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Sample records for lta pie results

  1. Results of PIE of experimental (U-Mo)-based LEU disperse fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Petrov, Y.; Trifonov, Y.; Alexandrov, V.; Ijutov, A.; Novoselov, A.; Starkov, V.; Shishin, V.; Yakovlev, V.

    2008-07-15

    Performed in frames of Russian RERTR Program were post-irradiation examinations of 12 types of disperse (U-Mo)-based fuel compositions in Al matrix. The goal of the work was to substantiate serviceability of the new fuel compositions being developed for utilization in Russian-built pool-type research reactors. Among the methods of PIE used in this work were visual examination, gamma-scanning, optical metallography, SEM, X-ray analysis and some others. The present paper is dedicated to an analysis of the main results of PIE completed so far. Special attention has been paid to the parameters affecting formation of interaction layer between fuel granules and matrix Al. (author)

  2. LOTS of LTA applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Current problems facing the logistical planner in utilizing the new ships of the modern, intermodal sea transportation systems in a logistics-over-the-shore (undeveloped) environment are described. Then the employment of two potential LTA vehicle systems are described and discussed as significant parts of possible solutions to this range of logistical problems. Vulnerability aspects of these LTA vehicles are also briefly addressed because of their possible employment near combat areas.

  3. Lea's Pies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center worked with a pie company owner to develop an inexpensive container that would protect pies and keep them in a near frozen condition for shipping in 48 hours. A NASA engineer made a thermal barrier envelope from a metalized mylar called 'space blanket material,' developed during the Apollo era. The envelope protects the pies from heat transfer. Pictured, a NASA engineer removes the temperature logger from a pecan pie shipped to him in a prototype envelope.

  4. Basic relationships for LTA economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausrotas, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Operating costs based on data of actual and proposed airships for conventional lighter than air craft (LTA) are presented. An economic comparison of LTA with the B-47F is included, and possible LTA economic trends are discussed.

  5. Remotely piloted LTA vehicle for surveillance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seemann, G. R.; Harris, G. L.; Brown, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    Various aspects of a remotely piloted mini-LTA vehicle for surveillance, monitoring and measurement for civilian and military applications are considered. Applications, operations and economics are discussed.

  6. LTA - Recent developments. [Lighter Than Air ships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1977-01-01

    NASA-sponsored studies of existing and new LTA missions showed that airships looked very promising for some two dozen civil and military applications. These include surveillance of rural and urban areas, in the form of forest and police patrols; transport of very heavy large-volume maritime, industrial, and military payloads; coastal patrol and sea control; seismographic surveys; air pollution monitoring; and moving goods to remote areas; along with a number of less important but still attractive missions. A figure of merit of productivity (payload weight, ton moles per hour) was used to compare airships of various type and size. In each case, this criterion established an index of efficiency for evaluating not only conceptual approaches but also modes of flight. Some, in part unexpected, results of these studies are described.

  7. 1981 LTA technology assessment - Past and present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashford, R. L.; Levitt, B. B.; Mayer, N. J.; Vocar, J. M.; Woodward, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    A four-part presentation is made of (1) lessons learned from the design and operation of the 'classic' airships of the 1920s and 30s, with respect to such issues as construction, propulsion, control, instrumentation, ground handling, habitability, aerodynamics, and structure and construction; (2) lessons learned from the development of such specialized lighter-than-air (LTA) concepts as metal-clad airships, semi-buoyant lifting bodies, experimental, sport and commercial free balloons, high-altitude platforms, and tethered aerostats; (3) the current status of LTA technology in various countries, with emphasis on significant developments in configuration, dynamics, control, structures, materials, and propulsion; and (4) a projection of future trends. It is concluded that socio-economic factors will strongly influence and encourage LTA development in the 1990s.

  8. Aerial view of entire LTA base after completion of both ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of entire LTA base after completion of both LTA ship hangars. Date unknown but probably circa 1945. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  9. Association analysis of the LTA4H gene polymorphisms and pulmonary tuberculosis in 9115 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, James; Kopanitsa, Liliya; Stebbings, Emma; Speirs, Arran; Ignatyeva, Olga; Balabanova, Yanina; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Hoffner, Sven; Horstmann, Rolf; Drobniewski, Francis; Nejentsev, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    Summary Immunoregulatory eicosanoids have been implicated in protection from mycobacterial infection in cell and animal models. Recently, a study of the zebrafish embryo demonstrated that mutants of the lta4h gene, which encodes the leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) enzyme of the eicosanoid pathway, have hypersusceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum infection. It also reported that heterozygosity at the two single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1978331 and rs2660898 located in introns of the LTA4H gene, a human homologue of lta4h, is associated with protection from pulmonary tuberculosis. To replicate this association we genotyped six LTA4H gene polymorphisms in samples from 3703 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 5412 healthy controls collected in Russia. We found no evidence of the protective effect of heterozygosity at the polymorphisms rs1978331 and rs2660898 (P = 0.29 and 0.49) and no association of the alleles of any of the six polymorphisms (P = 0.13–0.81). These results suggest that common polymorphisms in the LTA4H gene do not play any major role in susceptibility to clinical pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:21112816

  10. LTA measurements on shuttle cleaning nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer was used to make flow field velocity measurements on a supersonic air/water cleaning nozzle used to clean liquid oxygen shuttle components at Kennedy Space Center. The velocity along the centerline of the nozzle was characterized by the LTA system and compared with CFD calculations to ascertain the optimum distance the nozzle should be placed from the liquid oxygen part for maximum cleaning..

  11. The lta4h Locus Modulates Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Infection in Zebrafish and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, David M.; Vary, Jay C.; Ray, John P.; Walsh, Gregory S.; Dunstan, Sarah J.; Bang, Nguyen D.; Hagge, Deanna A.; Khadge, Saraswoti; King, Mary-Claire; Hawn, Thomas R.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces varied early outcomes, ranging from resistance to infection to progressive disease. Here we report results from a forward genetic screen in zebrafish larvae that identify multiple mutant classes with distinct patterns of innate susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum. A hypersusceptible mutant maps to the lta4h locus encoding leukotriene A4 hydrolase, which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a potent chemoattractant and proinflammatory eicosanoid. lta4h mutations confer hypersusceptibility independent of LTB4 reduction, by redirecting eicosanoid substrates to anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The resultant anti-inflammatory state permits increased mycobacterial proliferation by limiting production of tumor necrosis factor. In humans, we find that protection from both tuberculosis and multibacillary leprosy is associated with heterozygosity for LTA4H polymorphisms that have previously been correlated with differential LTB4 production. Our results suggest conserved roles for balanced eicosanoid production in vertebrate resistance to mycobacterial infection. PMID:20211140

  12. Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of construction of both LTA ship hangars (looking north) circa 1942. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  13. Aerial view of reroofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Aerial view of re-roofing of northern LTA ship hangar, circa 1957. - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  14. Stovetop Earth Pecan Pie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C. M.

    2005-12-01

    Many fluid mechanical experiments with direct applications to Earth Science are performed with sugary syrups using conceptually straightforward procedures. Corn syrup has indeed proven to be a godsend for those studying convection and related non-linear phenomena. In addition, however, it gives experimentalists a deep physical intuition for the interior workings of hot planets. The basic concepts behind plate tectonics and mantle convection are not difficult; indeed, although they may not be aware of it, most students probably have a basic intuitive understanding of fluid mechanics gained in their daily life. However, the large size and long time scale of geophysical processes may be quite intimidating to young students. Even a simple geophysical experiment requires a complicated array of coolers, heaters and measuring and recording equipment. It is of interest to introduce students to the geodynamical concepts that can be visualized in a high-tech lab using familiar processes and equipment. Using a homemade apparatus and grocery store supplies, I propose using a 'Stove-top Earth pecan pie' to introduce simple geodynamic concepts to middle- and high-school students. The initially cold syrup heats up and the pecans begin to float (continent formation), the syrup begins to convect (mantle convection), and convection slows down after the heat is removed (secular cooling). Even Wilson cycles can be simulated by moving the pan to one side or the other of the stovetop or heating element. The activity formally introduces students to convection and its application to the earth, and makes them think about plate motion, heat transfer, scaling, and experimental procedures. As an added bonus, they can eat their experiments after recess!

  15. Association between TNF promoter -308 G>A and LTA 252 A>G polymorphisms and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanan Hosni; Taha, Fatma Mohamed; Darweesh, Hanan El-Sayed; Morsi, Heba Mohamed Abdelhafiz

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and lymphotoxin alpha (LTA) are pivotal cytokines in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To investigate the possible association of the polymorphism of the TNF promoter gene -308 and that of the LTA gene 252 with susceptibility to SLE and with phenotypic disease features in Egyptian patients. A case control study involving 100 SLE patients and 100 unrelated healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods were applied to detect genetic polymorphism. We found that TNF-308 genotype AA was significantly increase by 26 % in SLE patients compared to 10 % in the control group (p = 0.003; OR 3.16; CI 1.43-6.98) and the frequency of the A allele of the TNF promoter -308 was significantly higher in the SLE patients (42 %) than in the control subjects (24 %) (p < 0.001; OR 2.29; 95 % CI 1.49-3.52). Genotype LTA 252 GG showed a significant increase by 22 % in SLE patients compared to 6 % in the control group (p = 0.001; OR 4.42; 95 % CI 1.71-11.44), and the frequency of the G allele of the LTA was significantly higher in the SLE patients (38 %) than in the control subjects (21 %) (p < 0.001; OR 2.31; 95 % CI 1.48-3.6). Genotype (AA+GA) of TNF was significantly associated with clinical manifestations as malar rash, arthritis, oral ulcers, serositis and systemic lupus erythematosus disease activity index. Genotype (GG+GA) of LTA was significantly associated with arthritis. These results suggest that TNF and LTA genetic polymorphisms contribute to SLE susceptibility in the Egyptian population and are associated with disease characteristics. TNF-308 and LTA+252 polymorphic markers may be used for early diagnosis of SLE and early prediction of clinical manifestations, like arthritis. PMID:24420856

  16. Discovery of the cell-penetrating function of A2 domain derived from LTA subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Guo, Hua; Zheng, Wenyun; Zhang, Na; Wang, Tianwen; Wang, Ping; Ma, Xingyuan

    2016-06-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is a protein toxin produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). As a bacterial toxin, LT holotoxin can enter intestinal epithelial cells and cause diarrhea. In addition, LT is also a powerful mucosal adjuvant capable of enhancing the strong immune responses to co-administered antigens. However, the LT immunological mechanism is still not clear in some aspects, especially with the respect to how the LTA subunit functions alone. Here, we discovered that the A2 domain of LTA could carry a fluorescent protein into cells, whose function is similar to a cell-penetrating peptide. The transmembrane-transporting ability of the A2 domain is non-specific in its cell-penetrating function, which was shown through testing with different cell types. Moreover, the LTA2 fusion protein penetrated a fluorescently labeled cell membrane that identified LTA2 internalization through membrane transport pathways, and showed it finally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, low-temperature stress and pharmacological agent treatments showed that the LTA2 internalization route is a temperature-dependent process involving the clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the macropinocytosis pathways. These results could explain the internalization of the LTA subunit alone without the LTB pentamer, contributing to a better understanding of LTA working as a mucosal adjuvant; they also suggest that the A2 domain could be used as a novel transport vehicle for research and treatment of disease. PMID:26960316

  17. [Pie]: Re-Count and Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The number [pie] [approximately] 3.14159 is defined to be the ratio C/d of the circumference C to the diameter d of any given circle. In this article, the author looks at some surprising and unexpected places where [pie] occurs, and then thinks about some ways of remembering all those digits in the expansion of [pie].

  18. The PIE Institute Project: Final Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark; Carroll, Becky; Helms, Jen; Smith, Anita

    2008-01-01

    The Playful Invention and Exploration (PIE) Institute project was funded in 2005 by the National Science Foundation (NSF). For the past three years, Inverness Research has served as the external evaluator for the PIE project. The authors' evaluation efforts have included extensive observation and documentation of PIE project activities; ongoing…

  19. Thermo-nanoimprinted biomimetic probe for LPS and LTA immunosensing.

    PubMed

    Buchegger, Patricia; Lieberzeit, Peter A; Preininger, Claudia

    2014-02-01

    A complex prepolymerized film comprising monomers, cross-linkers, and initiator is usually used to create molecularly imprinted polymers. We herein exploit ready-to-use resist materials and link molecular surface imprinting with UV- and thermo-nanoimprinting techniques to create a sensor layer for the specific recognition of the bacterial surface markers lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA). To account for the highly polar moieties of LPS and LTA, we evaluate different resist and stamp materials of distinct surface properties by AFM and molecularly imprinted sorbent assays. Thermo nanoimprinting of LPS and LTA micelles to Epon 1002F films exhibits excellent sensitivity of up to 13 times increased signals compared to those of the nonimprinted films and negligible cross-reaction with the tested nonspecific analyte. Additionally, the sensitivity and selectivity of the thermo nanoimprints is compared to conventional molecular surface imprints using a cocktail of acrylic monomers in QCM measurements. PMID:24392724

  20. A Staphylococcus aureus ypfP mutant with strongly reduced lipoteichoic acid (LTA) content: LTA governs bacterial surface properties and autolysin activity

    PubMed Central

    Fedtke, Iris; Mader, Diana; Kohler, Thomas; Moll, Hermann; Nicholson, Graeme; Biswas, Raja; Henseler, Katja; Götz, Friedrich; Zähringer, Ulrich; Peschel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Many Gram-positive bacteria produce lipoteichoic acid (LTA) polymers whose physiological roles have remained a matter of debate because of the lack of LTA-deficient mutants. The ypfP gene responsible for biosynthesis of a glycolipid found in LTA was deleted in Staphylococcus aureus SA113, causing 87% reduction of the LTA content. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that the mutant LTA contained a diacylglycerol anchor instead of the glycolipid, whereas the remaining part was similar to the wild-type polymer except that it was shorter. The LTA mutant strain revealed no major changes in patterns of cell wall proteins or autolytic enzymes compared with the parental strain indicating that LTA may be less important in S. aureus protein attachment than previously thought. However, the autolytic activity of the mutant was strongly reduced demonstrating a role of LTA in controlling autolysin activity. Moreover, the hydrophobicity of the LTA mutant was altered and its ability to form biofilms on plastic was completely abrogated indicating a profound impact of LTA on physicochemical properties of bacterial surfaces. We propose to consider LTA and its biosynthetic enzymes as targets for new antibiofilm strategies. PMID:17640274

  1. Association between ANKK1 (rs1800497) and LTA (rs909253) Genetic Variants and Risk of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Arwa H.; Elhawary, Nasser A.

    2015-01-01

    Limited research has assessed associations between schizophrenia and genetic variants of the ankyrin repeat and kinase domain containing 1 (ANKK1) and lymphotoxin-alpha (LTA) genes among individuals of Middle Eastern ancestry. Here we present the first association study investigating the ANKK1 rs1800497 (T>C) and LTA rs909253 (A>G) single-nucleotide polymorphisms in an Egyptian population. Among 120 patients with DSM-IV and PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) assessments of schizophrenia and 100 healthy controls, we determined the genotypes for the polymorphisms using endonuclease digestion of amplified genomic DNA. Results confirmed previous findings from different ethnic populations, in that the rs1800497 and rs909253 polymorphisms were both associated with risk of schizophrenia. Differences between the genotypes of cases and controls were strongly significant (P = 0.0005 for rs1800497 and P = 0.001 for rs909253). The relative risk to schizophrenia was 1.2 (P = 0.01) for the C allele and 0.8 (P = 0.04) for the G allele. The CC, GG, and combined CC/AA genotypes were all more frequent in cases than in controls. These results support an association between ANKK1 and LTA genetic markers and vulnerability to schizophrenia and show the potential influence of just one copy of the mutant C or G allele in the Egyptian population. PMID:26114114

  2. Assessment of the Microbiological Quality of Meat Pies from Retail Sale in England 2013.

    PubMed

    McLauchlin, Jim; Aird, Heather; Charlett, Andre; Elviss, Nicola; Fox, Andrew; Kaye, Moira; Willis, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Outbreaks of foodborne illness caused by Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes in England associated with meat pie consumption were detected in 2012. To obtain baseline data for pies unrelated to outbreaks, 862 samples of ready-to-eat meat pies were collected at retail or from catering facilities in England in 2013 and examined to enumerate food-poisoning bacteria and indicator organisms using Organization for Standardization (ISO) methods for Listeria spp. including L. monocytogenes (ISO 11290), Clostridium perfringens (ISO 21528), coagulase-positive staphylococci including Staphylococcus aureus (ISO 6888), Bacillus spp. including B. cereus (ISO 1737), Escherichia coli (ISO 16649), Enterobacteriaceae (ISO 21528), and aerobic colony counts (ACCs; ISO 4833). Microbiological quality was satisfactory in 94% of samples, borderline in 5%, and unsatisfactory in 1%. The proportion of pies from markets that were borderline or unsatisfactory significantly increased, and the proportion of borderline or unsatisfactory pies from supermarkets significantly decreased. Among the refrigerated (0 to 15°C) pies, microbiological quality significantly decreased in pies stored at >8°C and further significantly decreased at in pies stored at ambient temperature (>15 to 25°C). Samples collected at 25 to 40°C had the highest proportion of borderline or unsatisfactory results, but results improved in pies stored at >40°C. The most common cause for borderline or unsatisfactory results was elevated ACCs (5% of all samples). Within the individual microbiological parameters, borderline or unsatisfactory results resulted from elevated Enterobacteriaceae or Bacillus levels (10 samples for each), C. perfringens levels (2 samples), and S. aureus or E. coli levels (1 sample each). L. monocytogenes was recovered from one pie at <10 CFU/g. A literature review revealed a range of microbiological hazards responsible for food poisoning and meat pie consumption, and surveillance data from 1992

  3. Efforts toward achieving an unmanned, high-altitude LTA platform

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Masahiko; Ford, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The modern demands for an unmanned aerospace platform, capable of long-duration stationkeeping at high-altitudes, are well-known. Satellites, balloons, and aircraft have traditionally served in the role of platform, facilitating tasks ranging from telecommunications to deep-space astronomy. However, limitations on the performance and flexibility of these systems, as well as the intrinsically high-cost of satellite construction, operation, and repair, warrants development of a supplemental technology for the platform. Much has been written in the literature on the possible advantages of a lighter-than-air (LTA) platform, if such an LTA could be constructed. Potential applications include remote sensing, environmental monitoring, mobile communications, space and polar observations, cargo delivery, military reconnaissance, and others. At present, conventional LTA`s are not capable of serving in the manner specified. Within this context, a research program known as HALROP (High Altitude Long Range Observational Platform) is currently underway. The goal is to create a stratospheric platform, possibly in the form of a next generation LTA vehicle. The authors present a qualitative review of their efforts, focusing on milestones in the HALROP Program. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Airships 101: Rediscovering the Potential of Lighter-Than-Air (LTA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, John E.; Hochstetler, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    An overview of airships past, present, and future is provided in a Powerpoint-formatted presentation. This presentation was requested for transfer to the British MOD by Paul Espinosa of NASA Ames, Code PX. The presentation provides general information about airships divided into four main categories: the legacy of NASA Ames in LTA (Lighter-Than-Air), LTA taxonomy and theory, LTA revival and missions, and LTA research and technology.

  5. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  6. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  7. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  8. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  9. 21 CFR 152.126 - Frozen cherry pie.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Frozen cherry pie. 152.126 Section 152.126 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION FRUIT PIES Requirements for Specific Standardized Fruit Pies § 152.126 Frozen cherry pie. (a) Identity. (1) Frozen cherry pie (excluding baked and then frozen) is the food prepared...

  10. Phase selection controlled by sodium ions in the synthesis of FAU/LTA composite zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Linyan; Xie, Sujuan; Wang, Qingxia; Liu, Shenglin; Xu, Longya

    2009-01-01

    Zeolite faujasite (FAU), Linde type A (LTA) and FAU/LTA composite have been synthesized using tetramethylammonium cation (TMA +) as template, by adjusting only the concentration of Na + ions in the initial solution (1.00 Al2 O3 4.36 SiO2 : 2.39 (TMA)2 O : β Na2 O : 249.00H2 O). Na + ions alter the phase composition of the product more than TMA+ or OH- ions. When Na2 O concentration [Na2 O] increases from 0.024 to 0.168, the product gradually changes from pure FAU to pure LTA via the formation of FAU/LTA composite with increasing LTA fraction. Interestingly, the induction periods of FAU and LTA in the FAU/LTA composite zeolite ([Na2 O] is 0.072) are both 13 h, quite different from the induction periods of their individual pure phases—45 h for FAU and 4 h for LTA. During the crystallization, the LTA/(FAU + LTA) fraction in the composite zeolite decreases in a nearly linear fashion. Scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis indicate some difference between the properties of the FAU/LTA composite zeolite and of the mechanical mixture.

  11. Periodic model of LTA framework containing various non-tetrahedral cations.

    PubMed

    Koleżyński, A; Mikuła, A; Król, M

    2016-03-15

    A simplified periodic model of Linde Type A zeolite (LTA) structure with various selected mono- and di-valent extra-framework cations was formulated. Ab initio calculations (geometry optimization and vibrational spectra calculations) using the proposed model were carried out by means of Crystal09 program. The resulting structures and simulated spectra were analyzed in detail and compared with the experimental ones. The presented results show that in most cases the proposed model agrees well with experimental results. Individual bands were assigned to respective normal modes of vibration and the changes resulting from the selective substitution of extra framework cations were described and explained. PMID:26702792

  12. Periodic model of LTA framework containing various non-tetrahedral cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleżyński, A.; Mikuła, A.; Król, M.

    2016-03-01

    A simplified periodic model of Linde Type A zeolite (LTA) structure with various selected mono- and di-valent extra-framework cations was formulated. Ab initio calculations (geometry optimization and vibrational spectra calculations) using the proposed model were carried out by means of Crystal09 program. The resulting structures and simulated spectra were analyzed in detail and compared with the experimental ones. The presented results show that in most cases the proposed model agrees well with experimental results. Individual bands were assigned to respective normal modes of vibration and the changes resulting from the selective substitution of extra framework cations were described and explained.

  13. Airship logistics: The LTA vehicle; a total cargo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hackney, L. R. M.

    1975-01-01

    Design considerations for logistics are dealt with as they pertain to the large rigid LTA vehicle as either a commercial or military cargo carrier. Pertinent factors discussed are: (1) the basic mission; (2) types of payload; (3) the payload space in regards to configuration and sizing, its capacity, and its loadability. A logistic capability comparison of selected cargo airships versus jumbo jets is also made.

  14. 9 CFR 319.500 - Meat pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Meat pies. 319.500 Section 319.500... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat Food Entree Products, Pies,...

  15. 9 CFR 319.500 - Meat pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Meat pies. 319.500 Section 319.500... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat Food Entree Products, Pies,...

  16. 9 CFR 319.500 - Meat pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meat pies. 319.500 Section 319.500... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat Food Entree Products, Pies,...

  17. 9 CFR 319.500 - Meat pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Meat pies. 319.500 Section 319.500... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat Food Entree Products, Pies,...

  18. 9 CFR 319.500 - Meat pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Meat pies. 319.500 Section 319.500... ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Meat Food Entree Products, Pies,...

  19. Effects of nonframework metal cations and phonon scattering mechanisms on the thermal transport properties of polycrystalline zeolite LTA films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenstein, Abraham; Hudiono, Yeny; Graham, Samuel; Nair, Sankar

    2010-03-01

    We present a systematic study to investigate the effects of nonframework cations and the role of phonon scattering mechanisms on the thermal transport properties of zeolite LTA, via experiment and semiempirical lattice dynamics calculations. Our study is motivated by the increasing interest in accurate measurements and mechanistic understanding of the thermal transport properties of zeolite materials. The presence of a nanostructured pore network, extra-framework cations, and tunable framework structure and composition confer interesting thermophysical properties to these materials, making them a good model system to investigate thermal transport in complex materials. Continuous films of zeolite LTA with different nonframework cations (Na+, K+, and Ca+2) were synthesized and characterized. The thermal conductivity was measured using the three-omega method over a wide range of temperature (150-450 K). These are the first thermal conductivity measurements performed on bulk LTA, so they are more accurate than previous measurements, which involved the use of compacted zeolite powders. Our data showed significant dependence of the thermal conductivity on the extra-framework cations as well the temperature. The thermal conductivities of the zeolite LTA samples were modeled with the relaxation time approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation. The full phonon spectra for each type of LTA zeolite were calculated and used in conjunction with semiempirical relaxation time expressions to calculate the thermal conductivity. The results both validated, and suggested the limitations of, this modeling approach. Optical phonons dominated the thermal conductivity and boundarylike scattering was found to be the strongest phonon scattering mechanism, as also observed in MFI zeolite.

