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Sample records for low-temperature gas discharge

  1. Coulomb collisions in the Boltzmann equation for electrons in low-temperature gas discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates the effects of electron-electron and electron-ion Coulomb collisions on the electron distribution function and transport coefficients obtained from the Boltzmann equation for simple dc gas discharge conditions. Expressions are provided for the full Coulomb collision terms acting on both the isotropic and anisotropic parts of the electron distribution function, which are then incorporated in the freeware Boltzmann equation solver BOLSIG+. Different Coulomb collision effects are demonstrated and discussed on the basis of BOLSIG+  results for argon gas. It is shown that the anisotropic part of the electron-electron collision term, neglected in previous work, can in certain cases have a large effect on the electron mobility and is essential when describing the transition towards the Coulomb-collision dominated regime characterized by Spitzer transport coefficients. Finally, a brief overview is presented of the discharge conditions for which different Coulomb collision effects occur in different gases.

  2. Modelling electron transport in magnetized low-temperature discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2007-02-01

    Magnetic fields are sometimes used to confine the plasma in low-pressure low-temperature gas discharges, for example in magnetron discharges, Hall-effect-thruster discharges, electron-cyclotron-resonance discharges and helicon discharges. We discuss how these magnetized discharges can be modelled by two-dimensional self-consistent models based on electron fluid equations. The magnetized electron flux is described by an anisotropic drift diffusion equation, where the electron mobility is much smaller perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel to it. The electric potential is calculated either from Poisson's equation or from the electron equations, assuming quasineutrality. Although these models involve many assumptions, they are appropriate to study the main effects of the magnetic field on the charged particle transport and space charge electric fields in realistic two-dimensional discharge configurations. We demonstrate by new results that these models reproduce known phenomena such as the establishment of the Boltzmann relation along magnetic field lines, the penetration of perpendicular applied electric fields into the plasma bulk and the decrease in magnetic confinement by short-circuit wall currents. We also present an original method to prevent numerical errors arising from the extreme anisotropy of the electron mobility, which tend to invalidate model results from standard numerical methods.

  3. Low-temperature gas from marine shales

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200°C in the subsurface and generally above 300°C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100°C, robust gas generation below 100°C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300° below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50°C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1–C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (~1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50°C (57.4 μg C1–C5/g rock) than at 350°C by thermal cracking (12 μg C1–C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300° below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible. PMID:19236698

  4. Low-temperature gas from marine shales.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200 degrees C in the subsurface and generally above 300 degrees C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100 degrees C, robust gas generation below 100 degrees C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300 degrees below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50 degrees C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1-C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (approximately 1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50 degrees C (57.4 microg C1-C5/g rock) than at 350 degrees C by thermal cracking (12 microg C1-C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300 degrees below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible. PMID:19236698

  5. Low temperature discharge characteristics of lithium-manganese dioxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampartzumian, K.; Iltchev, N.

    Lithium—manganese dioxide cells have not only excellent specific energy and shelf life characteristics, but they are also capable of very promising performance at temperatures as low as -40 °C (-40 °F). The polarization and discharge curves of cylindrical and button cells at -40 °C are compared in an effort to evaluate the useful low temperature operation range. The cathode design, and type of MnO 2 strongly affect the low temperature behaviour. Although the excellent low temperature performance of the Li/SO 2 system can probably never be equalled, due to some diffusion shortcomings inherent in the Li/MnO 2 cells, for low and moderate current drains covering many meteorological, military, and consumer applications, Li/MnO 2 batteries are very competitive in terms of simple technology, increased safety, and price, offering satisfactory operation within the range -40 to +71 °C (-40 °F to +160 °F).

  6. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Kirsanov, Gennady; Eliseev, Stepan; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Sisoev, Sergey

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The calculation was based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharge. The system of equations is solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles, the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage, power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow predicting the temperature of the gases at the designing of atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources.

  7. Simulation of low temperature atmospheric pressure corona discharge in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, V.; Chirtsov, Alex; Demidova, Maria; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this work was to construct a numerical model of corona discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. Calculations were based on the two-dimensional hybrid model. Two different plasma-chemical models were considered. Models were built for RF corona and negative DC corona discharges. The system of equations was solved by the finite element method in the COMSOL Multiphysics. Main parameters of the discharge (the density of charged and excited particles and the electron temperature) and their dependence on the input parameters of the model (geometry, electrode voltage and power) were calculated. The calculations showed that the shape of the electron distribution near the electrode depends on the discharge power. The neutral gas heating data obtained will allow for the prediction of the temperature of the gases in atmospheric pressure helium plasma sources. This work was supported by Russian Science Foundation (project 14-19-00311).

  8. Low temperature tungsten spectroscopy on a Penning Ionization Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Englesbe, Alexander; Stutman, Dan; Finkenthal, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Complete Tungsten divertor operation is being planned on many tokamaks including Tore Supra and ITER. Thus, low temperature tungsten spectroscopy is important for aiding the divertor diagnostics on larger machines. A Penning Ionization Discharge (PID) at the Johns Hopkins University produces steady state plasmas with Te ~ 2 eV, ne ~1013 cm-3 and a fast electron fraction at ~ 10 s eV. Similar bi-Maxwellian distributions, but with slightly higher electron temperatures, are found in the divertor plasmas of tokamaks. The two significant populating mechanisms for higher charge states in the PID are: (a) collisional excitation from bulk electrons, and (b) inner shell ionization from the fast electrons. The PID is diagnosed in a wide wavelength range - XUV, VUV and visible, to differentiate the two populating mechanisms. W is introduced in the PID by the sputtering of cathodes made of CuW alloy. Spectral emission from significantly higher charge states of W (up to W IV) has been observed in the experiment. This poster will describe results indicating the populating mechanism of W ions and also describe plans on upgrading the experiment to achieve higher temperatures which are closer to the divertor conditions. Supported by USDOE.

  9. PlasmaPIC: A tool for modeling low-temperature plasma discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlich, Nina Sarah; Becker, Michael; Henrich, Robert; Heiliger, Christian

    2015-09-01

    PlasmaPIC is a three-dimensional particle in cell (PIC) code. It consists of an electrostatic part for modeling dc and rf-ccp discharges as well as an electrodynamic part for modeling inductively coupled discharges. The three-dimensional description enables the modeling of discharges in arbitrary geometries without limitations to any symmetry. These geometries can be easily imported from common CAD tools. A main feature of PlasmaPIC is the ability of an excellent massive parallelization of the computation, which scales linearly up to a few hundred cpu cores. This is achieved by using a multigrid algorithm for the field solver as well as an effective load balancing of the particles. Moreover, PlasmaPIC includes the interaction of the neutral gas and the plasma discharge. Because the neutral gas and the plasma simulation are acting on different time scales we perform the simulation of both separately in a self-consistent treatment, whereas the neutral gas distribution is calculated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method (DSMC). The merge of these features turns PlasmaPIC into a powerful simulation tool for a wide range of plasma discharges and introduces a new way of understanding and optimizing low-temperature plasma applications. This work has been supported by the ``Bundesministerium fuer Wirtschaft und Energie.'' Grant 50RS1507.

  10. Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Fayrushin, I.; Kashapov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The circuit has been done, to obtain output currentabout 90mA,and the maximum power was 100W, The frequency of the discharging was f = 40MHz.Twolamps (ГУ-50) were used in power supply. Helium consumption was about 1.5l/m.

  11. GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Arrol, W.J.; Jefferson, S.

    1957-08-27

    The construction of gas discharge devices where the object is to provide a gas discharge device having a high dark current and stabilized striking voltage is described. The inventors have discovered that the introduction of tritium gas into a discharge device with a subsequent electrical discharge in the device will deposit tritium on the inside of the chamber. The tritium acts to emit beta rays amd is an effective and non-hazardous way of improving the abovementioned discharge tube characteristics

  12. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-01

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  13. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-13

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  14. Low Temperature Plasma Nitriding Of Stainless Steel In N_2/H_2/Ar LFICP Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Luo, W.; Jiang, N.; Ostrikov, K. N.

    2001-10-01

    A low frequency, high density, inductively coupled plasma (LF ICP) source has been developed and used for nitriding of AISI stainless steels. A series of experiments has been conducted in a low temperature (320-400^circC), low pressure N_2/H_2/Ar gas mixture discharges. The results show that the nitriding process is very fast, ~ 45μm/hr for AISI 304 and ~ 90μm/hr for AIS410, even at a low nitriding temperature. After nitriding, the micro hardness of the nitrided layer is increased by a factor of 7 and the free corrosion potential is also improved. The pin-on-disc measurement indicates that the wear resistance improved more than 10 times. The microstructure and composition of the nitrided surface layers characterised using scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray diffraction and x-ray diffraction reveal that the nitrided layer has crystalline structure with various phases. The distribution of the nitrogen content varies sharply: high in the nitrided layer and almost zero elsewhere. The content of Cr, however, remains constant over the entire substrate/nitrided layer.

  15. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under gas flow and substantial in closed reactions. In sequential closed reactions at 100°C, gas from a Cretaceous Mowry shale progresses from predominately heavy hydrocarbons (66% C5, 2% C1) to predominantly light hydrocarbons (56% C1, 8% C5), the opposite of that expected from desorption of preexisting hydrocarbons. Differences in catalyst substrate composition explain these dynamics. Gas flow should carry heavier hydrocarbons to catalytic sites, in contrast to static conditions where catalytic sites are limited to in-place hydrocarbons. In-place hydrocarbons and their products should become lighter with conversion thus generating lighter hydrocarbon over time, consistent with our experimental results. We recognize the similarities between low-temperature gas generation reported here and the natural progression of wet gas to dry gas over geologic time. There is now substantial evidence for natural catalytic activity in source rocks. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium and the results reported here add to that evidence. Natural catalysis provides a plausible and unique explanation for the origin and evolution of gas in sedimentary basins. PMID:19900271

  16. Low-temperature sterilization of wrapped materials using flexible sheet-type dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Hiroyuki; Ono, Yoshihito; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2008-12-01

    A flexible sheet-type dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was studied for the low-temperature sterilization of medical instruments wrapped with Tyvek packaging. Sterilization experiments using Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with a population of 106 were carried out with various mixtures of nitrogen and oxygen. We confirmed the inactivation of spores after 4.5 min of DBD irradiation at a temperature of 28.4 °C and relative humidity of 64.4%. The main sterilizing factors of this method are the ozone and UV emissions generated by DBD in dry air and synergistic OH radicals generated by DBD in moist air.

  17. Decontamination effects of low-temperature plasma generated by corona discharge. Part II: new insights.

    PubMed

    Scholtz, V; Julák, J; Kríha, V; Mosinger, J; Kopecká, S

    2007-01-01

    The second part of our paper presents the results of experiments with the decontamination of surfaces by low-temperature plasma generated by corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. A simple device is described and the effects of the corona discharge on model microorganisms, viz. the yeast Candida albicans, Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Neisseria sicca, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Gram-positive bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and vegetative and spore forms of Geobacillus stearothermophilus are discussed. A similar microbicidal effect after about one-minute exposure was observed in all vegetative forms of the microorganisms. Measurement in growth inhibition zones on a semisolid medium was used to determine the dependence of the microbicidal effect on exposure time and the distance between electrodes. Counting of colonies served to assess the microbicidal effect of the discharge on contaminated inert surfaces observable after more than 1 min exposure. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were found to have several times lower susceptibility to the action of the discharge and the microbicidal effect was observed only after an 8 min exposure. Reaction with the iodide reagent did not unambiguously demonstrate the difference between ozone and singlet oxygen as presumed active components of the corona. The area distribution of reactive oxygen species was determined; it was found to differ from the Wartburg law depending on exposure time. Qualitative evidence was obtained on the penetration of the reactive oxygen species into the semisolid medium. PMID:18225640

  18. INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-03-01

    A method and apparatus for initiating and sustaining an energetic gas arc discharge are described. A hollow cathode and a hollow anode are provided. By regulating the rate of gas flow into the interior of the cathode, the arc discharge is caused to run from the inner surface of the cathode with the result that adequate space-charge neutralization is provided inside the cathode but not in the main arc volume. Thus, the gas fed to the cathode is substantially completely ionized before it leaves the cathode, with the result that an energetic arc discharge can be maintained at lower operating pressures.

  19. GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, S.

    1958-11-11

    An apparatus utilized in introducing tritium gas into envelope of a gas discharge device for the purpose f maintaining the discharge path in ionized condition is described. ln addition to the cathode and anode, the ischarge device contains a zirconium or tantalum ilament arranged for external excitation and a metallic seed containing tritium, and also arranged to have a current passed through it. Initially, the zirconium or tantalum filament is vaporized to deposit its material adjacent the main discharge region. Then the tritium gas is released and, due to its affinity for the first released material, it deposits in the region of the main discharge where it is most effective in maintaining the discharge path in an ionized condition.

  20. Acetamiprid removal in wastewater by the low-temperature plasma using dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanping; Ma, Xiaolong; Jiang, Yanyan; Cao, Xiaohong

    2014-08-01

    Degradation of acetamiprid in wastewater was studied in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. This reactor produces ultraviolet light and reactive species like ozone (O₃) can be used for the treatment of wastewater. We examined the factors that could affect the degradation process, including the discharge power, and the initial concentrations of acetamiprid, and O₃ which is generated by the DBD reactor. We also investigated the effect of adding Na₂B₄O₇ as a radical scavenger to probe the role of hydroxyl radical in the reaction. The results indicated that acetamiprid could be removed from aqueous solution effectively and hydroxyl radicals played an important role during the degradation by the low temperature plasma. The degradation process of acetamiprid fits the first-order kinetics. The degradation efficiency was 83.48 percent at 200 min when the discharge power was 170 W and the initial acetamiprid concentration was 50 mg/L. The removal efficiency of acetamiprid decreased with the increasing concentration of Na₂B₄O₇ because B₄O₇(2-) is an excellent radical scavenger that inhibited the generation of OH during the DBD process. The removal efficiency of acetamiprid improved in the presence of O₃. The main reason was that O₃ can oxidize certain organic compounds directly or indirectly by generating hydroxyl radicals. The degradation products of acetamiprid were characterized qualitatively and quantitatively using high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and UV-vis spectroscopy. PMID:24840877

  1. Townsend discharge in nitrogen at low temperatures: enhanced noise and instability due to electrode phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrov, Yu A.; Lodygin, A. N.; Portsel, L. M.

    2016-03-01

    The temperature dependence of the properties of the low-current Townsend discharge in nitrogen is studied. The experiments are carried out on a device with a high-resistivity semiconductor electrode in the temperature range 85-292 K at a current density not exceeding 25 μA cm-2. The discharge gap of the device is 0.85 mm, while the nitrogen density corresponds to the gas pressure p=6.6\\cdot {{10}3} Pa (49.5 Torr) at T  =  292 K. The earlier increase found in the discharge sustaining voltage {{U}\\text{S}} in time at a fixed current is quantitatively investigated for the cryogenic discharge. The {{U}\\text{S}} relaxation is accompanied by transitions to new discharge states with an increased noise intensity. The characteristic time of the relaxation is hundreds of seconds. The effect is especially pronounced in the range of 100-150 K and is relatively weak at room temperature. The interpretation of the experimental data is based on the hypothesis that considers the formation of neutral aggregates of nitrogen in the form [\\text{N}2+ (N2) n ]- in the discharge volume. The condensation of the clusters on the cathode leads to a change in its emission properties, which changes the properties of the discharge.

  2. Treatment of Candida albicans biofilms with low-temperature plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge and atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koban, Ina; Matthes, Rutger; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Welk, Alexander; Meisel, Peter; Holtfreter, Birte; Sietmann, Rabea; Kindel, Eckhard; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Because of some disadvantages of chemical disinfection in dental practice (especially denture cleaning), we investigated the effects of physical methods on Candida albicans biofilms. For this purpose, the antifungal efficacy of three different low-temperature plasma devices (an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and two different dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) on Candida albicans biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro was investigated. As positive treatment controls, we used 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 0.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The corresponding gas streams without plasma ignition served as negative treatment controls. The efficacy of the plasma treatment was determined evaluating the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered from titanium discs. The plasma treatment reduced the CFU significantly compared to chemical disinfectants. While 10 min CHX or NaOCl exposure led to a CFU log10 reduction factor of 1.5, the log10 reduction factor of DBD plasma was up to 5. In conclusion, the use of low-temperature plasma is a promising physical alternative to chemical antiseptics for dental practice.

  3. Noble-gas hydrides: new chemistry at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Räsänen, Markku; Gerber, R Benny

    2009-01-20

    Noble-gas chemistry has been undergoing a renaissance in recent years, due in large part to noble-gas hydrides, HNgY, where Ng = noble-gas atom and Y = electronegative fragment. These molecules are exceptional because of their relatively weak bonding and large dipole moments, which lead to strongly enhanced effects of the environment, complexation, and reactions. In this Account, we discuss the matrix-isolation synthesis of noble-gas hydrides, their spectroscopic and structural properties, and their stabilities.This family of species was discovered in 1995 and now has 23 members that are prepared in noble-gas matrices (HXeBr, HKrCl, HXeH, HXeOH, HXeO, etc.). The preparations of the first neutral argon molecule, HArF, and halogen-free organic noble-gas molecules (HXeCCH, HXeCC, HKrCCH, etc.) are important highlights of the field. These molecules are formed by the neutral H + Ng + Y channel. The first addition reaction involving HNgY molecules was HXeCC + Xe + H --> HXeCCXeH, and this led to the first hydride with two noble-gas atoms (recently extended by HXeOXeH). The experimental synthesis of HNgY molecules starts with production of H and Y fragments in solid noble gas via the UV photolysis of suitable precursors. The HNgY molecules mainly form upon thermal mobilization of the fragments.One of the unusual properties of these molecules is the hindered rotation of some HNgY molecules in solid matrices; this has been theoretically modeled. HNgY molecules also have unusual solvation effects, and the H-Xe stretching mode shifts to higher frequencies (up to about 150 cm-1) upon interaction with other species.The noble hydrides have a new bonding motif: HNgY molecules can be represented in the form (H-Ng)+Y-, where (H-Ng)+ is mainly covalent, whereas the interaction between (HNg)+ and Y- is predominantly ionic. The HNgY molecules are highly metastable species representing high-energy materials. The decomposition process HNgY --> Ng + HY is always strongly exoergic

  4. On the discharge capability and its limiting factors of commercial 18650 Li-ion cell at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiang

    We here study the discharge capability of commercial 18650 cylindrical lithium-ion cells at low temperatures. The discharge capacity at -20 °C ranges from 67 to 88% of the rated capacity at 0.2 C rate, which is good. However, the cell discharge capacity varies substantially at -30 and -40 °C among the studied cells. It ranges from 2 to 70% of the rated capacity at -30 °C, and 0 to 30% at -40 °C at 0.2 C rate. The cell impedance at 1 kHz increases very little from room temperature down to -20 or -30 °C in general, which does not correlate with the cell discharge capability. However, the dc impedance is increased by a factor of about ten at -30 °C and about twenty at -40 °C from room temperature. The discharge capability at low temperature correlates well with the dc resistance at both room and low temperatures. The limiting factors in the discharge capability at low temperatures and the direction for the future improvement are discussed according to the cell discharge capability, the electrode geometric area, the cell impedance at 1 kHz, and the dc impedance at various temperatures. It appears that the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte and lithium solid diffusion in the electrode do not limit the cell discharge capability, while the lithium diffusion in the SEI layer on the positive surface may be the limiting factor. Cell discharge capability at low temperature does not correlate with cycle life at room temperature.

  5. Experimental study of the formation of the combined discharge low-temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzhozovskiy, B. M.; Martynov, V. V.; Zinina, E. P.; Brovkova, M. B.

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with the experimental study of the relationship of parameters of combined discharge low temperature plasma with the parameters of its formation process: input SHF power and displacement potential. The purpose of the study is to increase the efficiency of the plasma impact on the surface of parts or products according to the criterion of the formation in the surface layer of composite structures enhancing their operational reliability. The study results revealed that, firstly, the level of input SHF power is responsible for the intensity of ionization processes at the outer boundary of the plasma; the potential supplied to the product is responsible for generating a compensated flow at the inner boundary of the plasma, and secondly, the processes occurring in the plasma must be controlled. This will ensure consistency of the desired speed and, consequently, the degree of surface heating within a set time, and, on this basis, the increase in the reproducibility of the composite structure synthesis in the surface layer of parts or products, including structures with desired properties.

  6. (Gas discharges and applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Sauers, I.

    1988-10-04

    The traveler attended the Ninth International Conference on Gas Discharges and Their Applications, which was held in Venice, Italy, on September 19--23, 1988; presented two papers, (1) Ion Chemistry in SF{sub 6} Corona'' and (2) Production of S{sub 2}F{sub 10} by SF{sub 6} Spark Discharge''; and participated in numerous discussions with conference participants on gas discharges related to his work on SF{sub 6}. The traveler visited the Centre de Physique Atomique at the University Paul Sabatier in Toulouse, France, to discuss with Dr. J. Casanovas his work on SF{sub 6} decomposition. Following that visit, the traveler visited the Laboratoire de Photoelectricite at the University of Dijon to discuss with Dr. J.-P. Goudonnet his work on surface studies and on the use of tunneling electron spectroscopy for the chemical analysis of surfaces.

  7. Singlet oxygen in the low-temperature plasma of an electron-beam-sustained discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, N. P.; Ionin, A. A.; Klimachev, Yu. M.; Kotkov, A. A.; Kochetov, I. V.; Napartovich, A. P.; Podmar'kov, Yu. P.; Rulev, O. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Frolov, M. P.; Yuryshev, N. N.

    2006-05-15

    Results are presented from experimental and theoretical studies of the production of singlet delta oxygen in a pulsed electron-beam-sustained discharge ignited in a large ({approx}18-1) volume at a total gas mixture pressure of up to 210 Torr. The measured yield of singlet oxygen reaches 10.5%. It is found that varying the reduced electric field from {approx}2 to {approx}11 kV/(cm atm) slightly affects singlet oxygen production. It is shown experimentally that an increase in the gas mixture pressure or the specific input energy reduces the duration of singlet oxygen luminescence. The calculated time evolution of the singlet oxygen concentration is compared with experimental results.

  8. Discharge conditions for CW and pulse-modulated surface-wave plasmas in low-temperature sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Terashita, F.; Nonaka, H.; Ogino, A.; Nagata, T.; Koide, Y.; Nanko, S.; Kurawaki, I.; Nagatsu, M.

    2006-01-01

    The discharge conditions required for low-temperature plasma sterilization were investigated using low-pressure surface-wave plasma (SWP). The discharge conditions for both continuous wave (CW) and pulse-modulated SWPs in low-temperature sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus with a population of 1.5 × 106 and 3.0 × 106 were studied by varying the microwave input power from 500 W to 3 kW, and the effective plasma treatment time from 40 to 300 s. Results showed that sterilization was possible in a shorter treatment time using a higher microwave power for both CW and pulse-modulated SWPs. Pulse-modulated SWPs gave effective sterilization at a temperature roughly 10 to 20 °C below that of CW SWPs under the same average microwave power.

  9. Alkali-Stabilized Pt-OHx Species Catalyze Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Pierre, D; Si, R; Deng, W; Ferrin, P; Nilekar, A; Peng, G; Herron, J; Bell, D; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    We report that alkali ions (sodium or potassium) added in small amounts activate platinum adsorbed on alumina or silica for the low-temperature water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (H{sub 2}O + CO {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) used for producing H{sub 2}. The alkali ion-associated surface OH groups are activated by CO at low temperatures ({approx}100 C) in the presence of atomically dispersed platinum. Both experimental evidence and density functional theory calculations suggest that a partially oxidized Pt-alkali-O{sub x}(OH){sub y} species is the active site for the low-temperature Pt-catalyzed WGS reaction. These findings are useful for the design of highly active and stable WGS catalysts that contain only trace amounts of a precious metal without the need for a reducible oxide support such as ceria.

  10. Demonstration of organic volatile decomposition and bacterial sterilization by miniature dielectric barrier discharges on low-temperature cofired ceramic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk-jae; Shim, Yeun-keun; Park, Jeongwon; Kim, Hyung-jun; Han, Jeon-geon

    2016-04-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge is designed with low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) electrodes to achieve dielectric barrier surface discharge (DBSD). The environmental requirement (below 0.05 ppm) of the amount of byproducts (ozone and NO x ) produced during the process was met by optimizing the electrode design to produce a high dielectric barrier discharge for low-voltage (∼700 V) operation and minimizing the distance between electrodes to improve the plasma discharging efficiency. The concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within interior cabins of commercial vehicles were significantly reduced after 1-h treatment to improve air quality cost-effectively. This atmospheric-pressure plasma process was demonstrated for the sterilization of Escherichia coli to prevent food poisoning during the preservation of food in refrigerators.

  11. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  12. Low Temperature Force Microscopy on a Deeply Embedded Two Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, James Augustin

    2011-12-01

    Experimental physics in the low temperature limit has consistently produced major advances for condensed matter research. Likewise, scanning probe microscopy offers a unique view of the nanometer scale features that populate the quantum landscape. This work discusses the merger of the two disciplines via the development of the Ultra Low Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope, the ULT-SPM. We focus on the novel characterization of an exotic condensed matter system: a deeply buried two dimensional electron gas with a cleaved edge overgrowth geometry. By coupling the dynamics of the force sensing probe microscope to the electrostatics of the electron gas, we can remotely and non-invasively measure charge transport features which are normally only observable using physically contacted electrodes. Focusing on the quantum Hall regime, we can exploit the high sensitivity of the local force sensor to study spatially dependent phenomena associated with electronic potential distributions. The instrument shows promise for many exciting experiments in which low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and local measurements are critical. Designed for operation at 50 mK, in magnetic fields reaching 16 T, many components of the instrument are not commercially available and were therefore designed and constructed in- house. As such, the intricate details of its design, construction and operation are documented thoroughly. This includes: the microscope assembly, the modular components such as the scan head and coarse motors, the electronics developed for controlling the instrument, and the general integration into the low temperature infrastructure. A quartz tuning fork is used as the force sensor in this instrument, enabling a wide selection between different modes of operation, the most relevant being electrostatic force microscopy. Noise limits are investigated and matched sources of experimental noise are identified. Detailed schematics of the instrument are also included.

  13. Streptococci biofilm decontamination on teeth by low-temperature air plasma of dc corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalóvá, Z.; Zahoran, M.; Zahoranová, A.; Machala, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric pressure air direct current corona discharges were investigated for potential applications in dental medicine. The objective of this ex vivo study was to apply cold plasmas for the decontamination of Streptococci biofilm grown on extracted human teeth, and to estimate their antimicrobial efficiency and the plasma's impact on the enamel and dentine of the treated tooth surfaces. The results show that both positive streamer and negative Trichel pulse coronas can reduce bacterial population in the biofilm by up to 3 logs in a 10 min exposure time. This bactericidal effect can be reached faster (within 5 min) by electrostatic spraying of water through the discharge onto the treated tooth surface. Examination of the tooth surface after plasma exposure by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant alteration in the tooth material composition or the tooth surface structures.

  14. Nitric Oxide Studies in Low Temperature Plasmas Generated with a Nanosecond Pulse Sphere Gap Electrical Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David Dean

    This dissertation presents studies of NO kinetics in a plasma afterglow using various nanosecond pulse discharges across a sphere gap. The discharge platform is developed to produce a diffuse plasma volume large enough to allow for laser diagnostics in a plasma that is rich in vibrationally-excited molecules. This plasma is characterized by current and voltage traces as well as ICCD and NO PLIF images that are used to monitor the plasma dimensions and uniformity. Temperature and vibrational loading measurements are performed via coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). Absolute NO concentrations are obtained by laser-induce fluorescence (LIF) measurements, and N and O densities are found using two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). For all dry air conditions studied, the NO behavior is characterized by a rapid rate of formation consistent with an enhanced Zeldovich process involving electronically-excited nitrogen species that are generated within the plasma. After several microseconds, the NO evolution is entirely controlled by the reverse Zeldovich process. These results show that under the chosen range of conditions and even in extreme instances of vibrational loading, there is no formation channel beyond ~2 musec. Both the NO formation and consumption mechanisms are strongly affected by the addition of fuel species, producing much greater NO concentrations in the afterglow.

  15. Low-temperature thermodynamics of the unitary Fermi gas: Superfluid fraction, first sound, and second sound

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, Luca

    2010-12-15

    We investigate the low-temperature thermodynamics of the unitary Fermi gas by introducing a model based on the zero-temperature spectra of both bosonic collective modes and fermonic single-particle excitations. We calculate the Helmholtz free energy and from it we obtain the entropy, the internal energy, and the chemical potential as a function of the temperature. By using these quantities and the Landau's expression for the superfluid density we determine analytically the superfluid fraction, the critical temperature, the first sound velocity, and the second sound velocity. We compare our analytical results with other theoretical predictions and experimental data of ultracold atoms and dilute neutron matter.

  16. Liquid phase low temperature method for production of methanol from synthesis gas and catalyst formulations therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2005-07-26

    The invention provides a homogenous catalyst for the production of methanol from purified synthesis gas at low temperature and low pressure which includes a transition metal capable of forming transition metal complexes with coordinating ligands and an alkoxide, the catalyst dissolved in a methanol solvent system, provided the transition metal complex is not transition metal carbonyl. The coordinating ligands can be selected from the group consisting of N-donor ligands, P-donor ligands, O-donor ligands, C-donor ligands, halogens and mixtures thereof.

  17. Low temperature oxidation of silicon in a microwave-discharged oxygen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, S.I.; Miyake, K.; Murakami, E.; Sunami, H.; Tokuyama, T.; Warabisako, T.

    1985-06-01

    Silicon dioxide growth in an oxygen plasma is investigated using newly developed microwave discharge equipment with electron cyclotron resonance. It is found that the plasma oxidation kinetics can be explained by the Cabrera-Mott model, in which the drift motion of ions is assumed, rather than by the Deal-Grove thermal oxidation model. The drift motion of oxygen ions across the oxide film under the influence of self-bias in the plasma is considered to be the plasma oxidation mechanism. Infrared absorption and etch-rate measurements reveal that the physica properties of plasma oxidized SiO/sub 2/ at 600/sup 0/C are structurally quite comparable to those of thermally oxidized SiO/sub 2/.

  18. Effects of forming gas plasma treatment on low-temperature Cu–Cu direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sungdong; Nam, Youngju; Eunkyung Kim, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature Cu–Cu direct bonding becomes of great importance as Cu is widely used as an interconnection material in the packaging industry. Preparing a clean surface is a key to successful Cu–Cu direct bonding. We investigated the effects of forming gas plasma treatment on the reduction of Cu oxide and Cu–Cu bonding temperature. As plasma input power and treatment time increased, Cu oxide could be effectively reduced, and this could be attributed to the enhanced chemical reaction between forming gas plasma and Cu oxide. When the bonding temperature was reduced from 415 to 300 °C, the bonding strength of the plasma-treated interface was increased from 1.8 to 5.55 J/m2 while that of the wet-treated interface was decreased.

  19. Spectroscopic measurements in low temperature inductively coupled RF discharges in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebschman, Michael Lee

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive spectroscopic measurements of density and temperature which are characteristic of plasma processing tools have been obtained on inductively driven low- density hydrogen plasma sources. These measurements allow full radial and axial profiles of electron density and temperature to be estimated from absolutely calibrated multichannel spectroscopic measurements of upper state densities and a collisional radiative model that accounts for both collisional and radiative processes. The electron temperature and density were estimated by minimizing the least square deviation of measured population of upper state densities and the prediction of the collisional radiative model. Profiles were obtained over a range of powers from 50 to 200 Watts and pressures from 5 to 50 mTorr in hydrogen in a small cylindrical source. Typical density and temperature measurement profiles have been plotted to characterize the apparatus. An elementary sensitivity analysis, which includes plasma opacity and non- Maxwellian electron distributions, showed that, for hydrogen at processing pressures, the accuracy of the technique is relatively unaffected by these perturbations. The molecular dissociation processes were found to be important in determining the steady state densities of atomic hydrogen but had little affect in populating the upper state hydrogen levels for the plasma conditions measured. A hydrogen working gas and simple geometry were chosen to simplify detailed comparisons with a 2D computational model (INDUCT95) which uses a fluid approximation for the plasma and neutral gas. The code calculates the inductive coupling of the 13.5MHz RIF source and collisional, radiative, and wall losses as well as a complete chemistry model for H2, H, H+, H 3+. Good qualitative agreement between the initial model calculations and experimental data have been obtained over part of the operational range. Lastly, to characterize the apparatus for use in wafer cleaning, radial profiles of the

  20. Improving the low temperature dyeability of polyethylene terephthalate fabric with dispersive dyes by atmospheric pressure plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabid, Amel E. A.; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Jianjun; Guo, Ying; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber and textile is one of the largest synthetic polymer commodity in the world. The great energy consumption and pollution caused by the high temperature and pressure dyeing of PET fibers and fabrics with disperse dyes has been caused concern these years. In this study, an atmospheric pressure plasma with fine and uniform filament discharge operated at 20 kHz has been used to improve the low temperature dyeability of PET fabric at 95 °C with three cation disperse dyes: Red 73, Blue 183 and Yellow 211. The dyes uptake percentage of the treated PET fabrics was observed to increase as twice as much of untreated fabric. The color strength rate was increased more than 20%. The reducing of the water contact angle and the raising of the capillary height of treated PET fabric strip indicate its hydrophilicity improvement. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results display nano to micro size of etching pits appeared uniformly on the fiber surface of the treated PET. Simultaneously, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates an increase of the oxygen content in the surface caused by the introduction of polar groups such as Cdbnd O and COOH. The rough surface with improved polar oxygen groups showed hydrophilicity and affinity to C.I. dispersive dyes and is believed to be caused by the strong and very fine filament discharge appearing randomly at one place at an instant but evenly at many places at a longer period. This increases the diffusion and absorption of the C.I. disperse dyes on the PET fiber surface, which improve its low temperature dyeability.

  1. Low temperatures shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with unequal population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsheshdar, E.; Yavari, H.; Zangeneh, Z.

    2016-07-01

    By using the Green's functions method and linear response theory we calculate the shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with population imbalance (spin polarized) in the low temperatures limit. In the strong-coupling Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) region where a Feshbach resonance gives rise to tightly bound dimer molecules, a spin-polarized Fermi superfluid reduces to a simple Bose-Fermi mixture of Bose-condensed dimers and the leftover unpaired fermions (atoms). The interactions between dimer-atom, dimer-dimer, and atom-atom take into account to the viscous relaxation time (τη) . By evaluating the self-energies in the ladder approximation we determine the relaxation times due to dimer-atom (τDA) , dimer-dimer (τcDD ,τdDD) , and atom-atom (τAA) interactions. We will show that relaxation rates due to these interactions τDA-1 ,τcDD-1, τdDD-1, and τAA-1 have T2, T4, e - E /kB T (E is the spectrum of the dimer atoms), and T 3 / 2 behavior respectively in the low temperature limit (T → 0) and consequently, the atom-atom interaction plays the dominant role in the shear viscosity in this rang of temperatures. For small polarization (τDA ,τAA ≫τcDD ,τdDD), the low temperatures shear viscosity is determined by contact interaction between dimers and the shear viscosity varies as T-5 which has the same behavior as the viscosity of other superfluid systems such as superfluid neutron stars, and liquid helium.

  2. Low-power, fast-response active gas-gap heat switches for low temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Mark O.; Shirron, Peter J.; James, Bryan L.; Muench, Theodore T.; Sampson, Michael A.; Letmate, Richard V.

    2015-12-01

    Heat switches are critical to many low temperature applications, where control of heat flow and selective thermal isolation are required. Their designs tend to be driven by the need for the lowest possible off-state conductance, while meeting requirements for on-state conduction. As a result, heat switches tend to be designed as close as possible to the limits of material strength and machinability, using materials that have the lowest thermal conductivity to strength ratio. In addition, switching speed is important for many applications, and many designs and switch types require a compromise between the power used for actuation and on/off transition times. We present a design for an active gas-gap heat switch, developed for the Soft X-ray Spectrometer instrument on the Japanese Astro-H mission, that requires less than 0.5 mW of power to operate, has on/off transition times of < 1 minute, and that achieves a conductance of > 50 mW/K at 1 K with a heat leak of < 0.5 μW from 1 K to very low temperature. Details of the design and performance will be presented.

  3. Low-temperature resistant, elastic adhesives and sealants for gas tank insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrer, R.

    The leading European insulating firms in the domain of liquid natural gas (LNG)/liquid petroleum gas (LPG) carriers have developed special sandwich elements for the insulation of liquid gas tanks. The trend to increasing tank volumes and, at the same time, to reducing the number of cargo tanks in modern liquid gas carriers with loading capacities of up to 135,000 m 3 has in some cases entailed major changes with respect to tank design (Kaefer-Isoliertechnik, Hansa Schiffahrt-Schiffbau-Hafen, 133rd year, 1996, 2, 20-22). These changes have equally influenced both the design and the assembly of the panels used for insulation, as well as the adhesives and sealants applied for this purpose. This article describes the requirement profile and the possible applications of solvent-free two-component polyurethane adhesives (2-K PU) and recently developed polyurethane hot-melt adhesives (PU-HM) for the manufacture and/or assembly of panels. Moreover, it deals with the role of the advanced solvent-free, silane-modified polymers (MS polymers) in the pointing of panels (seam-sealing) exposed to low temperatures.

  4. Ignition of a coal particle at the low temperature of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Dmitrii O.; Sharypov, Oleg V.

    2015-01-01

    Regularities of physical and chemical processes occurring during the heating of the coal dust particles by low-temperature air flow are investigated by means of thermogravimetric analyzer TA SDT Q600 and experimental setup of optical diagnostics of multiphase flows based on PIV method. Qualitative and quantitative characteristics were established for the processes of the coal particle inert heating, moisture evaporation, thermal decomposition, combustible gas mixture formation, oxidation of volatiles and carbon. It was revealed that the temperature of the oxidizer required for the coal particle ignition is higher than 500 ∘C. The experimental data can be used to develop predictive mathematical models of technological processes fire hazard in pulverized coal systems of thermal power plants.

  5. Low temperature, sulfur tolerant homogeneous catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, R.M.

    1986-01-20

    The purpose of this report is to update and reorganize our recent review on homogeneous catalysis of the water-gas shift reaction (WGSR) based on recent literature publications and patents. This updated version will serve as a means of selecting 10 candidate catalyst systems for use in developing effective, sulfur-tolerant, low temperature WGSR catalysts. This report discusses the variations possible in the basic chemistry associated with WGSR catalytic cycles, including basic, acidic, and neutral conditions. Then individual mechanism for specific WGSR catalyst systems are discussed. Finally, on the basis of the literature reports, a list is presented of candidate catalysts and basic systems we have chosen for study in Task 3.

  6. Gas generation test data and life tests of low temperature heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, A. S.; Brown, J. R.; Chang, W. S.; Ponnappan, R.

    1990-06-01

    Functional life tests of thirty low-temperature heat pipes of different design, manufacture, fluid, and envelope combinations are continuing beyond 70,000 hours at Wright Research and Development Center. As originally configured by NASA Lewis Research Center, the intent of this research is to evaluate the commercial heat pipes for long-life applications in spacecraft. Aluminum and stainless steel heat pipes with ammonia, methanol, and refrigerant-21 are being tested in vacuum chambers at 60 C average operating temperature. Tests for gas indicate that considerable amount of noncondensibles accumulate in the aluminum/ammonia heat pipes compared to stainless steel/ammonia pipes. Serious performance deterioration has been observed in three pipes, while the remaining are functioning normally.

  7. Gas-liquid type phase transition in semiivietals at low temperatures and high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mase, Shoichi; Fukami, Takeshi; Mori, Masatoshi; Inoue, Tomnio

    1982-07-01

    Remarkable anomalies have been found in the temperature and frequency dependences of the attenuation coefficient of sound waves in bismuth, antimony and pyrolytic graphite at low temperatures and high magnetic fields. The result for bismuth in particular is app]arently similar to those observed in second-order phase transition phenomena. On the basis of the Nakajima-Yoshioka-Kuramoto theory of the gas-liquid type phase transition in the electron-hole system, these anomalies are fairly well explained in terms of the fluctuation effect above the phase transition temperature, provided that the electron-hole correlation interaction is assumed to be sensitively dependent on the state of the overlapping of the electron and hole Landau levels.

  8. Low-Temperature Multiple-Reheat Closed Gas Power Cycles for the AHTR and LSFR

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua, Zhao; Peterson, Per F.

    2006-07-01

    High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGR) such as GT-MHR and PBMR with direct closed gas-turbine Brayton cycle can achieve efficiency between 44% to 48% with core outlet temperatures from 850 deg. C to 900 deg. C. The use of multiple reheat and inter-cooling stages can further improve thermal efficiency. Low-temperature multiple reheat cycles for the AHTR-MI and liquid-salt fast reactors (LSFR), with core outlet temperatures ranging from 620 deg. C to 750 deg. C, can reach similar efficiency as these direct-cycle HTGRs but with reduced technical risk due to lower temperatures. This paper discusses design optimization at these lower temperatures for multiple reheat closed gas cycles and vertical and horizontal arrangement options for power conversion units (PCU). Figures of merit such as specific power density, specific steel input, and specific helium inventory are estimated for different PCU arrangement configurations. With similar components parameters and reasonable arrangement, different configurations such as horizontal or vertical shaft, integrated system or distributed system, were compared. Among those configurations, integrated systems basing on the GT-MHR PCU design result in the highest specific power density and lowest specific steel input. Because the differences in these high-level performance parameters are not large enough to de-select any configurations, further detailed design and comparison must be performed to select optimal system designs. (authors)

  9. The Far-Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Low Temperature Hydrogen Gas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishnow, Edward Hyman

    The far-infrared absorption spectrum of normal hydrogen gas has been measured from 20-320 cm^ {-1} (lambda = 500-31 mu M), over the temperature range 21-38 K, and the pressure range 0.6-3 atmospheres. The spectra cover the very weak and broad collision-induced translational absorption band of H_2 which at these low temperatures is observed well isolated from the H_2 rotational lines. Translational absorption occurs when two molecules collide and absorb a photon via a transient induced dipole moment. The molecules emerge from the collision with altered translational energies, and the rotational, vibrational, and electronic energy states remain unaffected. The present spectra are the lowest temperature, lowest pressure, and highest resolution studies of the H_2 translational spectrum. In order to observe the weak translational absorption band, a long pathlength multireflection absorption cell ('White cell'), cooled by the continuous flow of helium vapour, has been designed and constructed. The cell has an f/10 optical beam that allows long wavelength radiation to be transmitted, with low diffraction losses, over an optical path of up to 60 m. The cell is coupled to a Fourier transform interferometer and H_2^ectra are obtained at a spectral resolution of 0.24 cm ^{-1}, 10 times higher than previous experiments. Low temperature absorption spectra are due to not only transitions between molecular translational energy states, but also rotational transitions between the bound states of the van der Waals complex formed by two hydrogen molecules. The integrated absorption of the measured H _2 translational spectrum is consistent with the binary absorption coefficient calculated using the Poll and Van Kranendonk theory of collison-induced absorption. The calculation is based on the quantum mechanical pair distribution function derived from the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential, and it includes contributions from H_2 dimer bound states. Although dimer transitions

  10. Low temperature combustion using nitrogen enrichment to mitigate NOx from large bore natural gas fueled engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Biruduganti, M.; Gupta, S.; Sekar, R.; Energy Systems

    2010-01-01

    Low temperature combustion is identified as one of the pathways to meet the mandatory ultra low NO{sub x} emissions levels set by the regulatory agencies. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a well known technique to realize low NO{sub x} emissions. However, EGR has many built-in adverse ramifications that negate its advantages in the long term. This paper discusses nitrogen enrichment of intake air using air separation membranes as a better alternative to the mature EGR technique. This investigation was undertaken to determine the maximum acceptable level of nitrogen enrichment of air for a single-cylinder spark-ignited natural gas engine. NO{sub x} reduction as high as 70% was realized with a modest 2% nitrogen enrichment while maintaining power density and simultaneously improving fuel conversion efficiency (FCE). Any enrichment beyond this level degraded engine performance in terms of power density, FCE, and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. The effect of ignition timing was also studied with and without N{sub 2} enrichment. Finally, lean burn versus stoichiometric operation utilizing nitrogen enrichment was compared. Analysis showed that lean burn operation along with nitrogen enrichment is one of the effective pathways for realizing better FCE and lower NO{sub x} emissions.

  11. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance

  12. Testing marine shales' ability to generate catalytic gas at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L.; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Sauer, P. E.; Mastalerz, M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon gases are generally thought to originatevia low-temperature microbial or high-temperature thermogenicpathways (Whiticar, 1996) that can be distinguished by compound-specific hydrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios. An alternative low-temperature catalytic pathway for hydrocarbon generation from sedimentary organic matter has been proposed to be active at temperatures as low as 50oC (e.g.,Mango and Jarvie,2009,2010; Mango et al., 2010; Bartholomew et al., 1999). This hypothesis, however, still requires rigoroustesting by independent laboratory experiments.The possibility of catalytic generation of hydrocarbons in some source rocks (most likely in relatively impermeable and organic-rich shales where reduced catalytic centers can be best preserved) would offer an explanation for the finding of gas of non-microbial origin in formations that lack the thermal maturity for generating thermogenic gas.It is unknown whether catalytically generated methane would be isotopically different from thermogenicmethane (δ13CCH4>-50‰, δ2HCH4from -275‰ to -100‰) ormicrobially generated methane (δ13CCH4from -40‰ to -110‰, δ2HCH4from -400‰to -150‰) (Whiticar, 1998). In order to test for catalytic gas generationin water-wet shales and coals, we are conductinglaboratory experiments at three temperatures (60°C, 100°C, 200°C)and three pressures (ambient pressure, 107 Pa, 3x107 Pa)over periods of six months to several years. So far, our longest running experiments have reached one year. We sealed different types of thermally immature, pre-evacuatedshales (Mowry, New Albany, and Mahoganyshales) and coals (SpringfieldCoal and Wilcoxlignite)with isotopically defined waters in gold cells in the absence of elemental oxygen.Preliminary results show that these samples, depending on conditions, can generate light hydrocarbon gases (methane, ethane and propane) and CO2. Methane, CO2, and traces of H2havebeen generated at 60°C, whereas experiments at 100°C and 200

  13. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T; Mao, Wendy L; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P; Hickmott, Donald D

    2007-04-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H(2)O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H(2)-H(2) distance of only 2.93 A. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 A), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu(3)[Co(CN)(6)](2) and Cu(3)(BTC)(2) (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  14. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: Progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L.; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T.; Mao, Wendy L.; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P.; Hickmott, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H2O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H2–H2 distance of only 2.93 Å. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 Å), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu3[Co(CN)6]2 and Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  15. Advances in electron kinetics and theory of gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kolobov, Vladimir I.

    2013-10-15

    “Electrons, like people, are fertile and infertile: high-energy electrons are fertile and able to reproduce.”—Lev TsendinModern physics of gas discharges increasingly uses physical kinetics for analysis of non-equilibrium plasmas. The description of underlying physics at the kinetic level appears to be important for plasma applications in modern technologies. In this paper, we attempt to grasp the legacy of Professor Lev Tsendin, who advocated the use of the kinetic approach for understanding fundamental problems of gas discharges. We outline the fundamentals of electron kinetics in low-temperature plasmas, describe elements of the modern kinetic theory of gas discharges, and show examples of the theoretical approach to gas discharge problems used by Lev Tsendin. Important connections between electron kinetics in gas discharges and semiconductors are also discussed. Using several examples, we illustrate how Tsendin's ideas and methods are currently being developed for the implementation of next generation computational tools for adaptive kinetic-fluid simulations of gas discharges used in modern technologies.

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions from Australian open-cut coal mines: contribution from spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation.

