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Sample records for low-temperature energy calibration

  1. Comparison of Blackbody Sources for Low-Temperature IR Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljungblad, S.; Holmsten, M.; Josefson, L. E.; Klason, P.

    2015-12-01

    Radiation thermometers are traditionally mostly used in high-temperature applications. They are, however, becoming more common in different applications at room temperature or below, in applications such as monitoring frozen food and evaluating heat leakage in buildings. To measure temperature accurately with a pyrometer, calibration is essential. A problem with traditional, commercially available, blackbody sources is that ice is often formed on the surface when measuring temperatures below 0°C. This is due to the humidity of the surrounding air and, as ice does not have the same emissivity as the blackbody source, it biases the measurements. An alternative to a traditional blackbody source has been tested by SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden. The objective is to find a cost-efficient method of calibrating pyrometers by comparison at the level of accuracy required for the intended use. A disc-shaped blackbody with a surface pyramid pattern is placed in a climatic chamber with an opening for field of view of the pyrometer. The temperature of the climatic chamber is measured with two platinum resistance thermometers in the air in the vicinity of the disc. As a rule, frost will form only if the deposition surface is colder than the surrounding air, and, as this is not the case when the air of the climatic chamber is cooled, there should be no frost or ice formed on the blackbody surface. To test the disc-shaped blackbody source, a blackbody cavity immersed in a conventional stirred liquid bath was used as a reference blackbody source. Two different pyrometers were calibrated by comparison using the two different blackbody sources, and the results were compared. The results of the measurements show that the disc works as intended and is suitable as a blackbody radiation source.

  2. Low-temperature light detectors: Neganov-Luke amplification and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaila, C.; Ciemniak, C.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Gütlein, A.; Kemmer, J.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lanfranchi, J.-C.; Pfister, S.; Potzel, W.; Roth, S.; Sivers, M. v.; Strauss, R.; Westphal, W.; Wiest, F.

    2012-09-01

    The simultaneous measurement of phonons and scintillation light induced by incident particles in a scintillating crystal such as CaWO4 is a powerful technique for the active rejection of background induced by γ's and β's and even neutrons in direct Dark Matter searches. However, ≲1% of the energy deposited in a CaWO4 crystal is detected as light. Thus, very sensitive light detectors are needed for an efficient event-by-event background discrimination. Due to the Neganov-Luke effect, the threshold of low-temperature light detectors based on semiconducting substrates can be improved significantly by drifting the photon-induced electron-hole pairs in an applied electric field. We present measurements with low-temperature light detectors based on this amplification mechanism. The Neganov-Luke effect makes it possible to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of our light detectors by a factor of ˜9 corresponding to an energy threshold of ˜21 eV. We also describe a method for an absolute energy calibration using a light-emitting diode.

  3. Low Temperature Infrared Source Calibration And Traceability At Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, H. R.; Hiatt, Jay; Lienemann, K. A.

    1983-09-01

    The Aerospace Chamber (7V) at AFDC is a radiometric calibration facility for cold back-ground space-based long-wavelength infrared sensors. A working standard, low-temperature blackbody (BB) has been developed for use in establishing radiometric calibrations that are directly traceable to the National Bureau of Standards (NBS). A description of the BB and the NBS calibration results are presented. This standa.rd source has been utilized to calibrate a phosphorous-doped, silicon bolometer which serves as a transfer device for the calibration of new blackbody sources. The electrically self-calibrating feature of this bolometer has been used to normalize variations in responsivity from one installation to anotter over a period of five years. For infrared (IR) sensor testing, the radiometric quantity of interest is beam irradiance at the sensor aperture. The calibration transfer process which is used to relate the working standard to attenuated sources, is described and the transfer devices are discussed.

  4. Calibration of low-temperature ac susceptometers with a copper cylinder standard

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.-X.; Skumryev, V.

    2010-02-15

    A high-quality low-temperature ac susceptometer is calibrated by comparing the measured ac susceptibility of a copper cylinder with its eddy-current ac susceptibility accurately calculated. Different from conventional calibration techniques that compare the measured results with the known property of a standard sample at certain fixed temperature T, field amplitude H{sub m}, and frequency f, to get a magnitude correction factor, here, the electromagnetic properties of the copper cylinder are unknown and are determined during the calibration of the ac susceptometer in the entire T, H{sub m}, and f range. It is shown that the maximum magnitude error and the maximum phase error of the susceptometer are less than 0.7% and 0.3 deg., respectively, in the region T=5-300 K and f=111-1111 Hz at H{sub m}=800 A/m, after a magnitude correction by a constant factor as done in a conventional calibration. However, the magnitude and phase errors can reach 2% and 4.3 deg. at 10 000 and 11 Hz, respectively. Since the errors are reproducible, a large portion of them may be further corrected after a calibration, the procedure for which is given. Conceptual discussions concerning the error sources, comparison with other calibration methods, and applications of ac susceptibility techniques are presented.

  5. Low-Temperature Blackbodies for IR Calibrations in a Medium-Background Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogarev, S. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Parfentyev, N. A.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2009-02-01

    Utilization of Earth remote-sensing data to solve scientific and engineering problems within such fields as meteorology and climatology requires precise radiometric calibration of space-borne instruments. High-accuracy calibration equipment in the thermal-IR wavelength range ought to be combined during calibration procedures with the simulation of environmental conditions for space orbit (high vacuum, medium background). For more than 35 years, VNIIOFI has developed and manufactured standard radiation sources in the form of precision blackbodies (BB) functioning within wide ranges of wavelengths and working temperatures. These BBs are the spectral radiance and irradiance calibration devices in the world’s leading space research institutions, such as SDL (USA), DLR (Germany), Keldysh Space Center (Russia), RNIIKP/RISDE (Russia), NEC Toshiba Space Systems (Japan), etc. The paper contains a detailed description of low-temperature precision BBs developed at VNIIOFI. The characteristics of variable-temperature (100 K to 400 K) research-grade extended-area (up to 350 mm) BB models BB100-V1 and BB-80/350 are described (they are intended for radiometric calibrations by comparison with a primary standard source), as well as those that can be used as sources for high-accuracy IR calibration of space-borne and other systems not requiring a vacuum environment. The temperature nonuniformity and stability of these BBs are (0.05 to 0.1) K (cavity-type BB100-V1), and 0.1 % for the (1.5 to 15) μm wavelength region under cryo-vacuum conditions of a medium-background environment.

  6. Development of decay energy spectroscopy using low temperature detectors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Y S; Kim, G B; Kim, K J; Kim, M S; Lee, H J; Lee, J S; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, S J; Ri, H C; Yoon, W S; Yuryev, Y N; Kim, Y H

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a high-resolution detection technique for measuring the energy and activity of alpha decay events using low-temperature detectors. A small amount of source material containing alpha-emitting radionuclides was enclosed in a 4π metal absorber. The energy of the alpha particles as well as that of the recoiled nuclides, low-energy electrons, and low-energy x-rays and γ-rays was converted into thermal energy of the gold absorber. A metallic magnetic calorimeter serving as a fast and sensitive thermometer was thermally attached to the metal absorber. In the present report, experimental demonstrations of Q spectroscopy were made with a new meander-type magnetic calorimeter. The thermal connection between the temperature sensor and the absorber was established with annealed gold wires. Each alpha decay event in the absorber resulted in a temperature increase of the absorber and the temperature sensor. Using the spectrum measured for a drop of (226)Ra solution in a 4π gold absorber, all of the alpha emitters in the sample were identified with a demonstration of good detector linearity. The resolution of the (226)Ra spectrum showed a 3.3 keV FWHM at its Q value together with an expected gamma escape peak at the energy shifted by its γ-ray energy. PMID:22410296

  7. Optical Diagnostics of Electron Energy Distributions in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Amy

    2011-05-01

    Passive, non-invasive optical emission measurements provide a means of probing important plasma parameters without introducing contaminants into plasma systems. We investigate the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in argon containing inductively-coupled plasmas due to dominant role in rates of gas-phase reactions for processing plasmas. EEDFs are determined using measurements of 3p5 4 p --> 3p5 4 s emissions in the 650-1150 nm wavelength range and measured metastable and resonant level concentrations, in conjunction with a radiation model that includes contributions from often neglected but critical processes such as radiation trapping and electron-impact excitation from metastable and resonant levels. Measurements over a wide range of operating conditions (pressure, RF power, Ar/Ne/N2 gas mixtures) show a depletion of the EEDF relative to the Maxwell- Boltzmann form at higher electron energy, in good agreement with measurements made with Langmuir probes and predictions of a global discharge model. This result is consistent with predictions of electron kinetics and can be explained in terms of reduced life times for energetic electrons due to wall losses and inelastic collisions. This example highlights the potential utility of this method as a tool for probing kinetics of many types of low-temperature plasma systems, which are typically characterized by non-Maxwellian EEDFs. This work was supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and by NSF Grant CBET 0714600.

  8. Low temperature latent heat thermal energy storage - Heat storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhat, A.

    1983-01-01

    Heat-of-fusion storage materials for low temperature latent heat storage in the temperature range 0-120 C are reviewed. Organic and inorganic heat storage materials classified as paraffins, fatty acids, inorganic salt hydrates and eutectic compounds are considered. The melting and freezing behavior of the various substances is investigated using the techniques of Thermal Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The importance of thermal cycling tests for establishing the long-term stability of the storage materials is discussed. Finally, some data pertaining to the corrosion compatibility of heat-of-fusion substances with conventional materials of construction is presented.

  9. New blackbody calibration source for low temperatures from -20 C to +350 C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mester, Ulrich; Winter, Peter

    2001-03-01

    Calibration procedures for infrared thermometers and thermal imaging systems require radiation sources of precisely known radiation properties. In the physical absence of an ideal Planck's radiator, the German Committee VDI/VDE-GMA FA 2.51, 'Applied Radiation Thermometry', agreed upon desirable specifications and limiting parameters for a blackbody calibration source with a temperature range from -20 degree(s)C to +350 degree(s)C, a spectral range from 2 to 15 microns, an emissivity greater than 0.999 and a useful source aperture of 60 mm, among others. As a result of the subsequent design and development performed with the support of the laboratory '7.31 Thermometry' of the German national institute of natural and engineering sciences (PTB), the Mester ME20 Blackbody Calibration Source is presented. The ME20 meets or exceeds all of the specifications formulated by the VDI/VDE committee.

  10. Energy calibration via correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Daniel; Limousin, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The main task of an energy calibration is to find a relation between pulse-height values and the corresponding energies. Doing this for each pulse-height channel individually requires an elaborated input spectrum with an excellent counting statistics and a sophisticated data analysis. This work presents an easy to handle energy calibration process which can operate reliably on calibration measurements with low counting statistics. The method uses a parameter based model for the energy calibration and concludes on the optimal parameters of the model by finding the best correlation between the measured pulse-height spectrum and multiple synthetic pulse-height spectra which are constructed with different sets of calibration parameters. A CdTe-based semiconductor detector and the line emissions of an 241Am source were used to test the performance of the correlation method in terms of systematic calibration errors for different counting statistics. Up to energies of 60 keV systematic errors were measured to be less than ~ 0.1 keV. Energy calibration via correlation can be applied to any kind of calibration spectra and shows a robust behavior at low counting statistics. It enables a fast and accurate calibration that can be used to monitor the spectroscopic properties of a detector system in near realtime.

  11. Current fundamental science challenges in low temperature plasma science that impact energy security and international competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    2010-11-01

    Products and consumer goods that utilize low temperature plasmas at some point in their creation touch and enrich our lives on almost a continuous basis. Examples are many but include the tremendous advances in microelectronics and the pervasive nature of the internet, advanced material coatings that increase the strength and reliability of products from turbine engines to potato chip bags, and the recent national emphasis on energy efficient lighting and compact fluorescent bulbs. Each of these products owes their contributions to energy security and international competiveness to fundamental research investments. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the great commercial success of these products implies a robust understanding of the complicated interactions inherent in plasma systems. Rather, current development of the next generation of low temperature plasma enabled products and processes is clearly exposing a new set of exciting scientific challenges that require leaps in fundamental understanding and interdisciplinary research teams. Emerging applications such as liquid-plasma systems to improve water quality and remediate hazardous chemicals, plasma-assisted combustion to increase energy efficiency and reduce emissions, and medical applications promise to improve our lives and the environment only if difficult science questions are solved. This talk will take a brief look back at the role of low temperature plasma science in enabling entirely new markets and then survey the next generation of emerging plasma applications. The emphasis will be on describing the key science questions and the opportunities for scientific cross cutting collaborations that underscore the need for increased outreach on the part of the plasma science community to improve visibility at the federal program level. This work is supported by the DOE, Office of Science for Fusion Energy Sciences, and Sandia National Laboratories, a multi-program laboratory managed and operated

  12. Determination of anharmonic free energy contributions: Low temperature phases of the Lennard-Jones system.

    PubMed

    Calero, C; Knorowski, C; Travesset, A

    2016-03-28

    We investigate a general method to calculate the free energy of crystalline solids by considering the harmonic approximation and quasistatically switching the anharmonic contribution. The advantage of this method is that the harmonic approximation provides an already very accurate estimate of the free energy, and therefore the anharmonic term is numerically very small and can be determined to high accuracy. We further show that the anharmonic contribution to the free energy satisfies a number of exact inequalities that place constraints on its magnitude and allows approximate but fast and accurate estimates. The method is implemented into a readily available general software by combining the code HOODLT (Highly Optimized Object Oriented Dynamic Lattice Theory) for the harmonic part and the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation package HOOMD-blue for the anharmonic part. We use the method to calculate the low temperature phase diagram for Lennard-Jones particles. We demonstrate that hcp is the equilibrium phase at low temperature and pressure and obtain the coexistence curve with the fcc phase, which exhibits reentrant behavior. Several implications of the method are discussed. PMID:27036422

  13. Determination of anharmonic free energy contributions: Low temperature phases of the Lennard-Jones system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calero, C.; Knorowski, C.; Travesset, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate a general method to calculate the free energy of crystalline solids by considering the harmonic approximation and quasistatically switching the anharmonic contribution. The advantage of this method is that the harmonic approximation provides an already very accurate estimate of the free energy, and therefore the anharmonic term is numerically very small and can be determined to high accuracy. We further show that the anharmonic contribution to the free energy satisfies a number of exact inequalities that place constraints on its magnitude and allows approximate but fast and accurate estimates. The method is implemented into a readily available general software by combining the code HOODLT (Highly Optimized Object Oriented Dynamic Lattice Theory) for the harmonic part and the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation package HOOMD-blue for the anharmonic part. We use the method to calculate the low temperature phase diagram for Lennard-Jones particles. We demonstrate that hcp is the equilibrium phase at low temperature and pressure and obtain the coexistence curve with the fcc phase, which exhibits reentrant behavior. Several implications of the method are discussed.

  14. Determination of anharmonic free energy contributions: Low temperature phases of the Lennard-Jones system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Calero, C.; Knorowski, C.; Travesset, A.

    2016-03-22

    We investigate a general method to calculate the free energy of crystalline solids by considering the harmonic approximation and quasistatically switching the anharmonic contribution. The advantage of this method is that the harmonic approximation provides an already very accurate estimate of the free energy, and therefore the anharmonic term is numerically very small and can be determined to high accuracy. We further show that the anharmonic contribution to the free energy satisfies a number of exact inequalities that place constraints on its magnitude and allows approximate but fast and accurate estimates. The method is implemented into a readily available generalmore » software by combining the code HOODLT (Highly Optimized Object Oriented Dynamic Lattice Theory) for the harmonic part and the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation package HOOMD-blue for the anharmonic part. We use the method to calculate the low temperature phase diagram for Lennard-Jones particles. We demonstrate that hcp is the equilibrium phase at low temperature and pressure and obtain the coexistence curve with the fcc phase, which exhibits reentrant behavior. Furthermore, several implications of the method are discussed.« less

  15. Relaxation dynamics and exciton energy transfer in the low-temperature phase of MEH-PPV

    SciTech Connect

    Consani, Cristina; Koch, Federico; Panzer, Fabian; Unger, Thomas; Köhler, Anna; Brixner, Tobias

    2015-06-07

    Understanding the effects of aggregation on exciton relaxation and energy transfer is relevant to control photoinduced function in organic electronics and photovoltaics. Here, we explore the photoinduced dynamics in the low-temperature aggregated phase of a conjugated polymer by transient absorption and coherent electronic two-dimensional (2D) spectroscopy. Coherent 2D spectroscopy allows observing couplings among photoexcited states and discriminating band shifts from homogeneous broadening, additionally accessing the ultrafast dynamics at various excitation energies simultaneously with high spectral resolution. By combining the results of the two techniques, we differentiate between an initial exciton relaxation, which is not characterized by significant exciton mobility, and energy transport between different chromophores in the aggregate.

  16. Casimir-Foucault interaction: Free energy and entropy at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Henkel, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    It was recently found that thermodynamic anomalies which arise in the Casimir effect between metals described by the Drude model can be attributed to the interaction of fluctuating Foucault (or eddy) currents [F. Intravaia and C. Henkel, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.130405 103, 130405 (2009).] We focus on the transverse electric (TE) polarization, where the anomalies occur, and show explicitly that the two leading terms of the low-temperature correction to the Casimir free energy of interaction between two plates are identical to those pertaining to the Foucault current interaction alone, up to a correction which is very small for good metals. Moreover, a mode density along real frequencies is introduced, showing that the TE contribution to the Casimir free energy, as given by the Lifshitz theory, separates in a natural manner into contributions from eddy currents and propagating cavity modes, respectively. The latter have long been known to be of little importance to the low-temperature Casimir anomalies. This convincingly demonstrates that eddy current modes are responsible for the large temperature correction to the Casimir effect between Drude metals, predicted by the Lifshitz theory, but not observed in experiments.

  17. Low Temperature Double-layer Capacitors with Improved Energy Density: An Overview of Recent Development Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Yushin, Gleb; Korenblit, Yair; Kajdos, Adam; Kvit, Alexander; Jagiello, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemical double-layer capacitors are finding increased use in a wide range of energy storage applications, particularly where high pulse power capabilities are required. Double-layer capacitors store charge at a liquid/solid interface, making them ideal for low temperature power applications, due to the facile kinetic processes associated with the rearrangement of the electrochemical double-layer at these temperatures. Potential low temperature applications include hybrid and electric vehicles, operations in polar regions, high altitude aircraft and aerospace avionics, and distributed environmental and structural health monitoring. State-of-the-art capacitors can typically operate to -40 C, with a subsequent degradation in power performance below room temperature. However, recent efforts focused on advanced electrolyte and electrode systems can enable operation to temperatures as low as -70 C, with capacities similar to room temperature values accompanied by reasonably low equivalent series resistances. This presentation will provide an overview of recent development efforts to extend and improve the wide temperature performance of these devices.

  18. High-Energy-Density, Low-Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitacre, Jay; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Smart, Marshall; Prakash, G.; Yazami, Rachid

    2007-01-01

    High-energy-density primary (nonrechargeable) electrochemical cells capable of relatively high discharge currents at temperatures as low as -40 C have been developed through modification of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries. The commercial Li/CFx units are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. The term "Li/CFx" refers to an anode made of lithium and a cathode made of a fluorinated carbonaceous material (typically graphite). In commercial cells, x typically ranges from 1.05 to 1.1. This cell composition makes it possible to attain specific energies up to 800 Wh/kg, but in order to prevent cell polarization and the consequent large loss of cell capacity, it is typically necessary to keep discharge currents below C/50 (where C is numerically equal to the current that, flowing during a charge or discharge time of one hour, would integrate to the nominal charge or discharge capacity of a cell). This limitation has been attributed to the low electronic conductivity of CFx for x approx. 1. To some extent, the limitation might be overcome by making cathodes thinner, and some battery manufacturers have obtained promising results using thin cathode structures in spiral configurations. The present approach includes not only making cathodes relatively thin [.2 mils (.0.051 mm)] but also using sub-fluorinated CFx cathode materials (x < 1) in conjunction with electrolytes formulated for use at low temperatures. The reason for choosing sub-fluorinated CFx cathode materials is that their electronic conductivities are high, relative to those for which x > 1. It was known from recent prior research that cells containing sub-fluorinated CFx cathodes (x between 0.33 and 0.66) are capable of retaining substantial portions of their nominal low-current specific energies when discharged at rates as high as 5C at room temperature. However

  19. Low-temperature aluminum reduction of graphene oxide, electrical properties, surface wettability, and energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Wan, Dongyun; Yang, Chongyin; Lin, Tianquan; Tang, Yufeng; Zhou, Mi; Zhong, Yajuan; Huang, Fuqiang; Lin, Jianhua

    2012-10-23

    Low-temperature aluminum (Al) reduction is first introduced to reduce graphene oxide (GO) at 100-200 °C in a two-zone furnace. The melted Al metal exhibits an excellent deoxygen ability to produce well-crystallized reduced graphene oxide (RGO) papers with a low O/C ratio of 0.058 (Al-RGO), compared with 0.201 in the thermally reduced one (T-RGO). The Al-RGO papers possess outstanding mechanical flexibility and extremely high electrical conductivities (sheet resistance R(s) ~ 1.75 Ω/sq), compared with 20.12 Ω/sq of T-RGO. More interestingly, very nice hydrophobic nature (90.5°) was observed, significantly superior to the reported chemically or thermally reduced papers. These enhanced properties are attributed to the low oxygen content in the RGO papers. During the aluminum reduction, highly active H atoms from H(2)O reacted with melted Al promise an efficient oxygen removal. This method was also applicable to reduce graphene oxide foams, which were used in the GO/SA (stearic acid) composite as a highly thermally conductive reservoir to hold the phase change material for thermal energy storage. The Al-reduced RGO/SnS(2) composites were further used in an anode material of lithium ion batteries possessing a higher specific capacity. Overall, low-temperature Al reduction is an effective method to prepare highly conductive RGO papers and related composites for flexible energy conversion and storage device applications. PMID:22984901

  20. Use of Low-Temperature Geothermal Energy for Desalination in the Western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, Craig S.; Akar, Sertac; Cath, Tzahi; Vanneste, Johan; Geza, Mengistu

    2015-11-01

    This joint project between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Colorado School of Mines has examined the potential of using low-temperature geothermal resources for desalination. The temperature range in question is not well suited for electricity generation, but can be used for direct heating. Accordingly, the best integration approaches use thermal desalination technologies such as multi-effect distillation (MED) or membrane distillation (MD), rather than electric-driven technologies such as reverse osmosis (RO). The examination of different desalination technologies led to the selection of MD for pairing with geothermal energy. MD operates at near-ambient pressure and temperatures less than 100°C with hydrophobic membranes. The technology is modular like RO, but the equipment costs are lower. The thermal energy demands of MD are higher than MED, but this is offset by an ability to run at lower temperatures and a low capital cost. Consequently, a geothermal-MD system could offer a low capital cost and, if paired with low-cost geothermal energy, a low operating cost. The target product water cost is $1.0 to $1.5 per cubic meter depending on system capacity and the cost of thermal energy.

