 proteins are largely unknown. In this study, we report GST-pulldown coupled mass spectrometry analysis with low-risk HPV E6 proteins that identified sterile alpha motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9) as a novel interacting partner. We then confirmed the interaction between HPV-E6 and SAMD9 using co-immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay, and confocal immunofluorescence staining. The SAMD9 gene is down-regulated in a variety of neoplasms and deleteriously mutated in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. Interestingly, SAMD9 also has antiviral functions against poxvirus. Our study adds to the limited knowledge of the molecular properties of low-risk HPVs and describes new potential functions for the low-risk HPV E6 protein. PMID:26901061

  16. Sterile α Motif Domain Containing 9 Is a Novel Cellular Interacting Partner to Low-Risk Type Human Papillomavirus E6 Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia; Dupuis, Crystal; Tyring, Stephen K; Underbrink, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Low-risk type human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 11 infection causes recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) and genital warts. RRP is the most common benign tumor of the larynx in children with frequent relapses. Repeated surgeries are often needed to improve vocal function and prevent life-threatening respiratory obstruction. Currently, there are no effective treatments available to completely eliminate these diseases, largely due to limited knowledge regarding their viral molecular pathogenesis. HPV E6 proteins contribute to cell immortalization by interacting with a variety of cellular proteins, which have been well studied for the high-risk type HPVs related to cancer progression. However, the functions of low-risk HPV E6 proteins are largely unknown. In this study, we report GST-pulldown coupled mass spectrometry analysis with low-risk HPV E6 proteins that identified sterile alpha motif domain containing 9 (SAMD9) as a novel interacting partner. We then confirmed the interaction between HPV-E6 and SAMD9 using co-immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay, and confocal immunofluorescence staining. The SAMD9 gene is down-regulated in a variety of neoplasms and deleteriously mutated in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. Interestingly, SAMD9 also has antiviral functions against poxvirus. Our study adds to the limited knowledge of the molecular properties of low-risk HPVs and describes new potential functions for the low-risk HPV E6 protein. PMID:26901061

  17. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  18. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment ...

  19. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-08-16

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  20. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2011-05-31

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  1. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2008-12-02

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  2. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    DOEpatents

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2012-08-07

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  3. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegeburr, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2013-02-19

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  4. Variant Humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Larenas, Edmund

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  5. Variant humicola grisea CBH1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Goedegebuur, Frits; Gualfetti, Peter; Mitchinson, Colin; Edmund, Larenas

    2014-09-09

    Disclosed are variants of Humicola grisea Cel7A (CBH1.1), H. jecorina CBH1 variant or S. thermophilium CBH1, nucleic acids encoding the same and methods for producing the same. The variant cellulases have the amino acid sequence of a glycosyl hydrolase of family 7A wherein one or more amino acid residues are substituted.

  6. Pigmented Porokeratosis. A Further Variant?

    PubMed

    Tan, Tracy S P; Tallon, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Porokeratosis is a clonal disorder of keratinization characterized by the presence of the cornoid lamella. A number of variants of porokeratosis have been described, based on the clinical features and histologic features of the lesions. The authors present a case of porokeratosis with prominent melanocytic hyperplasia, which was biopsied to clinically exclude melanoma. The authors retrospectively studied cases of porokeratosis to look for the presence of melanocytic hyperplasia. Melanocytic hyperplasia was identified in 8 of 31 cases (25.8%). All of the cases except the index case were clinically nonpigmented but arose in solar damaged skin. This case represents a distinct variant of porokeratosis, and the authors propose the designation pigmented porokeratosis. Melanocytic hyperplasia is a benign condition, and it is important that this is not histologically confused with melanoma in situ, particularly in a context of clinically pigmented lesion. Increased recognition of pigmented porokeratosis is essential to avoid an erroneous diagnosis of melanoma in situ. PMID:26894774

  7. Management of Adolescent Low-Risk Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma: Which Chemotherapy Backbone Gives the Best Chance of Omitting Radiotherapy Safely.