    PubMed

    Day, Stuart J; Carras, John N; Fry, Robyn; Williams, David J

    2010-07-01

    Spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation of waste coal and other carbonaceous material at open-cut coal mines are potentially significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions. However, the magnitude of these emissions is largely unknown. In this study, emissions from spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation were estimated for six Australian open-cut coal mines with annual coal production ranging from 1.7 to more than 16 Mt. Greenhouse emissions from all other sources at these mines were also estimated and compared to those from spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation. In all cases, fugitive emission of methane was the largest source of greenhouse gas; however, in some mines, spontaneous combustion accounted for almost a third of all emissions. For one mine, it was estimated that emissions from spontaneous combustion were around 250,000 t CO(2)-e per annum. The contribution from low-temperature oxidation was generally less than about 1% of the total for all six mines. Estimating areas of spoil affected by spontaneous combustion by ground-based surveys was prone to under-report the area. Airborne infrared imaging appears to be a more reliable method. PMID:19572109

  17. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics. PMID:27430635

  18. Non-LTE Kinetics Modeling and Experimental Investigation of VUV Emission from Low Temperature Nobel Gas Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Masnavi, Majid; Richardson, Martin; One Team

    2013-10-01

    The VUV light sources have applications in various scientific and engineering fields, such as semiconductor industry, nanometer processing, and photochemistry. A detailed multilevel non-LTE atomic model is developed to investigate emissivity and absorption properties of low temperature Nobel gas plasmas around 80 nm based on the Yb/Al multilayer mirrors. We will present the optimum regions for conversion efficiency of Nobel gas targets against target density and laser parameters by means of 1D hydrodynamic coupled to a developed population kinetics codes. We discuss in detailed predictions by comparing calculations to our experimental results.

  19. Low temperature impact toughness of the main gas pipeline steel after long-term degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruschak, Pavlo O.; Danyliuk, Iryna M.; Bishchak, Roman T.; Vuherer, Tomaž

    2014-12-01

    The correlation of microstructure, temperature and Charpy V-notch impact properties of a steel 17G1S pipeline steel was investigated in this study. Within the concept of physical mesomechanics, the dynamic failure of specimens is represented as a successive process of the loss of shear stability, which takes place at different structural/scale levels of the material. Characteristic stages are analyzed for various modes of failure, moreover, typical levels of loading and oscillation periods, etc. are determined. Relations between low temperature derived through this test, microstructures and Charpy (V-notch) toughness test results are also discussed in this paper.

  20. Nanoporous gold catalysts for selective gas-phase oxidative coupling of methanol at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wittstock, A; Zielasek, V; Biener, J; Friend, C M; Bäumer, M

    2010-01-15

    Gold (Au) is an interesting catalytic material because of its ability to catalyze reactions, such as partial oxidations, with high selectivities at low temperatures; but limitations arise from the low O2 dissociation probability on Au. This problem can be overcome by using Au nanoparticles supported on suitable oxides which, however, are prone to sintering. Nanoporous Au, prepared by the dealloying of AuAg alloys, is a new catalyst with a stable structure that is active without any support. It catalyzes the selective oxidative coupling of methanol to methyl formate with selectivities above 97% and high turnover frequencies at temperatures below 80 degrees C. Because the overall catalytic characteristics of nanoporous Au are in agreement with studies on Au single crystals, we deduced that the selective surface chemistry of Au is unaltered but that O2 can be readily activated with this material. Residual silver is shown to regulate the availability of reactive oxygen. PMID:20075249

  1. Inactivation of microorganisms and endotoxins by low temperature nitrogen gas plasma exposure.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Hideharu; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Sekiya, Takayuki; Tamazawa, Kahoru; Taniguchi, Akira; Kido, Nobuo

    2007-12-01

    The plasma of several different gases has shown a sporicidal activity. From these gases, nitrogen gas was most difficult to produce atomic nitrogen radicals. However, these radicals have a high energy, indicating that nitrogen gas plasma could be used to sterilize microorganisms and inactivate endotoxins. The sterilization mechanism of nitrogen gas plasma is the synergistic effect of a high rising-up voltage pulse, UV irradiation and atomic nitrogen radicals. Thus, the target cells were damaged by degradation, which resulted in death. The biological indicator (BI) used in this study was Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 at a population of 1 x 10(6) CFU/sheet. Sterility assurance was confirmed by using the BI. Moreover, endotoxins were successfully inactivated. More than 5 log reduction of endotoxins could be attained with 30 minutes of nitrogen gas plasma exposure. Material functionality influenced by nitrogen gas plasma presented a satisfactory result. No deterioration of polymers could be observed by nitrogen gas plasma exposure. PMID:18198719

  2. Stability and photochemistry of ClO dimers formed at low temperature in the gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. A.; Hayman, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    The recent observations of elevated concentrations of the ClO radical in the austral spring over Antarctica have implicated catalytic destruction by chlorine in the large depletions seen in the total ozone column. One of the chemical theories consistent with an elevated concentration of the ClO is a cycle involving the formation of the ClO dimer through the association reaction: ClO + ClO = Cl2O2 and the photolysis of the dimer to give the active Cl species necessary for O3 depletion. Here, researchers report experimental studies designed to characterize the dimer of ClO formed by the association reaction at low temperatures. ClO was produced by static photolysis of several different precursor systems: Cl sub 2 + O sub 3; Cl sub 2 O sub 2; OClO + Cl sub 2 O spectroscopy in the U.V. region, which allowed the time dependence of Cl sub 2, Cl sub 2 O, ClO, OClO, O sub 3 and other absorbing molecules to be determined.

  3. Low-temperature gas-barrier films by atomic layer deposition for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hui-Huan; Chou, Kun-Yi; Jou, Jwo-Huei; Lin, Kung-Liang; Wang, Chin-Chiun; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dependences of gas-barrier performance on the deposition temperature of atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) Al2O3, HfO2, and ZnO films were studied to establish low-temperature ALD processes for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By identifying and controlling the key factors, i.e. using H2O2 as an oxidant, laminating Al2O3 with HfO2 or ZnO layers into AHO or AZO nanolaminates, and extending purge steps, OLED-acceptable gas-barrier performance (water vapor transmission rates ∼ 10‑6 g m‑2 d‑1) was achieved for the first time at a low deposition temperature of 50 °C in a thermal ALD mode. The compatibility of the low-temperature ALD process with OLEDs was confirmed by applying the process to encapsulate different types of OLED devices, which were degradation-free upon encapsulation and showed adequate lifetime during accelerated aging tests (pixel shrinkage <5% after 240 h at 60 °C/90% RH).

  4. Acoustic Measurements in a Hexamethyldisiloxane-Loaded Low-Temperature Direct Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Effluent: Nozzle Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Paa, W.

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) measurements as well as laser light scattering experiments were performed during SiO2 layer deposition. SiO2 was generated in low-temperature atmospheric plasma torches (≤500 W), which were seeded with hexamethyldisiloxane. These AE measurements can be used to detect the necessity for nozzle cleaning online. The plasma torches were used to obtain high-quality SiO2 coatings. For electrical power of less than 350 W, we observed parasitic SiO2 deposition in the burner nozzle, which decreases the nozzle aperture within several hours of operation time. No parasitic SiO2 deposition inside the burner nozzle was observed when the plasma source was operated at more than 350 W. The reduced nozzle aperture causes increased plasma velocities and acoustic noise. Especially burst-like increases of this acoustic emission were assumed to be correlated to the ejection of particles. This hypothesis could be confirmed by measurements of scattered light from a sheet of laser light at 248 nm. The obtained correlations suggest using a microphone as a low-cost monitor for the degree of parasitic deposition inside the plasma burner nozzle. The threshold for acoustic noise detection has to be chosen low enough to avoid burst-like emission of particles.

  5. Low temperature operated NiO-SnO2 heterostructured SO2 gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Punit; Sharma, Anjali; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is among the most toxic gas released by the industries which is extremely dangerous for human health. In the present communication, an attempt has been made for the detection of SO2 gas (500 ppm) with the help of SnO2 thin film based gas sensor. A low sensing response of 1.3 is obtained for sputtered SnO2 thin films based sensors at a high operating temperature of 220 °C. To improve the sensing response, different heterostructured sensors are developed by incorporating other metal oxide thin films (PdO, MgO, NiO, V2O5) over SnO2 thin film surface. Sensing response studies of different sensors towards SO2 gas (500 ppm) are presented in the present report. Among all the prepared sensors NiO-SnO2 hetero-structure sensor is showing highest sensing response (˜8) at a comparatively lower operating temperature (140 °C). Possible sensing mechanism for NiO-SnO2 heterostructured sensor has also been discussed in the present report.

  6. Diffraction-enhanced X-ray imaging under low-temperature conditions: non-destructive observations of clathrate gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yoneyama, Akio; Ueda, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Hondoh, Takeo; Hori, Akira; Sun, Duo; Ohmura, Ryo; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Tohoru

    2012-11-01

    Diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI) is a phase-contrast X-ray imaging technique suitable for visualizing light-element materials. The method also enables observations of sample-containing regions with large density gradients. In this study a cryogenic imaging technique was developed for DEI-enabled measurements at low temperature from 193 K up to room temperature with a deviation of 1 K. Structure-II air hydrate and structure-I carbon dioxide (CO(2)) hydrate were examined to assess the performance of this cryogenic DEI technique. It was shown that this DEI technique could image gas hydrate coexisting with ice and gas bubbles with a density resolution of about 0.01 g cm(-3) and a wide dynamic density range of about 1.60 g cm(-3). In addition, this method may be a way to make temperature-dependent measurements of physical properties such as density. PMID:23093767

  7. Rotational relaxation of fluoromethane molecules in low-temperature collisions with buffer-gas helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingjia; Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Xu, Supeng; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to study the rotational relaxation of polar molecules [here taking fluoromethane (CH3F ) as an example] in collisions with 3.5 K buffer-gas helium (He) atoms by using an electrostatic guiding technique. The dependence of the guiding signal of CH3F on the injected He flux and the dependence of the guiding efficiency of CH3F on its rotational temperature are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. By comparing the experimental and simulated results, we find that the translational and rotational temperatures of the buffer-gas cooled CH3F molecules can reach to about 5.48 and 0.60 K, respectively, and the ratio between the translational and average rotational collisional cross sections of CH3F -He is γ =σt/σr=36.49 ±6.15 . In addition, the slowing, cooling, and boosting effects of the molecular beam with different injected He fluxes are also observed and their forming conditions are investigated in some detail. Our study shows that our proposed method can not only be used to measure the translational and rotational temperatures of the buffer-gas cooled molecules, but also to measure the ratio of the translational collisional cross section to the average rotational collisional cross section, and even to measure the average rotational collisional cross section when the translational collisional cross section is measured by fitting the lifetime of molecule signal to get a numerical solution from the diffusion equation of buffer-gas He atoms in the cell.

  8. Low temperature tin oxide (SnO2) nanowire gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johari, Anima; Bhatnagar, M. C.; Rana, V.

    2012-10-01

    In present work, we report the synthesis of SnO2 nanowires on gold catalyzed silicon substrate and implementation of these grown SnO2 nanowires as a sensing element for methanol sensing. The SnO2 nanowires were synthesized by using thermal evaporation method. The growth of SnO2 nanowires was carried out on gold catalyzed silicon (Au/Si) substrate by thermal evaporation of a mixture of SnO2 and graphite powders in Argon (Ar) ambience at a temperature of 1050°C. The growth of SnO2 nanowires takes place at atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology study reveals the growth of SnO2 nanowires (diameter~ 300 nm, length~ 50 μm) on the Au coated silicon substrate. The XRD analysis concludes that synthesized SnO2 nanostructures show polycrystalline nature with tetragonal rutile structure. The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth mechanism of SnO2 nanowires were also confirmed by EDX spectra. The SnO2 nanowires were used to fabricate single SnO2 nanowire based methanol gas sensor. The result reveals that the device exhibit the resistance change from 23 MΩ to 10 KΩ upon exposing to 200 ppm concentration of methanol gas at 100°C. This sensing behaviour offers a suitable application of the SnO2 nanowire sensor for detection of methanol gas.

  9. Low temperature, sulfur tolerant homogeneous catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, R.M.; Wood, B.J.; Krishnan, G.N.

    1986-04-01

    The objective of this project is to identify, prepare, test, characterize, and evaluate a practical, homogeneous catalyst for a water-gas shift process. The project effort is divided into the following five tasks: (1) Update SRI's recent review of the literature on the catalysis of the water-gas shift reaction (WGSR) to include references after 1982 and those in the patent literature. Based on this review, SRI will choose ten candidate systems to be evaluated as to their abilities to catalyze the WGSR using syngas derived from gasified coal. (2) Develop a test plan designed to effectively evaluate both the catalysts and, to some extent, reactor configuration for WGSR catalysis. (3) Perform a series of experiments to identify the most effective and economical of the ten candidate catalysts and then further evaluate the reaction kinetics of at least one selected catalyst system to develop sufficient data to provide the basis for the work in Task 4. (4) Develop a mathematical model of the final candidate system that uses rate expressions to describe the catalytic process. (5) Perform a techno-economical evaluation of the catalyst in terms of a proposed plant design based on the reaction model, current costs, and standard chemical engineering practice and compare the proposed design with a conventional hydrogen plant.

  10. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  11. Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35 degrees C.

  12. Solid sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35.degree. C.

  13. Evaluation of bactericidal effects of low-temperature nitrogen gas plasma towards application to short-time sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kumiko; Sakuma, Ayaka; Nakamura, Yuka; Oguri, Tomoko; Sato, Natsumi; Kido, Nobuo

    2012-07-01

    To develop a novel low-temperature plasma sterilizer using pure N(2) gas as a plasma source, we evaluated bactericidal ability of a prototype apparatus provided by NGK Insulators. After determination of the sterilizing conditions without the cold spots, the D value of the BI of Geobacillus stearothermophilus endospores on the filter paper was determined as 1.9 min. However, the inactivation efficiency of BI carrying the same endospores on SUS varied to some extent, suggesting that the bactericidal effect might vary by materials of sterilized instruments. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were also exposed to the N(2) gas plasma and confirmed to be inactivated within 30 min. Through the evaluation of bactericidal efficiency in a sterilization bag, we concluded that the UV photons in the plasma and the high-voltage pulse to generate the gas plasma were not concerned with the bactericidal effect of the N(2) gas plasma. Bactericidal effect might be exhibited by activated nitrogen atoms or molecular radicals. PMID:22469251

  14. On the Mechanism of Low-Temperature Water Gas Shift Reaction on Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhale, Amit A.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2008-01-30

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations are used to investigate the water gas shift reaction (WGSR) mechanism on Cu(111). The thermochemistry and activation energy barriers for all the elementary steps of the commonly accepted redox mechanism, involving complete water activation to atomic oxygen, are presented. Through our calculations, we identify carboxyl, a new reactive intermediate, which plays a central role in WGSR on Cu(111). The thermochemistry and activation energy barriers of the elementary steps of a new reaction path, involving carboxyl, are studied. A detailed DFTbased microkinetic model of experimental reaction rates, accounting for both the previous and the new WGSR mechanism show that, under relevant experimental conditions, (1) the carboxyl-mediated route is the dominant path, and (2) the initial hydrogen abstraction from water is the rate-limiting step. Formate is a stable “spectator” species, formed predominantly through CO₂ hydrogenation. In addition, the microkinetic model allows for predictions of (i) surface coverage of intermediates, (ii) WGSR apparent activation energy, and (iii) reaction orders with respect to CO, H₂O, CO₂, and H₂.

  15. Reduced graphene oxide and graphene composite materials for improved gas sensing at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zöpfl, Alexander; Lemberger, Michael-Maximilian; König, Matthias; Ruhl, Guenther; Matysik, Frank-Michael; Hirsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was investigated as a material for use in chemiresistive gas sensors. The carbon nanomaterial was transferred onto a silicon wafer with interdigital gold electrodes. Spin coating turned out to be the most reliable transfer technique, resulting in consistent rGO layers of reproducible quality. Fast changes in the electrical resistance at a low operating temperature of 85 °C could be detected for the gases NO(2), CH(4) and H(2). Especially upon adsorption of NO(2) the high signal changes allowed a minimum detection of 0.3 ppm (S/N = 3). To overcome the poor selectivity, rGO was chemically functionalized with octadecylamine, or modified by doping with metal nanoparticles such as Pd and Pt, and also metal oxides such as MnO(2), and TiO(2). The different response patterns for six different materials allowed the discrimination of all of the test gases by pattern recognition based on principal component analysis. PMID:25467062

  16. Low temperature, sulfur tolerant homogeneous catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction. Task 1, Topical report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, R.M.

    1986-01-20

    The purpose of this report is to update and reorganize our recent review on homogeneous catalysis of the water-gas shift reaction (WGSR) based on recent literature publications and patents. This updated version will serve as a means of selecting 10 candidate catalyst systems for use in developing effective, sulfur-tolerant, low temperature WGSR catalysts. This report discusses the variations possible in the basic chemistry associated with WGSR catalytic cycles, including basic, acidic, and neutral conditions. Then individual mechanism for specific WGSR catalyst systems are discussed. Finally, on the basis of the literature reports, a list is presented of candidate catalysts and basic systems we have chosen for study in Task 3.

  17. Effects of low-temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization on in vitro cytotoxicity of poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL).

    PubMed

    Franklin, Samuel Patrick; Stoker, Aaron M; Cockrell, Mary K; Pfeiffer, Ferris M; Sonny Bal, B; Cook, James L

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether low-temperature hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) gas plasma sterilization of porous three-dimensional poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) constructs significantly inhibits cellular metabolism of canine chondrocytes. Porous cylindrical constructs were fabricated using fused deposition modeling and divided into four sterilization groups. Two groups were sterilized with low-temperature H2O2 gas plasma (LTGP) and constructs from one of those groups were subsequently rinsed with Dulbecco's Modified Essential Media (LTGPDM). Constructs in the other two groups were disinfected with either 70% isopropyl alcohol or exposure to UV light. Canine chondrocytes were seeded in 6-well tissue-culture plates and allowed to adhere prior to addition of PCL. Cellular metabolism was assessed by adding resazurin to the tissue-culture wells and assessing conversion of this substrate by viable cells to the fluorescent die resorufin. This process was performed at three times prior to addition of PCL and at four times after addition of PCL to the tissue-culture wells. Metabolism was not significantly different among the different tissue-culture wells at any of the 3 times prior to addition of PCL. Metabolism was significantly different among the treatment groups at 3 of 4 times after addition of PCL to the tissue culture wells. Metabolism was significantly lower with constructs sterilized by LTGP than all other treatment groups at all 3 of these times. We conclude that LTGP sterilization of PCL constructs resulted in significant cytotoxicity to canine chondrocytes when compared to PCL constructs disinfected with either UV light exposure or 70% isopropyl alcohol. PMID:22126862

  18. Low Temperature Combustion using nitrogen enrichment to mitigate nox from large bore natural gas-filled engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Biruduganti, M. S.; Gupta, S. B.; Sekar, R. R.

    2008-01-01

    Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) is identified as one of the pathways to meet the mandatory ultra low NOx emissions levels set by regulatory agencies. This phenomenon can be realized by utilizing various advanced combustion control strategies. The present work discusses nitrogen enrichment using an Air Separation Membrane (ASM) as a better alternative to the mature Exhaust Gas Re-circulation (EGR) technique currently in use. A 70% NOx reduction was realized with a moderate 2% nitrogen enrichment while maintaining power density and simultaneously improving Fuel Conversion Efficiency (FCE). The maximum acceptable Nitrogen Enriched Air (NEA) in a single cylinder spark ignited natural gas engine was investigated in this paper. Any enrichment beyond this level degraded engine performance both in terms of power density and FCE, and unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions. The effect of ignition timing was also studied with and without N2 enrichment. Finally, lean burn versus stoichiometric operation utilizing NEA was compared. Analysis showed that lean burn operation along with NEA is one of the effective pathways for realizing better FCE and lower NOx emissions.

  19. Structure Sensitivity of the Low-temperature Water-gas Shift Reaction on Cu–CeO2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Si, R.; Zhang, L.; Raitano, J.; Yi, N.; Chan, S.-W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    2012-01-17

    We have investigated the structure sensitivity of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts prepared at the nanoscale by different techniques. On the surface of ceria, different CuO{sub x} structures exist. We show here that only the strongly bound Cu-[O{sub x}]-Ce species, probably associated with the surface oxygen vacancies of ceria, are active for catalyzing the low-temperature WGS reaction. Weakly bound CuO{sub x} clusters and CuO nanoparticles are spectator species in the reaction. Isolated Cu{sup 2+} ions doping the ceria surface are not active themselves, but they are important in that they create oxygen vacancies and can be used as a reservoir of copper to replenish surface Cu removed by leaching or sintering. Accordingly, synthesis techniques such as coprecipitation that allow for extensive solubility of Cu in ceria should be preferred over impregnation, deposition-precipitation, ion exchange or another two-step method whereby the copper precursor is added to already made ceria nanocrystals. For the synthesis of different structures, we have used two methods: a homogeneous coprecipitation (CP), involving hexamethylenetetramine as the precipitating agent and the pH buffer; and a deposition-precipitation (DP) technique. In the latter case, the ceria supports were first synthesized at the nanoscale with different shapes (rods, cubes) to investigate any potential shape effect on the reaction. Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts with different copper contents up to ca. 20 at.% were prepared. An indirect shape effect of CeO{sub 2}, manifested by the propensity to form oxygen vacancies and strongly bind copper in the active form, was established; i.e. the water-gas shift reaction is not structure-sensitive. The apparent activation energy of the reaction on all samples was similar, 50 {+-} 10 kJ/mol, in a product-free (2% CO-10% H{sub 2}O) gas mixture.

  20. Low Temperature Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Amorphous Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles doped with Erbium, synthesized using Inert Gas Condensation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha; Wang, Jingzhou; Wojciech, Jadwisienczak; Kordesch, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Free standing Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles (NPs) doped in situwith Erbium (AlN:Er), ranging from 3-30nm in size, were synthesized using a vapor phase deposition technique known as Inert Gas Condensation (IGC). Amorphous behavior of these NPs was inferred from the wide-angle X-ray spectroscopy studies. Raman spectra analysis for these AlN:Er NPs showed characteristic peaks for A1(TO) and E2(high) phonon modes of AlN. Detailed structural characterization of these Er doped AlN NPs will be carried out using a High-Resolution TEM, results of which will be included in my talk. Low temperature Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were carried out for these a-AlN:Er NPs. The corresponding Er+3 ion emission peaks were compared to the CL emission spectra obtained for a-AlN:Er thin films, and for commercially obtained Erbium-Oxide NPs. These spectroscopic results will be discussed in detail. I will also present the CL results obtained for in-air and in-nitrogen atmosphere annealed a-AlN:Er NPs. In addition to this, I will illustrate how these Er doped NPs can be used as nano-scale temperature sensors. The SNOM help provided by Prof. Hugh Richardson is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Low temperature synthesis of silicon nitride thin films deposited by VHF/RF PECVD for gas barrier application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jun S.; Shin, Kyung S.; Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, silicon nitride (SiNx) thin films were deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates as barrier layers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. Utilizing a combination of very high-frequency (VHF 40.68 MHz) and radio-frequency (RF 13.56 MHz) plasmas it was possible to adopt PECVD deposition at low-temperature using the precursors: Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDSN) and nitrogen. To investigate relationship between film properties and plasma properties, plasma diagnostic using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was performed along with the film analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). OES measurements show that there is dominance of the excited N2 and N2+ emissions with increase in N2 dilution, which has a significant impact on the film properties. It was seen that all the deposited films contains mainly silicon nitride with a small content of carbon and no signature of oxygen. Interestingly, upon air exposure, films have shown the formation of Si-O bonds in addition to the Si-N bonds. Measurements and analysis reveals that SiNx films deposited with high content of nitrogen with HMDSN plasma can have lower gas barrier properties as low as 7 . 3 ×10-3 g/m2/day. Also at Chiang Mai University.

  2. Low-temperature GaN growth on silicon substrates by single gas-source epitaxy and photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.A.; Tolle, J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Roucka, R.; Ritter, Cole; Kouvetakis, J.; Tsong, I.S.T.

    2005-08-15

    We report a unique low-temperature growth method for epitaxial GaN on Si(111) substrates via a ZrB{sub 2}(0001) buffer layer. The method utilizes the decomposition of a single gas-source precursor (D{sub 2}GaN{sub 3}){sub 3} on the substrate surface to form GaN. The film growth process is further promoted by irradiation of ultraviolet light to enhance the growth rate and ordering of the film. The best epitaxial film quality is achieved at a growth temperature of 550 deg. C with a growth rate of 3 nm/min. The films exhibit intense photoluminescence emission at 10 K with a single peak at 3.48 eV, indicative of band-edge emission for a single-phase hexagonal GaN film. The growth process achieved in this study is compatible with low Si processing temperatures and also enables direct epitaxy of GaN on ZrB{sub 2} in contrast to conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition based approaches.

  3. Simulation of Gas Mixtures in RF Discharges for Nitride Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Helen H.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Tungsten and titanium nitride films have long been grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods. However, there has been recent interest in low temperature growth using plasma enhanced CVD. For the present work, we focus on the radio frequency (BE) discharge characteristics of gas mixtures used in nitride deposition (for example, WF6 and ammonia). Because the radial variations for a standard 200 mm, parallel plate reactor are limited to a small zone near the edges of the electrodes, a 1-D (one-dimensional) analysis is considered. This model consists of a self-consistent, 3-D (three-dimensional) moment fluid simulation that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations for neutral and charged species. The results in terms of plasma structure, radical concentrations, and local deposition rate will be presented. We will also compare the 1-D results with those obtained from a 2-D hybrid plasma equipment model (HPEM) developed at the University of Illinois.

  4. Multi-zone modelling of partially premixed low-temperature combustion in pilot-ignited natural-gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S. R.; inivasan, K. K.

    2010-09-14

    Detailed results from a multi-zone phenomenological simulation of partially premixed advanced-injection low-pilot-ignited natural-gas low-temperature combustion are presented with a focus on early injection timings (the beginning of (pilot) injection (BOI)) and very small diesel quantities (2-3 per cent of total fuel energy). Combining several aspects of diesel and spark ignition engine combustion models, the closed-cycle simulation accounted for diesel autoignition, diesel spray combustion, and natural-gas combustion by premixed turbulent flame propagation. The cylinder contents were divided into an unburned zone, several pilot fuel zones (or 'packets') that modelled diesel evaporation and ignition, a flame zone for natural-gas combustion, and a burned zone. The simulation predicted the onset of ignition, cylinder pressures, and heat release rate profiles satisfactorily over a wide range of BOIs (20-60° before top dead centre (before TDC)) but especially well at early BOIs. Strong coupling was observed between pilot spray combustion in the packets and premixed turbulent combustion in the flame zone and, therefore, the number of ignition centres (packets) profoundly affected flame combustion. The highest local peak temperatures (greater than 2000 K) were observed in the packets, while the flame zone was much cooler (about 1650 K), indicating that pilot diesel spray combustion is probably the dominant source of engine-out emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx). Further, the 60° before TDC BOI yielded the lowest average peak packet temperatures (about 1720 K) compared with the 20° before TDC BOI (about 2480 K) and 40° before TDC BOI (about 2700 K). These trends support experimental NOx trends, which showed the lowest NOx emissions for the 60°, 20°, and 40° before TDC BOIs in that order. Parametric studies showed that increasing the intake charge temperature, pilot quantity, and natural-gas equivalence ratio all led to higher peak

  5. Multiplex electric discharge gas laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, James B. (Inventor); Pacala, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A multiple pulse electric discharge gas laser system is described in which a plurality of pulsed electric discharge gas lasers are supported in a common housing. Each laser is supplied with excitation pulses from a separate power supply. A controller, which may be a microprocessor, is connected to each power supply for controlling the application of excitation pulses to each laser so that the lasers can be fired simultaneously or in any desired sequence. The output light beams from the individual lasers may be combined or utilized independently, depending on the desired application. The individual lasers may include multiple pairs of discharge electrodes with a separate power supply connected across each electrode pair so that multiple light output beams can be generated from a single laser tube and combined or utilized separately.

  6. Metal hydrides studied in gas discharge tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, I.; Kolev, S.; Popov, Tsv.; Pashov, A.; Dimitrova, M.

    2016-05-01

    A novel construction of gas discharge tube has been tested for production of high densities of metal hydrydes. Its performance turned out to be comparable with the existing sources of the same type and even better. First results of the tests on NiH are reported and critically analysed. Plans for future modifiaction of the construction and application of the tube are discussed.

  7. The effect of microwave-frequency discharge-activated oxygen on the microscale structure of low-temperature water ice films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doering, Skye R.; Strobush, Kirsten M.; Marschall, Jochen; Boulter, James E.

    2009-12-01

    Low-temperature, amorphous water ice films grown by vapor deposition under high-vacuum are exposed to microwave-frequency discharge-activated oxygen in order to investigate its effect on the ice surface. Adsorption of methane is used to probe alterations to microscale structures and surface morphology. Films are interrogated throughout the experiment by grazing-angle Fourier-transform infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, and after the experiment by temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry. Multilayer Fresnel thin-film optics simulations aid in the interpretation of absorbance spectra. Using these techniques, structural alterations are observed over a range of spatial and time scales. At first, spectral absorbance features arising from incompletely coordinated water molecules disappear. The density of high-energy methane adsorption sites is reduced, lowering the equilibrium amount of adsorbed methane. At longer exposure times, this is manifested in a narrowing of the width of the primary methane desorption peak, indicating a narrower range of methane adsorption energies on the ice surface. Together these observations indicate restructuring of micropores resulting in an increase in the structural homogeneity of the film. Enhancement of small, higher-temperature methane desorption features associated with methane encapsulation during thermal annealing indicates alterations to larger pore structures by the same restructuring process. Attribution of these effects to various energetic species in active oxygen is discussed. Based on their abundance, O(P3) and O2(aΔ1g) are the most likely candidates; other trace atomic and molecular species may also contribute.

  8. Oxynitrided Surface Layer Produced On Ti6Al4V Titanium Alloy Under Low Temperature Glow Discharge Conditions For Medical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzchon, T.; Ossowski, M.; Borowski, T.; Morgiel, J.; Czarnowska, E.

    2011-01-17

    In spite that titanium oxides increase biocompatibility of titanium implants but their functional life is limited due to the problems arising from brittles and metalosis. Therefore technology, that allow to produce composite surface layer with controlled microstructure, chemical and phase composition and surface morphology on titanium alloy and eliminates the oxides disadvantages has been existing till now is searched. The requirements of titanium and its alloys implants can be fulfill by the low-temperature glow discharge assisted oxynitriding.The paper describes the surface layer of TiO{sub 2}+TiN+Ti{sub 2}N+{alpha}Ti(N) type produced at temperature 680 deg. C that preserves mechanical properties of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V. Characteristics of produced diffusion multi-phase surface layers in range of phase composition, microstructure (SEM, TEM, XRD) and its properties, such as frictional wear resistance are presented. The biological properties in dependency to the applied sterilization method are also analyzed.Properties of produced surface layers are discussed with reference to titanium alloy. The obtained data show that produced surface layers improves titanium alloy properties both frictional wear and biological. Preliminary in vitro examinations show good biocompatibility and antithrombogenic properties.

  9. Vehicle exhaust gas clearance by low temperature plasma-driven nano-titanium dioxide film prepared by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  10. Vehicle Exhaust Gas Clearance by Low Temperature Plasma-Driven Nano-Titanium Dioxide Film Prepared by Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  11. Sensors for low temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  12. Research on Modern Gas Discharge Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, M.; Markus, T.

    This article gives an overview of today's gas discharge light sources and their application fields with focus on research aspects. In Sect. 15.1 of this chapter, an introduction to electric light sources, the lighting market and related research topics is outlined. Due to the complexity of the subject, we have focused on selected topics in the field of high intensity discharge (HID) lamps since these represent an essential part of modern lamp research. The working principle and light technical properties of HID lamps are described in Sect. 15.2. Physical and thermochemical modelling procedures and tools as well as experimental analysis are discussed in Sects. 15.3 and 15.4, respectively. These tools result in a detailed scientific insight into the complexity of real discharge lamps. In particular, analysis and modelling are the keys for further improvement and development of existing and new products.

  13. Role of adsorption kinetics in the low-temperature Si growth by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy: In situ observations and detailed modeling of the growth

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Hideki; Tsukidate, Yoshikazu; Suemitsu, Maki

    2001-08-06

    The growth rate and surface hydrogen coverage during Si gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using disilane have been obtained as functions of both the growth temperature and the source-gas pressure. The activation energy of the low-temperature (<600{sup o}C) growth rate was found to increase with the source-gas pressure, indicating a contribution by the adsorption process in these low-temperature growth kinetics. Several growth models have been constructed based on the results, among which the two-site/four-site-adsorption model [M. Suemitsu Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., Part 236, L625 (1997)] showed the best fit to both the growth rate and the hydrogen coverage. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane at low temperatures: numerical analysis of gas-phase chemical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goujard, Valentin; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Yuzawa, Shuhei; Ağiral, Anil; Okazaki, Ken

    2011-07-01

    Methane partial oxidation was investigated using a plasma microreactor. The experiments were performed at 5 and 300 °C. Microreactor configuration allows an efficient evacuation of the heat generated by methane partial oxidation and dielectric barrier discharges, allowing at the same time a better temperature control. At 5 °C, liquid condensation of low vapour pressure compounds, such as formaldehyde and methanol, occurs. 1H-NMR analysis allowed us to demonstrate significant CH3OOH formation during plasma-assisted partial oxidation of methane. Conversion and product selectivity were discussed for both temperatures. In the second part of this work, a numerical simulation was performed and a gas-phase chemical mechanism was proposed and discussed. From the comparison between the experimental results and the simulation it was found that CH3OO· formation has a determinant role in oxygenated compound production, since its fast formation disfavoured radical recombination. At 5 °C the oxidation leads mainly towards oxygenated compound formation, and plasma dissociation was the major phenomenon responsible for CH4 conversion. At 300 °C, higher CH4 conversion resulted from oxidative reactions induced by ·OH radicals with a chemistry predominantly oxidative, producing CO, H2, CO2 and H2O.

  15. Development of low temperature battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, G. M.

    1967-01-01

    Self-contained low temperature battery system consisting of a magnesium anode, potassium thiocyanate-ammonia electrolyte and a cathode composed of a mixture of sulfur, carbon, and mercuric sulfate operates for at least seventy-two hours within a discharge temperature range of plus 20 degrees C to minus 90 degrees C.

  16. Charge polarization at a Au-TiC interface and the generation of highly active and selective catalysts for the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, José A; Ramírez, Pedro J; Asara, Gian Giacomo; Viñes, Francesc; Evans, Jaime; Liu, Ping; Ricart, Josep M; Illas, Francesc

    2014-10-13

    Au atoms in contact with TiC(001) undergo significant charge polarization. Strong metal-support interactions make Au/TiC(001) an excellent catalyst for the low-temperature water-gas shift (WGS), with turnover frequencies orders of magnitude larger than those observed for conventional metal/oxide catalysts. DFT calculations indicate that the WGS reaction follows an associative mechanism with HOCO as a key intermediate. PMID:25196121

  17. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 153.964 Section 153.964... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Cargo Transfer Procedures § 153.964 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may...

  18. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 153.964 Section 153.964... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Cargo Transfer Procedures § 153.964 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may...

  19. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 153.964 Section 153.964... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Cargo Transfer Procedures § 153.964 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may...

  20. PREFACE: 12th International Conference on Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, N.; Landl, N.; Bogdan, A.; Yudin, A.

    2015-11-01

    The 12th International Conference ''Gas Discharge Plasmas and Their Applications'' (GDP 2015) was held in Tomsk, Russia, on September 6-11, 2015. GDP 2015 represents a continuation of the conferences on physics of gas discharge held in Russia since 1984 and seminars and conferences on the technological applications of low temperature plasmas traditionally organized in Tomsk. The six-day Conference brought together the specialists from different countries and organizations and provided an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge, make oral contributions and poster presentations, and initiate discussions on the topics that are of interest to the Conference participants. The selected papers of the Conference cover a wide range of technical areas and modern aspects of the physical processes in the generators of low-temperature plasma, the low and high-pressure discharges, the pulsed plasma sources, the surface modification, and other gas-discharge technologies. The Conference was hosted by Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk Scientific Center, and Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building.

  1. 46 CFR 154.1838 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 154.1838 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1838 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize cargo discharge...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1838 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 154.1838 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1838 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize cargo discharge...

  3. 46 CFR 154.1838 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 154.1838 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1838 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize cargo discharge...

  4. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-07-10

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} molecules/cm{sup 3}, 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm{sup 3}) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm{sup 3}) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved.

  5. Low-voltage gas-discharge device

    DOEpatents

    Kovarik, V.J.; Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1982-06-08

    An electronic device of the type wherein current flow is conducted by an ionized gas comprising a cathode of the type heated by ionic bombardment, an anode, means for maintaining a predetermined pressure in the region between the anode and the cathode and means for maintaining a field in the region is described. The field, which is preferably a combined magnetic and electric field, is oriented so that the mean distance traveled by electrons before reaching the anode is increased. Because of this increased distance traveled electrons moving to the anode will ionize a large number of gas atoms, thus reducing the voltage necessary to initiate gas breakdown. In a preferred embodiment the anode is a main hollow cathode and the cathode is a smaller igniter hollow cathode located within and coaxial with the main hollow cathode. An axial magnetic field is provided in the region between the hollow cathodes in order to facilitate gas breakdown in that region and initiate plasma discharge from the main hollow cathode.

  6. Quantification of OH and HO2 radicals during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons by Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique

    PubMed Central

    Blocquet, Marion; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Amedro, Damien; Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Fittschen, Christa

    2013-01-01

    •OH and •HO2 radicals are known to be the key species in the development of ignition. A direct measurement of these radicals under low-temperature oxidation conditions (T = 550–1,000 K) has been achieved by coupling a technique named fluorescence assay by gas expansion, an experimental technique designed for the quantification of these radicals in the free atmosphere, to a jet-stirred reactor, an experimental device designed for the study of low-temperature combustion chemistry. Calibration allows conversion of relative fluorescence signals to absolute mole fractions. Such radical mole fraction profiles will serve as a benchmark for testing chemical models developed to improve the understanding of combustion processes. PMID:24277836

  7. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 153.964 Section 153.964 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Cargo Transfer Procedures § 153.964 Discharge by...

  8. Low-Temperature Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.

    2008-01-01

    An effort to extend the low-temperature operational limit of supercapacitors is currently underway. At present, commercially available non-aqueous supercapacitors are rated for a minimum operating temperature of -40 C. A capability to operate at lower temperatures would be desirable for delivering power to systems that must operate in outer space or in the Polar Regions on Earth. Supercapacitors (also known as double-layer or electrochemical capacitors) offer a high power density (>1,000 W/kg) and moderate energy density (about 5 to 10 Wh/kg) technology for storing energy and delivering power. This combination of properties enables delivery of large currents for pulsed applications, or alternatively, smaller currents for low duty cycle applications. The mechanism of storage of electric charge in a supercapacitor -- at the electrical double-layer formed at a solid-electrode/liquid-electrolyte interface -- differs from that of a primary or secondary electrochemical cell (i.e., a battery) in such a manner as to impart a long cycle life (typically >10(exp 6) charge/discharge cycles).

  9. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  10. Low-temperature thermal reduction of graphene oxide nanobrick walls: unique combination of high gas barrier and low resistivity in fully organic polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Bart; Dessiatova, Ekaterina; Hagen, David A; Todd, Alexander D; Bielawski, Christopher W; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2014-07-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly from aqueous solutions was used to construct multilayer thin films (<200 nm) comprising polyethylenimine and graphene oxide. Low-temperature (175 °C) thermal reduction of these films improved gas barrier properties (e.g., lower permeability than SiOx), even under high humidity conditions, and enhanced their electrical conductivity to 1750 S/m. The flexible nature of the aforementioned thin films, along with their excellent combination of transport properties, make them ideal candidates for use in a broad range of electronics and packaging applications. PMID:24949524

  11. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  12. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on metallic samples at very low temperature in different ambient gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Saeid, R. H.; Abdelhamid, M.; Harith, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of metals at very low temperature adopting laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is greatly beneficial in space exploration expeditions and in some important industrial applications. In the present work, the effect of very low sample temperature on the spectral emission intensity of laser-induced plasma under both atmospheric pressure and vacuum has been studied for different bronze alloy samples. The sample was cooled down to liquid nitrogen (LN) temperature 77 K in a special vacuum chamber. Laser-induced plasma has been produced onto the sample surface using the fundamental wavelength of Nd:YAG laser. The optical emission from the plasma is collected by an optical fiber and analyzed by an echelle spectrometer combined with an intensified CCD camera. The integrated intensities of certain spectral emission lines of Cu, Pb, Sn, and Zn have been estimated from the obtained LIBS spectra and compared with that measured at room temperature. The laser-induced plasma parameters (electron number density Ne and electron temperature Te) were investigated at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures for both atmospheric pressure and vacuum ambient conditions. The results suggest that reducing the sample temperature leads to decrease in the emission line intensities under both environments. Plasma parameters were found to decrease at atmospheric pressure but increased under vacuum conditions.

  13. Optical emission spectroscopy study in the VUV-VIS regimes of a developing low-temperature plasma in nitrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, A.; Laity, G.; Neuber, A.

    2012-12-01

    The mechanisms leading to the development of an atmospheric low temperature plasma along a surface under pulsed conditions is of current interest. In the early plasma phase, high energy photons are a contributing factor to the process of generating electron avalanches resulting in surface flashover. Since only photons in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regime are energetic enough to cause step-ionization or direct ionization of atmospheric gases, an experiment has been set up to enable observations of photons with wavelengths shorter than 200 nm while still allowing observation up to 800 nm. A spectrum simulation software package has been developed to allow for temperature analysis on the developing plasma in the VUV region. Observations below 200 nm revealed a Boltzmann distributed excited state population corresponding to a temperature of 3.1 eV. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy measurements of the entire electrode region during the streamer phase of breakdown demonstrate the presence of molecular nitrogen emission lines from the second positive system. Further photomultiplier tube measurements of the spark phase showed a rapid decrease in intensity of the second positive system compared to that of a representative atomic emission line in the VUV regime. This emission dominates the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectrum during the initial phases of breakdown with little detection of other sources of emission during this phase.

  14. Discharge source with gas curtain for protecting optics from particles

    DOEpatents

    Fornaciari, Neal R.; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2004-03-30

    A gas curtain device is employed to deflect debris that is generated by an extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation discharge source such as an electric discharge plasma source. The gas curtain device projects a stream of gas over the path of the radiation to deflect debris particles into a direction that is different from that of the path of the radiation. The gas curtain can be employed to prevent debris accumulation on the optics used in photolithography.

  15. High-repetition-rate short-pulse gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Tulip, J; Seguin, H; Mace, P N

    1979-09-01

    A high-average-power short-pulse gas discharge is described. This consists of a volume-preionized transverse discharge of the type used in gas lasers driven by a Blumlein energy storage circuit. The Blumlein circuit is fabricated from coaxial cable, is pulse-charged from a high-repetition-rate Marx-bank generator, and is switched by a high-repetition-rate segmented rail gap. The operation of this discharge under conditions typical of rare-gas halide lasers is described. A maximum of 900 pps was obtained, giving a power flow into the discharge of 30 kW. PMID:18699678

  16. Self-organization of intense light within erosive gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2007-01-01

    Process of appearance of fire balls at gas discharges is considered. It is shown that the intense white light radiated by atoms excited at gas discharge is subject to self-organization in such a way that miniature ball lightnings appear.

  17. Coke-free dry reforming of model diesel fuel by a pulsed spark plasma at low temperatures using an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Yasushi; Furukawa, Naotsugu; Matsukata, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Eiichi

    2011-07-01

    Dry reforming of diesel fuel, an endothermic reaction, is an attractive process for on-board hydrogen/syngas production to increase energy efficiency. For operating this dry reforming process in a vehicle, we can use the exhaust gas from an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system as a source of carbon dioxide. Catalytic dry reforming of heavy hydrocarbon is a very difficult reaction due to the high accumulation of carbon on the catalyst. Therefore, we attempted to use a non-equilibrium pulsed plasma for the dry reforming of model diesel fuel without a catalyst. We investigated dry reforming of model diesel fuel (n-dodecane) with a low-energy pulsed spark plasma, which is a kind of non-equilibrium plasma at a low temperature of 523 K. Through the reaction, we were able to obtain syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) and a small amount of C2 hydrocarbon without coke formation at a ratio of CO2/Cfuel = 1.5 or higher. The reaction can be conducted at very low temperatures such as 523 K. Therefore, it is anticipated as a novel and effective process for on-board syngas production from diesel fuel using an EGR system.

  18. Operation of Ferroelectric Plasma Sources in a Gas Discharge Mode

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2004-03-08

    Ferroelectric plasma sources in vacuum are known as sources of ablative plasma, formed due to surface discharge. In this paper, observations of a gas discharge mode of operation of the ferroelectric plasma sources (FPS) are reported. The gas discharge appears at pressures between approximately 20 and approximately 80 Torr. At pressures of 1-20 Torr, there is a transition from vacuum surface discharge to the gas discharge, when both modes coexist and the surface discharges sustain the gas discharge. At pressures between 20 and 80 Torr, the surface discharges are suppressed, and FPS operate in pure gas discharge mode, with the formation of almost uniform plasma along the entire surface of the ceramics between strips. The density of the expanding plasma is estimated to be about 1013 cm-3 at a distance of 5.5 mm from the surface. The power consumption of the discharge is comparatively low, making it useful for various applications. This paper also presents direct measurements of the yield of secondary electron emission from ferroelectric ceramics, which, at low energies of primary electrons, is high and dependent on the polarization of the ferroelectric material

  19. Power supply for negative impedance gas discharge lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bees, G.L.

    1987-12-29

    An adjustable constant current power supply for a negative impedance gas discharge laser is described comprising: means for providing constant output of current, means connected between the constant current providing means and the gas discharge laser for matching the current output of the constant current providing means with lasing requirements of the gas discharge laser, the constant current providing means providing electrical energy to pump the gas discharge laser; and means electrically connected to the constant current providing means for feeding a variable controlled voltage to the constant current providing means the variable voltage altering the constant output of current over a preselected range feedback circuit means for providing a control signal to the variably controlled voltage feeding means; such that output power of the gas discharge laser varies with the output of current from the current providing means.

  20. Composite body for gas discharge lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Driessen, A. J. G. C.; Geertsema, E. B.; Oomen, J. J. C.; Rouwendal, J. W.

    1985-02-26

    Composite body, a gas discharge lamp having a sodium pressure from 300-600 torr in particular, having an envelope of densely sintered aluminium oxide or of other sodium vapor-resistant materials and a feed-through member of tantalum, niobium or other metals equivalent thereto, The bonding material consisting of a finely dispersed polycrystalline product having a composition in mole % between the following limits: Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-5-70 at least one oxide chosen from Sc/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Ti/sub 2/O /SUB x/ , wherein 2

  1. Sensitive glow discharge ion source for aerosol and gas analysis

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2007-08-14

    A high sensitivity glow discharge ion source system for analyzing particles includes an aerodynamic lens having a plurality of constrictions for receiving an aerosol including at least one analyte particle in a carrier gas and focusing the analyte particles into a collimated particle beam. A separator separates the carrier gas from the analyte particle beam, wherein the analyte particle beam or vapors derived from the analyte particle beam are selectively transmitted out of from the separator. A glow discharge ionization source includes a discharge chamber having an entrance orifice for receiving the analyte particle beam or analyte vapors, and a target electrode and discharge electrode therein. An electric field applied between the target electrode and discharge electrode generates an analyte ion stream from the analyte vapors, which is directed out of the discharge chamber through an exit orifice, such as to a mass spectrometer. High analyte sensitivity is obtained by pumping the discharge chamber exclusively through the exit orifice and the entrance orifice.

  2. Low temperature, sulfur tolerant homogeneous catalysts for the water-gas shift reaction. Task 2, Test plan

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, R.M.; Wood, B.J.; Krishnan, G.N.

    1986-04-01

    The objective of this project is to identify, prepare, test, characterize, and evaluate a practical, homogeneous catalyst for a water-gas shift process. The project effort is divided into the following five tasks: (1) Update SRI`s recent review of the literature on the catalysis of the water-gas shift reaction (WGSR) to include references after 1982 and those in the patent literature. Based on this review, SRI will choose ten candidate systems to be evaluated as to their abilities to catalyze the WGSR using syngas derived from gasified coal. (2) Develop a test plan designed to effectively evaluate both the catalysts and, to some extent, reactor configuration for WGSR catalysis. (3) Perform a series of experiments to identify the most effective and economical of the ten candidate catalysts and then further evaluate the reaction kinetics of at least one selected catalyst system to develop sufficient data to provide the basis for the work in Task 4. (4) Develop a mathematical model of the final candidate system that uses rate expressions to describe the catalytic process. (5) Perform a techno-economical evaluation of the catalyst in terms of a proposed plant design based on the reaction model, current costs, and standard chemical engineering practice and compare the proposed design with a conventional hydrogen plant.