  1. Thermal energy harvesting near-infrared radiation and accessing low temperatures with plasmonic sensors.

    PubMed

    Karker, Nicholas A; Dharmalingam, Gnanaprakash; Carpenter, Michael A

    2015-11-14

    Near-infrared (NIR) thermal energy harvesting has been demonstrated for gold nanorods (AuNRs), allowing concentration dependent, ppm-level, gas detection of H2, CO, and NO2 at 500 °C without using a white light source. Part-per-million detection capabilities of the gold nanorods are demonstrated with a factor of 11 reduction in collection times in the NIR as compared to measurements made in the visible light region. Decreased collection times are enabled by an increase in S : N ratio, which allowed a demonstration of selectivity through the use of both full spectral and a reduced spectral-based principal component analysis. Furthermore, low temperature thermal imaging spectra have been obtained at sample temperatures ranging from 275-500 °C, showing the possibility of energy harvested gas sensing at lower temperatures. These findings are promising in the area of miniaturizing plasmonic gas sensing technology and integration in areas such as gas turbines. PMID:26456790

  2. Distribution functions for internal interface energy as a characteristic of submicrocrystalline copper structure evolution under low-temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, P.; Rakhmatulina, T.; Koznikov, A.; Belyaeva, I.

    2015-10-01

    Submicrocrystalline structure of 99.99% pure copper produced by equal channel angular pressing was under investigation. After deformation the samples were subjected to low-temperature annealing. Grain and subgrain structure was studied by scanning tunnel microscopy. Internal interface energy was estimated using the method based on measurement of dihedral angles (ψ) of the boundary grooves formed by electrochemical etching. Analysis of the differential and cumulative distribution functions for relative grain boundary energy enabled to qualitatively evaluate energy redistribution between the boundaries of different types and internal bulk crystallites and to study evolution of submicrocrystalline structure under low-temperature annealing.

  3. Convergence and low temperature adaptability analysis of the high temperature series expansion of the free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2013-09-01

    By appealing to the coupling parameter series expansion to calculate the first seven perturbation coefficients of the high temperature series expansion (HTSE) of the free energy, analysis of convergence and low temperature adaptability of the HTSE in calculating fluid thermodynamic properties is performed for the first time; the fluid thermodynamic properties considered include critical parameters, vapor-liquid coexistence curve, thermodynamic characteristic functions, chemical potential, pressure, and constant volume excess heat capacity. To proceed with the analysis, a well known square well model is used as sample; the well widths considered range over a wide interval, and the relevant temperatures amenable to simulation calculations (used as "exact" results to analyze the HTSE) can be both very high and very low. The main discoveries reached are summarized as follows: (1) The HTSE usually converges at the 4th-order truncation, but with decrease of the temperature considered, the lowest truncation order, which makes the HTSE to converge, tends to rise. As a conservative estimate, it is considered that the HTSE always converges for reduced temperature T* higher than 0.25, whereas for T* < 0.25 there appear signs indicating that the HTSE may diverge from the 7th-order truncation. (2) Within the temperature interval with T* ⩾ 0.5, the HTSE converges approximately to the correct solution, and the HTSE can be reliably used to calculate the fluid thermodynamic properties, and within this temperature interval, the 4th-order truncation is enough; whereas for T* < 0.5, such as within the temperature interval with 0.275 ⩽ T* ⩽ 0.355, although the HTSE does converge, it does not converge to the correct solution, and the deviations between the HTSE calculations and MC simulations become an ever-prominent issue with the rising of the density, and the slopes of the thermodynamic properties over density are not satisfactorily represented. As a result, the HTSE is not

  4. Materials studies for magnetic fusion energy applications at low temperatures, 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, R. P.; Simon, N. J.

    1984-05-01

    Work leading toward development of strong, tough structural alloys for use in superconducting magnets of magnetic fusion power plants is reported. Low temperature studies were conducted to assess the quantitative dependence of the yield strength, density, and elastic constants of AISI 304 stainless steels upon carbon and nitrogen concentration. Tensile property measurements of developmental austenitic steels confirmed the dependence of yield strength upon temperature. Evidence is presented to show that the flow strength and austenite stability of stainless steels are not significantly affected by 8-T fields at 4 K. Instrumentation developed for low temperature testing included a computer assisted apparatus used to measure threshold fatigue. Low temperature welding research involved an investigation of the weld reinforcement effect on the weld joint strength and measurements of the 4 K fracture toughness of magnesium-chromium steel weldments and electroodes. In the area of non-metallics, a standardized test specimen was devised to aid in screening radiation-resistant composites for magnet insulation. Mechanical properties of concrete mortar and polyurethane foam at 4 K are reported.

  5. An energy-saving glutathione production method from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Yoshida, Hideyo; Arai, Shogo; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-05-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is industrially produced by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Before the glutathione fermentation process with S. cerevisiae, a glucose extraction process from starchy materials is required. This glucose extraction is usually carried out by converting starchy materials to starch using high-temperature cooking and subsequent hydrolysis by amylases to convert starch to glucose. In this study, to develop an energy-saving glutathione production process by reducing energy consumption during the cooking step, we efficiently produced glutathione from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing S. cerevisiae. The combination of the amylase-expressing yeast with low-temperature cooking is potentially applicable to a variety of energy-saving bio-production methods of chemicals from starchy bio-resources. PMID:22294378

  6. Low energy THz excitations in distorted perovskites under strong magnetic fields and low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, N. E.; Holldack, K.; Ta Phuoc, V.; Sopracase, R.; Del Campo, L.; de Sousa Meneses, D.; Echegut, P.; Alonso, J. A.

    We report on the magnetic field evolution of distinctive absorption bands in several zero field cooled polycrystalline RMO3 (R = Pr, Nd, Sm, Er, Tm, Lu; M = Cr, Mn, Fe. Ni) at low temperatures. Measurements below 120 cm-1 were done in an 11 T magnet combined with a Bruker IFS125-HR interferometer at the THz beamline of the BESSY II storage ring. At the reordering spin temperature, the spectra of ErCrO3 show an Er-Kramers doublet at ~55 cm-1 following a second order continuous reorientation. It suggests strong anisotropic Er3+-Cr3 + magnetic exchange interactions. The band strength of its triplet excited states decreases upon increasing the magnetic field. Non-Kramers Pr in PrCrO3 implies a magnetic field induced quasi-doublet system. Spin wave modes AF and F are also tentatively assigned. In ErFeO3, the spin reordering of the canted transition metal, and the Er3+ exchange, is monitored emerging above 80 K. Temperature dependent multiplet transitions centered at 50 cm-1 and 110 cm-1 appear as asymmetric field dependent broad lines. The absence of activity at ~4 K in SmCrO3, shared by SmMO3 (M =Fe, Ni), is consequence of near Cr-canted-Rare-Earth-opposite moment compensation juxtaposed to random micrograin orientation. We will also comment on observed only in ErNiO3 field dependent Er transitions and band profiles.

  7. Low-temperature conditioning alleviates chilling injury in loquat fruit and regulates glycine betaine content and energy status.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Zhang, Yu; Shan, Timin; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Jia; Zheng, Yonghua

    2015-04-15

    The influence of low-temperature conditioning (LTC) treatment on chilling injury, glycine betaine content, and energy metabolism in loquat fruit at 1 °C storage was investigated. The results indicated that LTC treatment significantly reduced chilling injury index, ion leakage, and malondialdehyde content in loquat fruit. Betaine aldehyde hydrogenase (BADH) activity and endogenous glycine betaine (GB) content in loquats treated with LTC were significantly higher than those in control fruit. Moreover, LTC treatment induced activities of energy metabolism-associated enzymes, including H(+)-adenosine triphosphatase, Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase, succinic dehydrogenase, and cytochrome c oxidase. LTC treatment triggered obviously higher levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content and energy charge in loquat fruit. These results showed that LTC possibly alleviated chilling injury and enhanced chilling tolerance of loquat fruit by enhancing endogenous GB content and energy status. PMID:25822129

  8. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Edward R.; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A.

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques.

  9. Benzylammonium Thermometer Ions: Internal Energies of Ions Formed by Low Temperature Plasma and Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Edward R; Dumlao, Morphy; Xiao, Dan; Zhang, Daming; Donald, William A

    2015-12-01

    The extent of internal energy deposition upon ion formation by low temperature plasma and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was investigated using novel benzylammonium thermometer ions. C-N heterolytic bond dissociation enthalpies of nine 4-substituted benzylammoniums were calculated using CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), which was significantly more accurate than B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), MP2/6-311++G(d,p), and CBS-QB3 for calculating the enthalpies of 20 heterolytic dissociation reactions that were used to benchmark theory. All 4-substituted benzylammonium thermometer ions fragmented by a single pathway with comparable dissociation entropies, except 4-nitrobenzylammonium. Overall, the extent of energy deposition into ions formed by low temperature plasma was significantly lower than those formed by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization under these conditions. Because benzylamines are volatile, this new suite of thermometer ions should be useful for investigating the extent of internal energy deposition during ion formation for a wide range of ionization methods, including plasma, spray and laser desorption-based techniques. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:26438128

  10. Energy (mass) transfer processes in low-temperature plasma as applied to forming ordered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramenko, T. N.; Laktyushina, T. V.; Laktyushin, A. N.

    2000-03-01

    The methods of irreversible thermodynamics are adopted to analyze the energy (mass) transfer in gases (their mixtures) over a wide temperature range up to 20000 K. An energy transfer process is considered as a path in the state space, and a concept of non-Euclidean state space is postulated. Experimental data on the gas thermal conductivity over a wide temperature range is generalized by the methods of thermodynamic similarity theory. Thermal conductivities of CH4-O2 and CH4-H2O mixtures are calculated for technological applications. The process of forming a space-time structure is analyzed by using the experimental data on the gas thermal conductivity over a wide temperature range. An attempt is made to interpret the mechanism of the thermal diffusion in gases due to the forming of ordered structures. A contribution of the diffusional thermoeffect to the energy transfer processes in a three-component nitrogen plasma is calculated.

  11. High-resolution submicron retarding field energy analyzer for low-temperature plasma analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M. G.; Stevens, J. E.; Woodworth, J. R.

    1999-12-20

    A retarding potential energy analyzer having 750 nm diameter, self-aligned grid apertures and micron scale grid separation has been fabricated using polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide. High-resolution in situ measurements of ion velocity distributions have been demonstrated in inductively coupled argon plasmas. Measurement results agree well with those from a macroscopic analyzer. Important differences are observed in the energies of plasma ions when measured with respect to chamber wall versus those measured with respect to the plasma floating potential. Preliminary measurements under rf bias conditions have also been made and results follow the expected trends. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Low-temperature fuel cells: Outlook for application in energy storage systems and materials for their development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenina, I. A.; Safronova, E. Yu.; Levchenko, A. V.; Dobrovolsky, Yu. A.; Yaroslavtsev, A. B.

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature fuel cells (FCs) are perspective alternative energy sources. They cannot, however, be considered as a primary energy source, because no hydrogen in pure form, used in their operation, exists in nature. The development of devices to autonomously supply and store energy can be considered as one of the most promising applications of low-temperature FCs. In the latter case, the primary purpose is to compensate differences in peaks of producing and consuming energy both in the seasons and time of day. The first part of the review describes this problem. The second part involves analyzing nanomaterials used in FCs, so that hybrid membranes, including inorganic nanoparticles, are high priority in this regard. Their incorporation into the pores of the membranes leads to an improvement in transport properties in many cases, including an increase in ionic conductivity and selectivity of transport processes. These properties of the hybrid membranes are discussed by using a model of limited elasticity of walls of the pores. Catalysts, being platinum nano-size particles, play an important role in the FC. To reduce their costs and increase activity, some approaches, implying decrease in particle sizes or using two-component particles, for example, alloys and `core-shell' particles, are used. In the latter case, platinum, localized on the surface, determines activity of the catalyst, whereas the second metal increases surface area and catalyst activity. The main reasons for changes in properties of the materials and effect of the catalyst support on electrochemical processes in FCs are also considered.

  13. Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions In Low-Temperature Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kasagi, J.; Toriyabe, Y.; Yoshida, E.; Fang, K. H.; Yonemura, H.

    2010-06-01

    We report the Li+d reaction with liquid Li target and the D+D reaction in liquid Li with ultrasonic cavitation. The screening potential of the Li+d reaction has been deduce from the thick target yields of alpha particles emitted in the {sup 6}Li(d,alpha){sup 4} He reaction in the solid and liquid phase. The deduced screening potential for the liquid Li is about 180 eV larger than for the solid. This difference is considered to attributed to the effect of liquefied Li{sup +} ions. It is found out that the D+D reaction in liquid Li with ultrasonic cavitation is enhanced very much; the enhancement corresponds to effective energy increase of about 2000 eV.

  14. Low temperature dependence of triboelectric effect for energy harvesting and self-powered active sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanjie; Chen, Jun; Wu, Zhiming; Jiang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    The triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) has been proved as a simple, reliable, cost-effective, and efficient means to harvest ambient mechanical energy in a normal environment, although its performance evaluation under the room temperature is still lacking. Here, we systematically looked into the reliance of triboelectric nanogenerators output on the ambient temperature spanning from 77 K to 320 K. Employed the most commonly used Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and aluminum as two contact materials, both the output voltage and current show a tendency of increase with decreasing temperature. Applicability of triboelectric nanogenerator over a wide range of temperature was confirmed from 77 K to 320 K. And, an output enhancement of 79.3% was experimentally obtained at the temperature of 77 K compared to that at a temperature of 300 K. However, a reverse tendency was observed for the TiO2 nanotubes/PTFE and Al coated TiO2 nanotubes/PTFE based triboelectric nanogenerators. This work can contribute not only to the design and packaging of triboelectric devices to operate at extreme environmental temperatures but also to the fundamental understanding of the mechanism of triboelectric effect.

  15. Low Temperature Plasma Science: Not Only the Fourth State of Matter but All of Them. Report of the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Workshop on Low Temperature Plasmas, March 25-57, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2008-09-01

    Low temperature plasma science (LTPS) is a field on the verge of an intellectual revolution. Partially ionized plasmas (often referred to as gas discharges) are used for an enormous range of practical applications, from light sources and lasers to surgery and making computer chips, among many others. The commercial and technical value of low temperature plasmas (LTPs) is well established. Modern society would simply be less advanced in the absence of LTPs. Much of this benefit has resulted from empirical development. As the technology becomes more complex and addresses new fields, such as energy and biotechnology, empiricism rapidly becomes inadequate to advance the state of the art. The focus of this report is that which is less well understood about LTPs - namely, that LTPS is a field rich in intellectually exciting scientific challenges and that addressing these challenges will result in even greater societal benefit by placing the development of plasma technologies on a solid science foundation. LTPs are unique environments in many ways. Their nonequilibrium and chemically active behavior deviate strongly from fully ionized plasmas, such as those found in magnetically confined fusion or high energy density plasmas. LTPs are strongly affected by the presence of neutral species-chemistry adds enormous complexity to the plasma environment. A weakly to partially ionized gas is often characterized by strong nonequilibrium in the velocity and energy distributions of its neutral and charged constituents. In nonequilibrium LTP, electrons are generally hot (many to tens of electron volts), whereas ions and neutrals are cool to warm (room temperature to a few tenths of an electron volt). Ions and neutrals in thermal LTP can approach or exceed an electron volt in temperature. At the same time, ions may be accelerated across thin sheath boundary layers to impact surfaces, with impact energies ranging up to thousands of electron volts. These moderately energetic electrons

  16. Analysis of Thermal and Chemical Effets on Negative Valve Overlap Period Energy Recovery for Low-Temperature Gasoline Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Ekoto, Dr Isaac; Peterson, Dr. Brian; Szybist, James P; Northrop, Dr. William

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for efficient auto-ignition controlled low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engines has been achieving the combustion phasing needed to reach stable performance over a wide operating regime. The negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy has been explored as a way to improve combustion stability through a combination of charge heating and altered reactivity via a recompression stroke with a pilot fuel injection. The study objective was to analyze the thermal and chemical effects on NVO-period energy recovery. The analysis leveraged experimental gas sampling results obtained from a single-cylinder LTGC engine along with cylinder pressure measurements and custom data reduction methods used to estimate period thermodynamic properties. The engine was fueled by either iso-octane or ethanol, and operated under sweeps of NVO-period oxygen concentration, injection timing, and fueling rate. Gas sampling at the end of the NVO period was performed via a custom dump-valve apparatus, with detailed sample speciation by in-house gas chromatography. The balance of NVO-period input and output energy flows was calculated in terms of fuel energy, work, heat loss, and change in sensible energy. Experiment results were complemented by detailed chemistry single-zone reactor simulations performed at relevant mixing and thermodynamic conditions, with results used to evaluate ignition behavior and expected energy recovery yields. For the intermediate bulk-gas temperatures present during the NVO period (900-1100 K), weak negative temperature coefficient behavior with iso-octane fueling significantly lengthened ignition delays relative to similar ethanol fueled conditions. Faster ethanol ignition chemistry led to lower recovered fuel intermediate yields relative to similar iso-octane fueled conditions due to more complete fuel oxidation. From the energy analysis it was found that increased NVO-period global equivalence ratio, either from lower NVOperiod oxygen

  17. Energy calibration of a multilayer photon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The job of energy calibration was broken into three parts: gain normalization of all equivalent elements; determination of the functions for conversion of pulse height to energy; and gain stabilization. It is found that calorimeter experiments are no better than their calibration systems - calibration errors will be the major source of error at high energies. Redundance is found to be necessary - the system should be designed such that every element could be replaced during the life of the experiment. It is found to be important to have enough data taken during calibration runs and during the experiment to be able to sort out where the calibration problems were after the experiment is over. Each layer was normalized independently with electrons, and then the pulse height to energy conversion was determined with photons. The primary method of gain stabilization used the light flasher system. (LEW)

  18. Muon Energy Calibration of the MINOS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Paul S.

    2004-09-01

    MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment designed to search for conclusive evidence of neutrino oscillations and to measure the oscillation parameters precisely. MINOS comprises two iron tracking calorimeters located at Fermilab and Soudan. The Calibration Detector at CERN is a third MINOS detector used as part of the detector response calibration programme. A correct energy calibration between these detectors is crucial for the accurate measurement of oscillation parameters. This thesis presents a calibration developed to produce a uniform response within a detector using cosmic muons. Reconstruction of tracks in cosmic ray data is discussed. This data is utilized to calculate calibration constants for each readout channel of the Calibration Detector. These constants have an average statistical error of 1.8%. The consistency of the constants is demonstrated both within a single run and between runs separated by a few days. Results are presented from applying the calibration to test beam particles measured by the Calibration Detector. The responses are calibrated to within 1.8% systematic error. The potential impact of the calibration on the measurement of oscillation parameters by MINOS is also investigated. Applying the calibration reduces the errors in the measured parameters by {approx} 10%, which is equivalent to increasing the amount of data by 20%.

  19. Calibration Monitor for Dark Energy Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, M. E.

    2009-11-23

    The goal of this program was to design, build, test, and characterize a flight qualified calibration source and monitor for a Dark Energy related experiment: ACCESS - 'Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars'. This calibration source, the On-board Calibration Monitor (OCM), is a key component of our ACCESS spectrophotometric calibration program. The OCM will be flown as part of the ACCESS sub-orbital rocket payload in addition to monitoring instrument sensitivity on the ground. The objective of the OCM is to minimize systematic errors associated with any potential changes in the ACCESS instrument sensitivity. Importantly, the OCM will be used to monitor instrument sensitivity immediately after astronomical observations while the instrument payload is parachuting to the ground. Through monitoring, we can detect, track, characterize, and thus correct for any changes in instrument senstivity over the proposed 5-year duration of the assembled and calibrated instrument.

  20. Low-Temperature Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.

    2008-01-01

    An effort to extend the low-temperature operational limit of supercapacitors is currently underway. At present, commercially available non-aqueous supercapacitors are rated for a minimum operating temperature of -40 C. A capability to operate at lower temperatures would be desirable for delivering power to systems that must operate in outer space or in the Polar Regions on Earth. Supercapacitors (also known as double-layer or electrochemical capacitors) offer a high power density (>1,000 W/kg) and moderate energy density (about 5 to 10 Wh/kg) technology for storing energy and delivering power. This combination of properties enables delivery of large currents for pulsed applications, or alternatively, smaller currents for low duty cycle applications. The mechanism of storage of electric charge in a supercapacitor -- at the electrical double-layer formed at a solid-electrode/liquid-electrolyte interface -- differs from that of a primary or secondary electrochemical cell (i.e., a battery) in such a manner as to impart a long cycle life (typically >10(exp 6) charge/discharge cycles).

  1. Raman spectroscopic and low-temperature calorimetric investigation of the low-energy vibrational dynamics of hen egg-white lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, C.; D'Angelo, G.; Wanderlingh, U.; Vasi, C.

    2011-05-01

    The low-frequency vibrational dynamics of chicken hen egg-white lysozyme were investigated using Raman spectroscopy and low-temperature calorimetry. An amorphous-like behaviour of low-frequency dynamics was observed in this protein. By using inelastic light scattering data and resorting to a fitting procedure, the low-temperature specific heat trend was theoretically reproduced, confirming that, as in disordered systems, the same low-energy excitations give rise to the observed anomalies in low-frequency vibrational and low-temperature thermal properties. A further study of polarised and depolarised Raman spectra has allowed us to infer information about the symmetry of these modes. The frequency dependence of the light-vibrational coupling constant has also been analysed.

  2. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiple p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.

  3. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-11-10

    In this study, jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton–proton (p–p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiplemore » p–p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo.« less

  4. Temperature conditioning system suitable for use with a solar energy collection and storage apparatus or a low temperature energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Briley, P.B.

    1983-02-22

    A temperature conditioning system employing an ejector-type compressor and a refrigerant selected for operation at the limited operating temperatures of a heat energy collection and storage apparatus. Improved performance may be achieved by employing a two-tank storage system having a control circuit for supplying heat transfer medium from the hotter of the tanks for return to the cooler.

  5. Temperature conditioning system suitable for use with a solar energy collection and storage apparatus or a low temperature energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Briley, P. B.

    1981-02-03

    A temperature conditioning system is disclosed employing an ejector-type compressor and a refrigerant selected for operation at the limited operating temperatures of a heat energy collection and storage apparatus. Improved performance may be achieved by employing a two-tank storage system having a control circuit for supplying heat transfer medium from the hotter of the tanks for return to the cooler.

  6. Low temperature fluid blender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blender supplies hydrogen at temperatures from 289 deg K to 367 deg K. Hydrogen temperature is controlled by using blender to combine flow from liquid hydrogen tank /276 deg K/ and gaseous hydrogen cylinder /550 deg K/. Blenders are applicable where flow of controlled low-temperature fluid is desired.

  7. Attaining Low Temperatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, John D.; Van Till, Howard J.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the definition of temperature and the concept of order in non-mathematical terms. Describes the cooling techniques necessary in low temperature physics research, including magnetic cooling, the use of the Pomeranchuk Effect, and dilution refrigeration. Outlines the types of phenomena observed in matter within various temperature ranges…

  8. FCC-ee: Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Koratzinos, M.; Blondel, A.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Zimmermann, F.

    2015-06-02

    The FCC-ee aims to improve on electroweak precision measurements, with goals of 100 ke V on the Z mass and width, and a fraction of MeV on the W mass. Compared to LEP, this implies a much improved knowledge of the center-of-mass energy when operating at the Z peak and WW threshold. This can be achieved by making systematic use of resonant depolarization. A number of issues have been identified, due in particular to the long polarization times. However the smaller emittance and energy spread of FCC-ee with respect to LEP should help achieve a much improved performance.