    PubMed

    Algiraigri, Ali H; Essa, Mohammed F

    2016-03-01

    Even though more than 90% of adolescents with low-risk classical Hodgkin lymphoma (LRcHL) will be cured with first-line therapy, many will suffer serious late toxic effects from radiotherapy (RT). The goals for care have shifted toward minimizing late toxic effects without compromising the outstanding cure rates by adapting a risk and response-based therapy. Recent published and ongoing randomized clinical trials, using functional imaging, may allow for better identification of those patients for whom RT may be safely omitted while maintaining excellent cure rates. To evaluate the best chemotherapy regimens with a reasonable toxicity profile and that are expected to have a high chance of omitting RT based on a response-directed therapy while maintaining high cure rates, a mini review was conducted of the recent clinical trials in pediatric and adult LRcHL. The UK RAPID trial chemotherapy backbone (3 × ABVD) followed by a response-based positron emission tomography scan offers up to a 75% chance of safely omitting RT without compromising the cure rate, which remained well above 90%. PMID:26812449

  8. Protein biomarkers distinguish between high- and low-risk pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a tissue specific manner

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated the differential expression detected in the proteomic profiles of low risk- and high risk- ALL pediatric patients to characterize candidate biomarkers related to diagnosis, prognosis and patient targeted therapy. Bone marrow and peripheral blood plasma and cell lysates samples were obtained from pediatric patients with low- (LR) and high-risk (HR) ALL at diagnosis. As controls, non-leukemic pediatric patients were studied. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out by G- banding and interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization. Differential proteomic analysis was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The differential expression of certain proteins was confirmed by Western blot analysis. The obtained data revealed that CLUS, CERU, APOE, APOA4, APOA1, GELS, S10A9, AMBP, ACTB, CATA and AFAM proteins play a significant role in leukemia prognosis, potentially serving as distinctive biomarkers for leukemia aggressiveness, or as suppressor proteins in HR-ALL cases. In addition, vitronectin and plasminogen probably contributed to leukemogenesis, whilst bicaudal D-related protein 1 could afford a significant biomarker for pediatric ALL therapeutics. PMID:23849470

  9. Offshore Evidence for an Undocumented Tsunami Event in the 'Low Risk' Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat, Northern Red Sea.

    PubMed

    Goodman Tchernov, Beverly; Katz, Timor; Shaked, Yonathan; Qupty, Nairooz; Kanari, Mor; Niemi, Tina; Agnon, Amotz

    2016-01-01

    Although the Gulf of Aqaba-Eilat is located in the tectonically active northern Red Sea, it has been described as low-risk with regard to tsunami activity because there are no modern records of damaging tsunami events and only one tsunami (1068 AD) referred to in historical records. However, this assessment may be poorly informed given that the area was formed by and is located along the seismically active Dead Sea Fault, its population is known to fluctuate in size and literacy in part due to its harsh hyper-arid climate, and there is a dearth of field studies addressing the presence or absence of tsunamigenic deposits. Here we show evidence from two offshore cores for a major paleotsunami that occurred ~2300 years ago with a sedimentological footprint that far exceeds the scarce markers of the historically mentioned 1068 AD event. The interpretation is based on the presence of a laterally continuous and synchronous, anomalous sedimentological deposit that includes allochtonous inclusions and unique structural characteristics. Based on sedimentological parameters, these deposits could not be accounted for by other transport events, or other known background sedimentological processes. PMID:26815553

  10. Characterization of the transport signals that mediate the nucleocytoplasmic traffic of low risk HPV11 E7

    SciTech Connect

    McKee, Courtney H.; Onder, Zeynep; Ashok, Aditya; Cardoso, Rebeca; Moroianu, Junona

    2013-08-15

    We previously discovered that nuclear import of low risk HPV11 E7 is mediated by its zinc-binding domain via a pathway that is independent of karyopherins/importins (Piccioli et al., 2010. Virology 407, 100–109). In this study we mapped and characterized a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), {sub 76}IRQLQDLLL{sub 84}, within the zinc-binding domain that mediates the nuclear export of HPV11 E7 in a CRM1-dependent manner. We also identified a mostly hydrophobic patch {sub 65}VRLVV{sub 69} within the zinc-binding domain that mediates nuclear import of HPV11 E7 via hydrophobic interactions with the FG-repeats domain of Nup62. Substitutions of hydrophobic residues to alanine within the {sub 65}VRLVV{sub 69} sequence disrupt the nuclear localization of 11E7, whereas the R66A mutation has no effect. Overall the data support a model of nuclear entry of HPV11 E7 protein via hydrophobic interactions with FG nucleoporins at the nuclear pore complex. - Highlights: • HPV11 E7 has a leucine-rich nuclear export signal that mediates its nuclear export via CRM1. • HPV11 E7 interacts via its unique cNLS with the FG domain of Nup62. • Identification of a hydrophobic patch essential for nuclear localization of HPV11 E7.