  3. LOW TEMPERATURE X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF NATURAL GAS HYDRATE SAMPLES FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn, Claudia J; Sassen, Roger; Ulrich, Shannon M; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Payzant, E Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates of methane and other small alkanes occur widespread terrestrially in marine sediments of the continental margins and in permafrost sediments of the arctic. Quantitative study of natural clathrate hydrates is hampered by the difficulty in obtaining pristine samples, particularly from submarine environments. Bringing samples of clathrate hydrate from the seafloor at depths without compromising their integrity is not trivial. Most physical property measurements are based on studies of laboratory-synthesized samples. Here we report X-ray powder diffraction measurements of a natural gas hydrate sample from the Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico. The first data were collected in 2002 and revealed ice and structure II gas hydrate. In the subsequent time the sample has been stored in liquid nitrogen. More recent X-ray powder diffraction data have been collected as functions of temperature and time. This new data indicates that the larger sample is heterogeneous in ice content and shows that the amount of sII hydrate decreases with increasing temperature and time as expected. However, the dissociation rate is higher at lower temperatures and earlier in the experiment.

  4. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  5. Gas exchange and low temperature resistance in two tropical high mountain tree species from the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A.; Rada, Fermín; Azócar, Aura; García-Núñez, Carlos; Cabrera, Hernán M.

    2000-05-01

    Temperature may determine altitudinal tree distribution in different ways: affecting survival through freezing temperatures or by a negative carbon balance produced by lower photosynthetic rates. We studied gas exchange and supercooling capacity in a timberline and a treeline species ( Podocarpus oleifolius and Espeletia neriifolia, respectively) in order to determine if their altitudinal limits are related to carbon balance, freezing temperature damage, or both. Leaf gas exchange, leaf temperature-net photosynthesis curves and leaf temperature at which ice formation occurred were measured at two sites along an altitudinal gradient. Mean CO 2 assimilation rates for E. neriifolia were 3.4 and 1.3 μmol·m -2·s -1, at 2 400 and 3 200 m, respectively. Mean night respiration was 2.2 and 0.9 μmol·m -2·s -1 for this species at 2 400 and 3 200 m, respectively. Mean assimilation rates for P. oleifolius were 3.8 and 2.2 μmol·m -2·s -1 at 2 550 and 3 200 m, respectively. Night respiration was 0.8 μmol·m -2·s -1 for both altitudes. E. neriifolia showed similar optimum temperatures for photosynthesis at both altitudes, while a decrease was observed in P. oleifolius.E. neriifolia and P. oleifolius presented supercooling capacities of -6.5 and -3.0 °C, respectively. For E. neriifolia, freezing resistance mechanisms are sufficient to reach higher altitudes; however, other environmental factors such as cloudiness may be affecting its carbon balance. P. oleifolius does not reach higher elevations because it does not have the freezing resistance mechanisms.

  6. Supported Copper, Nickel and Copper-Nickel Nanoparticle Catalysts for Low Temperature Water-Gas-Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiann-Horng

    Hydrogen is being considered worldwide as a future replacement for gasoline, diesel fuel, natural gas in both the transportation and non-transportation sectors. Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that can be produced from a variety of widely available primary energy sources, including coal, natural gas, biomass, solar, wind, and nuclear power. Coal, the most abundant fossil fuel on the planet, is being looked at as the possible future major source of H2, due to the development of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell technologies (IGFC). The gasification of coal produces syngas consisting of predominately carbon monoxide and hydrogen with some remaining hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and water. Then, the water-gas shift reaction is used to convert CO to CO2 and additional hydrogen. The present work describes the synthesis of model Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni catalysts prepared from metal colloids, and compares their behavior in the WGS reaction to that of traditional impregnation catalysts. Initially, we systematically explored the performance of traditional Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni WGS catalysts made by impregnation methods. Various bimetallic Cu-Ni catalysts were prepared by supported impregnation and compared to monometallic Cu and Ni catalysts. The presence of Cu in bimetallic catalysts suppressed undesirable methanation side reaction, while the Ni component was important for high WGS activity. Colloidal Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles obtained by chemical reduction were deposited onto alumina to prepare supported catalysts. The resulting Cu and Ni nanoparticle catalysts were found to be 2.5 times more active in the WGS reaction per unit mass of active metal as compared to catalysts prepared by the conventional impregnation technique. The powder XRD and HAADF-STEM provided evidence supporting the formation of Cu-Ni particles containing the Cu core and Cu-Ni alloy shell. The XPS data indicated surface segregation of Cu in

  7. Low temperature H2S removal with 3-D structural mesoporous molecular sieves supported ZnO from gas stream.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Sun, T H; Shu, C H; Zhang, H B

    2016-07-01

    A series of 3-dimensional (3-D) structural mesoporous silica materials, SBA-16, MCM-48 and KIT-6, was synthesized and supported with different ZnO loadings (10, 20, 30, and 40wt%) by the incipient wetness method to evaluate the performances on H2S removal at room temperature. These materials were characterized by N2 adsorption, XRD, and TEM to investigate their textural properties. All the ZnO-loaded adsorbents exhibited the H2S removal capacity of bellow 0.1 ppmv. With the best ZnO loading percentage of 30wt% on MCM-48 and KIT-6, 20wt% on SBA-16 according to the results of breakthrough test, further increasing ZnO loading caused the decrease of the adsorption capacity due to the agglomeration of ZnO. Besides, the H2S adsorption capacities of the supports materials varied in the order of KIT-6>MCM-48>SBA-16, which was influenced primarily by their pore volume and pore size. With the largest pores in these 3-D arrangement materials, KIT-6 showed the best performance of supported material for ZnO, due to its retained superior physical properties as well as large pore diameter to allow faster gas-solid interaction and huge pore volume to disperse ZnO on the surface of it. PMID:26970044

  8. Electric-discharge gas laser based on a multisectional discharge gap

    SciTech Connect

    Lazhintsev, B V; Nor-Arevyan, V A

    2000-01-31

    An electric discharge laser with an electrode unit of novel design was developed. An electric discharge system was based on multisectional plate-like electrodes and an automatic UV preionisation that makes it possible to form a highly stable volume discharge. High-efficiency lasing in N{sub 2} and XeF lasers was achieved. A pulse repetition rate up to 200 Hz was realised in the N{sub 2} laser without recourse to gas circulation. (lasers)

  9. Atomically Dispersed Au-(OH)x Species Bound on Titania Catalyze the Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2013-03-27

    We report a new method for stabilizing appreciable loadings (~1 wt %) of isolated gold atoms on titania and show that these catalyze the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction. The method combines a typical gold deposition/precipitation method with UV irradiation of the titania support suspended in ethanol. Dissociation of H2O on the thus-created Au–O–TiOx sites is facile. At higher gold loadings, nanoparticles are formed, but they were shown to add no further activity to the atomically bound gold on titania. Removal of this “excess” gold by sodium cyanide leaching leaves the activity intact and the atomically dispersed gold still bound on titania. The new materials may catalyze a number of other reactions that require oxidized active metal sites.

  10. Radiofrequency gas plasma (glow discharge) disinfection of dental operative instruments, including handpieces.

    PubMed

    Baier, R E; Carter, J M; Sorensen, S E; Meyer, A E; McGowan, B D; Kasprzak, S A

    1992-01-01

    The radiofrequency-stimulated argon gas plasma (glow discharge) technique, already well-known for surface cleaning and activation of adhesion, was investigated for determination of its separate potential for rapid disinfection of dental operative instruments. Disinfection effectiveness was judged from diminished post-treatment recovery of viable organisms from the instruments agitated in saline. Streptococcus salivarius, Bacillus stearothermophilus, and Escherichia coli were used as primary contaminant organisms, dried from gelatin-thickened laboratory cultures onto the instruments and not subjected to any preliminary cleaning steps. Significant disinfection was obtained, with no sensible temperature increases, in under 10 minutes in laboratory apparatus consuming fewer than 5 Watts of power per cycle. Also, clinically used and deliberately-saliva-contaminated high-speed handpieces were gas-discharge-treated, with their resultant rapid disinfection noted by complete suppression of the viability of any transferred natural contaminant organisms within two minutes. With regard to preservation of instrument quality, it was also shown that this low-temperature gas-discharge method provides the noted substantial disinfection without deterioration of sharp edges. Work now in progress suggests that the method can provide cool, rapid, and complete sterilization when hydrogen peroxide vapors are present in the gas plasma used for treatment of instruments first given the normally recommended thorough pre-cleaning. PMID:1289559

  11. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  12. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  13. 46 CFR 154.1838 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1838 Discharge... pressurizing medium is the cargo vapor or a nonflammable, nontoxic gas that is inert with the cargo; and...

  14. Abiotic methane flux from the Chimaera seep and Tekirova ophiolites (Turkey): Understanding gas exhalation from low temperature serpentinization and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, Giuseppe; Schoell, Martin; Hosgörmez, Hakan

    2011-10-01

    The emission of abiotic methane (CH 4) into the atmosphere from low temperature serpentinization in ophiolitic rocks is documented to date only in four countries, the Philippines, Oman, New Zealand, and Turkey. Serpentinization produces large amounts of hydrogen (H 2) which in theory may react with CO 2 or CO to form hydrocarbons (Fischer-Tropsch Type synthesis, FTT). Similar mechanisms have been invoked to explain the CH 4 detected on Mars, so that understanding flux and exhalation modality of ophiolitic gas on Earth may contribute to decipher the potential degassing on Mars. This work reports the first direct measurements of gas (CH 4, CO 2) flux ever done on onshore ophiolites with present-day serpentinization. We investigated the Tekirova ophiolites at Çirali, in Turkey, hosting the Chimaera seep, a system of gas vents issuing from fractures in a 5000 m 2 wide ophiolite outcrop. At this site at least 150-190 t of CH 4 is annually released into the atmosphere. The molecular and isotopic compositions of C 1-C 5 alkanes, CO 2, and N 2 combined with source rock maturity data and thermogenic gas formation modelling suggested a dominant abiotic component (~ 80-90%) mixed with thermogenic gas. Abiotic H 2-rich gas is likely formed at temperatures below 50 °C, suggested by the low deuterium/hydrogen isotopic ratio of H 2 (δD H2: - 720‰), consistent with the low geothermal gradient of the area. Abiotic gas synthesis must be very fast and effective in continuously producing an amount of gas equivalent to the long-lasting (> 2 millennia) emission of > 100 t CH 4 yr - 1 , otherwise pressurised gas accumulation must exist. Over the same ophiolitic formation, 3 km away from Chimaera, we detected an invisible microseepage of abiotic CH 4 with fluxes from 0.07 to 1 g m - 2 d - 1 . On Mars similar fluxes could be able to sustain the CH 4 plume apparently recognised in the Northern Summer 2003 (10 4 or 10 5 t yr - 1 ) over the wide olivine bedrock and outcrops of hydrated

  15. Endotoxin removal by radio frequency gas plasma (glow discharge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Angela

    2011-12-01

    -IR measurements were repeated after employing 3-minute RFGD treatments sequentially for more than 10 cycles to observe removal of deposited matter that correlated with diminished EU titers. The results showed that 5 cycles, for a total exposure time of 15 minutes to low-temperature gas plasma, was sufficient to reduce endotoxin titers to below 0.05 EU/ml, and correlated with concurrent reduction of major endotoxin reference standard absorption bands at 3391 cm-1, 2887 cm-1, 1646 cm -1 1342 cm-1, and 1103 cm-1 to less than 0.05 Absorbance Units. Band depletion varied from 15% to 40% per 3-minute cycle of RFGD exposure, based on peak-to-peak analyses. In some cases, 100% of all applied biomass was removed within 5 sequential 3-minute RFGD cycles. The lipid ester absorption band expected at 1725 cm-1 was not detectable until after the first RFGD cycle, suggesting an unmasking of the actual bacterial endotoxin membrane induced within the gas plasma environment. Future work must determine the applicability of this low-temperature, quick depyrogenation process to medical devices of more complicated geometry than the flat surfaces tested here.

  16. Oxynitrided Surface Layer Produced On Ti6Al4V Titanium Alloy Under Low Temperature Glow Discharge Conditions For Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzchon, T.; Ossowski, M.; Borowski, T.; Morgiel, J.; Czarnowska, E.

    2011-01-01

    In spite that titanium oxides increase biocompatibility of titanium implants but their functional life is limited due to the problems arising from brittles and metalosis. Therefore technology, that allow to produce composite surface layer with controlled microstructure, chemical and phase composition and surface morphology on titanium alloy and eliminates the oxides disadvantages has been existing till now is searched. The requirements of titanium and its alloys implants can be fulfill by the low—temperature glow discharge assisted oxynitriding. The paper describes the surface layer of TiO2+TiN+Ti2N+αTi(N) type produced at temperature 680° C that preserves mechanical properties of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V. Characteristics of produced diffusion multi-phase surface layers in range of phase composition, microstructure (SEM, TEM, XRD) and its properties, such as frictional wear resistance are presented. The biological properties in dependency to the applied sterilization method are also analyzed. Properties of produced surface layers are discussed with reference to titanium alloy. The obtained data show that produced surface layers improves titanium alloy properties both frictional wear and biological. Preliminary in vitro examinations show good biocompatibility and antithrombogenic properties.

  17. Study on the removal of elemental mercury from simulated flue gas by Fe₂O₃-CeO₂/AC at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Xie, Yin'e; Zhang, Xunan; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Huiyu; Zhang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Fe2O3 and CeO2 modified activated coke (AC) synthesized by the equivalent-volume impregnation were employed to remove elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from simulated flue gas at a low temperature. Effects of the mass ratio of Fe2O3 and CeO2, reaction temperature, and individual flue gas components including O2, NO, SO2, and H2O (g) on Hg(0) removal efficiency of impregnated AC were investigated. The samples were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that with optimal mass percentage of 3 % Fe2O3 and 3 % CeO2 on Fe3Ce3/AC, the Hg(0) removal efficiency could reach an average of 88.29 % at 110 °C. Besides, it was observed that O2 and NO exhibited a promotional effect on Hg(0) removal, H2O (g) exerted a suppressive effect, and SO2 showed an insignificant inhibition without O2 to some extent. The analysis of XPS indicated that the main species of mercury on used Fe3Ce3/AC was HgO, which implied that adsorption and catalytic oxidation were both included in Hg(0) removal. Furthermore, the lattice oxygen, chemisorbed oxygen, and/or weakly bonded oxygen species made a contribution to Hg(0) oxidation. PMID:26552788

  18. Development of novel low-temperature selective hydrogen gas sensors made of palladium/oxide or nitride capped Magnesium-transition metal hydride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu Ming

    Palladium capped Mg-based transition metal alloy film (Pd/Mg-TM) is a potentially useful hydrogen gas (H2) sensing material, which can operate at low temperature for detection of H2 leakage in an environment to ensure safe use and storage of the gas. The Pd layer catalytically dissociates hydrogen molecules, and the hydrogen atoms produced can enter (hydridation) or be detached (dehydridation) from the alloy layer. These processes are reversible, such that the film is switchable between a metal state and a hydride state, giving rise to substantial changes in its optical transmittance/reflectance and electrical resistivity. Unlike a conventional metal-oxide (MOx) H2 sensor, hydridation of an Mg-TM film is associated with relatively low enthalpy, and hence can perform at temperature much lower than the operation temperature of an MOx sensor (typically around 500°C or above). As such, an Mg-TM based sensor does not experience undesired annealing effect during operation, and hence is much more stable and durable. Furthermore, the detection selectivity of a Pd/Mg-TM film versus other reducing gases is superior to most conventional MOx-type hydrogen sensors. In this project, we systematically investigated the H2 sensing properties of Pd/Mg-TM films.

  19. Attaining Low Temperatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, John D.; Van Till, Howard J.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the definition of temperature and the concept of order in non-mathematical terms. Describes the cooling techniques necessary in low temperature physics research, including magnetic cooling, the use of the Pomeranchuk Effect, and dilution refrigeration. Outlines the types of phenomena observed in matter within various temperature ranges…

  20. Low temperature fluid blender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blender supplies hydrogen at temperatures from 289 deg K to 367 deg K. Hydrogen temperature is controlled by using blender to combine flow from liquid hydrogen tank /276 deg K/ and gaseous hydrogen cylinder /550 deg K/. Blenders are applicable where flow of controlled low-temperature fluid is desired.

  1. Plasma physics issues in gas discharge laser development

    SciTech Connect

    Garscadden, A. ); Kushner, M.J.; Eden, J.G. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1991-12-01

    In this paper an account is given of the interplay between partially ionized plasma physics and the development of gas discharge lasers. Gas discharge excitation has provided a wide array of laser devices extending from the soft X-ray region to the far infrared. The scaling of gas discharge lasers in power and energy also covers many orders of magnitude. The particular features of three regimes are discussed: short wavelength lasers (deep UV to soft X-ray); visible and near UV lasers; and infrared molecular gas lasers. The current status (Fall 1990) of these areas is reviewed, and an assessment is made of future research topics that are perceived to be important.

  2. Gas mixture for diffuse-discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Carter, James G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1984-01-01

    Gaseous medium in a diffuse-discharge switch of a high-energy pulse generator is formed of argon combined with a compound selected from the group consisting of CF.sub.4, C.sub.2 F.sub.6, C.sub.3 F.sub.8, n-C.sub.4 F.sub.10, WF.sub.6, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 S and (CF.sub.3).sub.2 O.

  3. Gas mixture for diffuse-discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Carter, J.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1982-08-31

    Gaseous medium in a diffuse-discharge switch of a high-energy pulse generator is formed of argon combined with a compound selected from the group consisting of CF/sub 4/, C/sub 2/F/sub 6/, C/sub 3/F/sub 8/, n-C/sub 4/F/sub 10/, WF/sub 6/, (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/S and (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/O.

  4. Low temperature benefits discussed.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    At a recent educational workshop event hosted by Advanced Sterilization Products, expert speakers including Authorising Engineers, and delegates, discussed some of their experiences of low temperature sterilisation of 'hi-tech' medical devices, and highlighted the benefits of a process which allows decontamination of instruments and, for example, parts of robotic surgery systems, that cannot be decontaminated using standard methods. Also examined,and reported on here in an article that first appeared in HEJ's sister publication, The Clinical Services Journal, were some of the disadvantages of low temperature sterilisation, the key considerations and options when choosing such a system, and a focus on how the technology's use had benefited a major London-based NHS Trust. PMID:27132304

  5. Periodically Discharging, Gas-Coalescing Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Donald Layne; Holder, Donald W.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed device would remove bubbles of gas from a stream of liquid (typically water), accumulate the gas, and periodically release the gas, in bulk, back into the stream. The device is intended for use in a flow system (1) in which there is a requirement to supply bubble-free water to a downstream subsystem and (2) that includes a sensor and valves, just upstream of the subsystem, for sensing bubbles and diverting the flow from the subsystem until the water stream is again free of bubbles. By coalescing the gas bubbles and then periodically releasing the accumulated gas, the proposed device would not contribute to net removal of gas from the liquid stream; nevertheless, it would afford an advantage by reducing the frequency with which the diverter valves would have to be activated. The device (see figure) would include an upper and a lower porous membrane made of a hydrophilic material. Both membranes would cover openings in a tube leading to an outlet. These membranes would allow water, but not gas bubbles, to pass through to the interior of the tube. Inside the tube, between the two membranes, there would be a flow restrictor that would play a role described below. Below both membranes there would be a relief valve. Water, possibly containing bubbles, would enter from the top and would pass through either the lower membrane or both membranes, depending how much gas had been accumulated thus far. When the volume of accumulated gas was sufficient to push the top surface of the liquid below the lower porous membrane, water could no longer flow through either membrane toward the outlet. This blockage would cause an increase in back pressure that would cause the relief valve to open. The opening of the relief valve would allow both the water and the bulk-accumulated gas to pass through to the outlet. Once the gas had been pushed out, water would once again flow through both membranes at a much lower pressure drop. The flow restrictor would maintain enough pressure

  6. Comparison of the effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization on the molecular structure, fatigue resistance, and wear behavior of UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Pruitt, L

    1998-06-01

    The effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (HPGP) sterilization on structure and cyclic mechanical properties were examined for orthopedic grade ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and compared to each other as well as to no sterilization (control). Density was monitored with a density gradient column and was found to be directly influenced by the sterilization method employed: Gamma radiation led to an increase, while plasma did not. Oxidation of the polymer was studied by observing changes in the carbonyl peak with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and was found to be strongly affected by both gamma radiation and subsequent aging, while plasma sterilization had little effect. Gamma radiation resulted in embrittlement of the polymer and a decreased resistance to fatigue crack propagation. This mechanical degradation was a direct consequence of postradiation oxidation and molecular evolution of the polymer and was not observed in the plasma-sterilized polymer. Both gamma radiation and plasma sterilization led to improved wear performance of the UHMWPE compared to the nonsterile control material. PMID:9570068

  7. High resolution infrared studies of dynamics in low temperature matrics: Vibrational dephasing for SeF/sub 6/ in noble gas solids

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.H.; Swanson, B.I.

    1981-03-15

    High resolution infrared absorption spectra for the upsilon/sub 3/ mode of SeF/sub 6/ in low temperature noble gas matrices have been observed. A remarkable amount of structure is observed leading to the conclusion that multiple trapping sites as well as site symmetry splittings, similar to those observed previously for SF/sub 6/, are common. Temperature dependent studies give a rich display of dynamics arising from host--guest interactions. These give evidence for dynamic exchange among equivalent low symmetry sites within a given trapping cage. This exchange is evidence for a dephasing of the components of upsilon/sub 3/ by a local site phonon mode in resonance with part of the phonon bath. Unexpected matrix shifts and intensity changes with temperature have been observed. Accurate isotope shifts, especially in a neon matrix, are shown to be useful for calculation of potential constants. A discussion of host--guest interactions, dephasing, and dynamic site exchange in these matrices is given.

  8. Hydrogen discharges operating at atmospheric pressure in a semiconductor gas discharge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, K.; Acar, S.; Salamov, B. G.

    2011-08-01

    Analyses of physical processes which initiate electrical breakdown and spatial stabilization of current and control it with a photosensitive cathode in a semiconductor gas discharge system (SGDS) are carried out in a wide pressure range up to atmospheric pressure p, interelectrode distance d and diameter D of the electrode areas of the semiconductor cathode. The study compares the breakdown and stability curves of the gas discharge in the planar SGDS where the discharge gap is filled with hydrogen and air in two cases. The impact of the ionizing component of the discharge plasma on the control of the stable operation of the planar SGDS is also investigated at atmospheric pressure. The loss of stability is primarily due to modification of the semiconductor-cathode properties on the interaction with low-energy hydrogen ions and the formation of a space charge of positive ions in the discharge gap which changes the discharge from Townsend to glow type. The experimental results show that the discharge current in H2 is more stable than in air. The breakdown voltages are measured for H2 and air with parallel-plane electrodes, for pressures between 28 and 760 Torr. The effective secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient is then determined from the breakdown voltage results and compared with the experimental results. The influence of the SEE coefficient is stated in terms of the differences between the experimental breakdown law.

  9. Low temperature near infrared plasmonic gas sensing of gallium and aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films from colloidal inks (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturaro, Marco; Della Gaspera, Enrico; Martucci, Alessandro; Guglielmi, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    We obtained Gallium-doped and Aluminum-doped Zinc Oxide nanocrystals by non aqueous colloidal heat-up synthesis. These nanocrystals are transparent in the visible range but exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the near IR range, tunable and shiftable with dopant concentration (up to 20% mol nominal). GZO and AZO inks can be deposited by spin coating, dip coating or spray coating on glass or silicon, leading to uniform and high optical quality thin films. To enhance absorbtion in the infrared region, samples can be annealed in inert or reductant atmosphere (N2/Argon or H2 in Argon) resulting in plasmon intensity enhancement due to oxygen vacancies and conduction band electrons density increment. Then IR plasmon has been exploited for gas sensing application, according to the plasmon shifting for carrier density variations, due to electrons injection or removal by the target gas/sample chemical interactions. To obtain a functional sensor at low temperature, another treatment was investigated, involving surfanctant removal by dipping deposited films in a solution of organic acid, tipically oxalic acid in acetonitrile; such process could pave the way to obtain similar sensors deposited on plastics. Finally, GZO and AZO thin films proved sensibility to H2 and NOx, and in particular circumstances also to CO, from room temperature to 200°C. Sensibility behavior for different dopant concentration and temperture was investigated both in IR plasmon wavelengths (~2400 nm) and zinc oxide band gap (~370 nm). An enhancement in sensitivity to H2 is obtained by adding Pt nanoparticles, exploiting catalytic properties of Platinum for hydrogen splitting.

  10. Highly enhanced low temperature discharge capacity of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 with lithium boron oxide glass modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, ShuangYuan; Wang, Lei; Bian, Liang; Xu, JinBao; Ren, Wei; Hu, PengFei; Chang, AiMin

    2015-03-01

    Although lithium ion battery is known to be an excellent renewable energy provider in electronic markets further application of it has been limited by its notoriously poor performance at low temperature, especially below -20 °C. In this paper, the electrochemical performance of the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 cathode materials coated by lithium boron oxide (LBO) glass was investigated at a temperature range from 20 to -40 °C. The results show that the LBO coating not only helps to improve the discharge capacity of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 at room temperature but also increase the discharge capacity retention of the LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 from 22.5% to 57.8% at -40 °C. Electrochemical impedance spectra results reveal that the LBO coating plays an important role in reducing the charge-transfer resistance on the electrolyte-electrode interfaces and improving lithium ion diffusion coefficients. The mechanism associated with the change of the structure and electrical properties are discussed in detail.

  11. Interaction of a surface glow discharge with a gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A. L. Schweigert, I. V.

    2010-05-15

    A surface glow discharge in a gas flow is of particular interest as a possible tool for controlling the flow past hypersonic aircrafts. Using a hydrodynamic model of glow discharge, two-dimensional calculations for a kilovolt surface discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.5 Torr are carried out in a stationary gas, as well as in a flow with a velocity of 1000 m/s. The discharge structure and plasma parameters are investigated near a charged electrode. It is shown that the electron energy in a cathode layer reaches 250-300 eV. Discharge is sustained by secondary electron emission. The influence of a high-speed gas flow on the discharge is considered. It is shown that the cathode layer configuration is flow-resistant. The distributions of the electric field and electron energy, as well as the ionization rate profile in the cathode layer, do not change qualitatively under the action of the flow. The basic effect of the flow's influence is a sharp decrease in the region of the quasineutral plasma surrounding the cathode layer due to fast convective transport of ions.

  12. GAS DISCHARGE SWITCH EVALUATION FOR RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER APPLICATION.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; SHELDRAKE,R.; PIRRIE,C.

    2002-06-30

    A gas discharge switch EEV HX3002 is being evaluated at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a possible candidate of RHIC Beam Abort Kicker modulator main switch. At higher beam energy and higher beam intensity, the switch stability becomes very crucial. The hollow anode thyratron used in the existing system is not rated for long reverse current conduction. The reverse voltage arcing caused thyratron hold-off voltage de-rating has been the main limitation of the system operation. To improve the system reliability, a new type of gas discharge switch has been suggested by Marconi Applied Technology for its reverse conducting capability.

  13. Features of plasma glow in low pressure terahertz gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Bratman, V. L.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Koldanov, V. A.; Razin, S. V.; Litvak, A. G.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.

    2013-12-15

    Investigations of the low pressure (1–100 Torr) gas discharge in the powerful (1 kW) quasi-optical terahertz (0.55 THz) wave beams were made. An intense afterglow was observed after the end of gyrotron terahertz radiation pulse. Afterglow duration significantly exceeded radiation pulse length (8 μs). This phenomenon could be explained by the strong dependence of the collisional-radiative recombination rate (that is supposed to be the most likely mechanism of electron losses from the low pressure terahertz gas discharge) on electron temperature.

  14. Features of plasma glow in low pressure terahertz gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratman, V. L.; Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Kalynov, Yu. K.; Koldanov, V. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Razin, S. V.; Sidorov, A. V.; Skalyga, V. A.; Zorin, V. G.

    2013-12-01

    Investigations of the low pressure (1-100 Torr) gas discharge in the powerful (1 kW) quasi-optical terahertz (0.55 THz) wave beams were made. An intense afterglow was observed after the end of gyrotron terahertz radiation pulse. Afterglow duration significantly exceeded radiation pulse length (8 μs). This phenomenon could be explained by the strong dependence of the collisional-radiative recombination rate (that is supposed to be the most likely mechanism of electron losses from the low pressure terahertz gas discharge) on electron temperature.

  15. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  16. Development of a pulsed uniform supersonic gas expansion system based on an aerodynamic chopper for gas phase reaction kinetic studies at ultra-low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Ballesteros, B; Canosa, A; Townsend, T M; Maigler, F J; Napal, V; Rowe, B R; Albaladejo, J

    2015-04-01

    A detailed description of a new pulsed supersonic uniform gas expansion system is presented together with the experimental validation of the setup by applying the CRESU (French acronym for Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in a Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique to the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with 1-butene at ca. 23 K and 0.63 millibars of helium (carrier gas). The carrier gas flow, containing negligible mixing ratios of OH-precursor and 1-butene, is expanded from a high pressure reservoir (337 millibars) to a low pressure region (0.63 millibars) through a convergent-divergent nozzle (Laval type). The novelty of this experimental setup is that the uniform supersonic flow is pulsed by means of a Teflon-coated aerodynamic chopper provided with two symmetrical apertures. Under these operational conditions, the designed Laval nozzle achieves a temperature of (22.4 ± 1.4) K in the gas jet. The spatial characterization of the temperature and the total gas density within the pulsed uniform supersonic flow has also been performed by both aerodynamical and spectroscopic methods. The gas consumption with this technique is considerably reduced with respect to a continuous CRESU system. The kinetics of the OH+1-butene reaction was investigated by the pulsed laser photolysis/laser induced fluorescence technique. The rotation speed of the disk is temporally synchronized with the exit of the photolysis and the probe lasers. The rate coefficient (k(OH)) for the reaction under investigation was then obtained and compared with the only available data at this temperature. PMID:25933898

  17. Development of a pulsed uniform supersonic gas expansion system based on an aerodynamic chopper for gas phase reaction kinetic studies at ultra-low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, E.; Ballesteros, B.; Canosa, A.; Townsend, T. M.; Maigler, F. J.; Napal, V.; Rowe, B. R.; Albaladejo, J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed description of a new pulsed supersonic uniform gas expansion system is presented together with the experimental validation of the setup by applying the CRESU (French acronym for Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in a Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique to the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with 1-butene at ca. 23 K and 0.63 millibars of helium (carrier gas). The carrier gas flow, containing negligible mixing ratios of OH-precursor and 1-butene, is expanded from a high pressure reservoir (337 millibars) to a low pressure region (0.63 millibars) through a convergent-divergent nozzle (Laval type). The novelty of this experimental setup is that the uniform supersonic flow is pulsed by means of a Teflon-coated aerodynamic chopper provided with two symmetrical apertures. Under these operational conditions, the designed Laval nozzle achieves a temperature of (22.4 ± 1.4) K in the gas jet. The spatial characterization of the temperature and the total gas density within the pulsed uniform supersonic flow has also been performed by both aerodynamical and spectroscopic methods. The gas consumption with this technique is considerably reduced with respect to a continuous CRESU system. The kinetics of the OH+1-butene reaction was investigated by the pulsed laser photolysis/laser induced fluorescence technique. The rotation speed of the disk is temporally synchronized with the exit of the photolysis and the probe lasers. The rate coefficient (kOH) for the reaction under investigation was then obtained and compared with the only available data at this temperature.

  18. Transport mechanisms of metastable and resonance atoms in a gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubovskii, Yu; Gorchakov, S.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2013-04-01

    Atoms in electronically excited states are of significant importance in a large number of different gas discharges. The spatio-temporal distribution particularly of the lower excited states, the metastable and resonance ones, influences the overall behavior of the plasma because of their role in the ionization and energy budget. This article is a review of the theoretical and experimental studies on the spatial formation and temporal evolution of metastable and resonance atoms in weakly ionized low-temperature plasmas. Therefore, the transport mechanisms due to collisional diffusion and resonance radiation are compared step by step. The differences in formation of spatio-temporal structures of metastable and resonance atoms in plasmas are attributed to these different transport mechanisms. The analysis is performed by obtaining solutions of the diffusion and radiation transport equations. Solutions of stationary and non-stationary problems by decomposition over the eigenfunctions of the corresponding operators showed that there is, on the one hand, an effective suppression of the highest diffusion modes and, on the other hand, a survival of the highest radiation modes. The role of the highest modes is illustrated by examples. In addition, the differences in the Green functions for the diffusion and radiation transport operators are discussed. Numerical methods for the simultaneous solution of the balance equations for metastable and resonance atoms are proposed. The radiation transport calculations consider large absorption coefficients according to the Lorentz contour of a spectral line. Measurements of the distributions of metastable and resonance atoms are reviewed for a larger number of discharge conditions, i.e. in the positive column plasma, afterglow plasma, constricted pulsed discharge, stratified discharge, magnetron discharge, and in a discharge with a cathode spot.

  19. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGES

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device for producing an energetic gas arc discharge employing the use of gas-fed hollow cathode and anode electrodes is reported. The rate of feed of the gas to the electrodes is regulated to cause complete space charge neutralization to occur within the electrodes. The arc discharge is closely fitted within at least one of the electrodes so tint the gas fed to this electrode is substantially completely ionized before it is emitted into the vacuum chamber. It is this electrode design and the axial potential gradient that exists in the arc which permits the arc to be operated in low pressures and at volthges and currents that permit the arc to be energetic. The use of the large number of energetic ions that are accelerated toward the cathode as a propulsion device for a space vehicle is set forth.

  20. Physical processes in grid control gas discharge device Tacitron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefiev, Alexander; Vereschagin, Nicolay; Kruglov, Sergey

    2003-10-01

    Physical processes in grid control gas discharge device Tacitron Arefjev A.S., Vereschagin N.M., Kruglov S. A. Radioengineering Academy, Ryazan, Russia Nowdays pulsed power units is getting widely used for cleaning biogas and water. Their parameters and dimension defines by the current commutator, which is used as a switch for interrupting the current in the circuit. Experimental investigations have been carried out to find out the propeties of the one type of the current commutator - the so-called tacitron. It has specific construction of the control grid ,which enables to control the moment of the discharge plasma distinguish and consequently a tacitron has ability to distinguish the discharge, e.i. to interrupt the current, flowing through the device. The grid of a tacitron is constructed of small-mesh metal. The dimension of the small-mesh cell must be compare with Debay radius at the proper discharge conditions. It is stipulated by the fact that if the dimensions of the grid cell are compare with Debay radius then ionic sheaths on the negative electrode as if 'overlap' each other. Then if to supply the controlling impulse to the grid of the tacitron one can ensure interrupting the current through the tacitron. Thus a tacitron is full controlling discharge current commutator. There has been performed experimental investigation of the process of the current interruption.(distinguishing of the gas discharge), taking place in the discharge space between the anode and the cathode of the tacitron. The outcomes of experiments show that the process of the distinguishing may be divided on 4 stages, which differ one from another by elementary processes, going on there : - delay of the distinguishing of the discharge; - so-called 'slow ' stage; - decay of plasma inside the anode - grid gap; - decay of plasma inside the cathode - grid gap. The whole duration of the process of the discharge distinguishing equals mostly the second and the third stages together. The duration

  1. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Tonkyn, Russell G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes.

  2. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Tonkyn, R.G.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes. 12 figs.

  3. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique

  4. Direct-current converter for gas-discharge lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutus, P.

    1980-01-01

    Metal/halide and similar gas-discharge lamps are powered from low-voltage dc source using small efficient converter. Converter is useful whenever 60-cycle ac power is not available or where space and weight allocations are limited. Possible applications are offshore platforms, mobile homes, and emergency lighting. Design innovations give supply high reliability and efficiency up to 75 percent.

  5. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  6. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  7. Spots and patterns on electrodes of gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benilov, Mikhail

    2015-09-01

    Concentration of electrical current onto the surface of electrodes of gas discharges in well-defined regions, or current spots, is often the rule rather than the exception. These spots occur on otherwise uniform electrode surfaces, a regime where one might expect a uniform distribution of current over the surface. In many cases, multiple spots may appear, forming beautiful patterns and surprising the observer. Important advances have been attained in the last 15 years in experimental investigation, understanding, and modelling of spots and patterns in discharges of different types, in particular, high-pressure arc discharges, dc glow discharges, and barrier discharges. It became clear that in many, if not most, cases there is no need to look for special physical mechanisms responsible for the formation of spots or patterns on uniform electrode surfaces: the spots or patterns originate in self-organization caused by (nonlinear) interaction of well-known mechanisms. In particular, standard mechanisms of near-cathode space-charge sheath are sufficient to produce self-organization, and it is this kind of self-organization that gives rise to cathode spots in low-current high-pressure arcs and normal spots and patterns of spots on cathodes of dc glow discharges. It was shown that spots and patterns on electrodes of gas discharges, being self-organization phenomena, are inherently related to multiple solutions, with one of the solutions describing a mode with a uniform distribution of current over the electrode surface and the others describing regimes with different spot patterns. These multiple solutions exist even in the most basic self-consistent models of gas discharges. In particular, multiple solutions have been found for dc glow discharges; the fact rather surprising by itself, given that such discharges have been under intensive theoretical investigation for many years. A concise review of the above-described advances is given in this talk. Work supported by FCT

  8. Gas laser in which the gas is excited by capacitor discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lacour, B.; de Witte, O.; Maillet, M.; Vannier, C.

    1985-01-22

    A gas laser in which the gas is excited by laser discharge, said laser including two capacitors formed by two parallel metal plates between which two dielectric parts are spaced apart to form a passage which contains the laser gas. It further includes a transformer whose secondary winding is connected to the plates and whose primary winding is connected in series with a capacitor, means for charging and capacitor and a thyristor for discharging the capacitor in the primary winding. Application to exciting gas lasers in which the gas contains a dye stuff.

  9. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  10. Low-temperature plasma ionization differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuklya, Andriy; Engelhard, Carsten; Uteschil, Florian; Kerpen, Klaus; Marks, Robert; Telgheder, Ursula

    2015-09-01

    A low-temperature plasma (LTP) was used as an ionization source for differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the first time. This ionization source enhances the potential of DMS as a miniaturized system for on-site rapid monitoring. The effects of experimental parameters (e.g., discharge/carrier gas composition and flow rate, applied voltage) on the analysis of model aromatic compounds were investigated and discussed. It was found that the nature of reactant ion positive (RIP) is dependent on the discharge/carrier gas composition. The best response to the analyte was achieved when pure nitrogen was used as the discharge/carrier gas. The ability to perform analysis with zero helium consumption is especially attractive in view of the potential application of LTP-DMS for online (and on-site) monitoring. Analytical performance was determined with six environmentally relevant model compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and naphthalene) using LTP and directly compared to APPI and APCI ((63)Ni) ionization sources. When LTP was coupled to DMS, calculated LOD values were found to be in the range of 35-257 ng L(-1) (concentration in the carrier gas). These values are competitive with those calculated for two DMS equipped with traditional ionization sources (APPI, (63)Ni). The obtained results are promising enough to ensure the potential of LTP as ionization source for DMS. PMID:26266836

  11. Industrial applications of low-temperature plasma physics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.F.

    1995-06-01

    The application of plasma physics to the manufacturing and processing of materials may be the new frontier of our discipline. Already partially ionized discharges are used in industry, and the performance of plasmas has a large commercial and technological impact. However, the science of low-temperature plasmas is not as well developed as that of high-temperature, collisionless plasmas. In this paper several major areas of application are described and examples of forefront problems in each are given. The underlying thesis is that gas discharges have evolved beyond a black art, and that intellectually challenging problems with elegant solutions can be found. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in nitrogen-methane gas mixture: PTR-MS analyzes of the exhaust gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torokova, Lucie; Mazankova, Vera; Krcma, Frantisek; Mason, Nigel J.; Matejcik, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an extensive study of with the in situ mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous phase species produced by an atmospheric plasma glow discharge in N2-CH4 gas mixtures (with methane concentrations ranging from 1% to 4%). The products are studied using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). HCN and CH3CN are identified as the main gaseous products. Hydrazine, methanimine, methyldiazene, ethylamine, cyclohexadiene, pyrazineacetylene, ethylene, propyne and propene are identified as minor compounds. All the detected compounds and their relative abundances are determined with respect to the experimental conditions (gas composition and applied power). The same molecules were observed by the Cassini-Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (which has same N2-CH4 gas mixtures). Such, experiments show that the formation of such complex organics in atmospheres containing C, N and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  13. Self-Organized Patterns in Gas-Discharge: Particle-Like Behaviour and Dissipative Solitons

    SciTech Connect

    Purwins, H.-G.

    2008-03-19

    The understanding of self-organise patterns in spatially extended nonlinear dissipative systems (SOPs) is one of the most challenging subjects in modern natural sciences. In the last 20 years it turned out that research in the field of low temperature gas-discharge can help to obtain insight into important aspect of SOPs. At the same time, due to the practical relevance of plasma systems one might expect interesting applications. In the present paper the focus is on self-organised filamentary patterns in planar dc and ac systems with high ohmic and dielectric barrier, respectively. - In the discharge plane of these systems filaments show up as spots which are also referred to as dissipative solitons (DSs). In many respect experimentally detected DSs exhibit particle-like behaviour. Among other things, isolated stationary or travelling DSs, stationary, travelling or rotating 'molecules' and various kinds of many-body systems have been observed. Also scattering, generation and annihilation of DSs are frequent phenomena. - At least some of these patterns can be described quantitatively in terms of a drift diffusion model. It is also demonstrated that a simple reaction diffusion model allows for an intuitive understanding of many of the observed phenomena. At the same time this model is the basis for a theoretical foundation of the particle picture and the experimentally observed universal behaviour of SOPs. - Finally some hypothetical applications are discussed.

  14. Exploration of the Townsend regime by discharge light emission in a gas discharge device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilal Yucel, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    The Townsend discharge mechanism has been explored in a planar microelectronic gas discharge device (MGDD) with different applied voltages U and interelectrode distance d under various pressures in air. The anode and the cathode of the MGDD are formed by a transparent SnO2 covered glass and a GaAs semiconductor, respectively. In the experiments, the discharge is found to be unstable just below the breakdown voltage Ub, whereas the discharge passes through a homogeneous stable Townsend mode beyond the breakdown voltage. The measurements are made by an electrical circuit and a CCD camera by recording the currents and light emission (LE) intensities. The intensity profiles, which are converted from the 3D light emission images along the semiconductor diameter, have been analysed for different system parameters. Different instantaneous conductivity σt regimes are found below and beyond the Townsend region. These regimes govern the current and spatio-temporal LE stabilities in the plasma system. It has been proven that the stable LE region increases up to 550 Torr as a function of pressure for small d. If the active area of the semiconductor becomes larger and the interlectrode distance d becomes smaller, the stable LE region stays nearly constant with pressure.

  15. Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Slegeir, William A.; Sapienza, Richard S.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

  16. Decomposition of dimethylamine gas with dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhaolian; Zhao, Jie; Huang, Hong ying; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Renxi

    2013-09-15

    The decomposition of dimethylamine (DMA) with gas under high flow rate was investigated with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technology. Different parameters including removal efficiency, energy yield, carbon balance and CO2 selectivity, secondary products, as well as pathways and mechanisms of DMA degradation were studied. The experimental results showed that removal efficiency of DMA depended on applied voltage and gas flow rate, but had no obvious correlation with initial concentration. Excellent energy performance was obtained using present DBD technology for DMA abatement. When experiment conditions were controlled at: gas flow rate of 14.9 m(3)/h, initial concentration of 2104 mg/m(3), applied voltage of 4.8 kV, removal efficiency of DMA and energy yield can reach 85.2% and 953.9 g/kWh, respectively. However, carbon balance (around 40%) was not ideal due to shorter residence time (about 0.1s), implying that some additional conditions should be considered to improve the total oxidation of DMA. Moreover, secondary products in outlet gas stream were detected via gas chromatogram-mass spectrum and the amounts of NO3(-) and NO2(-) were analyzed by ion chromatogram. The obtained data demonstrated that NOx might be suppressed due to reductive NH radical form DMA dissociation. The likely reaction pathways and mechanisms for the removal of DMA were suggested based on products analysis. Experimental results demonstrated the application potential of DBD as a clean technology for organic nitrogen-containing gas elimination from gas streams. PMID:23742954

  17. Gas-discharge improving ecological characteristics of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batanov, German; Kossyi, Igor; Silakov, Valerii

    2004-09-01

    GAS-DISCHARGE IMPROVING ECOLOGICALCHARACTERISTICS OF THE ATMOSPHERE 2.20. Environmental applications G.M.Batanov, I.A.Kossyi and V.P.Silakov Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Vavilov Street 38, 119991, Moscow, Russia The possibility of improving ecological characteristics of the atmosphere with the help of freely localized microwave discharge is analyzed. Theoretical and experimental studies devoted to cleaning the troposphere of ozone-destroying pollutants and creating an artificial ozone layer in the stratosphere are reviewed. Experiments performed with convergent powerful microwave beam exciting discharge in condition close to the natural atmosphere one are discussed. Theoretical consideration of consequences of freely localized microwave discharge in atmosphere are analyzed and conclusions concerning to the possibility to improve ecological situation are made. Results of the studies in the Institute of General Physics of the possibility of the plasmachemical utilization of the accumulated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), capable of depleting the ozone layer, are presented. Experiments open up new avenues for development of an efficient reactor dedicated to the "harmful" CFCs decomposition. The results of theoretical and experimental modeling are used to predict the plasmachemical consequences of creating artificial ionized regions in the upper atmosphere for the purpose of long-range radio and TV communications.

  18. Flue-gas cleaning using heterogeneously pulsed discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankelevitch, E.; Bystritskii, Vitaly M.; Sinebryukhov, A. V.; Akishev, Yurii

    1995-03-01

    A new promising electro physical method for cleaning flue gases from sulfur and nitrogen oxides has been proposed. This method is based on the initiation of repetitive arc micro discharges in an air-water mixture. The report gives a description of the setup used in an experimental verification of the method, the experimental results obtained, and the results of their analyses. It has been demonstrated that the proposed method has some advantages over other electro physical methods, such as simplicity to realize and operability in a highly humidified gas stream, which substantially extends the realize of its possible applications. The energy required to remove harmful impurity is 200 eV/mol and 23 eV/mol for gas mixtures with NO and SO2, respectively, which is an excellent result for an electro physical method of gas cleaning.

  19. Rotating structures and vortices in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Rotating structures are present in a number of low temperature EXB devices such as Hall thrusters, magnetrons, Penning discharges etc...Some aspects of the physics of these rotating instabilities are specific to low temperature plasmas because of the relatively large collisionality, the role of ionization, and the fact that ions are often non-magnetized. On the basis of fully kinetic simulations (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions) we describe the formation of a rotating instability associated with an ionization front (``rotating spoke'') and driven by a cross-field current in a self-sustained cylindrical magnetron discharge at gas pressure on the order of 1 Pa. The rotating spoke is a strong double layer (electrostatic sheath) moving towards the higher potential region at a velocity close to the critical ionization velocity, a concept proposed by Alfvén in the context of the formation of the solar system. The mechanisms of cross-field electron transport induced by this instability are analyzed. At lower pressure (<0.01 Pa) the plasma of a magnetron discharge is non-neutral and the simulations predict the formation of electron vortices rotating in the azimuthal direction and resulting from the diocotron instability. The properties of these vortices are specific since they form in a self-sustained discharge where ionization (and losses at the ends of the plasma column) play an essential role in contrast with the electron vortices in pure electron plasmas. We discuss and analyze the mechanisms leading to the generation, dynamics and merging of these self-sustained electron vortices, and to the periodic ejection of fast electrons at the column ends (consistent with previous experimental observations).