  9. Low temperature benefits discussed.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    At a recent educational workshop event hosted by Advanced Sterilization Products, expert speakers including Authorising Engineers, and delegates, discussed some of their experiences of low temperature sterilisation of 'hi-tech' medical devices, and highlighted the benefits of a process which allows decontamination of instruments and, for example, parts of robotic surgery systems, that cannot be decontaminated using standard methods. Also examined,and reported on here in an article that first appeared in HEJ's sister publication, The Clinical Services Journal, were some of the disadvantages of low temperature sterilisation, the key considerations and options when choosing such a system, and a focus on how the technology's use had benefited a major London-based NHS Trust. PMID:27132304

  10. Energy calibration of the fly's eye detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baltrusaitis, R. M.; Cassiday, G. L.; Cooper, R.; Elbert, J. W.; Gerhardy, P. R.; Ko, S.; Loh, E. C.; Mizumoto, Y.; Sokolsky, P.; Steck, D.

    1985-01-01

    The methods used to calibrate the Fly's eye detector to evaluate the energy of EAS are discussed. The energy of extensive air showers (EAS) as seen by the Fly's Eye detector are obtained from track length integrals of observed shower development curves. The energy of the parent cosmic ray primary is estimated by applying corrections to account for undetected energy in the muon, neutrino and hadronic channels. Absolute values for E depend upon the measurement of shower sizes N sub e(x). The following items are necessary to convert apparent optical brightness into intrinsical optical brightness: (1) an assessment of those factors responsible for light production by the relativistic electrons in an EAS and the transmission of light thru the atmosphere, (2) calibration of the optical detection system, and (3) a knowledge of the trajectory of the shower.

  11. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Coutrakon, G. B.; Ghebremedhin, A.; Shahnazi, K.; Koss, P.; Sanders, E.

    2007-06-15

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of {+-}0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of {+-}0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  12. Calibration of a proton beam energy monitor.

    PubMed

    Moyers, M F; Coutrakon, G B; Ghebremedhin, A; Shahnazi, K; Koss, P; Sanders, E

    2007-06-01

    Delivery of therapeutic proton beams requires an absolute energy accuracy of +/-0.64 to 0.27 MeV for patch fields and a relative energy accuracy of +/-0.10 to 0.25 MeV for tailoring the depth dose distribution using the energy stacking technique. Achromatic switchyard tunes, which lead to better stability of the beam incident onto the patient, unfortunately limit the ability of switchyard magnet tesla meters to verify the correct beam energy within the tolerances listed above. A new monitor to measure the proton energy before each pulse is transported through the switchyard has been installed into a proton synchrotron. The purpose of this monitor is to correct and/or inhibit beam delivery when the measured beam energy is outside of the tolerances for treatment. The monitor calculates the beam energy using data from two frequency and eight beam position monitors that measure the revolution frequency of the proton bunches and the effective offset of the orbit from the nominal radius of the synchrotron. The new energy monitor has been calibrated by measuring the range of the beam through water and comparing with published range-energy tables for various energies. A relationship between depth dose curves and range-energy tables was first determined using Monte Carlo simulations of particle transport and energy deposition. To reduce the uncertainties associated with typical scanning water phantoms, a new technique was devised in which the beam energy was scanned while fixed thickness water tanks were sandwiched between two fixed parallel plate ionization chambers. Using a multitude of tank sizes, several energies were tested to determine the nominal accelerator orbit radius. After calibration, the energy reported by the control system matched the energy derived by range measurements to better than 0.72 MeV for all nine energies tested between 40 and 255 MeV with an average difference of -0.33 MeV. A study of different combinations of revolution frequency and radial

  13. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  14. Energy-effective method for low-temperature deaeration of make-up water on the heating supply system of heat power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Pazushkina, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    The technology for low-temperature deaeration of make-up water of heating supply systems is developed that makes it possible to substantially enhance the energy efficiency of heat power plants (HPPs). As a desorbing agent for deaeration of make-up water of heating supply systems, it is proposed to use not steam or superheated water but a gas supplied to boiler burners. Natural gas supplied to steam boilers of HPPs has very low or often negative temperature after reducing devices. At the same time, it is virtually corrosive gas-free (oxygen and carbon dioxide) and, therefore, can be successfully used as the desorbing agent for water deaeration. These factors make it possible to perform deaeration of make-up water of heating supply systems at relatively low temperatures (10-30°C). Mixing of the cold deaerated make-up water with the return delivery water results in a significant decrease in the temperature the return delivery water before a lower delivery heater of a dual-purpose turbine plant, increase in the power output with the heat consumption, and, consequently, enhancement in the operation efficiency of the HPP. The article presents the calculation of the consumption of gas theoretically required for deaeration and reveals the evaluation of the energy efficiency of the technology for a typical energy unit of thermal power station. The mass transfer efficiency of the deaeration of the make-up water of heating supply systems is estimated for the case of using natural gas as the desorbing agent for which the specific gas consumption required theoretically for deaeration is calculated. It is shown that the consumption of natural gas used as fuel in boilers of HPPs is sufficient for the deaeration of any volumes of the make-up water of heating supply systems. The energy efficiency of the developed technology is evaluated for a typical heat power-generating unit of the HPP with a T-100-12.8 turbine. The calculation showed that the application of the new technology

  15. Origin of the red sites and energy transfer rates in single MEH-PPV chains at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Feist, Florian A; Zickler, Martin F; Basché, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Single poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) molecules dispersed in thin poly(methylmethacrylate) films have been investigated by fluorescence emission, excitation and time-resolved spectroscopy at 1.2 K. For the molecular weight studied (∼200 kDa) a bimodal distribution of emission maxima is observed. Based on a comparison of the spectroscopic properties of blue and red sites and on polarisation-resolved measurements, we argue in agreement with recent quantum-chemical calculations that the red subpopulation most probably does not arise from interchromophoric excitation delocalisation but is to be attributed to longer chromophoric units originating from ordered regions of a polymer chain, where due to constraints on the chain conformation larger conjugation lengths can be realised. In excitation spectra within the red spectral region we can identify multiple chromophoric units, among them chromophores without correspondence in the emission spectrum-donors of the intramolecular energy transfer. Zero-phonon lines of donor chromophores proved to be significantly broadened, indicating fast excited-state population decay due to energy transfer. Thus, a distribution of energy transfer times within MEH-PPV chains could be determined from donor zero-phonon line widths, with an average value of 3.9 ps. Our study represents the first direct measurement of energy transfer times in conjugated polymers, parameters that are crucial for the performance of many technical applications based on this class of material. PMID:21472962

  16. Definition of energy-calibrated spectra for national reachback

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Christopher L.; Hertz, Kristin L.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the timeliness and accuracy of analysis results of spectra submitted to National Reachback, particularly for the detection of threat items. Many spectra submitted for analysis include either a calibration spectrum using 137Cs or no calibration spectrum at all. The single line provided by 137Cs is insufficient to adequately calibrate nonlinear spectra. A calibration source that provides several lines that are well-spaced, from the low energy cutoff to the full energy range of the detector, is needed for a satisfactory energy calibration. This paper defines the requirements of an energy calibration for the purposes of National Reachback, outlines a method to validate whether a given spectrum meets that definition, discusses general source considerations, and provides a specific operating procedure for calibrating the GR-135.

  17. Comparative thermodynamic performance of some Rankine/Brayton cycle configurations for a low-temperature energy application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, F. L.

    1977-01-01

    Various configurations combining solar-Rankine and fuel-Brayton cycles were analyzed in order to find the arrangement which has the highest thermal efficiency and the smallest fuel share. A numerical example is given to evaluate both the thermodynamic performance and the economic feasibility of each configuration. The solar-assisted regenerative Rankine cycle was found to be leading the candidates from both points of energy utilization and fuel conservation.

  18. Insight into the energy loss in organic solar cells based on benzotrithiophene copolymers: A dark current analysis at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Naamani, Eman; Ide, Marina; Gopal, Anesh; Saeki, Akinori

    2016-02-01

    Owing to the formation of the charge transfer (CT) state, the open-circuit voltage (Voc) of organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices commonly suffers an energy loss of 0.8-1.3 eV from the effective bandgap. Benzotrithiophene (BTT)-based low-bandgap polymers that we have recently reported showed deep HOMO levels (-5.4 to -5.6 eV) and moderate optical bandgaps of 1.7-1.8 eV, which resulted in high Voc’s of 0.78-0.98 V and relatively low energy losses when blended with methano[60]fullerene (PCBM). Here, we report the temperature-dependent dark current analysis of organic solar cells of BTT copolymers:PCBM blends. Shockley diode analyses revealed the dominant contribution of CT energy and concomitant pre-exponential factor of dark saturation current density associated with charge recombination. The findings could establish a fundamental aspect to draw a design rule in BTT-based polymers towards their evolutions in OPV devices.

  19. Low energy stable plasma calibration facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick-Frost, K. M.; Lynch, K. A.

    2007-07-01

    We have designed and fabricated a low energy plasma calibration facility for testing and calibration of rocket-borne charged-particle detectors and for the investigation of plasma sheath formation in an environment with ionospheric plasma energies, densities, and Debye lengths. We describe the vacuum system and associated plasma source, which was modified from a Naval Research Laboratory design [Bowles et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 455 (1996)]. Mechanical and electrical modifications to this cylindrical microwave resonant source are outlined together with a different method of operating the magnetron that achieves a stable discharge. This facility produces unmagnetized plasmas with densities from 1×103/cm3to6×105/cm3, electron temperatures from 0.1to1.7eV, and plasma potentials from 0.5to8V depending on varying input microwave power and neutral gas flow. For the range of input microwave power explored (350-600W), the energy density of the plasma remains constant because of an inverse relationship between density and temperature. This relationship allows a wide range of Debye lengths (0.3-8.4cm) to be investigated, which is ideal for simulating the ionospheric plasma sheaths we explore.

  20. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  1. Low temperature grown photoconductive antennas for pulsed 1060 nm excitation: Influence of excess energy on the electron relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, R. J. B.; Brahm, A.; Velauthapillai, A.; Wilms, A.; Lammers, C.; Globisch, B.; Koch, M.; Notni, G.; Tünnermann, A.; Göbel, T.; Schell, M.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of MBE grown photoconductive terahertz (THz) antennas based on the InGaAs/InAlAs/InP material system aimed for an excitation wavelength of approx. 1060 nm. Therefore, we analyze several different approaches concerning growth parameters, layer and material compositions as well as doping. The carrier dynamics are probed via transient white-light pump-probe spectroscopy as well as THz Time Domain Spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. We find that the electron capture probability is reduced for higher electron energies. By adjusting the material band gap this can be resolved and lifetimes of 1.3 ps are obtained. These short lifetimes enable the detection of THz TDS spectra with a bandwidth exceeding 4 THz.

  2. Liquid-Metal Electrode to Enable Ultra-Low Temperature Sodium-Beta Alumina Batteries for Renewable Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiaochuan; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Mei, Donghai; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Liu, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Metal electrodes have a high capacity for energy storage but have found limited applications in batteries because of dendrite formation and other problems. In this paper, we report a new alloying strategy that can significantly reduce the melting temperature and improve wetting with the electrolyte to allow the use of liquid metal as anode in sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) at much lower temperatures (e.g., 95 to 175°C). Commercial NBBs such as sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries typically operate at relatively high temperatures (e.g., 300-350°C) due to poor wettability of sodium on the surface of β"-Al2O3. Our combined experimental and computational studies suggest that Na-Cs alloy can replace pure sodium as the anode material, which provides a significant improvement in wettability, particularly at lower temperatures (i.e., <200°C). Single cells with the Na-Cs alloy anode exhibit excellent cycling life over those with pure sodium anode at 175 and 150°C. The cells can even operate at 95°C, which is below the melting temperature of pure sodium. These results demonstrate that NBB can be operated at ultra lower temperatures with successfully solving the wetting issue. This work also suggests a new strategy to use liquid metal as the electrode materials for advanced batteries that can avoid the intrinsic safety issues associated with dendrite formation on the anode.

  3. Energy efficient production of hydrogen and syngas from biomass: development of low-temperature catalytic process for cellulose gasification.

    PubMed

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Ito, Shin-ichi; Kunimori, Kimio; Yamada, Muneyoshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2002-10-15

    The Rh/CeO2/M (M = SiO2, Al2O3, and ZrO2) type catalysts with various compositions have been prepared and investigated in the gasification of cellulose, a model compound of biomass, in a fluidized bed reactor at 500-700 degrees C. The conventional nickel and dolomite catalysts have also been investigated. Among the catalysts, Rh/CeO2/SiO2 with 35% CeO2 has been found to be the best catalyst with respect to the carbon conversion to gas and product distribution. The steam addition contributed to the complete conversion of cellulose to gas even at 600 degrees C. Lower steam supply gave the syngas and higher steam supply gave the hydrogen as the major product. Hydrogen and syngas from cellulose or cellulosic biomass gasification are environmentally super clean gaseous fuels for power generation. Moreover, the syngas derived liquid fuels such as methanol, dimethyl ether, and synthetic diesels are also super clean transportation fuels. However, the use of cellulose or cellulosic biomass for energy source through the gasification is challenging because of the formation of tar and char during the gasification process. It is interesting that no tar or char was finally formed in the effluent gas at as low as 500-600 degrees C using Rh/CeO2/SiO2(35) catalyst in this process. PMID:12387426

  4. In situ observation of low temperature growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) by reflection high energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Andreas; Fissel, Andreas; Bugiel, Eberhard; Wietler, Tobias F.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we investigate the initial stages of epitaxial growth of Ge on Si(1 1 1) and the impact of growth temperature on strain evolution in situ by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) for temperatures between 200 °C and 400 °C. The change in surface morphology from a flat wetting layer to subsequent islanding that is characteristic for Stranski-Krastanov growth is monitored by spot intensity analysis. The corresponding critical layer thickness is determined to 3.1 < dc < 3.4 ML. In situ monitoring of the strain relaxation process reveals a contribution of the Si(1 1 1) 7 × 7-surface reconstruction to the strain relaxation process. High resolution transmission electron microscopy confirms that the Ge islands exhibit a high degree of structural perfection and an ordered interfacial misfit dislocation network already at a growth temperature of 200 °C is established. The temperature dependency of island shape, density and height is characterized by atomic force microscopy and compared to the RHEED investigations.

  5. Ionometric determination of fluorides at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyukova, I.S.; Ennan, A.A.; Dzerzhko, E.K.; Leivikova, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    A method for determining fluoride ions in solution at low temperatures using a solid-contact fluorine-selective electrode (FSE) has been developed. The effect of temperature (60 to -15{degrees}C) on the calibration slope, potential equilibrium time, and operational stability is studied; the effect of an organic additive (cryoprotector) on the calibration slope is also studied. The temperature relationships obtained for the solid-contact FSEs allow appropriate corrections to be applied to the operational algorithm of the {open_quotes}Ftoring{close_quotes} hand-held semiautomatic HF gas analyzer for the operational temperature range of -16 to 60{degrees}C.

  6. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  7. Ultrasound energy to accelerate dye uptake and dye-fiber interaction of reactive dye on knitted cotton fabric at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Tissera, Nadeeka D; Wijesena, Ruchira N; de Silva, K M Nalin

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic cavitation formed due to propagation of ultrasound wave inside a dye bath was successfully used to dye cotton fabric with a reactive dye at lower temperatures. The energy input to the system during sonication was 0.7 W/cm(2). This was within the energy range that contributes towards forming cavitation during ultra-sonication. The influence of ultrasound treatment on dye particle size and fiber morphology is discussed. Particle size analysis of the dye bath revealed ultra-sonication energy was capable of de-agglomeration of hydrolyzed dye molecules during dyeing. SEM micrograph and AFM topographical image of the fiber surface revealed fiber morphology remains unchanged after the sonication. The study was extended in understanding the contribution of ultrasound method of dyeing towards achieving good color strength on the fabric, compared to the normal heating method of dyeing. Study showed color strength obtained using ultra sound method of dyeing is higher compared to normal heating dyeing. Ultrasound energy was able to achieve the good color strength on cotton fabric at very low temperature such as 30 °C, which was approximately 230% more than the color strength achieved in normal heating method of dyeing. This indicates that energy input to the system using ultrasound was capable of acting as an effective alternative method of dyeing knitted cotton fabrics with reactive dye. PMID:26585007

  8. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D

    2013-09-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-(57)Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4](=) and 10%-(57)Fe and 90%-(54)Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4](=) has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3-4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements. PMID:23955030

  9. Performance Characteristics of Lithium Ion Cells for Low Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, M. C.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Huang, C. K.; Surampudi, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several of NASA's future Planetary Exploration (specifically Mars) missions will require rechargeable batteries of high specific energy and energy density and more importantly of good low temperature performance.

  10. A hybrid geothermal energy conversion technology: Auxiliary heating of geothermally preheated water or CO2 - a potential solution for low-temperature resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saar, Martin; Garapati, Nagasree; Adams, Benjamin; Randolph, Jimmy; Kuehn, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Safe, sustainable, and economic development of deep geothermal resources, particularly in less favourable regions, often requires employment of unconventional geothermal energy extraction and utilization methods. Often "unconventional geothermal methods" is synonymously and solely used as meaning enhanced geothermal systems, where the permeability of hot, dry rock with naturally low permeability at greater depths (4-6 km), is enhanced. Here we present an alternative unconventional geothermal energy utilization approach that uses low-temperature regions that are shallower, thereby drastically reducing drilling costs. While not a pure geothermal energy system, this hybrid approach may enable utilization of geothermal energy in many regions worldwide that can otherwise not be used for geothermal electricity generation, thereby increasing the global geothermal resource base. Moreover, in some realizations of this hybrid approach that generate carbon dioxide (CO2), the technology may be combined with carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) and CO2-based geothermal energy utilization, resulting in a high-efficiency (hybrid) geothermal power plant with a negative carbon footprint. Typically, low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resources are more effectively used for direct heat energy applications. However, due to high thermal losses during transport, direct use requires that the heat resource is located near the user. Alternatively, we show here that if such a low-temperature geothermal resource is combined with an additional or secondary energy resource, the power production is increased compared to the sum from two separate (geothermal and secondary fuel) power plants (DiPippo et al. 1978) and the thermal losses are minimized because the thermal energy is utilized where it is produced. Since Adams et al. (2015) found that using CO2 as a subsurface working fluid produces more net power than brine at low- to moderate-temperature geothermal resource conditions, we

  11. The Effect of Disorder on the Free-Energy for the Random Walk Pinning Model: Smoothing of the Phase Transition and Low Temperature Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Quentin; Lacoin, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    We consider the continuous time version of the Random Walk Pinning Model (RWPM), studied in (Berger and Toninelli (Electron. J. Probab., to appear) and Birkner and Sun (Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré Probab. Stat. 46:414-441, 2010; arXiv:0912.1663). Given a fixed realization of a random walk Y on ℤ d with jump rate ρ (that plays the role of the random medium), we modify the law of a random walk X on ℤ d with jump rate 1 by reweighting the paths, giving an energy reward proportional to the intersection time Lt(X,Y)=int0t {1}_{Xs=Ys} {d}s: the weight of the path under the new measure is exp ( βL t ( X, Y)), β∈ℝ. As β increases, the system exhibits a delocalization/localization transition: there is a critical value β c , such that if β> β c the two walks stick together for almost-all Y realizations. A natural question is that of disorder relevance, that is whether the quenched and annealed systems have the same behavior. In this paper we investigate how the disorder modifies the shape of the free energy curve: (1) We prove that, in dimension d≥3, the presence of disorder makes the phase transition at least of second order. This, in dimension d≥4, contrasts with the fact that the phase transition of the annealed system is of first order. (2) In any dimension, we prove that disorder modifies the low temperature asymptotic of the free energy.

  12. Low-temperature coal desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, P. S.; Gavalas, G. R.; Hsu, G. C.; Kalfayan, S. H.

    1977-01-01

    Economical, low-temperature chlorinolysis converts sulfur to water-soluble sulfates. Sulfates are removed by washing. Subsequent steps dry coal and remove chlorine. Chlorine and solvents can be reused.

  13. Low Temperature Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flight of the Lambda Point Experiment has demonstrated the potential for performing precise tests of fundamental theories using low temperature techniques in Earth orbit. NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division has established a program of successor expermients to investigate other aspects of condensed matter physics using the same low temperature flight facility. This paper describes the new investigations that have been chosen for flight experiments, and those selected for ground-based studies that could lead to flight experiments later.

  14. Sensors for low temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  15. Electron decoherence at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2001-03-01

    Electron decoherence is fundamental to condensed matter physics. Our understanding of metals and insulators in the Fermi-liquid framework relies entirely on a diverging decoherence rate 1/τ_φ at low temperatures, which is expected to vanish at T=0. However, recent experiments find that 1/τ_φ saturates at low temperatures [1-2]. We review these measurements on a variety of mesoscopic systems (in 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D) as well as the control experiments used to check for various artifacts [1-3]. We emphasize the connection between the temperature-independent decoherence rate and persistent current in normal metals [4]. We briefly discuss decoherence induced by dynamic defects or two-level systems [5,6], including its relevance--or lack thereof---to the experiments on metallic wires [2]. Saturation of decohrence rate is argued to be present in---and relevant to---the following phenomena: metal-insulator transition in 2D [7,8], superconductor-insulator transition in 2D [9], quantum-Hall-insulator transition [10], transport through superconductor/normal-metal hybrid junctions [11], normal-state resistivity of high Tc superconductors [12], persistent current in normal metals [4], and energy relaxation in normal metals [13]. [1] P. Mohanty, Physica B 280, 446 (2000). [2] P. Mohanty, E.M.Q. Jariwala, R. Webb, PRL 78, 3366 (1997); PRB 55, R13542 (1997). [3] P. Mohanty, R. Webb, PRL 84, 4481 (2000). [4] P. Mohanty, Ann. Phys. 8, 549 (1999). [5] P. Mohanty, M.L. Roukes (to be published). [6] K. Ahn, P. Mohanty, cond-mat/ 0011139. [7] S. Kravchenko et al. PRB 50, 8039 (1994). [8] G. Brunthaler, A. Prinz, G. Bauer, V. Pudalov, cond-mat/0007230. [9] A. Kapitulnik, N. Mason, S. Kivelson, S. Chakravarty, cond-mat/0008005. [10] D. Shahar, D. Tsui, M. Shayegan, J. Cunningham, E. Shimsoni, S. Sondhi, SSC. 102, 817 (1997). [11] A. Vaknin, A. Frydman, Z. Ovadyahu, PRB 61, 13037 (2000). [12] P. Fournier et al., PRB 62, R11993 (2000). [13] A. Gougam, F. Pierre, H. Pothier, D. Esteve, N

  16. Thermodynamic power stations at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, J.; Ployart, R.; Alleau, T.; Bandelier, P.; Lauro, F.

    The development of low-temperature thermodynamic power stations using solar energy is considered, with special attention given to the choice of the thermodynamic cycle (Rankine), working fluids (frigorific halogen compounds), and heat exchangers. Thermomechanical conversion machines, such as ac motors and rotating volumetric motors are discussed. A system is recommended for the use of solar energy for irrigation and pumping in remote areas. Other applications include the production of cold of fresh water from brackish waters, and energy recovery from hot springs.

  17. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH(+) → C(+) + H2 reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering.

    PubMed

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna; Stoecklin, Thierry

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH(+), in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH(+) in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H2, and e(-). In this work, we address the destruction process of CH(+) by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH(+). The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K-800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation. PMID:26395702

  18. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background wouldmore » simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.« less

  19. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background would simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.