  11. Comparison of hepatitis B, core, HBc, and hepatitis B antibody, anti HBs, in a presumed low risk donor population.

    PubMed

    Heck, Ellen; Cavanagh, H Dwight

    2014-09-01

    Donors screened by medical social history interview negative for high risk behavior or communicable disease history, but subsequently exhibiting reactive serological markers, emphasize importance of duel safe guarding factors for determining donor suitability. This report examines a relationship between two immunoabsorption assay tests, hepatitis B core (HBc) antibody, a required food and drug administration (FDA) test, and hepatitis B antibody (anti HBs), non-required test. Reactive serology results, 129 cases, 3,581 donors (2008-2012) for HBc as the only initially positive serological marker were subjected to anti HBs testing in this history pre-screened donor population. Enzyme linked immunoabsorption assay kits hepatitis B, core and antibody, were used in this study. All samples were initially tested for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, utilizing nucleic acid testing and antigen antibody immunoabsorption assay. Testing was performed by a FDA-registered CLEA-certified reference laboratory. Samples were deceased donor blood samples and a limited number of pre-mortem samples, separated, stored and analyzed according to manufacturer recommendation and FDA regulations. 129 reactive HBc only samples, were subsequently tested for anti HBs. Of these 129, 94 were found to be reactive for anti HBs. This represented 72 % of samples tested for antibody, a higher percentage than anticipated for a medical history negative, low risk population. PMID:24374389

  12. Tobacco, alcohol, coffee, and caffeine as risk factors for colon cancer in a low-risk population.

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; West, D W; Robison, L M; French, T K; Ford, M H; Schuman, K L; Sorenson, A W

    1990-03-01

    We used data from a population-based case-control study to examine how use of tobacco products and consumption of alcohol, coffee, and caffeine relate to colon cancer in Utah. We hypothesized that low use of these substances is one factor contributing to the low colon cancer incidence in Utah and could help explain the low risk associated for colon cancer with being a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In females, we observed little or no increase in risk of colon cancer from smoking cigarettes or from consumption of alcohol, caffeine, or coffee. Males who used pipes, however, experienced an increased risk for colon cancer (OR = 4.1, 95% CI = 1.3-12.3). Risk for colon cancer associated with alcohol use was greatly attenuated after adjusting for caffeine and pipe use in males; males who consumed higher levels of caffeine during the two to three years prior to the interview were at higher risk than males who consumed low levels of caffeine (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.0-4.2); similar associations were observed for coffee consumption. Nonuse of these substances could explain the low colon cancer incidence rates observed in members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Utah males. PMID:2073501

  13. SCIM: Sample Collection for Investigation of Mars, A Low-Cost, Low-Risk Concept for the First Mars Sample Return Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, M.; Leshin, L.; Wiens, R.; Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Clark, B.

    2012-06-01

    SCIM is a revolutionary concept for a low-cost, low-risk sample return from Mars to fundamentally advance knowledge of the geology, climate and habitability of Mars. SCIM would be a pathfinder for future unmanned and manned missions to Mars.

  14. The Mother-Infant Feeding Relationship across the First Year and the Development of Feeding Difficulties in Low-Risk Premature Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silberstein, Dalia; Feldman, Ruth; Gardner, Judith M.; Karmel, Bernard Z.; Kuint, Jacob; Geva, Ronny

    2009-01-01

    Although feeding problems are common during infancy and are typically accompanied by relational difficulties, little research observed the mother-infant feeding relationship across the first year as an antecedent to the development of feeding difficulties. We followed 76 low-risk premature infants and their mothers from the transition to oral…

  15. Attractive toxic sugar baits: Control of mosquitoes with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran and potential impacts on non-target organisms in Morocco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of ATSB in the laboratory and the field with the low risk active ingredient dinotefuran against mosquito populations. Assays indicated that dinotefuran in solution with the sugar baits was ingested and resulted in high mortality of female Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes a...