  20. Post irradiation effects (PIE) in integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, D. C.; Lowry, L.; Barnes, C.; Zakharia, M.; Agarwal, S.; Rax, B.

    1991-01-01

    Post-irradiation effects (PIE) ranging from normal recovery to catastrophic failure have been observed in integrated circuits during the PIE period. Data presented show failure due to rebound after a 10 krad(Si) dose. In particular, five device types are investigated with varying PIE response. Special attention has been given to the HI1-507A analog multiplexer because its PIE response is extreme. X-ray diffraction has been uniquely employed to measure physical stress in the HI1-507A metallization. An attempt has been made to show a relationship between stress relaxation and radiation effects. All data presented support the current MIL-STD Method 1019.4 but demonstrate the importance of performing PIE measurements, even when mission doses are as low as 10 krad(Si).

  1. The causal pie model: an epidemiological method applied to evolutionary biology and ecology.

    PubMed

    Wensink, Maarten; Westendorp, Rudi G J; Baudisch, Annette

    2014-05-01

    A general concept for thinking about causality facilitates swift comprehension of results, and the vocabulary that belongs to the concept is instrumental in cross-disciplinary communication. The causal pie model has fulfilled this role in epidemiology and could be of similar value in evolutionary biology and ecology. In the causal pie model, outcomes result from sufficient causes. Each sufficient cause is made up of a "causal pie" of "component causes". Several different causal pies may exist for the same outcome. If and only if all component causes of a sufficient cause are present, that is, a causal pie is complete, does the outcome occur. The effect of a component cause hence depends on the presence of the other component causes that constitute some causal pie. Because all component causes are equally and fully causative for the outcome, the sum of causes for some outcome exceeds 100%. The causal pie model provides a way of thinking that maps into a number of recurrent themes in evolutionary biology and ecology: It charts when component causes have an effect and are subject to natural selection, and how component causes affect selection on other component causes; which partitions of outcomes with respect to causes are feasible and useful; and how to view the composition of a(n apparently homogeneous) population. The diversity of specific results that is directly understood from the causal pie model is a test for both the validity and the applicability of the model. The causal pie model provides a common language in which results across disciplines can be communicated and serves as a template along which future causal analyses can be made. PMID:24963386

  2. Hybrid LTA vehicle controllability as affected by buoyancy ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, D. N.; Kubicki, P.; Tarczynski, T.; Fairbanks, A.; Piasecki, F. N.

    1979-01-01

    The zero and low speed controllability of heavy lift airships under various wind conditions as affected by the buoyancy ratio are investigated. A series of three hybrid LTA vehicls were examined, each having a dynamic thrust system comprised of four H-34 helicopters, but with buoyant envelopes of different volumes (and hence buoyancies), and with varying percentage of helium inflation and varying useful loads (hence gross weights). Buoyancy ratio, B, was thus examined varying from approximately 0.44 to 1.39. For values of B greater than 1.0, the dynamic thrusters must supply negative thrust (i.e. downward).

  3. The Cassini Solstice Mission: Streamlining Operations by Sequencing with PIEs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandermey, Nancy; Alonge, Eleanor K.; Magee, Kari; Heventhal, William

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini Solstice Mission (CSM) is the second extended mission phase of the highly successful Cassini/Huygens mission to Saturn. Conducted at a much-reduced funding level, operations for the CSM have been streamlined and simplified significantly. Integration of the science timeline, which involves allocating observation time in a balanced manner to each of the five different science disciplines (with representatives from the twelve different science instruments), has long been a labor-intensive endeavor. Lessons learned from the prime mission (2004-2008) and first extended mission (Equinox mission, 2008-2010) were utilized to design a new process involving PIEs (Pre-Integrated Events) to ensure the highest priority observations for each discipline could be accomplished despite reduced work force and overall simplification of processes. Discipline-level PIE lists were managed by the Science Planning team and graphically mapped to aid timeline deconfliction meetings prior to assigning discrete segments of time to the various disciplines. Periapse segments are generally discipline-focused, with the exception of a handful of PIEs. In addition to all PIEs being documented in a spreadsheet, allocated out-of-discipline PIEs were entered into the Cassini Information Management System (CIMS) well in advance of timeline integration. The disciplines were then free to work the rest of the timeline internally, without the need for frequent interaction, debate, and negotiation with representatives from other disciplines. As a result, the number of integration meetings has been cut back extensively, freeing up workforce. The sequence implementation process was streamlined as well, combining two previous processes (and teams) into one. The new Sequence Implementation Process (SIP) schedules 22 weeks to build each 10-week-long sequence, and only 3 sequence processes overlap. This differs significantly from prime mission during which 5-week-long sequences were built in 24 weeks

  4. 46 CFR 16.109 - Public Interest Exclusion (PIE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... General § 16.109 Public Interest Exclusion (PIE). Service agents are subject to Public Interest Exclusion (PIE) actions in accordance with 49 CFR Part 40, subpart R. The PIE is an action which excludes from... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public Interest Exclusion (PIE). 16.109 Section...

  5. Framework Stabilization of Si-Rich LTA Zeolite Prepared in Organic-Free Media

    SciTech Connect

    Conato, Marlon T.; Oleksiak, Matthew D.; McGrail, B. Peter; Motkuri, Radha K.; Rimer, Jeffrey D.

    2014-10-16

    Zeolite HOU-2 (LTA type) is prepared with the highest silica content (Si/Al = 2.1) reported for Na-LTA zeolites without the use of an organic structure-directing agent. The rational design of Si-rich zeolites has the potential to improve their thermal stability for applications in catalysis, gas storage, and selective separations.

  6. MAE4, an eLtaS monoclonal antibody, blocks Staphylococcus aureus virulence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Feng, Jiannan; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Xin; Gao, Yaping; Yan, Jun; Mu, Chunhua; Hei, Yan; Lv, Ming; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Jin, Peng; Hu, Weiguo; Shen, Beifen; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of infectious diseases. Treatment of these infections has become increasingly difficult due to the widespread emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains; therefore, it is essential to explore effective alternatives to antibiotics. A secreted protein of S. aureus, known as eLtaS, is an extracellular protein released from the bacterial membrane protein, LtaS. However, the role of eLtaS in S. aureus pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we show eLtaS dramatically aggravates S. aureus infection by binding to C3b and then inhibiting the phagocytosis of C3b-deposited S. aureus. Furthermore, we developed a monoclonal antibody against eLtaS, MAE4, which neutralizes the activity of eLtaS and blocks staphylococcal evasion of phagocytosis. Consequently, MAE4 is capable of protecting mice from lethal S. aureus infection. Our findings reveal that targeting of eLtaS by MAE4 is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of infectious diseases caused by S. aureus. PMID:26599734

  7. 49 CFR 40.367 - Who initiates a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who initiates a PIE proceeding? 40.367 Section 40... DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.367 Who initiates a PIE proceeding? The following DOT officials may initiate a PIE proceeding: (a) The drug and alcohol program manager...

  8. Geophysical evidence for an extensive Pie de Palo Complex mafic-ultramafic belt, San Juan, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernicoff, Carlos J.; Vujovich, Graciela I.; van Staal, Cees R.

    2009-12-01

    The recent completion of a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey over the Pie de Palo uplift of the western Sierras Pampeanas has revealed an area of large magnetic anomalies associated with the Pie de Palo Complex. The Las Pirquitas thrust, which has transported and uplifted the Pie de Palo Complex, is recognized for at least 30 km in a roughly NE direction along the western boundary of the Pie de Palo Complex, beyond its limited outcrop. The type of sediments of the Caucete Group in the footwall of the Las Pirquitas thrust, which are regarded as the leading edge of the Precordillera terrane, are associated with much less pronounced magnetic anomalies. In addition, a conspicuous, NNE trending, broad magnetic high stands out in the survey, several kilometers to the east of the main outcrops of the Pie de Palo Complex; this broad magnetic anomaly bisects the Pie de Palo basement block, and continues further south at least as far as 32°S, the southern boundary of the latest aeromagnetic survey. This magnetic anomaly is interpreted to represent a structure corresponding to the Grenvillian Precordillera-Pie de Palo tectonic boundary zone, and would comprise the buried largest part of the mafic-ultramafic belt. The geophysical model of the magnetic data indicates that the boundary zone dips to the east, possibly suggesting the existence of a set of synthetic east dipping, west-verging thrusts, of which only one major structure (Las Pirquitas thrust) is exposed; the possibility of other slivers of upthrust boundary zone material cannot be excluded. It is considered that the Pie de Palo Complex represents a small sliver upthrust from the unexposed boundary zone material (containing highly magnetic mafic-ultramafic rocks). The east-dipping, west verging structures associated with the Pie de Palo Complex are suggested to represent an Ordovician reactivation of a Grenvillian suture zone developed when the Precordillera basement and Pie de Palo terrane docked; this

  9. Mom, Apple Pie, and the American Dream.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambs, Jean Dresden

    1982-01-01

    Discusses how the mom-and-apple-pie facet of the American dream no longer seems to be working. Ways to redefine that dream so that women, men, children, and families are comfortable with each other and are able to develop a mutual dependence which also allows for mutual independence are examined. (RM)

  10. Bufexamac ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by targeting LTA4H.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qiang; Dong, Ningning; Yao, Xue; Wu, Dang; Lu, Yanli; Mao, Fei; Zhu, Jin; Li, Jian; Huang, Jin; Chen, Aifang; Huang, Lu; Wang, Xuehai; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan; Xu, Yong; Lu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in the occurrence and development of acute lung injury (ALI). Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a hydrolysis product of epoxide leukotriene A4 (LTA4) catalyzed by LTA4 hydrolase (LTA4H), is one of the most potent chemoattractants for neutrophil. Bufexamac is a drug widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent on the skin, however, the mechanism of action is still not fully understood. In this study, we found bufexamac was capable of specifically inhibiting LTA4H enzymatic activity and revealed the mode of interaction of bufexamac and LTA4H using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, bufexamac significantly prevented the production of LTB4 in neutrophil and inhibited the fMLP-induced neutrophil migration through inhibition of LTA4H. Finally, bufexamac significantly attenuated lung inflammation as reflected by reduced LTB4 levels and weakened neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from a lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI mouse model. In summary, our study indicates that bufexamac acts as an inhibitor of LTB4 biosynthesis and may have potential clinical applications for the treatment of ALI. PMID:27126280

  11. Bufexamac ameliorates LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice by targeting LTA4H

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qiang; Dong, Ningning; Yao, Xue; Wu, Dang; Lu, Yanli; Mao, Fei; Zhu, Jin; Li, Jian; Huang, Jin; Chen, Aifang; Huang, Lu; Wang, Xuehai; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan; Xu, Yong; Lu, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils play an important role in the occurrence and development of acute lung injury (ALI). Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a hydrolysis product of epoxide leukotriene A4 (LTA4) catalyzed by LTA4 hydrolase (LTA4H), is one of the most potent chemoattractants for neutrophil. Bufexamac is a drug widely used as an anti-inflammatory agent on the skin, however, the mechanism of action is still not fully understood. In this study, we found bufexamac was capable of specifically inhibiting LTA4H enzymatic activity and revealed the mode of interaction of bufexamac and LTA4H using X-ray crystallography. Moreover, bufexamac significantly prevented the production of LTB4 in neutrophil and inhibited the fMLP-induced neutrophil migration through inhibition of LTA4H. Finally, bufexamac significantly attenuated lung inflammation as reflected by reduced LTB4 levels and weakened neutrophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from a lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI mouse model. In summary, our study indicates that bufexamac acts as an inhibitor of LTB4 biosynthesis and may have potential clinical applications for the treatment of ALI. PMID:27126280

  12. PIE: an online prediction system for protein–protein interactions from text

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, In-Hee; Kim, Soo-Jin; Sriram, Ram; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2008-01-01

    Protein–protein interaction (PPI) extraction has been an important research topic in bio-text mining area, since the PPI information is critical for understanding biological processes. However, there are very few open systems available on the Web and most of the systems focus on keyword searching based on predefined PPIs. PIE (Protein Interaction information Extraction system) is a configurable Web service to extract PPIs from literature, including user-provided papers as well as PubMed articles. After providing abstracts or papers, the prediction results are displayed in an easily readable form with essential, yet compact features. The PIE interface supports more features such as PDF file extraction, PubMed search tool and network communication, which are useful for biologists and bio-system developers. The PIE system utilizes natural language processing techniques and machine learning methodologies to predict PPI sentences, which results in high precision performance for Web users. PIE is freely available at http://bi.snu.ac.kr/pie/. PMID:18508809

  13. PIE: an online prediction system for protein-protein interactions from text.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, In-Hee; Kim, Soo-Jin; Sriram, Ram; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2008-07-01

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) extraction has been an important research topic in bio-text mining area, since the PPI information is critical for understanding biological processes. However, there are very few open systems available on the Web and most of the systems focus on keyword searching based on predefined PPIs. PIE (Protein Interaction information Extraction system) is a configurable Web service to extract PPIs from literature, including user-provided papers as well as PubMed articles. After providing abstracts or papers, the prediction results are displayed in an easily readable form with essential, yet compact features. The PIE interface supports more features such as PDF file extraction, PubMed search tool and network communication, which are useful for biologists and bio-system developers. The PIE system utilizes natural language processing techniques and machine learning methodologies to predict PPI sentences, which results in high precision performance for Web users. PIE is freely available at http://bi.snu.ac.kr/pie/. PMID:18508809

  14. PIE preparation of the MEGAPIE target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuther, Michael; Wagner, Werner

    2012-12-01

    The MEGAPIE target, after successfully operating for 4 months at a beam power of 0.77 MW, is now being prepared for post irradiation examination PIE. The lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) target was irradiated from August until December 2006, and in this period received a beam charge of 2.8 A h of 575 MeV protons. After that, the target was stored in the target storage facility of PSI, waiting for its post irradiation examination. In the meantime several campaigns of tests have been conducted by PSI and ZWILAG, the interim storage facility of Swiss nuclear power plants. In these tests the feasibility of the conditioning of the target and the extraction of sample material for the PIE has been proven. After transport to the hot cell facility at ZWILAG in June 2009, the dismantling of the MEGAPIE target started. It finally was cut into 21 pieces. Ten of these pieces will be shipped to the Hot Laboratory of PSI ('PSI hotlab') to extract samples from the structural materials as well as from the LBE. Currently it is foreseen that the sample extraction will start in the first half of 2011. The remaining parts of the MEGAPIE target were conditioned as radioactive waste. The present paper will mainly focus on the dismantling and first visual inspection of the MEGAPIE target. In addition an outlook on the PIE phase of MEGAPIE is given.

  15. A revolutionary and operational tethered aerostat system illustrating new LTA technology. [for ground-air-ground communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menke, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    An operational tethered aerostat system, which demonstrates utility of LTA systems, is described. It was made possible by development of a reliable tethered aerostat that is used to support broadcast equipment at an altitude of 10,000 feet. Two elements of the TCOM system, the aerostat and mooring station, are particularly relevant to the LTA Workshop. They demonstrate the feasibility of using LTA vehicles in real, operational, all-weather applications and, in addition, illustrate an advance in the overall technology base of LTA. The aerostat and the mooring station, including their technical design features and demonstrated performance characteristics, are described.

  16. 49 CFR 40.391 - What is the scope of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the scope of a PIE? 40.391 Section 40.391... TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.391 What is the scope of a PIE? (a) The scope of a PIE is... PIE applies. (b) If, as a service agent, the Department issues a PIE concerning you, the PIE...

  17. Sex and the Cinema: What "American Pie" Teaches the Young

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Sharyn

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the wildly successful blockbuster "American Pie" teenpics, especially "American Pie 3--The Wedding". I argue that these films are specifically designed to appeal to teenage male audiences, and to provide lessons in sex and romance. Movies like this are especially important as they are experienced by far more teenagers than,…

  18. A remarkable activity of human leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) toward unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Byzia, Anna; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Salvesen, Guy S; Drag, Marcin

    2014-05-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H--EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme, which processes LTA4 through an epoxide hydrolase activity and is also able to trim one amino acid at a time from N-terminal peptidic substrates via its aminopeptidase activity. In this report, we have utilized a library of 130 individual proteinogenic and unnatural amino acid fluorogenic substrates to determine the aminopeptidase specificity of this enzyme. We have found that the best proteinogenic amino acid recognized by LTA4H is arginine. However, we have also observed several unnatural amino acids, which were significantly better in terms of cleavage rate (k cat/K m values). Among them, the benzyl ester of aspartic acid exhibited a k cat/K m value that was more than two orders of magnitude higher (1.75 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) as compared to L-Arg (1.5 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)). This information can be used for design of potent inhibitors of this enzyme, but may also suggest yet undiscovered functions or specificities of LTA4H. PMID:24573245

  19. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, Northern Lighter Than Air Ship Hangar, Meffett Avenue & Maxfield Street, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  20. Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Map of Naval Air Station (L.T.A.), Santa Ana, Calif. Showing conditions on June 30, 1949. Drawing no. NA 91/A9-1(1) 1949 - Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, East of Red Hill Avenue between Edinger Avenue & Barranca Parkway, Tustin, Orange County, CA

  1. Comparative analysis of isotopic composition of spent fuel from Takahama-3 PWR PIE database using TRIPOLI-PEPIN code

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. K.

    2006-07-01

    Evaluation of isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel is essential for reactor physics and fuel cycle back-end applications. A TRIPOLI-PEPIN coupled depletion code, TR4PEP, has been developed to meet these requirements. It combines the continuous-energy Monte Carlo transport code, TRIPOLI4.3 [1] and the point depletion code, PEPIN-2 [2], to perform the burnup dependent material data calculation. The depletion calculation flow of TR4PEP code has been presented on a previous study. Its application on PWR UO{sub 2} and MOX spent fuel has been validated against several international numerical benchmarks. Compared to industry standard deterministic cell codes and other Monte Carlo based depletion codes, TR4PEP deep-burn depletion calculations have shown satisfactory results. [3] In addition to the numerical benchmarks, the analysis of available post irradiation examination (PIE) results by TR4PEP is also important The PIE results at fuel assembly level are accessible only from spent fuel reprocessing plant and these data are not easy to use for code validation due to the dissolution of several assemblies in the same time. The PIE results at fuel pellet level depend not only on the method for the isotopic measurements but also on the irradiation environment and history. A free access PIE database on isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel is obtainable from OECD/NEA. [4] Both PWR and BWR PIE data at fuel pellet level are taken into account in this database but the only 17 x 17 type PWR fuel available in this database is from Takahama-3 PIE results. To validate TR4PEP with Takahama-3 PIE results, two irradiated UO{sub 2} samples, SF95-4 from fuel assembly NT3G23 and SF97-5 from NT3G24, are considered in this study. Both samples have an initial {sup 235}U enrichment of 4.11 wt% and their burnup are respectively 36.69 and 47.03 GWd/t. Comparative analysis of isotopic composition from SF95-4 and SF97-5 including 19 actinides from {sup 234}U to {sup 247}Cm and 18

  2. 49 CFR 40.379 - How do you contest the issuance of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How do you contest the issuance of a PIE? 40.379... issuance of a PIE? (a) If you receive a NOPE, you may contest the issuance of the PIE. (b) If you want to contest the proposed PIE, you must provide the Director information and argument in opposition to...

  3. 49 CFR 40.363 - On what basis may the Department issue a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On what basis may the Department issue a PIE? 40... the Department issue a PIE? (a) If you are a service agent, the Department may issue a PIE concerning... also may issue a PIE if you have failed to cooperate with DOT agency representatives...

  4. 49 CFR 40.377 - Who decides whether to issue a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who decides whether to issue a PIE? 40.377 Section... a PIE? (a) The ODAPC Director, or his or her designee, decides whether to issue a PIE. If a designee... determination about whether to start a PIE proceeding. (c) There is a “firewall” between the initiating...

  5. Comparison of the STA/LTA and power spectral density methods for microseismic event detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaezi, Yoones; Van der Baan, Mirko

    2015-12-01

    Robust event detection and picking is a prerequisite for reliable (micro-) seismic interpretations. Detection of weak events is a common challenge among various available event detection algorithms. In this paper we compare the performance of two event detection methods, the short-term average/long-term average (STA/LTA) method, which is the most commonly used technique in industry, and a newly introduced method that is based on the power spectral density (PSD) measurements. We have applied both techniques to a 1-hr long segment of the vertical component of some raw continuous data recorded at a borehole geophone in a hydraulic fracturing experiment. The PSD technique outperforms the STA/LTA technique by detecting a higher number of weak events while keeping the number of false alarms at a reasonable level. The time-frequency representations obtained through the PSD method can also help define a more suitable bandpass filter which is usually required for the STA/LTA method. The method offers thus much promise for automated event detection in industrial, local, regional and global seismological data sets.

  6. A LTA flight research vehicle. [technology assessment, airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nebiker, F. R.

    1975-01-01

    An Airship Flight Research Program is proposed. Major program objectives are summarized and a Modernized Navy ZPG3W Airship recommended as the flight test vehicle. The origin of the current interest in modern airship vehicles is briefly discussed and the major benefits resulting from the flight research program described. Airship configurations and specifications are included.

  7. Extinction of a bacterial colony under forced convection in pie geometry.

    PubMed

    Shnerb, N M

    2001-01-01

    The extinction of a bacterial colony, as it is forced to migrate into a hostile environment, is analyzed in pie geometry. Under convection, separation of the radial and the azimuthal degrees of freedom is not possible, so the linearized evolution operator is diagonalized numerically. Some characteristic scales are compared with the results of recent experiments, and the "integrable" limit of the theory in the narrow growth region is studied. PMID:11304286

  8. The crystal chemistry of L-Ta 2O 5 and related structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grey, I. E.; Mumme, W. G.; Roth, R. S.

    2005-11-01

    Single crystals of a new form of L-Ta 2O 5 with a 19× b superstructure have been synthesised by flux growth. The phase is most likely stabilised by the incorporation of a small amount of lithium (0.14 wt% Li) from the flux. The phase has C-centred monoclinic symmetry with a=6.1939(4) Å, b=69.549(5) Å ( =19×3.66 Å), c=3.8895(3) Å, γ=90.00(1)°. The structure was refined in space group C112/m to R1=0.044 for 814 unique reflections with F>4σ(F). The structure can be described as comprising chains of edge-shared TaO 7 pentagonal bipyramids that are regularly folded at (010) planes to give sinusoidal chains along [010]. These chains are interconnected along [100] and [001] by corner sharing, creating inter-chain regions that are occupied by isolated TaO 6 octahedra and pairs of corner-shared octahedra. A comparison with published data for high-quality refinements of related structures has led to the development of a general model that can explain the structural chemistry variations in the known L-Ta 2O 5-related structures. A shorthand notation is presented for representing the structures, based on the sequence along [010] of the interchain octahedra.

  9. 49 CFR 40.409 - What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What does the issuance of a PIE mean to... What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers? (a) As an employer, you are deemed to have notice of the issuance of a PIE when it appears on the List mentioned in § 40.401(a) or the...

  10. 49 CFR 40.365 - What is the Department's policy concerning starting a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... starting a PIE proceeding? 40.365 Section 40.365 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... What is the Department's policy concerning starting a PIE proceeding? (a) It is the Department's policy to start a PIE proceeding only in cases of serious, uncorrected noncompliance with the provisions...

  11. 49 CFR 40.385 - Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding? 40.385 Section 40.385 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR... burden of proof in a PIE proceeding? (a) As the proponent of issuing a PIE, the initiating official...

  12. 49 CFR 40.397 - When does the Director make a PIE decision?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When does the Director make a PIE decision? 40.397... a PIE decision? The Director makes his or her decision within 60 days of the date when the record of a PIE proceeding is complete (including any meeting with the Director and any additional...

  13. 49 CFR 40.375 - How does the initiating official start a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does the initiating official start a PIE... initiating official start a PIE proceeding? (a) As a service agent, if your compliance matter is not... initiating official starts a PIE proceeding by sending you a notice of proposed exclusion (NOPE). The...

  14. 49 CFR 40.383 - What procedures apply if you contest the issuance of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What procedures apply if you contest the issuance of a PIE? 40.383 Section 40.383 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES... What procedures apply if you contest the issuance of a PIE? (a) DOT conducts PIE proceedings in a...

  15. 49 CFR 40.361 - What is the purpose of a public interest exclusion (PIE)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (PIE)? 40.361 Section 40.361 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR... purpose of a public interest exclusion (PIE)? (a) To protect the public interest, including protecting...) The Department therefore uses PIEs to exclude from participation in DOT's drug and alcohol...

  16. 49 CFR 40.395 - Can you settle a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Can you settle a PIE proceeding? 40.395 Section 40... DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.395 Can you settle a PIE proceeding... concurrence, settle a PIE proceeding....