  20. Gas flow dependence of atmospheric pressure plasma needle discharge characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Muyang; Yang, Congying; Liu, Sanqiu; Chen, Xiaochang; Ni, Gengsong; Wang, Dezhen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional coupled model of neutral gas flow and plasma dynamics is presented to explain the gas flow dependence of discharge characteristics in helium plasma needle at atmospherics pressure. The diffusional mixing layer between the helium jet core and the ambient air has a moderate effect on the streamer propagation. The obtained simulation results present that the streamer shows the ring-shaped emission profile at a moderate gas flow rate. The key chemical reactions which drive the streamer propagation are electron-impact ionization of helium neutral, nitrogen and oxygen molecules. At a moderate gas flow rate of 0.5 slm, a significant increase in propagation velocity of the streamer is observed due to appropriate quantity of impurities air diffuse into the helium. Besides, when the gas flow rate is below 0.35 slm, the radial density of ground-state atomic oxygen peaks along the axis of symmetry. However, when the gas flow rate is above 0.5 slm, a ring-shaped density distribution appears. The peak density is on the order of 1020 m-3 at 10 ns in our work.

  1. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described.

  2. Dynamic processes in active medium of small diameter gas discharge lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schishov, S. I.

    2008-03-01

    Review of electrodynamics properties for gas discharge lasers of small diameter has been completed with consideration of inertia typical for ionisation processes and transient nature of electron diffusion from unipolar to ambipolar. Procedure for calculation of transfer function and elements of equivalent electrical circuit for substitution of gas discharge laser discharge space.

  3. Laser scattering for temporal and spatial diagnostic of low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomares Linares, Jose Maria

    2012-10-01

    Many recent industrial and technological applications like surface etching, inorganic films deposition, polymerization of surfaces or sterilization are developed within the field of low temperature plasmas. To study, monitor and model plasma processes is of great importance to have diagnostic tools that can provide reliable information on different plasma parameters. In general, laser scattering techniques provide a direct and accurate method for plasma diagnostic with spatial and temporal resolution. Laser Thomson scattering is used for the diagnostic of electron density and temperature, two of the most important parameters in low temperature discharges. With a similar setup Rayleigh and Raman scattering techniques are used for the diagnostic of gas density and temperature. In this contribution we deal with the different technical and theoretical aspects that are required for the application of these laser scattering techniques. Of special importance are the detection limit, laser stray light rejection and laser perturbations of the plasma. The present study is performed on different low temperature microwave discharges, both at low and atmospheric pressure. The laser scattering techniques provide information on the spatial distribution of the mentioned plasma parameters over different discharge conditions, including small micro-plasmas. Similarly, the temporal evolution of pulsed plasmas is studied, unraveling the features of the switching on and off phases of the discharges.

  4. Dynamic Reduction Effect of CO2 Gas Discharge in Introducing Electric Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Inaba, Tsuginori

    For this study, the dynamic reduction effect of CO2 gas discharge for change from internal combustion engines to electric vehicles, EVs, was investigated quantitatively. The Japanese power generation status, which shows characteristics of electricity generation, and optimized adjustment to electricity demand, load and environment was examined. Based on a CO2 gas discharge basic unit, the estimated reduction quantity of CO2 gas discharge from EVs was calculated. The reduction effect of CO2 gas discharge is expected to be 52% by changing gas-fuelled vehicles to EVs. However, the dynamic differential is only 19% reduction by using the thermal power and -2% if only the coal thermal power is used.

  5. Gas lasers pumped by runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Panchenko, Nikolai A.; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Suslov, Alexei I.

    2015-05-01

    It was shown that run-away electron preionized volume (diffuse) discharge (REP DD) can be used as an excitation source of gas mixtures at elevated pressures and can produce laser emission. We report experimental and simulated results of application of the REP DD for excitation of different active gas mixtures. Kinetic model of the REP DD in mixtures of nitrogen with SF6 is developed allowing predicting the radiation parameters of nitrogen laser at 337.1 nm. Peculiarities of the REP DD development in different gas mixtures are studied, as well. It was shown that the REP DD allows obtaining efficient lasing stimulated radiation in the IR, visible and UV spectral ranges. New operation mode of nitrogen laser is demonstrated under REP DD excitation. Laser action on N2, HF, and DF molecules was obtained with the efficiency close to the limiting value. Promising prospects of REP DD employment for exciting a series of gas lasers was demonstrated. It was established that the REP DD is most efficient for pumping lasers with the mixtures comprising electro-negative gases.

  6. Low-temperature coal desulfurization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, P. S.; Gavalas, G. R.; Hsu, G. C.; Kalfayan, S. H.

    1977-01-01

    Economical, low-temperature chlorinolysis converts sulfur to water-soluble sulfates. Sulfates are removed by washing. Subsequent steps dry coal and remove chlorine. Chlorine and solvents can be reused.

  7. Modeling nitrogen and methane with ethane and propane gas hydrates at low temperatures (173-290 K) with applications to Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Tan, S. P.

    2015-09-01

    The FREZCHEM model was primarily designed for cold temperatures (173-298 K) and high pressures (1-1000 bars). Nitrogen gas (95.0%) and methane gas (5.0%) are major gases on the surface of Titan. Recently, we added nitrogen and methane gas hydrates to FREZCHEM model on Titan; and nitrogen-methane gas hydrates formed on Titan at 178 K. The other common but less abundant gases on Titan are ethane (C2H6) and propane (C3H8) that can also form gas hydrates with nitrogen and methane. The specific objectives of this study were to (1) add ethane and propane to gas hydrates, including mixtures with nitrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide, and (2) explore the potential roles of gas hydrates on Titan. At 273 K, the Ln(gas hydrates) were 5.095 for N2, 3.217 for CH4, 2.327 for CO2, 1.288 for C2H6, and 0.281 for C3H8. At 173 K, the Ln(gas hydrates) were -4.968 for N2, -6.102 for CH4, -7.803 for CO2, -5.125 for C2H6, and -5.512 for C3H8. Apparently C2H6 and C3H8 gas hydrates change less at lower temperatures than N2, CH4, and CO2 gas hydrates. In previous papers, we added three mixed CH4-CO2, N2-CH4, and N2-CO2 binary gas hydrates. In this paper, we added ethane and propane to include new binary gas hydrate mixtures of N2-C2H6, N2-C3H8, C2H6-C3H8, CH4-C2H6, CH4-C3H8, CO2-C2H6, and CO2-C3H8. Today, there are ten binary gas hydrates in the FREZCHEM model. In the text, how to cope with more than two species is described. Simulations from 273 K to 173 K used a surface Titan pressure of 1.467 bars with a major gas of nitrogen (94.24%), a minor gas of methane (5.65%), and extremely minor gases of ethane (0.0038%), and propane (0.000343%). Eventually at 178 K, N2·6H2O formed with 0.17694 mol, CH4·6H2O formed with 0.04101 mol, C2H6·6H2O formed with 6.48e-6 mol, and C3H8·6H2O formed with 9.36e-7 mol. Based on the atmospheric conditions of Titan, the trace gases of ethane and propane led to low gas hydrate precipitations of ethane and propane with nitrogen and methane. However, the gas

  8. Low Temperature Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flight of the Lambda Point Experiment has demonstrated the potential for performing precise tests of fundamental theories using low temperature techniques in Earth orbit. NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division has established a program of successor expermients to investigate other aspects of condensed matter physics using the same low temperature flight facility. This paper describes the new investigations that have been chosen for flight experiments, and those selected for ground-based studies that could lead to flight experiments later.

  9. Organic Combustion in the Presence of Ca-Carbonate and Mg-Perchlorate: A Possible Source for the Low Temperature CO2 Release Seen in Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, Douglas; Ming, D.; Niles, P.; Sutter, B.; Lauer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most important discoveries of the Phoenix Lander were the detection of approx.0.6% perchlorate [1] and 3-5% carbonate [2] in landing site soils. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument on the Phoenix lander could heat samples up to approx.1000 C and monitor evolved gases with a mass spectrometer. TEGA detected a low (approx.350 C) and high (approx.750 C) temperature CO2 release. The high temp release was attributed to the thermal decomposition of Ca-carbonate (calcite). The low temperature CO2 release could be due to desorption of CO2, decomposition of a different carbonate mineral, or the combustion of organic material. A new hypothesis has also been proposed that the low temperature CO2 release could be due to the early breakdown of calcite in the presence of the decomposition products of certain perchlorate salts [3]. We have investigated whether or not this new hypothesis is also compatible with organic combustion. Magnesium perchlorate is stable as Mg(ClO4)2-6H2O on the martian surface [4]. During thermal decomposition, this perchlorate salt releases H2O, Cl2, and O2 gases. The Cl2 can react with water to form HCl which then reacts with calcite, releasing CO2 below the standard thermal decomposition temperature of calcite. However, when using concentrations of perchlorate and calcite similar to what was detected by Phoenix, the ratio of high:low temperature CO2 evolved is much larger in the lab, indicating that although this process might contribute to the low temp CO2 release, it cannot account for all of it. While H2O and Cl2 cause calcite decomposition, the O2 evolved during perchlorate decomposition can lead to the combustion of any reduced carbon present in the sample [5]. We investigate the possible contribution of organic molecules to the low temperature CO2 release seen on Mars.

  10. Self-Organization and Migration of Dielectric Barrier Discharge Filaments in Argon Gas Flow

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Cho, Young I.; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander; Fridman, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric-pressure dielectric barrier discharge are conducted through a water-filled electrode in atmospheric-pressure argon gas flow. Quasi-symmetric self-organized discharge filaments were observed. The streamers moved with the gas flow, and the migration velocity increased with increasing gas velocity. PMID:22287814

  11. Reactivity of atomic oxygen radical anions bound to titania and zirconia nanoparticles in the gas phase: low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Bi; Xu, Bo; Meng, Jing-Heng; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Ding, Xun-Lei; Li, Xiao-Na; He, Sheng-Gui

    2013-02-27

    Titanium and zirconium oxide cluster anions with dimensions up to nanosize are prepared by laser ablation and reacted with carbon monoxide in a fast low reactor. The cluster reactions are characterized by time-of-flight mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. The oxygen atom transfers from (TiO(2))(n)O(-) (n = 3-25) to CO and formations of (TiO(2))(n)(-) are observed, whereas the reactions of (ZrO(2))(n)O(-) (n = 3-25) with CO generate the CO addition products (ZrO(2))(n)OCO(-), which lose CO(2) upon the collisions (studied for n = 3-9) with a crossed helium beam. The computational study indicates that the (MO(2))(n)O(-) (M = Ti, Zr; n = 3-8) clusters are atomic radical anion (O(-)) bonded systems, and the energetics for CO oxidation by the O(-) radicals to form CO(2) is strongly dependent on the metals as well as the cluster size for the titanium system. Atomic oxygen radical anions are important reactive intermediates, while it is difficult to capture and characterize them for condensed phase systems. The reactivity pattern of the O(-)-bonded (TiO(2))(n)O(-) and (ZrO(2))(n)O(-) correlates very well with different behaviors of titania and zirconia supports in the low-temperature catalytic CO oxidation. PMID:23368886

  12. Low-temperature plasma simulations with the LSP PIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Johan; Khrabrov, Alex; Kaganovich, Igor; Keating, David; Selezneva, Svetlana; Sommerer, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    The LSP (Large-Scale Plasma) PIC-MCC code has been used to simulate several low-temperature plasma configurations, including a gas switch for high-power AC/DC conversion, a glow discharge and a Hall thruster. Simulation results will be presented with an emphasis on code comparison and validation against experiment. High-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) power transmission is becoming more common as it can reduce construction costs and power losses. Solid-state power-electronics devices are presently used, but it has been proposed that gas switches could become a compact, less costly, alternative. A gas-switch conversion device would be based on a glow discharge, with a magnetically insulated cold cathode. Its operation is similar to that of a sputtering magnetron, but with much higher pressure (0.1 to 0.3 Torr) in order to achieve high current density. We have performed 1D (axial) and 2D (axial/radial) simulations of such a gas switch using LSP. The 1D results were compared with results from the EDIPIC code. To test and compare the collision models used by the LSP and EDIPIC codes in more detail, a validation exercise was performed for the cathode fall of a glow discharge. We will also present some 2D (radial/azimuthal) LSP simulations of a Hall thruster. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  13. Role of flue gas components in mercury oxidation over TiO2 supported MnOx-CeO2 mixed-oxide at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Wu, Chang-Yu; Li, Ying; Li, Liqing; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying

    2012-12-01

    MnO(x)-CeO(2) mixed-oxide supported on TiO(2) (Mn-Ce/Ti) was synthesized by an ultrasound-assisted impregnation method and employed to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg(0)) at 200°C in simulated coal combustion flue gas. Over 90% of Hg(0) oxidation was achieved on the Mn-Ce/Ti catalyst at 200°C under simulated flue gas representing those from burning low-rank coals with a high gas hourly space velocity of 60,000 h(-1). Gas-phase O(2) regenerated the lattice oxygen and replenished the chemisorbed oxygen, which facilitated Hg(0) oxidation. HCl was the most effective flue gas component responsible for Hg(0) oxidation. 10 ppm HCl plus 4% O(2) resulted in 100% Hg(0) oxidation under the experimental conditions. SO(2) competed with Hg(0) for active sites, thus deactivating the catalyst's capability in oxidizing Hg(0). NO covered the active sites and consumed surface oxygen active for Hg(0) oxidation, hence limiting Hg(0) oxidation. Water vapor showed prohibitive effect on Hg(0) oxidation due to its competition with HCl and Hg(0) for active adsorption sites. This study provides information about the promotional or inhibitory effects of individual flue gas components on Hg(0) oxidation over a highly effective Mn-Ce/Ti catalyst. Such knowledge is of fundamental importance for industrial applications of the Mn-Ce/Ti catalyst in coal-fired power plants. PMID:23131500

  14. Fabrication of SnO2-SnO nanocomposites with p-n heterojunctions for the low-temperature sensing of NO2 gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Wei

    2015-07-28

    In this report, the fabrication of a novel SnO2-SnO nanostructure with p-n heterojunctions has been achieved through a facile one-pot and low-cost hydrothermal process. The structure and properties of the nanocomposite were analyzed with X-ray techniques and electron microscopy. HRTEM characterization showed that the p-n heterojunctions were formed with small n-type SnO2 nanocrystals dispersed on the surface of large p-type SnO crystals. Compared to the single SnO2-based material, a gas sensor fabricated from the SnO2-SnO composite exhibited an enhanced sensing performance for NO2 gas detection, with a limit of detection and sensitivity of 0.1 ppm and 0.26 ppm(-1), respectively, at a relatively low operating temperature (50 °C). Moreover, the p-n heterojunctions exhibited high sensing selectivity for NO2. Such a high sensing sensitivity and a low operating temperature make the SnO2-SnO p-n nanomaterial a promising gas sensor for practical NO2 gas detection. The improved sensing response characteristics of the hybrid material could be attributed to the p-n junctions formed through the in situ growth of SnO2 nanocrystals on SnO nanoplates. The present study is helpful for the design of novel gas sensing materials and the development of NO2 gas sensors. PMID:26123121

  15. Simulation of discharge in insulating gas from initial partial discharge to growth of a stepped leader using the percolation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Kato, Susumu; Takahashii, Eiichi; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Fujii, Takashi; Kanazawa, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    We show a cell simulation of a discharge in an insulating gas from the initial partial discharge to leader inception until breakdown, based on the percolation model. In the model, we consider that the propagation of the leader occurs when connections between randomly produced ionized regions in the discharge medium are established. To determine the distribution of ionized regions, the state of each simulation cell is decided by evaluating the probability of ionization in SF6, which depends on the local electric field. The electric field as well as the discharge current are calculated by solving circuit equations for the network of simulation cells. Both calculations are coupled to each other and the temporal evolution of discharge is self-consistently calculated. The model dependence of the features of the discharge is investigated. It is found that taking the suppression of attachment in the presence of a discharge current into account, the calculation reproduces the behavior of experimental discharges. It is shown that for a strong electric field, the inception of a stepped leader causes immediate breakdown. For an electric field of 30-50% of the critical field, the initial partial discharge persists for a stochastic time lag and then the propagation of a leader takes place. As the strength of the electric field decreases, the time lag increases rapidly and eventually only a partial discharge with a short arrested leader occurs, as observed in experiments.

  16. PREFACE: Low temperature Plasma in the Processes of Functional Coating Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gali Yunusovich, Dautov; Kashapov Faikovich, Nail; Larionov, Viktor; Gerfanovich Zaripov, Renat; Galyautdinov Tagirovich, Raphael; Ilnaz, Fayrushin; Ramil Nailevich, Kashapov

    2013-12-01

    In November 2013 the V Republican Scientific Technical Conference 'Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings' was held in Kazan. The Conference took place from 4-7 November at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and Kazan Federal University chaired by a member of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan Nail Kashapov, Professor, Doctor of Technical Science, and a member of the Scientific and Technical Council of the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Tatarstan. At the conference, the participants were offered a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and computational aspects of the research problems in the physics and technology of low-temperature plasma. There was also a whole series of works devoted to the study of thin films, obtained by low-temperature plasma. For the second year at this conference, work dedicated to the related field of pulsation combustion and low- temperature plasma was considered. In addition much interest is devoted to reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electron trodes and the study of dusty plasmas. The VI All-Russian Conference 'Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings', an extended version with international participation, is scheduled to take place in November 2014. Nail Kashapov Editor

  17. Generation and Control of Electrolyte Cathode Atmospheric Glow Discharges using Miniature Gas Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Naoki; Nakazawa, Masato; Ibuka, Shinji; Ishii, Shozo

    Stable electrolyte cathode atmospheric dc glow microdischarges were generated by using a miniature helium gas flow from a nozzle electrode in air. We developed two schemes to control the temporal evolution of the discharge and the interaction between the discharge column and the ambient air. The vaporization of electrolyte solutions takes place and affects the discharge characteristics. It takes time from the start of the discharge. Therefore the discharge was controlled by applying pulse modulated dc voltages. If the voltage was dropped down to zero before the vaporization, the gas discharge developed without the ionization of the components of solution. The helium gas discharge without air developed when the nozzle electrode was placed in a glass capillary. This was confirmed by examining the change in pH of the solution, which usually decreased owing to the generation of nitrogen oxides in the discharge in air.

  18. Low temperature barrier wellbores formed using water flushing

    DOEpatents

    McKinzie, II; John, Billy [Houston, TX; Keltner, Thomas Joseph [Spring, TX

    2009-03-10

    A method of forming an opening for a low temperature well is described. The method includes drilling an opening in a formation. Water is introduced into the opening to displace drilling fluid or indigenous gas in the formation adjacent to a portion of the opening. Water is produced from the opening. A low temperature fluid is applied to the opening.

  19. [Low-temperature sterilization for the surgical infection prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Kornev, I I; Baranov, G A; Ul'ianov, V I

    2011-01-01

    The comparative characteristic of the accepted methods of low-temperature sterilization of medical equipment is given. Special attention is devoted to the surgical infection prophylaxis. The efficacy, expediency and safety of gas sterilization with ethilenoxide is proved. Plasmic methods of sterilization is recommended for use together with other methods of low-temperature sterilization. PMID:21716218

  20. Ionization front in a high-current gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-02-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  1. Ionization front in a high-current gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-03-15

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  2. Coupling discharge and gas dynamics in streamer-less spark formation in supercritical N2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnihotri, Ashutosh; Hundsdorfer, Willem; Ebert, Ute

    2016-07-01

    A two-dimensional cylindrically symmetric model is developed to study the streamer-less spark formation in a short gap on the timescale of ion motion. It incorporates the coupling between the electric discharge and the gas through the heat generated by the discharge and the consecutive gas expansion. The model is employed to study electrical breakdown in supercritical N2. We present the simulation results of gas heating by the electrical discharge and the effect of gas expansion on the electrical discharge.

  3. Destruction of Bacterial Biofilms Using Gas Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramzon, Nina

    2005-03-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities embedded in an exopolysaccharidic matrix with a complex architectural structure. Bacteria in biofilms show different properties from those in free life thus, conventional methods of killing bacteria are often ineffective with biofilms. The use of plasmas potentially offers an alternative to conventional sterilization methods since plasmas contain a mixture of charged particles, chemically reactive species, and UV radiation. 4 and 7 day-old biofilms were produced using two bacterial species: Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum. Gas discharge plasma was produced by using an AtomfloTM reactor (Surfx Technologies) and bacterial biofilms were exposed to it for different periods of time. Our results show that a 10-minute plasma treatment was able to kill 100% of the cells in most cases. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study plasma composition which is then correlated with the effectiveness of killing. These results indicate the potentiality of plasma as an alternative sterilization method. Supported by CSuperb.

  4. Instability of dusty particle system in gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Filinov, V.S.; Petrov, O.F.; Fortov, V.E.; Molotkov, V.I.

    2005-10-31

    An effective anisotropic potential is proposed for the interaction between dust particles in a gas-discharge plasma. In addition to the Coulomb repulsion this potential takes into account attraction due to the spatial positive plasma charge originating from focusing of the ionic fluxes by dusty particles. The time evolution of the dust particle kinetic and potential energies from random initial configurations have been investigated by the Brownian dynamics method. Results of our simulation showed that the attraction between dusty particles can be the main physical reason of formation and decay of classical bound dust particle pairs and many particle complexes with low potential energy, while the kinetic energy (temperature) of unbound dust particles and particle oscillating in bound complexes may increase on three order as observed in experiments.

  5. Re-examination of demonstration gas discharge tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maharaj, H.P. )

    1991-10-01

    Gas discharge tubes in which electrons or ions are accelerated at voltages on the order of kilovolts to produce observable atomic effects are potential x-ray sources. These tubes come in various shapes, sizes and designs, and are still in use in science classrooms despite the decline predicted in the 1970s. Because of current applications, a representative sample consisting of fifteen tubes marketed over a recent 2-year period was reexamined for regulatory compliance, product identification and advertising. The results revealed that: poor quality control and design can affect x-ray emissions; and deficiencies exist in product identification, safe use guidelines and operating instructions. This paper reports that these findings, together with the dose estimates, implications and subjective indicators, strongly suggest a user group of unknown size is at increased risk. A combination of enhanced surveillance and promotion of user awareness strategies is adopted to reduce and possible eliminate the potential health risks.

  6. A summary of volatile impurity measurements and gas generation studies on MISSTD-1, a high-purity plutonium oxide produced by low-temperature calcination of plutonium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, John M.; Narlesky, Joshua E.; Veirs, Douglas K.

    2012-06-08

    Plutonium dioxide of high specific surface area was subjected to long-term tests of gas generation in sealed containers. The material preparation and the storage conditions were outside the bounds of acceptable parameters defined by DOE-STD-3013-2012 in that the material was stabilized to a lower temperature than required and had higher moisture content than allowed. The data provide useful information for better defining the bounding conditions for safe storage. Net increases in internal pressure and transient increases in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were observed, but were well within the bounds of gas compositions previously shown to not threaten integrity of 3013 containers.

  7. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  8. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  9. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... gas systems. An inert gas system on a tank that carries a flammable or combustible cargo must not... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design...

  10. Growth of arc in high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge by gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Wataru

    2000-10-01

    Effects of gas density depletion on arc formation of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge have been investigated by eliminating the other factors which may affect the discharge stability, such as shock waves, residual ions, electrode heating, and discharge products. The gas density depletion has been simulated by utilizing a subsonic gas flow between the curved electrodes combined with a convergent nozzle and a divergent diffuser. A comparison has been made on the discharge in the aerodynamically created gas density depletion with the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge within a stable gas. We have found that the large gas density depletion, Δρ/ρ0˜-3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of ˜50 Hz, tends to cause an arc-like filament or an arc without the shocks, ions, electrode heating, and products. However, the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge becomes an arc in much smaller gas density depletion (Δρ/ρ0˜-1.2% corresponding to PRR ˜3 Hz). Therefore, the collapse of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge is most likely caused by some factor other than the gas density depletion.

  11. Note: Fiber optic transport probe for Hall measurements under light and magnetic field at low temperatures: Case study of a two dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, P. P. S.; Gupta, Anurag; Kumar, Pramod; Dogra, Anjana; Budhani, R. C.

    2015-05-15

    A fiber optic based probe is designed and developed for electrical transport measurements in presence of quasi-monochromatic (360–800 nm) light, varying temperature (T = 1.8–300 K), and magnetic field (B = 0–7 T). The probe is tested for the resistivity and Hall measurements performed on a LaAlO{sub 3}–SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface system with a conducting two dimensional electron gas.

  12. Improving the gas barrier and mechanical properties of a-SiO x films synthesized at low temperature by using high energy and hydrogen flow rate control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Su B.; Long, Wen; Sahu, B. B.; Han, Jeon G.; Hori, M.

    2015-05-01

    Silicon-oxide thin films were deposited on polyethylene-terephthalate (PET) and glass substrates for applications in transparent barrier packaging and replacement display cover glasses by using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The bias conditions and the input power in the radio-frequency plasma were changed to optimize the gas barrier and the mechanical properties of the silicon-oxide thin film. We made an advanced plasma source for large-area PECVD (370 × 470 mm2 size). The dissociation of the octamethylycyclodisiloxane (OMCTS) precursor was controlled by using the plasma processing parameters. The gas barrier and the mechanical properties of the a-SiO x film were improved by controlling the plasma process parameters. The gas barrier and the mechanical properties of the coatings were examined using a Permatran (MOCON) system and a pencil hardness measurement. The chemical structure properties of the coatings were examined by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The properties of the a-SiO x thin films were improved by the dissociation of OMCTS obtained by using various appropriate plasma processing parameters.

  13. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  14. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  15. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  16. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  17. Effects of ionic liquid electrode on pulse discharge plasmas in the wide range of gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qiang; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2010-11-15

    Gas-liquid interfacial pulse discharge plasmas are generated in the wide range of gas pressures, where an ionic liquid is used as the liquid electrode. By analyzing the characteristics of discharge voltage and current, the discharge mechanisms at low and high pressures are found to be dominated by secondary electron emission and first Townsend ionization, respectively. Therefore, the discharge properties at low and high pressures are mainly determined by the cathode material and the discharge gas type, respectively. Furthermore, the plasma properties are investigated by a double Langmuir probe. The density of the positive pulse plasma is found to be much smaller than that of the negative pulse plasma, although the discharge voltage and current of the negative and positive pulse plasmas are of the same order of magnitude. The positive pulse discharge plasma is considered to quickly diffuse onto the chamber wall from the radially central region due to its high plasma potential compared with that in the peripheral region.

  18. The application of an assisting gas plasma generator for low- temperature magnetron sputtering of Ti-C-Mo-S antifriction coatings on titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Savostikov, V. M.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Dudarev, E. F.; Melnikova, E. A.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The positive effect of assisting influence of high-density gas plasma formed by an independent plasma generator PINK on mechanical and tribological characteristics of Ti-C- Mo-S magnetron coating on titanium alloys at lowered to 350°C temperature of coating regardless of alloy structural condition was revealed by methods of calotest, nanorecognition, scratch testing and frictional material tests. The coating formed by means of a combined magnetron plasma method reduces titanium alloys friction coefficient in multiple times and increases wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. At the same time the mechanical properties of ultra-fine-grained titanium alloys obtained by nanostructuring do not deteriorate.

  19. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  20. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  1. 21 CFR 1020.20 - Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes. 1020.20 Section...) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR IONIZING RADIATION EMITTING PRODUCTS § 1020.20 Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section are applicable to cold-cathode...

  2. Gas discharges in fumarolic ice caves of Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T. P.; Curtis, A. G.; Kyle, P. R.; Sano, Y.

    2013-12-01

    reactions. We are confident that the atmospheric component is not the result of sampling procedure but intrinsic to the ice cave system. In addition to carbon dioxide, magmatic gases emitted from Erebus lava lake contain significant amounts of SO2, HCl, HF, CO and H2 [1,2]. The acid magmatic gases (SO2, HCl, HF) and a significant amount of the CO2 are likely absorbed by the subsurface ice/water system. The atmospheric components (Ar, nitrogen, oxygen) likely enter the system at shallow levels. The relative abundances of these components reflect degassing fractionation of these volatiles from liquid water at low temperatures, suggesting the presence of liquid water in the subsurface. [1] Oppenheimer, C., Kyle, P.R., 2008. Probing the magma plumbing of Erebus volcano, Antarctica, by open-path FTIR spectroscopy of gas emissions. J. Vol. Geoth. Res. 177, 743-754. [2] Moussallam, Y., Oppenheimer, C., et al., 2012. Hydrogen emission from Erebus volcano, Antarctica. Bull. Volcan 74, 2109-2120.

  3. Characteristics of excitation discharge of an excimer laser in gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Masuda, Wataru; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    1998-12-01

    The influences of gas density depletion on the highly- repetitive, high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge for excitation of excimer laser have been investigated eliminating the other instabilities, such as shock waves, residual ions, discharge products and electrode heating. The gas density depletion is simulated by utilizing a subsonic flow between the curved electrodes. The comparison has been made on the discharge occurred in the presence of the gas density depletion with the second discharge on the double-pulse experiment. We have found that the big gas density non uniformity, (Delta) (rho) /(rho) 0 approximately 3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of approximately 20 Hz, tends to cause the arc discharge without the shocks, ions, discharge products and electrode heating. On the other hand, the second discharge on the double-pulse experiment becomes arc discharge in much smaller non uniformity ((Delta) (rho) /(rho) 0 approximately 1.2% corresponding to PRR approximately 3 Hz). The arc discharge in the double-pulse experiment might be driven by the residual ions and/or discharge products other than gas density depletion except for PRR greater than 20 Hz.

  4. Rapid synthesis and characterization of hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods for high performance, low temperature NO2 gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnuvelu, Dinesh Veeran; Pullithadathil, Biji; Prasad, Arun K.; Dhara, Sandip; Ashok, Anuradha; Mohamed, Kamruddin; Tyagi, Ashok Kumar; Raj, Baldev

    2015-11-01

    A rapid synthesis route for hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods has been realized for ultrasensitive, trace-level NO2 gas sensor applications. ZnO nanorods and hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods are structurally analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Optical characterization using UV-visible (UV-vis), photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectroscopies elucidate alteration in the percentage of defect and charge transport properties of ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods. The study reveals the accumulation of electrons at metal-semiconductor junctions leading to upward band bending for ZnO and thus favors direct electron transfer from ZnO to Au nanoclusters, which mitigates charge carrier recombination process. The operating temperature of ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods based sensor significantly decreased to 150 °C compared to alternate NO2 sensors (300 °C). Moreover, a linear sensor response in the range of 0.5-5 ppm of NO2 concentration was observed with a lowest detection limit of 500 ppb using conventional electrodes. The defects with deep level, observed in ZnO nanorods and hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods influences local electron density, which in-turn indirectly influence the gas sensing properties. The ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods based sensor exhibited good selectivity toward NO2 and was found to be very stable.

  5. Low temperature electrolytes for lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhovak, Denise R.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1991-01-01

    Combinations of methyl formate (MF) and propylene carbonate (PC) using salt concentrations of 0.6 to 2.4 M, with lithium hexafluoroarsenate and lithium tetrafluoroborate in a five to one molar ratio, were investigated as electrolytes in lithium/silver vanadium oxide batteries. The composition of the electrolyte affected cell performance at low temperature, self-discharge and abuse resistance as characterized by short circuit and crush testing. The electrolyte that provided the best combination of good low temperature performance, low cell self-discharge and abuse resistance was 0.6 M salt in 10:90 PC/MF.

  6. Inception of Snapover and Gas Induced Glow Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J. T.; Vayner, B. V.; Degroot, W. A.; Ferguson, D. C.; Thomson, C. D.; Dennison, J. R.; Davies, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Ground based experiments of the snapover phenomenon were conducted in the large vertical simulation chamber at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plasma Interaction Facility (PIF). Two Penning sources provided both argon and xenon plasmas for the experiments. The sources were used to simulate a variety of ionospheric densities pertaining to a spacecraft in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Secondary electron emission is believed responsible for dielectric surface charging, and all subsequent snapover phenomena observed. Voltage sweeps of conductor potentials versus collected current were recorded in order to examine the specific charging history of each sample. The average time constant for sample charging was estimated between 25 and 50 seconds for all samples. It appears that current drops off by approximately a factor of 3 over the charging time of the sample. All samples charged in the forward and reverse bias directions, demonstrated hysteresis. Current jumps were only observed in the forward or positive swept voltage direction. There is large dispersion in tile critical snapover potential when repeating sweeps on any one sample. The current ratio for the first snapover region jumps between 2 and 4.6 times, with a standard deviation less than 1.6. Two of the samples showed even larger current ratios. It is believed the second large snapover region is due to sample outgassing. Under certain preset conditions, namely at the higher neutral gas background pressures, a perceptible blue-green glow was observed around the conductor. The glow is believed to be a result of secondary electrons undergoing collisions with an expelled tenuous cloud of gas, that is outgassed from the sample. Spectroscopic measurements of the glow discharge were made in an attempt to identify specific lines contributing to the observed glow.

  7. Orientational ordering, site structure, and dynamics for octahedral molecules in low temperature matrices: SF6 and SeF6 in rare gas solidsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Llewellyn H.; Swanson, Basil I.

    1983-08-01

    From polarization studies of high resolution IR spectra of SF6 and SeF6 trapped in noble gas solids we show that much of the structure observed for the stretching mode represents site symmetry split components for low symmetry trapping sites, the triply-degenerate ν3 mode being split into a doubly- and singly-degenerate mode. Most of the sites showing polarization are orientationally ordered with the singly-degenerate component perpendicular to the substrate. We attribute the driving force for ordering to guest-host interaction potentials which result in registry between the molecules and the (111) growth plane during deposition. The observed orientational ordering combined with high temperature annealing studies has allowed the identification of the symmetry of certain trapping sites and further analysis of vibrational dephasing dynamics. Several sites with the same nominal symmetry and structure can be tracked through the matrices discussed herein. The implications of the ordering of impurity structure in a host lattice formed by vapor deposition are discussed.

  8. Investigation of isochronal annealing on the optical properties of HWCVD amorphous silicon nitride deposited at low temperatures and low gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T. F. G.; Jacobs, S.; Cummings, F. R.; Oliphant, C. J.; Malgas, G. F.; Arendse, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) is used as anti-reflection coatings in commercial solar cells. A final firing step in the production of micro-crystalline silicon solar cells allows hydrogen effusion from the a-SiNx:H into the solar cell, and contributes to bulk passivation of the grain boundaries. In this study a-SiNx:H deposited in a hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) chamber with reduced gas flow rates and filament temperature compared to traditional deposition regimes, were annealed isochronally. The UV-visible reflection spectra of the annealed material were subjected to the Bruggeman Effective Medium Approximation (BEMA) treatment, in which a theoretical amorphous semiconductor was combined with particle inclusions due to the structural complexities of the material. The extraction of the optical functions and ensuing Wemple-DeDomenici analysis of the wavelength-dependent refractive index allowed for the correlation of the macroscopic optical properties with the changes in the local atomic bonding configuration, involving silicon, nitrogen and hydrogen.

  9. Orientational ordering, site structure, and dynamics for octahedral molecules in low temperature matrices: SF/sub 6/ and SeF/sub 6/ in rare gas solids

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.H.; Swanson, B.I.

    1983-08-01

    From polarization studies of high resolution IR spectra of SF/sub 6/ and SeF/sub 6/ trapped in noble gas solids we show that much of the structure observed for the stretching mode represents site symmetry split components for low symmetry trapping sites, the triply-degenerate ..nu../sub 3/ mode being split into a doubly- and singly-degenerate mode. Most of the sites showing polarization are orientationally ordered with the singly-degenerate component perpendicular to the substrate. We attribute the driving force for ordering to guest--host interaction potentials which result in registry between the molecules and the (111) growth plane during deposition. The observed orientational ordering combined with high temperature annealing studies has allowed the identification of the symmetry of certain trapping sites and further analysis of vibrational dephasing dynamics. Several sites with the same nominal symmetry and structure can be tracked through the matrices discussed herein. The implications of the ordering of impurity structure in a host lattice formed by vapor deposition are discussed.

  10. A Possible Organic Contribution to the Low Temperature CO2 Release Seen in Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D. Jr.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Boynton, W. V.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most important discoveries of the Phoenix Mars Lander were the discovery of approx.0.6% perchlorate [1] and 3-5% carbonate [2] in the soils at the landing site in the martian northern plains. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument was one of the tools that made this discovery. After soil samples were delivered to TEGA and transferred into small ovens, the samples could be heated up to approx.1000 C and the gases that evolved during heating were monitored by a mass spectrometer. A CO2 signal was detected at high temperature (approx.750 C) that has been attributed to calcium carbonate decomposition. In addition to this CO2 release, a lower temperature signal was seen. This lower temperature CO2 release was postulated to be one of three things: 1) desorption of CO2, 2) decomposition of a different carbonate mineral, or 3) CO2 released due to organic combustion. Cannon et al. [3] present another novel hypothesis involving the interaction of decomposition products of a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate.

  11. Simulations of Electron Density Perturbations in a Gas Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplinger, James; Sotnikov, Vladimir; Main, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Beginning with the idealized case of the Pierce diode, a series of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations are conducted in order to characterize density perturbations in a laboratory gas discharge. This work is conducted to support future experimental investigations into electromagnetic scattering off of electron density perturbations excited by plasma flows. As a first step, 2D PIC simulations were conducted for the Pierce diode case, which is a simple model that exploits instabilities of a monochromatic electron beam between two grounded electrodes. These results were compared to the standard analytical solution. Departing from this idealized case we will include in the simulations electron-neutral collisions, particle creation from ionization, as well as an electric field generated by biased electrodes. A parameter study of electric field strength and collision frequency will be performed for values approaching the Pierce diode as well as extending to cases of expected laboratory parameters. If we can extract physical density spectra from simulations with parameters approaching experimental values, it may be possible to analyze electromagnetic scattering characteristics.

  12. Fracturing fluids for low temperature wells

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, C.T.; Dollarhide, F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Highly viscous fluids are used to initiate and propagate fractures and to place proppant in the fractures during the hydraulic stimulation process. These fluids can cause damage to the conductivity of the induced fractures if they are not properly cleaned out after the fracturing treatment. The clean-up process is aided by the degradation of the polymers, and in low temperature wells the breakdown of the polymer must be chemically induced. This work presents data on a new fracturing fluid aimed specifically at stimulating low temperature and low pressure reservoirs. The system consists of a CO/sub 2/-energized, cross-linked hydroxypropyl guar fluid. The gel is degraded by a traditional breaker that is activated by a new, low temperature breaker activator. The fluid is effective in wells as cool as 60 F and with bhp as low as 100 psi and should be particularly applicable to the shallow gas wells in the Alberta Medicine Hat and high level Keg River areas.

  13. Storage of CO2 at low temperature as liquid or solid gas hydrate - Application to the Biscay deep zone in the French EEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnol, André; Thinon, Isabelle; Audigane, Pascal; Leynet, Aurélien

    2013-04-01

    Amongst the various CO2 geological storage options currently under consideration, the deep saline aquifers (beyond 800-m depth) were considered to present the most interesting storage capacity due to the density of CO2 in its supercritical state. However, at lower temperature, another form of storage is possible, either in the state of CO2 hydrates or liquid CO2 (1, 2). In Alaska, a first demonstrator showed recently the possibility of exchange of CO2 and CH4 in natural gas hydrates. At higher pressures common in deep-sea sediments, liquid CO2 can be denser than the overlying seawater and therefore be trapped in the marine sediments (2). We explored in this work the storage capacity at the Biscay deep zone in the French Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). A local bathymetry of the zone (abyssal plain and continental margin) was used to define a potential interesting zone for the CO2 storage, considering different safety criteria. A sensitivity analysis on the geothermal gradient was carried out using two extreme scenarios (Low and High gradient) based on the available Ocean Drilling Program's data. In both cases, the Negative Buoyancy Zone (NBZ) and the CO2 Hydrate Formation Zone (HFZ) were calculated using the GERG-2008 Equation of State for liquid CO2 and the CSMGem code for CO2 hydrate, respectively. Following this sensitivity analysis, a CO2 injection depth is proposed and the French "deep offshore" storage capacity is quantitatively evaluated and compared to the "onshore" storage capacity in deep saline aquifers. References 1. Le Nindre Y., Allier D., Duchkov A., Altunina L. K., Shvartsev S., Zhelezniak M. and Klerkx J. (2011) Storing CO2 underneath the Siberian Permafrost: A win-win solution for long-term trapping of CO2 and heavy oil upgrading. Energy Procedia4, 5414-5421 2. House K. Z., Schrag D. P., Harvey C. F. and Lackner K. S. (2006) Permanent carbon dioxide storage in deep-sea sediments. PNAS

  14. Rice husk ash/calcium oxide/ceria sorbent for simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide from flue gas at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlan, I.; Lee, K.T.; Kamaruddin, A.H.; Mohamed, A.R.

    2009-06-15

    The reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions has become an isssue of great importance to government regulatory agencies and general public due to their negative effect towards the environment and human health. In this work, the simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxide (NO) from simulated flue gas was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor using rice husk ash (RHA)/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent. Attention was focused on the major reactor operation parameters affecting sorption capacity of RHA/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent, which include feed concentration of SO{sub 2} and NO, relative humidity (RH), operating temperature and space velocity (GHSV). This is because such information is unavailable for RHA-based sorbent and the effects of these parameters reported in the literature are also not reliable. Enhancement effect of NO on removal of SO{sub 2} was observed and the presence of SO{sub 2} was essential to the removal of NO. However, at a high level of SO{sub 2}/NO concentration, competition in the sorption of NO and SO{sub 2} on the sorbent active sites might have occurred. RH was found to significantly enhance the SO{sub 2} sorption of the RHA/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent. By contrast, NO sorption capacity decreases when RH was further introduced, as it was not easy to sorb NO in the presence of water. Apart from that, the results also shows that there was a threshold value for the RH to ensure higher SO{sub 2} and NO removal and this value was observed at 50% RH. Higher operating temperatures were favored for SO{sub 2} and NO removal. Nevertheless, beyond 150 degrees C the SO{sub 2} removal was found to decrease. On the other hand, a lower space velocity resulted in a higher SO{sub 2} and NO removal.

  15. Ionometric determination of fluorides at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyukova, I.S.; Ennan, A.A.; Dzerzhko, E.K.; Leivikova, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    A method for determining fluoride ions in solution at low temperatures using a solid-contact fluorine-selective electrode (FSE) has been developed. The effect of temperature (60 to -15{degrees}C) on the calibration slope, potential equilibrium time, and operational stability is studied; the effect of an organic additive (cryoprotector) on the calibration slope is also studied. The temperature relationships obtained for the solid-contact FSEs allow appropriate corrections to be applied to the operational algorithm of the {open_quotes}Ftoring{close_quotes} hand-held semiautomatic HF gas analyzer for the operational temperature range of -16 to 60{degrees}C.

  16. Transport in Strained Graphene at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera-Servin, Juan; Nosek, Adrian; Pan, Cheng; Bockrath, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Strain in graphene layers produces synthetic gauge fields that may be used to modify the properties of its electron system. We study single layers of graphene transferred over Ti/Au electrical contacts on oxidized Si wafers with etched triangular holes in the oxide. The layers are strained by applying pressure electrostatically using a gate voltage and hydrostatically using an external inert gas. We investigate electronic transport in this suspended variable-strain graphene system at low temperatures. We will discuss our latest results.

  17. PREFACE: VI Scientific Technical Conference on "Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The VI Republican Scientific Technical Conference "Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings" took place from 4 to 7 November 2014 at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and the Kazan Federal University. The conference was chaired by a Member of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan Nail Kashapov -Professor, Doctor of Technical Sciences- a member of the Scientific and Technical Council of the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Tatarstan. At the conference, the participants discussed a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and computational aspects of research problems in the physics and technology of low-temperature plasma. A series of works were devoted to the study of thin films obtained by low-temperature plasma. This year work dedicated to the related field of heat mass transfer in multiphase media and low-temperature plasma was also presented. Of special interest were reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electrotrodes and the study of dusty plasmas. Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., Professor (Kazan Federal University)

  18. PREFACE: VII Conference on Low Temperature Plasma in the Processes of Functional Coating Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nail, Kashapov

    2016-01-01

    The VII All-Russian (with international participation) Scientific Technical Conference "Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings" took place from 4-7 November 2015 at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and the Kazan Federal University. The conference was attended by over 150 people from Russia and abroad. The participants proposed a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and experimental aspects of the problems of the physics of low-temperature plasma. We heard the reports of experts from leading universities and research organizations in the field of plasma physics: Moscow State University, St. Petersburg State University, MEPhI, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, etc. A series of works were devoted to the study of thin films obtained by low-temperature plasma. This year, work dedicated to the related field of heat mass transfer in multiphase media and low-temperature plasma was also presented. Of special interest were reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electrodes and the study of dusty plasmas. Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., professor (Kazan Federal University)

  19. Harmonic distortion and power factor assessment in city street gas discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Rios, S.; Castaneda, R.; Veas, D.

    1996-04-01

    The current and voltage harmonic spectrum, and power factor in gas discharge lamps: Sodium (Na)-high pressure and Mercury (Hg) in actual use in public street lighting have been measured. A sample of nearby 360 gas discharge lamps (Na, Hg) of different rated power was obtained by simple random sampling over a universe of approximately 15,000 lamps. An equivalent current harmonic spectrum for gas discharge lamps is proposed, which is independent of the type of gas and the lamp rated power. This current spectrum can be used to integrate gas discharge lamp models for harmonic distortion level assessment in distribution networks. The relation of this equivalent current harmonic spectrum with: (1) lamp voltage waveform, (2) type of lamp (Na, Hg), and (3) power factor-capacitor lamp, is analyzed.

  20. Estimating the extreme low-temperature event using nonparametric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Silva, Anisha

    This thesis presents a new method of estimating the one-in-N low temperature threshold using a non-parametric statistical method called kernel density estimation applied to daily average wind-adjusted temperatures. We apply our One-in-N Algorithm to local gas distribution companies (LDCs), as they have to forecast the daily natural gas needs of their consumers. In winter, demand for natural gas is high. Extreme low temperature events are not directly related to an LDCs gas demand forecasting, but knowledge of extreme low temperatures is important to ensure that an LDC has enough capacity to meet customer demands when extreme low temperatures are experienced. We present a detailed explanation of our One-in-N Algorithm and compare it to the methods using the generalized extreme value distribution, the normal distribution, and the variance-weighted composite distribution. We show that our One-in-N Algorithm estimates the one-in- N low temperature threshold more accurately than the methods using the generalized extreme value distribution, the normal distribution, and the variance-weighted composite distribution according to root mean square error (RMSE) measure at a 5% level of significance. The One-in- N Algorithm is tested by counting the number of times the daily average wind-adjusted temperature is less than or equal to the one-in- N low temperature threshold.

  1. Optical Diagnostics of Electron Energy Distributions in Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Amy

    2011-05-01

    Passive, non-invasive optical emission measurements provide a means of probing important plasma parameters without introducing contaminants into plasma systems. We investigate the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in argon containing inductively-coupled plasmas due to dominant role in rates of gas-phase reactions for processing plasmas. EEDFs are determined using measurements of 3p5 4 p --> 3p5 4 s emissions in the 650-1150 nm wavelength range and measured metastable and resonant level concentrations, in conjunction with a radiation model that includes contributions from often neglected but critical processes such as radiation trapping and electron-impact excitation from metastable and resonant levels. Measurements over a wide range of operating conditions (pressure, RF power, Ar/Ne/N2 gas mixtures) show a depletion of the EEDF relative to the Maxwell- Boltzmann form at higher electron energy, in good agreement with measurements made with Langmuir probes and predictions of a global discharge model. This result is consistent with predictions of electron kinetics and can be explained in terms of reduced life times for energetic electrons due to wall losses and inelastic collisions. This example highlights the potential utility of this method as a tool for probing kinetics of many types of low-temperature plasma systems, which are typically characterized by non-Maxwellian EEDFs. This work was supported by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and by NSF Grant CBET 0714600.

  2. Growth of TiN films at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L. I.; Jun-Fang, Chen

    2007-06-01

    Thermodynamic analysis on growth of TiN films was given. The driving force for deposition of TiN is dependent on original Ti(g)/N(g) ratio and original partial pressure of N(g). TiN films were deposited by ion beam assisted electron beam evaporation system under suitable nitrogen gas flow rate at 523 K while the density of plasma varied with diverse discharge pressure had been investigated by the Langmuir probe. TiN films were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and observed by means of atom force microscopy (AFM). The results of these measurements indicated preferential TiN(1 1 1) films were deposited on substrate of Si(1 0 0) and glass by ion beam assisted electron beam evaporation system at low temperature, and it was possible for the deposition of TiN films with a preferential orientation or more orientations if the nitrogen gas flow rate increased enough. Sand Box was used to characterize the fractal dimension of surface of TiN films. The results showed the fractal dimension was a little more than 1.7, which accorded with the model of diffusion limited aggregation (DLA), and the fractal dimension of TiN films increased with increase of the temperature of deposition.