  16. Human Papillomavirus - Prevalence of High-Risk and Low-Risk Types among Females Aged 14-59 Years, National Health and ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Archive Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 45. Human Papillomavirus — Prevalence of High-risk and Low-risk Types Among Females Aged 14 – 59 Years, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003 – 2006 Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  17. Expressed Emotion in Mothers of Currently Depressed, Remitted, High-Risk, and Low-Risk Youth: Links to Child Depression Status and Longitudinal Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silk, Jennifer S.; Ziegler, Melissa L.; Whalen, Diana J.; Dahl, Ronald E.; Ryan, Neal D.; Dietz, Laura J.; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Williamson, Douglas E.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined expressed emotion in the families of children and adolescents who were (a) in a current episode of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), (b) in remission from a past episode of MDD, (c) at high familial risk for developing MDD, and (d) low-risk controls. Participants were 109 mother-child dyads (children ages 8-19). Expressed…

  18. Outpatient treatment of low-risk venous thromboembolism with monotherapy oral anticoagulation: patient quality of life outcomes and clinician acceptance

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Jeffrey A; Kahler, Zachary P; Beam, Daren M

    2016-01-01

    Background Oral monotherapy anticoagulation has facilitated home treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in outpatients. Objectives The aim of this study was to measure efficacy, safety, as well as patient and physician perceptions produced by a protocol that selected VTE patients as low-risk patients by the Hestia criteria, and initiated home anticoagulation with an oral factor Xa antagonist. Methods Patients were administered the Venous Insufficiency Epidemiological and Economic Study Quality of life/Symptoms questionnaire [VEINEs QoL/Sym] and the physical component summary [PCS] from the Rand 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF36]). The primary outcomes were VTE recurrence and hemorrhage at 30 days. Secondary outcomes compared psychometric test scores between patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to those with pulmonary embolism (PE). Patient perceptions were abstracted from written comments and physician perceptions specific to PE outpatient treatment obtained from structured survey. Results From April 2013 to September 2015, 253 patients were treated, including 67 with PE. Within 30 days, 2/253 patients had recurrent DVT and 2/253 had major hemorrhage; all four had DVT at enrollment. The initial PCS scores did not differ between DVT and PE patients (37.2±13.9 and 38.0±12.1, respectively) and both DVT and PE patients had similar improvement over the treatment period (42.2±12.9 and 43.4±12.7, respectively), consistent with prior literature. The most common adverse event was menorrhagia, present in 15% of women. Themes from patient-written responses reflected satisfaction with increased autonomy. Physicians’ (N=116) before-to-after protocol comfort level with home treatment of PE increased 48% on visual analog scale. Conclusion Hestia-negative VTE patients treated with oral monotherapy at home had low rates of VTE recurrence and bleeding, as well as quality of life measurements similar to prior reports. PMID:27143861

  19. Energy density at a buffet-style lunch differs for adolescents born at high and low risk of obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Tanja V.E.; Stunkard, Albert J.; Berkowitz, Robert I.; Stettler, Nicolas; Stallings, Virginia A.; Kabay, April; Faith, Myles S.

    2009-01-01

    The energy density (ED; kcal/g) of foods, when manipulated in the laboratory, affects short-term energy intake. The aim of this study was to examine if, when given a choice, dietary ED (foods only) and energy intake (expressed as a percentage of subjects’ estimated daily energy requirement) at a self-selected, single meal differs for teens born with a different familial predisposition to obesity and as a function of their sex. Subjects (13 males, 17 females) were 12 years of age and born at high-risk (HR; n = 15) or low-risk (LR; n = 15) for obesity based on maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI; kg/m2). The buffet meal, served for lunch and consumed ad libitum, consisted of a variety of foods and beverages with a range in ED. HR subjects consumed a more energy-dense meal (foods only) than LR subjects (1.84 vs. 1.42 kcal/g; P = 0.02) and males consumed a more energy-dense meal than females (1.83 vs. 1.43 kcal/g; P = 0.03). Total energy intake, when expressed as a percentage of subjects’ daily EER, did not differ between HR and LR subjects (42% vs. 33%; P = 0.16). Males, compared to females, consumed ∼ 59% more energy from foods and beverages during the meal (46 vs. 29%; P = 0.008). During a single multi-item lunch meal, teens with a familial predisposition to obesity and males, independent of their obesity risk status, self-selected a more energy-dense meal. Familial risk for obesity, through either genetic or environmental pathways, may facilitate a more energy-dense diet. PMID:19778749