  17. 49 CFR 40.385 - Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.385 Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding? (a) As the proponent of issuing a PIE, the initiating official...

  18. 49 CFR 40.385 - Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.385 Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding? (a) As the proponent of issuing a PIE, the initiating official...

  19. 49 CFR 40.385 - Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.385 Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding? (a) As the proponent of issuing a PIE, the initiating official...

  20. 49 CFR 40.385 - Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.385 Who bears the burden of proof in a PIE proceeding? (a) As the proponent of issuing a PIE, the initiating official...

  1. Personalized Information Environments: Do Public Libraries Want a Slice of the PIE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worcester, Lea

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of personalized information environments (PIEs) focuses on library personalized interfaces. Describes academic library PIEs and commercial sites, such as Amazon.com that use personalization; explores the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg's personalized interface; and discusses opportunities and challenges PIEs offer public…

  2. 9 CFR 381.158 - Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies. 381... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Definitions and Standards of Identity...

  3. 9 CFR 381.158 - Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies. 381... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Definitions and Standards of Identity...

  4. 9 CFR 381.158 - Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies. 381... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Definitions and Standards of Identity...

  5. 9 CFR 381.158 - Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies. 381... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Definitions and Standards of Identity...

  6. 9 CFR 381.158 - Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Poultry dinners (frozen) and pies. 381... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Definitions and Standards of Identity...

  7. Two-Person Pie-Cutting: The Fairest Cuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbanel, Julius B.; Brams, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Barbanel, Brams, and Stromquist (in 2009) asked whether there exists a two-person moving-knife procedure that yields an envy-free, undominated, and equitable division of a pie. We present two procedures: One yields an envy-free, almost undominated, and almost equitable allocation, whereas the second yields an allocation with the two "almost"…

  8. Decommissioning and PIE of the MEGAPIE spallation target

    SciTech Connect

    Latge, C.; Henry, J.; Wohlmuther, M.; Dai, Y.; Gavillet, D.; Hammer, B.; Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.; Thomsen, K.; Tuerler, A.; Wagner, W.; Gessi, A.; Guertin, A.; Konstantinovic, M.; Lindau, R.; Maloy, S.; Saito, S.

    2013-07-01

    A key experiment in the Accelerated Driven Systems roadmap, the MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) (1 MW) was initiated in 1999 in order to design and build a liquid lead-bismuth spallation target, then to operate it into the Swiss spallation neutron facility SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institute. The target has been designed, manufactured, and tested during integral tests, before irradiation carried out end of 2006. During irradiation, neutron and thermo hydraulic measurements were performed allowing deep interpretation of the experiment and validation of the models used during design phase. The decommissioning, Post Irradiation Examinations and waste management phases were defined properly. The phases dedicated to cutting, sampling, cleaning, waste management, samples preparation and shipping to various laboratories were performed by PSI teams: all these phases constitute a huge work, which allows now to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) of structural material, irradiated in relevant conditions. Preliminary results are presented in the paper, they concern chemical characterization. The following radio-nuclides have been identified by γ-spectrometry: {sup 60}Co, {sup 101}Rh, {sup 102}Rh, {sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 172}Hf/Lu, {sup 173}Lu, {sup 194}Hg/Au, {sup 195}Au, {sup 207}Bi. For some of these nuclides the activities can be easily evaluated from γ-spectrometry results ({sup 207}Bi, {sup 194}Hg/Au), while other nuclides can only be determined after chemical separations ({sup 108m}Ag, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 195}Au, {sup 129}I, {sup 36}Cl and α-emitting {sup 208-210}Po). The concentration of {sup 129}I is lower than expected. The chemical analysis already performed on spallation and corrosion products in the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) are very relevant for further applications of LBE as a spallation media and more generally as a coolant.

  9. 49 CFR 40.407 - May a service agent ask to have a PIE reduced or terminated?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May a service agent ask to have a PIE reduced or... agent ask to have a PIE reduced or terminated? (a) Yes, as a service agent concerning whom the Department has issued a PIE, you may request that the Director terminate a PIE or reduce its duration...

  10. Comparison of a Waveform Cross Correlation Detection Method to a Traditional STA/LTA Picker: Application to the Crooked Lake Sequence Near Fox Creek, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greig, D. W.; Spriggs, N.

    2014-12-01

    Waveform cross correlation, or template matching as it is sometimes called, has long been known to be an effective method for finding occurrences of a known repeating signal within a waveform. Because seismic signals are rarely known a priori, waveform cross correlation is not often used as a detection method for seismic networks. However, past studies (e.g. Gibbons and Ringdal, 2006) have shown that cross correlation can be effective in identifying events with similar locations and focal mechanisms (and thus waveforms) to a pre-existing template. Because induced seismicity often satisfies these requirements the method is well-suited to induced seismicity monitoring. We apply the method of waveform cross correlation to a sequence of events between Nov. 29, 2013 and Dec. 13, 2013 occurring at Crooked Lake near Fox Creek, Alberta. These events are believed to be attributable to injection activities in the area. A total of 24 events were detected using traditional STA/LTA triggering methods. The largest event, measured at local magnitude 3.9, is used as a template to identify other events. We compare the effectiveness of the traditional STA/LTA detection method to the cross correlation technique. With a modest correlation threshold we identify all 24 of the original events and an additional 89 new events for a total of 113 events identified by waveform cross correlation. We estimate the magnitude of completeness using the maximum curvature method (Wiemer and Wyss, 2000) and compare the result for the STA/LTA catalogue and the cross correlation catalogue. We find that the magnitude of completeness is about 0.8 magnitude units lower for the cross correlation catalogue. We explore the possibility of determining a probability density function to describe the values of observed correlation between a template and a seismic signal and reconcile theoretical expectations with empirical data. We further suggest a trigger threshold for cross correlation detection algorithms

  11. OpenMP for 3D potential boundary value problems solved by PIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KuŻelewski, Andrzej; Zieniuk, Eugeniusz

    2016-06-01

    The main purpose of this paper is examination of an application of modern parallel computing technique OpenMP to speed up the calculation in the numerical solution of parametric integral equations systems (PIES). The authors noticed, that solving more complex boundary problems by PIES sometimes requires large computing time. This paper presents the use of OpenMP and fast C++ linear algebra library Armadillo for boundary value problems modelled by 3D Laplace's equation and solved using PIES. The testing example shows that the use of mentioned technologies significantly increases speed of calculations in PIES.

  12. Fundamentals of Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC) Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Randall Gemmen; Harry Abernathy; Kirk Gerdes; Mark Koslowske; William A. McPhee; Tomas Tao

    2009-01-23

    An alternative high temperature fuel cell system, called Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC) technology, is presently under consideration by NETL for the ability to directly convert coal. Before such a fuel cell concept can be considered in system studies, a detailed assessment for the electrochemical activity and SnO and O-atom diffusion within the liquid tin needs to be performed. In addition, the fundamental thermodynamic operation of such a concept needs to be properly analyzed. Initial research efforts to characterize the tin electrochemistry on a button cell at 900°C and with a tin thickness of 6mm showed a peak power density of 40 mW/cm2, and an activation energy for total resistivity of 185600 J/gm-mol. Higher power densities are expected with a more optimized electrolyte interface, and additional tests are being planned. A review of the liquid tin anode cell theoretical operation and performance data will be presented.

  13. The Pied Crow (Corvus albus) is insensitive to diclofenac at concentrations present in carrion.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Vinny; Mompati, Kefiloe Feliciity; Duncan, Neil; Taggart, Mark Anthony

    2011-10-01

    Diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), kills vultures (Gyps spp.) that consume tainted carcasses. As a result, vulture populations in India, Nepal, and Pakistan have been devastated. Studies on meloxicam and ketoprofen demonstrated that the toxicity of the NSAIDs is unpredictable, thereby necessitating individual testing of all available NSAIDs. Because it is no longer practical to use vultures for toxicity testing, we evaluated the Pied Crow (Corvus albus) as a model. Pied Crows (n=6) were exposed to a dose of 0.8 and 10 mg/kg of diclofenac, with no signs of toxicity, and a rapid half-life of elimination. Using primary renal cell and hepatocyte cultures, a high tolerance was demonstrated at the cellular level. Meta-analysis of pharmacokinetic data for the Domestic Chicken (Gallus gallus) and the African White-backed (Gyps africanus), Cape Griffon (Gyps coprotheres), and Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura) showed a trend toward toxicity when the half-life of elimination increased. We conclude that the crow is not susceptible to diclofenac and, more important, that toxicity in the Gyps species is probably related to zero-order metabolism. PMID:22102664

  14. Relating the effects of protein type and content in increased-protein cheese pies to consumers' perception of satiating capacity.

    PubMed

    Marcano, J; Varela, P; Fiszman, S

    2015-02-01

    Since proteins have been shown to have the highest satiation-inducing effects of all the macronutrients, increasing the protein level is one of the main strategies for designing foods with enhanced satiating capacity. However, few studies analyze the effect that protein addition has on the texture and flavor characteristics of the target food item to relate it to the expected satiating capacity it elicits. The present work studied cheese pies with three levels of soy and whey proteins. Since the protein level altered the rheological behavior of the batters before baking and the texture of the baked pies, the feasibility of adding several protein levels for obtaining a range of final products was investigated. A check-all-that-apply questionnaire containing 32 sensory and non-sensory characteristics of the samples was given to consumers (n = 131) who also scored the perceived samples' satiating capacity. The results showed that the type and content of protein contributed distinctive sensory characteristics to the samples that could be related to their satiating capacity perception. Harder and drier samples (high protein levels) were perceived as more satiating with less perceptible sweet and milky cheese pie characteristic flavors. Soy contributed an off-flavour. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the interrelation of all these factors, aiding the development of highly palatable solid foods with enhanced satiating capacities. PMID:25504480

  15. Introducing a Framework for Physics Innovation and Entrepreneurship (PIE) Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roughani, Bahram

    A desired outcome for Physics Innovation and Entrepreneurship (PIE) education is preparing physics majors with an innovative and entrepreneurial mindset who are capable of opportunity recognition and adept in leveraging physics knowledge to address specific needs. Physics as a discipline is well-recognized to prepare students who become problem solvers and critical thinkers, gifted in dealing with abstract ideas and ambiguities in the context of complex and real-world problems. These characteristics when enhanced through appropriate combinations of curricular, co-curricular, and extra-curricular programs can prepare physics majors for careers and future challenges that may involve translating physics knowledge into useful products and services either as part of a technical team within an organization or through startups. A viable PIE education model prepares graduates for various career paths in addition to the traditional options such as pursuing graduate studies or becoming a science teacher. Having a well-defined ``third option'' for physics will benefit the robustness of the physics discipline through recruitment and retention of prospective students who in principle are interested in physics as a subject, but in practice they may overlook physics as their preferred major primarily because they are uncertain about a viable career path based on an undergraduate physics education. The ''Pathways to Innovation'' at Loyola is established based on the program developed by VentureWell and Epicenter (NSF Supported).

  16. Development of the Persistence in Engineering (PIE) Survey Instrument. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eris, Ozgur; Chen, Helen; Bailey, Tori; Engerman, Kimarie; Loshbaugh, Heidi; Griffin, Ashley; Lichtenstein, Gary; Cole, Angela

    2007-01-01

    The Persistence In Engineering (PIE) survey was developed to identify and characterize the fundamental factors that influence students' intentions to pursue an engineering degree over the course of their undergraduate career, and upon graduation, to practice engineering as a profession. The PIE survey is one of five data-gathering methods used in…

  17. 49 CFR 40.387 - What matters does the Director decide concerning a proposed PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... proposed PIE? 40.387 Section 40.387 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR... the Director decide concerning a proposed PIE? (a) Following the service agent's response (see § 40... from the service agent (see § 40.379(b)(1)) or on his or her own motion, the Director may dismiss a...

  18. 49 CFR 40.405 - May the Federal courts review PIE decisions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May the Federal courts review PIE decisions? 40.405 Section 40.405 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR... courts review PIE decisions? The Director's decision is a final administrative action of the...

  19. Harnessing the Internet for International Exchanges on Learning Cities: The Pie Experience 2011-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) project was developed to facilitate online exchanges of information and experience between learning cities around the world and, in doing this, to test the potential of the internet to enable such low-cost exchanges. The author provides a personal assessment of the PIE experience over the three years 2011…

  20. No Humble Pie: The Origins and Usage of a Statistical Chart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Ian

    2005-01-01

    William Playfair's pie chart is more than 200 years old and yet its intellectual origins remain obscure. The inspiration likely derived from the logic diagrams of Llull, Bruno, Leibniz, and Euler, which were familiar to William because of the instruction of his mathematician brother John. The pie chart is broadly popular but--despite its common…

  1. 49 CFR 40.409 - What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What does the issuance of a PIE mean to... What does the issuance of a PIE mean to transportation employers? (a) As an employer, you are deemed to... before September 1, and through November 30, are valid for all purposes under DOT drug and...

  2. 49 CFR 40.393 - How long does a PIE stay in effect?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How long does a PIE stay in effect? 40.393 Section... WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.393 How long does a PIE stay in effect? (a) In the NOPE (see § 40.375(b)(5)), the initiating official proposes the duration of the...

  3. 49 CFR 40.401 - How does the Department notify employers and the public about a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... public about a PIE? 40.401 Section 40.401 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... How does the Department notify employers and the public about a PIE? (a) The Department maintains a.... (b) When the Director issues a PIE, he or she adds to the List the name and address of the...

  4. 49 CFR 40.369 - What is the discretion of an initiating official in starting a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in starting a PIE proceeding? 40.369 Section 40.369 Transportation Office of the Secretary of... Exclusions § 40.369 What is the discretion of an initiating official in starting a PIE proceeding? (a) Initiating officials have broad discretion in deciding whether to start a PIE proceeding. (b) In...

  5. 49 CFR 40.381 - What information do you present to contest the proposed issuance of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... proposed issuance of a PIE? 40.381 Section 40.381 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation... What information do you present to contest the proposed issuance of a PIE? (a) As a service agent who wants to contest a proposed PIE, you must present at least the following information to the Director:...

  6. 49 CFR 40.373 - Before starting a PIE proceeding, does the initiating official give the service agent an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Before starting a PIE proceeding, does the... TESTING PROGRAMS Public Interest Exclusions § 40.373 Before starting a PIE proceeding, does the initiating... initiating official must send you a correction notice before starting a PIE proceeding. (b) The...

  7. Structural Conservation and Functional Diversity of the Poxvirus Immune Evasion (PIE) Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christopher A.; Epperson, Megan L.; Singh, Sukrit; Elliott, Jabari I.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2015-01-01

    Poxviruses encode a broad array of proteins that serve to undermine host immune defenses. Structural analysis of four of these seemingly unrelated proteins revealed the recurrent use of a conserved beta-sandwich fold that has not been observed in any eukaryotic or prokaryotic protein. Herein we propose to call this unique structural scaffolding the PIE (Poxvirus Immune Evasion) domain. PIE domain containing proteins are abundant in chordopoxvirinae, with our analysis identifying 20 likely PIE subfamilies among 33 representative genomes spanning 7 genera. For example, cowpox strain Brighton Red appears to encode 10 different PIEs: vCCI, A41, C8, M2, T4 (CPVX203), and the SECRET proteins CrmB, CrmD, SCP-1, SCP-2, and SCP-3. Characterized PIE proteins all appear to be nonessential for virus replication, and all contain signal peptides for targeting to the secretory pathway. The PIE subfamilies differ primarily in the number, size, and location of structural embellishments to the beta-sandwich core that confer unique functional specificities. Reported ligands include chemokines, GM-CSF, IL-2, MHC class I, and glycosaminoglycans. We expect that the list of ligands and receptors engaged by the PIE domain will grow as we come to better understand how this versatile structural architecture can be tailored to manipulate host responses to infection. PMID:26343707

  8. Replication of TMV-L and Lta1 RNAs and their recombinants in TMV-resistant Tm-1 tomato protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Yamafuji, R; Watanabe, Y; Meshi, T; Okada, Y

    1991-07-01

    Tm-1 is a gene that provides resistance to tomato plants against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infection. In tomato cells carrying the Tm-1 gene, multiplication of TMV is inhibited. From previous analysis of resistance-breaking mutants, the involvement of the 130- and 180-kDa proteins, putative viral replicases, in the resistance conferred by the Tm-1 gene was suggested. When wild-type TMV RNA was co-inoculated with a resistance-breaking mutant RNA, replication of the wild-type TMV genomic RNA could not be rescued by the 130- and 180-kDa proteins of a resistance-breaking strain, Lta1. To investigate how the putative resistance factor interacts with the 130- and 180-kDa proteins, we expressed the wild-type TMV protein sequence that is associated with the resistance-breaking phenomenon as part of a recombinant virus derived from Lta1 in Tm-1/Tm-1 protoplasts. No specific degradation of wild-type TMV protein sequences was observed, suggesting that the mechanism of the resistance does not involve the instability of a viral protein. PMID:2053299

  9. Heat and Ice in Sermilik Fjord: Novel Observational Techniques Using PIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, M.; Straneo, F.; Sutherland, D.

    2014-12-01

    A 1-year pilot experiment using pressure-sensor-equipped inverted echo sounders (PIES) was conducted in Sermilik Fjord in eastern Greenland to test non-traditional methods for measuring the time-varying
heat content in high-latitude seas, shelves, and fjords and for detecting the presence of ice. PIES, which are installed on the seafloor below the reach of destructive iceberg keels, present
a promising and inexpensive way to improve understanding of fjord dynamics and shelf-fjord interactions and will increase long-term monitoring capabilities in high latitudes where
remoteness and harsh conditions hamper traditional in situ observation techniques. The use
of PIES to characterize variability at high latitudes is a novel application of an existing
technology, but rests on the same principle as the traditional blue-water uses for PIES: due
to the dependence of sound speed on temperature, the surface-to-bottom round-trip acoustic-travel-time associated with reflections between the PIES and the air-sea interface is an excellent proxy
for heat content in the intervening water column. Furthermore, since reflections from seawater-ice interfaces are also detected when ice
is present, PIES provide a means to characterize the ice component in high-latitude systems. The PIES deployed in Sermilik Fjord (August 2011 - September 2012) resolved changes in heat content at scales ranging from hourly to seasonal. Furthermore, during winter, the PIES logged about 300 iceberg detections and recorded a 2-week period of land-fast ice cover in March. The deepest icebergs in the fjord were found to have keel depths reaching to ~350 m and iceberg speeds averaged about 0.2 m/s but were as high as 0.5 m/s.

  10. The Employer-Supported Parental Involvement in Education Program (ES/PIE): An Educator's Action Guide to ES/PIE Program Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Renato; Ramos-Cancel, Maria L.

    Described are characteristics of the Employer-Supported Parental Involvement in Education program (ES/PIE), designed to foster collaboration between education agencies and employers. An overview of the program details basic assumptions, core activities, and the roles of school districts and employers. Subsequent content provides a guide to program…

  11. Use of Formative Assessment, Self- and Peer-Assessment in the Classrooms: Some Insights from Recent Language Testing and Assessment (LTA) Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afitska, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    A considerable number of studies on formative teacher assessment and feedback, learner self- and peer-assessment have been carried out in the field of Language Testing and Assessment (LTA) research over the last two decades. These studies investigated the above mentioned concepts from different perspectives (impact of assessment on learning,…

  12. An Assessment of ORNL PIE Capabilities for the AGR Program Capsule Post Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Robert Noel

    2006-09-01

    ORNL has facilities and experienced staff that can execute +the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) task. While the specific PIE breakdown needs to be more formally defined, the basic outline is clear and the existing capabilities can be assessed within the needs of the tasks defined in the program plan. A one-to-one correspondence between the program plan tasks and the current ORNL PIE status was conducted and while some shortcomings were identified, the general capability is available. Specific upgrade needs were identified and reviewed. A path forward was formulated. Building 3525 is available for this work and this building is currently receiving renewed attention from management so that it will be in good working order prior to the expected PIE start date. This building is equipped with the tools necessary for PIEs of this nature, but the long hiatus in coated particle fuel work has left it with aging analysis tools. This report identified several of these tools and rough estimates of what would be required to update and replace them. In addition, other ORNL buildings are available to support Building 3525 in specialized tasks along with the normal laboratory infrastructure. Before the AGR management embarks on any equipment development effort, the PIE tasks should be updated against current program (modeling and data) needs and better defined so that the items to be measured, their measurement uncertainties, and thru-put needs can be reviewed. A Data Task Matrix (DTM) should be prepared so that the program data needs can be compared against the identified PIE tasks and what is practical in the hot cell environment to make sure nothing is overlooked. Finally, thought should be given to the development of standardized equipment designs between sites to avoid redundant design efforts and different measurement techniques. This is a potentially cost saving effort that can also avoid data inconsistencies.

  13. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus MF 31 on the Top and Cut Surfaces of Southern Custard Pies

    PubMed Central

    Preonas, D. L.; Nelson, A. I.; Ordal, Z. John; Steinberg, M. P.; Wei, L. S.

    1969-01-01

    A Staphylococcus strain was inoculated on the top and cut surfaces of freshly baked Southern custard pies which were then packaged in a pasteboard carton and held at 30 C. Daily plate counts of surface sections 0.3 inch (0.76 cm) in thickness were made. The top surface inoculum showed a 24-hr lag time. This was due to the protective action of a top cakelike layer as shown by homogenization of the mix and coating of the surface. Substitution of all sweeteners with dextrose completely inhibited growth on the top surface. Further addition of dextrose to lower water activity (Aw) to 0.9 prevented growth on the cut surface as well, but such pies were organoleptically unacceptable. Growth on the top surface could also be prevented by 80 μg of undissociated sorbic acid per g in combination with 100 μg of undissociated propionic acid per g in the baked pie. Growth on the cakelike top surface was always retarded longer than on the cut surface provided the packaging allowed evaporation of surface moisture. Reducing the Aw of a different type of cream pie to 0.907 prevented top surface growth. It was concluded that baked cream pies with a cakelike top layer could be marketed with a “refrigerate after opening” label, provided the package maintains the moisture gradient caused by the surface skin and either a combination of 80 μg of undissociated sorbic acid per g and 100 μg undissociated propionic acid per g is present in the baked pie or the Aw of the baked pie is 0.920 or lower. Images PMID:5803631

  14. Application of large-scale computing infrastructure for diverse environmental research applications using GC3Pie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffioletti, Sergio; Dawes, Nicholas; Bavay, Mathias; Sarni, Sofiane; Lehning, Michael

    2013-04-01

    , execute location-based subroutines at each grid point and store the results back into the central repository for post-processing. An optional extension of this infrastructure will be to provide a 'ring buffer'-type database infrastructure, such that model results (e.g. test runs made to check parameter dependency or for development) can be visualised and downloaded after completion without submitting them to a permanent storage infrastructure. Data organization Data collected from sensors are archived and classified in distributed sites connected with an open-source software middleware, GSN. Publicly available data are available through common web services and via a cloud storage server (based on Swift). Collocation of the data and processing in the cloud would eventually eliminate data transfer requirements. Execution control logic Execution of the data analysis pipelines (for both the R-based analysis and the Alpine3D simulations) has been implemented using the GC3Pie framework developed by UZH. (https://code.google.com/p/gc3pie/). This allows large-scale, fault-tolerant execution of the pipelines to be described in terms of software appliances. GC3Pie also allows supervision of the execution of large campaigns of appliances as a single simulation. This poster will present the fundamental architectural components of the data analysis pipelines together with initial experimental results.

  15. Characterization of Active Dry Wine Yeast During Starter Culture (Pied de Cuve) Preparation for Sparkling Wine Production.

    PubMed

    Benucci, Ilaria; Liburdi, Katia; Cerreti, Martina; Esti, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The preparation of yeast starter culture (Pied de Cuve) for producing sparkling wine with the traditional method is a key factor for manufacturing a good Prise de mousse. In this paper, the evolution of total yeast population, its viability during Pied de Cuve preparation, and the pressure profile during the 2nd fermentation in 2 different base wines made from Bombino bianco and Chardonnay grapes were investigated using 4 different commercial active dried yeasts. The study proves that despite the initial differences observed throughout the acclimatization phase, all the tested strains showed similar results on either the total population (from 8.2 × 10(7) cells/mL to 1.3 × 10(8) cells/mL) or cellular viability (from 70% to 84%). Independently from the base wine tested, the kinetic of sugar consumption was faster during the gradual acclimatization to the alcoholic medium (phase II) and slower during the preparation of starter culture in active growth phase (phase III). During both of these phases Saccharomyces cerevisiae bayanus Vitilevure DV10(®) (Station œnotechnique de Champagne) proved to have a higher sugar consumption rate than the other strains. During the Prise de mousse, S. cerevisiae bayanus Lalvin EC-1118(®) (Lallemand) reached the maximum pressure increase within time in both base wines. PMID:27376497

  16. Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES) for the Learner-Centered Information-Age Paradigm of Education: A Study to Improve the Design of the Functions and Features of PIES

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutta, Pratima

    2013-01-01

    The Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES) design theory is a design recommendation regarding the function and features of Learning Managements Systems (LMS) that can support the information-age learner-centered paradigm of education. The purpose of this study was to improve the proposed functions and features of the PIES design theory…

  17. Uranium hydrogeochemical survey of well waters from an area around Pie Town, Catron County, West-Central New Mexico, including concentrations of twenty-three additional elements

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, T.L.; George, W.E.; Hensley, W.K.; Thomas, G.J.; Langhorst, A.L.