  20. Evaluation of “Autotune” calibration against manual calibration of building energy models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chaudhary, Gaurav; New, Joshua; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Im, Piljae; O’Neill, Zheng; Garg, Vishal

    2016-08-26

    Our paper demonstrates the application of Autotune, a methodology aimed at automatically producing calibrated building energy models using measured data, in two case studies. In the first case, a building model is de-tuned by deliberately injecting faults into more than 60 parameters. This model was then calibrated using Autotune and its accuracy with respect to the original model was evaluated in terms of the industry-standard normalized mean bias error and coefficient of variation of root mean squared error metrics set forth in ASHRAE Guideline 14. In addition to whole-building energy consumption, outputs including lighting, plug load profiles, HVAC energy consumption,more » zone temperatures, and other variables were analyzed. In the second case, Autotune calibration is compared directly to experts’ manual calibration of an emulated-occupancy, full-size residential building with comparable calibration results in much less time. Lastly, our paper concludes with a discussion of the key strengths and weaknesses of auto-calibration approaches.« less

  1. Development of low temperature battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, G. M.

    1967-01-01

    Self-contained low temperature battery system consisting of a magnesium anode, potassium thiocyanate-ammonia electrolyte and a cathode composed of a mixture of sulfur, carbon, and mercuric sulfate operates for at least seventy-two hours within a discharge temperature range of plus 20 degrees C to minus 90 degrees C.

  2. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  3. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  4. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  5. Energy calibration of Cherenkov Telescopes using GLAST data

    SciTech Connect

    Bastieri, D.; Busetto, G.; Piano, G.; Rando, R.; Saggion, A.; De Angelis, A.; Longo, F.

    2007-07-12

    We discuss the possibility of using the observations by GLAST of steady gamma sources, as the Crab Nebula and some selected AGNs, to calibrate the Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) and improve their energy resolution, in particular. We show that at around 100 GeV, exploiting the features in the spectrum of the Crab Nebula, the absolute energy calibration uncertainty of Cherenkov telescopes can be reduced to < 10%.

  6. Kolmogorov Turbulence in Low-Temperature Superflows

    SciTech Connect

    Nore, C.; Brachet, M.E.; Abid, M.

    1997-05-01

    Low-temperature decaying superfluid turbulence is studied using the nonlinear Schroedinger equation in the geometry of the Taylor-Green (TG) vortex flow with resolutions up to 512{sup 3}. The rate of (irreversible) kinetic energy transfer in the superfluid TG vortex is found to be comparable to that of the viscous TG vortex. At the moment of maximum dissipation, the energy spectrum of the superflow has an inertial range compatible with Kolmogorov`s scaling. Physical-space visualizations show that the vorticity dynamics of the superflow is similar to that of the viscous flow, including vortex reconnection. The implications to experiments in low-temperature helium are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2000-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Microstructural changes in unsupported nanocrystalline yttrium stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, or YSZ) thin films were examined as a function of temperature and annealing time in order to determine the grain growth exponent and the mechanisms of pinhole formation. Grain growth and pinhole formation were measured using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), normal imaging mode transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Grain growth was found to vary with a time exponent of about one half before pinhole formation and about one third after. Pinhole formation in 70 nm thick films occurred at temperatures near 600 C, corresponding to a grain size of about 15 nm, or a grain size to film thickness ration of approximately 0.25. The deposition of films on porous substrates is hampered by the penetration of the polymer precursor solution into the substrate whose pores as > 0.2 {micro}m, therefore much attention has to be paid to the development of porous colloidal oxide films onto surfaces. Thus during this line period we have been studying these films. Optical properties have proven to be an excellent way to study the quality of these nanoporous films. The influence of porosity and densification on optical properties of films on sapphire substrates that were prepared from water colloidal suspensions of small ({approx}5nm) particles of ceria was investigated. The colloidal ceria films have initially very porous structure (porosity about 50%) and densification starts at about 600 C accompanied by

  8. Energy Calibration of the JLab Bremsstrahlung Tagging System

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan Stepanyan; S. Boyarinov; H. Egiyan; D. Dale; L. Guo; M. Gabrielyan; L. Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Bernhard Mecking; A. Teymurazyan; I. Nakagawa; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Michael Wood

    2007-03-01

    In this report, we present the energy calibration of the Hall B bremsstrahlung tagging system at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The calibration was performed using a magnetic pair spectrometer. The tagged photon energy spectrum was measured in coincidence with e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs as a function of the pair spectrometer magnetic field. Taking advantage of the internal linearity of the pair spectrometer, the energy of the tagging system was calibrated at the level of {+-} 0.1% E{sub {gamma}}. The absolute energy scale was determined using the e{sup +}e{sup -} rate measurements close to the end-point of the photon spectrum. The energy variations across the full tagging range were found to be <3 MeV.

  9. Low Temperature Trapping: from Reactions to Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, S.; Asvany, O.; Brunken, S.

    2013-06-01

    The kinetics of ion - molecule reactions are investigated in higher-order multipole traps by observation of the temporal evolution of mass selected parent ions in the presence of a neutral reaction partner. Rate coeffients for fast reactions (proceeding at collision rate) and very slow reactions (taking millions of collisions) are determined over a wide range of temperatures. Endothermic or hindered reactions can be promoted by excitation of the ion via absorption of a photon. Scanning the photon energy while detecting the number of product ions establishes an action spectroscopy method which we developed over the last 10-15 years and termed LIR: laser or light induced reactions. The main advantages of LIR are mass selection of the parent ion and low temperature conditions in the trap. Long storage times in combination with a near unity detection efficiency make LIR one of the most sensitive spectroscopy methods. The status quo of LIR will be discussed on selected examples. Recent measurements are concerned with ro-vibrational spectra of CH_2D^+ and CH_5^+ at highest resolution using cw OPO radiation. In the particular case of CH_5^+, the lines in the mid IR have been measured at a nominal temperature of 10 K and a frequency comb has been used for absolute calibration. Line positions can be determined to an accuracy which shall enable us in the future to obtain rotational spectra in a THz-IR double resonance approach. We tested the feasibility of this two photon method recently on H_2D^+. S. Schlemmer, T. Kuhn, E. Lescop, and D. Gerlich, Laser excited N_2^+ in a 22-Pole Trap: Experimental Studies of Rotational Relaxation Processes, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry and Ion Processes, 185-187, 589-602, (1999), S.D. Ivanov, O. Asvany, A. Witt, E. Hugo, G. Mathias, B. Redlich, D. Marx and S. Schlemmer, Quantum-induced symmetry breaking explains infrared spectra of CH_5^+ isotopologues, Nature Chemistry, 2, 298-302 (2010) S. Gaertner, J. Krieg, A. Klemann, O. Asvany and S

  10. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  11. Calibration of Electric Field Induced Energy Level Shifts in Argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, Greg

    1999-10-01

    Argon is a commonly used gas in a number of discharges. As such it is an ideal candidate for spectroscopic based electric field measurements within the sheath and bulk discharge regions. Recently, measurements demonstrated the use of the Stark induced shifts of high lying energy levels in Argon to make spatially and temporally resolved electric field measurements [1]. However, that method relied on the cross calibration of known and calculable shifts in helium discharges to calibrate, in-situ, the energy level shifts in Argon. This poster shows the use of an atomic beam system to calibrate the electric field induced shift of high lying energy levels directly. In addition, data on very high lying argon levels, up to the 20 F manifold, were obtained. Comparison of our electric field induced energy level shift calibration curves with previous work will be shown. The possibility of using this system to calibrate energy level shifts in other gases of technological interest to the microelectronics and lighting industry will be discussed. [1]. J. B. Kim, K. Kawamura, Y. W. Choi, M. D. Bowden, K. Muraoka and V. Helbig, IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 26(5), 1556 (1998). This work was performed at Sandia National Laboratories and supported by the United States Department of Energy (DE-AC04-94AL85000).

  12. Fission foil detector calibrations with high energy protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Frank, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    Fission foil detectors (FFD's) are passive devices composed of heavy metal foils in contact with muscovite mica films. The heavy metal nuclei have significant cross sections for fission when irradiated with neutrons and protons. Each isotope is characterized by threshold energies for the fission reactions and particular energy-dependent cross sections. In the FFD's, fission fragments produced by the reactions are emitted from the foils and create latent particle tracks in the adjacent mica films. When the films are processed surface tracks are formed which can be optically counted. The track densities are indications of the fluences and spectra of neutrons and/or protons. In the past, detection efficiencies have been calculated using the low energy neutron calibrated dosimeters and published fission cross sections for neutrons and protons. The problem is that the addition of a large kinetic energy to the (n,nucleus) or (p,nucleus) reaction could increase the energies and ranges of emitted fission fragments and increase the detector sensitivity as compared with lower energy neutron calibrations. High energy calibrations are the only method of resolving the uncertainties in detector efficiencies. At high energies, either proton or neutron calibrations are sufficient since the cross section data show that the proton and neutron fission cross sections are approximately equal. High energy proton beams have been utilized (1.8 and 4.9 GeV, 80 and 140 MeV) for measuring the tracks of fission fragments emitted backward and forward.

  13. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%).

  14. Electro-optical equivalent calibration technology for high-energy laser energy meters.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ji Feng; Chang, Yan; Sun, Li Qun; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Xiao Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optical equivalent calibration with high calibration power and high equivalence is particularly well-suited to the calibration of high-energy laser energy meters. A large amount of energy is reserved during this process, however, which continues to radiate after power-off. This study measured the radiation efficiency of a halogen tungsten lamp during power-on and after power-off in order to calculate the total energy irradiated by a lamp until the high-energy laser energy meter reaches thermal equilibrium. A calibration system was designed based on the measurement results, and the calibration equivalence of the system was analyzed in detail. Results show that measurement precision is significantly affected by the absorption factor of the absorption chamber and by heat loss in the energy meter. Calibration precision is successfully improved by enhancing the equivalent power and reducing power-on time. The electro-optical equivalent calibration system, measurement uncertainty of which was evaluated as 2.4% (k = 2), was used to calibrate a graphite-cone-absorption-cavity absolute energy meter, yielding a calibration coefficient of 1.009 and measurement uncertainty of 3.5% (k = 2). A water-absorption-type high-energy laser energy meter with measurement uncertainty of 4.8% (k = 2) was considered the reference standard, and compared to the energy meter calibrated in this study, yielded a correction factor of 0.995 (standard deviation of 1.4%). PMID:27131714

  15. How to calibrate the jet energy scale?

    SciTech Connect

    Hatakeyama, K.; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-01-01

    Top quarks dominantly decay into b-quark jets and W bosons, and the W bosons often decay into jets, thus the precise determination of the jet energy scale is crucial in measurements of many top quark properties. I present the strategies used by the CDF and D0 collaborations to determine the jet energy scale. The various cross checks performed to verify the determined jet energy scale and evaluate its systematic uncertainty are also discussed.

  16. Low-Temperature Spacecraft: Challenges/Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, J. E.; Patterson, R. L.; Overton, E.; Hammoud, A. N.; Gerber, S. S.

    2001-01-01

    Imagine sending a spacecraft into deep space that operates at the ambient temperature of its environment rather than hundreds of degrees Kelvin warmer. The average temperature of a spacecraft warmed only by the sun drops from 279 K near the Earth's orbit to 90 K near the orbit of Saturn, and to 44 K near Pluto's orbit. At present, deep space probes struggle to maintain an operating temperature near 300 K for the onboard electronics. To warm the electronics without consuming vast amounts of electrical energy, radioisotope heater units (RHUs) are used in vast numbers. Unfortunately, since RHU are always 'on', an active thermal management system is required to reject the excess heat. A spacecraft designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures and shielded from the sun by a large communication dish or solar cell array could be less complex, lighter, and cheaper than current deep space probes. Before a complete low-temperature spacecraft becomes a reality, there are several challenges to be met. Reliable cryogenic power electronics is one of the major challenges. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Research Group at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has demonstrated the ability of some commercial off the shelf power electronic components to operate at temperatures approaching that of liquid nitrogen (77 K). Below 77 K, there exists an opportunity for the development of reliable semiconductor power switching technologies other than bulk silicon CMOS. This paper will report on the results of NASA GRC's Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program and discuss the challenges to (opportunities for) the creation of a low-temperature spacecraft.

  17. Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunze, Hans-Joachim

    Commercial spectrographic systems are usually supplied with some wave-length calibration, but it is essential that the experimenter performs his own calibration for reliable measurements. A number of sources emitting well-known emission lines are available, and the best values of their wavelengths may be taken from data banks accessible on the internet. Data have been critically evaluated for many decades by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of the USA [13], see also p. 3. Special data bases have been established by the astronomy and fusion communities (Appendix B).

  18. Binary nucleation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahoransky, R. A.; Peters, F.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous condensation of binary vapors in the supersaturated state is studied in ethanol/n-propanol and water/ethanol via their unsteady expansion in a shock tube at temperatures below 273 K. Ethanol/n-propanol forms a nearly ideal solution, whereas water/ethanol is an example of a strongly nonideal mixture. Vapor mixtures of various compositions are diluted in dry air at small mole fractions and expanded in the driver section from room temperature. The onset of homogeneous condensation is detected optically and the corresponding thermodynamic state is evaluated. The experimental results are compared with the binary nucleation theory, and the particular problems of theoretical evaluation at low temperatures are discussed.

  19. 2014 Low-Temperature and Coproduced Geothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Reinhardt, Program Manager

    2014-09-01

    As a growing sector of geothermal energy development, the Low-Temperature Program supports innovative technologies that enable electricity production and cascaded uses from geothermal resources below 300° Fahrenheit.

  20. Energy calibration issues in nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy: observing small spectral shifts and making fast calibrations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxin; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Dong, Weibing; Huang, Songping D.

    2013-01-01

    The conventional energy calibration for nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) is usually long. Meanwhile, taking NRVS samples out of the cryostat increases the chance of sample damage, which makes it impossible to carry out an energy calibration during one NRVS measurement. In this study, by manipulating the 14.4 keV beam through the main measurement chamber without moving out the NRVS sample, two alternative calibration procedures have been proposed and established: (i) an in situ calibration procedure, which measures the main NRVS sample at stage A and the calibration sample at stage B simultaneously, and calibrates the energies for observing extremely small spectral shifts; for example, the 0.3 meV energy shift between the 100%-57Fe-enriched [Fe4S4Cl4]= and 10%-57Fe and 90%-54Fe labeled [Fe4S4Cl4]= has been well resolved; (ii) a quick-switching energy calibration procedure, which reduces each calibration time from 3–4 h to about 30 min. Although the quick-switching calibration is not in situ, it is suitable for normal NRVS measurements. PMID:23955030

  1. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Chui, T.; Croonquist, A.; Larson, M.; Liu, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  2. The low temperature microgravity physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Croonquist, A P.; Liu, F. C.; Larson, M. E.; Chui, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  3. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; Gannon, J.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  4. A stoichiometric calibration method for dual energy computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourque, Alexandra E.; Carrier, Jean-François; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-04-01

    The accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation relies crucially on patient composition data. The computed tomography (CT) calibration methods based on the stoichiometric calibration of Schneider et al (1996 Phys. Med. Biol. 41 111-24) are the most reliable to determine electron density (ED) with commercial single energy CT scanners. Along with the recent developments in dual energy CT (DECT) commercial scanners, several methods were published to determine ED and the effective atomic number (EAN) for polyenergetic beams without the need for CT calibration curves. This paper intends to show that with a rigorous definition of the EAN, the stoichiometric calibration method can be successfully adapted to DECT with significant accuracy improvements with respect to the literature without the need for spectrum measurements or empirical beam hardening corrections. Using a theoretical framework of ICRP human tissue compositions and the XCOM photon cross sections database, the revised stoichiometric calibration method yields Hounsfield unit (HU) predictions within less than ±1.3 HU of the theoretical HU calculated from XCOM data averaged over the spectra used (e.g., 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 140 kVp and 140/Sn kVp). A fit of mean excitation energy (I-value) data as a function of EAN is provided in order to determine the ion stopping power of human tissues from ED-EAN measurements. Analysis of the calibration phantom measurements with the Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source CT scanner shows that the present formalism yields mean absolute errors of (0.3 ± 0.4)% and (1.6 ± 2.0)% on ED and EAN, respectively. For ion therapy, the mean absolute errors for calibrated I-values and proton stopping powers (216 MeV) are (4.1 ± 2.7)% and (0.5 ± 0.4)%, respectively. In all clinical situations studied, the uncertainties in ion ranges in water for therapeutic energies are found to be less than 1.3 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.5 mm for protons, helium and carbon ions respectively, using a generic

  5. A stoichiometric calibration method for dual energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Alexandra E; Carrier, Jean-François; Bouchard, Hugo

    2014-04-21

    The accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculation relies crucially on patient composition data. The computed tomography (CT) calibration methods based on the stoichiometric calibration of Schneider et al (1996 Phys. Med. Biol. 41 111-24) are the most reliable to determine electron density (ED) with commercial single energy CT scanners. Along with the recent developments in dual energy CT (DECT) commercial scanners, several methods were published to determine ED and the effective atomic number (EAN) for polyenergetic beams without the need for CT calibration curves. This paper intends to show that with a rigorous definition of the EAN, the stoichiometric calibration method can be successfully adapted to DECT with significant accuracy improvements with respect to the literature without the need for spectrum measurements or empirical beam hardening corrections. Using a theoretical framework of ICRP human tissue compositions and the XCOM photon cross sections database, the revised stoichiometric calibration method yields Hounsfield unit (HU) predictions within less than ±1.3 HU of the theoretical HU calculated from XCOM data averaged over the spectra used (e.g., 80 kVp, 100 kVp, 140 kVp and 140/Sn kVp). A fit of mean excitation energy (I-value) data as a function of EAN is provided in order to determine the ion stopping power of human tissues from ED-EAN measurements. Analysis of the calibration phantom measurements with the Siemens SOMATOM Definition Flash dual source CT scanner shows that the present formalism yields mean absolute errors of (0.3 ± 0.4)% and (1.6 ± 2.0)% on ED and EAN, respectively. For ion therapy, the mean absolute errors for calibrated I-values and proton stopping powers (216 MeV) are (4.1 ± 2.7)% and (0.5 ± 0.4)%, respectively. In all clinical situations studied, the uncertainties in ion ranges in water for therapeutic energies are found to be less than 1.3 mm, 0.7 mm and 0.5 mm for protons, helium and carbon ions respectively, using a

  6. Low Temperature Decomposition Rates for Tetraphenylborate Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1998-11-18

    Previous studies indicated that palladium is catalyzes rapid decomposition of alkaline tetraphenylborate slurries. Additional evidence suggest that Pd(II) reduces to Pd(0) during catalyst activation. Further use of tetraphenylborate ion in the decontamination of radioactive waste may require removal of the catalyst or cooling to temperatures at which the decomposition reaction proceeds slowly and does not adversely affect processing. Recent tests showed that tetraphenylborate did not react appreciably at 25 degrees Celsius over six months suggesting the potential to avoid the decomposition at low temperatures. The lack of reaction at low temperature could reflect very slow kinetics at the lower temperature, or may indicate a catalyst ''deactivation'' process. Previous tests in the temperature range 35 to 70 degrees Celsius provided a low precision estimate of the activation energy of the reaction with which to predict the rate of reaction at 25 percent Celsius. To understand the observations at 25 degrees Celsius, experiments must separate the catalyst activation step and the subsequent reaction with TPB. Tests described in this report represent an initial attempt to separate the two steps and determine the rate and activation energy of the reaction between active catalyst and TPB. The results of these tests indicate that the absence of reaction at 25 degrees Celsius was caused by failure to activate the catalyst or the presence of a deactivating mechanism. In the presence of activated catalyst, the decomposition reaction rate is significant.

  7. Calibration of sonic flowmeters for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, D. F.; Salsman, G. G.; Hodges, C. E.

    1980-12-01

    Scientists at the Naval Coastal Systems Center (NCSC) at Panama City, Florida, have used a commercially available acoustic flowmeter to monitor critical flow conditions during an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) funded study of the effects of biofouling on the efficiency of a prototype heat transfer system. Flowmeters of this type are particularly useful in applications requiring unimpeded flow; i.e., no sensor projecting into the moving fluid. Unfortunately, sonic flowmeters are somewhat difficult to calibrate and may be subject to drift. A method of calibration devised by NCSC may thus be of some interest to other users. It is the purpose of this report to document the special procedures used by test personnel to calibrate the flowmeters. Briefly, the calibration consisted of pumping sea water through the flowmeter into a tank suspended beneath a special load cell which provided an output voltage proportional to the weight of water in the tank. A programmable desktop calculator system was used to monitor changes in voltage as a function of time and convert these changes into flow rates for direct comparison with values read from the sonic flowmeter's digital display. Calibration checks were made at metered flows of 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 gallons per minute (gpm). It was found that computed flows were essentially linear but differed from metered values by as much as 9.0 percent.

  8. Overview of low temperature sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.J.; McCright, R.D.

    1983-12-01

    A review of the literature on low temperature sensitization (LTS) has been conducted to determine if LTS-related microstructural changes can occur in Type 304L stainless steel within the times and temperatures associated with nuclear waste storage. It was found that Type 304L stainless steel is susceptible to sensitization and LTS, and that cold work plays an important role in determining the rate of LTS. Severely cold worked Type 304L stainless steel would clearly develop LTS-related microstructural changes within the times and temperatures associated with nuclear waste storage. These changes could lead to increased susceptibility to corrosion. Significant improvements in the long-term resistance to sensitization, LTS and corrosion can be achieved by modest changes in alloy composition and fabrication practices. Therefore, Type 304L would not be the preferred alloy of construction for nuclear waste storage canisters. The final qualification of an alternate canister alloy should involve corrosion experiments on actual canisters. Suggestions for alternate canister alloys are 316L, 316LN, 316ELC, 347, and XM-19. 47 references, 4 figures.

  9. White Dwarfs for Calibrating the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allyn Smith, J.; Wester, William; Tucker, Douglas Lee; Fix, Mees B.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Gulledge, Deborah J.; McDonald, Christopher P.; Allam, Sahar S.; James, David

    2016-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is surveying some 5000 square degrees in the southern hemisphere in the grizY filter system using the new Dark Energy Camera. In order to verify meeting photometric calibration requirements, we are obtaining imaging of several hundred white dwarfs (confirmed and candidates) to select nearly 100 or more hydrogen atmosphere (DA) white dwarfs for spectroscopy in the DES footprint. The spectra that are obtained will be extracted and used to derive synthetic spectra that can be compared with DES measurements from imaging in each of the DES grizY filters. This comparison should be able to verify and help calibrate the survey to a level better than 2% photometrically and to better than 0.5% in colors. We will discuss the observational and modeling effort required to develop a well-characterized DAs sample and present some preliminary results. This set would form the basis of a larger set of southern hemisphere survey calibration stars, and additionally serve as a legacy calibration set in the upcoming era of the LSST survey and the giant segmented mirror observatories. These stars will be used to establish and monitor the color zero points for the DES photometric system and can be used to search for systematic errors in the color zero points over the DES footprint. These stars will also be used as some of the primary standards for the DES photometric system which will allow nightly atmospheric monitoring during DES operations.