  20. The Effect of ABO Blood Incompatibility on Corneal Transplant Failure in Conditions with Low Risk of Graft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Steven P.; Stark, Walter J.; Doyle Stulting, R.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Sugar, Alan; Pavilack, Mark A.; Smith, Patricia W.; Tanner, Jean Paul; Dontchev, Mariya; Gal, Robin L.; Beck, Roy W.; Kollman, Craig; Mannis, Mark J.; Holland, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether corneal graft survival over a five-year follow-up period was affected by ABO blood type compatibility in participants in the Cornea Donor Study undergoing corneal transplantation principally for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, conditions at low risk for graft rejection. Design Multi-center prospective, double-masked, clinical trial Methods ABO blood group compatibility was determined for 1,002 donors and recipients. During a five-year follow-up period, episodes of graft rejection were documented, and graft failures were classified as to whether or not they were due to immunologic rejection. Endothelial cell density was determined by a central reading center for a subset of subjects. Results ABO donor-recipient incompatibility was not associated with graft failure due to any cause including graft failure due to rejection, or with the occurrence of a rejection episode. The five-year cumulative incidence of graft failure due to rejection was 6% for recipients with ABO recipient-donor compatibility and 4% for those with ABO incompatibility (hazard ratio 0.65, 95% confidence interval 0.33 to 1.25, p=0.20). The five-year incidence for a definite rejection episode, irrespective of whether graft failure ultimately occurred, was 12% for ABO compatible compared with 8% for ABO incompatible cases (p=0.09). Among clear grafts at five years, percent loss of endothelial cells was similar in ABO compatible and incompatible cases. Conclusions In patients undergoing penetrating keratoplasty for Fuchs’ dystrophy or pseudophakic corneal edema, ABO matching is not indicated since ABO incompatibility does not increase the risk of transplant failure due to graft rejection. PMID:19056078

  1. Echocardiographic Predictors for Left Ventricular Remodeling after Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction with Low Risk Group: Speckle Tracking Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyun-Min; Lee, Joo Myung; Cha, Myung-Jin; Yoon, Yeonyee E.; Lee, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Kim, Yong-Jin; Sohn, Dae-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background We sought to assess echocardiographic predictors of left ventricular (LV) adverse remodeling after successfully reperfused acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). LV remodeling is commonly found in STEMI patients and it may suggest adverse outcome in acute myocardial infarction. We sought to identify whether 2D strain and torsion be independent parameters for prediction of LV adverse remodeling. Methods We investigated 208 patients with low-risk STEMI patients who had follow up echocardiography at 6 or more months. After clinical assessments, all patients received revascularization according to current guideline. LV remodeling was defined as > 20% increase in end-diastolic volume (EDV) at follow up. Results During the follow-up (11.9 ± 5.3 months), 53 patients (25.5%) showed LV remodeling. In univariate analysis, EDV, end-systolic volume, deceleration time (DT), CK-MB, and global longitudinal strain (GLS) were associated with LV remodeling. In multivariate analysis, EDV [hazard ratio (HR): 0.922, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.897–0.948, p< 0.001], GLS (HR: 0.842, 95% CI: 0.728–0.974, p = 0.020), DT (HR: 0.989, 95% CI: 0.980–0.998, p = 0.023) and CK-MB (HR: 1.003, 95% CI: 1.000–1.005, p = 0.033) independently predicted LV remodeling. However, global circumferential strain, net twist, and twist or untwist rate were not associated with remodeling. Conclusion Of various parameters of speckle strain, only GLS predicted adverse remodeling in STEMI patients. PMID:27358705

  2. Identification of an obese eating style in 4-year-old children born at high and low risk for obesity.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Robert I; Moore, Renee' H; Faith, Myles S; Stallings, Virginia A; Kral, Tanja V E; Stunkard, Albert J