  3. Efficient gas lasers pumped by double-discharge circuits with semiconductor opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2012-01-01

    A review of applications of double-discharge circuits based on generators with inductive energy storage (IES) and semiconductor opening switches (SOS) for efficient excitation of different gas lasers is presented. Using a pre-pulse-sustainer circuit technique based on inductive energy storage and semiconductor opening switch generators allows the formation of a pre-pulse with high amplitude and short rise-time and provides a sharp increase of discharge current which significantly improves discharge stability and life-time of the volume discharge in gas mixtures containing halogens. A pre-pulse with high pumping power forms a high-density discharge plasma and an inversion population in gas mixtures under study within ∼10 ns and provides both early onset of lasing and conditions for efficient excitation of an active medium from the storage capacitor. As a result, pulse duration, output energy and efficiency of the lasers under study were improved.

  4. [Removal of SO2 from flue gas by water vapor DC corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ming; Wu, Yan

    2006-07-01

    The influence of several factors on removal rate of SO2 from flue gas in unsaturated water vapor DC corona discharge was researched. Furthermore, the experiments of the removal rate of SO2 in pulsed discharge increased by water vapor DC corona discharge plasma were conducted. The experiment system is supplied with multi-nozzle-plate electrodes and the flow of simulated flue gas is under 70 m3/h. The results show that removal rate of SO2 can be improved by increasing the concentration of water vapor, intensity of electric field or decreasing flow of simulated flue gas. In unsaturated water vapor DC corona discharge, removal rate of SO2 can be improved by 10%, when NH3 is added as NH3 and SO2 is in a mole ratio of two to one, it can reach 60%. The removal rate of SO2 can be increased by 5% in pulsed corona discharge and reach above 90%. PMID:16881295

  5. Magnetic refrigeration for low-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The application of refrigeration at low temperatures ranging from production of liquid helium for medical imaging systems to cooling of infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is discussed. Cooling below about 15 K with regenerative refrigerators is difficult because of the decreasing thermal mass of the regenerator compared to that of the working material. In order to overcome this difficulty with helium gas as the working material, a heat exchanger plus a Joule-Thomson or other exponder is used. Regenerative magnetic refrigerators with magnetic solids as the working material have the same regenerator problem as gas refrigerators. This problem provides motivation for the development of nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators that span approximately 1 K to approximately 0 K. Particular emphasis is placed on high reliability and high efficiency. Calculations indicate considerable promise in this area. The principles, the potential, the problems, and the progress towards development of successful 4 to 20 K magnetic refrigerators are discussed.

  6. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent. PMID:26920837

  7. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100 K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30 K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent.

  8. Atomic iodine production in a gas flow by decomposing methyl iodide in a dc glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheyev, P A; Shepelenko, A A; Voronov, A I; Kupryaev, Nikolai V

    2002-01-31

    The production of atomic iodine for an oxygen - iodine laser is studied by decomposing methyl iodide in a dc glow discharge in a vortex gas flow. The concentration of iodine atoms in discharge products was measured from the atomic iodine absorption of the radiation of a single-frequency tunable diode laser at a wavelength of 1.315 {mu}m. Atomic iodine concentrations sufficient for the operation of an oxygen - iodine laser were obtained. The concentration of atomic iodine amounted to 3.6 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -3} for a pressure of the carrying argon gas of 15 Torr. The discharge stabilisation by a vortex gas flow allowed the glow discharge to be sustained in a strongly electronegative halogen-containing gas mixture for pressures up to 20 Torr. (active media)

  9. Initiation of long, free-standing z discharges by CO2 laser gas heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, C.; Tauschwitz, A.; Penache, D.; Neff, S.; Knobloch, R.; Birkner, R.; Presura, R.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.

    2002-01-01

    High current discharge channels can neutralize both current and space charge of very intense ion beams. Therefore, they are considered an interesting solution for final focus and beam transport in a heavy ion beam fusion reactor. At the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung accelerator facility, 50 cm long, free-standing discharge channels were created in a 60 cm diameter metallic chamber. Discharges with currents of 45 kA in 2 to 25 mbar ammonia (NH3) gas are initiated by a CO2 laser pulse along the channel axis before the capacitor bank is triggered. Resonant absorption of the laser, tuned to the v2 vibration of the ammonia molecule, causes strong gas heating. Subsequent expansion and rarefaction of the gas prepare the conditions for a stable discharge to fulfill the requirements for ion beam transport. The influence of an electric prepulse on the high current discharge was investigated. This article describes the laser-gas interaction and the discharge initiation mechanism. We found that channels are magnetohydrodynamic stable up to currents of 45 kA, measured by fast shutter and streak imaging techniques. The rarefaction of the laser heated gas is studied by means of a one-dimensional Lagrangian fluid code (CYCLOPS) and is identified as the dominant initiation mechanism of the discharge.

  10. Binary nucleation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahoransky, R. A.; Peters, F.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous condensation of binary vapors in the supersaturated state is studied in ethanol/n-propanol and water/ethanol via their unsteady expansion in a shock tube at temperatures below 273 K. Ethanol/n-propanol forms a nearly ideal solution, whereas water/ethanol is an example of a strongly nonideal mixture. Vapor mixtures of various compositions are diluted in dry air at small mole fractions and expanded in the driver section from room temperature. The onset of homogeneous condensation is detected optically and the corresponding thermodynamic state is evaluated. The experimental results are compared with the binary nucleation theory, and the particular problems of theoretical evaluation at low temperatures are discussed.

  11. Binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in glow discharge closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Scott R.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1990-01-01

    Highly efficient binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches are disclosed. The binary mixtures are combinations of helium or neon and selected perfluorides. The ternary mixtures are combinations of helium, neon, or argon, a selected perfluoride, and a small amount of gas that exhibits enhanced ionization characteristics. These mixtures are shown to be the optimum choices for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches by virtue of the combined physio-electric properties of the mixture components.

  12. Gas-discharge probe microscopy of water-carrying channels in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.; Ivanova, E. I.

    2012-04-01

    We have used a gas-discharge imaging technique to study the water transport channels (tracheids) in wood samples. Results obtained for the samples of bitch and aspen show features of this variant of the probe microscopy and show its additional possibilities as compared to optical microscopy. It is concluded that gas-discharge probe microscopy can be used for additional diagnostics of the structure of plant and animal tissues.

  13. Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved barrier discharge produced in trapped helium gas at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chiper, Alina Silvia; Popa, Gheorghe

    2013-06-07

    Experimental study was made on induced effects by trapped helium gas in the pulsed positive dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating in symmetrical electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. Using fast photography technique and electrical measurements, the differences in the discharge regimes between the stationary and the flowing helium are investigated. It was shown experimentally that the trapped gas atmosphere (TGA) has notable impact on the barrier discharge regime compared with the influence of the flowing gas atmosphere. According to our experimental results, the DBD discharge produced in trapped helium gas can be categorized as a multi-glow (pseudo-glow) discharge, each discharge working in the sub-normal glow regime. This conclusion is made by considering the duration of current pulse (few {mu}s), their maximum values (tens of mA), the presence of negative slope on the voltage-current characteristic, and the spatio-temporal evolution of the most representative excited species in the discharge gap. The paper focuses on the space-time distribution of the active species with a view to better understand the pseudo-glow discharge mechanism. The physical basis for these effects was suggested. A transition to filamentary discharge is suppressed in TGA mode due to the formation of supplementary source of seed electrons by surface processes (by desorption of electrons due to vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, originated from barriers surfaces) rather than volume processes (by enhanced Penning ionisation). Finally, we show that the pseudo-glow discharge can be generated by working gas trapping only; maintaining unchanged all the electrical and constructive parameters.

  14. The Role of Molecules in Low Temperature Plasmas for Lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Lapatovich, Walter P.

    2007-04-06

    High intensity discharge (HID) lamps are low temperature ({approx}0.5eV), weakly ionized plasmas sustained in a refractory but light transmissive envelope for the purpose of converting electrical power into visible radiation. For commercial applications this conversion must occur with good efficiency and with sufficient spectral content throughout the visible (380-780nm) to permit the light so generated to render colors in a fashion comparable to natural sunlight. These goals are often achieved by adding multiple metals to a basic mercury discharge. Because the vapor pressure of most metals is very much lower than mercury itself, chemical compounds containing the desired metals, and having higher vapor pressures are used to introduce the material into the basic discharge. Complexing agents which further improve the vapor pressure are used to enhance the amount of metals in the discharge. The metal compound and complexes are usually polyatomic species which vaporize and subsequently dissociate as they diffuse into the bulk plasma. Under the approximation of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) the particles are in equilibrium, but not with the radiation Held. Strong thermal (106K/m) and density gradients are sustained in the discharge. Atomic and molecular radiation produced in the high temperature core transits through colder gas regions before exiting the lamp. In these regions where the complex molecular species exists in an undissociated state, bound-free transitions can result in energy being effectively converted from light radiation into heat in the mantle. Bound-bound transitions In Identifiable molecules can result in modification of the spectral output in unpredictable and counter-intuitive ways. Examples of completing agents and their effect on the spectral output of typical rare-earth containing HID lamps will be given. The melt composition and the complexing agents themselves may change with time, as chemical reactions in the lamp occur, and their

  15. Broad beam gas ion source with hollow cathode discharge and four-grid accelerator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Deli; Pu, Shihao; Huang, Qi; Tong, Honghui; Cui, Xirong; Chu, Paul K.

    2007-04-01

    A broad beam gas ion source based on low-pressure hollow cathode glow discharge is described. An axial magnetic filed produced by AlNiCo permanent magnets enhances the glow discharge in the ion source as a result of the magnetizing electrons between the hollow cathode and rod anode. The gas plasma is produced by magnetron hollow cathode glow discharge in the hollow cathode and a collimated broad ion beam is extracted by a four-grid accelerator system. A weak magnetic field of several millitesla is enough to ignite the magnetron glow discharge at pressure lower than 0.1 Pa, thereby enabling stable and continuous high-current discharge to form the homogeneous plasma. A four-grid accelerator, which separates the extraction and acceleration of the ion beam, is used in this design to generate the high-energy ion beam from 10 keV to 60 keV at a working pressure of 10-4 Torr. Although a higher gas pressure is necessary to maintain the low-pressure glow discharge when compared to hot filament discharge, the hollow cathode ion source is operational with reactive gases such as oxygen in the high-voltage continuous mode. A laterally uniform ion beam can be achieved by using the four-grid accelerator system. The effects of the rod anode length on the characteristics of the plasma discharge as well as ion beam extraction from the ion source are discussed.

  16. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; Gannon, J.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  17. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Chui, T.; Croonquist, A.; Larson, M.; Liu, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  18. The low temperature microgravity physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Croonquist, A P.; Liu, F. C.; Larson, M. E.; Chui, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  19. Nitrogen-related effects on low-temperature electronic properties of two-dimensional electron gas in very dilute nitride GaNxAs1-x/AlGaAs (x = 0 and 0.08%) modulation-doped heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mootabian, Mahnaz; Eshghi, Hosein

    2013-07-01

    The low-temperature (4 K) two-dimensional (2D) electron gas mobility data versus carrier concentration in the modulation-doped dilute nitride GaAs1-xNx/Al0.3Ga0.7As (x = 0 and 0.08%) heterostructures are analyzed. Theoretical analysis is based on Fermi-Dirac statistics for the occupation of the quantum confined electronic states in the triangular quantum wells and the width of the quantum well versus 2D concentration. In addition, the mobility analysis is based on Matthiessen's rule for various scattering mechanisms. We found that the N-related neutral cluster alloy scattering together with crystal dislocations created at the interface strongly affects the electrons' mobility in the N-contained channel sample. We also found that as the electron concentration in the well increases from ˜1 × 1011 to 3.5 × 1011 cm-2 the carriers mainly occupy the first subband, tending to remain closer and closer to the hetero-interface.

  20. Electron decoherence at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2001-03-01

    Electron decoherence is fundamental to condensed matter physics. Our understanding of metals and insulators in the Fermi-liquid framework relies entirely on a diverging decoherence rate 1/τ_φ at low temperatures, which is expected to vanish at T=0. However, recent experiments find that 1/τ_φ saturates at low temperatures [1-2]. We review these measurements on a variety of mesoscopic systems (in 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D) as well as the control experiments used to check for various artifacts [1-3]. We emphasize the connection between the temperature-independent decoherence rate and persistent current in normal metals [4]. We briefly discuss decoherence induced by dynamic defects or two-level systems [5,6], including its relevance--or lack thereof---to the experiments on metallic wires [2]. Saturation of decohrence rate is argued to be present in---and relevant to---the following phenomena: metal-insulator transition in 2D [7,8], superconductor-insulator transition in 2D [9], quantum-Hall-insulator transition [10], transport through superconductor/normal-metal hybrid junctions [11], normal-state resistivity of high Tc superconductors [12], persistent current in normal metals [4], and energy relaxation in normal metals [13]. [1] P. Mohanty, Physica B 280, 446 (2000). [2] P. Mohanty, E.M.Q. Jariwala, R. Webb, PRL 78, 3366 (1997); PRB 55, R13542 (1997). [3] P. Mohanty, R. Webb, PRL 84, 4481 (2000). [4] P. Mohanty, Ann. Phys. 8, 549 (1999). [5] P. Mohanty, M.L. Roukes (to be published). [6] K. Ahn, P. Mohanty, cond-mat/ 0011139. [7] S. Kravchenko et al. PRB 50, 8039 (1994). [8] G. Brunthaler, A. Prinz, G. Bauer, V. Pudalov, cond-mat/0007230. [9] A. Kapitulnik, N. Mason, S. Kivelson, S. Chakravarty, cond-mat/0008005. [10] D. Shahar, D. Tsui, M. Shayegan, J. Cunningham, E. Shimsoni, S. Sondhi, SSC. 102, 817 (1997). [11] A. Vaknin, A. Frydman, Z. Ovadyahu, PRB 61, 13037 (2000). [12] P. Fournier et al., PRB 62, R11993 (2000). [13] A. Gougam, F. Pierre, H. Pothier, D. Esteve, N

  1. Impact of gas flow rate on breakdown of filamentary dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höft, H.; Becker, M. M.; Kettlitz, M.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of gas flow rate on breakdown properties and stability of pulsed dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in a single filament arrangement using a gas mixture of 0.1 vol. % O2 in N2 at atmospheric pressure was investigated by means of electrical and optical diagnostics, accompanied by fluid dynamics and electrostatics simulations. A higher flow rate perpendicular to the electrode symmetry axis resulted in an increased breakdown voltage and DBD current maximum, a higher discharge inception jitter, and a larger emission diameter of the discharge channel. In addition, a shift of the filament position for low gas flow rates with respect to the electrode symmetry axis was observed. These effects can be explained by the change of the residence time of charge carriers in the discharge region—i.e., the volume pre-ionization—for changed flow conditions due to the convective transport of particles out of the center of the gap.

  2. Initiation of long, free-standing Z-discharges by CO2 laser gas heating

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, C.; Tauschwitz, A.; Penache, D.; Neff, S.; Knobloch, R.; Birkner, R.; Presura, R.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Yu, S.S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2004-04-19

    High current discharge channels can neutralize both current and space charge of very intense ion beams. Therefore they are considered as an interesting alternative for the final focus and beam transport in a heavy ion beam fusion reactor. At the GSI accelerator facility, 50 cm long, stable, free-standing discharge channels with currents in excess of 40 kA in 2 to 25 mbar ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas are investigated for heavy ion beam transport studies. The discharges are initiated by a CO{sub 2} laser pulse along the channel axis before the discharge is triggered. Resonant absorption of the laser, tuned to the {nu}{sub 2} vibration of the ammonia molecule, causes strong gas heating. Subsequent expansion and rarefaction of the gas prepare the conditions for a stable discharge to fulfill the requirements for ion beam transport. This paper describes the laser-gas interaction and the discharge initiation mechanism. We report on the channel stability and evolution, measured by fast shutter and streak imaging techniques. The rarefaction of the laser heated gas is studied by means of a hydrocode simulation.

  3. Overview of low temperature sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.J.; McCright, R.D.

    1983-12-01

    A review of the literature on low temperature sensitization (LTS) has been conducted to determine if LTS-related microstructural changes can occur in Type 304L stainless steel within the times and temperatures associated with nuclear waste storage. It was found that Type 304L stainless steel is susceptible to sensitization and LTS, and that cold work plays an important role in determining the rate of LTS. Severely cold worked Type 304L stainless steel would clearly develop LTS-related microstructural changes within the times and temperatures associated with nuclear waste storage. These changes could lead to increased susceptibility to corrosion. Significant improvements in the long-term resistance to sensitization, LTS and corrosion can be achieved by modest changes in alloy composition and fabrication practices. Therefore, Type 304L would not be the preferred alloy of construction for nuclear waste storage canisters. The final qualification of an alternate canister alloy should involve corrosion experiments on actual canisters. Suggestions for alternate canister alloys are 316L, 316LN, 316ELC, 347, and XM-19. 47 references, 4 figures.

  4. Evaluation of Low Temperature CO Removal Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    CO removal from spacecraft gas streams was evaluated for three commercial, low temperature oxidation catalysts: Carulite 300, Sofnocat 423, and Hamilton Sundstrand Pt1. The catalysts were challenged with CO concentrations (1-100 ppm) under dry and wet (50% humidity) conditions using 2-3 % O2. CO removal and CO2 concentration were measured at constant feed composition using a FTIR. Water vapor affected the CO conversion of each catalyst differently. An initial screening found that Caulite 300 could not operate in humid conditions. The presence of water vapor affected CO conversion of Sofnocat 423 for challenge concentrations below 40 ppm. The conversion of CO by Sofnocat 423 was 80% at CO concentrations greater than 40 ppm under both dry and moist conditions. The HS Pt1 catalyst exhibited CO conversion levels of 100% under both dry and moist conditions.

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and Testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thin electrolytes and porous LSM substrates. Both of these tasks are essentially on or ahead of schedule. In our proposal, we suggested that the ZrO{sub 2}/Sc system needed to be considered as a candidate as a thin electrolyte. This was because microcrystalline ZrO{sub 2}/Sc has a significantly higher ionic conductivity than YSZ, particularly at the lower temperatures. As a result, some 0.5 micron thick film of ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc on an alumina substrate (grain size 20nm) was prepared and the electrical conductivity measured as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} certainly has a higher conductivity that either 20nm or 2400nm YSZ, however, electronic conductivity dominates the conductivity for oxygen activities below 10{sup -15}. Whereas for YSZ, electronic conductivity is not a problem until the oxygen activity decreases below 10{sup -25}. These initial results show that the ionic conductivity of 20nm YSZ and 20nm ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc are essentially the same and the enhanced conductivity which is observed for Sc doping in microcrystalline specimens is not observed for the same composition when it is nanocrystalline. In addition they show that the electronic conductivity of Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that observed for YSZ. The conclusion one reaches is that for 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films, Sc doping of ZrO{sub 2} has no benefits compared to YSZ. As a result, electrolyte films of ZrO{sub 2}/Sc should not be considered as candidates

  6. Silicon Vibrating Wires at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Eddy; Filleau, Laure; Fournier, Thierry; Bunkov, Yuriy M.; Godfrin, Henri

    2008-03-01

    Nowadays microfabrication techniques originating from micro-electro nics enable to create mechanical objects of micron-size. The field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical devices (MEMs) is continuously expanding, with an amazingly broad range of applications at room temperature. Vibrating objects (torsional oscillators, vibrating wires) widely used at low temperatures to study quantum fluids, can be replaced advantageously by Silicon MEMs. In this letter we report on the study of Silicon vibrating wire devices. A goal-post structure covered with a metal layer is driven at resonance by the Laplace force acting on a current in a magnetic field, while the induced voltage arising from the cut magnetic flux allows to detect the motion. The characteristics of the resonance have been studied from 10 mK to 30 K, in vacuum and in 4He gas. In this article, we focus on the results obtained above 1.5 K, in vacuum and gas, and introduce some features observed at lower temperatures. The resonant properties can be quantitatively understood by means of simple models, from the linear regime to a highly non-linear response at strong drives. We demonstrate that the non-linearity is mostly due to the geometry of the vibrators. We also show that in our device the friction mechanisms originate in the metallic layers, and can be fully characterized. The interaction with 4He gas is fit to theory without adjustable parameters.

  7. Spark discharge method of liquid rare-gas purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokachalov, S. G.; Kirsanov, M. A.; Kruglov, A. A.; Obodovski, I. M.

    1993-03-01

    The spark disharge method of liquid rare-gas purification is describe. The method is sufficiently more simple than those widely used. Physical aspects of the method are discussed, and examples of its application are presented.

  8. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  9. Gas Breakdown of Radio Frequency Glow Discharges in Helium at near Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinkun; Xu, Jinzhou; Cui, Tongfei; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun

    2013-07-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was developed for radio frequency glow discharge in helium at near atmospheric pressure, and was employed to study the gas breakdown characteristics in terms of breakdown voltage. The effective secondary electron emission coefficient and the effective electric field for ions were demonstrated to be important for determining the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge at near atmospheric pressure. The constant of A was estimated to be 64±4 cm-1Torr-1, which was proportional to the first Townsend coefficient and could be employed to evaluate the gas breakdown voltage. The reduction in the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge with excitation frequency was studied and attributed to the electron trapping effect in the discharge gap.

  10. Low Temperature Water–gas Shift: Differences in Oxidation States Observed with Partially Reduced Pt/MnOX and Pt/CeOX Catalysts Yield Differences in OH Group Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, M.; Jacobs, G; Graham, U; Azzam, K; Linganiso, L; Davis, B

    2010-01-01

    The Pt-ceria synergy may be described as the dehydrogenation of formate formed on the surface of the partially reducible oxide (PRO), ceria, by Pt across the interface, with H{sub 2}O participating in the transition state. However, due to the rising costs of rare earth oxides like ceria, replacement by a less expensive partially reducible oxide, like manganese oxide, is desirable. In this contribution, a comparison between Pt/ceria and Pt/manganese oxide catalysts possessing comparable Pt dispersions reveals that there are significant differences and certain similarities in the nature of the two Pt/PRO catalysts. With ceria, partial reduction involves reduction of the oxide surface shell, with Ce{sup 3+} at the surface and Ce{sup 4+} in the bulk. In the case of manganese oxide, partial reduction results in a mixture of Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}, with Mn{sup 2+} located at the surface. With Pt/CeO{sub X}, a high density of defect-associated bridging OH groups react with CO to yield a high density of the formate intermediate. With Pt/MnO{sub X}, the fraction of reactive OH groups is low and much lower formate band intensities result upon CO adsorption; moreover, there is a greater fraction of OH groups that are essentially unreactive. Thus, much lower CO conversion rates are observed with Pt/MnO{sub X} during low temperature water-gas shift. As with ceria, increasing the Pt loading facilitates partial reduction of MnO{sub X} to lower temperature, indicating metal-oxide interactions should be taken into account.

  11. Combined effects Na and SO2 in flue gas on Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalyst for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 simulated by Na2SO4 doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Aiyi; Yu, Danqing; Yang, Liu; Sheng, Zhongyi

    2016-08-01

    A series of Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalysts were synthesized through an impregnation method and used for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia (NH3). Na2SO4 was added into the catalyst to simulate the combined effects of alkali metal and SO2 in the flue gas. Experimental results showed that Na2SO4 had strong and fluctuant influence on the activity of Mn-Ce/TiO2, because the effect of Na2SO4 included pore occlusion and sulfation effect simultaneously. When Na2SO4 loading content increased from 0 to 1 wt.%, the SCR activities of Na2SO4-doped catalysts decreased greatly. With further increasing amount of Na2SO4, however, the catalytic activity increased gradually. XRD results showed that Na2SO4 doping could induce the crystallization of MnOx phases, which were also confirmed by TEM and SEM results. BET results showed that the surface areas decreased and a new bimodal mesoporous structure formed gradually with the increasing amount of Na2SO4. XPS results indicated that part of Ce4+ and Mn3+ were transferred to Ce3+ and Mn4+ due to the sulfation after Na2SO4 deposition on the surface of the catalysts. When the doped amounts of Na2SO4 increased, NH3-TPD results showed that the Lewis acid sites decreased and the Brønsted acid sites of Mn-Ce/TiO2 increased quickly, which could be considered as another reason for the observed changes in the catalytic activity. The decreased Mn and Ce atomic concentration, the changes of their oxidative states, and the variation in acidic properties on the surface of Na2SO4-doped catalysts could be the reasons for the fluctuant changes of the catalytic activity.

  12. Toxic Gas Removal by Dielectric Discharge with Corona Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, H.; Pacheco, M.; Mercado, A.; Cruz, A.; Pacheco, J.; Yousfi, M.; Eichwald, O.; Benhenni, M.

    2006-12-04

    In this work, a theoretical and experimental study on SO2 and NOx removal by non-thermal plasma technology, more specifically a dielectric barrier (DBD) discharge combined with the Corona effect, is presented. Results obtained from a theoretical study describe the chemical kinetic model of SO2 and NOx removal processes; the effect of OH radicals in removal of both gases is noteworthy. Experimental results of de-SO2 process are reported. Also, optical emission spectroscopy study was applied on some atomic helium lines to obtain temperature of electrons in the non-thermal plasma.

  13. Fault and partial discharge location systems for gas-insulated transmission lines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.A.; Ford, G.L.; Fujimoto, N.; Stone, G.C.

    1983-12-01

    Partial discharge and faults in gas-insulated transmission line (GITL) can be difficult to locate. This report describes the development, testing, and application of systems for fault and partial discharge location in GITL. Both systems are based on timing of electromagnetic transients generated by a fault/partial discharge source. Both systems employ microcomputers to facilitate automated data acquisition and analysis. The major problems solved in developing the fault location system were coupling of high frequency signals from and between phases and isolation of high voltage short risetime signals from high speed digital logic. The problems addressed in the partial discharge location project include handling a large number of pulses which may include noise, the large dynamic range of partial discharge induced transients (> 80 dB), and achieving an accurate correlation resolution of 2 ns.

  14. Dynamics of dielectric barrier discharge in non-uniform gas composition investigated by laser spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Ito, Yosuke; Choi, Joon-Young; Sakai, Osamu; Tachibana, Kunihide

    2009-10-01

    It is well known that stable and glow dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure is observed using helium gas and AC high voltage of kHz-order frequency. We have investigated the discharge mechanisms of DBDs from a view point of the spatiotemporal distributions of excited species measured by laser spectroscopic methods. In this presentation, we will show convincing arguments about the discharge model of the DBD especially having the non-uniformity of gas composition. As a DBD plasma source for atmospheric pressure processes, we have investigated an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using helium gas flow in ambient air, and this plasma source can be regarded as the DBD near the boundary interface of helium gas and ambient air. In this APPJ, we observed spatiotemporal distributions of excited species density inside the helium gas channel, using laser absorption spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence, to measure the densities of helium metastable atom (2^3S1 state) and nitrogen ion (X^2σg^+ state) respectively. To study the influence of nitrogen gas contamination on the discharge profile of DBD, we have also applied CO2-laser heterodyne interferometry to measure the special distribution of electron density in parallel-plate DBD.

  15. Advanced low-temperature sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.; Venkataramani, V.S.; Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.

    1995-12-01

    A number of promising technologies are currently being optimized for coal-based power generation, including the Integrated-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. If IGCC is to be used successfully for power generation, an economic and efficient way must be found to remove the contaminants, particularly sulfur species, found in coal gas. Except for the hot gas desulfurization system, all major components of IGCC are commercially available or have been shown to meet system requirements. Over the last two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has sponsored development of various configurations of high-temperature desulfurization systems including fixed-bed, moving-bed, transport-bed, and fluidized-bed systems. Because of their mode of operation and requirements for sorbent manufacturing, the fixed-bed systems can generally use the same materials as moving-bed configurations, i.e., pelletized or extruded sorbents, while fluidized-bed (circulating or bubbling configurations) and transport reactor configurations use materials generally described as agglomerated or granulated.The objective of this program is to remove hydrogen sulfides from coal gas using sorbent materials.

  16. Application of neural networks in identification of various types of partial discharges in gas insulated substations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, K. K.; Adikesavulu, A. K.; Singh, B. P.; Eswaran, Kumar

    2000-03-01

    Gas Insulated substations (GIS) up to 500kV class have been widely accepted over conventional air insulated substation due to several advantages. However, the presence of floating metal particles and protrusions within the GIS at various locations could seriously affect the performance. The paper describes the method of detection of partial discharges for various type of discharging sources e.g. floating particles, protrusions of high voltage conductor and particles sticking on the surface of insulator. In order to identify the discharge source, a Neural Network program is developed to classify each of the above source on the basis of its characteristic pattern.

  17. Rapid Decomposition of Cellulose Dissolved in Ionic Liquid Using Gas-Liquid Interface Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Shoichiro; Inoue, Nobuhiro; Ishioka, Toshio; Furuya, Kenji; Harata, Akira

    2012-07-01

    Cellulose was dissolved at 3 wt % in 15 mL of 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl) together with 2 wt % water, and then gas-liquid interface discharge was carried out at 20 W for 200 s. As a result, 7.6% of initially dissolved cellulose decomposed and 3.9% of initially dissolved cellulose changed into reducing sugar. Adding a small amount of water to the solution was essential for the decomposition of cellulose. [Amim]Cl was stable against the discharge, as determined from the NMR signals measured before and after the discharge.

  18. Pulsed microwave discharge in a capillary filled with atmospheric-pressure gas

    SciTech Connect

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Gushchin, P. A.; Davydov, A. M.; Ivanov, E. V.; Kossyi, I. A.

    2013-08-15

    A pulsed microwave coaxial capillary plasma source generating a thin plasma filament along the capillary axis in an atmospheric-pressure argon flow is described. The dynamics of filament formation is studied, and the parameters of the gas and plasma in the contraction region are determined. A physical model of discharge formation and propagation is proposed. The model is based on the assumption that, under the conditions in which the electric fields is substantially below the threshold value, the discharge operates in a specific form known as a self-sustained-non-self-sustained (SNS) microwave discharge.

  19. Effects of Gas Flow Rate on the Discharge Characteristics of a DC Excited Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong; Bao, Wenting; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-09-01

    A direct current (DC) source excited plasma jet consisting of a hollow needle anode and a plate cathode has been developed to form a diffuse discharge plume in ambient air with flowing argon as the working gas. Using optical and electrical methods, the discharge characteristics are investigated for the diffuse plasma plume. Results indicate that the discharge has a pulse characteristic, under the excitation of a DC voltage. The discharge pulse corresponds to the propagation process of a plasma bullet travelling from the anode to the cathode. It is found that, with an increment of the gas flow rate, both the discharge plume length and the current peak value of the pulsed discharge decrease in the laminar flow mode, reach their minima at about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly increase in the turbulent mode. However, the frequency of the pulsed discharge increases in the laminar mode with increasing the argon flow rate until the argon flow rate equals to about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly decreases in the turbulent mode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805013, 11375051), Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012201045), Department of Education for Outstanding Youth Project of China (No. Y2011120), and Youth Project of Hebei University of China (No. 2011Q14)

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2000-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Microstructural changes in unsupported nanocrystalline yttrium stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, or YSZ) thin films were examined as a function of temperature and annealing time in order to determine the grain growth exponent and the mechanisms of pinhole formation. Grain growth and pinhole formation were measured using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), normal imaging mode transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Grain growth was found to vary with a time exponent of about one half before pinhole formation and about one third after. Pinhole formation in 70 nm thick films occurred at temperatures near 600 C, corresponding to a grain size of about 15 nm, or a grain size to film thickness ration of approximately 0.25. The deposition of films on porous substrates is hampered by the penetration of the polymer precursor solution into the substrate whose pores as > 0.2 {micro}m, therefore much attention has to be paid to the development of porous colloidal oxide films onto surfaces. Thus during this line period we have been studying these films. Optical properties have proven to be an excellent way to study the quality of these nanoporous films. The influence of porosity and densification on optical properties of films on sapphire substrates that were prepared from water colloidal suspensions of small ({approx}5nm) particles of ceria was investigated. The colloidal ceria films have initially very porous structure (porosity about 50%) and densification starts at about 600 C accompanied by

  1. Treatment of Dye Wastewater by Using a Hybrid Gas/Liquid Pulsed Discharge Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan; Masayuki, Sato

    2012-02-01

    A hybrid gas/liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor using a porous ceramic tube is proposed for dye wastewater treatment. High voltage pulsed discharge plasma was generated in the gas phase and simultaneously the plasma channel was permeated through the tiny holes of the ceramic tube into the water phase accompanied by gas bubbles. The porous ceramic tube not only separated the gas phase and liquid phase but also offered an effective plasma spreading channel. The effects of the peak pulse voltage, additive gas varieties, gas bubbling rate, solution conductivity and TiO2 addition were investigated. The results showed that this reactor was effective for dye wastewater treatment. The decoloration efficiency of Acid Orange II was enhanced with an increase in the power supplied. Under the studied conditions, 97% of Acid Orange II in aqueous solution was effectively decolored with additive oxygen gas, which was 51% higher than that with argon gas, and the increasing O2 bubbling rate also benefited the decoloration of dye wastewater. Water conductivity had a small effect on the level of decoloration. Catalysis of TiO2 could be induced by the pulsed discharge plasma and addition of TiO2 aided the decoloration of Acid Orange II.

  2. Low Temperature Catalyst for NH3 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar; Melendez, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Air revitalization technologies maintain a safe atmosphere inside spacecraft by the removal of C02, ammonia (NH3), and trace contaminants. NH3 onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is produced by crew metabolism, payloads, or during an accidental release of thermal control refrigerant. Currently, the ISS relies on removing NH3 via humidity condensate and the crew wears hooded respirators during emergencies. A different approach to cabin NH3 removal is to use selective catalytic oxidation (SCO), which builds on thermal catalytic oxidation concepts that could be incorporated into the existing TCCS process equipment architecture on ISS. A low temperature platinum-based catalyst (LTP-Catalyst) developed at KSC was used for converting NH3 to H20 and N2 gas by SCO. The challenge of implementing SCO is to reduce formation of undesirable byproducts like NOx (N20 and NO). Gas mixture analysis was conducted using FTIR spectrometry in the Regenerable VOC Control System (RVCS) Testbed. The RVCS was modified by adding a 66 L semi-sealed chamber, and a custom NH3 generator. The effect of temperature on NH3 removal using the LTP-Catalyst was examined. A suitable temperature was found where NH3 removal did not produce toxic NO, (NO, N02) and N20 formation was reduced.

  3. Bending behavior of prestressed-concrete beams at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, T.; Imai, M.; Nagasawa, Y.; Kunishima, M.

    1982-01-01

    The report describes the results of experimental studies on the bending behavior and creep characteristics of prestressed concrete beams at temperatures from -100 C to +20 C. In addition, the mechanical properties pertinent to the design of liquified natural gas storage tanks, at low temperatures, is investigated.

  4. Low-temperature sterilization alternatives in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P. . Surgical Div.)

    1994-01-01

    Vapor phase hydrogen peroxide, gas plasma, ozone, and peracetic acids have been commercialized as alternative technologies for low-temperature sterilization. None are viewed as a total replacement for ethylene oxide for on-site sterilization of reusable, heat-sensitive medical materials in healthcare facilities.

  5. Low-Temperature Extraction of Oil From Shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Technique increases recovery and energy efficiency. Advantages of method greater product yield and, because of the relatively low temperatures, minimal gas formation, smaller amounts of char byproduct, and less carbonate-rock decomposition. Up to 94 percent by weight of organic material in shale extracted.

  6. Low Temperature Detectors: Principles and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, G. C.

    2009-12-16

    Despite the added cost and complexity of operating at sub-Kelvin temperatures, there are many measurement applications where the sensitivity and precision provided by low temperature detectors greatly outweigh any disadvantages. As a result, low temperature detectors are now finding wide application for measurements ranging from cosmology to homeland defense. In this tutorial I will introduce the basic operating principles and fundamental performance limits of several types of low temperature detectors.

  7. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make

  8. Low temperature performance of lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, E. S.; Tuhovak, D. R.; Post, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells for low temperature applications have been developed. Prismatic and spirally wound AA cells were tested under constant load discharge of 0.3 to 1.8 amps or pulse discharge of 0.225 or 1.0 amps at temperatures from -40 to 25 C. At -40 C with current densities of 2.5 mA/cm2, 23 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under constant load discharge and 40 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under pulse test. Self-discharge estimates of 0.7 percent per year at 25 C were obtained from microcalorimetry. Preliminary safety testing of the cells revealed no violent performance under short circuit or crush tests.

  9. Ring-shaped electric discharge as an igniter of gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhudarov, E. M.; Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Popov, N. A.; Taktakishvili, M. I.; Temchin, S. M.

    2010-09-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of ignition of a stoichiometric methane-oxygen mixture in a closed chamber by a ring electric discharge. It is shown that the process of fast (explosive) ignition of the reactor volume starts on the axis of the ring, near its centre, i.e. at a distance from the annular region of power deposition. Experimental evidence suggests that the ignition of a combustible gas mixture near the axis is triggered by strong gas-dynamic perturbations converging to the axis, radially propagating from the ring discharger.

  10. Binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in glow discharge closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, S.R.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1988-04-27

    Highly efficient binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches are disclosed. The binary mixtures are combinations of helium or neon and selected perfluorides. The ternary mixtures are combinations of helium, neon, or argon, a selected perfluoride, and a small amount of gas that exhibits enhanced ionization characteristics. These mixtures are shown to be the optimum choices for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches by virtue if the combines physio-electric properties of the mixture components. 9 figs.

  11. Method for visualizing gas temperature distributions around hypersonic vehicles by using electric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Masatomi

    1993-06-01

    A method for visualizing qualitative gas temperature distributions around hypersonic vehicles by taking a photograph of the electric discharge is proposed. A gas temperature distribution over a slightly blunted wedge is visualized using the electric discharge generated by a pair of point-line electrodes. A hypersonic tunnel used for the experiment is characterized by Mach 10, a freestream duration of 10 ms, and a stagnation temperature of the tunnel barrel of 1000 K. It is concluded that the photograph shows a radiation spectrum contrast near the model surface, from which a temperature layer is seen.

  12. Employing partially coherent, compact gas-discharge sources for coherent diffractive imaging with extreme ultraviolet light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bußmann, J.; Odstrčil, M.; Bresenitz, R.; Rudolf, D.; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W. S.; Grützmacher, D.; Juschkin, L.

    2015-09-01

    Coherent diffractive imaging (CDI) and related techniques enable a new type of diffraction-limited high-resolution extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy. Here, we demonstrate CDI reconstruction of a complex valued object under illumination by a compact gas-discharge EUV light source emitting at 17.3 nm (O VI spectral line). The image reconstruction method accounts for the partial spatial coherence of the radiation and allows imaging even with residual background light. These results are a first step towards laboratory-scale CDI with a gas-discharge light source for applications including mask inspection for EUV lithography, metrology and astronomy.

  13. TOPICAL REVIEW: Optical emission spectroscopy in low-temperature plasmas containing argon and nitrogen: determination of the electron temperature and density by the line-ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2010-10-01

    This article reviews a variety of methods to obtain the electron temperature and density by the emission line ratios for low-temperature plasmas containing argon or nitrogen gas. Based on the collisional-radiative model of excited particles, the underlying principle of each of these methods is described, along with the criterion on how to select an appropriate line-ratio method according to the discharge conditions. Limitations on the application of each line-ratio technique are also discussed.

  14. Miniaturized Argon Plasma: Neutral Gas Characteristics in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Farahat

    2015-10-01

    Plasma-neutral gas dynamics is computationally investigated in a miniaturized microthruster that encloses Ar and contains dielectric material sandwiched between two metal plates using a two-dimensional plasma mode. Spatial and temporal plasma properties are investigated by solving the Poisson equation with the conservation equations of charged and excited neutral plasma species using the COMSOL Multiphysics 4.2b. The microthruster property is found to depend on the secondary electron emission coefficient. The electrohydrodynamic force (EHD) is calculated and found to be significant in the sheath area near the dielectric layer and is found to affect gas flow dynamics including the Ar excimer formation and density. The effects of pressure and secondary emission coefficient are discussed. The plasma characteristics are affected by small changes in the secondary electron emission coefficient, which could result from the dielectric erosion and aging, and is found to affect the electrohydrodynamic force produced when the microthruster is used to produce thrust for a small spacecraft.

  15. Observation of charge separation and gas discharge during sliding friction between metals and insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, T.

    2015-10-01

    Charge generation due to friction between stainless steel and fused quartz in a vacuum was measured, and it was found that the density of the charge separation at the friction contact was 4×10-4 C/m2 In experiments in ambient gas, reduction of the separated charge caused by microgap gas discharge was observed. The residual rate of the charge, which is the ratio of charge accumulation in an ambient gas to that in a vacuum, in argon ambient gas was small, and it seemed to be effective for the relaxation of generated static electricity due to friction between solids.

  16. CORONA DISCHARGE IGNITION FOR ADVANCED STATIONARY NATURAL GAS ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul D. Ronney

    2003-09-12

    An ignition source was constructed that is capable of producing a pulsed corona discharge for the purpose of igniting mixtures in a test chamber. This corona generator is adaptable for use as the ignition source for one cylinder on a test engine. The first tests were performed in a cylindrical shaped chamber to study the characteristics of the corona and analyze various electrode geometries. Next a test chamber was constructed that closely represented the dimensions of the combustion chamber of the test engine at USC. Combustion tests were performed in this chamber and various electrode diameters and geometries were tested. The data acquisition and control system hardware for the USC engine lab was updated with new equipment. New software was also developed to perform the engine control and data acquisition functions. Work is underway to design a corona electrode that will fit in the new test engine and be capable igniting the mixture in one cylinder at first and eventually in all four cylinders. A test engine was purchased for the project that has two spark plug ports per cylinder. With this configuration it will be possible to switch between corona ignition and conventional spark plug ignition without making any mechanical modifications.

  17. The gas conversion of methane with oxygen at atmospheric pressure using a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Tom; Petrovic, Dragana; de Bie, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annemie; Brok, Wouter; van Dijk, Jan

    2008-10-01

    The conversion of methane to useful chemicals and liquid fuels currently requires steam reforming, which requires great amounts of energy input. We are currently investigating the possibilities of using a plasma activated system for this gas conversion. Due to the pulsed nature and the low operating temperature capabilities, we have chosen the atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge as a setup to investigate whether it can be used as a more efficient gas conversion reactor. For this purpose we have developed a CH4/O2 chemical reaction set and used it in a 2D fluid model of a cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge, in which we also incorporate the influence of the gas flow. In this way we investigate whether we can optimize the production of methanol or formaldehyde. The parameters under study are the CH4/O2 ratio, the applied voltage characteristics, the gap width and the gas flow rate.

  18. Degradation of dyes by active species injected from a gas phase surface discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Tiecheng; Lu, Na; Zhang, Dandan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Tianwei; Sato, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    A reactor, based on the traditional gas phase surface discharge (GPSD), is designed for degradation of dye wastewater in this study. The reactor is characterized by using the dye wastewater as a ground electrode. A spiral discharge electrode of stainless steel wire attached on the inside wall of a cylindrical insulating medium and the wastewater surrounding the insulating medium for simultaneous cooling of the discharge electrode constitute the reactor. The active chemical radicals generated by the discharge of the spiral electrode are injected into the water with the carrier gas. The removal of three organic dyes (including methyl red (MR), reactive brilliant blue (RBB) and cationic red (CR)) in aqueous solution is investigated. The effects of electrode configuration, discharge voltage and solution pH value on the decoloration efficiency of MR are discussed. The experimental results show that over 95% of decoloration efficiencies for all the dyes are obtained after several minutes of plasma treatment. 40% of chemical oxygen demand removal of MR is obtained after 8 min of discharge treatment. Furthermore, it is found that ozone mainly affects the removal of dyes and several aliphatic compounds are identified as the oxidation products of MR. The possible degradation pathways of MR by GPSD are proposed.

  19. A powerful electrohydrodynamic flow generated by a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge in a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebogatkin, S. V.; Rebrov, I. E.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamshchikov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of an electrohydrodynamic flow induced by a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge distributed over a dielectric surface in a gas have been conducted. Dependences of the ion current, the gas flow velocity, and the spatial distributions thereof on the parameters of the power supply of the plasma ion emitter and an external electric field determined by the collector grid voltage have been described.

  20. Operation of FPGAs at Extremely Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Gary R.; Cozy, Scott; Lacayo, Veronica; Bakhshi, Alireza; Stern, Ryan; Mojarradi, Mohammad; Johnson, Travis; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Bolotin, Gary; Gregoire, Tim; Ramesham, Rajeshuni

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the operation of FPGAs at very low temperatures eg -160(deg)C. Both Actel and Xilinx parts are tested It was found that low temperature operations is not a problem with the parts tested, but there is a problem with powering on an FPGA at cold temperatures.

  1. Low Temperature Thermometry Using Inexpensive Silicon Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltham, N. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of silicon diodes for low temperature thermometry in the teaching laboratory. A simple and inexpensive circuit for display of the diode forward voltage under constant current conditions is described, and its application in the evaluation of low cost silicon diodes as low temperature thermometers is presented. (SK)

  2. Discharge characteristics and hydrodynamics behaviors of atmospheric plasma jets produced in various gas flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric nonequilibrium plasma jets have been widely employed in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, it is an important issue to understand the complicated mechanism of interaction of the plasma jet with liquid. In this study, we present analysis of the discharge characteristics of a plasma jet impinging onto the liquid surface under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. For this purpose, we analyzed gas flow patters by using a Schlieren gas-flow imaging system in detail The plasma jet impinging into the liquid surface expands along the liquid surface. The diameter of the expanded plasma increases with gas flow rate, which is well explained by an increase in the diameter of the laminar gas-flow channel. When the gas flow rate is further increased, the gas flow mode transits from laminar to turbulence in the gas flow channel, which leads to the shortening of the plasm-jet length. Our experiment demonstrated that the gas flow patterns strongly affect the discharge characteristics in the plasma-jet system. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  3. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Trottenberg, Thomas; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Kersten, Holger; Faupel, Franz

    2015-08-01

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  4. Three-dimensional numerical modelling of gas discharges at atmospheric pressure incorporating photoionization phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, L.; Metaxas, A. C.; Georghiou, G. E.

    2011-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model for the characterization of gas discharges in air at atmospheric pressure incorporating photoionization through the solution of the Helmholtz equation is presented. Initially, comparisons with a two-dimensional (2D) axi-symmetric model are performed in order to assess the validity of the model. Subsequently several discharge instabilities (plasma spots and low pressure inhomogeneities) are considered in order to study their effect on streamer branching and off-axis propagation. Depending on the magnitude and position of the plasma spot, deformations and off-axis propagation of the main discharge channel were obtained. No tendency for branching in small (of the order of 0.1 cm) overvolted discharge gaps was observed.

  5. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Faupel, Franz; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kersten, Holger

    2015-08-15

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  6. Spacecraft Charging in Low Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda N.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft charging in plasma and radiation environments is a temperature dependent phenomenon due to the reduction of electrical conductivity in dielectric materials at low temperatures. Charging time constants are proportional to l/conductivity may become very large (on the order of days to years) at low temperatures and accumulation of charge densities in insulators in charging environments traditionally considered benign at ambient temperatures may be sufficient to produce charge densities and electric fields of concern in insulators at low temperatures. Low temperature charging is of interest because a number of spacecraft-primarily infrared astronomy and microwave cosmology observatories-are currently being design, built, and or operated at very cold temperatures on the order of 40K to 100K. This paper reviews the temperature dependence of spacecraft charging processes and material parameters important to charging as a function of temperature with an emphasis on low temperatures regimes.