  10. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  11. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and Testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thin electrolytes and porous LSM substrates. Both of these tasks are essentially on or ahead of schedule. In our proposal, we suggested that the ZrO{sub 2}/Sc system needed to be considered as a candidate as a thin electrolyte. This was because microcrystalline ZrO{sub 2}/Sc has a significantly higher ionic conductivity than YSZ, particularly at the lower temperatures. As a result, some 0.5 micron thick film of ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc on an alumina substrate (grain size 20nm) was prepared and the electrical conductivity measured as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} certainly has a higher conductivity that either 20nm or 2400nm YSZ, however, electronic conductivity dominates the conductivity for oxygen activities below 10{sup -15}. Whereas for YSZ, electronic conductivity is not a problem until the oxygen activity decreases below 10{sup -25}. These initial results show that the ionic conductivity of 20nm YSZ and 20nm ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc are essentially the same and the enhanced conductivity which is observed for Sc doping in microcrystalline specimens is not observed for the same composition when it is nanocrystalline. In addition they show that the electronic conductivity of Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that observed for YSZ. The conclusion one reaches is that for 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films, Sc doping of ZrO{sub 2} has no benefits compared to YSZ. As a result, electrolyte films of ZrO{sub 2}/Sc should not be considered as candidates

  12. US Low-Temperature EGS Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Shapefile of shallow, low-temperature EGS resources for the United States, and accompanying paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis. These data are part of a very rough estimate created for use in the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Office's Vision Study. They are not a robust estimate of low-temperature EGS resources in the U.S, and should be used accordingly.

  13. Calibrating Building Energy Models Using Supercomputer Trained Machine Learning Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan; Edwards, Richard; Parker, Lynne Edwards

    2014-01-01

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposes. EnergyPlus is the flagship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for different types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manually by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building energy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the Autotune research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the different kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of EnergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-effective calibration of building models.

  14. Time-of-flight spectroscopy: energy calibration and consistensy check

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunault, A.; Andersen, K. H.; Blanc, Y.; Fåk, B.; Godfrin, H.; Guckelsberger, K.; Scherm, R.

    1992-06-01

    A method for calibration of the energy transfers at a time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer is presented: flight pamths and wavelength are determined to 10 -3 using the arrival times of neutron pulses and prompt capture γs from the sample. We also developed a method to check the reproducibility of a series of TFO data sets, each with over 50 000 data points.

  15. Low temperature electrical conductivity measurements under high pressure up to 10 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Yadunath

    2016-05-01

    This paper report about a modified version of Fuji high pressure cell and other necessary instrumentation required for the calibration of the high pressure cell and electrical resistivity measurement under high pressure and very low temperature environment.

  16. NIR Laser Radiation Induced Conformational Changes and Tunneling Lifetimes of High-Energy Conformers of Amino Acids in Low-Temperature Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazso, Gabor; Najbauer, Eszter E.; Magyarfalvi, Gabor; Tarczay, Gyorgy

    2013-06-01

    We review our recent results on combined matrix isolation FT-IR and NIR laser irradiation studies on glycine alanine, and cysteine. The OH and the NH stretching overtones of the low-energy conformers of these amino acids deposited in Ar, Kr, Xe, and N_{2} matrices were irradiated. At the expense of the irradiated conformer, other conformers were enriched and new, high-energy, formerly unobserved conformers were formed in the matrices. This enabled the separation and unambiguous assignment of the vibrational transitions of the different conformers. The main conversion paths and their efficiencies are described qualitatively showing that there are significant differences in different matrices. It was shown that the high-energy conformer decays in the matrix by H-atom tunneling. The lifetimes of the high-energy conformers in different matrices were measured. Based on our results we conclude that some theoretically predicted low-energy conformers of amino acids are likely even absent in low-energy matrices due to fast H-atom tunneling. G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Mol. Struct. 1025 (Light-Induced Processes in Cryogenic Matrices Special Issue) 33-42 (2012). G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A 116 (43) 10539-10547 (2012). G. Bazso, E. E. Najbauer, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay J. Phys. Chem. A in press, DOI: 10.1021/jp400196b. E. E. Najbauer, G. Bazso, G. Magyarfalvi, G. Tarczay in preparation.

  17. Don't Waste Your Energy: Modelling the Sustainability of Direct Use at Tauranga Low-Temperature Geothermal System, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, S. C.; Alcaraz, S.

    2012-12-01

    Tauranga geothermal system is located on the north coast of the North Island of New Zealand, and is used by the more than 120,000 inhabitants for direct heating and cooling, bathing and aquaculture. With warm waters of up to 60°C at 500 m depth it has been monitored as a groundwater system, but increasing demands on the field and awareness of the fragility of geothermal systems has led to a call to assess the potential long-term effects of withdrawing and reinjecting fluid. Here, we create a numerical simulation of the field to determine if currently approved usage rates are sustainable, and if not to provide some constraints for future management of the area. We created a geological model of the Tauranga area covering 70 km by 130 km down to 2 km depth using Leapfrog Geothermal, and used this as the basis for a TOUGH2 model of fluid and heat flow. We calibrated the model against well temperatures measured between 0 and 759 m depth, showing that the surficial sedimentary layer was not a major control on fluid and heat flow, but that the underlying volcanoclastic rocks must have a slightly higher bulk thermal conductivity and lower permeability than had been previously measured. The model allowed us to better constrain the extent of the heat source at depth, as well as to assess its distribution. The system is primarily conductive, with the onset of convection above the main heat source in the centre of the system where modelled heat input is up to 300 mW/m2. Modelling a range of take and reinjection scenarios based on permitted values allows us to determine the capacity of the field and if its use needs to be limited to ensure that it is maintained for future generations.

  18. Low-temperature thermodynamics with quantum coherence

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhachar, Varun; Gour, Gilad

    2015-01-01

    Thermal operations are an operational model of non-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics. In the absence of coherence between energy levels, exact state transition conditions under thermal operations are known in terms of a mathematical relation called thermo-majorization. But incorporating coherence has turned out to be challenging, even under the relatively tractable model wherein all Gibbs state-preserving quantum channels are included. Here we find a mathematical generalization of thermal operations at low temperatures, ‘cooling maps', for which we derive the necessary and sufficient state transition condition. Cooling maps that saturate recently discovered bounds on coherence transfer are realizable as thermal operations, motivating us to conjecture that all cooling maps are thermal operations. Cooling maps, though a less-conservative generalization to thermal operations, are more tractable than Gibbs-preserving operations, suggesting that cooling map-like models at general temperatures could be of use in gaining insight about thermal operations. PMID:26138621

  19. Low Temperature Flow of PVC Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Xue, Gi

    2011-03-01

    PVC is usually processed at temperature above 180& circ; C, however, it starts to degrade at 130& circ; C. If PVC can flow at temperatures below glass transition temperature (Tg), the manufacturing procedure will be energy-conserving and environment-friendly. We find that PVC powders with controlled inter-segment van der Waals attraction can be compressed into a transparent pellet with high modulus at low temperatures. The molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon involves shear-induced unjamming transition. PVC chains are unjammed by cold-pressing freeze-dried powder with decreased packing density. Because the Tg of freeze-dried PVC is dramatically reduced to the test temperatures under compression, PVC chains are able to flow by applying pressure solely. These results help us better understanding glass transition and can possible to develop a theory for cold processes.

  20. Low Temperature Detectors: Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, G. C.

    2009-12-16

    Despite the added cost and complexity of operating at sub-Kelvin temperatures, there are many measurement applications where the sensitivity and precision provided by low temperature detectors greatly outweigh any disadvantages. As a result, low temperature detectors are now finding wide application for measurements ranging from cosmology to homeland defense. In this tutorial I will introduce the basic operating principles and fundamental performance limits of several types of low temperature detectors.

  1. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Youvan, Douglas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2002-09-24

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  2. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  3. Low-temperature energy transfer in LHC-II trimers from the Chl a/b light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II.

    PubMed Central

    Savikhin, S; van Amerongen, H; Kwa, S L; van Grondelle, R; Struve, W S

    1994-01-01

    Temperature dependence in electronic energy transfer steps within light-harvesting antenna trimers from photosystem II was investigated by studying Chl a pump-probe anisotropy decays at several wavelengths from 675 to 682 nm. The anisotropy lifetime is markedly sensitive to temperature at the longest wavelengths (680-682 nm), increasing by factors of 5 to 6 as the trimers are cooled from room temperature to 13 K. The temperature dependence is muted at 677 and 675 nm. This behavior is modeled using simulations of temperature-broadened Chl a absorption and fluorescence spectra in spectral overlap calculations of Förster energy transfer rates. In this model, the 680 nm anisotropy decays are dominated by uphill energy transfers from 680 nm Chl a pigments at the red edge of the LHC-II spectrum; the 675 nm anisotropy decays reflect a statistical average of uphill and downhill energy transfers from 676-nm pigments. The measured temperature dependence is consistent with essentially uncorrelated inhomogeneous broadening of donor and acceptor Chl a pigments. PMID:8061208

  4. Radically Different Kinetics at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Ian

    2014-06-01

    The use of the CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme, or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique coupled with pulsed laser photochemical kinetics methods has shown that reactions involving radicals can be very rapid at temperatures down to 10 K or below. The results have had a major impact in astrochemistry and planetology, as well as proving an exacting test for theory. The technique has also been applied to the formation of transient complexes of interest both in atmospheric chemistry and combustion. Until now, all of the chemical reactions studied in this way have taken place on attractive potential energy surfaces with no overall barrier to reaction. The F + H2 {→} HF + H reaction does possess a substantial energetic barrier ({\\cong} 800 K), and might therefore be expected to slow to a negligible rate at very low temperatures. In fact, this H-atom abstraction reaction does take place efficiently at low temperatures due entirely to tunneling. I will report direct experimental measurements of the rate of this reaction down to a temperature of 11 K, in remarkable agreement with state-of-the-art quantum reactive scattering calculations by François Lique (Université du Havre) and Millard Alexander (University of Maryland). It is thought that long chain cyanopolyyne molecules H(C2)nCN may play an important role in the formation of the orange haze layer in Titan's atmosphere. The longest carbon chain molecule observed in interstellar space, HC11N, is also a member of this series. I will present new results, obtained in collaboration with Jean-Claude Guillemin (Ecole de Chimie de Rennes) and Stephen Klippenstein (Argonne National Labs), on reactions of C2H, CN and C3N radicals (using a new LIF scheme by Hoshina and Endo which contribute to the low temperature formation of (cyano)polyynes. H. Sabbah, L. Biennier, I. R. Sims, Y. Georgievskii, S. J. Klippenstein, I. W. M. Smith, Science 317, 102 (2007). S. D. Le Picard, M

  5. Energy calibration of a linear accelerator with photonuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    St. George, F.; Anderson, D.W.

    1982-05-01

    Photonuclear reactions have been used to calibrate the energy of a Sagittaire clinical electron accelerator between 10 and 30 MeV. Thresholds at 10.8 MeV for the /sup 63/Cu(..gamma..,n)/sup 62/Cu reaction and 29.7 MeV for the /sup 32/S(..gamma..,3p)/sup 29/Al reaction provided two energy points. The break in the /sup 16/O(..gamma..,n)/sup 15/O activation yield curve at 17.3 MeV was determined as an intermediate point. The relationship between electron kinetic enegy and current through the energy-analyzing magnet was found to be linear within 1.0% in this energy range.

  6. Development of Electronics for Low Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott; Overton, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about -183 C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. An on-going research and development program on low temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of efficient power systems capable of surviving and exploiting the advantages of low temperature environments. Inhouse efforts include the design, fabrication, and characterization of low temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low temperature operations, such as dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, opto-electronic devices, as well as packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware.

  7. Energy gap revealed by low-temperature scanning-tunnelling spectroscopy of the Si(111)-7×7 surface in illuminated slightly doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Odobescu, A B; Zaitsev-Zotov, S V

    2012-10-01

    Physical properties of the Si(111)-7×7 surface of low-doped n- and p-type Si samples are studied in the liquid helium temperature region by scanning-tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy. Conduction required for the study is provided by illumination of the surface. Application of illumination completely removes the band bending near the surface and restores the initial population of the surface states. Our results indicate the existence of the energy gap 2Δ = 40 ± 10 meV in the intrinsically populated Si(111)-7×7 surface. PMID:22909896

  8. Effects of high-flux low-energy ion bombardment on the low-temperature growth morphology of TiN(001) epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, Brian W.; Cahill, David G.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2000-06-15

    Ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is used to characterize the surface morphology of TiN(001) epitaxial layers grown by dc reactive magnetron sputtering at growth temperatures of T{sub s}=650 and T{sub s}=750 degree sign C. An auxiliary anode is used to bias the N{sub 2} plasma and produce a large flux of low-energy N{sub 2}{sup +} ions that bombard the film surface during growth: the ratio of the N{sub 2}{sup +} flux to the Ti growth flux is {approx_equal}25. At ion energies E{sub i} near the threshold for the production of bulk defects (E{sub i}=43 eV and T{sub s}=650 degree sign C), ion bombardment decreases the amplitude of the roughness, decreases the average distance between growth mounds, and reduces the sharpness of grooves between growth mounds. The critical island radius for second layer nucleation R{sub c} is approximately 12 and 17 nm at growth temperatures of 650 and 750 degree sign C respectively; at 650 degree sign C, R{sub c} is reduced to (approx =)10 nm by ion bombardment. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  9. Calibrated Ultra Fast Image Simulations for the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruderer, Claudio; Chang, Chihway; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Bergé, Joel; Gamper, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Image simulations are becoming increasingly important in understanding the measurement process of the shapes of galaxies for weak lensing and the associated systematic effects. For this purpose we present the first implementation of the Monte Carlo Control Loops (MCCL), a coherent framework for studying systematic effects in weak lensing. It allows us to model and calibrate the shear measurement process using image simulations from the Ultra Fast Image Generator (UFig) and the image analysis software SExtractor. We apply this framework to a subset of the data taken during the Science Verification period (SV) of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). We calibrate the UFig simulations to be statistically consistent with one of the SV images, which covers ∼0.5 square degrees. We then perform tolerance analyses by perturbing six simulation parameters and study their impact on the shear measurement at the one-point level. This allows us to determine the relative importance of different parameters. For spatially constant systematic errors and point-spread function, the calibration of the simulation reaches the weak lensing precision needed for the DES SV survey area. Furthermore, we find a sensitivity of the shear measurement to the intrinsic ellipticity distribution, and an interplay between the magnitude-size and the pixel value diagnostics in constraining the noise model. This work is the first application of the MCCL framework to data and shows how it can be used to methodically study the impact of systematics on the cosmic shear measurement.

  10. Low Temperature Thermometry Using Inexpensive Silicon Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltham, N. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of silicon diodes for low temperature thermometry in the teaching laboratory. A simple and inexpensive circuit for display of the diode forward voltage under constant current conditions is described, and its application in the evaluation of low cost silicon diodes as low temperature thermometers is presented. (SK)

  11. Operation of FPGAs at Extremely Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Cozy, Scott; Lacayo, Veronica; Bakhshi, Alireza; Stern, Ryan; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Johnson, Travis; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Bolotin, Gary; Gregoire, Tim; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the operation of FPGAs at very low temperatures eg -160(deg)C. Both Actel and Xilinx parts are tested It was found that low temperature operations is not a problem with the parts tested, but there is a problem with powering on an FPGA at cold temperatures.

  12. Thermoelectric Materials Development for Low Temperature Geothermal Power Generation

    DOE Data Explorer

    Tim Hansen

    2016-01-29

    Data includes characterization results for novel thermoelectric materials developed specifically for power generation from low temperature geothermal brines. Materials characterization data includes material density, thickness, resistance, Seebeck coefficient. This research was carried out by Novus Energy Partners in Cooperation with Southern Research Institute for a Department of Energy Sponsored Project.

  13. Spacecraft Charging in Low Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda N.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft charging in plasma and radiation environments is a temperature dependent phenomenon due to the reduction of electrical conductivity in dielectric materials at low temperatures. Charging time constants are proportional to l/conductivity may become very large (on the order of days to years) at low temperatures and accumulation of charge densities in insulators in charging environments traditionally considered benign at ambient temperatures may be sufficient to produce charge densities and electric fields of concern in insulators at low temperatures. Low temperature charging is of interest because a number of spacecraft-primarily infrared astronomy and microwave cosmology observatories-are currently being design, built, and or operated at very cold temperatures on the order of 40K to 100K. This paper reviews the temperature dependence of spacecraft charging processes and material parameters important to charging as a function of temperature with an emphasis on low temperatures regimes.

  14. Low temperature oxidation of plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Art J.; Roussel, Paul

    2013-05-15

    The initial oxidation of gallium stabilized {delta}-plutonium metal at 193 K has been followed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. On exposure to Langmuir quantities of oxygen, plutonium rapidly forms a trivalent oxide followed by a tetravalent plutonium oxide. The growth modes of both oxides have been determined. Warming the sample in vacuum, the tetravalent oxide reduces to the trivalent oxide. The kinetics of this reduction reaction have followed and the activation energy has been determined to be 38.8 kJ mol{sup -1}.

  15. Advanced low-temperature sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.; Venkataramani, V.S.; Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.

    1995-12-01

    A number of promising technologies are currently being optimized for coal-based power generation, including the Integrated-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. If IGCC is to be used successfully for power generation, an economic and efficient way must be found to remove the contaminants, particularly sulfur species, found in coal gas. Except for the hot gas desulfurization system, all major components of IGCC are commercially available or have been shown to meet system requirements. Over the last two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has sponsored development of various configurations of high-temperature desulfurization systems including fixed-bed, moving-bed, transport-bed, and fluidized-bed systems. Because of their mode of operation and requirements for sorbent manufacturing, the fixed-bed systems can generally use the same materials as moving-bed configurations, i.e., pelletized or extruded sorbents, while fluidized-bed (circulating or bubbling configurations) and transport reactor configurations use materials generally described as agglomerated or granulated.The objective of this program is to remove hydrogen sulfides from coal gas using sorbent materials.

  16. The low temperature radiolysis of cis-syn-cis-dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 complexes with alkaline earth metal nitrates: An evidence for energy transfer to the macrocyclic ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakurdaeva, O. A.; Nesterov, S. V.; Shmakova, N. A.; Sokolova, N. A.; Feldman, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    Formation of paramagnetic intermediates in macrocyclic complexes of cis-syn-cis-dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) with alkaline earth metal nitrates under X-rays irradiation was studied by EPR spectroscopy. NO32- dianions appear to be predominant intermediate species in the samples irradiated at 77 K at low doses (up to 40 kGy). This result was interpreted as an evidence for energy transfer within the complex from crown ether to nitrate anion. Increase in the absorbed dose from 40 kGy to 284 kGy results in built-up of a new EPR signal assigned to macrocyclic -CH2-ĊH-O- radicals produced from crown ether moieties. Thermal annealing of the irradiated macrocyclic complexes at 273 К led to fast decay of NO32- . This process was accompanied by a formation of -CH2-ĊH-O- radicals in secondary reactions. The nature of the metal cations coordinated in the macrocycle cavity had no appreciable effect on the composition of radical products and their post-radiation transformations.

  17. Defect energy levels in p-type GaAsBi and GaAs grown by MBE at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, P. M.; Tarun, M. C.; Bahrami-Yekta, V.; Tiedje, T.; Lewis, R. B.; Masnadi-Shirazi, M.

    2016-06-01

    Deep level defects in p-type GaAs1‑x Bi x (x < 1%) and GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy at substrate temperatures of 330 °C and 370 °C have been characterized by deep level transient spectroscopy. We find that incorporating Bi into GaAs at 330 °C does not affect the total concentration of hole traps, which is ∼4 × 1016 cm‑3, comparable to the concentration of electron traps observed in Si-doped GaAsBi having a similar alloy composition. Increasing the growth temperature of the p-type GaAsBi (x = 0.8%) layer from 330 °C to 370 °C reduces the hole trap concentration by an order of magnitude. Moreover, the defects having near mid-gap energy levels that are the most efficient non-radiative recombination centers are present only in GaAsBi layers grown at the lower temperature. These new results are discussed in the context of previous measurements of n-type GaAs and GaAsBi layers grown under similar conditions.

  18. Effects of the Distributions of Energy or Charge Transfer Rates on Spectral Hole Burning in Pigment-Protein Complexes at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Herascu, N.; Ahmouda, S.; Picorel, R.; Seibert, M.; Jankowiak, R.; Zazubovich, V.

    2011-12-22

    Effects of the distributions of excitation energy transfer (EET) rates (homogeneous line widths) on the nonphotochemical (resonant) spectral hole burning (SHB) processes in photosynthetic chlorophyll-protein complexes (reaction center [RC] and CP43 antenna of Photosystem II from spinach) are considered. It is demonstrated that inclusion of such a distribution results in somewhat more dispersive hole burning kinetics. More importantly, however, inclusion of the EET rate distributions strongly affects the dependence of the hole width on the fractional hole depth. Different types of line width distributions have been explored, including those resulting from Foerster type EET between weakly interacting pigments as well as Gaussian ones, which may be a reasonable approximation for those resulting, for instance, from so-called extended Foerster models. For Gaussian line width distributions, it is possible to determine the parameters of both line width and tunneling parameter distributions from SHB data without a priori knowledge of any of them. Concerning more realistic asymmetric distributions, we demonstrate, using the simple example of CP43 antenna, that one can use SHB modeling to estimate electrostatic couplings between pigments and support or exclude assignment of certain pigment(s) to a particular state.

  19. The impact of low-temperature seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage (SATES) systems on chlorinated solvent contaminated groundwater: Modeling of spreading and degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuurbier, Koen G.; Hartog, Niels; Valstar, Johan; Post, Vincent E. A.; van Breukelen, Boris M.

    2013-04-01

    Groundwater systems are increasingly used for seasonal aquifer thermal energy storage (SATES) for periodic heating and cooling of buildings. Its use is hampered in contaminated aquifers because of the potential environmental risks associated with the spreading of contaminated groundwater, but positive side effects, such as enhanced contaminant remediation, might also occur. A first reactive transport study is presented to assess the effect of SATES on the fate of chlorinated solvents by means of scenario modeling, with emphasis on the effects of transient SATES pumping and applicable kinetic degradation regime. Temperature effects on physical, chemical, and biological reactions were excluded as calculations and initial simulations showed that the small temperature range commonly involved (ΔT < 15 °C) only caused minor effects. The results show that a significant decrease of the contaminant mass and (eventually) plume volume occurs when degradation is described as sediment-limited with a constant rate in space and time, provided that dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) is absent. However, in the presence of DNAPL dissolution, particularly when the dissolved contaminant reaches SATES wells, a considerably larger contaminant plume is created, depending on the balance between DNAPL dissolution and mass removal by degradation. Under conditions where degradation is contaminant-limited and degradation rates depend on contaminant concentrations in the aquifer, a SATES system does not result in enhanced remediation of a contaminant plume. Although field data are lacking and existing regulatory constraints do not yet permit the application of SATES in contaminated aquifers, reactive transport modeling provides a means of assessing the risks of SATES application in contaminated aquifers. The results from this study are considered to be a first step in identifying the subsurface conditions under which SATES can be applied in a safe or even beneficial manner.

  20. Energy Calibration of the Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter Chamber (SOFCAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christl, M. C.; Fountain, W. F.; Parnell, T.; Roberts, F. E.; Gregory, J. C.; Johnson, J.; Takahashi, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The Scintillating Optical Fiber Calorimeter (SOFCAL) detector is designed to make direct measures of the primary cosmic ray spectrum from -200 GeV/amu - 20 TeV/amu. The primary particles are resolved into groups according to their charge (p, He, CNO, Medium Z, Heavy Z) using both active and passive components integrated into the detector. The principal part of SOFCAL is a thin ionization calorimeter that measures the electromagnetic cascades that result from these energetic particles interacting in the detector. The calorimeter is divided into two sections: a thin passive emulsion/x-ray film calorimeter, and a fiber calorimeter that uses crossing layers of small scintillating optical fibers to sample the energy deposition of the cascades. The energy determination is made by fitting the fiber data to transition curves generated by Monte Carlo simulations. The fiber data must first be calibrated using the electron counts from the emulsion plates in the calorimeter for a small number of events. The technique and results of this calibration will be presented together with samples of the data from a balloon flight.