    1980-10-01

    As part of the Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) conducted a detailed hydrogeochemical survey of well waters in a 4250-km/sup 2/ area near Pie Town in west-central New Mexico. A total of 300 well samples was collected and analyzed for uranium and 23 other elements. The results of these analyses and carbonate and bicarbonate ion concentrations are presented in the Appendixes of this report. Uranium concentrations range from below the detection limit of 0.02 parts per billion (ppB) to 293.18 ppB and average 8.71 ppB. Samples containing high levels of uranium were collected from the Largo Creek valley west of Quemado, from a small area about 6 km east of Quemado, from a small area surrounding Pie Town, and from scattered locations in the area surrounding Adams Diggings north of Pie Town. Most of the samples containing high uranium concentrations were collected from wells associated with the volcanic sedimentary facies of the Datil formation. This formation is a likely source of mobile uranium that may be precipitating in the underlying Baca formation, a known uranium host unit. Bicarbonate ion concentration, while proportional to uranium concentration in some cases, is not a strong controlling factor in the uranium concentrations in samples from this area.

  18. On the Fair Division of Multiple Stochastic Pies to Multiple Agents within the Nash Bargaining Solution

    PubMed Central

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.; Sotirchos, Anastasios

    2012-01-01

    The fair division of a surplus is one of the most widely examined problems. This paper focuses on bargaining problems with fixed disagreement payoffs where risk-neutral agents have reached an agreement that is the Nash-bargaining solution (NBS). We consider a stochastic environment, in which the overall return consists of multiple pies with uncertain sizes and we examine how these pies can be allocated with fairness among agents. Specifically, fairness is based on the Aristotle’s maxim: “equals should be treated equally and unequals unequally, in proportion to the relevant inequality”. In this context, fairness is achieved when all the individual stochastic surplus shares which are allocated to agents are distributed in proportion to the NBS. We introduce a novel algorithm, which can be used to compute the ratio of each pie that should be allocated to each agent, in order to ensure fairness within a symmetric or asymmetric NBS. PMID:23024752

  19. Contributions from Particles in Europe (PiE) 2010, Villefranche-sur-Mer, France: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, Ole A.; Chami, Malik; Doxaran, David

    2012-04-01

    This special issue of Geo-Marine Letters presents selected contributions from the international conference Particles in Europe (PiE) 2010 organized by Sequoia Scientific, Inc., and the Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche (LOV) on 15-17 November 2010 in Villefranche-sur-Mer, France, and guest-edited by Ole Mikkelsen, Malik Chami and David Doxaran. PiE was initiated in 2008, in order to promote and further our understanding of the importance of suspended particulate matter (SPM) for a very wide range of processes in the aquatic environment—from optics and acoustics, over sediment transport, to the global carbon balance. The papers in this special issue are in particular concerned with the interaction between SPM and water optical properties, as well as how to use optical proxy measurements to understand SPM processes. The next PiE conference is scheduled for 17-19 October 2012 in Barcelona, Spain.

  20. Trade-offs between sexual advertisement and immune function in the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca).

    PubMed Central

    Kilpimaa, Janne; Alatalo, Rauno V.; Siitari, Heli

    2004-01-01

    Good genes models of sexual selection assume that sexual advertisement is costly and thus the level of advertisement honestly reveals heritable viability. Recently it has been suggested that an important cost of sexual advertisement might be impairment of the functioning of the immune system. In this field experiment we investigated the possible trade-offs between immune function and sexual advertisement by manipulating both mating effort and activity of immune defence in male pied flycatchers. Mating effort was increased in a non-arbitrary manner by removing females from mated males during nest building. Widowed males sustained higher haematocrit levels than control males and showed higher expression of forehead patch height, suggesting that manipulation succeeded in increasing mating effort. Males that were experimentally forced to increase mating effort had reduced humoral immune responsiveness compared with control males. In addition, experimental activation of immune defence by vaccination with novel antigens reduced the expression of male ornament dimensions. To conclude, our results indicate that causality behind the trade-off between immune function and sexual advertisement may work in both directions: sexual activity suppresses immune function but immune challenge also reduces sexual advertisement. PMID:15058434

  1. 49 CFR 40.371 - On what information does an initiating official rely in deciding whether to start a PIE proceeding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... rely in deciding whether to start a PIE proceeding? 40.371 Section 40.371 Transportation Office of the... start a PIE proceeding? (a) An initiating official may rely on credible information from any source as the basis for starting a PIE proceeding. (b) Before sending a correction notice (see § 40.373),...

  2. Theoretical modeling of optical properties of Ag8 and Ag14 silver clusters embedded in an LTA sodalite zeolite cavity.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Ngo Tuan; Nguyen, Hue Minh Thi; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2013-10-01

    Optical properties of silver Ag(n) nanoclusters are demonstrated to be dependent on their size, structure and charge state. It is found that when being contained in the sodalite cavity of LTA zeolite the tetradecanuclear hexacation silver cluster Ag14(6+) is stable. Its lower-lying states and optical spectrum are theoretically determined using the quantum chemical TD-DFT method. Its ground state possesses an outer-shell electron configuration of A1g(2)T2g(6) mimicking the s(2)p(6) valence of noble gas atoms. These frontier orbitals are constructed from 5s,5p(Ag)-AOs with contributions from framework oxygen atoms. Light absorption of Ag14(6+) embedded in the sodalite cage which is characterized by strong peaks centered at 331 and 476 nm (transitions 5s,p(Ag) → 5s,p(Ag)) leads to much longer wavelength emission. The sodalite cage, as a container, stabilizes the central Ag14(6+) cluster by electrostatic attraction. The absorption spectrum of the isovalent neutral Ag8 cluster embedded inside the same sodalite cavity is also simulated using TD-DFT and CASPT2 methods. This absorption spectrum which is similar to that of the Ag14(6+) cluster has two absorption bands in the near UV and visible regions. PMID:23936902

  3. Reading: Making It Personal Again--Now Serving PIE to Hungry Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Nancy; Oleynik, Myra; Sacco, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Something wonderful happens when children are asked to choose their own books and are given ample time to read and discuss them. They become hungry readers with an appetite for books! This simple strategy was the basis for developing the program known as PIE (Personalized Independent Enrichment) and its recipe for reading success. The goal of the…

  4. Giant Paperclip Necklaces, Soup-Can Rings and Cherry-Pie Hats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes an art project inspired by the wearable sculpture art created by artist Marjorie Schick. Students used wallpaper paste and newspapers to create papier-mache for a mountain hat, a cherry-pie mask/hat, a "dress" shoe and a Cubistic mask. Cardboard was used in many of these things, in addition to being used as…

  5. Reflections on "Petit Battement sur le Cou de Pied": Is It Still Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paskevska, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This article presents multiple perspectives of "petit battement sur le cou de pied". These perspectives include historical, biomechanical, and pedagogic points of view. The article offers useful information for ballet specialists and applied research studies aimed at ballet pedagogy. (Contains 2 tables and 5 figures.)

  6. Adolescent Ambiguities in "American Pie": Popular Culture as a Resource for Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashcraft, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Proposes the need to critically incorporate popular culture into sex education efforts in order to develop programs that resonate with teens' experiences while allowing them to construct more equitable social relations. Illustrates how this might be done through an analysis of the recent teen film, "American Pie," identifying specific implications…

  7. Bars, Lines, & Pies: A Graphing Skills Program. Expect the Unexpected with Math[R

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Actuarial Foundation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Bars, Lines, & Pies" is a dynamic math program designed to build graphing skills in students, while also showing them the relevance of math in their lives. Developed by The Actuarial Foundation along with Scholastic, the graphing lessons and activities involve engaging, real-world examples about the environment and recycling. In these lessons,…

  8. Oxidative stress in pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings from metal contaminated environments in northern Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, A.M.M. Sturve, J.; Foerlin, L.; Nyholm, N.E.I.

    2007-11-15

    Metals have been shown to induce oxidative stress in animals. One of the most metal polluted terrestrial environments in Sweden is the surroundings of a sulfide ore smelter plant located in the northern part of the country. Pied flycatcher nestlings (Ficedula hypoleuca) that grew up close to the industry had accumulated amounts of arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, iron and zinc in their liver tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate if pied flycatcher nestlings in the pollution gradient of the industry were affected by oxidative stress using antioxidant molecules and enzyme activities. The antioxidant assays were also evaluated in search for useful biomarkers in pied flycatchers. This study indicated that nestlings in metal contaminated areas showed signs of oxidative stress evidenced by up regulated hepatic antioxidant defense given as increased glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) activities and slightly but not significantly elevated lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities. Stepwise linear regression indicated that lipid peroxidation and CAT activities were influenced mostly by iron, but iron and lead influenced the CAT activity to a higher degree. Positive relationships were found between GST and lead as well as GR activities and cadmium. We conclude that GR, CAT, GST activities and lipid peroxidation levels may function as useful biomarkers for oxidative stress in free-living pied flycatcher nestlings exposed to metal contaminated environments.

  9. Mnemonic Device for Relating the Eight Thermodynamic State Variables: The Energy Pie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fieberg, Jeffrey E.; Girard, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    A mnemonic device, the energy pie, is presented that provides relationships between thermodynamic potentials ("U," "H," "G," and "A") and other sets of variables that carry energy units, "TS" and "PV." Methods are also presented in which the differential expressions for the potentials and the corresponding Maxwell relations follow from the energy…

  10. Fate of prions in soil: interactions of RecPrP with organic matter of soil aggregates as revealed by LTA-PAS.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Amaranta; D'Acqui, Luigi Paolo; Calamai, Luca

    2008-02-01

    The contribution of soil organic matter (OM) to the adsorption of a recombinant prion protein (RecPrP) was studied in microcosm systems (soil aggregates from two different soils) before and after OM removal by low temperature ashing (LTA). The LTA technique allows a controlled removal of OM layer by layer, like a peeling of an onion skin, with minimal disturbance of the mineral matrix. Soil aggregates were selected as a representative model of the "in situ" conditions. Adsorption from batch vs percolation experiments were compared, and the aggregates were characterized by photoacustic Fourier-transform IR spectroscopy (PAS-FTIR). High affinity (H-type) adsorption isotherms were found with complete removal of RecPrP from solution for protein/soil ratios up to 1:62.5. OM removal from aggregates decreased the adsorbed RecPrP in amounts corresponding to 330-1000 microg mg(-1) of soil organic carbon (OC) indicating that native OM has specific adsorption capacity comparable and/or superior to the mineral matrix. The coupled LTA-PAS-FTIR approach demonstrated that, albeit OM composition was homogeneous throughout the aggregates, its presence in the most external surfaces of the aggregates affects the diffusion dynamics of RecPrP within the aggregates during percolation. PMID:18323094

  11. International Workshop on Characterization and PIE Needs for Fundamental Understanding of Fuels Performance and Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Not Listed

    2011-12-01

    The International Workshop on Characterization and PIE Needs to Support Science-Based Development of Innovative Fuels was held June 16-17, 2011, in Paris, France. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party on the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) sponsored the workshop to identify gaps in global capabilities that need to be filled to meet projected needs in the 21st century. First and foremost, the workshop brought nine countries and associated international organizations, together in support of common needs for nuclear fuels and materials testing, characterization, PIE, and modeling capabilities. Finland, France, Germany, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States of America, IAEA, and ITU (on behalf of European Union Joint Research Centers) discussed issues and opportunities for future technical advancements and collaborations. Second, the presentations provided a base level of understanding of current international capabilities. Three main categories were covered: (1) status of facilities and near term plans, (2) PIE needs from fuels engineering and material science perspectives, and (3) novel PIE techniques being developed to meet the needs. The International presentations provided valuable data consistent with the outcome of the National Workshop held in March 2011. Finally, the panel discussion on 21st century PIE capabilities, created a unified approach for future collaborations. In conclusion, (1) existing capabilities are not sufficient to meet the needs of a science-based approach, (2) safety issues and fuels behavior during abnormal conditions will receive more focus post-Fukushima; therefore we need to adopt our techniques to those issues, and (3) International collaboration is needed in the areas of codes and standards development for the new techniques.

  12. Demographic Divergence History of Pied Flycatcher and Collared Flycatcher Inferred from Whole-Genome Re-sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Nadachowska-Brzyska, Krystyna; Burri, Reto; Olason, Pall I.; Kawakami, Takeshi; Smeds, Linnéa; Ellegren, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Profound knowledge of demographic history is a prerequisite for the understanding and inference of processes involved in the evolution of population differentiation and speciation. Together with new coalescent-based methods, the recent availability of genome-wide data enables investigation of differentiation and divergence processes at unprecedented depth. We combined two powerful approaches, full Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis (ABC) and pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent modeling (PSMC), to reconstruct the demographic history of the split between two avian speciation model species, the pied flycatcher and collared flycatcher. Using whole-genome re-sequencing data from 20 individuals, we investigated 15 demographic models including different levels and patterns of gene flow, and changes in effective population size over time. ABC provided high support for recent (mode 0.3 my, range <0.7 my) species divergence, declines in effective population size of both species since their initial divergence, and unidirectional recent gene flow from pied flycatcher into collared flycatcher. The estimated divergence time and population size changes, supported by PSMC results, suggest that the ancestral species persisted through one of the glacial periods of middle Pleistocene and then split into two large populations that first increased in size before going through severe bottlenecks and expanding into their current ranges. Secondary contact appears to have been established after the last glacial maximum. The severity of the bottlenecks at the last glacial maximum is indicated by the discrepancy between current effective population sizes (20,000–80,000) and census sizes (5–50 million birds) of the two species. The recent divergence time challenges the supposition that avian speciation is a relatively slow process with extended times for intrinsic postzygotic reproductive barriers to evolve. Our study emphasizes the importance of using genome-wide data to

  13. Clutch size determination in shorebirds: revisiting incubation limitation in the pied avocet (Recurvirostra avosetta).

    PubMed

    Lengyel, Szabolcs; Kiss, Béla; Tracy, C Richard

    2009-03-01

    1. Traits strongly related to fitness, such as offspring number, are expected to show intraspecific variation among individuals. However, offspring number is invariant in several reptiles, birds, and mammals. Most shorebirds (210+ species), for example, have an invariant clutch size of four eggs, which is unexpected in such an ecologically, behaviourally and socially diverse group. 2. The incubation-limitation hypothesis (ILH) suggests that shorebird clutch size is limited by the inability of adults to incubate clutches larger than four eggs. Several recent studies reported no overall costs of incubating experimentally enlarged clutches and concluded no support for the traditional ILH. However, most studies have not measured all potential costs, and none has quantified costs beyond egg hatching. We conducted a clutch-enlargement experiment and measured potential costs both during incubation and chick rearing in pied avocets (Recurvirostra avosetta L.). 3. Hatching was more asynchronous and egg hatchability was marginally lower in enlarged clutches than in controls. Nonetheless, more young hatched from enlarged clutches (mean: 4.2 +/- 0.17 SE) than from controls (3.4 +/- 0.09), and the two groups did not differ in incubation period, complete or partial clutch failure, or hatchling body size, apparently refuting the ILH. 4. However, pairs incubating enlarged clutches occupied poorer feeding territories during chick rearing, experienced higher chick mortality, and eventually raised fewer young to independence (mean adjusted for season: 0.7 +/- 0.16 SE juveniles) than did control pairs (1.2 +/- 0.13). Chick survival was primarily associated with prey availability, and predation risks were not higher in larger broods. 5. Our results provide evidence that incubating unusually large clutches can affect post-hatching performance and lead to lower annual reproductive success in shorebirds. This study, therefore, supports the ILH and points to the importance of monitoring

  14. The effects of selected modern technological concepts on the performance and handling characteristics of LTA vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazza, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an airship design sensitivity study are presented. A wide variety of airship design concepts, including the classical and high aero-lift augmented-hybrids are examined with regard to specific technological improvements, and consequent gains in performance, stability and control and flying qualities. Variations in size, payload, power required and airspeed are quantitatively analyzed for airships representing aero-to-buoyant lift ratios of zero to 3.0 over a range of technology improvements implying reduced drag, reduced structural weight fractions and lighter, more efficient propulsion systems. Qualitatively, future airships are discussed in terms of stability, control and flying qualities requirements dictated by projected demands for vastly improved operational effectiveness and ease of handling. Such topics include stability augmentation systems, load-alleviation systems and total computer state-sensing and controls management systems. It was shown that, for the most part, highly refined conventional designs offer attractive gains in both performance and ease of handling. Hybrid airships represent a good potential for missions requiring the transport of heavy payloads at higher airspeeds over shorter ranges without the capability for sustained hover and vertical flight.

  15. Mesoporous aluminosilicates assembled from dissolved LTA zeolite and triblock copolymer in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shunsuke; Okada, Hiroaki; Nakatani, Norihito; Maruo, Takanori; Nishiyama, Norikazu; Miyake, Yoshikazu

    2009-05-15

    Zeolite Na-A crystals dissolved in a HCl solution were used as a single-source of silicon and aluminum for the synthesis of mesoporous aluminosilicates via a template-assisted method with an organic base tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH). Amphiphilic triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 (EO(106)PO(70)EO(106)) was used as template. Increasing the amount of TMAOH in the synthetic solution resulted in an increase in the aluminum content of the products. On the other hand, mesostructural periodicity was deteriorated with higher content of aluminum incorporated into the mesoporous framework. The samples with low Si/Al ratios less than 5 have wormhole-like pore structure, while the samples with Si/Al ratios more than 7 possess highly ordered mesoporous structure, a body-centered Im3m symmetry, with single crystal like morphology. The samples with Si/Al ratio of 7, which prepared at TMAOH molar concentration of 25 mM in the templating solution, possess BET surface area of 470 m(2)/g, pore size of 6.4 nm, and pore volume of 0.56 cm(3)/g. Aluminum atoms have successfully been incorporated in a tetra-coordinated position and remained stable even after calcination at 600 degrees C. PMID:19223041

  16. Testicular distribution and toxicity of a novel LTA4H inhibitor in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, P.D. La, D.

    2014-07-01

    JNJ 40929837, a novel leukotriene A4 hydrolase inhibitor in drug development, was reported to induce testicular toxicity in rats. The mechanism of toxicity was considered to be rodent specific and not relevant to humans. To further investigate this finding in rats, the distribution and toxicokinetics of JNJ 40929837 and its two metabolites, M1 and M2, were investigated. A quantitative whole body autoradiography study showed preferential distribution and retention of JNJ 40929837-derived radioactivity in the testes consistent with the observed site of toxicity. Subsequent studies with unlabeled JNJ 40929837 showed different metabolite profiles between the plasma and testes. Following a single oral 50 mg/kg dose of JNJ 40929837, M2 was the primary metabolite in plasma whereas M1 was the primary metabolite in testes. The exposure of M1 was 386-fold higher in the testes compared to plasma whereas M2 had limited exposure in testes. Furthermore, the T{sub max} of M1 was 48 h in testes suggesting a large accumulation potential of this metabolite in testes compared to plasma. Following six months of repeated daily oral dosing, M1 accumulated approximately five-fold in the testes whereas the parent did not accumulate. These results indicate that the toxicokinetic profiles of JNJ 40929837 and its two metabolites in testes are markedly different compared to plasma and support the importance of understanding the toxicokinetic profiles of compounds and their metabolites in organs/tissues where toxicity is observed. - Highlights: • JNJ 40929837-derived radioactivity preferentially distributed into testes • Primary metabolite flip-flop in plasma and testes • The primary metabolite in testes accumulated 5-fold but not parent.

  17. Precision Information Environment (PIE) for International Safeguards: Pre-Demonstration Development Use Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Gastelum, Zoe N.; Henry, Michael J.

    2013-11-13

    In FY2013, the PIE International Safeguards team demonstrated our development progress to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) staff from the Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24, our client) and the Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22). Following the demonstration, the team was asked by our client to complete additional development prior to a planned demonstration at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), scheduled tentatively for January or spring of 2014. The team discussed four potential areas for development (in priority order), and will develop them as time and funding permit prior to an IAEA demonstration. The four capability areas are: 1. Addition of equipment manuals to PIE-accessible files 2. Optical character recognition (OCR) of photographed text 3. Barcode reader with information look-up from a database 4. Add Facilities to Data Model 5. Geospatial capabilities with information integration Each area will be described below in a use case.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of LTA nanozeolite using barley husk silica: Mercury removal from standard and real solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, Seyed Naser; Dehnavi, Ahmad Roozbehani; Joorabdoozha, Amir

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Silica extraction from barley husk with high purity for the synthesis of A nanozeolite. ► Free template A nanozeolite synthesized via new source of silica at low temperature. ► Optimization of SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratios, temperature and time of the synthesis. ► Utilizing of synthesized A nanozeolite for mercury removal from aqueous solutions. ► Mercury removal at optimized pH, contact time and adsorbent dose from real solution. - Abstract: In this study, synthesized Lined Type A (LTA) nanozeolite from barley husk silica (BHS) was used for mercury removal from standard and real aqueous solutions. The BHS in amorphous phase with 80% purity was extracted from barley husk ash (BHA), and used effectively as a new source of silica for the synthesis of NaA nanozeolite. The NaA nanocrystal in pure phase has been synthesized at low temperature, without adding any organic additives. The effects of heating time, reaction temperature, SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} mole ratios on the crystallization of NaA nanozeolite were studied. The adsorption capacity of mercury (II) was studied as a function of pH, contact time, and amount of adsorbent. The crystallization of NaA nanozeolite from BHS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), and FTIR techniques. Moreover, concentration of Hg{sup 2+} ions in the aqueous solutions was analyzed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy method (HG-AAS). The standard and real samples analysis showed that NaA nanozeolite is capable of Hg{sup 2+} ions removal from the aqueous solutions. Efficiency of mercury (II) adsorption from real solutions onto the nano-sized NaA zeolite was 98%.

  19. Tunable PIE and synchronized gating detections by FastFLIM for quantitative microscopy measurements of fast dynamics of single molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Coskun, Ulas; Ferreon, Allan Chris; Barbieri, Beniamino; Liao, Shih-Chu Jeff

    2016-03-01

    The crosstalk between two fluorescent species causes problems in fluorescence microscopy imaging, especially for quantitative measurements such as co-localization, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence cross correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). In laser scanning confocal microscopy, the lasers can be switched on and off by acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTF) in the microsecond scale for alternative line scanning in order to avoid the crosstalk while minimizing the time delay between two lasers on the same pixel location. In contrast, the pulsed interleaved excitation (PIE) technique synchronizes two pulsed lasers of different wavelengths in the nanosecond scale to enable measuring superfast dynamics of two fluorescent species simultaneously and yet quantitatively without the crosstalk contamination. This feature is critical for many cell biology applications, e.g. accurate determination of stoichiometry in FRET measurements for studying protein-protein interactions or cell signal events, detection of weaker bindings in FCCS by eliminating the false cross correlation due to the crosstalk. The PIE has been used with the time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) electronics. Here, we describe a novel PIE development using the digital frequency domain (DFD) technique -- FastFLIM, which provides tunable PIE setups and synchronized gating detections, tailored and optimized to specific applications. A few PIE setups by FastFLIM and measurement examples are described. Combined with the sensitivity of Alba and Q2 systems, the PIE allowed us to quantitatively measure the fast dynamics of single molecules.