  7. Waveguide CO2 laser gain: Dependence on gas kinetic and discharge properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Using a simple rate equation approach the gas kinetic and discharge properties of waveguide CO2 lasers were examined. The dependence was calculated of the population inversion and laser small signal gain on gas pressure, gas mixture, pumping rate (discharge current), tube bore diameter, and wall temperature. At higher pressures the gain is optimized by using more helium rich mixtures and smaller bore diameters. The dependence of laser tunability on the gas kinetic properties and cavity losses was determined, it was found that for loss cavities the laser tunability may substantially exceed the molecular fullwidth at half maximum. The more helium rich gas mixtures give greater tunability when cavity losses are small and less tunability when cavity losses are large. The role of the various gases in the waveguide CO2 laser is the same as that in conventional devices, by contrast with conventional lasers, the waveguide laser transition is homogeneously broadened. The dependence of gain on gas pressure and other kinetic and discharge properties differs substantially from that predicted by scaling results from conventional low pressure lasers.

  8. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2010-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N{sub d} on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N{sub d} leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}, discharge current density 10{sup -1}-10{sup 1} mA/cm{sup 2}, and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 mum. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  9. Johann Wilhelm Hittorf and the material culture of nineteenth-century gas discharge research.

    PubMed

    Müller, Falk

    2011-06-01

    In the second half of the nineteenth century, gas discharge research was transformed from a playful and fragmented field into a new branch of physical science and technology. From the 1850s onwards, several technical innovations-powerful high-voltage supplies, the enhancement of glass-blowing skills, or the introduction of mercury air-pumps- allowed for a major extension of experimental practices and expansion of the phenomenological field. Gas discharge tubes served as containers in which resources from various disciplinary contexts could be brought together; along with the experimental apparatus built around them the tubes developed into increasingly complex interfaces mediating between the human senses and the micro-world. The focus of the following paper will be on the physicist and chemist Johann Wilhelm Hittorf (1824-1914), his educational background and his attempts to understand gaseous conduction as a process of interaction between electrical energy and matter. Hittorf started a long-term project in gas discharge research in the early 1860s. In his research he tried to combine a morphological exploration of gas discharge phenomena-aiming at the experimental production of a coherent phenomenological manifold--with the definition and precise measurements of physical properties. PMID:21879606

  10. 21 CFR 1020.20 - Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... as specified herein. (b) Definitions. Beam blocking device means a movable or removable portion of... prevent the emergence of an exit beam. Cold-cathode gas discharge tube means an electronic device in which... cathode. Exit beam means that portion of the radiation which passes through the aperture resulting...

  11. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  12. Development of prototype apparatus for creating ZnO at low temperatures using diethyl zinc and O- plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himura, Haruhiko; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Mizuike, Naruhiro; Kiyohara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    A new plasma process for fabricating impurity-free zinc oxide films and/or nanoparticles using diethyl zinc (DEZn) and negative oxygen (O-) plasmas at low temperatures has been proposed. To test it experimentally, a prototype apparatus has been developed. For the O- source, an intermittent discharge with 13.56 MHz radio frequency is employed. As the Zn precursor, DEZn is successfully transported to a reactor chamber without using any carrier gas. Initial results obtained using the developed apparatus are also discussed.

  13. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  14. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1990-01-01

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc.

  15. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1988-06-28

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc. 11 figs.

  16. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1990-06-26

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc. 11 figs.

  17. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  18. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature in Support of the NASA Cassini Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 and CH4, is the siege of a complex chemistry induced by solar UV radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere. This organic chemistry occurs at temperatures lower than 200 K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the orange haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed on the COSMIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames in order to study the different steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature and to provide laboratory data in support for Cassini data analysis. The chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is adiabatically cooled to Titan-like temperature (approx. 150 K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing N2, CH4, and the first products of the N2,-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, C6H6...) but also heavier molecules such as PAHs or nitrogen containing PAHs can be injected. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed. Here we present the results of recent gas phase and solid phase studies that highlight the chemical growth evolution when injecting heavier hydrocarbon trace elements in the initial N2-CH4 mixture. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, only the first steps of the chemistry have time to occur in a N2-CH4 discharge. However by adding acetylene and benzene to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, we can study the intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways. These results show the uniqueness of the THS experiment to help understand the first and intermediate steps of Titan fs atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways leading to Titan fs haze formation.

  19. Dimmable Electronic Ballast for a Gas Discharge Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raducanu, Marius; Hennings, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is the most efficient photocatalyst for organic oxidative degradation. TiO2 is effective not only in aqueous solution, but also in nonaqueous solvents and in the gas phase. It is photostable, biologically and chemically inert, and non-toxic. Low-energy UV light (approximately 375 nm, UV-A) can be used to photoactivate TiO2. TiO2 photocatalysis has been used to mineralize most types of organic compounds. Also, TiO2 photocatalysis has been effectively used in sterilization. This effectiveness has been demonstrated by its aggressive destruction of microorganisms, and aggressive oxidation effects of toxins. It also has been used for the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, and ammonia to nitrogen. Despite having many attractive features, advanced photocatalytic oxidation processes have not been effectively used for air cleaning. One of the limitations of the traditional photocatalytic systems is the ballast that powers (lights) the bulbs. Almost all commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) ballasts are not dimmable and do not contain safety features. COTS ballasts light the UV lamp as bright as the bulb can be lit, and this results in shorter bulb lifetime and maximal power consumption. COTS magnetic ballasts are bulky, heavy, and inefficient. Several iterations of dimmable electronic ballasts have been developed. Some manifestations have safety features such as broken-bulb or over-temperature warnings, replace-bulb alert, logbulb operational hours, etc. Several electronic ballast boards capable of independently lighting and controlling (dimming) four fluorescent (UV light) bulbs were designed, fabricated, and tested. Because of the variation in the market bulb parameters, the ballast boards were designed with a very broad range output. The ballast boards can measure and control the current (power) for each channel.

  20. Low power gas discharge plasma mediated inactivation and removal of biofilms formed on biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F.

    2013-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of gas discharge plasma has been studied for quiet some time. However, high biofilm inactivation activity of plasma was only recently reported. Studies indicate that the etching effect associated with plasmas generated represent an undesired effect, which may cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. Meanwhile, the strong etching effects from these high power plasmas may also alter the surface chemistry and affect the biocompatibility of biomaterials. In this study, we examined the efficiency and effectiveness of low power gas discharge plasma for biofilm inactivation and removal. Among the three tested gases, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon, discharge oxygen demonstrated the best anti-biofilm activity because of its excellent ability in killing bacteria in biofilms and mild etching effects. Low power discharge oxygen completely killed and then removed the dead bacteria from attached surface but had negligible effects on the biocompatibility of materials. DNA left on the regenerated surface after removal of biofilms did not have any negative impact on tissue cell growth. On the contrary, dramatically increased growth was found for these cells seeded on regenerated surfaces. These results demonstrate the potential applications of low power discharge oxygen in biofilm treatments of biomaterials and indwelling device decontaminations. PMID:23894232

  1. Emission spectroscopy of a microhollow cathode discharge plasma in helium-water gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Yamasaki, T.; Hane, Y.; Fukuhara, D.; Kozue, K.; Takiyama, K.

    2011-10-01

    A dc microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) plasma was generated inflowing helium gas containing water vapor. The cathode hole diameters were 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, and 2.0 mm, each with a length of 2.0 mm. Emission spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the discharge mode and to determine the plasma parameters. For the 0.3-mm cathode, stable MHCDs in an abnormal glow mode existed at pressures up to 100 kPa, whereas for larger diameters, a plasma was not generated at atmospheric pressure. An analysis of the lineshapes relevant to He at 667.8 nm and to H{alpha} at 656.3 nm implied an electron density and gas temperature of 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1100 K, respectively, for a 100-kPa discharge in the negative glow region. The dependence of the OH band, and H{alpha} intensities on the discharge current exhibited different behaviors. Specifically, the OH spectrum had a maximum intensity at a certain current, while the H atom intensity kept increasing with the discharge current. This observation implies that a high concentration of OH radicals results in quenching, leading to the production of H atoms via the reaction OH + e{sup -}{yields} O + H + e{sup -}.

  2. Improved Low Temperature Performance of Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Gnanaraj, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature double-layer capacitor operation enabled by: - Base acetonitrile / TEATFB salt formulation - Addition of low melting point formates, esters and cyclic ethers center dot Key electrolyte design factors: - Volume of co-solvent - Concentration of salt center dot Capacity increased through higher capacity electrodes: - Zeolite templated carbons - Asymmetric cell designs center dot Continuing efforts - Improve asymmetric cell performance at low temperature - Cycle life testing Motivation center dot Benchmark performance of commercial cells center dot Approaches for designing low temperature systems - Symmetric cells (activated carbon electrodes) - Symmetric cells (zeolite templated carbon electrodes) - Asymmetric cells (lithium titanate/activated carbon electrodes) center dot Experimental results center dot Summary

  3. Research of the DC discharge of He-Ne gas mixture in hollow core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinbing; Duan, Lian

    2013-09-01

    Since the first waveguide 0.633 μm He-Ne laser from a 20 cm length of 430 μm glass capillary was reported in 1971, no smaller waveguide gas laser has ever been constructed. Recently as the development of low loss hollow core PBG fiber, it is possible to constract a He-Ne lasers based on hollow-core PBG fibers. For the small diameter of the air hole, it is necessary to do some research to obtain glow discharge in hollow core fibers. In this paper, the experimental research of DC discharge in 200 μm bore diameter hollow core fibers was reported. Stable glow discharge was obained at varioue He-Ne mixtures from 4 Torr to 18 Torr. In order to obtain the plasma parameter of the discharge, the trace gasses of N2 and H2 were added to the He-Ne mixtures, the optical emission spectroscopy of the discharge was recorded by a PI 2750 spectroscopy with a CCD camera. The gas temperature (Tg) could be obtained by matching the simulated rovibronic band of the N2 emission with the observed spectrum in the ultraviolet region. The spectral method was also used to obtained the electron density, which is based on the analysis of the wavelength profile of the 486.13 nm Hβ line, and the electron temperature was obtain by Boltzmann plot methods. Experimental results show that it is very difficult to achieve DC discharge in bore diameter less than 50 μm, and a RF discharge method was proposed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (61078033).

  4. Size-controlled synthesis and gas sensing application of tungsten oxide nanostructures produced by arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Fang, F; Kennedy, J; Futter, J; Hopf, T; Markwitz, A; Manikandan, E; Henshaw, G

    2011-08-19

    Several different synthetic methods have been developed to fabricate tungsten oxide (WO(3)) nanostructures, but most of them require exotic reagents or are unsuitable for mass production. In this paper, we present a systematic investigation demonstrating that arc discharge is a fast and inexpensive synthesis method which can be used to produce high quality tungsten oxide nanostructures for NO(2) gas sensing measurements. The as-synthesized WO(3) nanostructures are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), finger-print Raman spectroscopy and proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE). The analysis shows that spheroidal-shaped monoclinic WO(3) crystal nanostructures were produced with an average diameter of 30 nm (range 10-100 nm) at an arc discharge current of 110 A and 300 Torr oxygen partial pressure. It is found that the morphology is controlled by the arc discharge parameters of current and oxygen partial pressure, e.g. a high arc discharge current combined with a low oxygen partial pressure results in small WO(3) nanostructures with improved conductivity. Sensors produced from the WO(3) nanostructures show a strong response to NO(2) gas at 325 °C. The ability to tune the morphology of the WO(3) nanostructures makes this method ideal for the fabrication of gas sensing materials. PMID:21778569

  5. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Gas-dynamic effects in the interaction of a motionless optical pulsating discharge with gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, V. N.; Grachev, G. N.; Pavlov, A. A.; Smirnov, A. L.; Pavlov, A. A.; Golubev, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of energy removal from the combustion zone of a motionless optical pulsating discharge in the horizontal direction along the axis of a repetitively pulsed laser beam producing the discharge is discovered. The directivity diagram of a hot gas flow is formed during the action of hundreds of pulses. The effect is observed for short pulse durations, when the discharge efficiently generates shock waves. For long pulse durations, the heated gas propagates upward, as in a thermal source.

  6. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment. PMID:26624519

  7. Singlet oxygen generation in gas discharge for oxygen-iodine laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopaev, D. V.; Braginsky, O. V.; Klopovsky, K. S.; Kovalev, A. S.; Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Popov, N. A.; Rakhimov, A. T.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Vasilieva, A. N.

    2004-09-01

    The possibility of development of effective discharged singlet oxygen (SO) generator (DSOG) for oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) is studied in detail. Researches of kinetics of oxygen atoms and oxygen molecules in the lowest metastable singlet states have been carried out in the different discharges and its afterglow (DC discharges, E-beam controlled discharge and RF discharges) in both CW and pulsed mode in a wide range of conditions (pressures, gas mixtures, energy deposits etc.). The models developed for all the discharges have allowed us to analyze SO generation and loss mechanisms and to find out the key-parameters controlling the highest SO yield. It is shown that in addition to spatial plasma uniformity at low E/N and high specific energy deposit per oxygen molecule, DSOG must be oxygen atom free to avoid fast three-body quenching of SO by atomic oxygen with increasing pressure and thereby to provide pressure scaling (in tens Torrs) for applying to real OIL systems.

  8. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-28

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ∼30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  9. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-01

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ˜30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  10. Gas laser for efficient sustaining a continuous optical discharge plasma in scientific and technological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zimakov, V P; Kuznetsov, V A; Kedrov, A Yu; Solov'ev, N G; Shemyakin, A N; Yakimov, M Yu

    2009-09-30

    A stable high-power laser is developed for the study and technical applications of a continuous optical discharge (COD). The laser based on the technology of a combined discharge in a scheme with a fast axial gas flow emits 2.2 kW at 10.6 {mu}m per meter of the active medium in continuous and repetitively pulsed regimes with the electrooptical efficiency 20%. The sustaining of the COD plasma in argon and air is demonstrated at the atmospheric pressure. The emission properties of the COD plasma are studied and its possible applications are discussed. (lasers)

  11. Two-Dimensional Plasma Density Distributions in Low-Pressure Gas Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, E.V.; Dvinin, S.A.; Mikheev, V.V.; Omarov, M.O.; Sviridkina, V. S.

    2004-12-15

    The plasma density distribution in a two-dimensional nonuniform positive column of a low-pressure gas discharge is studied in the hydrodynamic approximation with allowance for ion inertia. Exact solutions are derived for discharges in a rectangular and a cylindrical chamber. Asymptotic solutions near the coordinate origin and near the critical surface are considered. It is shown that, for potential plasma flows, the flow velocity component normal to the plasma boundary is equal to the ion acoustic velocity. The results obtained can be used to analyze the processes occurring in low-pressure plasmochemical reactors.

  12. Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Sterilization Shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhiraman, R. P.; Beeler, D.; Meyyappan, M.; Khare, B. N.

    2012-10-01

    Low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma sterilization shower to address both forward and backward biological contamination issues is presented. The molecular effects of plasma exposure required to sterilize microorganisms is also analysed.

  13. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  14. Li/CFx Cells Optimized for Low-Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Bhalla, Pooja; Smith, Kiah

    2009-01-01

    Some developments reported in prior NASA Tech Briefs articles on primary electrochemical power cells containing lithium anodes and fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx) cathodes have been combined to yield a product line of cells optimized for relatively-high-current operation at low temperatures at which commercial lithium-based cells become useless. These developments have involved modifications of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries, which are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current-limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. One of two developments that constitute the present combination is, itself, a combination of developments: (1) the use of sub-fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx wherein x<1) cathode material, (2) making the cathodes thinner than in most commercial units, and (3) using non-aqueous electrolytes formulated especially to enhance low-temperature performance. This combination of developments was described in more detail in High-Energy-Density, Low- Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells (NPO-43219), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (July 2007), page 43. The other development included in the present combination is the use of an anion receptor as an electrolyte additive, as described in the immediately preceding article, "Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells" (NPO- 43579). A typical cell according to the present combination of developments contains an anion-receptor additive solvated in an electrolyte that comprises LiBF4 dissolved at a concentration of 0.5 M in a mixture of four volume parts of 1,2 dimethoxyethane with one volume part of propylene carbonate. The proportion, x, of fluorine in the cathode in such a cell lies between 0.5 and 0.9. The best of such cells fabricated to date have exhibited discharge capacities as large as 0.6 A h per gram at a temperature of 50 C when discharged at a rate of C/5 (where C is the magnitude of the

  15. Study of the switching rate of gas-discharge devices based on the open discharge with counter-propagating electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Lavrukhin, M. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.

    2015-06-15

    The switching rate of gas-discharge devices “kivotrons” based on the open discharge with counter-propagating electron beams has been experimentally studied. Structures with 2-cm{sup 2} overall cathode area were examined. The switching time was found to show a monotonic decrease with increasing the working-gas helium pressure and with increasing the voltage across the discharge gap at breakdown. The minimum switching time was found to be ∼240 ps at 17 kV voltage, and the maximum rate of electric-current rise limited by the discharge-circuit inductance was 3 × 10{sup 12 }A/s.

  16. The THS: Simulating Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 (95-98%) and CH4 (2-5%), a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature, and leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. Here, we used the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental setup developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas- and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics.A recent mass spectrometry study of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini’s CAPS-IBS instrument. The results of a complementary study of the solid phase are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited on various substrates for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates. A DART mass spectrometry analysis of the solid phase has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine and nitrile

  17. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  18. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-09-15

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  19. Physical gas discharge procedure for adhesive surface pretreatment of polymer composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, O.; Huesgen, B.

    The effects of corona discharge and low-pressure plasma treatments are examined with respect to the preparation of the adhesive surfaces of polymer composites. A glass-fiber-reinforced polyamide and an epoxy-based structural adhesive are employed and treated with the physical gas-discharge procedure. Attention is given to the wettability of the polymer surface and to the adhesive strengths of the joints for the two pretreatment procedures. Diagrams show the dependence of bonding strength and constant contact angle on the duration, performance, and storage times of the corona and plasma treatments. SEM is used to study the surface characteristics of the materials, and decomposition products are noted in the surfaces of the joints. Plasma treatments generally lead to more effective bonds in the polyamide specimens, and the corona-discharge treatment leads to good bonds with some surface modifications.

  20. Environmental policy constraints for acidic exhaust gas scrubber discharges from ships.

    PubMed

    Ülpre, H; Eames, I

    2014-11-15

    Increasingly stringent environmental legislation on sulphur oxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels onboard ships (International Maritime Organization (IMO) Regulation 14) can be met by either refining the fuel to reduce sulphur content or by scrubbing the exhaust gases. Commonly used open loop marine scrubbers discharge warm acidic exhaust gas wash water into the sea, depressing its pH. The focus on this paper is on the physics and chemistry behind the disposal of acidic discharges in seawater. The IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 59/24/Add.1 Annex 9) requires the wash water to reach a pH greater than 6.5 at a distance of 4m from the point of discharge. We examine the engineering constraints, specifically size and number of ports, to identify the challenges of meeting regulatory compliance. PMID:25284442

  1. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2003-04-08

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  2. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Numerical modelling of atmospheric pressure gas discharges leading to plasma production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georghiou, G. E.; Papadakis, A. P.; Morrow, R.; Metaxas, A. C.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we give a detailed review of recent work carried out on the numerical characterization of non-thermal gas discharge plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure. First, we briefly describe the theory of discharge development for dielectric barrier discharges, which is central to the production of non-equilibrium plasma, and we present a hydrodynamic model to approximate the evolution of charge densities. The model consists of the continuity equations for electrons, positive and negative ions coupled to Poisson's equation for the electric field. We then describe features of the finite element flux corrected transport algorithm, which has been developed to specifically aim for accuracy (no spurious diffusion or oscillations), efficiency (through the use of unstructured grids) and ease of extension to complex 3D geometries in the framework of the hydrodynamic model in gas discharges. We summarize the numerical work done by other authors who have applied different methods to various models and then we present highlights of our own work, which includes code validation, comparisons with existing results and modelling of radio frequency systems, dc discharges, secondary effects such as photoionization and plasma production in the presence of dielectrics. The extension of the code to 3D for more realistic simulations is demonstrated together with the adaptive meshing technique, which serves to achieve higher efficiency. Finally, we illustrate the versatility of our scheme by using it to simulate the transition from non-thermal to thermal discharges. We conclude that numerical modelling and, in particular, the extension to 3D can be used to shed new light on the processes involved with the production and control of atmospheric plasma, which plays an important role in a host of emerging technologies.

  4. Is Submarine Groundwater Discharge a Gas Hydrate Formation Mechanism on the Circum-Arctic Shelf?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate is an ice-like solid that can sequester large quantities of methane gas in marine sediments along most continental margins where thermodynamic conditions permit its formation. Along the circum-Arctic shelf, relict permafrost-associated methane hydrate deposits formed when non-glaciated portions of the shelf experienced subaerial exposure during ocean transgressions. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of circum-Arctic shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Heat flow observations on the Alaskan North Slope and Canadian Beaufort Shelf suggest the movement of groundwater offshore, but direct observations of groundwater flow do not exist. Submarine discharge, an offshore flow of fresh, terrestrial groundwater, can affect the temperature and salinity field in shelf sediments, and may be an important factor in submarine permafrost and gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. Submarine groundwater discharge may also enhance the transport of organic matter for methanogenesis within marine sediments. Because it is buoyancy-driven, the velocity field contains regions with a vertical (upward) component as groundwater flows offshore. This combination of factors makes submarine groundwater discharge a potential mechanism controlling permafrost-associated gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. In this study, we quantitatively investigate the feasibility of submarine groundwater discharge as a control on permafrost-associated gas hydrate formation on the Arctic continental shelf, using the Canadian Beaufort Shelf as an example. We have developed a shelf-scale, two-dimensional numerical model based on the finite volume method for two-phase flow of pore fluid and methane gas within Arctic shelf sediments. The model tracks the evolution of the pressure, temperature, salinity, methane gas, methane hydrate, and permafrost fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of

  5. [Study on vibrational temperature and gas temperature in a hollowneedle-plate discharge plasma].

    PubMed

    Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Wei-yuan; Yang, Yu-jie; Wang, Shuai

    2010-09-01

    A 1.6-3 cm long plasma torch was generated when argon gas was introduced by using a hollowneedle-plate discharge device working in atmosphere. The vibrational temperature and the gas temperature at plasma root and tip were studied by using optical emission spectrum at different argon gas flow. The gas temperature was obtained by comparing experimental line shape of OH radicals band around 309 nm with its simulated line shape. The vibrational temperature was calculated using N2 second posi tive band system C3:pi u-B3 pi g. It was found that the gas temperatures at arc root and arc tip are equal and they decrease with the argon flow rate increasing. The gas temperature decreases from 350 to 300 K when argon flow rate increases from 3.0 to 6.5 mL x min(-1). The vibrational temperature at are tip (1950 K) is higher than that at arc root (1755 K) under a low gas flow rate (e.g., 3.0 mL x min(-1)). With gas flow rate increasing, the vibrational temperature at both tip and root decreases, but the decreasing rate at are tip is faster than that at arc root. When gas flow is larger, the vibrational temperatures at tip and root tend to be equal. PMID:21105384

  6. The Fungal Spores Survival Under the Low-Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soušková, Hana; Scholtz, V.; Julák, J.; Savická, D.

    This paper presents an experimental apparatus for the decontamination and sterilization of water suspension of fungal spores. The fungicidal effect of stabilized positive and negative corona discharges on four fungal species Aspergillus oryzae, Clacosporium sphaerospermum, Penicillium crustosum and Alternaria sp. was studied. Simultaneously, the slower growing of exposed fungal spores was observed. The obtained results are substantially different in comparison with those of the analogous experiments performed with bacteria. It may be concluded that fungi are more resistant to the low-temperature plasma.

  7. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  8. Thermal poling of ferroelectrets: How does the gas temperature influence dielectric barrier discharges in cavities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Xunlin; Wirges, Werner; Gerhard, Reimund

    2016-06-01

    The influence of the temperature in the gas-filled cavities on the charging process of ferroelectret film systems has been studied in hysteresis measurements. The threshold voltage and the effective polarization of the ferroelectrets were determined as functions of the charging temperature TP. With increasing TP, the threshold voltage for triggering dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets decreases. Thus, increasing the temperature facilitates the charging of ferroelectrets. However, a lower threshold voltage reduces the attainable remanent polarization because back discharges occur at lower charge levels, as soon as the charging voltage is turned off. The results are discussed in view of Paschen's law for electrical breakdown, taking into account the respective gas temperature and a simplified model for ferroelectrets. Our results indicate that the thermal poling scheme widely used for conventional ferroelectrics is also useful for electrically charging ferroelectrets.

  9. Electronics Demonstrated for Low- Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many NASA spacecraft, such as planetary explorers and deep space probes. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would experience an average temperature near Saturn of about 183 C. Electronics capable of low-temperature operation in the harsh deep space environment also would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. An ongoing research and development program on low-temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is focusing on the design of efficient power systems that can survive and exploit the advantages of low-temperature environments. The targeted systems, which are mission driven, include converters, inverters, controls, digital circuits, and special-purpose circuits. Initial development efforts successfully demonstrated the low-temperature operation and cold-restart of several direct-current/direct-current (dc/dc) converters based on different types of circuit design, some with superconducting inductors. The table lists some of these dc/dc converters with their properties, and the photograph shows a high-voltage, high-power dc/dc converter designed for an ion propulsion system for low-temperature operation. The development efforts of advanced electronic systems and the supporting technologies for low-temperature operation are being carried out in-house and through collaboration with other Government agencies, industry, and academia. The Low Temperature Electronics Program supports missions and development programs at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center. The developed technologies will be transferred to commercial end users for applications such as satellite infrared sensors and medical diagnostic equipment.

  10. Electron beam method and apparatus for obtaining uniform discharges in electrically pumped gas lasers

    DOEpatents

    Fenstermacher, Charles A.; Boyer, Keith

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining uniform, high-energy, large-volume electrical discharges in the lasing medium of a gas laser whereby a high-energy electron beam is used as an external ionization source to ionize substantially the entire volume of the lasing medium which is then readily pumped by means of an applied potential less than the breakdown voltage of the medium. The method and apparatus are particularly useful in CO.sub.2 laser systems.

  11. Behaviour Of Gas Conditions During Vacuum Arc Discharges Used For Deposition Of Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzyzewski, P.; Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Langner, J.; Lorkiewicz, J.; Mirowski, R.; Russo, R.; Sadowski, M.; Tazzari, S.; Witkowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    The paper concerns an important problem which is connected with the inclusion of some impurities in the deposited metal film. It was found that appearance of contaminants in the film is induced mainly by water vapor remnants inside the vacuum chamber. The paper presents information on changes in the gas composition during and between arc-discharges, which is of primary importance for the selection of appropriate experimental conditions.

  12. VUV generation by adiabatically expanded and excited by a DC electrical discharge Argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pipergias, K.; Yasemidis, D.; Reppa, E.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T.; Merlemis, N.; Giannetas, V.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the emission of Argon (Ar) gas which is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle and excited using a DC electrical discharge. Because of the expansion and the electronic excitation, Ar dimers and clusters are formed, which give radiation in the second (2nd) and in the third (3rd) continua of Ar, centered at about 126 and 254 nm respectively. We particularly focus our study on the 2nd continuum, in order to develop a laser at this wavelength.

  13. Control of stochastic sensitivity in a stabilization problem for gas discharge system

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirtseva, Irina

    2015-11-30

    We consider a nonlinear dynamic stochastic system with control. A problem of stochastic sensitivity synthesis of the equilibrium is studied. A mathematical technique of the solution of this problem is discussed. This technique is applied to the problem of the stabilization of the operating mode for the stochastic gas discharge system. We construct a feedback regulator that reduces the stochastic sensitivity of the equilibrium, suppresses large-amplitude oscillations, and provides a proper operation of this engineering device.

  14. Visible and near-ultraviolet spectra of low-pressure rare-gas microwave discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. P.; Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    The spectral emission characteristics of three commercial low pressure rare gas discharge lamps wire obtained in the near ultraviolet and visible wavelength range. All three lamps show a definite continuum over the entire wavelength range from 0.185 to 0.6 micrometers. Considerable line emission is superimposed on much of the continuum for wavelengths greater than 0.35 micrometers. These sources were used to make transmittance measurements on quartz samples in the near ultraviolet wavelength range.

  15. A method for removal of CO from exhaust gas using pulsed corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Yang, L; Lei, Y; Wang, J; Lu, Y

    2000-10-01

    An experimental study of the oxidation of CO in exhaust gas from a motorcycle has been carried out using plasma chemical reactions in a pulsed corona discharge. In the process, some main parameters, such as the initial CO concentration, amplitude and frequency of pulses, residence time, reactor volume, and relative humidity (RH), as well as their effects on CO removal characteristics, were investigated. O3, which is beneficial to reducing CO, was produced during CO removal. When the exhaust gas was at ambient temperature, more than 80% CO removal efficiency was realized at an initial concentration of 288 ppm in a suitable range of the parameters. PMID:11288300

  16. Multifrequency laser probing of CO-containing gas mixtures excited in a pulsed discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Klimachev, Yu M; Kozlov, A Yu; Kotkov, A A; Rulev, O A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V

    2007-03-31

    The method of multifrequency laser probing is developed which can be used for diagnostics of the temperature and population of vibrational levels in gas mixtures containing CO molecules in excited vibrational states. The method is tested by studying the dynamics of the gas temperature and population of vibrational levels of the CO molecule in gas mixtures excited by a pulsed discharge. It is shown that the method provides the reduction of the gas temperature measurement error down to 3%. It is found that the population of lower vibrational levels in the CO-O{sub 2} mixture can exceed the population of levels in CO-He and CO-N{sub 2} laser mixtures by several times. (active media)

  17. Design for gas chromatography-corona discharge-ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Mohammad T; Saraji, Mohammad; Sherafatmand, Hossein

    2012-11-20

    A corona discharge ionization-ion mobility spectrometry (CD-IMS) with a novel sample inlet system was designed and constructed as a detector for capillary gas chromatography. In this design, a hollow needle was used instead of a solid needle which is commonly used for corona discharge creation, helping us to have direct axial interfacing for GC-IMS. The capillary column was passed through the needle, resulting in a reaction of effluents with reactant ions on the upstream side of the corona discharge ionization source. Using this sample introduction design, higher ionization efficiency was achieved relative to the entrance direction through the side of the drift tube. In addition, the volume of the ionization region was reduced to minimize the resistance time of compounds in the ionization source, increasing chromatographic resolution of the instrument. The effects of various parameters such as drift gas flow, makeup gas flow, and column tip position inside the needle were investigated. The designed instrument was exhaustively validated in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and reproducibility by analyzing the standard solutions of methyl isobutyl ketone, heptanone, nonanone, and acetophenone as the test compounds. The results obtained by CD-IMS detector were compared with those of the flame ionization detector, which revealed the capability of the proposed GC-IMS for two-dimensional separation (based on the retention time and drift time information) and identification of an analyte in complex matrixes. PMID:23083064

  18. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati, Jos, B.

    2015-12-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O3) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  19. Theoretical Study of Plasma Parameters Dependence on Gas Temperature in an Atmospheric Pressure Argon Microwave Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2008-03-19

    The gas temperature is an important parameter in many applications of atmospheric pressure microwave discharges (MW). That is why it is necessary to study the influence of that temperature on the plasma characteristics. Our investigation is based on a self-consistent model including the wave electrodynamics and gas-discharge kinetics. We adopt a blocks' energy structure of the argon excited atom. More specifically, we consider 7 different blocks of states, namely 4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, and 6s. Each block k is characterized by its effective energy uk (derived as an average energy of all levels in the block), as well as its effective g-factor and population. The argon dimmer, atomic and molecular ions are also taken into account in the model. We solve the Boltzmann equation in order to get the electron energy distribution function and the necessary rate constants of the elementary processes. The collisional-radiative part of the model is based on 87 processes. As a result we obtain the electron and ions' number densities, mean electron energy, mean power for sustaining an electron--ion pair in the discharge bulk, as well as the population of the excited blocks of states of the argon atom as functions of the gas temperature.

  20. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Prasetyaningrum, A. Ratnawati,; Jos, B.

    2015-12-29

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  1. Theoretical Study of Plasma Parameters Dependence on Gas Temperature in an Atmospheric Pressure Argon Microwave Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2008-03-01

    The gas temperature is an important parameter in many applications of atmospheric pressure microwave discharges (MW). That is why it is necessary to study the influence of that temperature on the plasma characteristics. Our investigation is based on a self-consistent model including the wave electrodynamics and gas-discharge kinetics. We adopt a blocks' energy structure of the argon excited atom. More specifically, we consider 7 different blocks of states, namely 4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, and 6s. Each block k is characterized by its effective energy uk (derived as an average energy of all levels in the block), as well as its effective g-factor and population. The argon dimmer, atomic and molecular ions are also taken into account in the model. We solve the Boltzmann equation in order to get the electron energy distribution function and the necessary rate constants of the elementary processes. The collisional-radiative part of the model is based on 87 processes. As a result we obtain the electron and ions' number densities, mean electron energy, mean power for sustaining an electron—ion pair in the discharge bulk, as well as the population of the excited blocks of states of the argon atom as functions of the gas temperature.

  2. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  3. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  4. A low temperature thermal conductivity database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcraft, Adam L.; Gray, Adam

    2009-12-01

    Low temperature detectors necessarily require low temperature instruments. Constructing good low temperature instruments requires information on the properties of materials used in their construction, in particular the thermal conductivity. Unfortunately, this is poorly known for many materials. Collections of data in text books tend to be incomplete and in the worst cases are misleading. For most materials, what information is known is scattered through the literature. Searching out this data is time consuming, and in any case often results in conflicting information. We have started a programme to locate, consolidate and critically analyse thermal conductivity measurements from the literature, particularly for the challenging temperature range below 1 K. This has already produced useful results. We present some preliminary results here.

  5. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; McKinzie, II. Billy John

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  6. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  7. Electronics for Low-Temperature Space Operation Being Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2001-01-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of low-temperature operation are needed for many future NASA missions where it is desirable to have smaller, lighter, and cheaper (unheated) spacecraft. These missions include Mars (-20 to -120 C) orbiters, landers, and rovers; Europa (-150 C) oceanic exploratory probes and instrumentation; Saturn (-183 C) and Pluto (-229 C) interplanetary probes. At the present, most electronic equipment can operate down to only -55 C. It would be very desirable to have electronic components that expand the operating temperature range down to -233 C. The successful development of these low-temperature components will eventually allow space probes and onboard electronics to operate in very cold environments (out as far as the planet Pluto). As a result, radioisotope heating units, which are used presently to keep space electronics near room temperature, will be reduced in number or eliminated. The new cold electronics will make spacecraft design and operation simpler, more flexible, more reliable, lighter, and cheaper. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center are evaluating potential commercial off-the- shelf devices and are developing new electronic components that will tolerate operation at low temperatures down to -233 C. This work is being carried out mainly inhouse and also through university grants and commercial contracts. The components include analog-to-digital converters, semiconductor switches, capacitors, dielectric and packaging material, and batteries. For example, the effect of low temperature on the capacitance of three different types of capacitors is shown in the graph. Using these advanced components, system products will be developed, including dc/dc converters, battery charge/discharge management systems, digital control electronics, transducers, and sensor instrumentation.

  8. Improving the Performance of Lithium Ion Batteries at Low Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Trung H. Nguyen; Peter Marren; Kevin Gering

    2007-04-20

    The ability for Li-ion batteries to operate at low temperatures is extremely critical for the development of energy storage for electric and hybrid electric vehicle technologies. Currently, Li-ion cells have limited success in operating at temperature below –10 deg C. Electrolyte conductivity at low temperature is not the main cause of the poor performance of Li-ion cells. Rather the formation of a tight interfacial film between the electrolyte and the electrodes has often been an issue that resulted in a progressive capacity fading and limited discharge rate capability. The objective of our Phase I work is to develop novel electrolytes that can form low interfacial resistance solid electrolyte interface (SEI) films on carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes. From the results of our Phase I work, we found that the interfacial impedance of Fluoro Ethylene Carbonate (FEC) electrolyte at the low temperature of –20degC is astonishingly low, compared to the baseline 1.2M LiPFEMC:EC:PC:DMC (10:20:10:60) electrolyte. We found that electrolyte formulations with fluorinated carbonate co-solvent have excellent film forming properties and better de-solvation characteristics to decrease the interfacial SEI film resistance and facilitate the Li-ion diffusion across the SEI film. The very overwhelming low interfacial impedance for FEC electrolytes will translate into Li-ion cells with much higher power for cold cranking and high Regen/charge at the low temperature. Further, since the SEI film resistance is low, Li interaction kinetics into the electrode will remain very fast and thus Li plating during Regen/charge period be will less likely to happen.

  9. The THS Experiment: Ex Situ Analyses of Titan's Aerosol Analogs Produced at Low Temperature (200K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E. M.; Upton, K. T.; Beauchamp, J. L.; Salama, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the study presented here, we used the COSmIC/Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental platform developed to study Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature, to produce aerosols representative of the early stages of Titan's aerosol formation. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is jet-cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K). Because of the pulsed nature of the plasma, the residence time of the gas in the discharge is only a few microseconds, which leads to a truncated chemistry and allows for the study of the first and intermediate steps of the chemistry. Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics. In a recently published study, a mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini's CAPS-IBS instrument. Here we present the results of a complementary study of the solid phase. Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that aggregates produced in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixtures are much larger (up to 5 μm in diameter) than those produced in N2-CH4 mixtures (0.1-0.5 μm). Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) combined with Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) have detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS

  10. Effect of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Relict Arctic Submarine Permafrost and Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits exist at shallow depths within the sediments of the circum-Arctic continental shelves. Degradation of this shallow water reservoir has the potential to release large quantities of methane gas directly to the atmosphere. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of the shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with submarine permafrost. Submarine permafrost extent depends on several factors, such as the lithology, sea level variations, mean annual air temperature, ocean bottom water temperature, geothermal heat flux, and the salinity of the pore water. The salinity of the pore water is especially relevant because it partially controls the freezing point for both ice and gas hydrate. Measurements of deep pore water salinity are few and far between, but show that deep off-shore sediments are fresh. Deep freshening has been attributed to large-scale topographically-driven submarine groundwater discharge, which introduces fresh terrestrial groundwater into deep marine sediments. We investigate the role of submarine ground water discharge on the salinity field and its effects on the seaward extent of relict submarine permafrost and gas hydrate stability on the Arctic shelf with a 2D shelf-scale model based on the finite volume method. The model tracks the evolution of the temperature, salinity, and pressure fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of water ice and hydrate formation included. The permeability structure of the sediments is coupled to changes in permafrost. Results show that pore fluid is strongly influenced by the permeability variations imposed by the overlying permafrost layer. Groundwater discharge tends to travel horizontally off-shore beneath the permafrost layer and the freshwater-saltwater interface location displays long timescale transient behavior that is dependent on the groundwater discharge strength. The seaward permafrost extent is in turn strongly influenced by the

  11. Selective and low temperature synthesis of polycrystalline diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramesham, R.; Roppel, T.; Ellis, C.; Baugh, W.; Jaworske, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond thin films have been deposited on single-crystal silicon substrates at low temperatures (not above 600 C) using a mixture of hydrogen and methane gases by high-pressure microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Low-temperature deposition has been achieved by cooling the substrate holder with nitrogen gas. For deposition at reduced substrate temperature, it has been found that nucleation of diamond will not occur unless the methane/hydrogen ratio is increased significantly from its value at higher substrate temperature. Selective deposition of polycrystalline diamond thin films has been achieved at 600 C. Decrease in the diamond particle size and growth rate and an increase in surface smoothness have been observed with decreasing substrate temperature during the growth of thin films. As-deposited films are identified by Raman spectroscopy, and the morphology is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

  12. Analysis of double-probe characteristics in low-frequency gas discharges and its improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, DongLin Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei; Shao, MingXu

    2015-01-15

    The double-probe has been used successfully in radio-frequency discharges. However, in low-frequency discharges, the double-probe I-V curve is so much seriously distorted by the strong plasma potential fluctuations that the I-V curve may lead to a large estimate error of plasma parameters. To suppress the distortion, we investigate the double-probe characteristics in low-frequency gas discharge based on an equivalent circuit model, taking both the plasma sheath and probe circuit into account. We discovered that there are two primary interferences to the I-V curve distortion: the voltage fluctuation between two probe tips caused by the filter difference voltage and the current peak at the negative edge of the plasma potential. Consequently, we propose a modified passive filter to reduce the two types of interference simultaneously. Experiments are conducted in a glow-discharge plasma (f = 30 kHz) to test the performance of the improved double probe. The results show that the electron density error is reduced from more than 100% to less than 10%. The proposed improved method is also suitable in cases where intensive potential fluctuations exist.

  13. Organic acids enhanced decoloration of azo dye in gas phase surface discharge plasma system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-01-25

    A gas phase surface discharge plasma combined with organic acids system was developed to enhance active species mass transfer and dye-containing wastewater treatment efficacy, with Acid Orange II (AO7) as the model pollutant. The effects of discharge voltage and various organic acid additives (acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid) on AO7 decoloration efficiency were evaluated. The experimental results showed that an AO7 decoloration efficiency of approximately 69.0% was obtained within 4 min of discharge plasma treatment without organic acid addition, which was improved to 82.8%, 83.5% and 88.6% within the same treatment time with the addition of acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid, respectively. The enhancement effects on AO7 decoloration efficiency could be attributed to the decrease in aqueous surface tension, improvement in bubble distribution and shape, and increase in ozone equivalent concentration. The AO7 wastewater was biodegradable after discharge plasma treatment with the addition of organic acid. AO7 decomposition intermediates were analyzed by UV-vis spectrometry and GC-MS; 2-naphthol, 1,4-benzoquinone, phthalic anhydride, coumarin, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid were detected. A possible pathway for AO7 decomposition in this system was proposed. PMID:26444488

  14. A compact repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen; Ren, Baozhong; He, Kun

    2011-04-01

    Uniform and stable discharge plasma requires very short duration pulses with fast rise times. A repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge is presented in this paper. It is constructed with all solid-state components. Two-stage magnetic compression is used to generate a short duration pulse. Unlike in some reported studies, common commercial fast recovery diodes instead of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are used in our experiment that plays the role of SOS. The SOS-like effects of four different kinds of diodes are studied experimentally to optimize the output performance. It is found that the output pulse voltage is higher with a shorter reverse recovery time, and the rise time of pulse becomes faster when the falling time of reverse recovery current is shorter. The SOS-like effect of the diodes can be adjusted by changing the external circuit parameters. Through optimization the pulse generator can provide a pulsed voltage of 40 kV with a 40 ns duration, 10 ns rise time, and pulse repetition frequency of up to 5 kHz. Diffuse plasma can be formed in air at standard atmospheric pressure using the developed pulse generator. With a light weight and small packaging the pulse generator is suitable for gas discharge application. PMID:21529005

  15. A compact repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen; Ren, Baozhong; He, Kun

    2011-04-01

    Uniform and stable discharge plasma requires very short duration pulses with fast rise times. A repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge is presented in this paper. It is constructed with all solid-state components. Two-stage magnetic compression is used to generate a short duration pulse. Unlike in some reported studies, common commercial fast recovery diodes instead of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are used in our experiment that plays the role of SOS. The SOS-like effects of four different kinds of diodes are studied experimentally to optimize the output performance. It is found that the output pulse voltage is higher with a shorter reverse recovery time, and the rise time of pulse becomes faster when the falling time of reverse recovery current is shorter. The SOS-like effect of the diodes can be adjusted by changing the external circuit parameters. Through optimization the pulse generator can provide a pulsed voltage of 40 kV with a 40 ns duration, 10 ns rise time, and pulse repetition frequency of up to 5 kHz. Diffuse plasma can be formed in air at standard atmospheric pressure using the developed pulse generator. With a light weight and small packaging the pulse generator is suitable for gas discharge application.

  16. Breakdown voltage reliability improvement in gas-discharge tube surge protectors employing graphite field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan; Rozman, Robert; Nemanič, Vincenc

    2012-04-01

    Gas-discharge tube (GDT) surge protectors are known for many decades as passive units used in low-voltage telecom networks for protection of electrical components from transient over-voltages (discharging) such as lightning. Unreliability of the mean turn-on DC breakdown voltage and the run-to-run variability has been overcome successfully in the past by adding, for example, a radioactive source inside the tube. Radioisotopes provide a constant low level of free electrons, which trigger the breakdown. In the last decades, any concept using environmentally harmful compounds is not acceptable anymore and new solutions were searched. In our application, a cold field electron emitter source is used as the trigger for the gas discharge but with no activating compound on the two main electrodes. The patent literature describes in details the implementation of the so-called trigger wires (auxiliary electrodes) made of graphite, placed in between the two main electrodes, but no physical explanation has been given yet. We present experimental results, which show that stable cold field electron emission current in the high vacuum range originating from the nano-structured edge of the graphite layer is well correlated to the stable breakdown voltage of the GDT surge protector filled with a mixture of clean gases.

  17. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  18. Nondestructive Evaluation of the J-2X Direct Metal Laser Sintered Gas Generator Discharge Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esther, Elizabeth A.; Beshears, Ronald D.; Lash, Rhonda K.

    2012-01-01

    The J-2X program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) procured a direct metal laser sintered (DMLS) gas generator discharge duct from Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and Morris Technologies for a test program that would evaluate the material properties and durability of the duct in an engine-like environment. DMLS technology was pursued as a manufacturing alternative to traditional techniques, which used off nominal practices to manufacture the gas generator duct's 180 degree turn geometry. MSFC's Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Team performed radiographic, ultrasonic, computed tomographic, and fluorescent penetrant examinations of the duct. Results from the NDE examinations reveal some shallow porosity but no major defects in the as-manufactured material. NDE examinations were also performed after hot-fire testing the gas generator duct and yielded similar results pre and post-test and showed no flaw growth or development.

  19. Efficient gas lasers pumped by run-away electron preionized diffuse discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Panchenko, Nikolai A.; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Suslov, Alexey I.

    2015-02-01

    It was shown that run-away electron preionized volume (diffuse) discharge (REP DD) can be used as an excitation source of active gas mixtures at elevated pressures and can produce laser emission. We report experimental and calculated results of application of the REP DD for excitation of different active gas mixtures. It was shown that the REP DD allows to obtain efficient lasing stimulated radiation in the IR, visible and UV spectral ranges. Kinetic model of the REP DD in mixtures of nitrogen with SF6 is developed allowing to predict the radiation parameters of nitrogen laser at 337.1 nm. Promising prospects of REP DD employment for exciting a series of gas lasers was demonstrated. Lasing was obtained on molecules N2, HF, and DF with the efficiency close to the limiting value. It was established that the REP DD is most efficient for pumping lasers with the mixtures comprising electro-negative gases.

  20. Removal of ammonia from gas streams with dielectric barrier discharge plasmas.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lanyan; Huang, Li; Shu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Renxi; Dong, Wenbo; Hou, Huiqi

    2008-03-21

    We reported on the experimental study of gas-phase removal of ammonia (NH3) via dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure, in which we mainly concentrated on three aspects--influence of initial NH3 concentration, peak voltage, and gas residence time on NH3 removal efficiency. Effectiveness, e.g. the removal efficiency, specific energy density, absolute removal amount and energy yield, of the self-made DBD reactor had also been studied. Basic analysis on DBD physical parameters and its performance was made in comparison with previous investigation. Moreover, products were detected via ion exchange chromatography (IEC). Experimental results demonstrated the application potential of DBD as an alternative technology for odor-causing gases elimination from gas streams. PMID:17659834

  1. Fuzzy Logic Controller for Low Temperature Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Gonzalez, A.; Barmatz, M.

    1996-01-01

    The most common temperature controller used in low temperature experiments is the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller due to its simplicity and robustness. However, the performance of temperature regulation using the PID controller depends on initial parameter setup, which often requires operator's expert knowledge on the system. In this paper, we present a computer-assisted temperature controller based on the well known.

  2. CVD growth of graphene at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changgan

    2012-02-01

    Graphene has attracted a lot of research interest owing to its exotic properties and a wide spectrum of potential applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from gaseous hydrocarbon sources has shown great promises for large-scale graphene growth. However, high growth temperature, typically 1000^oC, is required for such growth. In this talk, I will show a revised CVD route to grow graphene on Cu foils at low temperature, adopting solid and liquid hydrocarbon feedstocks. For solid PMMA and polystyrene precursors, centimeter-scale monolayer graphene films are synthesized at a growth temperature down to 400^oC. When benzene is used as the hydrocarbon source, monolayer graphene flakes with excellent quality are achieved at a growth temperature as low as 300^oC. I will also talk about our recent progress on low-temperature graphene growth using paraterphenyl as precursor. The successful low-temperature growth can be qualitatively understood from the first principles calculations. Our work might pave a way to economical and convenient growth route of graphene, as well as better control of the growth pattern of graphene at low temperature.