  1. Improved Low Temperature Performance of Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Gnanaraj, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature double-layer capacitor operation enabled by: - Base acetonitrile / TEATFB salt formulation - Addition of low melting point formates, esters and cyclic ethers center dot Key electrolyte design factors: - Volume of co-solvent - Concentration of salt center dot Capacity increased through higher capacity electrodes: - Zeolite templated carbons - Asymmetric cell designs center dot Continuing efforts - Improve asymmetric cell performance at low temperature - Cycle life testing Motivation center dot Benchmark performance of commercial cells center dot Approaches for designing low temperature systems - Symmetric cells (activated carbon electrodes) - Symmetric cells (zeolite templated carbon electrodes) - Asymmetric cells (lithium titanate/activated carbon electrodes) center dot Experimental results center dot Summary

  2. Viscosity and density of methanol/water mixtures at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, J. G.; Kurata, F.; Swift, G. W.

    1968-01-01

    Viscosity and density are measured at low temperatures for three methanol/water mixtures. Viscosity is determined by a modified falling cylinder method or a calibrated viscometer. Density is determined by the volume of each mixture contained in a calibrated glass cell placed in a constant-temperature bath.

  3. Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sterilization Shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhiraman, R. P.; Beeler, D.; Meyyappan, M.; Khare, B. N.

    2012-10-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sterilization shower to address both forward and backward biological contamination issues is presented. The molecular effects of plasma exposure required to sterilize microorganisms is also analysed.

  4. Low temperature deformation detwinning - a reverse mode of twinning.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. D.; Liu, W.; Lu, L.; Ren, Y.; Nie, Z. H.; Almer, J.; Cheng, S.; Shen, Y. F.; Zuo, L.; Liaw, P. K.; Lu, K.

    2010-01-01

    The origin of the plasticity in bulk nanocrystalline metals have, to date, been attributed to the grain-boundary-mediated process, stress-induced grain coalescence, dislocation plasticity, and/or twinning. Here we report a different mechanism - detwinning, which operates at low temperatures during the tensile deformation of an electrodeposited Cu with a high density of nanosized growth twins. Both three-dimensional XRD microscopy using the Laue method with a submicron-sized polychromatic beam and high-energy XRD technique with a monochromatic beam provide the direct experimental evidences for low temperature detwinning of nanoscale twins.

  5. Low Temperature Detectors for Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nucciotti, A.

    2014-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed many exciting breakthroughs in neutrino physics. The detection of neutrino oscillations has proved that neutrinos are massive particles but the assessment of their absolute mass scale is still an outstanding challenge in today particle physics and cosmology. Due to their abundance as big-bang relics, massive neutrinos strongly affect the large-scale structure and dynamics of the universe. In addition, the knowledge of the scale of neutrino masses, together with their hierarchy pattern, is invaluable to clarify the origin of fermion masses beyond the Higgs mechanism. The mass hierarchy is not the only missing piece in the puzzle. Theories of neutrino mass generation call into play Majorana neutrinos and there are experimental observations pointing to the existence of sterile neutrinos in addition to the three ones weakly interacting. Since low temperature detectors were first proposed for neutrino physics experiments in 1984, there have been impressive technical progresses: today this technique offers the high energy resolution and scalability required for leading edges and competitive experiments addressing the still open questions.

  6. Low-Temperature Extraction of Oil From Shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Technique increases recovery and energy efficiency. Advantages of method greater product yield and, because of the relatively low temperatures, minimal gas formation, smaller amounts of char byproduct, and less carbonate-rock decomposition. Up to 94 percent by weight of organic material in shale extracted.

  7. Mass calibration of the energy axis in ToF-E elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meersschaut, J.; Laricchiuta, G.; Sajavaara, T.; Vandervorst, W.

    2016-03-01

    We report on procedures that we have developed to mass-calibrate the energy axis of ToF-E histograms in elastic recoil detection analysis. The obtained calibration parameters allow one to transform the ToF-E histogram into a calibrated ToF-M histogram.

  8. Electronics Demonstrated for Low- Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many NASA spacecraft, such as planetary explorers and deep space probes. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would experience an average temperature near Saturn of about 183 C. Electronics capable of low-temperature operation in the harsh deep space environment also would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. An ongoing research and development program on low-temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is focusing on the design of efficient power systems that can survive and exploit the advantages of low-temperature environments. The targeted systems, which are mission driven, include converters, inverters, controls, digital circuits, and special-purpose circuits. Initial development efforts successfully demonstrated the low-temperature operation and cold-restart of several direct-current/direct-current (dc/dc) converters based on different types of circuit design, some with superconducting inductors. The table lists some of these dc/dc converters with their properties, and the photograph shows a high-voltage, high-power dc/dc converter designed for an ion propulsion system for low-temperature operation. The development efforts of advanced electronic systems and the supporting technologies for low-temperature operation are being carried out in-house and through collaboration with other Government agencies, industry, and academia. The Low Temperature Electronics Program supports missions and development programs at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center. The developed technologies will be transferred to commercial end users for applications such as satellite infrared sensors and medical diagnostic equipment.

  9. Final technical report to Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences. ''Oxide ceramic alloys and microlaminates'' (1996-1999) and ''Low temperature processing and kinetics of ceramics and ceramic matrix composites with large interfacial areas'' (1999-2000)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, I-Wei

    2001-03-26

    We have discovered a novel two-step sintering method that opened up a low temperature processing window within which fully dense nanocrystalline yttrium oxide was obtained with no concurrent grain growth during final-stage sintering. We have developed a new method of processing laminate ceramics using deformation processing in the green state. We have lastly developed a colloidal processing technique to encapsulate biomolecules at ambient, neutral-pH, aqueous conditions.

  10. Formation of silicon oxide grains at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnokutski, S. A.; Rouillé, G.; Jäger, C.; Huisken, F.; Zhukovska, S.; Henning, Th.

    2014-02-10

    The formation of grains in the interstellar medium, i.e., at low temperature, has been proposed as a possibility to solve the lifetime problem of cosmic dust. This process lacks a firm experimental basis, which is the goal of this study. We have investigated the condensation of SiO molecules at low temperature using neon matrix and helium droplet isolation techniques. The energies of SiO polymerization reactions have been determined experimentally with a calorimetric method and theoretically with calculations based on the density functional theory. The combined experimental and theoretical values have revealed the formation of cyclic (SiO) {sub k} (k = 2-3) clusters inside helium droplets at T = 0.37 K. Therefore, the oligomerization of SiO molecules is found to be barrierless and is expected to be fast in the low-temperature environment of the interstellar medium on the surface of dust grains. The incorporation of numerous SiO molecules in helium droplets leads to the formation of nanoscale amorphous SiO grains. Similarly, the annealing and evaporation of SiO-doped Ne matrices lead to the formation of solid amorphous SiO on the substrate. The structure and composition of the grains were determined by infrared absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results support the hypothesis that interstellar silicates can be formed in the low-temperature regions of the interstellar medium by accretion through barrierless reactions.

  11. A low temperature thermal conductivity database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcraft, Adam L.; Gray, Adam

    2009-12-01

    Low temperature detectors necessarily require low temperature instruments. Constructing good low temperature instruments requires information on the properties of materials used in their construction, in particular the thermal conductivity. Unfortunately, this is poorly known for many materials. Collections of data in text books tend to be incomplete and in the worst cases are misleading. For most materials, what information is known is scattered through the literature. Searching out this data is time consuming, and in any case often results in conflicting information. We have started a programme to locate, consolidate and critically analyse thermal conductivity measurements from the literature, particularly for the challenging temperature range below 1 K. This has already produced useful results. We present some preliminary results here.

  12. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; McKinzie, II. Billy John

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  13. Thermoelectric harvesting of low temperature natural/waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, David Michael

    2012-06-01

    Apart from specialized space requirements current development in applications of thermoelectric generation mainly relate to reducing harmful carbon emissions and decreasing costly fuel consumption through the recovery of exhaust heat from fossil fuel powered engines and emissions from industrial utilities. Focus on these applications is to the detriment of the wider exploitations of thermoelectrics with other sources of heat energy, and in particular natural occurring and waste low temperature heat, receiving little, if any, attention. In this presentation thermoelectric generation applications, both potential and real in harvesting low temperature waste/natural heat are reviewed. The use of thermoelectrics to harvest solar energy, ocean thermal energy, geothermal heat and waste heat are discussed and their credibility as future large-scale sources of electrical power assessed.

  14. CVD growth of graphene at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changgan

    2012-02-01

    Graphene has attracted a lot of research interest owing to its exotic properties and a wide spectrum of potential applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from gaseous hydrocarbon sources has shown great promises for large-scale graphene growth. However, high growth temperature, typically 1000^oC, is required for such growth. In this talk, I will show a revised CVD route to grow graphene on Cu foils at low temperature, adopting solid and liquid hydrocarbon feedstocks. For solid PMMA and polystyrene precursors, centimeter-scale monolayer graphene films are synthesized at a growth temperature down to 400^oC. When benzene is used as the hydrocarbon source, monolayer graphene flakes with excellent quality are achieved at a growth temperature as low as 300^oC. I will also talk about our recent progress on low-temperature graphene growth using paraterphenyl as precursor. The successful low-temperature growth can be qualitatively understood from the first principles calculations. Our work might pave a way to economical and convenient growth route of graphene, as well as better control of the growth pattern of graphene at low temperature.

  15. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  16. Fuzzy Logic Controller for Low Temperature Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Gonzalez, A.; Barmatz, M.

    1996-01-01

    The most common temperature controller used in low temperature experiments is the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller due to its simplicity and robustness. However, the performance of temperature regulation using the PID controller depends on initial parameter setup, which often requires operator's expert knowledge on the system. In this paper, we present a computer-assisted temperature controller based on the well known.

  17. Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Slegeir, William A.; Sapienza, Richard S.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

  18. Low-Temperature Seal for Actuator Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindfors, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Combination bearing and seal used on Space Shuttle functions reliably at temperatures as low as - 160 degrees F and as high as + 130 degrees F. Corrosion-resistant stainless-steel spacer separates secondary and primary seals in both old and new versions of seal assembly. In new version, combination of flexible sealing lip and bridge is less susceptible to cracking at low temperatures.

  19. Low temperature thermophysical properties of lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremers, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of lunar fines samples from the Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 missions, determined at low temperatures as a function of temperature and various densities, are reviewed. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of lunar soil is nearly the same as that of terrestrial basaltic rock under the same temperature and pressure conditions.

  20. Development of Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott S.; Overton, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Electronic systems that are capable of operating at cryogenic temperatures will be needed for many future NASA space missions, including deep space probes and spacecraft for planetary surface exploration. In addition to being able to survive the harsh deep space environment, low-temperature electronics would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic exploration. An ongoing research and development project for the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature electronics and supporting technologies at NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on efficient power systems capable of surviving in and exploiting the advantages of low-temperature environments. Supporting technologies include dielectric and insulating materials, semiconductor devices, passive power components, optoelectronic devices, and packaging and integration of the developed components into prototype flight hardware. An overview of the project is presented, including a description of the test facilities, a discussion of selected data from component testing, and a presentation of ongoing research activities being performed in collaboration with various organizations.

  1. Low temperature rate coefficients of the H + CH{sup +} → C{sup +} + H{sub 2} reaction: New potential energy surface and time-independent quantum scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Werfelli, Ghofran; Halvick, Philippe; Stoecklin, Thierry; Honvault, Pascal; Kerkeni, Boutheïna

    2015-09-21

    The observed abundances of the methylidyne cation, CH{sup +}, in diffuse molecular clouds can be two orders of magnitude higher than the prediction of the standard gas-phase models which, in turn, predict rather well the abundances of neutral CH. It is therefore necessary to investigate all the possible formation and destruction processes of CH{sup +} in the interstellar medium with the most abundant species H, H{sub 2}, and e{sup −}. In this work, we address the destruction process of CH{sup +} by hydrogen abstraction. We report a new calculation of the low temperature rate coefficients for the abstraction reaction, using accurate time-independent quantum scattering and a new high-level ab initio global potential energy surface including a realistic model of the long-range interaction between the reactants H and CH{sup +}. The calculated thermal rate coefficient is in good agreement with the experimental data in the range 50 K–800 K. However, at lower temperatures, the experimental rate coefficient takes exceedingly small values which are not reproduced by the calculated rate coefficient. Instead, the latter rate coefficient is close to the one given by the Langevin capture model, as expected for a reaction involving an ion and a neutral species. Several recent theoretical works have reported a seemingly good agreement with the experiment below 50 K, but an analysis of these works show that they are based on potential energy surfaces with incorrect long-range behavior. The experimental results were explained by a loss of reactivity of the lowest rotational states of the reactant; however, the quantum scattering calculations show the opposite, namely, a reactivity enhancement with rotational excitation.

  2. LOW-TEMPERATURE CRYSTALLIZATION OF AMORPHOUS SILICATE IN ASTROPHYSICAL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    We construct a theoretical model for low-temperature crystallization of amorphous silicate grains induced by exothermic chemical reactions. As a first step, the model is applied to the annealing experiments, in which the samples are (1) amorphous silicate grains and (2) amorphous silicate grains covered with an amorphous carbon layer. We derive the activation energies of crystallization for amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon from the analysis of the experiments. Furthermore, we apply the model to the experiment of low-temperature crystallization of an amorphous silicate core covered with an amorphous carbon layer containing reactive molecules. We clarify the conditions of low-temperature crystallization due to exothermic chemical reactions. Next, we formulate the crystallization conditions so as to be applicable to astrophysical environments. We show that the present crystallization mechanism is characterized by two quantities: the stored energy density Q in a grain and the duration of the chemical reactions {tau}. The crystallization conditions are given by Q>Q{sub min} and {tau} < {tau}{sub cool} regardless of details of the reactions and grain structure, where {tau}{sub cool} is the cooling timescale of the grains heated by exothermic reactions, and Q{sub min} is minimum stored energy density determined by the activation energy of crystallization. Our results suggest that silicate crystallization occurs in wider astrophysical conditions than hitherto considered.

  3. Development of an FBG-based low temperature measurement system for cargo containment of LNG tankers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D. G.; Yoo, W.; Swinehart, P.; Jiang, B.; Haber, T.; Mendez, A.

    2007-09-01

    Given the growing demand for oil and natural gas to meet the world's energy needs, there is nowadays renewed interest in the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) systems. For LNG to remain in its liquid phase, the gas has to be kept at cryogenic temperatures (< 160°C). And, as part of the LNG supply process, it becomes necessary to transport it using massive carrier tankers with cargo hulls operating at low temperatures and using special insulating double-wall construction. The safe and reliable storage and transportation of LNG products calls for low temperature monitoring of said containers to detect the onset of any potential leaks and possible thermal insulation degradation. Because of the hazardous nature of this cargo, only intrinsically-safe, explosion proof devices can be used. Optical fiber sensors-- such as fiber Bragg gratings-- are ideal for this application given their dielectric nature and multi-point sensing telemetry capability. In this paper, we describe the development of an on-line, multi-point FBG-based low temperature monitoring system based on a network of specially packaged FBG temperature and strain sensors mounted at critical locations within the inner hull, cofferdam and secondary barriers of a LNG carrier tanker. Given the stringent cryogenic operating temperature conditions, pertinent FBG designs, coatings and packaging approaches were formulated along with adequate installation techniques and integration of the interrogating FBG electronics into the tanker's overall SCADA monitoring system. FBG temperature sensors were demonstrated to be stable and sensitive over the 80-480K range. Stability is +/- 0.25K or better with repeated calibrations, and long term stability at 480K is ~0.2mK/hour.

  4. Low Temperature Surface Carburization of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sunniva R; Heuer, Arthur H; Sikka, Vinod K

    2007-12-07

    Low-temperature colossal supersaturation (LTCSS) is a novel surface hardening method for carburization of austenitic stainless steels (SS) without the precipitation of carbides. The formation of carbides is kinetically suppressed, enabling extremely high or colossal carbon supersaturation. As a result, surface carbon concentrations in excess of 12 at. % are routinely achieved. This treatment increases the surface hardness by a factor of four to five, improving resistance to wear, corrosion, and fatigue, with significant retained ductility. LTCSS is a diffusional surface hardening process that provides a uniform and conformal hardened gradient surface with no risk of delamination or peeling. The treatment retains the austenitic phase and is completely non-magnetic. In addition, because parts are treated at low temperature, they do not distort or change dimensions. During this treatment, carbon diffusion proceeds into the metal at temperatures that constrain substitutional diffusion or mobility between the metal alloy elements. Though immobilized and unable to assemble to form carbides, chromium and similar alloying elements nonetheless draw enormous amounts of carbon into their interstitial spaces. The carbon in the interstitial spaces of the alloy crystals makes the surface harder than ever achieved before by more conventional heat treating or diffusion process. The carbon solid solution manifests a Vickers hardness often exceeding 1000 HV (equivalent to 70 HRC). This project objective was to extend the LTCSS treatment to other austenitic alloys, and to quantify improvements in fatigue, corrosion, and wear resistance. Highlights from the research include the following: • Extension of the applicability of the LTCSS process to a broad range of austenitic and duplex grades of steels • Demonstration of LTCSS ability for a variety of different component shapes and sizes • Detailed microstructural characterization of LTCSS-treated samples of 316L and other alloys

  5. Issues in energy calibration, nonlinearity, and signal processing for gamma-ray microcalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, Mike W; Hoover, Andrew S; Bacrania, Mnesh K; Hoteling, Nathan; Croce, M; Karpius, P J; Ullom, J N; Bennett, D A; Horansky, R D; Vale, L R; Doriese, W B

    2009-01-01

    Issues regarding the energy calibration of high dynamic range microcalorimeter detector arrays are presented with respect to new results from a minor actinide-mixed oxide radioactive source. The need to move to larger arrays of such detectors necessitates the implementation of automated analysis procedures, which turn out to be nontrivial due to complex calibration shapes and pixel-to-pixel variability. Some possible avenues for improvement, including a more physics-based calibration procedure, are suggested.

  6. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji-Won; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Duty, Chad E.; Gresback, Ryan; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Jellison, Gerald Earle; Jang, Gyoung Gug; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jung, Hyunsung; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Phelps, Tommy

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  7. Cyclic and low temperature effects on microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic temperature and low temperature operating life tests, and pre-/post-life device evaluations were used to determine the degrading effects of thermal environments on microcircuit reliability. Low power transistor-transistor-logic gates and linear devices were included in each test group. Device metallization systems included aluminum metallization/aluminum wire, aluminum metallization/gold wire, and gold metallization/gold wire. Fewer than 2% electrical failures were observed during the cyclic and low temperature life tests and the post-life evaluations revealed approximately 2% bond pull failures. Reconstruction of aluminum die metallization was observed in all devices and the severity of the reconstruction appeared to be directly related to the magnitude of the temperature excursion. All types of bonds except the gold/gold bonds were weakened by exposure to repeated cyclic temperature stress.

  8. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  9. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  10. Low-temperature geothermal database for Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, G.

    1994-11-01

    The goals of the low-temperature assessment project, performed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) is aimed primarily at updating the inventory of the nation's low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. The study has begun in Oregon, where the areas of Paisley, Lakeview, Burns/Hines, Lagrande, and Vale were identified over 40 sites as having potential for direct heat utilization. Specifics sites are outlined, detailing water temperature, flow, and current uses of the sites.

  11. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  12. Fracturing fluids for low temperature wells

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, C.T.; Dollarhide, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Highly viscous fluids are used to initiate and propagate fractures and to place proppant in the fractures during the hydraulic stimulation process. These fluids can cause damage to the conductivity of the induced fractures if they are not properly cleaned out after the fracturing treatment. The clean-up process is aided by the degradation of the polymers, and in low temperature wells the breakdown of the polymer must be chemically induced. This work presents data on a new fracturing fluid aimed specifically at stimulating low temperature and low pressure reservoirs. The system consists of a CO/sub 2/-energized, cross-linked hydroxypropyl guar fluid. The gel is degraded by a traditional breaker that is activated by a new, low temperature breaker activator. The fluid is effective in wells as cool as 60 F and with bhp as low as 100 psi and should be particularly applicable to the shallow gas wells in the Alberta Medicine Hat and high level Keg River areas.

  13. Dynamical States of Low Temperature Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Low ice crystal concentration and sustained in-cloud supersaturation, commonly found in cloud observations at low temperature, challenge our understanding of cirrus formation. Heterogeneous freezing from effloresced ammonium sulfate, glassy aerosol, dust and black carbon are proposed to cause these phenomena; this requires low updrafts for cirrus characteristics to agree with observations and is at odds with the gravity wave spectrum in the upper troposphere. Background temperature fluctuations however can establish a dynamical equilibrium between ice production and sedimentation loss (as opposed to ice crystal formation during the first stages of cloud evolution and subsequent slow cloud decay) that explains low temperature cirrus properties. This newly-discovered state is favored at low temperatures and does not require heterogeneous nucleation to occur (the presence of ice nuclei can however facilitate its onset). Our understanding of cirrus clouds and their role in anthropogenic climate change is reshaped, as the type of dynamical forcing will set these clouds in one of two preferred microphysical regimes with very different susceptibility to aerosol.

  14. Honeycomb artificial spin ice at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Cohen, Lesley; Branford, Will

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a macroscopic playground for magnetically frustrated systems. It consists of a geometrically ordered but magnetically frustrated arrangement of ferromagnetic macros spins, e.g. an arrangement of single domain ferromagnetic nanowires on a honeycomb lattice. Permalloy and cobalt which have critical temperature scales far above 290 K, are commonly used in the construction of such systems. Previous measurements have shown unusual features in the magnetotransport signature of cobalt honeycomb artificial spin ice at temperatures below 50 K which are due to changes in the artificial spin ice's magnetic reversal. In that case, the artificial spin ice bars were 1 micron long, 100 nm wide and 20 nm thick. Here we explore the low temperature magnetic behavior of honeycomb artificial spin ice structures with a variety of bar dimensions, indirectly via electrical transport, as well as, directly using low temperature magnetic imaging techniques. We discuss the extent to which this change in the magnetic reversal at low temperatures is generic to the honeycomb artificial spin ice geometry and whether the bar dimensions have an influence on its onset temperature. The EPSRC (Grant No. EP/G004765/1; Grant No. EP/L504786/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (Grant No. RPG 2012-692) funded this scientific work.