  20. An Outbreak of Human Listeriosis in England between 2010 and 2012 Associated with the Consumption of Pork Pies.

    PubMed

    Awofisayo-Okuyelu, A; Arunachalam, N; Dallman, T; Grant, K A; Aird, H; McLauchlin, J; Painset, A; Amar, C

    2016-05-01

    An outbreak of listeriosis in England affecting 14 people between 2010 and 2012 and linked to the consumption of pork pies was investigated. All 14 individuals were older than 55 years, 12 were men, and 10 reported the presence of an underlying condition. All were resident in or had visited either of two English regions and were infected with the same strain of Listeria monocytogenes. In interviews with 12 patients, 9 reported eating pork pies, and individuals that consumed pork pies were significantly more likely to be infected with an outbreak strain than were individuals with sporadic cases of listeriosis infections in England from 2010 to 2012. Pork pies were purchased from seven retailers in South Yorkshire or the East Midlands, and the outbreak strain was recovered from pork pies supplied by only the producer in South Yorkshire. The outbreak strain was also recovered from samples of finished product and from environmental samples collected from the manufacturer. The likely source of contamination was environmental sites within the manufacturing environment, and the contamination was associated with the process of adding gelatin to the pies after cooking. Inadequate temperature control and poor hygienic practices at one of the retailers were also identified as possible contributory factors allowing growth of the pathogen. Following improvements in manufacturing practices and implementation of additional control measures at the retailers' premises, L. monocytogenes was not recovered from subsequent food and environmental samples, and the outbreak strain was not detected in further individuals with listeriosis in England. PMID:27296419

  1. "Operation Pied Piper": a psychoanalytic narrative of authority in a time of war.

    PubMed

    Farley, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    The evacuation of British children during World War II is read alongside the legend of the "Pied Piper" after which the mass migration was officially named. While virtually every British account of World War II makes mention of the evacuation, most are silent on the question of its ominous title: "Operation Pied Piper." This paper traces the legend's key theme - on influencing and being influenced - as it surfaces in the writing of one child analyst and one social worker charged with the responsibility of leading a family of five hostels for British youth. At a time when Hitler's deadly regime reached unprecedented heights across the Channel, the legend of the "Pied Piper" becomes a highly suggestive metaphor for thinking about D. W. Winnicott and Clare Britton's writing on what authority could mean in the face of leadership gone terribly wrong. Quite another, profoundly intimate loss of leadership haunts their words as well: Sigmund Freud, in exile from Hitler's Europe and leader of the psychoanalytic movement, died in London just weeks after the first wave of Blitz evacuations. It is in this context that Winnicott and Britton articulated a theory of authority that could address the losses of history without at the same time demanding the loss of the mind. PMID:22737729

  2. PIE on Safety-Tested AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, John D.; Morris, Robert Noel; Baldwin, Charles A.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Gerczak, Tyler J.

    2015-08-01

    Post-irradiation examination (PIE) is being performed in support of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel development and qualification for High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). AGR-1 was the first in a series of TRISO fuel irradiation experiments initiated in 2006 under the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program; this work continues to be funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) initiative. AGR-1 fuel compacts were fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2006 and irradiated for three years in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to demonstrate and evaluate fuel performance under HTGR irradiation conditions. PIE is being performed at INL and ORNL to study how the fuel behaved during irradiation, and to examine fuel performance during exposure to elevated temperatures at or above temperatures that could occur during a depressurized conduction cooldown event. This report summarizes safety testing of irradiated AGR-1 Compact 5-1-1 in the ORNL Core Conduction Cooldown Test Facility (CCCTF) and post-safety testing PIE.

  3. Highly selective uptake of carbon dioxide on the zeolite |Na10.2KCs0.8|-LTA- a possible sorbent for biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ocean; Wardecki, Dariusz; Bacsik, Zoltán; Vasiliev, Petr; McCusker, Lynne B; Hedin, Niklas

    2016-06-28

    The|Na10.2KCs0.8|8[Al12Si12O48]8(Fm3[combining macron]c)-LTA zeolite adsorbs CO2-over-CH4 with a high selectivity (over 1500). The uptake of carbon dioxide is also high (3.31 mmol g(-1), 293 K, 101 kPa). This form of zeolite A is a very promising adsorbent for applications such as biogas upgrading, where keeping the adsorption of methane to a minimum is crucial. PMID:27251457

  4. Vortex wake, downwash distribution, aerodynamic performance and wingbeat kinematics in slow-flying pied flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Muijres, Florian T.; Bowlin, Melissa S.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Many small passerines regularly fly slowly when catching prey, flying in cluttered environments or landing on a perch or nest. While flying slowly, passerines generate most of the flight forces during the downstroke, and have a ‘feathered upstroke’ during which they make their wing inactive by retracting it close to the body and by spreading the primary wing feathers. How this flight mode relates aerodynamically to the cruising flight and so-called ‘normal hovering’ as used in hummingbirds is not yet known. Here, we present time-resolved fluid dynamics data in combination with wingbeat kinematics data for three pied flycatchers flying across a range of speeds from near hovering to their calculated minimum power speed. Flycatchers are adapted to low speed flight, which they habitually use when catching insects on the wing. From the wake dynamics data, we constructed average wingbeat wakes and determined the time-resolved flight forces, the time-resolved downwash distributions and the resulting lift-to-drag ratios, span efficiencies and flap efficiencies. During the downstroke, slow-flying flycatchers generate a single-vortex loop wake, which is much more similar to that generated by birds at cruising flight speeds than it is to the double loop vortex wake in hovering hummingbirds. This wake structure results in a relatively high downwash behind the body, which can be explained by the relatively active tail in flycatchers. As a result of this, slow-flying flycatchers have a span efficiency which is similar to that of the birds in cruising flight and which can be assumed to be higher than in hovering hummingbirds. During the upstroke, the wings of slowly flying flycatchers generated no significant forces, but the body–tail configuration added 23 per cent to weight support. This is strikingly similar to the 25 per cent weight support generated by the wing upstroke in hovering hummingbirds. Thus, for slow-flying passerines, the upstroke cannot be regarded as

  5. Comparison between urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 detection and platelet Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA) assays for evaluating aspirin response in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tengfei; Zhang, Jingwei; Chen, Xiahuan; Feng, Xueru; Fu, Sidney W; McCaffrey, Timothy A; Liu, Meilin

    2015-10-15

    Aspirin is widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of our study was to compare between two established methods of aspirin response, urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (11dhTXB2) and platelet Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA) assays in elderly Chinese patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), and to investigate the clinical significance of both methods in predicting cardiovascular events. Urinary 11dhTxB2 assay and arachidonic acid-induced (AA, 0.5mg/ml) platelet aggregation by Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTAAA) assay were measured to evaluate aspirin responses. High-on aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) was defined as urinary 11dhTxB2>1500pg/mg or AA-induced platelet aggregation≥15.22%-the upper quartile of our enrolled population. The two tests showed a poor correlation for aspirin inhibition (r=0.063) and a poor agreement in classifying HAPR (kappa=0.053). With a mean follow-up time of 12months, cardiovascular events occurred more frequently in HAPR patients who were diagnosed by LTA assay as compared with no-HAPR patients (22.5% versus 10.6%, P=0.039, OR=2.45, 95% CI=1.06-5.63). However, the HAPR status, as determined by urinary 11dTXB2 measurement, did not show a significant correlation with outcomes. PMID:26095809

  6. Calling Where It Counts: Subordinate Pied Babblers Target the Audience of Their Vocal Advertisements

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, David J.; Finch, Fiona M.; Bell, Matthew B. V.; Ridley, Amanda R.

    2015-01-01

    For territorial group-living species, opportunities to reproduce on the natal territory can be limited by a number of factors including the availability of resources within a territory, access to unrelated individuals, and monopolies on reproduction by dominant group members. Individuals looking to reproduce are therefore faced with the options of either waiting for a breeding opportunity to arise in the natal territory, or searching for reproductive opportunities in non-natal groups. In the cooperatively breeding Southern pied babbler, Turdoides bicolor, most individuals who achieve reproductive success do so through taking up dominant breeding positions within non-natal groups. For subordinate pied babblers therefore, searching for breeding opportunities in non-natal groups is of primary importance as this represents the major route to reproductive success. However, prospecting (where individuals leave the group to search for reproductive opportunities within other groups) is costly and individuals rapidly lose weight when not part of a group. Here we demonstrate that subordinate pied babblers adopt an alternative strategy for mate attraction by vocal advertisement from within their natal territories. We show that subordinates focus their calling efforts on the edges of their territory, and specifically near boundaries with neighbouring groups that have potential breeding partners (unrelated individuals of the opposite sex). In contrast to prospecting, calling individuals showed no body mass loss associated with this behaviour, suggesting that calling from within the group may provide a ‘cheap’ advertisement strategy. Additionally, we show that subordinates use information regarding the composition of neighbouring groups to target the greatest number of potential mating partners. PMID:26177094

  7. Calling Where It Counts: Subordinate Pied Babblers Target the Audience of Their Vocal Advertisements.

    PubMed

    Humphries, David J; Finch, Fiona M; Bell, Matthew B V; Ridley, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    For territorial group-living species, opportunities to reproduce on the natal territory can be limited by a number of factors including the availability of resources within a territory, access to unrelated individuals, and monopolies on reproduction by dominant group members. Individuals looking to reproduce are therefore faced with the options of either waiting for a breeding opportunity to arise in the natal territory, or searching for reproductive opportunities in non-natal groups. In the cooperatively breeding Southern pied babbler, Turdoides bicolor, most individuals who achieve reproductive success do so through taking up dominant breeding positions within non-natal groups. For subordinate pied babblers therefore, searching for breeding opportunities in non-natal groups is of primary importance as this represents the major route to reproductive success. However, prospecting (where individuals leave the group to search for reproductive opportunities within other groups) is costly and individuals rapidly lose weight when not part of a group. Here we demonstrate that subordinate pied babblers adopt an alternative strategy for mate attraction by vocal advertisement from within their natal territories. We show that subordinates focus their calling efforts on the edges of their territory, and specifically near boundaries with neighbouring groups that have potential breeding partners (unrelated individuals of the opposite sex). In contrast to prospecting, calling individuals showed no body mass loss associated with this behaviour, suggesting that calling from within the group may provide a 'cheap' advertisement strategy. Additionally, we show that subordinates use information regarding the composition of neighbouring groups to target the greatest number of potential mating partners. PMID:26177094

  8. Pharmaceuticals and the Environment (PiE): Evolution and impact of the published literature revealed by bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Daughton, Christian G

    2016-08-15

    The evolution and impact of the published literature surrounding the transdisciplinary, multifaceted topic of pharmaceuticals as contaminants in the environment is examined for the first time in an historical context. The preponderance of literature cited in this examination represents the earlier works. As an historical chronology, the focus is on the emergence of key, specific aspects of the overall topic (often termed PiE) in the published literature and on the most highly cited works. This examination is not a conventional, technical review of the literature; as such, little attention was devoted to the more recent literature. The many dimensions involved with PiE span over 70years of published literature. Some articles began to appear in published works in the 1940s and earlier, while others only began to receive attention in the 1990s and later. Decades of early research on what at the time seemed to be disconnected topics eventually coalesced in the mid-to-late 1990s around a number of interconnected concerns and issues that now comprise PiE. Major objectives are to provide a new perspective to the topic, to facilitate more efficient and effective review of the literature by others, and to recognize the more significant, seminal contributions to the advancement of PiE as a field of research. Some of the most highly cited articles in all of environmental science now involve PiE. As of April 2015, a core group of 385 PiE articles had each received at least 200 citations; one had received 5424 citations. But hundreds of additional articles also played important roles in the evolution and advancement of the field. PMID:27104492

  9. Moser's C-Line, the Apparent Multiplicity m‧ and Modules in Descriptions of L-Ta2O5 and Related Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinder, Bengt-Olov

    2001-08-01

    Several L-Ta2O5 related phases, often classified as type I and type II structures, are described as composed of elements of α-and β-U3O8 type. Published powder patterns are reindexed in a four-index notation using a modulation vector q=qb*. From the so-called C-line a relation between the apparent multiplicity m‧ and q is obtained: m‧=1/∣2-3q∣. A modified (AB) module, based on the α-U3O8 structure, is given and used in modeling the structures. It is shown that the proportion of metal atom sites with octahedral surrounding, foct, is linearly related to q.

  10. Difficult Dialogues, Privilege and Social Justice: Uses of the Privileged Identity Exploration (PIE) Model in Student Affairs Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2007-01-01

    This article will introduce the Privileged Identity Exploration (PIE) Model. This model identifies eight (8) defense modes associated with behaviors individuals display when engaged in difficult dialogues about social justice issues. Implications for the model and ways it can be used to assist facilitators as they engage participants in…

  11. 49 CFR 40.373 - Before starting a PIE proceeding, does the initiating official give the service agent an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Before starting a PIE proceeding, does the initiating official give the service agent an opportunity to correct problems? 40.373 Section 40.373... official give the service agent an opportunity to correct problems? (a) If you are a service agent,...

  12. 49 CFR 40.403 - Must a service agent notify its clients when the Department issues a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Must a service agent notify its clients when the... Must a service agent notify its clients when the Department issues a PIE? (a) As a service agent, if... notice to each client within three business days of receiving from the Department the notice provided...

  13. A Comparison of Learning Management Systems in a School District: Searching for the Ideal Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildirim, Zahide; Reigeluth, Charles M.; Kwon, Seolim; Kageto, Yuichi; Shao, Zihang

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the use of several learning management systems (LMS), their benefits, and their limitations in relation to the desired characteristics of an ideal Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES) for the information age. A qualitative research design was used. The participants of the study were teachers, administrators, and…

  14. Alternate non-stop migration strategies of pied flycatchers to cross the Sahara desert.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Janne; Both, Christiaan

    2016-04-01

    Each year more than two billion songbirds cross the Sahara, but how they perform this formidable task is largely unknown. Using geolocation tracks from 27 pied flycatchers, a nocturnally migrating passerine, we show that most birds made diurnal flights in both autumn and spring. These diurnal flights were estimated to be part of non-stop flights of mostly 40-60 h. In spring, birds flew across the Sahara, while autumn migration probably circumpassed part of the desert, through a long oversea flight. Our data contradict claims that passerines cross the Sahara by intermittent flight and daytime resting. The frequent occurrence of long non-stop flights to cross the desert shows migrants' physiological abilities and poses the question why this would not be the general migration strategy to cross the Sahara. PMID:27072404

  15. Coalition readiness management system preliminary interoperability experiment (CReaMS PIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Peter; Ryan, Peter; Zalcman, Lucien; Robbie, Andrew

    2003-09-01

    The United States Navy (USN) has initiated the Coalition Readiness Management System (CReaMS) Initiative to enhance coalition warfighting readiness through advancing development of a team interoperability training and combined mission rehearsal capability. It integrates evolving cognitive team learning principles and processes with advanced technology innovations to produce an effective and efficient team learning environment. The JOint Air Navy Networking Environment (JOANNE) forms the Australian component of CReaMS. The ultimate goal is to link Australian Defence simulation systems with the USN Battle Force Tactical Training (BFTT) system to demonstrate and achieve coalition level warfare training in a synthetic battlespace. This paper discusses the initial Preliminary Interoperability Experiment (PIE) involving USN and Australian Defence establishments.

  16. Climate change, breeding date and nestling diet: how temperature differentially affects seasonal changes in pied flycatcher diet depending on habitat variation.

    PubMed

    Burger, Claudia; Belskii, Eugen; Eeva, Tapio; Laaksonen, Toni; Mägi, Marko; Mänd, Raivo; Qvarnström, Anna; Slagsvold, Tore; Veen, Thor; Visser, Marcel E; Wiebe, Karen L; Wiley, Chris; Wright, Jonathan; Both, Christiaan

    2012-07-01

    1. Climate warming has led to shifts in the seasonal timing of species. These shifts can differ across trophic levels, and as a result, predator phenology can get out of synchrony with prey phenology. This can have major consequences for predators such as population declines owing to low reproductive success. However, such trophic interactions are likely to differ between habitats, resulting in differential susceptibility of populations to increases in spring temperatures. A mismatch between breeding phenology and food abundance might be mitigated by dietary changes, but few studies have investigated this phenomenon. Here, we present data on nestling diets of nine different populations of pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca, across their breeding range. This species has been shown to adjust its breeding phenology to local climate change, but sometimes insufficiently relative to the phenology of their presumed major prey: Lepidoptera larvae. In spring, such larvae have a pronounced peak in oak habitats, but to a much lesser extent in coniferous and other deciduous habitats. 2. We found strong seasonal declines in the proportions of caterpillars in the diet only for oak habitats, and not for the other forest types. The seasonal decline in oak habitats was most strongly observed in warmer years, indicating that potential mismatches were stronger in warmer years. However, in coniferous and other habitats, no such effect of spring temperature was found. 3. Chicks reached somewhat higher weights in broods provided with higher proportions of caterpillars, supporting the notion that caterpillars are an important food source and that the temporal match with the caterpillar peak may represent an important component of reproductive success. 4. We suggest that pied flycatchers breeding in oak habitats have greater need to adjust timing of breeding to rising spring temperatures, because of the strong seasonality in their food. Such between-habitat differences can have

  17. Miniature Gas Chromatograph (GC): Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy (PIES) Instrument for the Trace Analyses of Extraterrestrial Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Sheverev, Valery A.; Holland, Paul M.; Takeuchi, Norishige

    2006-01-01

    In situ exploration of the solar system to identify its early chemistry as preserved in icy bodies and to look for compelling evidence of astrobiology will require new technology for chemical analysis. Chemical measurements in space flight environments highlight the need for a high level of positive identification of chemical compounds, since re-measurement by alternative techniques for confirmation will not be feasible. It also may not be possible to anticipate all chemical species that are observed, and important species may be present only at trace levels where they can be masked by complex chemical backgrounds. Up to now, the only techniques providing independent sample identification of GC separated components across a wide range of chemical species have been Mass Spectrometry (MS) and Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS). We describe here the development of a versatile and robust miniature GC detector based on Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy (PIES), for use with miniature GC systems being developed for planetary missions. PIES identifies the sample molecule through spectra related to its ionization potential. The combination of miniature GC technology with the primary identification capabilities of PIES provides an analytical approach ideal for planetary analyses.

  18. Syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur pied malformé (à propos d'un cas)

    PubMed Central

    Benbella, Imane; Khalki, Hanane; Lahmadi, Khalid; Kouara, Sara; Abbadi, Abderrahim; Er-rami, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Le syndrome de larva migrans cutanée est une dermite sous cutanée causée par des larves d'ankylostomes d'animaux en impasse parasitaire chez l'homme. L'infestation transcutanée est favorisée par le contact avec le sol contaminé par les larves du parasite. Nous rapportons le cas d'un nourrisson de 15 mois, originaire de Guinée-Bissau, atteint d'un syndrome de larva migrans cutanée sur un pied malformé. Cette malformation sous forme d'une syndactylie associée à une tuméfaction du pied, était à l'origine d'un retard d'acquisition de la station debout. De même, on a rapporté une notion de pieds nus, vue la difficulté de chausser le pied malformé du patient. Tous ces facteurs auraient contribués à favoriser l'infestation du malade par les larves du nématode. PMID:27217876

  19. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  20. Monitoring Lipid Anchor Organization in Cell Membranes by PIE-FCCS

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the dynamic co-localization of lipid-anchored fluorescent proteins in living cells using pulsed-interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS) and fluorescence lifetime analysis. Specifically, we look at the pairwise co-localization of anchors from lymphocyte cell kinase (LCK: myristoyl, palmitoyl, palmitoyl), RhoA (geranylgeranyl), and K-Ras (farnesyl) proteins in different cell types. In Jurkat cells, a density-dependent increase in cross-correlation among RhoA anchors is observed, while LCK anchors exhibit a more moderate increase and broader distribution. No correlation was detected among K-Ras anchors or between any of the different anchor types studied. Fluorescence lifetime data reveal no significant Förster resonance energy transfer in any of the data. In COS 7 cells, minimal correlation was detected among LCK or RhoA anchors. Taken together, these observations suggest that some lipid anchors take part in anchor-specific co-clustering with other existing clusters of native proteins and lipids in the membrane. Importantly, these observations do not support a simple interpretation of lipid anchor-mediated organization driven by partitioning based on binary lipid phase separation. PMID:22631607

  1. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium–sulfur batteries

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium–sulfur (Li–S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a ‘pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers ‘filling' and amino-functionalized graphene ‘crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm−2) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g−1 (4.7 mAh cm−2) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm−2) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm−2 by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm−2. PMID:26608228

  2. Pie-like electrode design for high-energy density lithium-sulfur batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jin Tao; Chen, Yu Ming; Li, Ju; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2015-11-01

    Owing to the overwhelming advantage in energy density, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising next-generation electrochemical energy storage system. Despite many efforts in pursuing long cycle life, relatively little emphasis has been placed on increasing the areal energy density. Herein, we have designed and developed a `pie' structured electrode, which provides an excellent balance between gravimetric and areal energy densities. Combining lotus root-like multichannel carbon nanofibers `filling' and amino-functionalized graphene `crust', the free-standing paper electrode (S mass loading: 3.6 mg cm-2) delivers high specific capacity of 1,314 mAh g-1 (4.7 mAh cm-2) at 0.1 C (0.6 mA cm-2) accompanied with good cycling stability. Moreover, the areal capacity can be further boosted to more than 8 mAh cm-2 by stacking three layers of paper electrodes with S mass loading of 10.8 mg cm-2.

  3. Optical properties of the hydrated charged silver tetramer and silver hexamer encapsulated inside the sodalite cavity of an LTA-type zeolite.

    PubMed

    Cuong, Ngo Tuan; Nguyen, Hue Minh Thi; Pham-Ho, My Phuong; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2016-07-21

    The optical spectra in the UV-VIS region of the hydrated doubly charged tetramer Ag4(2+) and hydrated multiply charged hexamer Ag6(p+) silver clusters encapsulated inside the sodalite cavity of an LTA-type zeolite have been systematically predicted using DFT, TD-DFT and CASSCF/CASPT2 methods. The optical behaviour of the model hydrated clusters [Ag6(H2O)8(Si24H24O36)](p+) is very sensitive to their charge. Among the cations [Ag6(H2O)8(Si24H24O36)](p+), only the embedded hydrated quadruply charged silver hexamer [Ag6(H2O)8(Si24H24O36)](4+) shows a strong absorption band at ∼420 nm (blue light) and emits light in red color. The absorption spectrum of the hydrated doubly charged silver tetramer cluster [Ag4(H2O)m(Si24H24O36)](2+), which shifts slightly and steadily with the increasing amount of interacting water molecules to longer wavelengths, has a strong peak in the blue region. The water environment forces the silver tetramer to relocate into one side of the cavity instead of at its center as in the case of the non-hydrated [Ag4(Si24H24O36)](2+) cluster. Water molecules act as ligands significantly splitting the energy levels of excited states of the Ag4(2+) and Ag6(4+) clusters. This causes the absorption spectra of the clusters to broaden and the emission to shift to the green-yellow and red part of the visible region. PMID:27328036

  4. Probing the structure-activity relationship of Escherichia coli LT-A by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Pizza, M; Domenighini, M; Hol, W; Giannelli, V; Fontana, M R; Giuliani, M M; Magagnoli, C; Peppoloni, S; Manetti, R; Rappuoli, R

    1994-10-01

    Computer analysis of the crystallographic structure of the A subunit of Escherichia coli heat-labile toxin (LT) was used to predict residues involved in NAD binding, catalysis and toxicity. Following site-directed mutagenesis, the mutants obtained could be divided into three groups. The first group contained fully assembled, non-toxic new molecules containing mutations of single amino acids such as Val-53-->Glu or Asp, Ser-63-->Lys, Val-97-->Lys, Tyr-104-->Lys or Asp, and Ser-114-->Lys or Glu. This group also included mutations in amino acids such as Arg-7, Glu-110 and Glu-112 that were already known to be important for enzymatic activity. The second group was formed by mutations that caused the collapse or prevented the assembly of the A subunit: Leu-41-->Phe, Ala-45-->Tyr or Glu, Val-53-->Tyr, Val-60-->Gly, Ser-68-->Pro, His-70-->Pro, Val-97-->Tyr and Ser-114-->Tyr. The third group contained those molecules that maintained a wild-type level of toxicity in spite of the mutations introduced: Arg-54-->Lys or Ala, Tyr-59-->Met, Ser-68-->Lys, Ala-72-->Arg, His or Asp and Arg-192-->Asn. The results provide a further understanding of the structure-function of the active site and new, non-toxic mutants that may be useful for the development of vaccines against diarrhoeal diseases. PMID:7830560

  5. Meaningful call combinations and compositional processing in the southern pied babbler.

    PubMed

    Engesser, Sabrina; Ridley, Amanda R; Townsend, Simon W

    2016-05-24

    Language's expressive power is largely attributable to its compositionality: meaningful words are combined into larger/higher-order structures with derived meaning. Despite its importance, little is known regarding the evolutionary origins and emergence of this syntactic ability. Although previous research has shown a rudimentary capability to combine meaningful calls in primates, because of a scarcity of comparative data, it is unclear to what extent analog forms might also exist outside of primates. Here, we address this ambiguity and provide evidence for rudimentary compositionality in the discrete vocal system of a social passerine, the pied babbler (Turdoides bicolor). Natural observations and predator presentations revealed that babblers produce acoustically distinct alert calls in response to close, low-urgency threats and recruitment calls when recruiting group members during locomotion. On encountering terrestrial predators, both vocalizations are combined into a "mobbing sequence," potentially to recruit group members in a dangerous situation. To investigate whether babblers process the sequence in a compositional way, we conducted systematic experiments, playing back the individual calls in isolation as well as naturally occurring and artificial sequences. Babblers reacted most strongly to mobbing sequence playbacks, showing a greater attentiveness and a quicker approach to the loudspeaker, compared with individual calls or control sequences. We conclude that the sequence constitutes a compositional structure, communicating information on both the context and the requested action. Our work supports previous research suggesting combinatoriality as a viable mechanism to increase communicative output and indicates that the ability to combine and process meaningful vocal structures, a basic syntax, may be more widespread than previously thought. PMID:27155011

  6. Geographical trends in the yolk carotenoid composition of the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca).