    2010-03-01

    This study tested whether children's eating behavior and parental feeding prompts during a laboratory test meal differ among children born at high risk (HR) or low risk (LR) for obesity and are associated with excess child weight gain. At 4 years of age, 32 HR children (mean maternal prepregnancy BMI = 30.4 kg/m(2)) and 29 LR children (maternal BMI = 19.6 kg/m(2)) consumed a test meal in which their eating behavior was assessed, including rate of caloric consumption, mouthfuls/min, and requests for food. Parental prompts for the child to eat also were measured at year 4, and child body composition was measured at ages 4 and 6 years. T-tests, and logistic and multiple regression analyses tested study aims. Results indicated that HR and LR children did not differ in eating rate or parental feeding prompts. Greater maternal BMI, child mouthfuls of food/min, and total caloric intake/min during the test meal predicted an increased risk of being overweight or obese at age 6, whereas greater active mealtime was associated with a reduced risk of being overweight or obese. Regression analyses indicated that only mouthfuls of food/min predicted changes in BMI from 4 to 6 years, and mouthfuls of food/min and gender predicted 2-year changes in sum of skinfolds and total body fat. Thus, a rapid eating style, characterized by increased mouthfuls of food/min, may be a behavioral marker for the development of childhood obesity. PMID:19779474

  3. Ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy of the spleen: high clinical efficacy and low risk in a multicenter Italian study.

    PubMed

    Civardi, G; Vallisa, D; Bertè, R; Giorgio, A; Filice, C; Caremani, M; Caturelli, E; Pompili, M; De Sio, I; Buscarini, E; Cavanna, L

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of the ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (UG-FNB) of the spleen in a large population of patients. We collected retrospectively the findings concerning the application of UG-FNB of the spleen from eight Italian clinical centers that utilized this technique for at least ten years. A data schedule was sent to all centers to collect information about techniques, results, and complications of UG-FNB of the spleen. We analyzed 398 biopsy procedures both on focal lesions (257 cases) and on splenic parenchyma (141 cases). The overall accuracy was 90.9% for the series as a whole, 84.9% for cytological sampling, 88.3% for microhistological sampling, and 90.3% for both cytological and histological sampling (double biopsy). Tissue core biopsy yielded better overall accuracy in patients with suspected splenic involvement by lymphoma (90.9% vs. 68.5% for cytology). The complication rate was low (no death cases, less than 1% for major complications, and 5.2% for all complications). No predictive factors were able to detect high-risk situations. The operator's skill (higher number of performed procedures) was significantly related to better overall accuracy. Conversely, the complication rate was not affected. UG-FNB of the spleen is a very effective diagnostic procedure with low risk for the patient. Aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy showed similar diagnostic yields, except for the diagnosis of splenic lymphoma, in which core needle biopsy obtained better results. PMID:11343380

  4. Radioiodine remnant ablation in low-risk differentiated thyroid cancer patients who had R0 dissection is an over treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chandrasekhar; Ballal, Sanjana; Soundararajan, Ramya; Chopra, Saurav; Garg, Aayushi

    2015-01-01

    Low-risk (LR) differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients should be ablated or not, albeit, with small dose of radioiodine is highly controversial. We hypothesized that those LR DTC patients who were surgically ablated need no radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA). This study aims to evaluate the long-term outcome in these two groups of patients. Retrospective cohort study conducted from January 1991 to December 2012. Based on extent of surgical resection and histopathology, LR DTC patients were classified as Gr-1: 169 patients, who were surgically ablated; Gr-2: 153 patients, who had significant remnant in thyroid bed. Basal parameters were comparable between two groups except pretherapy 24 h radioiodine uptake (0.16 ± 0.01% vs. 5.64 ± 0.46%; P < 0.001). No patient received RRA in Gr-1; Gr-2 patients were administered 30 mCi 131I. Total number of events (recurrence, persistent, and progression of disease), with median follow up of 10.3 years, was observed in 10/322 (3.1%) of LR DTC patients. Only one patient had disease recurrence from Gr-1, who became disease-free after radioiodine therapy. Similarly, one patient from 126, who was ablated with single dose of RRA, had recurrence from Gr-2. However, 8/27 (29.7%) patients from Gr-2 had persistent disease; even two of them subsequently developed disease progression, who failed first-dose of RRA. The event-free survival rates were 99.4% and 94.1% (P = 0.006) in Gr-1 and Gr-2, respectively. RRA is an overtreatment in surgically ablated LR DTC patients. Successfully ablated RRA patients also had similar long-term outcome, however, those who failed, should be re-stratified as intermediate-risk category, and managed aggressively. PMID:25755077