  15. Analysis of Low-Temperature Utilization of Geothermal Resources

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian

    2015-06-30

    Full realization of the potential of what might be considered “low-grade” geothermal resources will require that we examine many more uses for the heat than traditional electricity generation. To demonstrate that geothermal energy truly has the potential to be a national energy source we will be designing, assessing, and evaluating innovative uses for geothermal-produced water such as hybrid biomass-geothermal cogeneration of electricity and district heating and efficiency improvements to the use of cellulosic biomass in addition to utilization of geothermal in district heating for community redevelopment projects. The objectives of this project were: 1) to perform a techno-economic analysis of the integration and utilization potential of low-temperature geothermal sources. Innovative uses of low-enthalpy geothermal water were designed and examined for their ability to offset fossil fuels and decrease CO2 emissions. 2) To perform process optimizations and economic analyses of processes that can utilize low-temperature geothermal fluids. These processes included electricity generation using biomass and district heating systems. 3) To scale up and generalize the results of three case study locations to develop a regionalized model of the utilization of low-temperature geothermal resources. A national-level, GIS-based, low-temperature geothermal resource supply model was developed and used to develop a series of national supply curves. We performed an in-depth analysis of the low-temperature geothermal resources that dominate the eastern half of the United States. The final products of this study include 17 publications, an updated version of the cost estimation software GEOPHIRES, and direct-use supply curves for low-temperature utilization of geothermal resources. The supply curves for direct use geothermal include utilization from known hydrothermal, undiscovered hydrothermal, and near-hydrothermal EGS resources and presented these results at the Stanford

  16. PreCam: A Step Towards the Photometric Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, S. S.; Tucker, D. L.; PreCam Team; DES Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) will be taking the next step in probing the properties of Dark Energy and in understanding the physics of cosmic acceleration. A step towards the photometric calibration of DES is to have a quick, bright survey in the DES footprint (PreCam), using a pre-production set of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) CCDs and a set of 100 mm×100 mm DES filters. The objective of the PreCam Survey is to create a network of calibrated DES grizY standard stars that will be used for DES nightly calibrations and to improve the DES global relative calibrations. Here, we describe the first year of PreCam observation, results, and photometric calibrations.

  17. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, Alan; Persson, Per-Olof; Sutton, Brian D.

    2014-06-15

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, β is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit β → ∞. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-β Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-β random matrix theory.

  18. Precision Spectrophotometric Calibration System for Dark Energy Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Schubnell, Michael S.

    2015-06-30

    For this research we build a precision calibration system and carried out measurements to demonstrate the precision that can be achieved with a high precision spectrometric calibration system. It was shown that the system is capable of providing a complete spectrophotometric calibration at the sub-pixel level. The calibration system uses a fast, high precision monochromator that can quickly and efficiently scan over an instrument’s entire spectral range with a spectral line width of less than 0.01 nm corresponding to a fraction of a pixel on the CCD. The system was extensively evaluated in the laboratory. Our research showed that a complete spectrophotometric calibration standard for spectroscopic survey instruments such as DESI is possible. The monochromator precision and repeatability to a small fraction of the DESI spectrograph LSF was demonstrated with re-initialization on every scan and thermal drift compensation by locking to multiple external line sources. A projector system that mimics telescope aperture for point source at infinity was demonstrated.

  19. Method to calibrate the absolute energy scale of air showers with ultrahigh energy photons.

    PubMed

    Homola, Piotr; Risse, Markus

    2014-04-18

    Calibrating the absolute energy scale of air showers initiated by ultrahigh energy (UHE) cosmic rays is an important experimental issue. Currently, the corresponding systematic uncertainty amounts to 14%-21% using the fluorescence technique. Here, we describe a new, independent method which can be applied if ultrahigh energy photons are observed. While such photon-initiated showers have not yet been identified, the capabilities of present and future cosmic-ray detectors may allow their discovery. The method makes use of the geomagnetic conversion of UHE photons (preshower effect), which significantly affects the subsequent longitudinal shower development. The conversion probability depends on photon energy and can be calculated accurately by QED. The comparison of the observed fraction of converted photon events to the expected one allows the determination of the absolute energy scale of the observed photon air showers and, thus, an energy calibration of the air shower experiment. We provide details of the method and estimate the accuracy that can be reached as a function of the number of observed photon showers. Already a very small number of UHE photons may help to test and fix the absolute energy scale. PMID:24785024

  20. Noise thermometry at ultra-low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, D; Reiser, A; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2016-03-28

    The options for primary thermometry at ultra-low temperatures are rather limited. In practice, most laboratories are using (195)Pt NMR thermometers in the microkelvin range. In recent years, current sensing direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (DC-SQUIDs) have enabled the use of noise thermometry in this temperature range. Such devices have also demonstrated the potential for primary thermometry. One major advantage of noise thermometry is the fact that no driving current is needed to operate the device and thus the heat dissipation within the thermometer can be reduced to a minimum. Ultimately, the intrinsic power dissipation is given by the negligible back action of the readout SQUID. For thermometry in low-temperature experiments, current noise thermometers and magnetic flux fluctuation thermometers have proved to be most suitable. To make use of such thermometers at ultra-low temperatures, we have developed a cross-correlation technique that reduces the amplifier noise contribution to a negligible value. For this, the magnetic flux fluctuations caused by the Brownian motion of the electrons in our noise source are measured inductively by two DC-SQUID magnetometers simultaneously and the signals from these two channels are cross-correlated. Experimentally, we have characterized a thermometer made of a cold-worked high-purity copper cylinder with a diameter of 5 mm and a length of 20 mm for temperatures between 42 μK and 0.8 K. For a given temperature, a measuring time below 1 min is sufficient to reach a precision of better than 1%. The extremely low power dissipation in the thermometer allows continuous operation without heating effects. PMID:26903101

  1. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bingchen; Shen, Xiaonan; Shang, Jingzhi; Cong, Chunxiao; Yang, Weihuang; Eginligil, Mustafa E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg; Yu, Ting E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-11-01

    High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup), while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  2. Cryocoolers near their low-temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper analyses the recently-observed temperature-time dependence in a GM-cooler near its low-temperature limit. The paper mainly focusses on GM-coolers with 4He as the working fluid, but some attention is also paid to pulse-tube refrigerators (PTR's) using 3He and many features of the treatment equally apply to Stirling coolers. Ample attention is paid to the thermodynamics of the cycle by considering the isentropes in the Tp-diagrams of 4He and 3He. The role of the line, where the thermal expansion coefficient is zero, is emphasized. Some fundamental thermodynamic relationships are derived.

  3. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  4. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  5. Low temperature waste form process intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Cozzi, A. D.; Hansen, E. K.; Hill, K. A.

    2015-09-30

    This study successfully demonstrated process intensification of low temperature waste form production. Modifications were made to the dry blend composition to enable a 50% increase in waste concentration, thus allowing for a significant reduction in disposal volume and associated costs. Properties measurements showed that the advanced waste form can be produced using existing equipment and processes. Performance of the waste form was equivalent or better than the current baseline, with approximately double the amount of waste incorporation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of significantly accelerating low level waste immobilization missions across the DOE complex and at environmental remediation sites worldwide.

  6. Transport in Strained Graphene at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Servin, Juan; Nosek, Adrian; Pan, Cheng; Bockrath, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Strain in graphene layers produces synthetic gauge fields that may be used to modify the properties of its electron system. We study single layers of graphene transferred over Ti/Au electrical contacts on oxidized Si wafers with etched triangular holes in the oxide. The layers are strained by applying pressure electrostatically using a gate voltage and hydrostatically using an external inert gas. We investigate electronic transport in this suspended variable-strain graphene system at low temperatures. We will discuss our latest results.

  7. Low temperature breakers for gelled fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Syrinek, A.R.; Lyon, L.B.

    1989-01-03

    A method is described for breaking gelled viscosities of oil-based gelled fracturing fluids containing a gellant comprising aluminum complexes of alkyl phosphate esters and a proppant. The fracturing fluids are used in low-temperature formations having operating temperatures ranging between 60/sup 0/ - 120/sup 0/F. The oil-based gelled fracturing fluids are treated with an effective viscosity breaking amount of a chemical breaker consisting essentially of an admixture of hydrated lime and sodium bicarbonate containing a weight ratio ranging between 100/0 to about 20/80 hydrated lime to sodium bicarbonate.

  8. Low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization.

    PubMed

    Robertshaw, R G

    1983-09-01

    A standard low temperature steam/formaldehyde autoclave was tested according to the manufacturer's instructions, using a range of test pieces containing Bacillus stearothermophilus spores as the challenge organism. There were failures in killing the challenge organism and the reasons for these are discussed. A description of modifications made to the autoclave is given together with details of an improved operating cycle. The performance of the modified autoclave was greatly improved and conditions were established for reliable and consistent sterilization of all the test pieces. A commercially produced prototype autoclave similarly modified also showed effective sterilization. PMID:6195245

  9. Energy efficient microwave synthesis of mesoporous Ce0.5M0.5O2 (Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles for low temperature CO oxidation in an ionic liquid – a comparative study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alammar, Tarek; Chow, Ying -Kit; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2014-11-19

    Ce0.5M0.5O2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by microwave irradiation in the ionic liquid [C4mim][Tf2N] (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide). The morphology, crystallinity, and chemical composition of the obtained materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and N2–adsorption measurements. XRD and Raman spectroscopy analyses confirmed the formation of solid solutions with cubic fluorite structure. The catalytic activities of the Ce0.5M0.5O2 (M = Ti, Zr, Hf) nanoparticles were investigated in the low-temperature oxidation of CO. Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 nanospheres exhibit the best performance (100% conversion at 350 °C), followed by Ce0.5Hf0.5O2more » (55% conversion at 360 °C) and Ce0.5Ti0.5O2 (11% conversion at 350 °C). Heating the as-prepared Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 to 600 °C for extended time leads to a decrease in surface area and, as expected decreased catalytic activity. Depending on the ionic liquid the obtained Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 exhibits different morphologies, varying from nano-spheres in [C4mim][Tf2N] and [P66614][Tf2N] (P66614 = trishexyltetradecylphosphonium) to sheet-like assemblies in [C3mimOH][Tf2N] (C3mimOH = 1-(3-hydroxypropyl)-3-methylimidazolium). As a result, the microwave synthesis superiority to other heating methods like sonochemical synthesis and conventional heating was proven by comparative experiments where the catalytic activity of Ce0.5Zr0.5O2 obtained by alternate methods such as conventional heating was found to be poorer than that of the microwave-synthesised material.« less

  10. Template-assisted synthesis of III-nitride and metal-oxide nano-heterostructures using low-temperature atomic layer deposition for energy, sensing, and catalysis applications (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biyikli, Necmi; Ozgit-Akgun, Cagla; Eren, Hamit; Haider, Ali; Uyar, Tamer; Kayaci, Fatma; Guler, Mustafa Ozgur; Garifullin, Ruslan; Okyay, Ali K.; Ulusoy, Gamze M.; Goldenberg, Eda

    2015-08-01

    Recent experimental research efforts on developing functional nanostructured III-nitride and metal-oxide materials via low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) will be reviewed. Ultimate conformality, a unique propoerty of ALD process, is utilized to fabricate core-shell and hollow tubular nanostructures on various nano-templates including electrospun nanofibrous polymers, self-assembled peptide nanofibers, metallic nanowires, and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). III-nitride and metal-oxide coatings were deposited on these nano-templates via thermal and plasma-enhanced ALD processes with thickness values ranging from a few mono-layers to 40 nm. Metal-oxide materials studied include ZnO, TiO2, HfO2, ZrO2, and Al2O3. Standard ALD growth recipes were modified so that precursor molecules have enough time to diffuse and penetrate within the layers/pores of the nano-template material. As a result, uniform and conformal coatings on high-surface area nano-templates were demonstrated. Substrate temperatures were kept below 200C and within the self-limiting ALD window, so that temperature-sensitive template materials preserved their integrity III-nitride coatings were applied to similar nano-templates via plasma-enhanced ALD (PEALD) technique. AlN, GaN, and InN thin-film coating recipes were optimized to achieve self-limiting growth with deposition temperatures as low as 100C. BN growth took place only for >350C, in which precursor decomposition occured and therefore growth proceeded in CVD regime. III-nitride core-shell and hollow tubular single and multi-layered nanostructures were fabricated. The resulting metal-oxide and III-nitride core-shell and hollow nano-tubular structures were used for photocatalysis, dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC), energy storage and chemical sensing applications. Significantly enhanced catalysis, solar efficiency, charge capacity and sensitivity performance are reported. Moreover, core-shell metal-oxide and III-nitride materials

  11. Advanced materials and design for low temperature SOFCs

    DOEpatents

    Wachsman, Eric D.; Yoon, Heesung; Lee, Kang Taek; Camaratta, Matthew; Ahn, Jin Soo

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the invention are directed to SOFC with a multilayer structure comprising a porous ceramic cathode, optionally a cathodic triple phase boundary layer, a bilayer electrolyte comprising a cerium oxide comprising layer and a bismuth oxide comprising layer, an anion functional layer, and a porous ceramic anode with electrical interconnects, wherein the SOFC displays a very high power density at temperatures below 700.degree. C. with hydrogen or hydrocarbon fuels. The low temperature conversion of chemical energy to electrical energy allows the fabrication of the fuel cells using stainless steel or other metal alloys rather than ceramic conductive oxides as the interconnects.

  12. Inert Anode Life in Low Temperature Reduction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, Donald R.

    2005-06-30

    The production of aluminum metal by low temperature electrolysis utilizing metal non-consumable anodes and ceramic cathodes was extensively investigated. Tests were performed with traditional sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride composition electrolytes, potassium fluoride-- aluminum fluoride electrolytes, and potassium fluoride--sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride electrolytes. All of the Essential First-Tier Requirements of the joint DOE-Aluminum Industry Inert Anode Road Map were achieved and those items yet to be resolved for commercialization of this technology were identified. Methods for the fabrication and welding of metal alloy anodes were developed and tested. The potential savings of energy and energy costs were determined and potential environmental benefits verified.

  13. Stretched Exponential Relaxation of Glasses at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingtian; Wang, Mengyi; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Bu; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    The question of whether glass continues to relax at low temperature is of fundamental and practical interest. Here, we report a novel atomistic simulation method allowing us to directly access the long-term dynamics of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that the potential energy relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay, with a stretching exponent β =3 /5 , as predicted by Phillips's diffusion-trap model. Interestingly, volume relaxation is also found. However, it is not correlated to the energy relaxation, but it is rather a manifestation of the mixed alkali effect.

  14. Low temperature discharge characteristics of lithium-manganese dioxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampartzumian, K.; Iltchev, N.

    Lithium—manganese dioxide cells have not only excellent specific energy and shelf life characteristics, but they are also capable of very promising performance at temperatures as low as -40 °C (-40 °F). The polarization and discharge curves of cylindrical and button cells at -40 °C are compared in an effort to evaluate the useful low temperature operation range. The cathode design, and type of MnO 2 strongly affect the low temperature behaviour. Although the excellent low temperature performance of the Li/SO 2 system can probably never be equalled, due to some diffusion shortcomings inherent in the Li/MnO 2 cells, for low and moderate current drains covering many meteorological, military, and consumer applications, Li/MnO 2 batteries are very competitive in terms of simple technology, increased safety, and price, offering satisfactory operation within the range -40 to +71 °C (-40 °F to +160 °F).

  15. Compton-edge-based energy calibration of double-sided silicon strip detectors in Compton camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee; Park, Jin Hyung; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Ju Hahn; Lee, Chun Sik; Sung Lee, Jae

    2011-05-01

    Accurate energy calibration of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs) is very important, but challenging for high-energy photons. In the present study, the calibration was improved by considering the Compton edge additionally to the existing low-energy calibration points. The result, indeed, was very encouraging. The energy-calibration errors were dramatically reduced, from, on average, 15.5% and 16.9% to 0.47% and 0.31% for the 356 (133Ba) and 662 keV (137Cs) peaks, respectively. The imaging resolution of a double-scattering-type Compton camera using DSSDs as the scatterer detectors, for a 22Na point-like source, also was improved, by ˜9%.

  16. Improving the Performance of Lithium Ion Batteries at Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Trung H. Nguyen; Peter Marren; Kevin Gering

    2007-04-20

    The ability for Li-ion batteries to operate at low temperatures is extremely critical for the development of energy storage for electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Currently, Li-ion cells have limited success in operating at temperature below –10 deg C. Electrolyte conductivity at low temperature is not the main cause of the poor performance of Li-ion cells. Rather the formation of a tight interfacial film between the electrolyte and the electrodes has often been an issue that resulted in a progressive capacity fading and limited discharge rate capability. The objective of our Phase I work is to develop novel electrolytes that can form low interfacial resistance solid electrolyte interface (SEI) films on carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes. From the results of our Phase I work, we found that the interfacial impedance of Fluoro Ethylene Carbonate (FEC) electrolyte at the low temperature of –20degC is astonishingly low, compared to the baseline 1.2M LiPFEMC:EC:PC:DMC (10:20:10:60) electrolyte. We found that electrolyte formulations with fluorinated carbonate co-solvent have excellent film forming properties and better de-solvation characteristics to decrease the interfacial SEI film resistance and facilitate the Li-ion diffusion across the SEI film. The very overwhelming low interfacial impedance for FEC electrolytes will translate into Li-ion cells with much higher power for cold cranking and high Regen/charge at the low temperature. Further, since the SEI film resistance is low, Li interaction kinetics into the electrode will remain very fast and thus Li plating during Regen/charge period be will less likely to happen.

  17. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  18. Low Temperature Reflectance Spectra of Titan Tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, T. L.; Dalton, J. B.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositional interpretation of remotely obtained reflectance spectra of outer solar system surfaces is achieved by a variety of methods. These include matching spectral curves, matching spectral features, quantitative spectral interpretation, and theoretical modeling of spectra. All of these approaches rely upon laboratory measurements of one kind or another. The bulk of these laboratory measurements are obtained with the sample of interest at ambient temperatures and pressures. However, surface temperatures of planets, satellites, and asteroids in the outer solar system are significantly cooler than ambient laboratory conditions on Earth. The infrared spectra of many materials change as a function of temperature. As has been recently demonstrated it is important to assess what effects colder temperatures have on spectral properties and hence, compositional interpretations. Titan tholin is a solid residue created by energetic processing of H-, C-, and N-bearing gases. Such residues can also be created by energetic processing if the gases are condensed into ices. Titan tholin has been suggested as a coloring agent for several surfaces in the outer solar system. Here we report laboratory measurements of Titan tholin at a temperature of 100 K and compare these to measurements of the same sample near room temperature. At low temperature the absorption features beyond 1 micrometer narrow slightly. At wavelengths greater than approx. 0.8 micrometer the overall reflectance of the sample decreases slightly making the sample less red at low temperatures. We will discuss the implications of the laboratory measurements for interpretation of cold outer solar system surfaces.

  19. Antimisting kerosene: Low temperature degradation and blending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.

    1988-01-01

    The inline filtration characteristics of freshly blended and degraded antimisting fuels (AMK) at low temperature are examined. A needle valve degrader was modified to include partial recirculation of degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop. A pressure drop across the needle valve of up to 4,000 psi was used. The pressure drop across a 325 mesh filter screen placed inline with the degrader and directly downstream of the needle valve was measured as a function of time for different values of pressure drop across the needle valve. A volume flux of 1 gpm/sq in was employed based on the frontal area of the screen. It was found that, at ambient temperatures, freshly blended AMK fuel could be degraded using a single pass degradation at 4,000 psi pressure drop across the needle valve to give acceptable filterability performance. At fuel temperatures below -20 C, degradation becomes increasingly difficult and a single pass technique results in unacceptable filtration performance. Recirculation of a fraction of the degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop improved low temperature degradation performance. The problem is addressed of blending the AMK additive with Jet A at various base fuel temperatures.

  20. Electronics for Low Temperature Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2007-01-01

    Exploration missions to outer planets and deep space require spacecraft, probes, and on-board data and communication systems to operate reliably and efficiently under severe harsh conditions. On-board electronics, in particular those in direct exposures to the space environment without any shielding or protection, will encounter extreme low temperature and thermal cycling in their service cycle in most of NASA s upcoming exploration missions. For example, Venus atmosphere, Jupiter atmosphere, Moon surface, Pluto orbiter, Mars, comets, Titan, Europa, and James Webb Space Telescope all involve low-temperature surroundings. Therefore, electronics for space exploration missions need to be designed for operation under such environmental conditions. There are ongoing efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to establish a database on the operation and reliability of electronic devices and circuits under extreme temperature operation for space applications. This work is being performed under the Extreme Temperature Electronics Program with collaboration and support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. The results of these investigations will be used to establish safe operating areas and to identify degradation and failure modes, and the information will be disseminated to mission planners and system designers for use as tools for proper part selection and in risk mitigation. An overview of this program along with experimental data will be presented.

  1. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V.; Kaupp, Martin

    2014-11-01

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities.

  2. Towards improved local hybrid functionals by calibration of exchange-energy densities

    SciTech Connect

    Arbuznikov, Alexei V. E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de; Kaupp, Martin E-mail: martin.kaupp@tu-berlin.de

    2014-11-28

    A new approach for the calibration of (semi-)local and exact exchange-energy densities in the context of local hybrid functionals is reported. The calibration functions are derived from only the electron density and its spatial derivatives, avoiding spatial derivatives of the exact-exchange energy density or other computationally unfavorable contributions. The calibration functions fulfill the seven more important out of nine known exact constraints. It is shown that calibration improves substantially the definition of a non-dynamical correlation energy term for generalized gradient approximation (GGA)-based local hybrids. Moreover, gauge artifacts in the potential-energy curves of noble-gas dimers may be corrected by calibration. The developed calibration functions are then evaluated for a large range of energy-related properties (atomization energies, reaction barriers, ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomic energies) of three sets of local hybrids, using a simple one-parameter local-mixing. The functionals are based on (a) local spin-density approximation (LSDA) or (b) Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange and correlation, and on (c) Becke-88 (B88) exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr (LYP) correlation. While the uncalibrated GGA-based functionals usually provide very poor thermochemical data, calibration allows a dramatic improvement, accompanied by only a small deterioration of reaction barriers. In particular, an optimized BLYP-based local-hybrid functional has been found that is a substantial improvement over the underlying global hybrids, as well as over previously reported LSDA-based local hybrids. It is expected that the present calibration approach will pave the way towards new generations of more accurate hyper-GGA functionals based on a local mixing of exchange-energy densities.

  3. The DECalS Software for the Dark Energy Survey Spectrophotometric Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Jason; Rheault, J. P.; DePoy, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    DECalS is a fully automated remote control program for the Dark Energy Survey spectrophotometric calibration system (DECal). Expected to be used roughly once a month to calibrate the Dark Energy Camera, DECalS provides a TCP/IP server with commands to give the user access to all aspects of the calibration. There is a separate "expert mode” used for installation and debugging purposes. Data gathered from the DECal system will track changes in the throughput of the compete optical path of the telescope system.

  4. High-Energy Calibration of a BGO detector of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kienlin, Andreas von; Steinle, Helmut; Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Godfrey, Gary L.

    2007-07-12

    The understanding of the instrumental response of the GLAST Burst Monitor BGO detectors at energies above the energy range which is accessible by common laboratory radiation sources (< 4.43 MeV), is important, especially for the later cross-calibration with the LAT response in the overlap region between {approx} 20 MeV to 30 MeV. In November 2006 the high-energy calibration of the GBM-BGO spare detector was performed at the small Van-de-Graaff accelerator at SLAC. High-energy gamma-rays from excited 8Be* (14.6 MeV and 17.5 MeV) and 16O* (6.1 MeV) were generated through (p, {gamma})-reactions by irradiating a LiF-target. For the calibration at lower energies radioactive sources were used. The results, including spectra, the energy/channel-relation and the dependence of energy resolution are presented.