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Ruuskanen, Suvi; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Belskii, Eugen; Järvinen, Antero; Kerimov, Anvar; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Moreno, Juan; Morosinotto, Chiara; Mänd, Raivo; Orell, Markku; Qvarnström, Anna; Siitari, Heli; Slater, Fred M; Tilgar, Vallo; Visser, Marcel E; Winkel, Wolfgang; Zang, Herwig; Laaksonen, Toni

    2011-02-01

    Carotenoids in the egg yolks of birds are considered to be important antioxidants and immune stimulants during the rapid growth of embryos. Yolk carotenoid composition is strongly affected by the carotenoid composition of the female's diet at the time of egg formation. Spatial and temporal differences in carotenoid availability may thus be reflected in yolk concentrations. To assess whether yolk carotenoid concentrations or carotenoid profiles show any large-scale geographical trends or differences among habitats, we collected yolk samples from 16 European populations of the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca. We found that the concentrations and proportions of lutein and some other xanthophylls in the egg yolks decreased from Central Europe northwards. The most southern population (which is also the one found at the highest altitude) also showed relatively low carotenoid levels. Concentrations of β-carotene and zeaxanthin did not show any obvious geographical gradients. Egg yolks also contained proportionally more lutein and other xanthophylls in deciduous than in mixed or coniferous habitats. We suggest that latitudinal gradients in lutein and xanthophylls reflect the lower availability of lutein-rich food items in the northern F. hypoleuca populations and in montane southern populations, which start egg-laying earlier relative to tree phenology than the Central European populations. Similarly, among-habitat variation is likely to reflect the better availability of lutein-rich food in deciduous forests. Our study is the first to indicate that the concentration and profile of yolk carotenoids may show large-scale spatial variation among populations in different parts of the species' geographical range. Further studies are needed to test the fitness effects of this geographical variation. PMID:20848135

  7. d-Alanyl Ester Depletion of Teichoic Acids in Lactobacillus plantarum Results in a Major Modification of Lipoteichoic Acid Composition and Cell Wall Perforations at the Septum Mediated by the Acm2 Autolysin

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Emmanuelle; Deghorain, Marie; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Geyer, Armin; Hartung, Thomas; Morath, Siegfried; Hols, Pascal

    2006-01-01

    The insertional inactivation of the dlt operon from Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB8826 had a strong impact on lipoteichoic acid (LTA) composition, resulting in a major reduction in d-alanyl ester content. Unexpectedly, mutant LTA showed high levels of glucosylation and were threefold longer than wild-type LTA. The dlt mutation resulted in a reduced growth rate and increased cell lysis during the exponential and stationary growth phases. Microscopy analysis revealed increased cell length, damaged dividing cells, and perforations of the envelope in the septal region. The observed defects in the separation process, cell envelope perforation, and autolysis of the dlt mutant could be partially attributed to the L. plantarum Acm2 peptidoglycan hydrolase. PMID:16672624

  8. Carcass Traits and Meat Quality of Prestice Black-Pied Pig Breed.

    PubMed

    Matoušek, Václav; Kernerová, Naděžda; Hyšplerová, Klára; Jirotková, Dana; Brzáková, Michaela

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate fattening performance, carcass value and meat quality in pigs of Prestice Black-Pied breed in relation to slaughter weight (SW) and gender (barrows and gilts, resp.). Pigs were divided into weight categories: SW1 (75 to 99.9 kg), SW2 (100 to 109.9 kg) and SW3 (110 to 130 kg) and all individual traits were analyzed by the general linear model procedure (SAS 9.3). Average SW of each weight group was as follows: SW1 94.2 kg, SW2 105.8 kg, and SW3 115.2 kg. Differences among average backfat thickness of 36.07 mm in SW1, 40.16 mm in SW2, and 43.21 mm in SW3 were significant (p<0.01). Lean meat content was 48.94% (SW1), 48.78% (SW2), and 48.76% (SW3). Pigs were slaughtered at average weight of 105.7 kg for barrows and 104.4 kg for gilts. Average backfat thickness for barrows was 40.90 mm and 38.72 mm for gilts (significant difference p<0.05). Lean meat content was 48.75% in barrows and 48.91% in gilts. The values of pH45, characterizing the meat of very good quality. The loin in SW3 was darker than the muscles of SW1 and SW2. Drip loss was the lowest in SW1 (1.96%), compared to the highest drip loss in SW3 (2.59%). Content of intramuscular fat was 2.68% in SW3, 2.79% in SW2, and SW1 had the lowest content 2.47%. The values of pH45, colour lightness and drip loss were similar in both genders. However barrows had higher intramuscular fat content by 0.31% than gilts (p<0.05). PMID:26954141

  9. Differentiation in neutral genes and a candidate gene in the pied flycatcher: using biological archives to track global climate change

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Kerstin; Schwenk, Klaus; Both, Christiaan; Canal, David; Johansson, Ulf S; van der Mije, Steven; Töpfer, Till; Päckert, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is one of the major driving forces for adaptive shifts in migration and breeding phenology and possibly impacts demographic changes if a species fails to adapt sufficiently. In Western Europe, pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) have insufficiently adapted their breeding phenology to the ongoing advance of food peaks within their breeding area and consequently suffered local population declines. We address the question whether this population decline led to a loss of genetic variation, using two neutral marker sets (mitochondrial control region and microsatellites), and one potentially selectively non-neutral marker (avian Clock gene). We report temporal changes in genetic diversity in extant populations and biological archives over more than a century, using samples from sites differing in the extent of climate change. Comparing genetic differentiation over this period revealed that only the recent Dutch population, which underwent population declines, showed slightly lower genetic variation than the historic Dutch population. As that loss of variation was only moderate and not observed in all markers, current gene flow across Western and Central European populations might have compensated local loss of variation over the last decades. A comparison of genetic differentiation in neutral loci versus the Clock gene locus provided evidence for stabilizing selection. Furthermore, in all genetic markers, we found a greater genetic differentiation in space than in time. This pattern suggests that local adaptation or historic processes might have a stronger effect on the population structure and genetic variation in the pied flycatcher than recent global climate changes. PMID:24363905

  10. Candidate genes for colour and vision exhibit signals of selection across the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) breeding range

    PubMed Central

    Lehtonen, P K; Laaksonen, T; Artemyev, A V; Belskii, E; Berg, P R; Both, C; Buggiotti, L; Bureš, S; Burgess, M D; Bushuev, A V; Krams, I; Moreno, J; Mägi, M; Nord, A; Potti, J; Ravussin, P-A; Sirkiä, P M; Sætre, G-P; Winkel, W; Primmer, C R

    2012-01-01

    The role of natural selection in shaping adaptive trait differentiation in natural populations has long been recognized. Determining its molecular basis, however, remains a challenge. Here, we search for signals of selection in candidate genes for colour and its perception in a passerine bird. Pied flycatcher plumage varies geographically in both its structural and pigment-based properties. Both characteristics appear to be shaped by selection. A single-locus outlier test revealed 2 of 14 loci to show significantly elevated signals of divergence. The first of these, the follistatin gene, is expressed in the developing feather bud and is found in pathways with genes that determine the structure of feathers and may thus be important in generating variation in structural colouration. The second is a gene potentially underlying the ability to detect this variation: SWS1 opsin. These two loci were most differentiated in two Spanish pied flycatcher populations, which are also among the populations that have the highest UV reflectance. The follistatin and SWS1 opsin genes thus provide strong candidates for future investigations on the molecular basis of adaptively significant traits and their co-evolution. PMID:22027894

  11. "Then You Can Take Half... Almost"--Elementary Students Learning Bar Graphs and Pie Charts in a Computer-Based Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberg-Bengtsson, Lisbeth

    2006-01-01

    Forty Swedish elementary students, 7-12 years of age and working in pairs, constructed a series of bar graphs and pie charts using a graphing application software as an instructional tool under the guidance of the researcher. After successive withdrawal of help, each pair drew a small number of graphic displays manually at the end of the data…

  12. La place de la double arthrodèse dans la prise en charge du pied bot varus équin invétéré

    PubMed Central

    Atarraf, Karima; Arroud, Mounir; Chater, Lamiae; Afifi, My Abderrahmane

    2014-01-01

    La prise en charge du pied bot varus équin invétéré ( PBVEI) pose d’énormes problèmes thérapeutiques. La double arthrodèse sous-talienne et médio-tarsienne longtemps considérée comme la solution de sécurité pour ces déformations est encore couramment utilisée. Nous rapportons une série de 13 enfants opérés pour un pied bot varus équin invétérés (16 pieds) par Arthrodèse sous-talienne et médio tarsienne réalisée au service d'orthopédie pédiatrique du CHU Hassan II; de Fès au Maroc sur une période de 4 ans; étalée de janvier 2009 à décembre 2012. L’âge moyen de nos patients était de 12,6 ans avec prédominance féminine. L'origine congénitale était retrouvée chez 10 patients. L'atteinte était gauche chez 8 patients avec une localisation bilatérale chez 3 patients. La radiographie standard du pied de face et de profil a révélée une divergence talo-calcanéenne qui variait entre 5 et 20°, l'angle talus-1er métatarsien entre 20 et 40° (avec une moyenne de 28°) et l'angle calcanéus-5ème métatarsien entre 15° et 45° (avec une moyenne de 30°). Tous les patients ont bénéficiés d'une arthrodèse sous-talienne et médio tarsienne. Les résultats étaient satisfaisants dans 98% des cas. Le pied était plantigrade dans 9 cas, le varus de l'arrière pied persistait dans 4 pieds alors que l’équin et le varus de l'avant pied étaient notés chez 2 cas. La double arthrodèse est l'intervention idéale pour stabiliser et corriger les déformations rencontrées dans le PBVE invétéré, elle assure totalement le verrouillage du couple de torsion. Elle permet outre une correction des diverses déformations et une ré-axation de l'arrière-pied dans les 3 plans de l'espace. PMID:25829977

  13. A patient with phonologic alexia can learn to read "much" from "mud pies"

    PubMed Central

    Lott, Susan Nitzberg; Sample, Diane M.; Oliver, Robyn T.; Lacey, Elizabeth H.; Friedman, Rhonda B.

    2008-01-01

    People with phonologic alexia often have difficulty reading functors and verbs, in addition to pseudowords. Friedman et al (2002) reported a successful treatment for phonologic alexia that paired problematic functors and verbs with easily read relays that were homophonous nouns (e.g. "be" paired with "bee"). The current study evaluates the efficacy of pairing problematic grammatical words with relays that share initial phonemes, but vary in the relationship of their final phonemes. Results showed that reading of target grammatical words improved to criterion level (90% accuracy over two consecutive probes) in all experimental conditions with shared phonology, but remained far below criterion level in control conditions. There was a significant correlation between degree of phonologic relatedness and error rate. Maintenance of the treatment effect was poor as assessed by traditional measurement, however a dramatic savings during relearning was demonstrated during a subsequent treatment phase. The finding that reading can be re-organized by pairing target words not only with homophones, but with other phonologically related relays, suggests that this approach could be applied to a wide corpus of words and, therefore, potentially be of great use clinically. We suggest, within a connectionist account, that the treatment effect results from relays priming the initial phonologic units of the targets. PMID:18513760

  14. Psychiatry in the Korean War: perils, PIES, and prisoners of war.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Elspeth Cameron

    2002-11-01

    In the initial months of the Korean War, very high numbers of psychological casualties occurred among American troops, 250 per 1,000 per annum. Initially, these men were evacuated to Japan or the United States, and very few of them were returned to duty. Then the principles of early and far-forward treatment, learned in the previous world wars, were reinstituted. Up to 80% of neuropsychiatric casualties were returned to duty. During and after the war, the prisoners of war were believed to have been "brainwashed," have "give-it-upitis," and exhibit apathy and depression. Mistakenly believed to be signs of moral decay, the psychiatric symptoms during and after release were probably a result of extended inhumane treatment and vitamin deficiencies. PMID:12448614

  15. Profil bactériologique du pied diabétique et son impact sur le choix des antibiotiques

    PubMed Central

    Zemmouri, Adil; Tarchouli, Mohamed; Benbouha, Abdellatif; Lamkinsi, Tarik; Bensghir, Mustapha; Elouennass, Mostafa; Haimeur, Cherqui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Analyse du profil bactériologique des pieds diabétiques pris en charge à l'hôpital militaire de Rabat et son influence sur l'antibiothérapie de première intention. Méthodes Etude prospective non randomisée étalée sur 18 mois, ayant concerné 105 patients. Après recueil des données et en attente des résultats bactériologiques nos patients ont été divisés en deux groupes: un groupe a été mis sous Amoxicilline + Acide clavulanique + Gentamycine (59 patients) et un groupe sous Ertapénème±Gentamycine (46 patients). Résultats L’étude a regroupé 85 hommes et 20 femmes (sexe ratio = 4.26). L’âge moyen est de 64.4 ans. La gangrène a été observée chez 79% des malades; elle était humide-donc surinfectée en principe- dans 43% des cas. Par ailleurs, 67% des malades ont un chiffre de globules blancs 12000 définissant une infection sévère. L'ostéolyse a été mise en évidence chez 27% de nos patients. Parmi les différentes techniques de prélèvements: 81% ont été profonds dont 21% de biopsie osseuse per opératoire et 14% de prélèvements combinés. 42% de ces prélèvements sont poly microbiens et 21% sont stériles. Les résultats bactériologiques viennent confirmer la prédominance des bactéries aérobies à Gram positif. Le taux de remplacement de l'Ertapénème est de 22% contre un taux de 50% pour l'Amoxiclav. Conclusion L'antibiothérapie ne doit être instaurée qu'en cas d'infection du pied diabétique diagnostiquée sur les critères cliniques établis par les consensus internationaux récents. Le respect des mesures de lutte contre la diffusion de la résistance bactérienne s'avère primordiale. PMID:27386024

  16. Sweetie Pie Thornless Blackberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Sweetie Pie’ is a new thornless blackberry (Rubus L. subg. Watson) cultivar developed and released by the USDA-ARS Thad Cochran Southern Horticultural Laboratory. ‘Sweetie Pie’ is a vigorous, semi-erect blackberry that produces moderate yields of sweet high quality fruit having excellent flavor, ...

  17. Basic relationships for LTA technical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ausrotas, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    An introduction to airship performance is presented. Static lift equations are shown which, when combined with power requirements for conventional airships, allow parametric studies of range, payload, speed and airship size. It is shown that very large airships are required to attain reasonable speeds at transoceanic ranges.

  18. Preliminary results of the ion extraction simulations applied to the MONO1000 and SUPERSHyPIE electron cyclotron resonance ion sourcesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierret, C.; Maunoury, L.; Biri, S.; Pacquet, J. Y.; Tuske, O.; Delferriere, O.

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this article is to present simulations on the extraction from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The aim of this work is to find out an extraction system, which allows one to reduce the emittances and to increase the current of the extracted ion beam at the focal point of the analyzing dipole. But first, we should locate the correct software which is able to reproduce the specific physics of an ion beam. To perform the simulations, the following softwares have been tested: SIMION 3D, AXCEL, CPO 3D, and especially, for the magnetic field calculation, MATHEMATICA coupled with the RADIA module. Emittance calculations have been done with two types of ECRIS: one with a hexapole and one without a hexapole, and the difference will be discussed.

  19. Preliminary results of the ion extraction simulations applied to the MONO1000 and SUPERSHyPIE electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    PubMed

    Pierret, C; Maunoury, L; Biri, S; Pacquet, J Y; Tuske, O; Delferriere, O

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this article is to present simulations on the extraction from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The aim of this work is to find out an extraction system, which allows one to reduce the emittances and to increase the current of the extracted ion beam at the focal point of the analyzing dipole. But first, we should locate the correct software which is able to reproduce the specific physics of an ion beam. To perform the simulations, the following softwares have been tested: SIMION 3D, AXCEL, CPO 3D, and especially, for the magnetic field calculation, MATHEMATICA coupled with the RADIA module. Emittance calculations have been done with two types of ECRIS: one with a hexapole and one without a hexapole, and the difference will be discussed. PMID:18315194

  20. Milk yield, gross composition and fatty acid profile of dual-purpose Aosta Red Pied cows fed separate concentrate-forage versus total mixed ration.

    PubMed

    Renna, Manuela; Cornale, Paolo; Lussiana, Carola; Battaglini, Luca Maria; Turille, Germano; Mimosi, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of two feeding methods on milk yield, composition and fatty acid (FA) profile obtained from dual-purpose cattle. Twenty-four Aosta Red Pied cows beyond peak of lactation were assigned to two groups and fed hay and concentrates in the proportions 0.69 and 0.31 on a dry matter basis for 10 weeks. Concentrates were offered separately from forages 6 times a day (separate ration, SR) or as a total mixed ration (TMR). The feeding method did not significantly influence dry matter intake (16.8 vs. 16.9 kg/head/day for SR- and TMR-fed cows, respectively), milk yield (17.4 vs. 17.5 kg/head/day), milk fat, protein and lactose contents (36.4 vs. 35.2, 33.5 vs. 32.8, and 47.3 vs. 47.4 g/kg) and yields (607.9 vs. 613.4, 567.4 vs. 572.7 and 805.5 vs. 829.7 g/head/day). The overall milk FA profile was very similar between groups. Milk concentrations of FA used as indirect markers of rumen function (C18:2 t10c12, odd- and branched-chain FA) and the extent of ruminal biohydrogenation were comparable (P > 0.05) between SR- and TMR-fed cows, suggesting that ruminal pH did not vary considerably as a consequence of the feeding strategy applied. PMID:23841857

  1. C. butyricum lipoteichoic acid inhibits the inflammatory response and apoptosis in HT-29 cells induced by S. aureus lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Qi, Lili; Mei, Lehe; Wu, Zhige; Wang, Hengzheng

    2016-07-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is one of microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules of gram-positive bacteria. In this study, we demonstrated that Clostridium butyricum LTA (bLTA) significantly inhibited the inflammatory response and apoptosis induced by Staphylococcus aureus LTA (aLTA) in HT-29 cells. aLTA stimulated the inflammatory responses by activating a strong signal transduction cascade through NF-κB and ERK, but bLTA did not activate the signaling pathway. bLTA pretreatment inhibited the activation of the NF-κB and ERK signaling pathway induced by aLTA. The expression and release of cytokines such as IL-8 and TNF-α were also suppressed by bLTA pretreatment. aLTA treatment induced apoptosis in HT-29 cells, but bLTA did not affect the viability of the cells. Further study indicated that bLTA inhibited apoptosis in HT-29 cells induced by aLTA. These results suggest that bLTA may act as an aLTA antagonist and that an antagonistic bLTA may be a useful agent for suppressing the pro-inflammatory activities of gram-positive pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27020942

  2. MSL-2 accelerometer data results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Fred

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Science Laboratory-2 (MSL-2) mission flew the Marshall Space Flight Center-developed Linear Triaxial Accelerometer (LTA) on the Space Transportation System (STS) 61-C Shuttle mission launched January 21, 1986. Flight data were analyzed to verify the quietness of the MSL carrier and to characterize the acceleration environment for future MSL users. The MSL was found to introduce no significant experiment acceleration; and the effects of crew treadmill exercise, Orbiter vernier engine firings, and other routine flight occurrences were established. The LTA was found to be well suited for measuring nominal to very quiet STS acceleration levels at frequencies below 50 Hz. Special processing was used to examine the low-frequency spectrum and to establish the effective rms amplitude associated with dominant frequencies.

  3. Segmentation: Slicing the Urban Pie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, William A.

    1981-01-01

    Explains market segmentation and defines undifferentiated, concentrated, and differentiated marketing strategies. Describes in detail the marketing planning process at the Metropolitan Community Colleges. Focuses on the development and implementation of an ongoing recruitment program designed for the market segment composed of business employees.…

  4. Quels agents incriminés dans les mycoses du pied ? Enquête auprès des diabétiques consultant au CHU Mohammed VI de Marrakech

    PubMed Central

    Chegour, Hakima; El Ansari, Nawal; El Mghari, Ghizlane; Tali, Abdelali; Zoughaghi, Laila; Sebbani, Majda; Amine, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Les infections mycosiques du pied constituent un motif fréquent de consultation chez les diabétiques, le diabète constituant à la fois un facteur favorisant et aggravant les lésions cutanéomuqueuses. L'objectif de ce travail était d'identifier la flore mycologique locale responsable des lésions du pied chez le diabétique et déterminer les facteurs favorisant la survenue de mycoses. Il s'agissait d'une étude transversale intéressant des diabétiques suivis en consultation; un prélèvement mycologique, avec examen direct et culture, a été réalisé devant toute suspicion clinique de lésion mycosique. Quatre-vingt-deux patients ont été inclus. L'hémoglobine glycosylée moyenne a été de9,2% ± 2,23. Un intertrigo inter orteil a été noté dans 90,2% des cas; l'examen mycologique était positif dans 64,8% des cas, avec 18 cas de Trichophyton rubrum et 11 cas de Candida albicans. Une atteinte unguéale a été suspectée chez 65,9% patients; la culture a mis en évidence un Trichosporon pathogène chez sept patients, un Candida albicansdans six cas, un Trichophyton rubrum dans quatre cas, avec trois cas de Trichophyton mentagrophytes et deux cas de Scytalidium dimidiatum. L’étude analytique, après confirmation mycologique, en fonction des principales caractéristiques des patients a montré que l'atteinte mycosique du pied est significativement corrélée au déséquilibre glycémique. Ce travail a montré la prédominance du Trichophyton rubrum dans les lésions d'intertrigo inter orteil et du Trichosporon dans les onychomycoses, avec une prédominance globale plus globale plus élevée du TR. PMID:25170372

  5. Correlation Between the CYP2C19 Phenotype Status and the Results of Three Different Platelet Function Tests in Cardiovascular Disease Patients Receiving Antiplatelet Therapy: An Emphasis on Newly Introduced Platelet Function Analyzer-200 P2Y Test

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhua; Choi, Jae-Lim; Guo, Long Zhe; Goh, Ri-Young; Kim, Bo-Ram; Woo, Kwang-Sook; Kim, Moo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background An association has been reported between CYP2C19 polymorphism and the altered antiplatelet activity of clopidogrel. We investigated this association using the newly introduced platelet function analyzer (PFA)-200 (INNOVANCE PFA-200 System; Siemens Healthcare, Germany) P2Y test. Methods Polymorphisms of CYP2C19*2, *3, *17 and the degree of inhibition of platelet function were determined in 83 patients. Three different platelet function tests were used to evaluate the degree of platelet inhibition and to check the association with genotype. Results The post-procedure PFA-200 values of extensive metabolizers (EM) patients (285.3±38.8) were higher than those of intermediate metabolizers (IM) and poor metabolizers (PM) patients (227.7±98.3 and 133.7±99.2, respectively; P=0.024). Light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) and the VerifyNow system showed that the post-procedure values for EM patients were lower than those of IM and PM patients (LTA: 24.4±15.7, 34.1±17.6, and 42.2±16.9, respectively, P<0.001; VerifyNow: 133.2±60.5, 171.5±42.6, and 218.7±59.3, respectively, P<0.001). The high residual platelet reactivity (HPR) rates were significantly different among the EM, IM, and PM groups using PFA-200 (PM:IM:EM=82.4:40.6:11.8, P<0.001). Conclusions Approximately, 59.0% of Korean patients with cardiovascular disease receiving clopidogrel had CYP2C19 loss-of-function genotypes classified as IM or PM, and the frequency was similar to the data from Asian people. The PFA-200, LTA, and VerifyNow platelet function tests revealed evidence of a significant association between the efficacy of clopidogrel and CYP2C19 genotypes. PMID:26522758

  6. Validation environment for AIPS/ALS: Implementation and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, Zary; Siewiorek, Daniel; Caplan, Eddie; Chung, Alan; Czeck, Edward; Vrsalovic, Dalibor

    1990-01-01

    The work is presented which was performed in porting the Fault Injection-based Automated Testing (FIAT) and Programming and Instrumentation Environments (PIE) validation tools, to the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) in the context of the Ada Language System (ALS) application, as well as an initial fault free validation of the available AIPS system. The PIE components implemented on AIPS provide the monitoring mechanisms required for validation. These mechanisms represent a substantial portion of the FIAT system. Moreover, these are required for the implementation of the FIAT environment on AIPS. Using these components, an initial fault free validation of the AIPS system was performed. The implementation is described of the FIAT/PIE system, configured for fault free validation of the AIPS fault tolerant computer system. The PIE components were modified to support the Ada language. A special purpose AIPS/Ada runtime monitoring and data collection was implemented. A number of initial Ada programs running on the PIE/AIPS system were implemented. The instrumentation of the Ada programs was accomplished automatically inside the PIE programming environment. PIE's on-line graphical views show vividly and accurately the performance characteristics of Ada programs, AIPS kernel and the application's interaction with the AIPS kernel. The data collection mechanisms were written in a high level language, Ada, and provide a high degree of flexibility for implementation under various system conditions.