  5. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  6. Anal Cytology and Human Papillomavirus Genotyping in Women With a History of Lower Genital Tract Neoplasia Compared With Low-Risk Women

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Katina; Cronin, Beth; Bregar, Amy; Luis, Christine; DiSilvestro, Paul; Schechter, Steven; Pisharodi, Latha; Raker, Christina; Clark, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the prevalence of abnormal anal cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) among women with a history of HPV-related genital neoplasia with women without a history of HPV-related genital neoplasia. METHODS A cross-sectional cohort study was performed from December 2012 to February 2014. Women were recruited from outpatient clinics at an academic medical center. Women with a history of high-grade cervical, vulvar, or vaginal cytology, dysplasia, or cancer were considered the high-risk group. Women with no history of high-grade anogenital dysplasia or cancer were considered the low-risk group. Human immunodeficiency virus–positive women were excluded. Anal cytology and HPV genotyping were performed. Women with abnormal anal cytology were referred for high-resolution anoscopy. RESULTS There were 190 women in the high-risk group and 83 in the low-risk group. The high-risk group was slightly older: 57 years compared with 47 years (P=.045); 21.7% of low-risk women had abnormal anal cytology compared with 41.2% of high-risk women (P=.006). High-risk HPV was detected in the anal canal of 1.2% of the low-risk group compared with 20.8% of the high-risk group (P<.001). Among women who underwent anoscopy, no anal dysplasia was detected in the low-risk group, whereas 13.4% in the high-risk group had anal dysplasia with 4.2% having anal intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater (P<.001). CONCLUSION Human immunodeficiency virus–negative women with a history of lower genital tract neoplasia are more likely to have positive anal cytology, anal high-risk HPV, and anal intraepithelial neoplasia. Anal cancer screening should be considered for these high-risk women. PMID:26551180

  7. Variant of association of sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubro, V. G.

    2008-03-01

    The variant of association of sciences, offered in the given work, is based on the multilevel description complex (with dynamic treelike structure and with number of levels > 2) systems. In its basis the definition such physical, but dimensionless functions of interactions, as quality and quantity of the information, developed at interaction, lays. Thus levels are defined by hierarchy of interactions and "subordinates" to itself physical functions (space - time systems of readout, energy, pulse, moment of a pulse, information, etc.). The relations, traditional for them, and laws remain, but as special cases of more general (common) relations, i.e. they are formulated anew on some new uniform base of the reconsidered concepts.

  8. C3 variants in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Nishimukai, H; Kitamura, H; Sano, Y; Tamaki, Y

    1985-01-01

    By high-voltage agarose gel electrophoresis, seven phenotypes of C3 were found in Japanese. The allele frequencies for C3*S, C3*S025, C3*S02, C3*F, C3*F06, C3*F065, and C3*F08 were 0.9943, 0.0003, 0.0003, 0.0006, 0.0003, 0.0021, and 0.0021, respectively. CH50, C3/C3c protein concentrations, and C3 hemolytic activities in fresh sera with variant C3 phenotypes were within the normal ranges. PMID:3988301

  9. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  10. Alternatively Spliced Androgen Receptor Variants

    PubMed Central

    Dehm, Scott M.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism for increasing functional diversity from a limited set of genes. De-regulation of this process is common in diverse pathologic conditions. The androgen receptor (AR) is a steroid receptor transcription factor with functions critical for normal male development as well as the growth and survival of normal and cancerous prostate tissue. Studies of AR function in androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer (PCa) have demonstrated loss-of-function AR alterations in AIS, and gain-of-function AR alterations in PCa. Over the past two decades, AR gene alterations have been identified in various individuals with AIS, which disrupt normal AR splicing patterns and yield dysfunctional AR protein variants. More recently, altered AR splicing patterns have been identified as a mechanism of PCa progression and resistance to androgen-depletion therapy. Several studies have described the synthesis of alternatively spliced transcripts encoding truncated AR isoforms that lack the ligand-binding domain, which is the ultimate target of androgen depletion. Many of these truncated AR isoforms function as constitutively active, ligand-independent transcription factors that can support androgen-independent expression of AR target genes, as well as the androgen-independent growth of PCa cells. In this review, we will summarize the various alternatively spliced AR variants that have been discovered, with a focus on their role and origin in the pathologic conditions of AIS and PCa. PMID:21778211