  5. High-Energy Calibration of a BGO Detector of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Godfrey, Gary L.; Steinle, Helmut; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2011-11-30

    The understanding of the instrumental response of the GLAST Burst Monitor BGO detectors at energies above the energy range which is accessible by common laboratory radiation sources (< 4.43 MeV), is important, especially for the later cross-calibration with the LAT response in the overlap region between {approx}20 MeV to 30 MeV. In November 2006 the high-energy calibration of the GBM-BGO spare detector was performed at the small Van-de-Graaff accelerator at SLAC. High-energy gamma-rays from excited {sup 8}Be* (14.6 MeV and 17.5 MeV) and {sup 16}O* (6.1 MeV) were generated through (p, {gamma})-reactions by irradiating a LiF-target. For the calibration at lower energies radioactive sources were used. The results, including spectra, the energy/channel-relation and the dependence of energy resolution are presented.

  6. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  7. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  8. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  9. Coal desulfurization by low-temperature chlorinolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Ganguli, P. S.; Gavalas, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Among the three principal methods for precombustion desulfurization of coal, which include physical depyriting, chemical desulfurization, and coal conversion to low-sulfur liquid and gaseous fuels, the potential of chemical methods looks promising in terms of both total sulfur removal and processing cost. The principal chemical methods for coal desulfurization involve treatment with either oxidizing agents or basic media at elevated temperature and pressure. A description is given of some recent experimental results which show the feasibility of removing sulfur, particularly organic sulfur, from high-sulfur coals by a simple method of low-temperature chlorinolysis followed by hydrolysis and dechlorination. The chemical feasibility of sulfur removal by chlorinolysis rather than the detailed engineering process is emphasized.

  10. Low temperature synthesis of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, A.; Ghosh, C. K.; Mitra, M. K.; Das, G. C.; Mukherjee, S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2010-05-01

    Zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2O 4) nanocrystalline powder materials with various particle sizes were prepared by a unique solid-state combustion method. Phase purity of ZnFe 2O 4 was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. High resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis and selected area diffraction pattern also confirmed the correct crystalline phase formation. Particle size was determined from both the transmission electron microscopic images and also from the XRD peak broadening analysis. Oxidation states of different elements present in ZnFe 2O 4 were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Frequency dependent dielectric constant and a.c. conductivity were measured as a function of particle size and both of them were found to decrease with decreasing particle size. These studies indicated that good quality zinc ferrite nanocrystalline powdered materials can be synthesized at low temperature.

  11. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  12. Magnetic refrigeration for low-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The application of refrigeration at low temperatures ranging from production of liquid helium for medical imaging systems to cooling of infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is discussed. Cooling below about 15 K with regenerative refrigerators is difficult because of the decreasing thermal mass of the regenerator compared to that of the working material. In order to overcome this difficulty with helium gas as the working material, a heat exchanger plus a Joule-Thomson or other exponder is used. Regenerative magnetic refrigerators with magnetic solids as the working material have the same regenerator problem as gas refrigerators. This problem provides motivation for the development of nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators that span approximately 1 K to approximately 0 K. Particular emphasis is placed on high reliability and high efficiency. Calculations indicate considerable promise in this area. The principles, the potential, the problems, and the progress towards development of successful 4 to 20 K magnetic refrigerators are discussed.

  13. REFRIGERATION ESPECIALLY FOR VERY LOW TEMPERATURES

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, P.B.; Smith, H.R. Jr.

    1960-09-13

    A refrigeration system for producing very low temperatures is described. The system of the invention employs a binary mixture refrigerant in a closed constant volume, e.g., Freon and ethylene. Such mixture is compressed in the gaseous state and is then separated in a fractionating column element of the system. Thenceforth, the first liquid to separate is employed stagewise to cool and liq uefy successive portions of the refrigerant at successively lower temperatures by means of heat exchangers coupled between the successive stages. When shut down, all of the volumes of the system are interconnected and a portion of the refrigerant remains liquid at ambient temperatures so that no dangerous overpressures develop. The system is therefore rugged, simple and dependable in operation.

  14. Low temperature double-layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J. (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Double-layer capacitors capable of operating at extremely low temperatures (e.g., as low as -75.degree. C.) are disclosed. Electrolyte solutions combining a base solvent (e.g., acetonitrile) and a cosolvent are employed to lower the melting point of the base electrolyte. Example cosolvents include methyl formate, ethyl acetate, methyl acetate, propionitrile, butyronitrile, and 1,3-dioxolane. An optimized concentration (e.g., 0.10 M to 0.75 M) of salt, such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, is dissolved into the electrolyte solution. In some cases (e.g., 1,3-dioxolane cosolvent) additives, such as 2% by volume triethylamine, may be included in the solvent mixture to prevent polymerization of the solution. Conventional device form factors and structural elements (e.g., porous carbon electrodes and a polyethylene separator) may be employed.

  15. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E.; Bloomquist, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  16. A symmetrical low temperature pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; VanSciver, S. W.

    1990-03-01

    The design and operating characteristics of a fully differential pressure transducer are described. The device is intended for use with He II heat transfer experiments where it operates in vacuum and at low temperatures (T<4.2 K). A movable electrode is attached to two sets of miniature bellows such that the electrode position is determined by the differential pressure across the device. The movable electrode is located between two fixed electrodes, thus forming a pair of variable capacitors. A dedicated charge amplifier is used to convert the pressure induced capacitance change to an ac output voltage. The sensitivity is roughly 5 μV/Pa. For the present application, the capacitor and electronics have acceptable performance, with a mean noise level of ±5 Pa.

  17. Preparation of silver nanoparticles at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Mini; Chauhan, Pratima

    2016-04-01

    Silver from ancient time is used as antimicrobial agent in the bulk form but now with the advancement in nanotechnology silver in the form of nanoparticles shown potential effect against microbes which make us easy to fight with many diseases plants and animals. In this work silver nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical routes using sodium borohydride as reducing agent at low temperature. The particles were characterized through UV-Visible spectroscopy as well as X-Ray Diffraction. The UV-visible spectra of silver nanoparticles exhibited absorption at 425 cm; the crystallite size of the particles is between 19nm to 39nm. EDAX graph shows two peaks of silver and oxygen. Water absorbed by silver nanoparticles was removed by the calcinations.

  18. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  19. Evaluation of Low Temperature CO Removal Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    CO removal from spacecraft gas streams was evaluated for three commercial, low temperature oxidation catalysts: Carulite 300, Sofnocat 423, and Hamilton Sundstrand Pt1. The catalysts were challenged with CO concentrations (1-100 ppm) under dry and wet (50% humidity) conditions using 2-3 % O2. CO removal and CO2 concentration were measured at constant feed composition using a FTIR. Water vapor affected the CO conversion of each catalyst differently. An initial screening found that Caulite 300 could not operate in humid conditions. The presence of water vapor affected CO conversion of Sofnocat 423 for challenge concentrations below 40 ppm. The conversion of CO by Sofnocat 423 was 80% at CO concentrations greater than 40 ppm under both dry and moist conditions. The HS Pt1 catalyst exhibited CO conversion levels of 100% under both dry and moist conditions.

  20. Li/CFx Cells Optimized for Low-Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Bhalla, Pooja; Smith, Kiah

    2009-01-01

    Some developments reported in prior NASA Tech Briefs articles on primary electrochemical power cells containing lithium anodes and fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx) cathodes have been combined to yield a product line of cells optimized for relatively-high-current operation at low temperatures at which commercial lithium-based cells become useless. These developments have involved modifications of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries, which are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current-limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. One of two developments that constitute the present combination is, itself, a combination of developments: (1) the use of sub-fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx wherein x<1) cathode material, (2) making the cathodes thinner than in most commercial units, and (3) using non-aqueous electrolytes formulated especially to enhance low-temperature performance. This combination of developments was described in more detail in High-Energy-Density, Low- Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells (NPO-43219), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (July 2007), page 43. The other development included in the present combination is the use of an anion receptor as an electrolyte additive, as described in the immediately preceding article, "Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells" (NPO- 43579). A typical cell according to the present combination of developments contains an anion-receptor additive solvated in an electrolyte that comprises LiBF4 dissolved at a concentration of 0.5 M in a mixture of four volume parts of 1,2 dimethoxyethane with one volume part of propylene carbonate. The proportion, x, of fluorine in the cathode in such a cell lies between 0.5 and 0.9. The best of such cells fabricated to date have exhibited discharge capacities as large as 0.6 A h per gram at a temperature of 50 C when discharged at a rate of C/5 (where C is the magnitude of the

  1. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100 K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30 K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent.

  2. Low-temperature gas from marine shales

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200°C in the subsurface and generally above 300°C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100°C, robust gas generation below 100°C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300° below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50°C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1–C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (~1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50°C (57.4 μg C1–C5/g rock) than at 350°C by thermal cracking (12 μg C1–C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300° below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible. PMID:19236698

  3. Low-temperature gas from marine shales.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200 degrees C in the subsurface and generally above 300 degrees C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100 degrees C, robust gas generation below 100 degrees C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300 degrees below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50 degrees C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1-C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (approximately 1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50 degrees C (57.4 microg C1-C5/g rock) than at 350 degrees C by thermal cracking (12 microg C1-C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300 degrees below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible. PMID:19236698

  4. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent. PMID:26920837

  5. Universal spectrum of normal modes in low-temperature glasses.

    PubMed

    Franz, Silvio; Parisi, Giorgio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-11-24

    We report an analytical study of the vibrational spectrum of the simplest model of jamming, the soft perceptron. We identify two distinct classes of soft modes. The first kind of modes are related to isostaticity and appear only in the close vicinity of the jamming transition. The second kind of modes instead are present everywhere in the glass phase and are related to the hierarchical structure of the potential energy landscape. Our results highlight the universality of the spectrum of normal modes in disordered systems, and open the way toward a detailed analytical understanding of the vibrational spectrum of low-temperature glasses. PMID:26561585

  6. DOE-GTO Low Temperature Project Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Tom; Mines, Greg

    2015-09-02

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) has funded low temperature projects to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of power generation from geothermal resources at temperatures of 150 degrees C and lower. To date three of the funded projects have completed their two year operation phase during which they supplied operating data to the GTO. This paper discusses the operation of two of these plants while they were providing data, including a review of facility performance, as well as an initial economic assessment of each.

  7. Nonlinear dielectric response of glasses at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Rogge, S.; Natelson, D.; Tigner, B.; Osheroff, D.D.

    1997-05-01

    We have measured the dielectric response of amorphous insulators in the audio frequency range at temperatures between 500 {mu}K and 400 mK. We compare the measured superlinear behavior with a model incorporating higher order terms at low frequencies. Temperature independent dielectric response at low fields and low temperatures has also been observed which may indicate a low energy cutoff in the two-level system distribution of order 1 mK in some materials. We also find anomalously high sensitivity of the dielectric response to rf noise. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. A Low Temperature Analysis of the Boundary Driven Kawasaki Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; O'Kelly de Galway, Winny

    2013-12-01

    Low temperature analysis of nonequilibrium systems requires finding the states with the longest lifetime and that are most accessible from other states. We determine these dominant states for a one-dimensional diffusive lattice gas subject to exclusion and with nearest neighbor interaction. They do not correspond to lowest energy configurations even though the particle current tends to zero as the temperature reaches zero. That is because the dynamical activity that sets the effective time scale, also goes to zero with temperature. The result is a non-trivial asymptotic phase diagram, which crucially depends on the interaction coupling and the relative chemical potentials of the reservoirs.

  9. Universal spectrum of normal modes in low-temperature glasses

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Silvio; Parisi, Giorgio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Zamponi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We report an analytical study of the vibrational spectrum of the simplest model of jamming, the soft perceptron. We identify two distinct classes of soft modes. The first kind of modes are related to isostaticity and appear only in the close vicinity of the jamming transition. The second kind of modes instead are present everywhere in the glass phase and are related to the hierarchical structure of the potential energy landscape. Our results highlight the universality of the spectrum of normal modes in disordered systems, and open the way toward a detailed analytical understanding of the vibrational spectrum of low-temperature glasses. PMID:26561585

  10. Monte Carlo Collision method for low temperature plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccogna, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the basic foundation of the particle-based representation of low temperature plasma description. In particular, the Monte Carlo Collision (MCC) recipe has been described for the case of electron-atom and ion-atom collisions. The model has been applied to the problem of plasma plume expansion from an electric Hall-effect type thruster. The presence of low energy secondary electrons from electron-atom ionization on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) have been identified in the first 3 mm from the exit plane where, due to the azimuthal heating the ionization continues to play an important role. In addition, low energy charge-exchange ions from ion-atom electron transfer collisions are evident in the ion energy distribution functions (IEDF) 1 m from the exit plane.

  11. Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Truher, J.B.; Weiner, K.H.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1994-09-13

    A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate is disclosed. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900 C), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180 C for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180 C) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide. 5 figs.

  12. Crystallization and doping of amorphous silicon on low temperature plastic

    DOEpatents

    Kaschmitter, James L.; Truher, Joel B.; Weiner, Kurt H.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    A method or process of crystallizing and doping amorphous silicon (a-Si) on a low-temperature plastic substrate using a short pulsed high energy source in a selected environment, without heat propagation and build-up in the substrate. The pulsed energy processing of the a-Si in a selected environment, such as BF3 and PF5, will form a doped micro-crystalline or poly-crystalline silicon (pc-Si) region or junction point with improved mobilities, lifetimes and drift and diffusion lengths and with reduced resistivity. The advantage of this method or process is that it provides for high energy materials processing on low cost, low temperature, transparent plastic substrates. Using pulsed laser processing a high (>900.degree. C.), localized processing temperature can be achieved in thin films, with little accompanying temperature rise in the substrate, since substrate temperatures do not exceed 180.degree. C. for more than a few microseconds. This method enables use of plastics incapable of withstanding sustained processing temperatures (higher than 180.degree. C.) but which are much lower cost, have high tolerance to ultraviolet light, have high strength and good transparency, compared to higher temperature plastics such as polyimide.

  13. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  14. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using X-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, BP; Molloi, S

    2014-01-01

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using X-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for X-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm2 in detection area. The angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded X-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of X-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of X-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic X-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the X-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory. PMID:25369288

  15. Precise astronomical flux calibration and its impact on studying the nature of the dark energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubbs, Christopher W.; Brown, Yorke J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of the luminosity of Type Ia supernovae versus redshift provided the original evidence for the accelerating expansion of the Universe and the existence of dark energy. Despite substantial improvements in survey methodology, systematic uncertainty in flux calibration dominates the error budget for this technique, exceeding both statistics and other systematic uncertainties. Consequently, any further collection of Type Ia supernova data will fail to refine the constraints on the nature of dark energy unless we also improve the state of the art in astronomical flux calibration to the order of 1%. We describe how these systematic errors arise from calibration of instrumental sensitivity, atmospheric transmission and Galactic extinction, and discuss ongoing efforts to meet the 1% precision challenge using white dwarf stars as celestial standards, exquisitely calibrated detectors as fundamental metrologic standards, and real-time atmospheric monitoring.

  16. The science capability of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, M.; Croonquist, A.; Dick, G. J.; Liu, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is a multiple user and multiple-flight NASA facility that will provide a low temperature environment for about 4. 5 months on board the International Space Station (ISS).

  17. Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution Of Sludge Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.T.; Hamm, B.A.; Pike, J.A.

    2008-07-01

    primarily of radioactive wastes containing a very high aluminum concentration. Based on initial laboratory testing and previous sludge characterization, aluminum in this sludge could be dissolved at low temperature (no more than 65 deg. C) in a concentrated caustic solution. The amount of aluminum predicted to dissolve under these conditions ranged from 25% to 80%. An opportunity existed to remove a significant amount of aluminum prior to vitrification in DWPF and increase the level of understanding of the effects of caustic dissolution of aluminum at lower temperatures. This paper presents the results of a real waste laboratory demonstration and full-scale implementation of a low temperature aluminum dissolution process which should be considered as a viable means to reduce radioactive sludge mass and reduce the amount of waste to be vitrified. (authors)

  18. A new and simple calibration-independent method for measuring the beam energy of a cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Katherine; Jensen, Mikael; Thisgaard, Helge; Publicover, Julia; Lapi, Suzanne; McQuarrie, Steve A; Ruth, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    This work recommends a new and simple-to-perform method for measuring the beam energy of an accelerator. The proposed method requires the irradiation of two monitor foils interspaced by an energy degrader. The primary advantage of the proposed method, which makes this method unique from previous energy evaluation strategies that employ the use of monitor foils, is that this method is independent of the detector efficiency calibration. This method was evaluated by performing proton activation of (nat)Cu foils using both a cyclotron and a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. The monitor foil activities were read using a dose calibrator set to an arbitrary calibration setting. Excellent agreement was noted between the nominal and measured proton energies. PMID:20926304

  19. Assessing the feasibility of low temperature XAFS experiments at Indus-2, India: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanan, Nitya; Rajput, Parasmani; Jha, S. N.; Lahiri, Debdutta

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we report installation of displex cryostat XAFS sample holder at XAFS beamline (BL-09) of Indus-2 synchrotron facility, India and make critical assessment of feasibility of low-temperature XAFS experiments in terms of data quality and reproducibility, temperature range, calibration and attainable resolution. We adopted the Debye Model-based calibration method by measuring XAFS of standard Au foil with known Debye temperature (ΘDebye)Autheory = 165 K. The data is of good quality and reproducible with international data. By fitting Debye Waller Factor (σexpt2 (T)), we deduced (ΘDebye)Auexpt = 163 K which implies calibration within 2 K. Error bars for σexpt2 (T) correspond to temperature uncertainty ΔT ≤ 5 K, which defines the temperature resolution for low temperature XAFS experiments. Thus, from both calibration and resolution points-of-view, this work demonstrates the feasibility of low temperature XAFS experiments at BL-09, Indus-2. Feasibility of extending XAFS experiments to lower temperature and unknown samples is discussed.

  20. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  1. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  2. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  3. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  4. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  5. Energy calibration of energy-resolved photon-counting pixel detectors using laboratory polychromatic x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youn, Hanbean; Han, Jong Chul; Kam, Soohwa; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2014-10-01

    Recently, photon-counting detectors capable of resolving incident x-ray photon energies have been considered for use in spectral x-ray imaging applications. For reliable use of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors (ERPCDs), energy calibration is an essential procedure prior to their use because variations in responses from each pixel of the ERPCD for incident photons, even at the same energy, are inevitable. Energy calibration can be performed using a variety of methods. In all of these methods, the photon spectra with well-defined peak energies are recorded. Every pixel should be calibrated on its own. In this study, we suggest the use of a conventional polychromatic x-ray source (that is typically used in laboratories) for energy calibration. The energy calibration procedure mainly includes the determination of the peak energies in the spectra, flood-field irradiation, determination of peak channels, and determination of calibration curves (i.e., the slopes and intercepts of linear polynomials). We applied a calibration algorithm to a CdTe ERPCD comprised of 128×128 pixels with a pitch of 0.35 mm using highly attenuated polychromatic x-ray beams to reduce the pulse pile-up effect, and to obtain a narrow-shaped spectrum due to beam hardening. The averaged relative error in calibration curves obtained from 16,384 pixels was about 0.56% for 59.6 keV photons from an Americium radioisotope. This pixel-by-pixel energy calibration enhanced the signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios in images, respectively, by a factor of ~5 and 3 due to improvement in image homogeneity, compared to those obtained without energy calibration. One secondary finding of this study was that the x-ray photon spectra obtained using a common algorithm for computing x-ray spectra reasonably described the peaks in the measured spectra, which implies easier peak detection without the direct measurement of spectra using a separate spectrometer. The proposed method will be a useful alternative to

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, COAL-DERIVED, PROMOTED CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph M. Calo

    2000-07-19

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics. During the reporting period, the following has been accomplished: (1) A packed bed reactor/gas flow system has been tested and applied to performing NO-carbon reactivity studies. This system employs a Kin-Tek gas calibration/mixing system for varying NO and CO concentrations in the feed gas to the packed bed, a NO{sub x} chemiluminescence analyzer (ThermoElectron, Model 10), and a quadrupole mass spectrometer (Ametek). This system is used for both steady-state reactivity studies, as well as mechanistic studies on the effects of NO and CO in the gas phase on intermediate oxygen surface complex populations on the carbon substrates. (2) Reactivity studies of the NO-carbon system have been performed as a function of temperature and NO concentration. It was found that apparent activation energy in the ''high temperature'' regime of 180 {+-} 10 kJ/mol agrees well with corresponding values reported in the literature. At the low NO concentrations used, it was observed that the reaction is not strictly first order in NO. In addition, the influence of mass transfer limitations were noted at high temperatures and low NO concentrations. Plans for the next reporting period include applications of the packed bed reactor system to perform temperature programmed desorption studies of the reaction of the NO-carbon reaction, and to reactivity studies of the NO/CO reaction system.

  7. Calibration of the Accuscan II IN Vivo System for High Energy Lung Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Ovard R. Perry; David L. Georgeson

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the April 2011 calibration of the Accuscan II HpGe In Vivo system for high energy lung counting. The source used for the calibration was a NIST traceable lung set manufactured at the University of Cincinnati UCLL43AMEU & UCSL43AMEU containing Am-241 and Eu-152 with energies from 26 keV to 1408 keV. The lung set was used in conjunction with a Realistic Torso phantom. The phantom was placed on the RMC II counting table (with pins removed) between the v-ridges on the backwall of the Accuscan II counter. The top of the detector housing was positioned perpendicular to the junction of the phantom clavicle with the sternum. This position places the approximate center line of the detector housing with the center of the lungs. The energy and efficiency calibrations were performed using a Realistic Torso phantom (Appendix I) and the University of Cincinnati lung set. This report includes an overview introduction and records for the energy/FWHM and efficiency calibration including performance verification and validation counting. The Accuscan II system was successfully calibrated for high energy lung counting and verified in accordance with ANSI/HPS N13.30-1996 criteria.

  8. SU-E-I-38: Improved Metal Artifact Correction Using Adaptive Dual Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, X; Elder, E; Roper, J; Dhabaan, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Methods: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Results: Highly attenuating copper rods cause severe streaking artifacts on standard CT images. EDEC improves the image quality, but cannot eliminate the streaking artifacts. Compared to EDEC, the proposed ADEC method further reduces the streaking resulting from metallic inserts and beam-hardening effects and obtains material decomposition images with significantly improved accuracy. Conclusion: We propose an adaptive dual energy calibration method to correct for metal artifacts. ADEC is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan phantom, and shows superior metal artifact correction performance. In the future, we will further evaluate the performance of the proposed method with phantom and patient data.

  9. A Low Temperature, Reverse Brayton Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Walter L.

    2001-01-01

    This status report covers the fifty-second month of a project to develop a low temperature, reverse-Brayton cryocooler using turbomachines. This program consists of a Basic Phase and four Option Phases. Each of the Phases is directed to a particular load/temperature combination. The technology and fundamental design features of the components used in these systems are related but differ somewhat in size, speed, and some details in physical geometry. Each of the Phases can be carried out independently of the others, except that all of the Phases rely on the technology developed and demonstrated during the Basic Phase. The Basic Phase includes the demonstration of a critical component and the production of a prototype model cryocooler. The critical technology demonstration will be the test of a small turboalternator over a range of conditions at temperatures down to 6 K. These tests will provide design verification data useful for the further design of the other coolers. The prototype model cooler will be designed to provide at least 5 mW of cooling at 6 K. The heat rejection temperature for this requirement is 220 K or greater. The input power to the system at these conditions is to be less than 60 W.

  10. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-10-28

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.