  7. MOX LTA Fuel Cycle Analyses: Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovitchev, A.M.

    2001-09-28

    Tasks of nuclear safety assurance for storage and transport of fresh mixed uranium-plutonium fuel of the VVER-1000 reactor are considered in the view of 3 MOX LTAs introduction into the core. The precise code MCU that realizes the Monte Carlo method is used for calculations.

  8. Aerocrane: A hybrid LTA aircraft for aerial crane applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, R. G., Jr.; Doolittle, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Aerocrane, a hybrid aircraft, combines rotor lift with buoyant lift to offer VTOL load capability greatly in excess of helicopter technology while eliminating the airship problem of ballast transfer. In addition, the Aerocrane concept sharply reduces the mooring problem of airships and provides 360 deg vectorable thrust to supply a relatively large force component for control of gust loads. Designed for use in short range, ultra heavy lift missions, the Aerocrane operates in a performance envelope unsuitable for either helicopters or airships. Basic design considerations and potential problem areas of the concept are addressed.

  9. Apport de l’écho-doppler artériel des membres inférieurs dans la prise en charge du pied diabétique à l'hôpital Saint-Jean de Dieu de Thiès (Sénégal)

    PubMed Central

    Dia, Aliou Amadou; Affangla, Désiré Alain; Dione, Jean-Michel; Akpo, Géraud; Mbengue, Marie; Ka, Mamadou Mourtalla; Diop, Bernard Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Le pied diabétique se définit comme l'ensemble des manifestations trophiques du pied survenant chez le diabétique par atteinte nerveuse, artérielle et ou infectieuse. Le pied diabétique est un problème majeur de santé publique à l’échelle mondiale avec un taux d'amputation de membres inférieurs très élevé. L’écho-doppler artériel des membres inférieurs est de nos jours incontournable dans la prise en charge du pied diabétique. Le but de cette étude est de montrer la place prépondérante qu'occupe l’écho-doppler artériel dans le bilan lésionnel du pied diabétique. Méthodes Nous avons mené une étude rétrospective monocentrique incluant 46 patients sur une période de 24 mois, de mars 2012 à mars 2014 à l'hôpital Saint-Jean de Dieu, un des deux hôpitaux de référence de la région de Thiès, doté depuis juillet 2011 d'un centre moderne de traitement du diabète et des maladies cardio-métaboliques (Diabcarmet). Dans les critères d'inclusion, nous avons sélectionné tous les patients diabétiques adressés pour un écho-doppler artériel des membres inférieurs dans le cadre d'une prise en charge du pied diabétique. Etaient exclus de l’étude, les patients artéritiques non-diabétiques et les patients diabétiques asymptomatiques référés pour un bilan écho-doppler de routine. Résultats Le sex-ratio était de 1.42 (27 hommes pour 19 femmes). L’âge moyen des patients était de 62,86 ans avec des extrêmes de 23 et 88 ans. 60% des patients (n=28) étaient âgés entre 50 et 70 ans. Le diabète de type 2 était retrouvé chez 95% des patients (n=44) alors que le diabète de type 1 représentait 5% (n=2). La moyenne d’évolution du diabète était estimée à 8 ans, avec des extrêmes de 2 et 20 ans. On notait une atteinte du pied droit chez 24 patients, une atteinte du pied gauche chez 18 patients et une atteinte bilatérale chez 4 patients. La plupart du temps, les lésions du pied diabétique survenaient

  10. Discrimination of Beef Samples by Electronic Nose and Pattern Recognition Techniques Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornale, P.; Barbera, S.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper a study about the possibility of beef characterization with electronic nose is presented. Three beef classes were compared: Piemontese (PIE), Limousin (FRA) and meat from Argentine (ARG). 150 meat samples were put in glass vials and analysed with a commercial electronic nose instrument based on 10 metal oxide semiconductor sensors. Sensors response of beef classes seemed to be different. Different supervised and unsupervised pattern recognition procedures were applied to sensors signal: principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Multivariate analysis pointed out promising classification and prediction results. Three clusters (according to the beef classes) can be clearly discriminated in PCA score plot. Statistical parameters from calibration, validation and prediction of PLS-DA model revealed themselves to be indices of a good model. These results demonstrate that electronic nose technology with multivariate analysis models is promising for the rapid determination of differences in meat aroma.

  11. Different effects of lipoteichoic acid from C. butyricum and S. aureus on inflammatory responses of HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Qi, Lili; Wu, Zhige; Mei, Lehe; Wang, Hengzheng

    2016-06-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and represents one of the most critical microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) molecules. In this study, we isolated and purified LTA from Clostridium butyricum (bLTA) and compared its effects on the inflammatory responses of HT-29 cells with those of LTA from Staphylococcus aureus (aLTA). We also compared the effects of bLTA and aLTA on cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. The results showed that the length and saturation degree of the acyl chains in the two LTA molecules were obviously different. aLTA stimulated the phosphorylation of p65 and activated the NF-κB signaling pathway, inducing the expression and secretion of cytokines. Moreover, aLTA also inhibited the growth and proliferation of HT-29 cells and induced cell apoptosis. However, bLTA had no significant effects on the NF-κB signaling pathway in HT-29 cells and did not stimulate cellular inflammatory responses or induce apoptosis. These differences in activity may result from the different lengths and saturation degrees of the acyl fatty acid chains of the two LTA molecules. These differences may also account for the distinct effects elicited by probiotic bacteria and pathogenic bacteria on host cells. PMID:26968924

  12. The Cell Wall Polymer Lipoteichoic Acid Becomes Nonessential in Staphylococcus aureus Cells Lacking the ClpX Chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Lisa; Millership, Charlotte; Dupont Søgaard, Mia; Kaever, Volkhard; Siljamäki, Pia; Savijoki, Kirsi; Varmanen, Pekka; Nyman, Tuula A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria and a promising target for the development of vaccines and antimicrobial compounds against Staphylococcus aureus. Here we demonstrate that mutations in the conditionally essential ltaS (LTA synthase) gene arise spontaneously in an S. aureus mutant lacking the ClpX chaperone. A wide variety of ltaS mutations were selected, and among these, a substantial portion resulted in premature stop codons and other changes predicted to abolish LtaS synthesis. Consistent with this assumption, the clpX ltaS double mutants did not produce LTA, and genetic analyses confirmed that LTA becomes nonessential in the absence of the ClpX chaperone. In fact, inactivation of ltaS alleviated the severe growth defect conferred by the clpX deletion. Microscopic analyses showed that the absence of ClpX partly alleviates the septum placement defects of an LTA-depleted strain, while other phenotypes typical of LTA-negative S. aureus mutants, including increased cell size and decreased autolytic activity, are retained. In conclusion, our results indicate that LTA has an essential role in septum placement that can be bypassed by inactivating the ClpX chaperone. PMID:27507828

  13. Development of EMT, an advanced PIE apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Yasuharu; Amano, Hidetoshi; Kikuchi, Akira; Tashiro, Shingo

    1990-01-01

    The investigation of pellet/cladding interaction (PCI) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior in fuel cladding continues to be important in evaluating the integrity of light water reactor fuel rods. Particularly in high-burnup fuel, the possibility of SCC failure in the cladding is increased by severe pellet/cladding contact due to swelling, creep, and so on. To investigate SCC behavior in a fuel rod, an advanced postirradiation examination apparatus, the expanding mandrel test (EMT), was developed at the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The apparatus tests local deformation by simulating the ridge formation in fuel rods in a reactor. This paper describes the technical development of the EMT apparatus, focusing on remote handling and automatic control.

  14. Of stewardship, motherhood and apple pie.

    PubMed

    Livermore, David M

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotic stewardship is universally agreed to be desirable, but optimal models for stewardship remain uncertain. UK stewardship targets the particular antibiotic families-cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones-blamed for the selection of Clostridium-difficile-associated disease. To balance this there have been dramatic increases in the use of penicillin-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations. By channelling selection pressure in this way, we hazard destroying the utility of these antibiotic classes in turn, as happened with gonorrhoea where penicillins, fluoroquinolones and cefixime were sequentially lost as therapies. Strikingly, in context, almost all carbapenemase-producers are highly resistant to penicillin-β-lactamase inhibitor combinations, which may select for them. There is an urgent need to explore an alternative stewardship model, seeking to limit total antibiotic use but to maintain heterogeneity in what is used, avoiding concentrated selection pressure. There is also a great need to improve and accelerate diagnostics for infection and resistance, reducing or removing the need for protracted empirical treatment with broad-spectrum agents. PMID:24630303

  15. Trash Pie: Is Your School Serving?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Krista M.; Curran, Mary Carla

    2010-01-01

    In observation of Earth Day, third-grade students were invited to examine what they contribute to the landfill and learn new ways they could help protect the environment. In this lesson, students collected, evaluated, and displayed data comparing the trash generated by home-lunch versus school-lunch students. Students interpreted their findings…

  16. The Politics of the Static Economic Pie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    Until America gets a stable source of energy, we will have slow or no economic growth. The public policy of scarcity will differ from the politics of abundance and cause a rethinking of public policy. For example, we cannot have the immigration policies that we had as an empty continent. (SR)

  17. Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    Research on Global Carbon Emission and Sequestration NSFC Funded Project Made Significant Progress in Quantum Dynamics Functional Human Blood Protein Obtained from Rice How Giant Pandas Thrive on a Bamboo Diet New Evidence of Interpersonal Violence from 129,000 Years Ago Found in China Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces BGI Study Results on Resequencing 50 Accessions of Rice Cast New Light on Molecular Breeding BGI Reports Study Results on Frequent Mutation of Genes Encoding UMPP Components in Kidney Cancer Research on Habitat Shift Promoting Species Diversification

  18. DONUT results

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa, Tomoko

    2008-02-21

    The DONUT experiment succeeded in observing tau-neutrino CC interactions for the first time in 2000. The analysis using total sample is presented in this paper, based on 3.5x10{sup 17} protons on target. The number of identified {nu}{sub {tau}} CC interactions is 9 from 581 neutrino interactions located in the emulsion. The result of the first measurement of {nu}{sub {tau}} CC cross section is consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model.

  19. HTR-2014 Paper Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2001-10-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict fission product release from tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of fission products in the compacts outside of the SiC layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of these fission products was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed silicon carbide (SiC) layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of about two, corresponding to an over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of about 100. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by an average of about an order of magnitude, which could additionally be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 30%. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-estimated by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from intact particles varied considerably from compact to compact, making it difficult to assess the effective over-estimation of the diffusivities. Furthermore, the release of strontium from particles with failed SiC is difficult to observe experimentally due to the release from intact particles, preventing any conclusions to be made on the accuracy or validity of the

  20. Effects of dabigatran on the cellular and protein phase of coagulation in patients with coronary artery disease on dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Results from a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Francesco; Rollini, Fabiana; Cho, Jung Rae; King, Rhodri; Phoenix, Fladia; Bhatti, Mona; DeGroat, Christopher; Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Zenni, Martin M; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Ajjan, Ramzi A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2016-03-01

    There is growing interest in understanding the effects of adding an oral anticoagulant in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT). Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and clopidogrel represent the most broadly utilised oral anticoagulant and P2Y12 receptor inhibitor, respectively. However, VKAs can interfere with clopidogrel metabolism via the cytochrome P450 (CYP) system which in turn may result in an increase in platelet reactivity. Dabigatran is a direct acting (anti-II) oral anticoagulant which does not interfere with CYP and has favourable safety and efficacy profiles compared with VKAs. The pharmacodynamic (PD) effects on platelet reactivity and clot kinetic of adjunctive dabigatran therapy in patients on DAPT are poorly explored. In this prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled PD study, patients (n=30) on maintenance DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel were randomised to either dabigatran 150 mg bid or placebo for seven days. PD testing was performed before and after treatment using four different assays exploring multiple pathways of platelet aggregation and fibrin clot kinetics: light transmittance aggregometry (LTA), multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), kaolin-activated thromboelastography (TEG) and turbidimetric assays. There were no differences in multiple measures of platelet reactivity investigating purinergic and non-purinergic signaling pathways assessed by LTA, MEA and TEG platelet mapping. Dabigatran significantly increased parameters related to thrombin activity and thrombus generation, and delayed fibrin clot formation, without affecting clot structure or fibrinolysis. In conclusion, in patients on DAPT with aspirin and clopidogrel, adjunctive dabigatran therapy is not associated with modulation of profiles of platelet reactivity as determined by several assays assessing multiple platelet signalling pathways. However, dabigatran significantly interferes with parameters related to thrombin activity and delays fibrin clot formation

  1. In-pile test results of U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-7Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Park, J. M.; Lee, K. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Ryu, H. J.; Ye, B.

    2014-11-01

    U-silicide or U-nitride coated U-Mo particle dispersion fuel in Al (U-Mo/Al) was in-pile tested to examine the effectiveness of the coating as a diffusion barrier between the U-7Mo fuel kernels and Al matrix. This paper reports the PIE data and analyses focusing on the effectiveness of the coating in terms of interaction layer (IL) growth and general fuel performance. The U-silicide coating showed considerable success, but it also provided evidence for additional improvement for coating process. The U-nitride coated specimen showed largely inefficient results in reducing IL growth. From the test, important observations were also made that can be utilized to improve U-Mo/Al fuel performance. The heating process for coating turned out to be beneficial to suppress fuel swelling. The use of larger fuel particles confirmed favorable effects on fuel performance.

  2. Interaction of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses in microglia by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Bor-Ren; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Tseng, Wen-Pei; Huang, Shiang-Suo; Wu, Chi-Rei; Lin, Chingju; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2013-05-15

    We investigated the interaction between proinflammatory and inflammatory responses caused by Staphylococcus aureus-derived lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in primary cultured microglial cells and BV-2 microglia. LTA induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels increase in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Meanwhile, LTA also increased nitric oxide (NO) and PGE{sub 2} production in microglia. Administration of TLR2 antagonist effectively inhibited LTA-induced NO, iNOS, and COX-2 expression. Moreover, treatment of cells with LTA caused a time-dependent activation of ERK, p38, JNK, as well as AKT. We also found that LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 up-regulation were attenuated by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. On the other hand, LTA-enhanced HO-1 expression was attenuated by p38 and PI3-kinase inhibitors. Treatment of cells with NF-κB and AP-1 inhibitors antagonized LTA-induced iNOS and COX-2 expression. However, only NF-κB inhibitors reduced LTA-induced HO-1 expression in microglia. Furthermore, stimulation of cells with LTA also activated IκBα phosphorylation, p65 phosphorylation at Ser{sup 536}, and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, LTA-induced increases of κB-DNA and AP-1-DNA binding activity were inhibited by p38, JNK, and PI3-kinase inhibitors. HO-1 activator CoPP IX dramatically reversed LTA-induced iNOS expression. Our results provided mechanisms linking LTA and inflammation/anti-inflammation, and indicated that LTA plays a regulatory role in microglia activation. - Highlights: • LTA causes an increase in iNOS, COX-2, and HO-1 expression in microglia. • LTA induces iNOS and COX-2 expression through TLR-2/NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. • HO-1 expression is regulated through p38, JNK, PI3K/AKT and AP-1 pathways. • Induced HO-1 reduces LTA-induced iNOS expression. • LTA plays a regulatory role on inflammatory/anti-inflammatory responses.

  3. Planet-Induced Emission Enhancements in HD 179949: Results from McDonald Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurdemir, L.; Redfield, S.; Cuntz, M.

    2012-04-01

    We monitored the Ca II H and K lines of HD 179949, a notable star in the southern hemisphere, to observe and confirm previously identified planet induced emission (PIE) as an effect of star-planet interaction. We obtained high resolution spectra (R~53000) with a signal-to-noise ratio S/N >~50 in the Ca II H and K cores during 10 nights of observation at the McDonald Observatory. Wide-band echelle spectra were taken using the 2.7-m telescope. Detailed statistical analysis of Ca II K revealed fluctuations in the Ca II K core attributable to planet induced chromospheric emission. This result is consistent with previous studies by Shkolnik et al. (2003). Additionally, we were able to confirm the reality and temporal evolution of the phase shift of the maximum of star-planet interaction previously found. However, no identifiable fluctuations were detected in the Ca II H core. The Al I λ3944Å line was also monitored to gauge if the expected activity enhancements are confined to the chromospheric layer. Our observations revealed some variability, which is apparently unassociated with planet-induced activity.

  4. The technology assessment of LTA aircraft systems. [hybrid airships for passenger and cargo transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The advantages of conventional small and large airships over heavier than air aircraft are reviewed and the need for developing hybrid aircraft for passenger and heavy charge transport is assessed. Performance requirements and estimated operating costs are discussed for rota-ships to be used for short distance transportation near large cities as well as for airlifting civil engineering machinery and supplies for the construction of power stations, dams, tunnels, and roads in remote areas or on isolated islands.

  5. A practical concept for powered or tethered weight-lifting LTA vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balleyguier, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    A concept for a multi-hull weightlifting airship is presented. The concept is based upon experience in the design and handling of gas-filled balloons for commercial purposes, it was first tested in April, 1972. In the flight test, two barrage balloons were joined side-by-side, with an intermediate frame, and launched in captive flight. The success of this flight test led to plans for a development program calling for a powered, piloted prototype, a follow-on 40 ton model, and a 400 ton transport model. All of these airships utilize a tetrehedric three-line tethering method for loading and unloading phases of flight, which bypasses many of the difficulties inherent in the handling of a conventional airship near the ground. Both initial and operating costs per ton of lift capability are significantly less for the subject design than for either helicopters or airships of conventional mono-hull design.

  6. IL-10 Modulates Placental Responses to TLR Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Mehmet; Peltier, Morgan; Vetrano, Anna; Arita, Yuko; Gurzenda, Ellen; Joseph, Ansamma; Kazzaz, Jeffrey; Sharma, Surendra; Hanna, Nazeeh

    2013-01-01

    Problem Intra-uterine infections increase production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. It is unclear whether different infectious agents determine the relative expression of pro-and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Methods of study We compared the placental inflammatory response induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin from Gram-negative bacteria) with those induced by lipoteichoic acid (LTA, a cell wall component of Gram-positive bacteria). Placental explants from term delivery were treated with either LPS or LTA, in the presence or absence of IL-10, for 24 hrs. Cytokines, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression were quantified. Results Both LTA and LPS significantly induced several cytokines with LPS eliciting more potent effects. IL-6 and IL-8 were induced to comparable levels in response to both LTA and LPS whereas monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) production was induced more by LTA, demonstrating a differential placental response to a specific toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand. IL-10 treatment significantly reduced most pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as PGE2 induced by both LPS and LTA. Interestingly, IL-10 down-regulated LTA-mediated MCP1 induction, but not that mediated by LPS. Moreover, IL-10 was more effective in down-regulating PGE2 after LPS- when compared with LTA stimulation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that placental exposure to LTA and LPS appear to trigger distinct cytokine responses that can be modulated by IL-10. PMID:19821803

  7. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-11-01

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  8. HTR 2014 Paper - Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise P. Collin

    2001-10-01

    Safety tests were conducted on fourteen fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800°C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during the safety tests, and the predicted values were compared with experimental results. Preliminary comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of the safety tests show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of these fission products, which is largely attributed to an over-estimation of the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles. Correction factors to these diffusivities were assessed for silver and cesium in order to enable a better match between the modeling predictions and the safety testing results. In the case of strontium, correction factors could not be assessed because potential release during the safety tests could not be distinguished from matrix content released during irradiation. In the case of krypton, all the coating layers are partly retentive and the available data did not allow to determine their respective retention powers, hence preventing to derive any correction factors.

  9. Type utilization of baked-smashed sweet potato and vegetables on patisserie product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ana; Subekti, S.; Sudewi; Perdani, E. N.; Hanum, F.; Suciani, T.; Tania, V.

    2016-04-01

    The research was an experimental study in Green Skill Patisserie Course using Project-Based Learning model. It aims to complete the project development of pie named guramnis rainbow pie. Several experiments were carried out to produce a pie dough crust mixed with baked-smashed sweet potato and added with vegetables extract as the food coloring. The experiment method in order to make a better appearance or an attractive shape and to have more nutrition. In addition, the pie was filled with a mixture of sweet and sour gurame as Indonesian traditional food. By applying an organoleptic test to 10 respondents, the result shows that pie dough recipe using flour substituted by baked-smashed sweet potato with 2:1 of a ratio. Coloring pie dough adding extract vegetables (carrots, beets and celery) as color. We found that pie dough has more interesting pie color (90%) and the texture of the pie with a quite level of crispness (60%). Moreover, the pie taste is fairly (70%) and tasty (70%). Nutritional analysis results show that per size, serving guramnis rainbow pie contains energy as much as 81.72 calories, carbohydrates 12.5 grams, fat 2.32 grams and 2.77 grams of protein. The main findings are the pie appearance and taste was different compared to the previous pies because of the pie was served with gurame asam manis as the filling and had flour and cilembu sweet potato as the basic ingredients. The color of guramnis rainbow pie was resulted not only from food coloring but also from vegetables extract namely carrot (orange), bit (red), and salary (green). Thus, it had many benefits for health and adds the nutrition. The researchers recommend a further study in order to make pie dough with baked sweet potato and vegetables extract having an optimal level of crispness.

  10. Product formation controlled by substrate dynamics in leukotriene A4 hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Stsiapanava, Alena; Tholander, Fredrik; Kumar, Ramakrishnan B; Qureshi, Abdul Aziz; Niegowski, Damian; Hasan, Mahmudul; Thunnissen, Marjolein; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2014-02-01

    Leukotriene A4 hydrolase/aminopeptidase (LTA4H) (EC 3.3.2.6) is a bifunctional zinc metalloenzyme with both an epoxide hydrolase and an aminopeptidase activity. LTA4H from the African claw toad, Xenopus laevis (xlLTA4H) has been shown to, unlike the human enzyme, convert LTA4 to two enzymatic metabolites, LTB4 and another biologically active product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4 (5(S),12R-dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid). In order to study the molecular aspect of the formation of this product we have characterized the structure and function of xlLTA4H. We solved the structure of xlLTA4H to a resolution of 2.3Å. It is a dimeric structure where each monomer has three domains with the active site in between the domains, similar as to the human structure. An important difference between the human and amphibian enzyme is the phenylalanine to tyrosine exchange at position 375. Our studies show that mutating F375 in xlLTA4H to tyrosine abolishes the formation of the LTB4 isomeric product Δ(6)-trans-Δ(8)-cis-LTB4. In an attempt to understand how one amino acid exchange leads to a new product profile as seen in the xlLTA4H, we performed a conformer analysis of the triene part of the substrate LTA4. Our results show that the Boltzmann distribution of substrate conformers correlates with the observed distribution of products. We suggest that the observed difference in product profile between the human and the xlLTA4H arises from different level of discrimination between substrate LTA4 conformers. PMID:24333438

  11. Telescopes on the Moon or pie in the sky?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilcher, Carl B.

    1992-01-01

    The question is examined of whether it makes sense to believe that there will one day be an interferometric array of telescopes on the Moon. The question is really one of national commitment to a lunar base, since it is not likely that a scientific undertaking of this magnitude would occur in the absence of permanent human presence on the Moon. A discussion is also given of the real possibility if the exploration of space should be a multinational effort.