  3. Low temperature thermophysical properties of lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremers, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of lunar fines samples from the Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 missions, determined at low temperatures as a function of temperature and various densities, are reviewed. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of lunar soil is nearly the same as that of terrestrial basaltic rock under the same temperature and pressure conditions.

  4. Low-Temperature Seal for Actuator Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindfors, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Combination bearing and seal used on Space Shuttle functions reliably at temperatures as low as - 160 degrees F and as high as + 130 degrees F. Corrosion-resistant stainless-steel spacer separates secondary and primary seals in both old and new versions of seal assembly. In new version, combination of flexible sealing lip and bridge is less susceptible to cracking at low temperatures.

  5. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  6. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial review

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-15

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  7. Low temperature plasma biomedicine: A tutorial reviewa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David B.

    2014-08-01

    Gas discharge plasmas formed at atmospheric pressure and near room temperature have recently been shown to be potentially useful for surface and wound sterilization, antisepsis, bleeding cessation, wound healing, and cancer treatment, among other biomedical applications. This tutorial review summarizes the field, stressing the likely role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species created in these plasmas as the biologically and therapeutically active agents. Reactive species, including radicals and non-radical compounds, are generated naturally within the body and are now understood to be essential for normal biological functions. These species are known to be active agents in existing therapies for wound healing, infection control, and cancer treatment. But they are also observed at elevated levels in persons with many diseases and are associated with aging. The physical and chemical complexity of plasma medical devices and their associated biochemical effects makes the development of safe, effective plasma medical devices and procedures a challenge, but encouragingly rapid progress has been reported around the world in the last several years.

  8. Peculiarities of the charge transport in the gas discharge electronic device with irradiated porous zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Sevgul; Koseoglu, Kivilcim; Ozer, Metin; Salamov, Bahtiyar G.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of pressure and β-radiation (1 kGy β doses) on the charge transport mechanism, charge trapping effects in porous zeolite surfaces and breakdown voltage (UB) are discussed in atmospheric microplasmas for the first time. This is due to exposure the zeolite cathode (ZC) to β-radiation resulting in substantial decreases in the UB, discharge currents and conductivity due to increase in porosity of the material. Results indicated that the enhancement of plasma light intensity and electron emission from the ZC surface with the release of trapped electrons which are captured by the defect centers following β-irradiation. The porosity of the ZC and radiation defect centers has significant influence on the charge transport of the microstructure and optical properties of the devices manufactured on its base. Thus, we confirm that the ZCir is a suitable cathode material for plasma light source, field emission displays, energy storage devices and low power gas discharge electronic devices.

  9. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  10. [Mechanism of the organic pollutant degradation in water by hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-nan; Ma, Jun; Yang, Shi-dong

    2007-09-01

    The method of hybrid gas-liquid electrical discharge was investigated for the removal of phenol. The results indicate that this new method can remove phenol in water effectively. The removal rate increases with increasing voltage and air aeration. The production quantity of H2O2 and O3 is measured respectively in the discharge region and the production quantity increases with increasing of voltage and air aeration. The energy consumption analysis indicates that with increasing the voltage, the increase extent of the phenol removal rate is smaller than the energy's, so the increase of energy efficiency is very small. Air aeration increases the energy consumption. At the same time, a considerable part of energy in the overall input energy makes the temperature of the solution increase, and more energy is transformed into heat, which leads to the waste of energy. PMID:17990549

  11. Experimental investigation on the effect of plasma jet in the triggered discharge process of a gas switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, W.; Liu, S.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Q.

    2016-08-01

    The temporal and spatial evolution of a plasma jet generated by a spark discharge was observed. The electron temperature and density were obtained under different time and gas pressures by optical emission spectroscopy. Moreover, the discharge process of the plasma-jet triggered gas switch was recorded and analyzed at the lowest working coefficient. The results showed that the plasma jet moved forward in a bullet mode, and the advancing velocity increased with the decrease of pressure, and decreased with time growing. At initial time, the maximum velocity of a plasma jet could reach 3.68 × 106 cm/s. The electron temperature decreased from 2.0 eV to 1.3 eV, and the electron density increased from 3.1 × 1015/cm3 to 6.3 × 1015/cm3 at the initial moment as the gas pressure increases from 0.1 MPa to 0.32 MPa. For a two-gap gas switch, the discharge performances were more depended on the second discharge spark gap (gap 2). Because plasma jet promoted the discharge in Gap 2, the gas switch operating in mode II had better triggered discharge characteristics. In the discharge process, the plasma-jet triggering had the effect of non-penetrating inducing, which not only provided initial electrons for reducing statistical lag but also enhanced the local electric field. The discharge was initiated and accelerated from electron avalanche to streamer. Therefore, a fast discharge was occurred in the gas switch.

  12. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  13. The influence of the method of cooling liquid electrolyte cathode on the energy balance in the gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazmeev, Kh K.; Arslanov, I. M.; Tazmeev, G. Kh

    2016-01-01

    Experimentally investigated the energy balance in a gas discharge between a flowing electrolyte cathode and a metal anode at an power of tens of kilowatts. The discharge was burning in the air in the electrode gap with a height of 10 cm. The electrolyte was a solution of salt in distilled water. The concentration of the solution by weight was 5.5 g/l. The regularities of the influence of electrolyte mass flow through the flowing cathode on the energy characteristics of the discharge were studied. The modes of the discharge, whereby the energy balance of the portion of heat losses for heating of the electrolyte reaches a minimum were identified.

  14. Study of deposit associated with discharge in micro-pixel gas chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Y.; Ochi, A.; Moriya, K.; Matsuda, S.; Yoshida, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    2009-02-01

    We found some deposits associated with discharge on dielectric (polyimide) substrates in "Micro-Pixel Gas Chambers" ( μ-PIC) operating with Ar/C2H6 90/10. Secondary electron images taken with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) revealed that they were a conductive material. Auger electron spectroscopy clearly showed that their main component was carbon (98%). Their origin was clarified using spark tests in which a single pixel was sparked a specific number of times. Secondary electron images clearly showed that discharge occurred in the narrow gaps between the electrodes. With a Ar/C2H6 50/50 gas mixture, the amount of carbon deposited depended on the number of sparks. The drop in the applied voltage after the test depended on the number of sparks. With pure N2 gas, no deposits were clearly found, however, a decrease in the applied voltage after the tests was observed. This can be attributed to carbonization of the polyimide surface. Although the SEM images did not show clear proof of this, this carbonization could contribute much less than the ethane dissociation.

  15. Effects of water vapor on flue gas conditioning in the electric fields with corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Liqiang, Qi; Yajuan, Zhang

    2013-07-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal via pulsed discharge nonthermal plasma in the absence of ammonia was investigated to determine how electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) can effectively collect particulate matter less than 2.5μm in diameter from flue gas. SO2 removal increased as water vapor concentration increased. In a wet-type plasma reactor, directing a gas-phase discharge plasma toward the water film surface significantly enhanced the liquid-phase oxidation of HSO3(-) to SO4(2-). Comparisons of various absorbents revealed that the hydroxyl radical is a key factor in plasma-induced liquid-phase reactions. The resistivity, size distribution, and cohesive force of fly ash at different water vapor contents were measured using a Bahco centrifuge, which is a dust electrical resistivity test instrument, as well as a cohesive force test apparatus developed by the researchers. When water vapor content increased by 5%, fly ash resistivity in flue gas decreased by approximately two orders of magnitude, adhesive force and size increased, and specific surface area decreased. Therefore, ESP efficiency increased. PMID:23669785

  16. Modelling the interaction between the plasma and the neutral gas in a pulsed glow discharge in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Guiberteau, E.; Bonhomme, G.; Zoheir, C.

    1995-12-31

    We present here the first results obtained from the modelling of a pulsed glow discharge in nitrogen, taking into account the heat transfer to the neutral gas. The aim of modelling is to optimize the plasma process in a nitriding reactor. The iron sample to be nitrided forms the cathode of the glow discharge at low pressure (100 to 200 Pa). The reactor uses two disks of diameter 50 mm as electrodes with a 40 mm gap. It works in a pulsed regime (cycle period varies from 10 to 100 ms) with a discharge duration which can be varied from 0.5 to 10 ms. Experimental studies have been carried out using emission spectroscopy resolved in space (1 mm) and time (1 {mu}s), under various discharge and post-discharge durations. These studies have shown the important effect of energy transfer from the discharge to the neutral gas. In fact this transfer produces an expansion of the negative glow observed when the post-discharge duration is decreased. A realistic modelling should thus be performed bearing in mind that the neutral gas behaves not as a thermostat. Consequently the thermal and hydrodynamic evolution of the neutral gas must be considered in the whole modelling.

  17. Low-Temperature Synthesis Routes to Intermetallic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Schaak, Raymond E

    2008-01-08

    Over the past few years, our group has gained expertise at developing low-temperature solution-based synthetic pathways to complex nanoscale solids, with particular emphasis on nanocrystalline intermetallic compounds. Our synthetic capabilities are providing tools to reproducibly generate intermetallic nanostructures with simultaneous control over crystal structure, composition, and morphology. This DOE-funded project aims to expand these capabilities to intermetallic superconductors. This could represent an important addition to the tools that are available for the synthesis and processing of intermetallic superconductors, which traditionally utilize high-temperature, high-pressure, thin film, or gas-phase vacuum deposition methods. Our current knowledge of intermetallic superconductors suggests that significant enhancements could result from the inherent benefits of low-temperature solution synthesis, e.g. metastable phase formation, control over nanoscale morphology to facilitate size-dependent property studies, robust and inexpensive processability, low-temperature annealing and consolidation, and impurity incorporation (for doping, stoichiometry control, flux pinning, and improving the critical fields). Our focus is on understanding the superconducting properties as a function of synthetic route, crystal structure, crystallite size, and morphology, and developing the synthetic tools necessary to accomplish this. This research program can currently be divided into two classes of superconducting materials: intermetallics (transition metal/post transition metal) and metal carbides/borides. Both involve the development and exploitation of low-temperature synthesis routes followed by detailed characterization of structures and properties, with the goal of understanding how the synthetic pathways influence key superconducting properties of selected target materials. Because of the low-temperature methods used to synthesize them and the nanocrystalline morphologies

  18. Kolmogorov Turbulence in Low-Temperature Superflows

    SciTech Connect

    Nore, C.; Brachet, M.E.; Abid, M.

    1997-05-01

    Low-temperature decaying superfluid turbulence is studied using the nonlinear Schroedinger equation in the geometry of the Taylor-Green (TG) vortex flow with resolutions up to 512{sup 3}. The rate of (irreversible) kinetic energy transfer in the superfluid TG vortex is found to be comparable to that of the viscous TG vortex. At the moment of maximum dissipation, the energy spectrum of the superflow has an inertial range compatible with Kolmogorov`s scaling. Physical-space visualizations show that the vorticity dynamics of the superflow is similar to that of the viscous flow, including vortex reconnection. The implications to experiments in low-temperature helium are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji-Won; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Duty, Chad E.; Gresback, Ryan; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Jellison, Gerald Earle; Jang, Gyoung Gug; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jung, Hyunsung; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Phelps, Tommy

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  20. Cyclic and low temperature effects on microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic temperature and low temperature operating life tests, and pre-/post-life device evaluations were used to determine the degrading effects of thermal environments on microcircuit reliability. Low power transistor-transistor-logic gates and linear devices were included in each test group. Device metallization systems included aluminum metallization/aluminum wire, aluminum metallization/gold wire, and gold metallization/gold wire. Fewer than 2% electrical failures were observed during the cyclic and low temperature life tests and the post-life evaluations revealed approximately 2% bond pull failures. Reconstruction of aluminum die metallization was observed in all devices and the severity of the reconstruction appeared to be directly related to the magnitude of the temperature excursion. All types of bonds except the gold/gold bonds were weakened by exposure to repeated cyclic temperature stress.

  1. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  2. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential Estimate

    DOE Data Explorer

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  3. Thermodynamic power stations at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, J.; Ployart, R.; Alleau, T.; Bandelier, P.; Lauro, F.

    The development of low-temperature thermodynamic power stations using solar energy is considered, with special attention given to the choice of the thermodynamic cycle (Rankine), working fluids (frigorific halogen compounds), and heat exchangers. Thermomechanical conversion machines, such as ac motors and rotating volumetric motors are discussed. A system is recommended for the use of solar energy for irrigation and pumping in remote areas. Other applications include the production of cold of fresh water from brackish waters, and energy recovery from hot springs.

  4. Low-Temperature Spacecraft: Challenges/Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickman, J. E.; Patterson, R. L.; Overton, E.; Hammoud, A. N.; Gerber, S. S.

    2001-01-01

    Imagine sending a spacecraft into deep space that operates at the ambient temperature of its environment rather than hundreds of degrees Kelvin warmer. The average temperature of a spacecraft warmed only by the sun drops from 279 K near the Earth's orbit to 90 K near the orbit of Saturn, and to 44 K near Pluto's orbit. At present, deep space probes struggle to maintain an operating temperature near 300 K for the onboard electronics. To warm the electronics without consuming vast amounts of electrical energy, radioisotope heater units (RHUs) are used in vast numbers. Unfortunately, since RHU are always 'on', an active thermal management system is required to reject the excess heat. A spacecraft designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures and shielded from the sun by a large communication dish or solar cell array could be less complex, lighter, and cheaper than current deep space probes. Before a complete low-temperature spacecraft becomes a reality, there are several challenges to be met. Reliable cryogenic power electronics is one of the major challenges. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Research Group at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has demonstrated the ability of some commercial off the shelf power electronic components to operate at temperatures approaching that of liquid nitrogen (77 K). Below 77 K, there exists an opportunity for the development of reliable semiconductor power switching technologies other than bulk silicon CMOS. This paper will report on the results of NASA GRC's Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program and discuss the challenges to (opportunities for) the creation of a low-temperature spacecraft.

  5. Low-temperature geothermal database for Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Black, G.

    1994-11-01

    The goals of the low-temperature assessment project, performed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) is aimed primarily at updating the inventory of the nation's low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. The study has begun in Oregon, where the areas of Paisley, Lakeview, Burns/Hines, Lagrande, and Vale were identified over 40 sites as having potential for direct heat utilization. Specifics sites are outlined, detailing water temperature, flow, and current uses of the sites.

  6. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  7. Honeycomb artificial spin ice at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeissler, Katharina; Chadha, Megha; Cohen, Lesley; Branford, Will

    2015-03-01

    Artificial spin ice is a macroscopic playground for magnetically frustrated systems. It consists of a geometrically ordered but magnetically frustrated arrangement of ferromagnetic macros spins, e.g. an arrangement of single domain ferromagnetic nanowires on a honeycomb lattice. Permalloy and cobalt which have critical temperature scales far above 290 K, are commonly used in the construction of such systems. Previous measurements have shown unusual features in the magnetotransport signature of cobalt honeycomb artificial spin ice at temperatures below 50 K which are due to changes in the artificial spin ice's magnetic reversal. In that case, the artificial spin ice bars were 1 micron long, 100 nm wide and 20 nm thick. Here we explore the low temperature magnetic behavior of honeycomb artificial spin ice structures with a variety of bar dimensions, indirectly via electrical transport, as well as, directly using low temperature magnetic imaging techniques. We discuss the extent to which this change in the magnetic reversal at low temperatures is generic to the honeycomb artificial spin ice geometry and whether the bar dimensions have an influence on its onset temperature. The EPSRC (Grant No. EP/G004765/1; Grant No. EP/L504786/1) and the Leverhulme Trust (Grant No. RPG 2012-692) funded this scientific work.

  8. Dynamical States of Low Temperature Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Low ice crystal concentration and sustained in-cloud supersaturation, commonly found in cloud observations at low temperature, challenge our understanding of cirrus formation. Heterogeneous freezing from effloresced ammonium sulfate, glassy aerosol, dust and black carbon are proposed to cause these phenomena; this requires low updrafts for cirrus characteristics to agree with observations and is at odds with the gravity wave spectrum in the upper troposphere. Background temperature fluctuations however can establish a dynamical equilibrium between ice production and sedimentation loss (as opposed to ice crystal formation during the first stages of cloud evolution and subsequent slow cloud decay) that explains low temperature cirrus properties. This newly-discovered state is favored at low temperatures and does not require heterogeneous nucleation to occur (the presence of ice nuclei can however facilitate its onset). Our understanding of cirrus clouds and their role in anthropogenic climate change is reshaped, as the type of dynamical forcing will set these clouds in one of two preferred microphysical regimes with very different susceptibility to aerosol.

  9. Design and construct of a new detector for gas chromatography based on continuous negative corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Ghahfarokhi, M Sharifian; Khayamian, T

    2011-05-01

    In this work, a new detector was designed and constructed based on negative corona discharge. This detector can be used separately or as a detector in gas chromatography. The detector and chromatographic variables including cell temperature, gas flow rates, voltage between the two electrodes, and column temperature were optimized. Chloroform was used as a test compound to evaluate the performance of the detector. The detection limit of chloroform was obtained 0.78 ng∕ml and its dynamic range was over the range of 2-840 ng∕ml. The relative standard detection was about 6% for the limit of quantification. This detector is able to be used as an alternative for analysis of compounds containing electronegative elements. PMID:21639545

  10. Carbon dioxide fixation by microalgae photosynthesis using actual flue gas discharged from a boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Hiroyo; Shioji, Norio; Hamasaki, Akihiro

    1995-12-31

    To mitigate CO{sub 2} discharged from thermal power plants, studies on CO{sub 2} fixation by the photosynthesis of microalgae using actual exhaust gas have been carried out. The results are as follows: (1) A method is proposed for evaluating the maximum photosynthesis rate in the raceway cultivator using only the algal physical properties; (2) Outdoor cultivation tests taking actual flue gas were performed with no trouble or break throughout 1 yr using the strain collected in the test; (3) The produced microalgae is effective as solid fuel; and (4) The feasibility studies of this system were performed. The system required large land area, but the area is smaller than that required for other biomass systems, such as tree farms.

  11. Self-organized patterns in successive bifurcations in planar semiconductor-gas-discharge device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrov, Yu. A.; Lodygin, A. N.; Portsel, L. M.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of dissipative structures is investigated in a planar semiconductor-gas-discharge device at room temperature. The width of the discharge gap is about 1 mm. The gap is filled with nitrogen at a pressure that corresponds to the discharge operation at the right branch of the Paschen curve. Wafers of semi-insulating GaAs that exhibit linear transport in the whole range of voltage and current studied are used as semiconductor electrodes. In addition to the earlier investigated Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, a different mode of self-organization of the device is observed, where the transport of charge proceeds through an ensemble of pulsating current filaments. The corresponding critical current for the present bifurcation does not depend on the polarity of the bias voltage, while the spatiotemporal dynamics of a pattern differs substantially for a change in the polarity. Pulsating filaments can form a spatially ordered pattern when the GaAs electrode is under the positive potential. We also observe self-organization modes, where pulsating filaments form an irregular spatiotemporal dynamics of a pattern. The data obtained are briefly discussed in the frame of corresponding theoretical results in the field.

  12. Modeling the Dynamics of Micro- and Macroparticles in a Combined Gas-Discharge Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashinskii, V. V.; Bogach, M. I.; Burachevskii, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a model of the dynamics of micro- and macroparticles in a combined gas-discharge installation that accounts for the processes of metal explosion (heating of a metal in its solid state, melting, heating of the liquid metal, intense evaporation, ionization in metal vapor), a magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma acceleration (on the basis of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws neglecting the plasma viscosity and thermal conductivity), and a description of the processes of energy transfer from a high-velocity stream to accelerated particles. It has been established that the process of melting terminates in 1.3 ns after the start of the discharge and that the evaporation terminates in 480 ns. The stage of cooling starts in 21 μs. The average density of the plasma upon completion of the evaporation process can be estimated to be 1.7·10-5 g/cm3, with the pressure being of the order of 1.5·104 Pa and the total time of discharge, of about 250 μs.

  13. Modeling the Dynamics of Micro- and Macroparticles in a Combined Gas-Discharge Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashinskii, V. V.; Bogach, M. I.; Burachevskii, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We present a model of the dynamics of micro- and macroparticles in a combined gas-discharge installation that accounts for the processes of metal explosion (heating of a metal in its solid state, melting, heating of the liquid metal, intense evaporation, ionization in metal vapor), a magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma acceleration (on the basis of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws neglecting the plasma viscosity and thermal conductivity), and a description of the processes of energy transfer from a high-velocity stream to accelerated particles. It has been established that the process of melting terminates in 1.3 ns after the start of the discharge and that the evaporation terminates in 480 ns. The stage of cooling starts in 21 μs. The average density of the plasma upon completion of the evaporation process can be estimated to be 1.7·10-5 g/cm3, with the pressure being of the order of 1.5·104 Pa and the total time of discharge, of about 250 μs.

  14. Origin and Distribution of Thiophenes and Furans in Gas Discharges from Active Volcanoes and Geothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-01-01

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C2–C20 species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C4H8O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection. PMID:20480029

  15. Spectral Characteristics of Deuterium-, Helium- and Gas-Mixture-Discharges within PF-1000 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tsarenko, A.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2006-01-15

    The paper reports on spectroscopic studies of high-current plasma discharges performed at different gas fillings within the large PF-1000 facility. To study visible radiation (VR) the use was made of a MECHELLE registered 900-spectrometer equipped with the CCD readout. The observations of a PF pinch column were performed at an angle of about 65 deg. to the z-axis, and the viewing field was at a distance of 40-50 mm from the electrode ends. Optical measurements were carried out at 0.5-{mu}s exposition synchronized with a chosen period of the investigated discharge. Differences in the optical spectra, recorded at various deuterium-helium mixtures, were analyzed. Intensities of HeI lines were computed for an assumed electron temperature and compared with the experiment. Estimated plasma concentration in pure-deuterium discharges amounted to 8x1018 cm-3, while that in pure helium shots was (4-7)x1017 cm-3 only. Estimates of the electron temperature, from the ratio of intensities of the chosen spectral lines and the continuum, gave values ranging from 5 eV to 50 eV. The paper presents also some spectra from 'weak shots', which show distinct impurity lines caused by different reasons.

  16. Invention of Ozone Inclusion Ice Using Low-Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawasai, Manabu; Inada, Shigeaki; Ueno, Yusuke; Kawashima, Hisanobu

    Research on invention of the function ice is actively advanced in the field of perishable foodstuff saving, deodorization, sterilization and cleaning in addition to levelization of electric power in summer. When oxygen low-temperature plasma is generated in a decompressed furnace, a high-dense ozone gas is secondarily formed in the furnace. By utilizing the instant freezing of liquid introduced in the furnace, the purpose of this study is to efficiently store the ozone gas in the ice. The ozone content in the ice was evaluated for each liquid introduction method of a water spray system, a water droplet adsorption system and a gas involvement system on the surface of the water vessel in the furnace.

  17. A Low Temperature Analysis of the Boundary Driven Kawasaki Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Christian; O'Kelly de Galway, Winny

    2013-12-01

    Low temperature analysis of nonequilibrium systems requires finding the states with the longest lifetime and that are most accessible from other states. We determine these dominant states for a one-dimensional diffusive lattice gas subject to exclusion and with nearest neighbor interaction. They do not correspond to lowest energy configurations even though the particle current tends to zero as the temperature reaches zero. That is because the dynamical activity that sets the effective time scale, also goes to zero with temperature. The result is a non-trivial asymptotic phase diagram, which crucially depends on the interaction coupling and the relative chemical potentials of the reservoirs.

  18. The Ability of Microbial Community of Lake Baikal Bottom Sediments Associated with Gas Discharge to Carry Out the Transformation of Organic Matter under Thermobaric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bukin, Sergei V.; Pavlova, Olga N.; Manakov, Andrei Y.; Kostyreva, Elena A.; Chernitsyna, Svetlana M.; Mamaeva, Elena V.; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V.; Zemskaya, Tamara I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compare the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities inhabiting the subsurface sediment in geographically distinct locations is one of the keys to understanding the evolution and function of the subsurface biosphere. Prospective areas for study of the subsurface biosphere are the sites of hydrocarbon discharges on the bottom of the Lake Baikal rift, where ascending fluxes of gas-saturated fluids and oil from deep layers of bottom sediments seep into near-surface sediment. The samples of surface sediments collected in the area of the Posolskaya Bank methane seep were cultured for 17 months under thermobaric conditions (80°C, 5 MPa) with the addition of complementary organic substrate, and a different composition for the gas phase. After incubation, the presence of intact cells of microorganisms, organic matter transformation and the formation of oil biomarkers was confirmed in the samples, with the addition of Baikal diatom alga Synedra acus detritus, and gas mixture CH4:H2:CO2. Taxonomic assignment of the 16S rRNA sequence data indicates that the predominant sequences in the enrichment were Sphingomonas (55.3%), Solirubrobacter (27.5%) and Arthrobacter (16.6%). At the same time, in heat-killed sediment and in sediment without any additional substrates, which were cultivated in a CH4 atmosphere, no geochemical changes were detected, nor the presence of intact cells and 16S rRNA sequences of Bacteria and Archaea. This data may suggest that the decomposition of organic matter under culturing conditions could be performed by microorganisms from low-temperature sediment layers. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is migration of the representatives of the deep thermophilic community through fault zones in the near surface sediment layers, together with gas-bearing fluids. PMID:27242716

  19. The Ability of Microbial Community of Lake Baikal Bottom Sediments Associated with Gas Discharge to Carry Out the Transformation of Organic Matter under Thermobaric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bukin, Sergei V; Pavlova, Olga N; Manakov, Andrei Y; Kostyreva, Elena A; Chernitsyna, Svetlana M; Mamaeva, Elena V; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V; Zemskaya, Tamara I

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compare the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities inhabiting the subsurface sediment in geographically distinct locations is one of the keys to understanding the evolution and function of the subsurface biosphere. Prospective areas for study of the subsurface biosphere are the sites of hydrocarbon discharges on the bottom of the Lake Baikal rift, where ascending fluxes of gas-saturated fluids and oil from deep layers of bottom sediments seep into near-surface sediment. The samples of surface sediments collected in the area of the Posolskaya Bank methane seep were cultured for 17 months under thermobaric conditions (80°C, 5 MPa) with the addition of complementary organic substrate, and a different composition for the gas phase. After incubation, the presence of intact cells of microorganisms, organic matter transformation and the formation of oil biomarkers was confirmed in the samples, with the addition of Baikal diatom alga Synedra acus detritus, and gas mixture CH4:H2:CO2. Taxonomic assignment of the 16S rRNA sequence data indicates that the predominant sequences in the enrichment were Sphingomonas (55.3%), Solirubrobacter (27.5%) and Arthrobacter (16.6%). At the same time, in heat-killed sediment and in sediment without any additional substrates, which were cultivated in a CH4 atmosphere, no geochemical changes were detected, nor the presence of intact cells and 16S rRNA sequences of Bacteria and Archaea. This data may suggest that the decomposition of organic matter under culturing conditions could be performed by microorganisms from low-temperature sediment layers. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is migration of the representatives of the deep thermophilic community through fault zones in the near surface sediment layers, together with gas-bearing fluids. PMID:27242716

  20. Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter.

    PubMed

    Vizir, A V; Tyunkov, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10(9) cm(-3) at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10(-2) Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness. PMID:20192469

  1. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390 K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency.

  2. The physical nature of the phenomenon of positive column plasma constriction in low-pressure noble gas direct current discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbatov, P. F.

    2014-02-15

    The essence of the positive-column plasma constriction for static (the diffusion mode) and dynamic ionization equilibrium (the stratificated and constricted modes) is analyzed. Two physical parameters, namely, the effective ionization rate of gas atoms and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of electrons and ions, determine the transverse distribution of discharge species and affect the current states of plasma. Transverse constriction of the positive column takes place as the gas ionization level (discharge current) and pressure increase. The stratified mode (including the constricted one) is observed between the two adjacent types of self-sustained discharge phases when they coexist together at the same time or in the same place as a coherent binary mixture. In the case, a occurrence of the discharge phase with more high electron density presently involve a great decrease in the cross-section of the current channel for d.c. discharges. Additional physical factors, such as cataphoresis and electrophoresis phenomena and spatial gas density inhomogeneity correlated with a circulatory flow in d.c. discharges, are mainly responsible for the current hysteresis and partially constricted discharge.

  3. Studies on gas breakdown in pulsed radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Jian, S. J.; Yao, J.; Ding, Z. F.

    2014-05-15

    In pulsed RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges, the gas breakdown judged by the rapid drop in the amplitude of the pulsed RF voltage is no longer universally true. The steep increment of the plasma-absorbed RF power is proposed to determine the gas breakdown. The averaged plasma-absorbed RF power over a pulse period is used to evaluate effects of the preceding pulsed RF discharge on the breakdown voltage of the following one, finding that the breakdown voltage decreases with the increment in the averaged plasma-absorbed RF power under constant pulse duty ratio. Effects of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage and the breakdown delay time are also studied. The obtained dependence of the breakdown voltage on the pulse off-time is indicative of the transitional plasma diffusion processes in the afterglow. The breakdown voltage varies rapidly as the plasma diffuses fast in the region of moderate pulse off-time. The contribution of nitrogen atom recombination at the alumina surface is demonstrated in the prolonged memory effect on the breakdown delay time vs. the pulse off-time and experimentally validated by introducing a trace amount of nitrogen into argon at short and long pulse off-times.

  4. Effect of hydrogen ratio on plasma parameters of N2-H2 gas mixture glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Brulsy, R. A.; Abd Al-Halim, M. A.; Abu-Hashem, A.; Rashed, U. M.; Hassouba, M. A.

    2012-05-01

    A dc plane glow discharge in a nitrogen-hydrogen (N2-H2) gas mixture has been operated at discharge currents of 10 and 20 mA. The electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at different hydrogen concentrations is measured. A Maxwellian EEDF is found in the positive column region, while in both cathode fall and negative glow regions, a non-Maxwellian one is observed. Langmuir electric probes are used at different axial positions, gas pressures, and hydrogen concentrations to measure the electron temperature and plasma density. The electron temperature is found to increase with increasing H2 concentration and decrease with increasing both the axial distance from the cathode and the mixture pressure. At first, with increasing distance from the cathode, the ion density decreases, while the electron density increases; then, as the anode is further approached, they remain nearly constant. At different H2 concentrations, the electron and ion densities decrease with increasing the mixture pressure. Both the electron and ion densities slightly decrease with increasing H2 concentration.

  5. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Cherkovets, V. E.; Rerikh, V. K.; Taran, M. D.

    2015-11-15

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. The interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place.

  6. Natural gas in Lake Erie: a reconnaissance survey of discharges from an offshore drilling rig

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrante, J.G.; Dettmann, E.H.; Parker, J.I.

    1980-10-01

    Field studies were conducted May 28-June 1, 1979, to determine the chemical composition and physical behavior of discharges from an offshore gas drilling rig in the central basin of Lake Erie. The drilling operation was observed for four days, from rig jackup to the circulation of mud through the borehole after drilling had been completed. Resuspension studies using nephelometry, supplemented with chemical analyses, indicated little resuspension of lake bottom materials or release of metals to the water column during rig jack-up. Portions of the turbidity plumes generated during drilling were buoyant. Three surface turbidity plumes were mapped with nephelometry to a point at which particulate concentrations reached background levels in the Lake. Detectable plumes were approx. 400 to 1500 m in length and had maximum widths < 230 m. A chemical survey conducted in the plume during early gas shows indicated that discharged inorganic chemical species were rapidly diluted to background concentrations and that methane and ethane concentrations were substantially reduced within 330 m of the rig. There was no evidence of carbon tetrachloride extractable hydrocarbons (CTEH) above background concentrations during this chemical plume survey. However, a pair of water samples taken within 100 m of the rig approximately 3 hours after drilling of the target zone was completed had CTEH concentrations that were a factor of 2.4 above background.

  7. Removal of acetaldehyde and skatole in gas by a corona-discharge reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, Noriaki; Nagamoto, Toshiki; Hamon, Hajime; Suzuki, Tetsuo; Okazaki, Morio

    1997-09-01

    Recently, ultrahigh gas purification has been important in many cases, such as, for example, (1) removal of dioxin from incineration plants, (2) complete removal of radioactive iodine compounds from nuclear fuel recycling, (3) simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} in exhaust gases from cogeneration plants, (4) removal or decomposition of chlorofluorocarbons, and (5) supply of purified gas for semiconductor industries. A corona-discharge reactor, called a deposition-type reactor, was applied to remove acetaldehyde and skatole from nitrogen and an oxygen-nitrogen mixture. In the removal from nitrogen, acetaldehyde and skatole are negatively ionized and removed by depositing at the anode surface. In simultaneous removals of acetaldehyde and skatole, it is found that skatole has a higher reactivity of electron attachment than acetaldehyde. In the removal of acetaldehyde from an oxygen-nitrogen mixture, 40 molecules of acetaldehyde were removed by one electron. The reason for the extremely high removal efficiency is considered to be based on the ozone reaction and the formation of negative-ion clusters. Stabilization energies of the negative-ion clusters were estimated by ab initio molecular orbital calculation. Skatole was removed from a nitrogen-oxygen mixture perfectly with extremely low discharge current by the ozone reaction. Simultaneous removals of acetaldehyde and skatole from a nitrogen-oxygen mixture suggest that coexisting skatole inhibits the removal of acetaldehyde.

  8. Nonlinear transport of semi-insulating GaAs in a semiconductor gas discharge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel Kurt, H.; Salamov, B. G.

    2007-12-01

    Nonlinear transport of a semi-insulating (SI) GaAs photodetector in a semiconductor gas discharge structure (SGDS) is studied experimentally for a wide range of gas pressures p, interelectrode distances d and different diameters D of the detector areas. While being driven with a stationary voltage, the system generates current and discharge light emission (DLE) instabilities with different amplitudes of the oscillations. The transformation of the profile and amplitude of the current density of the filaments in the different regions of the current-voltage characteristic (CVC) has been studied. Instabilities of spatially non-uniform distributions resulting in the formation of multiple current filaments with increasing voltages above the critical values have been observed. It is shown that the interelectrode distance only plays a passive role and is not responsible for the appearance of the DLE instability under the experimental conditions. At the same time, the expanded range of current and DLE oscillations are observed for different diameters D of the infrared (IR) photodetector areas. An SGDS with an N-shaped CVC is analysed using both the current and DLE data which show the electrical instability in the GaAs photodetector. It is found that the application of high feeding voltage to this photodetector gives rise to a non-uniform spatial distribution of the DLE, which disturbs the operation of the system. The experiment also presents a new method to study and visualize the electrical instabilities in a high-resistivity IR photodetector of large diameter.

  9. Effects of gas temperature on NO(x) removal by dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Sun, Bao-Min; Xiao, Hai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to discuss the effect of gas temperature on NO(x) removal by dielectric barrier discharge. The Boltzmann equation was used to analyse the electron distribution function in the reactor, and experiments were conducted to find out the effects of different temperatures. The calculation results show that, with a rise in the temperature, E/N increases, increasing the ionization rate. When the ratio of electric field strength to total gas density (E/N) rises from 50 to 150 Td, the ionization rate and electron mean energy increase by 2.0 x 10(5) and 2.3, respectively. The experiments show that in the NO/N2 system, when the temperature increases to 1 30 degrees C and the applied voltage is 11.1 kV, the discharge power is 44.7 W, which is higher than the discharge power of 35.4 W found at 25 degrees C; in the NO/O2/N2 system, an increase in the temperature increases the decomposition of active O3 species, producing a negative effect on NO oxidation; in the NO/O2/N2/C2H4 system, when the temperature increases, the quantity of active species HO2 increases and the NO removal reaction rate increases, reflecting an obvious improvement in the NO removal; and in the NO/O2/N2/C2H4/H2O system, at 25 degrees C, 90 degrees C, and 130 degrees C, when the energy density is 239.7 J L(-1), the NO removal efficiencies are 52.8%, 66.4%, and 71.0%, respectively. PMID:24527633

  10. The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with dielectric barrier discharge in gas-liquid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dan; Sun, Bing; Zhu, Xiaomei; Yan, Zhiyu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with high voltage and frequency pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in hybrid gas-liquid reactor with a suspension electrode was studied experimentally. In the hybrid gas-liquid reactor, a steel plate was used as high voltage electrode while a quartz plate as a dielectric layer, another steel plate placing in the aqueous solution worked as a whole ground electrode. A suspension electrode is installed near the surface of solution between high voltage and ground electrode to make the dielectric barrier discharge uniform and stable, the discharge gap was between the quartz plate and the surface of the water. The effect of peak voltage, treatment time, the initial concentration of Chlorella spp. and conductivity of solution on the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. was investigated, and the inactivation mechanism of Chlorella spp. preliminarily was studied. Utilizing this system inactivation of Chlorella spp., the inactivation rate increased with increasing of peak voltage, treatment time and electric conductivity. It was found that the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. arrived at 100% when the initial concentration was 4 × 106 cells mL-1, and the optimum operation condition required a peak voltage of 20 kV, a treatment time of 10 min and a frequency of 7 kHz. Though the increasing of initial concentration of the Chlorella spp. contributed to the addition of interaction probability between the Chlorella spp. and O3, H2O2, high-energy electrons, UV radiation and other active substances, the total inactivation number raise, but the inactivation rate of the Chlorella spp. decreased.

  11. Association of gas hydrate formation in fluid discharges with anomalous hydrochemical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveeva, T.

    2009-04-01

    Numerous investigations worldwide have shown that active underwater fluid discharge produces specific structures on the seafloor such as submarine seepages, vents, pockmarks, and collapse depressions. Intensive fluxes of fluids, especially of those containing hydrocarbon gases, result in specific geochemical and physical conditions favorable for gas hydrate (GH) formation. GH accumulations associated with fluid discharge are usually controlled by fluid conduits such as mud volcanoes, diapirs or faults. During last decade, subaqueous GHs become the subject of the fuel in the nearest future. However, the expediency of their commercial development can be proved solely by revealing conditions and mechanisms of GH formation. Kinetic of GH growth (although it is incompletely understood) is one of the important parameters controlling their formation among with gas solubility, pressure, temperature, gas quantity and others. Original large dataset on hydrate-related interstitial fluids obtained from different fluid discharge areas at the Sea of Okhotsk, Black Sea, Gulf of Cadiz, Lake Baikal (Eastern Siberia) allow to suggest close relation of the subaqueous GH formation process to anomalous hydrochemical profiles. We have studied the chemical and isotopic composition of interstitial fluids from GH-bearing and GH-free sediments obtained at different GH accumulations. Most attention was paid to possible influence of the interstitial fluid chemistry on the kinetic of GH formation in a porous media. The influence of salts on methane solubility within hydrate stability zones was considered by Handa (1990), Zatsepina & Buffet (1998), and later by Davie et al. (2004) from a theoretical point of view. Our idea is based on the experimentally proved fact that fugacity coefficient of methane dissolved in saline gas-saturated water which is in equilibrium with hydrates, is higher than that in more fresh water though the solubility is lower. Therefore, if a gradient of water salinity

  12. Low-temperature performance of Li-ion batteries: The behavior of lithiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senyshyn, A.; Mühlbauer, M. J.; Dolotko, O.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2015-05-01

    Safety issues along with the substantially reduced energy and power capabilities of Li-ion cells, operated at low temperatures, pose a technical barrier limiting their use in electric vehicles and aerospace applications. A combined in situ high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and electrochemical study on Li-ion cells of the 18650-type over a temperature range from 230 K to 320 K is reported with a focus on the graphite anode and the low temperature performance of the cell. Instead of a quasi-continuous behavior as observed at ambient temperatures, an anomalous behavior occurs upon discharge at low temperature, primarily reflected in the abrupt character of the LiC12 - to - graphite phase transformation and the unusual temperature dependence of the amount of LiC6. An instability of lithiated graphite phases at temperatures below 250 K is observed, which affects the performance of Li-ion batteries at low temperatures.

  13. A method for achieving ignition of a low voltage gas discharge device

    DOEpatents

    Kovarik, Vincent J.; Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1988-01-01

    An electronic device of the type wherein current flow is conducted by an ionized gas comprising a cathode of the type heated by ionic bombardment, an anode, means for maintaining a predetermined pressure in the region between the anode and the cathode and means for maintaining a field in the region. The field, which is preferably a combined magnetic and electric field, is oriented so that the mean distance traveled by electrons before reaching the anode is increased. Because of this increased distance traveled electrons moving to the anode will ionize a larger number of gas atoms, thus reducing the voltage necesary to initiate gas breakdown. In a preferred embodiment the anode is a main hollow cathode and the cathode is a smaller igniter hollow cathode located within and coaxial with the main hollow cathode. An axial magnetic field is provided in the region between the hollow cathodes in order to facilitate gas breakdown in that region and initiate plasma discharge from the main hollow cathode.

  14. Research on the low-temperature decontamination of soil

    SciTech Connect

    Hetland, M.D.; Rindt, J.R.

    1995-10-01

    Decontamination of organically contaminated soil requires at least two processes: (1) separation of the contaminants from the soil and (2) destruction or stabilization and recovery of the organic contaminants. Techniques used to convert the organic contaminants must produce environmentally acceptable products. A process is seen as more favorable if the inorganic portion remaining after destruction of the organic contaminants retains a {open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} state, since ideally the residual should be returned to the original ecological system. Low-temperature plasma (LTP) processing has the potential to offer decontamination equivalent to incineration with decreased production of harmful by-products and without changing the morphology of the inorganic matrix. Low-temperature plasmas are formed by electric discharge (rather than thermal means) at conditions that do not result in thermal equilibrium. It is possible with an LTP system for typical plasma reactions to occur at nearly ambient bulk temperatures. The purpose of this project is to perform the appropriate engineering evaluations needed to scale up an LTP soil decontamination process developed at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The LTP process under development uses oxygen plasma, resulting in oxidation of the contaminant species. Previous research at the EERC proved that the technique successfully separates organic contaminants from soil. The success of this previous research indicated that the use of LTP as a decontamination technique should be investigated further, with possible scale up to real-world application.

  15. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  16. Noise thermometry at ultra-low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, D; Reiser, A; Fleischmann, A; Enss, C

    2016-03-28

    The options for primary thermometry at ultra-low temperatures are rather limited. In practice, most laboratories are using (195)Pt NMR thermometers in the microkelvin range. In recent years, current sensing direct current superconducting quantum interference devices (DC-SQUIDs) have enabled the use of noise thermometry in this temperature range. Such devices have also demonstrated the potential for primary thermometry. One major advantage of noise thermometry is the fact that no driving current is needed to operate the device and thus the heat dissipation within the thermometer can be reduced to a minimum. Ultimately, the intrinsic power dissipation is given by the negligible back action of the readout SQUID. For thermometry in low-temperature experiments, current noise thermometers and magnetic flux fluctuation thermometers have proved to be most suitable. To make use of such thermometers at ultra-low temperatures, we have developed a cross-correlation technique that reduces the amplifier noise contribution to a negligible value. For this, the magnetic flux fluctuations caused by the Brownian motion of the electrons in our noise source are measured inductively by two DC-SQUID magnetometers simultaneously and the signals from these two channels are cross-correlated. Experimentally, we have characterized a thermometer made of a cold-worked high-purity copper cylinder with a diameter of 5 mm and a length of 20 mm for temperatures between 42 μK and 0.8 K. For a given temperature, a measuring time below 1 min is sufficient to reach a precision of better than 1%. The extremely low power dissipation in the thermometer allows continuous operation without heating effects. PMID:26903101

  17. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  18. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  19. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bingchen; Shen, Xiaonan; Shang, Jingzhi; Cong, Chunxiao; Yang, Weihuang; Eginligil, Mustafa E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg; Yu, Ting E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-11-01

    High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup), while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  20. Cryocoolers near their low-temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper analyses the recently-observed temperature-time dependence in a GM-cooler near its low-temperature limit. The paper mainly focusses on GM-coolers with 4He as the working fluid, but some attention is also paid to pulse-tube refrigerators (PTR's) using 3He and many features of the treatment equally apply to Stirling coolers. Ample attention is paid to the thermodynamics of the cycle by considering the isentropes in the Tp-diagrams of 4He and 3He. The role of the line, where the thermal expansion coefficient is zero, is emphasized. Some fundamental thermodynamic relationships are derived.

  1. Low temperature breakers for gelled fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Syrinek, A.R.; Lyon, L.B.

    1989-01-03

    A method is described for breaking gelled viscosities of oil-based gelled fracturing fluids containing a gellant comprising aluminum complexes of alkyl phosphate esters and a proppant. The fracturing fluids are used in low-temperature formations having operating temperatures ranging between 60/sup 0/ - 120/sup 0/F. The oil-based gelled fracturing fluids are treated with an effective viscosity breaking amount of a chemical breaker consisting essentially of an admixture of hydrated lime and sodium bicarbonate containing a weight ratio ranging between 100/0 to about 20/80 hydrated lime to sodium bicarbonate.

  2. Low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization.

    PubMed

    Robertshaw, R G

    1983-09-01

    A standard low temperature steam/formaldehyde autoclave was tested according to the manufacturer's instructions, using a range of test pieces containing Bacillus stearothermophilus spores as the challenge organism. There were failures in killing the challenge organism and the reasons for these are discussed. A description of modifications made to the autoclave is given together with details of an improved operating cycle. The performance of the modified autoclave was greatly improved and conditions were established for reliable and consistent sterilization of all the test pieces. A commercially produced prototype autoclave similarly modified also showed effective sterilization. PMID:6195245

  3. Low temperature waste form process intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Cozzi, A. D.; Hansen, E. K.; Hill, K. A.

    2015-09-30

    This study successfully demonstrated process intensification of low temperature waste form production. Modifications were made to the dry blend composition to enable a 50% increase in waste concentration, thus allowing for a significant reduction in disposal volume and associated costs. Properties measurements showed that the advanced waste form can be produced using existing equipment and processes. Performance of the waste form was equivalent or better than the current baseline, with approximately double the amount of waste incorporation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of significantly accelerating low level waste immobilization missions across the DOE complex and at environmental remediation sites worldwide.

  4. Low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wago, Koichi

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) is a technique whose goal is to combine the three-dimensional, chemically specific imaging capability of magnetic resonance imaging with the atomic-scale spatial resolution of scanning force microscopy. MRFM relies on the detection of small oscillatory magnetic forces between spins in the sample and a magnetic tip, using a micromechanical cantilever. The force resolution is a key issue for successfully operating MRFM experiments. Operating at low temperature improves the force resolution because of the reduced thermal energy and increased mechanical Q of the cantilever. The spin polarization is also enhanced at low temperature, leading to the improved magnetic resonance sensitivity for ensemble spin samples. A low-temperature magnetic resonance force detection apparatus was built and used to demonstrate a force resolution of 8×10sp{-17}\\ N/sqrt{Hz} at 6 K with a commercial single-crystal silicon cantilever. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were detected in micron-size samples. Force-detection technique was also applied to a wide range of magnetic resonance measurements, including inversion recovery, nutation, and spin echoes. Force-detected EPR spectra of phosphorus-doped silicon revealed hyperfine splitting, illustrating the possibility of using the MRFM technique for spectroscopic purposes. An improved low-temperature magnetic resonance force microscope was also built, incorporating a magnetic tip mounted directly on the cantilever. This allows a much wider variety of samples to be investigated and greatly improves the convenience of the technique. Using the improved microscope, three-dimensional EPR imaging of diphenylpicrylhydrazil (DPPH) particles was accomplished by scanning the sample in two dimensions while stepping an external field. The EPR force map showed a broad response reflecting the size and shape of the sample, allowing a three-dimensional real

  5. Formation of stable direct current microhollow cathode discharge by venturi gas flow system for remote plasma source in atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ki Wan; Lee, Tae Il; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Noh, Joo Hyon; Baik, Hong Koo; Song, Kie Moon

    2008-02-11

    We introduce a microhollow cathode configuration with venturi gas flow to ambient air in order to obtain glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. Stable microhollow cathode discharge was formed in a 200 {mu}m diameter at 9 mA and the optimum value of gas velocityxdiameter for hollow cathode effect was obtained in our system. In order to confirm hollow cathode effect, we measured the enhancement of E/N strength for 200 {mu}m (0.31 m{sup 2}/s) and 500 {mu}m (0.78 m{sup 2}/s) air discharge at 8 mA under the velocity of 156 m/s. As a result, an increase of 46.7% in E/N strength of the discharge of 200 {mu}m hole was obtained compare to that of 500 {mu}m.

  6. Optical diagnostics with radiation trapping effect in low density and low temperature helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonwook; Park, Kyungdeuk; Kwon, Duck-Hee; Oh, Cha-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Low density (ne < 1011 cm-3) and low temperature (Te < 10 eV) helium plasma was generated by hot filament discharge. Electron temperature and density of neutral helium plasma were measured by Langmuir probe and were determined by line intensity ratio method using optical emission spectroscopy with population modelings. Simple corona model and collisional-radiative (CR) model without consideration for radiation trapping effect are applied. In addition, CR model taking into account the radiation trapping effect (RTE) is adopted. The change of single line intensity ratio as a function of electron temperature and density were investigated when the RTE is included and excluded. The changes of multi line intensity ratios as a function of electron temperature were scanned for various radiative-excitation rate coefficients from the ground state and the helium gas pressures related with the RTE. Our CR modeling with RTE results in fairly better agreement of the spectroscopic diagnostics for the plasma temperature or density with the Langmuir probe measurements for various helium gas pressures than corona modeling and CR modeling without RTE.

  7. Emission characteristics and parameters of gas-discharge plasma in mixtures of heavy inert gases with chlorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuaibov, A. K.; Malinin, A. N.

    2009-04-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation from longitudinal glow-discharge plasma in three- and four-component mixtures of argon, krypton, and xenon with chlorine has been investigated. The total radiation of Ar, Kr, and Xe monochlorides and chlorine molecules in the spectral range 170-310 nm has been optimized with respect to the composition and the pressure of gas mixtures, as well as the discharge current. The mean output power, the electric power of discharge, and the efficiency of a broadband low-pressure exciplex halogen lamp have been determined. Parameters of the glow discharge in Ar-Kr-Cl2 and Kr-Xe-Cl2 mixtures have been simulated numerically. The electron energy distribution functions have been determined through the solution of the Boltzmann kinetic equation. These functions have been used to calculate the plasma parameters, namely, electron transfer characteristics, specific losses of discharge power for electronic processes, and ionization and attachment coefficients.

  8. Physical mechanisms of self-organization and formation of current patterns in gas discharges of the Townsend and glow types

    SciTech Connect

    Raizer, Yu. P.; Mokrov, M. S.

    2013-10-15

    The paper discusses current filamentation and formation of current structures (in particular, hexagonal current patterns) in discharges of the Townsend and glow types. The aim of the paper, which is in part a review, is to reveal basic reasons for formation of current patterns in different cases, namely, in dielectric barrier discharge, discharge with semiconductor cathode, and micro-discharge between metallic electrodes. Pursuing this goal, we give a very brief review of observations and discuss only those theoretical, computational, and experimental papers that shed light on the physical mechanisms involved. The mechanisms are under weak currents—the thermal expansion of the gas as a result of Joule heating; under enhanced currents—the electric field and ionization rate redistribution induced by space charge. Both mechanisms lead to instability of the homogeneous discharges. In addition, we present new results of numerical simulations of observed short-living current filaments which are chaotic in space and time.

  9. Sterilization of Fungus in Water by Pulsed Power Gas Discharge Reactor Spraying Water Droplets for Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tsukasa; Handa, Taiki; Minamitani, Yasushi

    We study sterilization of bacteria in water using pulsed streamer discharge of gas phase. This method enhances efficiency of water treatment by spraying pretreatment water in a streamer discharge area. In this paper, yeast was sterilized because we assumed a case that fungus like mold existed in wastewater. As a result, colony forming units decreased rapidly for 2 minutes of the processing time, and all yeast sterilized by 45 minutes of the processing time.

  10. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, Sergey V.; Dubinov, Alexander E.; L'vov, Igor L.; Popolev, Vyacheslav L.; Sadovoy, Sergey A.; Sadchikov, Eugeny A.; Selemir, Victor D.; Valiulina, Valeria K.; Vyalykh, Dmitry V.; Zhdanov, Victor S.

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ˜90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ˜25%.

  11. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%. PMID:27250451

  12. Study of the Low Temperature Oxidation of Propane

    PubMed Central

    Cord, Maximilien; Husson, Benoit; Huerta, Juan Carlos Lizardo; Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Sirjean, Baptiste; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Ruiz-Lopez, Manuel; Wang, Zhandong; Xie, Mingfeng; Cheng, Zhanjun; Qi, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The low-temperature oxidation of propane was investigated using a jet-stirred reactor at atmospheric pressure and two methods of analysis: gas chromatography and synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry (SVUV-PIMS) with direct sampling through a molecular jet. The second method allowed the identification of products, such as molecules with hydroperoxy functions, which are not stable enough to be detected by gas chromatography. Mole fractions of the reactants and reaction products were measured as a function of the temperature (530-730 K), with a particular attention to reaction products involved in the low temperature oxidation, such as cyclic ethers, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, and hydroperoxides. A new model has been obtained from an automatically generated one, which was used as a starting point, with a large number of re-estimated thermochemical and kinetic data. The kinetic data of the most sensitive reactions, i.e., isomerizations of alkylperoxy radicals and the subsequent decompositions, have been calculated at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. The model allows a satisfactory prediction of the experimental data. A flow rate analysis has allowed highlighting the important reaction channels. PMID:23181456

  13. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  14. Low Temperature Decomposition Rates for Tetraphenylborate Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1998-11-18

    Previous studies indicated that palladium is catalyzes rapid decomposition of alkaline tetraphenylborate slurries. Additional evidence suggest that Pd(II) reduces to Pd(0) during catalyst activation. Further use of tetraphenylborate ion in the decontamination of radioactive waste may require removal of the catalyst or cooling to temperatures at which the decomposition reaction proceeds slowly and does not adversely affect processing. Recent tests showed that tetraphenylborate did not react appreciably at 25 degrees Celsius over six months suggesting the potential to avoid the decomposition at low temperatures. The lack of reaction at low temperature could reflect very slow kinetics at the lower temperature, or may indicate a catalyst ''deactivation'' process. Previous tests in the temperature range 35 to 70 degrees Celsius provided a low precision estimate of the activation energy of the reaction with which to predict the rate of reaction at 25 percent Celsius. To understand the observations at 25 degrees Celsius, experiments must separate the catalyst activation step and the subsequent reaction with TPB. Tests described in this report represent an initial attempt to separate the two steps and determine the rate and activation energy of the reaction between active catalyst and TPB. The results of these tests indicate that the absence of reaction at 25 degrees Celsius was caused by failure to activate the catalyst or the presence of a deactivating mechanism. In the presence of activated catalyst, the decomposition reaction rate is significant.

  15. Low Temperature Reflectance Spectra of Titan Tholins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, T. L.; Dalton, J. B.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositional interpretation of remotely obtained reflectance spectra of outer solar system surfaces is achieved by a variety of methods. These include matching spectral curves, matching spectral features, quantitative spectral interpretation, and theoretical modeling of spectra. All of these approaches rely upon laboratory measurements of one kind or another. The bulk of these laboratory measurements are obtained with the sample of interest at ambient temperatures and pressures. However, surface temperatures of planets, satellites, and asteroids in the outer solar system are significantly cooler than ambient laboratory conditions on Earth. The infrared spectra of many materials change as a function of temperature. As has been recently demonstrated it is important to assess what effects colder temperatures have on spectral properties and hence, compositional interpretations. Titan tholin is a solid residue created by energetic processing of H-, C-, and N-bearing gases. Such residues can also be created by energetic processing if the gases are condensed into ices. Titan tholin has been suggested as a coloring agent for several surfaces in the outer solar system. Here we report laboratory measurements of Titan tholin at a temperature of 100 K and compare these to measurements of the same sample near room temperature. At low temperature the absorption features beyond 1 micrometer narrow slightly. At wavelengths greater than approx. 0.8 micrometer the overall reflectance of the sample decreases slightly making the sample less red at low temperatures. We will discuss the implications of the laboratory measurements for interpretation of cold outer solar system surfaces.

  16. Electronics for Low Temperature Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2007-01-01

    Exploration missions to outer planets and deep space require spacecraft, probes, and on-board data and communication systems to operate reliably and efficiently under severe harsh conditions. On-board electronics, in particular those in direct exposures to the space environment without any shielding or protection, will encounter extreme low temperature and thermal cycling in their service cycle in most of NASA s upcoming exploration missions. For example, Venus atmosphere, Jupiter atmosphere, Moon surface, Pluto orbiter, Mars, comets, Titan, Europa, and James Webb Space Telescope all involve low-temperature surroundings. Therefore, electronics for space exploration missions need to be designed for operation under such environmental conditions. There are ongoing efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) to establish a database on the operation and reliability of electronic devices and circuits under extreme temperature operation for space applications. This work is being performed under the Extreme Temperature Electronics Program with collaboration and support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. The results of these investigations will be used to establish safe operating areas and to identify degradation and failure modes, and the information will be disseminated to mission planners and system designers for use as tools for proper part selection and in risk mitigation. An overview of this program along with experimental data will be presented.

  17. Antimisting kerosene: Low temperature degradation and blending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.

    1988-01-01

    The inline filtration characteristics of freshly blended and degraded antimisting fuels (AMK) at low temperature are examined. A needle valve degrader was modified to include partial recirculation of degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop. A pressure drop across the needle valve of up to 4,000 psi was used. The pressure drop across a 325 mesh filter screen placed inline with the degrader and directly downstream of the needle valve was measured as a function of time for different values of pressure drop across the needle valve. A volume flux of 1 gpm/sq in was employed based on the frontal area of the screen. It was found that, at ambient temperatures, freshly blended AMK fuel could be degraded using a single pass degradation at 4,000 psi pressure drop across the needle valve to give acceptable filterability performance. At fuel temperatures below -20 C, degradation becomes increasingly difficult and a single pass technique results in unacceptable filtration performance. Recirculation of a fraction of the degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop improved low temperature degradation performance. The problem is addressed of blending the AMK additive with Jet A at various base fuel temperatures.

  18. Stream measurements locate thermogenic methane fluxes in groundwater discharge in an area of shale-gas development.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Grieve, Paul L; Hynek, Scott A; Brantley, Susan L; Solomon, D Kip; Risser, Dennis W

    2015-04-01

    The environmental impacts of shale-gas development on water resources, including methane migration to shallow groundwater, have been difficult to assess. Monitoring around gas wells is generally limited to domestic water-supply wells, which often are not situated along predominant groundwater flow paths. A new concept is tested here: combining stream hydrocarbon and noble-gas measurements with reach mass-balance modeling to estimate thermogenic methane concentrations and fluxes in groundwater discharging to streams and to constrain methane sources. In the Marcellus Formation shale-gas play of northern Pennsylvania (U.S.A.), we sampled methane in 15 streams as a reconnaissance tool to locate methane-laden groundwater discharge: concentrations up to 69 μg L(-1) were observed, with four streams ≥ 5 μg L(-1). Geochemical analyses of water from one stream with high methane (Sugar Run, Lycoming County) were consistent with Middle Devonian gases. After sampling was completed, we learned of a state regulator investigation of stray-gas migration from a nearby Marcellus Formation gas well. Modeling indicates a groundwater thermogenic methane flux of about 0.5 kg d(-1) discharging into Sugar Run, possibly from this fugitive gas source. Since flow paths often coalesce into gaining streams, stream methane monitoring provides the first watershed-scale method to assess groundwater contamination from shale-gas development. PMID:25786038

  19. Low Temperature Growth of Nanostructured Diamond Films on Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Paul A.; Catledge, Shane A.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2001-01-01

    The field of nanocrystalline diamond and tetrahedral amorphous carbon films has been the focus of intense experimental activity in the last few years for applications in field emission display devices, optical windows, and tribological coatings, The choice of substrate used in most studies has typically been silicon. For metals, however, the thermal expansion mismatch between the diamond film and substrate gives rise to thermal stress that often results in delamination of the film. To avoid this problem in conventional CVD deposition low substrate temperatures (less than 700 C) have been used, often with the incorporation of oxygen or carbon monoxide to the feedgas mixture. Conventionally grown CVD diamond films are also rough and would require post-deposition polishing for most applications. Therefore, there is an obvious need to develop techniques for deposition of well-adhered, smooth nano-structured diamond films on metals for various tribological applications. In our work, nanostructured diamond films are grown on a titanium alloy substrate using a two-step deposition process. The first step is performed at elevated temperature (820 C) for 30 minutes using a H2/CH4/N2 gas mixture in order to grow a thin (approx. 600 nm) nanostructured diamond layer and improve film adhesion. The remainder of the deposition involves growth at low temperature (less than 600 C) in a H2/CH4/O2 gas mixture. Laser reflectance Interferometry (LRI) pattern during growth of a nanostructured diamond film on Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The first 30 minutes are at a high temperature of 820 C and the rest of the film is grown at a low temperature of 580 T. The fringe pattern is observed till the very end due to extremely low surface roughness of 40 nm. The continuation of the smooth nanostructured diamond film growth during low temperature deposition is confirmed by in-situ laser reflectance interferometry and by post-deposition micro-Raman spectroscopy and surface profilometry. Similar experiments

  20. Impacts from oil and gas produced water discharges on the gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M. E.; Satterlee, K.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division; ExxonMobil Production Co.; Shell Offshore

    2006-01-01

    Shallow water areas of the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf experience low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) each summer. The hypoxic zone is primarily caused by input of nutrients from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. The nutrients stimulate the growth of phytoplankton, which leads to reduction of the oxygen concentration near the sea floor. During the renewal of an offshore discharge permit used by the oil and gas industry in the Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified the need to assess the potential contribution from produced water discharges to the occurrence of hypoxia. The EPA permit required either that all platforms in the hypoxic zone submit produced water samples, or that industry perform a coordinated sampling program. This paper, based on a report submitted to EPA in August 2005 (1), describes the results of the joint industry sampling program and the use of those results to quantify the relative significance of produced water discharges in the context of other sources on the occurrence of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. In the sampling program, 16 facilities were selected for multiple sampling - three times each at one month intervals-- and another 34 sites for onetime sampling. The goal of the sampling program was to quantify the sources and amount of oxygen demand associated with a variety of Gulf of Mexico produced waters. Data collected included direct oxygen demand measured by BOD5 (5-day biochemical oxygen demand) and TOC (total organic carbon) and indirect oxygen demand measured by nitrogen compounds (ammonia, nitrate, nitrate, and TKN [total Kjeldahl nitrogen]) and phosphorus (total phosphorus and orthophosphate). These data will serve as inputs to several available computer models currently in use for forecasting the occurrence of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. The output of each model will be compared for consistency in their predictions and then a semi-quantitative estimate of the relative significance of

  1. Elongated dust clouds in a uniform DC positive column of low pressure gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usachev, A. D.; Zobnin, A. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Thoma, M. H.; Pustylnik, M. Y.; Fink, M. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental investigations of the formation of elongated dust clouds and their influence on the plasma glow intensity of the uniform direct current (DC) positive column (PC) have been performed under microgravity conditions. For the axial stabilization of the dust cloud position a polarity switching DC gas discharge with a switching frequency of 250 Hz was used. During the experiment, a spontaneous division of one elongated dust cloud into two smaller steady state dust clouds has been observed. Quantitative data on the dust cloud shape, size and dust number density distribution were obtained. Axial and radial distributions of plasma emission within the 585.2 nm and 703.2 nm neon spectral lines were measured over the whole discharge volume. It has been found that both spectral line intensities at the dust cloud region grew 1.7 times with respect to the undisturbed positive column region; in this the 585.2 nm line intensity increased by 10% compared to the 703.2 nm line intensity. For a semi-quantitative explanation of the observed phenomena the Schottky approach based on the equation of diffusion was used. The model reasonably explains the observed glow enhancement as an increasing of the ionization rate in the discharge with dust cloud, which compensates ion-electron recombination on the dust grain surfaces. In this, the ionization rate increases due to the growing of the DC axial electric field, and the glow grows directly proportional to the electric field. It is shown that the fundamental condition of the radial stability of the dusty plasma cloud is equal to the ionization and recombination rates within the cloud volume that is possible only when the electron density is constant and the radial electric field is absent within the dust cloud.

  2. Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

    2011-10-16

    Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

  3. Influence of Nitrogen Gas Flow Rate on the Electrical Behavior of an Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Jet Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, C. Y.; Chin, O. H.

    2011-03-30

    The dielectric barrier discharge configuration used consists of a hemispherical electrode insulated by 1 mm thick borosilicate glass and a grounded plate with a hole through which the jet is formed externally in the surrounding air. The effect of gas flow rate on the behavior of an atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier jet discharge was studied for different air-gap distance and drive voltage, V{sub DD}, to the MOSFET. It is found that at higher rate of nitrogen gas flow, the current spikes reduce in number when the driving voltage and air-gap distance are kept constant.

  4. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  5. Radically Different Kinetics at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Ian

    2014-06-01

    The use of the CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme, or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique coupled with pulsed laser photochemical kinetics methods has shown that reactions involving radicals can be very rapid at temperatures down to 10 K or below. The results have had a major impact in astrochemistry and planetology, as well as proving an exacting test for theory. The technique has also been applied to the formation of transient complexes of interest both in atmospheric chemistry and combustion. Until now, all of the chemical reactions studied in this way have taken place on attractive potential energy surfaces with no overall barrier to reaction. The F + H2 {→} HF + H reaction does possess a substantial energetic barrier ({\\cong} 800 K), and might therefore be expected to slow to a negligible rate at very low temperatures. In fact, this H-atom abstraction reaction does take place efficiently at low temperatures due entirely to tunneling. I will report direct experimental measurements of the rate of this reaction down to a temperature of 11 K, in remarkable agreement with state-of-the-art quantum reactive scattering calculations by François Lique (Université du Havre) and Millard Alexander (University of Maryland). It is thought that long chain cyanopolyyne molecules H(C2)nCN may play an important role in the formation of the orange haze layer in Titan's atmosphere. The longest carbon chain molecule observed in interstellar space, HC11N, is also a member of this series. I will present new results, obtained in collaboration with Jean-Claude Guillemin (Ecole de Chimie de Rennes) and Stephen Klippenstein (Argonne National Labs), on reactions of C2H, CN and C3N radicals (using a new LIF scheme by Hoshina and Endo which contribute to the low temperature formation of (cyano)polyynes. H. Sabbah, L. Biennier, I. R. Sims, Y. Georgievskii, S. J. Klippenstein, I. W. M. Smith, Science 317, 102 (2007). S. D. Le Picard, M

  6. Gas Breakdown, Low Current diffuse discharges, Townsend's theory: A Friday afternoon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Zoran

    2013-09-01

    Numerous aspects of the ``standard model'' of gas breakdown have been addressed in the past 20 years by Art Phelps and his coworkers. First, his studies of excitation coefficients were carried out in the Townsend regime where electric field is quasi uniform so swarm like conditions prevail. These studies have been extended to very high E/N where non-hydrodynamic effects were to be observed but were overshadowed in most cases by fast neutral excitation. Absolute calibration of emission provided a basis to obtain fast neutral cross section sets. This work necessarily overlapped with the left hand side of the Paschen curve and in extension of an ill fated data gathering experiment a review was made of all the processes that contribute to the secondary electron emission. It was shown that, if one includes all the processes, it is possible to fit the available breakdown data, Paschen curves and effective electron yields by binary collision data obtained in separate experiments. While performing measurements in the low current diffuse (Townsend) regime one can find negative differential resistance and oscillations. Both were explained by taking detailed information on properties of particles close to the cathode and small perturbations to the local field by the growing space charge. Last but not the least Phelps managed, with his coworkers to provide a phenomenology and predictions of the anomalously broadened profiles often observed in various discharges. In all those cases deep knowledge of atomic and molecular physics and of gas discharges were combined with best available data to produce quantitative (quantitative, quantitative) agreement with experiments. Coworkers: Dragana Maric. Supported by MPNTR project ON171037 and SANU project 155.

  7. Soft cutting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by low temperature ultrasonication in a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids.

    PubMed

    Shuba, M V; Paddubskaya, A G; Kuzhir, P P; Maksimenko, S A; Ksenevich, V K; Niaura, G; Seliuta, D; Kasalynas, I; Valusis, G

    2012-12-14

    To decrease single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) lengths to a value of 100-200 nm, aggressive cutting methods, accompanied by a high loss of starting material, are frequently used. We propose a cutting approach based on low temperature intensive ultrasonication in a mixture of sulfuric and nitric acids. The method is nondestructive with a yield close to 100%. It was applied to cut nanotubes produced in three different ways: gas-phase catalysis, chemical vapor deposition, and electric-arc-discharge methods. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to demonstrate that the cut carbon nanotubes have a low extent of sidewall degradation and their electronic properties are close to those of the untreated tubes. It was proposed to use the spectral position of the far-infrared absorption peak as a simple criterion for the estimation of SWCNT length distribution in the samples. PMID:23154484

  8. Coal desulfurization by low-temperature chlorinolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.; Kalvinskas, J. J.; Ganguli, P. S.; Gavalas, G. R.

    1977-01-01

    Among the three principal methods for precombustion desulfurization of coal, which include physical depyriting, chemical desulfurization, and coal conversion to low-sulfur liquid and gaseous fuels, the potential of chemical methods looks promising in terms of both total sulfur removal and processing cost. The principal chemical methods for coal desulfurization involve treatment with either oxidizing agents or basic media at elevated temperature and pressure. A description is given of some recent experimental results which show the feasibility of removing sulfur, particularly organic sulfur, from high-sulfur coals by a simple method of low-temperature chlorinolysis followed by hydrolysis and dechlorination. The chemical feasibility of sulfur removal by chlorinolysis rather than the detailed engineering process is emphasized.

  9. Low temperature synthesis of zinc ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, A.; Ghosh, C. K.; Mitra, M. K.; Das, G. C.; Mukherjee, S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2010-05-01

    Zinc ferrite (ZnFe 2O 4) nanocrystalline powder materials with various particle sizes were prepared by a unique solid-state combustion method. Phase purity of ZnFe 2O 4 was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. High resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis and selected area diffraction pattern also confirmed the correct crystalline phase formation. Particle size was determined from both the transmission electron microscopic images and also from the XRD peak broadening analysis. Oxidation states of different elements present in ZnFe 2O 4 were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Frequency dependent dielectric constant and a.c. conductivity were measured as a function of particle size and both of them were found to decrease with decreasing particle size. These studies indicated that good quality zinc ferrite nanocrystalline powdered materials can be synthesized at low temperature.

  10. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  11. REFRIGERATION ESPECIALLY FOR VERY LOW TEMPERATURES

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, P.B.; Smith, H.R. Jr.

    1960-09-13

    A refrigeration system for producing very low temperatures is described. The system of the invention employs a binary mixture refrigerant in a closed constant volume, e.g., Freon and ethylene. Such mixture is compressed in the gaseous state and is then separated in a fractionating column element of the system. Thenceforth, the first liquid to separate is employed stagewise to cool and liq uefy successive portions of the refrigerant at successively lower temperatures by means of heat exchangers coupled between the successive stages. When shut down, all of the volumes of the system are interconnected and a portion of the refrigerant remains liquid at ambient temperatures so that no dangerous overpressures develop. The system is therefore rugged, simple and dependable in operation.

  12. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  13. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  14. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  15. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E.; Bloomquist, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  16. Low Temperature Flow of PVC Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Xue, Gi

    2011-03-01

    PVC is usually processed at temperature above 180& circ; C, however, it starts to degrade at 130& circ; C. If PVC can flow at temperatures below glass transition temperature (Tg), the manufacturing procedure will be energy-conserving and environment-friendly. We find that PVC powders with controlled inter-segment van der Waals attraction can be compressed into a transparent pellet with high modulus at low temperatures. The molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon involves shear-induced unjamming transition. PVC chains are unjammed by cold-pressing freeze-dried powder with decreased packing density. Because the Tg of freeze-dried PVC is dramatically reduced to the test temperatures under compression, PVC chains are able to flow by applying pressure solely. These results help us better understanding glass transition and can possible to develop a theory for cold processes.

  17. Low-temperature thermodynamics with quantum coherence

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhachar, Varun; Gour, Gilad

    2015-01-01

    Thermal operations are an operational model of non-equilibrium quantum thermodynamics. In the absence of coherence between energy levels, exact state transition conditions under thermal operations are known in terms of a mathematical relation called thermo-majorization. But incorporating coherence has turned out to be challenging, even under the relatively tractable model wherein all Gibbs state-preserving quantum channels are included. Here we find a mathematical generalization of thermal operations at low temperatures, ‘cooling maps', for which we derive the necessary and sufficient state transition condition. Cooling maps that saturate recently discovered bounds on coherence transfer are realizable as thermal operations, motivating us to conjecture that all cooling maps are thermal operations. Cooling maps, though a less-conservative generalization to thermal operations, are more tractable than Gibbs-preserving operations, suggesting that cooling map-like models at general temperatures could be of use in gaining insight about thermal operations. PMID:26138621

  18. Low temperature double-layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J. (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Double-layer capacitors capable of operating at extremely low temperatures (e.g., as low as -75.degree. C.) are disclosed. Electrolyte solutions combining a base solvent (e.g., acetonitrile) and a cosolvent are employed to lower the melting point of the base electrolyte. Example cosolvents include methyl formate, ethyl acetate, methyl acetate, propionitrile, butyronitrile, and 1,3-dioxolane. An optimized concentration (e.g., 0.10 M to 0.75 M) of salt, such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, is dissolved into the electrolyte solution. In some cases (e.g., 1,3-dioxolane cosolvent) additives, such as 2% by volume triethylamine, may be included in the solvent mixture to prevent polymerization of the solution. Conventional device form factors and structural elements (e.g., porous carbon electrodes and a polyethylene separator) may be employed.

  19. A symmetrical low temperature pressure transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helvensteijn, B. P. M.; VanSciver, S. W.

    1990-03-01

    The design and operating characteristics of a fully differential pressure transducer are described. The device is intended for use with He II heat transfer experiments where it operates in vacuum and at low temperatures (T<4.2 K). A movable electrode is attached to two sets of miniature bellows such that the electrode position is determined by the differential pressure across the device. The movable electrode is located between two fixed electrodes, thus forming a pair of variable capacitors. A dedicated charge amplifier is used to convert the pressure induced capacitance change to an ac output voltage. The sensitivity is roughly 5 μV/Pa. For the present application, the capacitor and electronics have acceptable performance, with a mean noise level of ±5 Pa.

  20. Preparation of silver nanoparticles at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Mini; Chauhan, Pratima

    2016-04-01

    Silver from ancient time is used as antimicrobial agent in the bulk form but now with the advancement in nanotechnology silver in the form of nanoparticles shown potential effect against microbes which make us easy to fight with many diseases plants and animals. In this work silver nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical routes using sodium borohydride as reducing agent at low temperature. The particles were characterized through UV-Visible spectroscopy as well as X-Ray Diffraction. The UV-visible spectra of silver nanoparticles exhibited absorption at 425 cm; the crystallite size of the particles is between 19nm to 39nm. EDAX graph shows two peaks of silver and oxygen. Water absorbed by silver nanoparticles was removed by the calcinations.

  1. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Wade C; Lewis, Charlotte R; Openshaw, Anna P; Farnsworth, Paul B

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27380389

  2. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  3. The Effects of Added Hydrogen on Noble Gas Discharges Used as Ambient Desorption/Ionization Sources for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Wade C.; Lewis, Charlotte R.; Openshaw, Anna P.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of using hydrogen-doped argon as the support gas for the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ambient desorption/ionization (ADI) source in mass spectrometry. Also, we explore the chemistry responsible for the signal enhancement observed when using both hydrogen-doped argon and hydrogen-doped helium. The hydrogen-doped argon was tested for five analytes representing different classes of molecules. Addition of hydrogen to the argon plasma gas enhanced signals for gas-phase analytes and for analytes coated onto glass slides in positive and negative ion mode. The enhancements ranged from factors of 4 to 5 for gas-phase analytes and factors of 2 to 40 for coated slides. There was no significant increase in the background. The limit of detection for caffeine was lowered by a factor of 79 using H2/Ar and 2 using H2/He. Results are shown that help explain the fundamental differences between the pure-gas discharges and those that are hydrogen-doped for both argon and helium. Experiments with different discharge geometries and grounding schemes indicate that observed signal enhancements are strongly dependent on discharge configuration.

  4. Improved Thermal-Insulation Systems for Low Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stanislaw D.

    2003-01-01

    Improved thermal-insulation materials and structures and the techniques for manufacturing them are undergoing development for use in low-temperature applications. Examples of low-temperature equipment for which these thermal insulation systems could provide improved energy efficiency include storage tanks for cryogens, superconducting electric-power-transmission equipment, containers for transport of food and other perishable commodities, and cold boxes for low-temperature industrial processes. These systems could also be used to insulate piping used to transfer cryogens and other fluids, such as liquefied natural gas, refrigerants, chilled water, crude oil, or low-pressure steam. The present thermal-insulation systems are layer composites based partly on the older class of thermal-insulation systems denoted generally as multilayer insulation (MLI). A typical MLI structure includes an evacuated jacket, within which many layers of radiation shields are stacked or wrapped close together. Low-thermal-conductivity spacers are typically placed between the reflection layers to keep them from touching. MLI can work very well when a high vacuum level (less than 10(exp-4) torr) is maintained and utmost care is taken during installation, but its thermal performance deteriorates sharply as the pressure in the evacuated space rises into the soft vacuum range [pressures greater than 0.1 torr (greater than 13 Pa)]. In addition, the thermal performance of MLI is extremely sensitive to mechanical compression and edge effects and can easily decrease from one to two orders of magnitude from its ideal value even when the MLI is kept under high vacuum condition. The present thermal-insulation systems are designed to perform well under soft vacuum level, in particular the range of 1 to 10 torr. They are also designed with larger interlayer spacings to reduce vulnerability to compression (and consequent heat leak) caused by installation and use. The superiority of these systems is the

  5. Low-temperature growth of single-walled carbon nanotube using Al2O3/Pd/Al2O3 multilayer catalyst by alcohol gas source method at high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiribayashi, Hoshimitsu; Ogawa, Seigo; Kozawa, Akinari; Saida, Takahiro; Naritsuka, Shigeya; Maruyama, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    We carried out single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) growth at 500 and 600 °C using Al2O3/Pd/Al2O3 multilayer catalysts on SiO2/Si substrates by the alcohol gas source method. When the ethanol pressures were 1 × 10‑4 and 1 × 10‑3 Pa, radial-breathing-mode (RBM) peaks and sharp G band peaks appeared in Raman spectra, indicating the growth of SWCNTs even at 500 °C. When the growth temperature and ethanol pressure were 500 °C and 1 × 10‑4 Pa, respectively, the growth rate decreased gradually with the growth time, but the SWCNT growth continued for more than 4 h and the diameter distribution changed as the growth proceeded. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that oxidized Pd catalyst particles were reduced to metallic states after the SWCNT growth started.

  6. Pulsed-gas glow discharge for ultrahigh mass resolution measurements with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.H.; Eyler, J.R.; Barshick, C.M.; Wronka, J.; Laukien, F.H.

    1996-02-01

    A new pulsed-gas glow discharge (GD) source has been developed for use with an external ion source Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer. With pulsed argon gas introduction into the GD source, the gas load and pressure in the mass analyzer region were greatly reduced; this resulted in improved mass resolution. Mass resolution of greater than 145000 (fwhm) has been achieved for Cu{sup +} ions from a brass sample, the highest reported for any type of GD mass spectrometer. The pulsed-gas GD source promises analytical usefulness for ultrahigh resolution measurements in GD mass spectrometry. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of conducting zirconium nitride films using tetrakis (dimethylamido) zirconium and forming gas (5% H{sub 2} + 95% N{sub 2}) plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Muneshwar, Triratna Cadien, Ken

    2015-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) has the lowest bulk electrical resistivity and high thermal stability among group IV and V transition metal nitrides, which makes it a promising material for ULSI applications such as a diffusion barrier for Cu interconnects, contact metal in III-V semiconductor devices, and in high density memory structures. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of conducting ZrN thin films using Zr[N(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 4} and forming gas (5% H{sub 2} + 95% N{sub 2}) plasma is reported in this article. The growth per cycle (GPC) for every deposition was determined from analysis of dynamic in-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (d-iSE) measurements. An experimental design is proposed for faster determination of ALD growth saturation curves. At substrate temperature of 150 °C, a GPC of 0.10 nm/cycle was observed for self-limiting ZrN PEALD growth. The electrical resistivity of ZrN films deposited on SiO{sub 2} substrate was found to be 559.5 ± 18.5 μΩ cm with negligible change in resistivity even after ∼1000 h exposure to air. The metallic behavior of our ZrN films was evident from the free electron dispersion component in dielectric response, the broad band of photoelectron emission across Fermi level and the positive temperature coefficient for resistivity of 0.0088/ °C.

  8. Conformational Properties of 1-Halogenated-1-Silacyclohexanes, C5H10SiHX (X = Cl, Br, I): Gas Electron Diffraction, Low-Temperature NMR, Temperature-Dependent Raman Spectroscopy, and Quantum-Chemical Calculations.

    PubMed

    Wallevik, Sunna Ó; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Kvaran, Agúst; Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Arnason, Ingvar; Belyakov, Alexander V; Kern, Thomas; Hassler, Karl

    2013-12-01

    The molecular structures of axial and equatorial conformers of cyclo-C5H10SiHX (X = Cl, Br, I) as well as the thermodynamic equilibrium between these species was investigated by means of gas electron diffraction, dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance, temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy, and quantum-chemical calculations applying CCSD(T), MP2, and DFT methods. According to the experimental and calculated results, all three compounds exist as a mixture of two chair conformers of the six-membered ring. The two chair forms of Cs symmetry differ in the axial or equatorial position of the X atom. In all cases, the axial conformer is preferred over the equatorial one. When the experimental uncertainties are taken into account, all of the experimental and theoretical results for the conformational energy (E axial - E equatorial) fit into a remarkably narrow range of -0.50 ± 0.15 kcal mol(-1). It was found by NBO analysis that the axial conformers are unfavorable in terms of steric energy and conjugation effects and that they are stabilized mainly by electrostatic interactions. The conformational energies for C6H11X and cyclo-C5H10SiHX (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At) were compared using CCSD(T) calculations. In both series, fluorine is predicted to have a lower conformational preference (cyclohexane equatorial, silacyclohexane axial) than Cl, Br, and I. It is predicted that astatine would behave very similarly to Cl, Br, and I within each series. PMID:24353364

  9. Conformational Properties of 1-Halogenated-1-Silacyclohexanes, C5H10SiHX (X = Cl, Br, I): Gas Electron Diffraction, Low-Temperature NMR, Temperature-Dependent Raman Spectroscopy, and Quantum-Chemical Calculations†

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structures of axial and equatorial conformers of cyclo-C5H10SiHX (X = Cl, Br, I) as well as the thermodynamic equilibrium between these species was investigated by means of gas electron diffraction, dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance, temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy, and quantum-chemical calculations applying CCSD(T), MP2, and DFT methods. According to the experimental and calculated results, all three compounds exist as a mixture of two chair conformers of the six-membered ring. The two chair forms of Cs symmetry differ in the axial or equatorial position of the X atom. In all cases, the axial conformer is preferred over the equatorial one. When the experimental uncertainties are taken into account, all of the experimental and theoretical results for the conformational energy (Eaxial – Eequatorial) fit into a remarkably narrow range of −0.50 ± 0.15 kcal mol–1. It was found by NBO analysis that the axial conformers are unfavorable in terms of steric energy and conjugation effects and that they are stabilized mainly by electrostatic interactions. The conformational energies for C6H11X and cyclo-C5H10SiHX (X = F, Cl, Br, I, At) were compared using CCSD(T) calculations. In both series, fluorine is predicted to have a lower conformational preference (cyclohexane equatorial, silacyclohexane axial) than Cl, Br, and I. It is predicted that astatine would behave very similarly to Cl, Br, and I within each series. PMID:24353364

  10. Influence of discharge production conditions, gas pressure, current intensity and voltage type, on SF6 dissociation under point-plane corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belarbi, A.; Pradayrol, C.; Casanovas, J.; Casanovas, A. M.

    1995-02-01

    The study of the formation of Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) dissociation products under point to plane corona discharges was carried out at P(sub SF(6)) = 300 kPa using different discharges production conditions (50 Hz ac voltage, dc negative polarity voltage, mean discharge current intensity bar-I varying between 2 and 45 micro-A for dc negative polarity voltage), for two plane electrode materials (aluminum and stainless steel), and moisture levels (200 and 2000 ppm(sub v) H2O). The stable gaseous by-products formed (SO2F2, SOF4, SOF2, and S2F10) were assayed by gas-phase chromatography. The results indicate an important effect of the metal constituting the plane electrode and of the moisture conditions whatever the SF6 pressure (100-300 kPa), discharges intensity (bar-I) and voltage type studied. An effect of the increase of SF6 pressure up to 300 kPa was mainly observed for S2F10 and corresponds to a greater formation of this compound with P(sub SF(6)). The influence of the mean discharge current intensity on SF6 by-product formation carried out for a transported charge of 1 C showed that for I less than or equal to 10 micro-A, the effect varies according to the compound considered and depends on the water content of the SF6 and/or on the plane electrode material, whereas for bar-I greater than 10 micro-A, the levels of the four compound studied hardly vary with the current. Comparison of results obtained under ac and dc voltage for a cumulated charge of between 0.5 and 11 C showed that (SO2F2+SOF4) and SOF2 were formed in larger quantities with ac than with dc, unlike S2F10 for which the opposite effect was observed.

  11. Oxidation of ammonium sulfite by a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hua; Lu, Na; Shang, Kefeng; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2013-03-01

    The oxidation of ammonium sulfite in the ammonia-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) process was investigated in a multi-needle-to-plate gas phase pulsed corona discharge reactor in this paper. The effect of several parameters, including capacitance and peak pulse voltage of discharge system, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate on the oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite was reviewed. The oxidation rate of ammonium sulfite could reach 47.2% at the capacitance, the peak pulse voltage, electrode gap and bubbling gas flow rate equal to 2 nF, -24.6 k V, 35 mm and 4 L min-1 within treatment time of 40 min The experimental results indicate that the gas phase pulsed discharge system with a multi-needle-to-plate electrode can oxide the ammonium sulfite. The oxidation rate increased with the applied capacitance and peak pulse voltage and decreased with the electrode gap. As the bubbling gas flow rate increased, the oxidation rate increased first and then tended to reach a stationary value. These results would be important for the process optimization of the (NH4)2SO3 to (NH4)2SO4 oxidation.

  12. The science capability of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, M.; Croonquist, A.; Dick, G. J.; Liu, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is a multiple user and multiple-flight NASA facility that will provide a low temperature environment for about 4. 5 months on board the International Space Station (ISS).

  13. Effect of Oxygen Gas on the Decomposition of Dye by Pulsed Discharge in Water Droplet Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, Taisuke; Yokoyama, Yuzo; Nakamura, Akira; Minamitani, Yasushi

    Effect of O2 on the decolorization of indigo carmine and on the production of dissolved species such as NO2-, NO3-, O3 and H2O2 in the treatment water by pulsed discharge in water droplet spray was investigated by controlling the O2/N2 ratios as carrier gases in the reactor. The decolorization rate gradually increased with rise in O2 ratio, which reached a constant value in the range of 50% to 90% O2 ratio and decreased in pure O2. The maximum value was about 2 times as high as that of 20% O2 ratio. The decolorization efficiency was not affected by gas flow rate in the range of 4 L/min to 50 L/min. NO2- in the treatment water was only detected in pure N2, but NO3- was produced in O2/N2. NO2- added to the treatment water was not oxidized in pure N2, but was perfectly converted to NO3- in O2/N2. These results implied that hydroxyl radical produced in gas phase does not directly contribute to the oxidation of substances in water. O3 concentration gradually increased with rise in O2 ratio, whereas H2O2 concentration decreased. In the range of 50 to 80% O2 ratio, O3 and H2O2 concentrations were approximately constant value, similar to the trend of decolorization rate. Moreover rate constants on various gas mixing ratio of O2/N2 were determined from the kinetics study. These results suggested that hydroxyl radical produced in the treatment water by the chain reactions of O3 and hydroperoxy radical (HO2·) plays an important role of the decomposition of molecules in water.

  14. Fluoroester Co-Solvents for Low-Temperature Li+ Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall; Bugga, Ratnakumar; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smith, Kiah; Bhalla, Pooja

    2009-01-01

    Electrolytes comprising LiPF6 dissolved in alkyl carbonate/fluoroester mixtures have been found to afford improved low-temperature performance and greater high-temperature resilience in rechargeable lithium-ion electrochemical cells. These and other electrolytes comprising lithium salts dissolved mixtures of esters have been studied in continuing research directed toward extending the lower limit of operating temperatures of such cells. This research at earlier stages, and the underlying physical and chemical principles, were reported in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The purpose of the present focus on high-temperature resilience in addition to low-temperature performance is to address issues posed by the flammability of the esters and, at temperatures near the upper end (about 55 C) of their intended operating temperature range, by their high chemical reactivity. As used here, high-temperature resilience signifies, loosely, a desired combination of low flammability of an electrolyte mixture and the ability of a cell that contains the mixture to sustain a relatively small loss of reversible charge/discharge capacity during storage in the fully charged condition at high temperature. The selection of fluoroesters for study as candidate electrolyte solvent components to increase high-temperature resilience was prompted in part by the observation that like other halogenated compounds, fluoroesters have low flammability. The fluoroesters investigated in this study include trifluoroethyl butyrate (TFEB), ethyl trifluoroacetate (ETFA), trifluoroethyl acetate (TFEA), and methyl pentafluoropropionate (MPFP). Solvent mixtures were prepared by mixing these fluoroesters with two other esters: ethylene carbonate (EC) and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC).

  15. Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution Of Sludge Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.T.; Hamm, B.A.; Pike, J.A.

    2008-07-01

    primarily of radioactive wastes containing a very high aluminum concentration. Based on initial laboratory testing and previous sludge characterization, aluminum in this sludge could be dissolved at low temperature (no more than 65 deg. C) in a concentrated caustic solution. The amount of aluminum predicted to dissolve under these conditions ranged from 25% to 80%. An opportunity existed to remove a significant amount of aluminum prior to vitrification in DWPF and increase the level of understanding of the effects of caustic dissolution of aluminum at lower temperatures. This paper presents the results of a real waste laboratory demonstration and full-scale implementation of a low temperature aluminum dissolution process which should be considered as a viable means to reduce radioactive sludge mass and reduce the amount of waste to be vitrified. (authors)

  16. Plasma density evolution during nanosecond discharge in hydrogen gas at (1-3) × 105 Pa pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatom, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2014-05-01

    The results of a study of the nanosecond discharge in H2 gas at pressures of (1-3) × 105 Pa using fast-framing photography and space- and time-resolved spectroscopy are presented. The discharge is initiated by the application of a high-voltage pulse with an amplitude of ˜100 kV and duration of ˜5 ns to a blade cathode placed at a distance of 20 mm from the anode. The results show the dynamics of the discharge formation and the build-up of the plasma electron density in the discharge channels close to and at a distance from the edge of the cathode. The results obtained are compared to those obtained in recent studies of similar discharges in air and He gas. It was shown that the time and space evolution of the plasma light emission in the H2 gas discharge is very similar to that in air. Namely, the generation of the plasma is mainly confined to the plasma channels initiated at the top and bottom edges of the cathode electrode and that there are no new plasma channels formed from the explosive emission centres along the blade as it was obtained in earlier experiments with He gas. Spectroscopic measurements showed that the plasma density reaches 2 × 1017 cm-3 and 1.6 × 1016 cm-3 in the vicinity of the cathode and the middle of the anode-cathode gap, respectively, for a plasma electron temperature of <1.5 eV. The values of plasma electron density and the previously presented results of electric field measurements allow calculation of the resistance of the plasma channels.

  17. Retardation of C2C12 myoblast cell proliferation by exposure to low-temperature atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Naoya; Fujita, Ryo; Kawano, Fuminori; Takahashi, Kazuo; Ohira, Takashi; Shibaguchi, Tsubasa; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2014-09-01

    As the first step in evaluating the possibility of low-temperature atmospheric plasma for clinical applications in the treatment of rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), we determined the effects of plasma exposure on C2C12 myoblasts. The low-temperature atmospheric plasma was generated through an electrical discharge in argon gas. One minute of plasma exposure every 24 h inhibited the cell proliferation, whereas myoblast differentiation was not affected. Plasma exposure increased the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK at 30 min after the exposure, but the phosphorylation of both was decreased to less than control levels at 1 and 4 h after the exposure. Plasma exposure increased the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase at 8 h after the exposure. In conclusion, plasma exposure retarded the proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts by G2/M arrest. Therefore, plasma exposure can be a possible treatment for the anti-proliferative effects of malignant tumors, such as RMS, without affecting differentiated skeletal muscle cells. PMID:25034108

  18. High-power gas-discharge excimer ArF, KrCl, KrF and XeCl lasers utilising two-component gas mixtures without a buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razhev, A. M.; Kargapol'tsev, E. S.; Churkin, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Results of an experimental study of the influence of a gas mixture (laser active medium) composition on an output energy and total efficiency of gas-discharge excimer lasers on ArF* (193 nm), KrCl* (222 nm), KrF* (248 nm) and XeCl* (308 nm) molecules operating without a buffer gas are presented. The optimal ratios of gas components (from the viewpoint of a maximum output energy) of an active medium are found, which provide an efficient operation of laser sources. It is experimentally confirmed that for gas-discharge excimer lasers on halogenides of inert gases the presence of a buffer gas in an active medium is not a necessary condition for efficient operation. For the first time, in two-component gas mixtures of repetitively pulsed gas-discharge excimer lasers on electron transitions of excimer molecules ArF*, KrCl*, KrF* and XeCl*, the pulsed energy of laser radiation obtained under pumping by a transverse volume electric discharge in a low-pressure gas mixture without a buffer gas reached up to 170 mJ and a high pulsed output power (of up to 24 MW) was obtained at a FWHM duration of the KrF-laser pulse of 7 ns. The maximal total efficiency obtained in the experiment with two-component gas mixtures of KrF and XeCl lasers was 0.8%.

  19. Study of ozone-initiated limonene reaction products by low temperature plasma ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nørgaard, Asger W; Vibenholt, Anni; Benassi, Mario; Clausen, Per Axel; Wolkoff, Peder

    2013-07-01

    Limonene and its ozone-initiated reaction products were investigated in situ by low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry. Helium was used as discharge gas and the protruding plasma generated ~850 ppb ozone in front of the glass tube by reaction with the ambient oxygen. Limonene applied to filter paper was placed in front of the LTP afterglow and the MS inlet. Instantly, a wide range of reaction products appeared, ranging from m/z 139 to ca. 1000 in the positive mode and m/z 115 to ca. 600 in the negative mode. Key monomeric oxidation products including levulinic acid, 4-acetyl-1-methylcyclohexene, limonene oxide, 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal, and the secondary ozonide of limonene could be identified by collision-induced dissociation. Oligomeric products ranged from the nonoxidized dimer of limonene (C20H30) and up to the hexamer with 10 oxygen atoms (C60H90O10). The use of LTP for in situ ozonolysis and ionization represents a new and versatile approach for the assessment of ozone-initiated terpene chemistry. PMID:23666602

  20. Study of Ozone-Initiated Limonene Reaction Products by Low Temperature Plasma Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard, Asger W.; Vibenholt, Anni; Benassi, Mario; Clausen, Per Axel; Wolkoff, Peder

    2013-07-01

    Limonene and its ozone-initiated reaction products were investigated in situ by low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry. Helium was used as discharge gas and the protruding plasma generated ~850 ppb ozone in front of the glass tube by reaction with the ambient oxygen. Limonene applied to filter paper was placed in front of the LTP afterglow and the MS inlet. Instantly, a wide range of reaction products appeared, ranging from m/ z 139 to ca. 1000 in the positive mode and m/ z 115 to ca. 600 in the negative mode. Key monomeric oxidation products including levulinic acid, 4-acetyl-1-methylcyclohexene, limonene oxide, 3-isopropenyl-6-oxo-heptanal, and the secondary ozonide of limonene could be identified by collision-induced dissociation. Oligomeric products ranged from the nonoxidized dimer of limonene (C20H30) and up to the hexamer with 10 oxygen atoms (C60H90O10). The use of LTP for in situ ozonolysis and ionization represents a new and versatile approach for the assessment of ozone-initiated terpene chemistry.