  12. Improving Relationships: Serving up a Slice of "Enemy Pie"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, P. Cougar; McIntyre, Emily

    2011-01-01

    The "14 Characteristics of Effective Health Education Curricula" identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health promote teaching ideas designed to personalize information and engage students through activities which are both student centered and interactive. Effective health education efforts…

  13. Networking: Pie in the Sky or Icing on the Cake?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Tom

    1984-01-01

    Discusses benefits and pitfalls of networking or disk-sharing in computer labs where microcomputers are connected to a central disk drive which runs one program for all microcomputers at one time. Copyright and software compatibility from educators' and publishers' perspectives, costs, time factors, and educational objectives are included in the…

  14. The Pied Piper: A Parasitic Beetle's Melodies Modulate Ant Behaviours.

    PubMed

    Di Giulio, Andrea; Maurizi, Emanuela; Barbero, Francesca; Sala, Marco; Fattorini, Simone; Balletto, Emilio; Bonelli, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Ants use various communication channels to regulate their social organisation. The main channel that drives almost all the ants' activities and behaviours is the chemical one, but it is long acknowledged that the acoustic channel also plays an important role. However, very little is known regarding exploitation of the acoustical channel by myrmecophile parasites to infiltrate the ant society. Among social parasites, the ant nest beetles (Paussus) are obligate myrmecophiles able to move throughout the colony at will and prey on the ants, surprisingly never eliciting aggression from the colonies. It has been recently postulated that stridulatory organs in Paussus might be evolved as an acoustic mechanism to interact with ants. Here, we survey the role of acoustic signals employed in the Paussus beetle-Pheidole ant system. Ants parasitised by Paussus beetles produce caste-specific stridulations. We found that Paussus can "speak" three different "languages", each similar to sounds produced by different ant castes (workers, soldiers, queen). Playback experiments were used to test how host ants respond to the sounds emitted by Paussus. Our data suggest that, by mimicking the stridulations of the queen, Paussus is able to dupe the workers of its host and to be treated as royalty. This is the first report of acoustic mimicry in a beetle parasite of ants. PMID:26154266

  15. Dividing up the pie: Whales, fish, and humans as competitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, James J.; Steele, John H.; Ballerini, Tosca; Gaichas, Sarah K.; Ainley, David G.

    2013-09-01

    Similarly structured food web models of four coastal ecosystems (Northern California Current, Central Gulf of Alaska, Georges Bank, southwestern Antarctic Peninsula) were used to investigate competition among whales, fishes, pinnipeds, and humans. Two analysis strategies simulated the effects of historic baleen and odontocete whale abundances across all trophic levels: food web structure scenarios and time-dynamic scenarios. Direct competition between whales and commercial fisheries is small at current whale abundances; whales and fisheries each take similar proportions of annual pelagic fish production (4-7%). Scenarios show that as whale populations grow, indirect competition between whales and fish for zooplankton would more likely impact fishery production than would direct competition for fish between whales and commercial fisheries. Increased baleen whale abundance would have greater and broader indirect effects on upper trophic levels and fisheries than a similar increase in odontocete abundance. Time-dynamic scenarios, which allow for the evolution of compensatory mechanisms, showed more modest impacts than structural scenarios, which show the immediate impacts of altered energy pathways. Structural scenarios show that in terms of energy availability, there is potential for large increases in whale abundance without major changes to existing food web structures and without substantial reduction of fishery production. For each ecosystem, a five-fold increase in baleen whale abundance could be supported with minor disruptions to existing energy flow pathways. However, such an increase would remain below historical population levels for many cetaceans. A larger expansion (20X) could be accommodated only with large reductions in energy flow to competitor groups. The scope for odontocete expansion varies between ecosystems but may be more restricted than the scope for baleen expansion because they feed at higher, less productive trophic levels. Egestion: unassimilated consumption, feces; directed to detritus pools. Metabolism: basal metabolism, specific dynamic action, and activity costs in terms of ammonium excretion NH4+; directed to recycled nutrient pools. Predation: a production term; production directed to grazing or predation by other functional groups. “Other” mortality: a production term; “other” mortality is unconsumed production; principally unconsumed phytoplankton; directed to detritus pools. Export (losses): a production term; export of plankton and pelagic detritus by physical transport; export losses are handled as a reduction of group transfer efficiency (the fraction of consumption that is passed to higher trophic level groups through grazing or predation). “Consumption” for phytoplankton is the uptake of new nitrate NO3- input and recycled ammonium NH4+ produced by consumer metabolism. Nitrate input was rescaled to carbon based upon the Redfield ratio (6.625 mmole C mmole N-1) and to wet weight based upon the estimated carbon content of fish (8.8 mg wet weight mg C-1) (Steele et al., 2007).The E2E trophic network matrices for each region are provided as Supplementary material. The E2E network models for the Northern California Current (NCC), Central Gulf of Alaska (CGoA), and southwestern Antarctic Peninsula (sWAP) ecosystems were derived following the techniques of Steele and Ruzicka (2011) from solutions for biomasses, consumption rates, and predation pressure upon each functional group calculated using ECOPATH algorithms (Christensen and Walters, 2004). The NCC model was modified from Ruzicka et al. (2012), the CGoA model was modified as noted in the Supplementary material from the full Gulf of Alaska model documented in Aydin et al. (2007), and the sWAP model was modified from Ballerini et al. (submitted for publication). A quantitative assessment of the Georges Bank (GB) food web is given in Steele et al. (2007) and Collie et al. (2009). Top predators (seabirds, baleen whales, odontocetes) were implicit in the original GB model. These components have now been explicitly defined usin

  16. The Humble Pie--Half-Baked or Well Done?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Neville; Mashhoudy, Houshang

    2008-01-01

    This article re-examines the much maligned piechart and provides justification for its use. It identifies common pitfalls when drawing piecharts in Microsoft Excel and offers advice on how to avoid them. (Contains 6 figures and 5 tables.)

  17. Innovation, Motherhood, and Apple Pie. Brown Center Letters on Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehurst, Grover

    2009-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 authorized the Secretary of Education to establish a $650 million Innovation Fund to expand the work of schools that have made gains in closing achievement gaps. With growing discussion and considerable money heading in the direction of innovation, Grover "Russ" Whitehurst provides recommendations…

  18. Can the Lung Cancer Pie Be Divided into Angiogenic Slices?

    PubMed

    Cascone, Tina; Heymach, John V

    2015-12-01

    There are no validated markers for predicting benefit from angiogenesis inhibitors or classifying tumors with distinct angiogenic phenotypes. In patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with bevacizumab and erlotinib, Franzini and colleagues find that angiogenesis- and hypoxia-associated gene expression signatures predict tumor response and/or clinical outcome, and may define distinct angiogenic patterns. PMID:26232370

  19. Recurrent Education: "Apple Pie" ...or..."Atomic Bomb"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, William L.

    The author conceptualizes recurrent education as organized, structured, institutionally sponsored learning activities with intentional outcomes, which are distributed over the life span of the individual in a recurring way. Some problems to which recurrent education proposes solutions include: alienation at the inter-generational level,…

  20. Autonomous Soaring Flight Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on autonomous soaring flight results for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV)'s is shown. The topics include: 1) Background; 2) Thermal Soaring Flight Results; 3) Autonomous Dolphin Soaring; and 4) Future Plans.

  1. Outcomes of Living Donor Liver Transplantation Alone for Patients on Maintenance Renal Replacement Therapy in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Susumu; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Uemoto, Shinji; Umeshita, Koji; Imamura, Hajime; Soyama, Akihiko; Shimamura, Tsuyoshi; Isaji, Shuji; Ogura, Yasuhiro; Egawa, Hiroto; Kawachi, Shigeyuki; Kasahara, Mureo; Nagano, Hiroaki; Ku, Yonson; Ohdan, Hideki; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Sato, Shuntaro; Inomata, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Because simultaneous liver and kidney transplantation has been limited as a standard practice because of a severe shortage of deceased donors in Japan, living donor (LD) liver transplantation alone (LTA) is indicated in most recipients with maintenance renal replacement therapy (MRRT). Methods A retrospective nationwide survey of LD LTA was performed for liver transplant patients on MRRT. The characteristics of donors and recipients, postoperative complications, survival rate, and causes of death were analyzed. Results In the adult cases (n = 28), the overall survival rate at 1 year and 5 years were 66.1% and 57.3%, respectively. When compared with those adults without MRRT (n = 237), it was significantly worse. In the 7 pediatric cases, the overall survival rate at 1 and 5 years were both 83.3%. Three adult recipients died of nonaneurysm cerebral hemorrhage after 1 year and 1 adult recipient died of acute heart failure after 7 months. In adult recipients with MRRT, graft weight versus standard liver volume, and duration and blood loss in LTA surgery were associated with poor outcomes after LD LTA. Multivariate analysis revealed that MRRT was highest hazard ratio on patient survival after LD LTA. Conclusions Early post-LD LTA mortality was higher in patients with MRRT than in those without MRRT with characteristic causes. Smaller grafts for size and a complicated surgery were associated with poor outcome after LD LTA. Thus, LD LTA in adult patients on MRRT should be carefully treated with meticulous postoperative management and follow-up.

  2. Getting Districtwide Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBeath, Angus

    2006-01-01

    This monograph is based on a keynote presentation by Angus McBeath at the "Getting Districtwide Results" Conference in Long Beach, California, which was co-sponsored by the Cross City Campaign for Urban School Reform and Focus on Results. The author, a former superintendent of the Edmonton Public Schools, how his school district was "forced" and…

  3. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, Ryoji

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  4. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  5. Recent results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    R. Harr

    2004-01-26

    The authors report on the recent heavy-quark results from CDF in Run IIa. They focus on a selection of mature analyses that demonstrate the capabilities of the experiment to extract interesting physics from the data. A few of the results presented have already been submitted for publication and papers are being prepared for most of the others.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Program Results

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-19

    The Vehicle Technologies Program's progress is closely monitored by both internal and external organizations. The Program's results are detailed in a wide range of documents and tools that can be accessed through the PIR website. Descriptions of these materials are provided on this program results page.

  7. Unfavourable results in hypospadias

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Karoon; Misra, Anshumali

    2013-01-01

    Hypospadias urethroplasty is considered difficult as the complications and unfavourable results are not uncommon. At the turn of the century, due to a better understanding of applied anatomy of hypospadias, new techniques were developed which significantly brought down the complication rate. However unfavourable results are still disturbing. An algorithm for selection of surgery has been presented. Forty three secondary surgeries were performed over 3 years for correction of unfavourable results. The urethrocutaneous fistula was the most common (21%) followed by meatal stenosis (14%) and narrow neourethra (14%). Common unfavourable results have been discussed. On the basis of experience with a large number of hypospadias urethroplasty ‘tips to avoid or minimise unfavourable results’ have been presented. However, one should assess the final outcome of urethroplasty using hypospadias objective scoring evaluation. PMID:24501477

  8. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  9. Your Kidney Test Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Important Tests Blood Pressure Serum Albumin Bicarbonate Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN) Potassium Calcium Phosphorus Results Goal: Your ... level in your blood. BUN checks how much urea, a waste product, is in your blood. Potassium ...

  10. Tevatron direct photon results.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlmann, S.

    1999-09-21

    Tevatron direct photon results since DIS98 are reviewed. Two new CDF measurements are discussed, the Run Ib inclusive photon cross section and the photon + Muon cross section. Comparisons with the latest NLO QCD calculations are presented.

  11. Results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, G.B.

    1983-05-01

    The MAC detector has been exposed at PEP to 40 pb/sup -1/ luminosity of e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions. The detector is described and recent results of a continuing analysis of hadronic cross section, lepton pair charge asymmetry, Bhabha process, two photon final state and radiative ..mu.. pairs are given. New results on flavor tagging of hadronic events with an inclusive ..mu.., and some searches for new particles are presented.

  12. 2010 Election Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamzai, Anjuli; Robinson, Robert; Shirey, Steven

    2010-02-01

    On 3 February 2010, AGU members completed voting for Union and section officers and for directors for the newly approved Board of Directors. Access to voting was provided over the Internet for a period of 31 days. Paper ballots were available upon request. Voting results and analysis were prepared by AGU staff, with results certified by AGU's Tellers Committee on 4 February 2010. Voting was widespread throughout the global base of AGU members. The overall participation rate was 19.2%.

  13. Higgs Results from CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornheim, Adolf

    2014-03-01

    The Nobel Prize in physics 2013 has been awarded to François Englert and Peter W. Higgs for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles which plays a crucial role in our understanding of electro-weak symmetry breaking. I will review the experimental results manifesting the discovery of the so called Higgs boson from the perspective of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration. The review is based on the final results from the proton-proton collision data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV center-of-mass energy, collected in 2011 and 2012 in the initial run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). Results on the properties of the new particle with a mass around 125 GeV, all in agreement with the expectations for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson, are highlighted. Latest results on the couplings between the Higgs and fermionic fields, in particular the final results of searches for a Higgs boson decaying into a b-quark or a tau-lepton pair, are presented. Non-SM Higgs searches are briefly summarized. Future perspectives for Higgs physics with CMS at LHC for the next data taking period starting in 2015 and beyond are discussed. CMS Collaboration.

  14. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  15. New Results from Hermes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tytgat, M.

    2004-06-01

    An overview is given of selected recent HERMES results obtained from measurements performed during the first running period of HERA. These topics include inclusive g1(x)-measurements with a NLO QCD analysis, polarized quark distribution extraction, b1(x)-measurement, double spin asymmetries in vector meson production, ρ0-nuclear transparency and finally quark fragmentation in nuclei.

  16. Reporting Research Results Effectively

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks

    2010-01-01

    Assessment research is at its best when it packages research results and data so that they can be digested by multiple audiences. Too many assessment researchers spend all their efforts planning and executing the research project with little attention to closing the loop at the end. If assessment findings are not communicated effectively, the…

  17. 2006 Election Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudt, Amanda C.; Given, Holly K.; McDonough, William F.

    2006-02-01

    The voting by the membership for Union and Section officers for the 2006-2008 term was completed on 10 January. Voting was conducted electronically through the Internet using commercial surveying software. Paper ballots were available upon request. The tallying and recording of the elections was managed by AGU staff using the Web-Surveyor software. The results of the voting are listed below.

  18. [The applicability of results].

    PubMed

    Marín-León, I

    2015-11-01

    The ultimate aim of the critical reading of medical literature is to use the scientific advances in clinical practice or for innovation. This requires an evaluation of the applicability of the results of the studies that have been published, which begins with a clear understanding of these results. When the studies do not provide sufficient guarantees of rigor in design and analysis, the conditions necessary for the applicability of the results are not met; however, the fact that the results are reliable is not enough to make it worth trying to use their conclusions. This article explains how carrying out studies in experimental or artificial conditions often moves them away from the real conditions in which they claim to apply their conclusions. To evaluate this applicability, the article proposes evaluating a set of items that will enable the reader to determine the likelihood that the benefits and risks reported in the studies will yield the least uncertainty in the clinical arena where they aim to be applied. PMID:26454562

  19. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. NIDCD-funded researchers from ... An NIDCD-funded research team says it might be possible in the ...

  20. NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For an enhanced version of this page please turn Javascript on. Testing very young babies ... according to recent research funded by the National Institute of Allergy and ...

  1. Sharing Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities…

  2. Recent CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-11-01

    As of November of 2007, the CDF detector has recorded approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data. This contribution describes some of the most recent and most relevant results from the CDF collaboration in all areas of its wide physics program, as well as some insights into the Tevatron reach for Higgs searches within the next few years.

  3. Implementation Challenges and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Kirk; Sorensen, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of the online and f2f summer algebra courses that were delivered in summers 2011 and 2012. These data will be used to frame the impact results presented in an earlier paper. In particular, the paper will provide a detailed picture of how the online course was structured and the types of supports provided to…

  4. QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, R.; The CDF Collaboration

    1991-10-01

    Results are presented for hadronic jet and direct photon production at {radical}{bar s} = 1800 GeV. The data are compared with next-to-leading QCD calculations. A new limit on the scale of possible composite structure of the quarks is also reported. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Pathways Involved in the Synergistic Activation of Macrophages by Lipoteichoic Acid and Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Kathleen H.; Cox, Michelle E.; Woo-Rasberry, Virginia; Hasty, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a Gram-positive cell surface molecule that is found in both a cell-bound form and cell-free form in the host during an infection. Hemoglobin (Hb) can synergize with LTA, a TLR2 ligand, to potently activate macrophage innate immune responses in a TLR2- and TLR4-dependent way. At low levels of LTA, the presence of Hb can result in a 200-fold increase in the secretion of IL-6 following macrophage activation. Six hours after activation, the macrophage genes that are most highly up-regulated by LTA plus Hb activation compared to LTA alone are cytokines, chemokines, receptors and interferon-regulated genes. Several of these genes exhibit a unique TLR4-dependent increase in mRNA levels that continued to rise more than eight hours after stimulation. This prolonged increase in mRNA levels could be the result of an extended period of NF-κB nuclear localization and the concurrent absence of the NF-κB inhibitor, IκBα, after stimulation with LTA plus Hb. Dynasore inhibition experiments indicate that an endocytosis-dependent pathway is required for the TLR4-dependent up-regulation of IL-6 secretion following activation with LTA plus Hb. In addition, interferon-β mRNA is present after activation with LTA plus Hb, suggesting that the TRIF/TRAM-dependent pathway may be involved. Hb alone can elicit the TLR4-dependent secretion of TNF-α from macrophages, so it may be the TLR4 ligand. Hb also led to secretion of high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1), which synergized with LTA to increase secretion of IL-6. The activation of both the TLR2 and TLR4 pathways by LTA plus Hb leads to an enhanced innate immune response. PMID:23071790

  6. Results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Nico, J.S.

    1994-10-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first nine runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 66{sub -13}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result of 73{sub -16}{sup +18} (stat) {sub -7}{sup 5} (sys) SNU, the capture rate is 69{sub -11}{sup +11} (stat) {sub -7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 52%--56% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  7. New results from RENO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Seon-Hee; RENO Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Neutrino oscillation is well known but one of the oscillation parameters, θ13, has not been well measured until 2012. The main goal of RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) is to measure the θ13 using reactor neutrinos. RENO is located in Yonggwang, South Korea, where there are six reactor cores with a total of 16.5 GWth. By detecting the electron anti-neutrinos from nuclear fission processes from the reactors, RENO measured (4.9 sigma) the θ13 in 2012 with 220 live days of data. Since then we have been updating our results more precisely with increased statistics and improved systematics. In this talk, we would like to present our new results (800 live days of data) obtained by a shape analysis method. Excess of neutrino-like events at 5 MeV seen in our data is also discussed.

  8. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reitz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  9. Dosimetric results on EURECA

    SciTech Connect

    Reitz, G.

    1995-02-01

    Detector packages were exposed on the European Retrievable Carrier (EURECA) as part of the Biostack experiment inside the Exobiology and Radiation Assembly (ERA) and at several locations around EURECA. The packages consist of different plastic nuclear track detectors, nuclear emulsions and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD`s). Evaluation of these detectors yields data on absorbed dose and particle and LET spectra. Preliminary results of absorbed dose measurements in the EURECA dosimeter packages are reported and compared to results of the LDEF experiments. The highest dose rate measured on EURECA is 63.3 plus or minus 0.4 mGy d(exp -1) behind a shielding thickness of 0.09 g cm(exp -2) in front of the detector package.

  10. Space Shuttle radargrammetry results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leberl, F.; Domik, G.; Raggam, J.; Cimino, J.; Kobrick, M.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results on the radargrammetric processing of SIR-A and SIR-B data are presented. Radargrammetric processing was applied to images of the Trinity National Forest in Northern California, the islands of Cephalonia, Ithaka, and Sardegna, Mt. Shasta, and Cordon La Grasa, Argentina. The preliminary processing of the SIR-A and SIR-B data has produced digital elevation models, stereo models, and a contour map.

  11. Recent results from MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, Hans-Juergen

    2011-10-24

    The Mainz Microtron MAMI is an ideal facility to study the hadron structure with the electromagnetic probe. With the new accelerator stage (HDSM), which went into operation in 2007, high-intensity polarized electron and photon beams with energies up to 1.6 GeV are delivered to the experiments. Polarized targets and recoil polarimeters in combination with dedicated detectors are available for precision experiments in hadron physics. In this article, an overview over selected recent results is given.

  12. Results from SAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Gavrin, V.N.; Girin, S.V.

    1996-04-01

    The Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. Beginning in September 1992, SAGE II data were taken with 55 tons of Ga and with significantly reduced backgrounds. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October 1993 is presented. The result of 69 {+-} 10 +5/{minus}7 SNU is to be compared with a Standard Solar Model prediction of 132 SNU.

  13. PDX experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Meade, D.; Arunasalam, V.; Barnes, C.

    1981-01-01

    The main objectives of the Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) are to: (1) determine the effectiveness of poloidal divertors in controlling impurities in high temperature plasmas, (2) use the poloidal divertor to provide clean plasmas for confinement and high beta studies, and (3) investigate the effect of cross-section shaping on plasma confinement and MHD properties. In this paper, we report the results obtained during initial divertor operation of the PDX.

  14. GIRAFFE test results summary

    SciTech Connect

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H.

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  15. MOPEX Workshop Results Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, G. H.

    2003-12-01

    A complementary program to the Prediction in Ungauged Basins (PUB) program is the Model Parameter Estimation Experiment (MOPEX). The primary goal of MOPEX is to develop techniques for the a priori estimation of parameters in land surface parameterization schemes in atmospheric models and in hydrologic models. A recent MOPEX workshop evaluated the use of a priori estimated parameters in eight hydrologic models. A data set of mean areal precipitation, temperature, and potential evapotranspiration was provided for each of 12 basins located predominantly in the southeastern United States. While workshop results provided valuable insight to some problems in a priori parameter estimation within and among models, additional questions remain. Using additional data sets for the 12 basins, alternative parameter estimation techniques are being evaluated to compare the use of distributed values of precipitation and temperature to the use of mean areal values in the original study. Also, the magnitudes of the uncertainty in streamflow prediction resulting from errors in the meteorological variables and their distribution are being compared with the magnitudes of uncertainty associated with errors in parameter estimates of basin physical characteristics. The U.S Geological Survey's distributed-parameter watershed model PRMS was one of the eight models used in the MOPEX workshop and is the model being used to conduct these further studies. Results of this investigation are presented.

  16. The Viking biology results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Harold P.

    1989-01-01

    A brief review of the purposes and the results from the Viking Biology experiments is presented, in the expectation that the lessons learned from this mission will be useful in planning future approaches to the biological exploration of Mars. Since so little was then known about potential micro-environments on Mars, three different experiments were included in the Viking mission, each one based on different assumptions about what Martian organisms might be like. In addition to the Viking Biology Instrument (VBI), important corollary information was obtained from the Viking lander imaging system and from the molecular analysis experiments that were conducted using the gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GCMS) instrument. No biological objects were noted by the lander imaging instrument. The GCMS did not detect any organic compounds. A description of the tests conducted by the Gas Exchange Experiment, the Labeled Release experiment, and the Pyrolytic Release experiment is given. Results are discussed. Taken as a whole, the Viking data yielded no unequivocal evidence for a Martian biota at either landing site. The results also revealed the presence of one or more reactive oxidants in the surface material and these need to be further characterized, as does the range of micro-environments, before embarking upon future searches for extant life on Mars.

  17. Certification of computational results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gregory F.; Wilson, Dwight S.; Masson, Gerald M.

    1993-01-01

    A conceptually novel and powerful technique to achieve fault detection and fault tolerance in hardware and software systems is described. When used for software fault detection, this new technique uses time and software redundancy and can be outlined as follows. In the initial phase, a program is run to solve a problem and store the result. In addition, this program leaves behind a trail of data called a certification trail. In the second phase, another program is run which solves the original problem again. This program, however, has access to the certification trail left by the first program. Because of the availability of the certification trail, the second phase can be performed by a less complex program and can execute more quickly. In the final phase, the two results are compared and if they agree the results are accepted as correct; otherwise an error is indicated. An essential aspect of this approach is that the second program must always generate either an error indication or a correct output even when the certification trail it receives from the first program is incorrect. The certification trail approach to fault tolerance is formalized and realizations of it are illustrated by considering algorithms for the following problems: convex hull, sorting, and shortest path. Cases in which the second phase can be run concurrently with the first and act as a monitor are discussed. The certification trail approach are compared to other approaches to fault tolerance.

  18. Local tumour ablation for localized kidney cancer: Practice patterns in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, Vincent; Larcher, Alessandro; Dell’Oglio, Paolo; Boehm, Katharina; Bishr, Mohamed; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Local tumour ablation (LTA) is a recommended option for the treatment of localized kidney cancer in nonsurgical candidates. We performed a survey to describe the practice patterns of this procedure in Canada. Methods: An electronic survey was sent by email to all urologists registered to the Canadian Urological Association (CUA). Urologists were queried about general demographic information, LTA availability at their institution (and reasons for non-availability, if it was the case), as well as the type and context of LTA use. Results: Overall, 103 individual responses were obtained (response rate of 19.5%). Of those, 58 (56.3%) had access to LTA at their institution. Urologists who had access to LTA were more likely to work at an academic institution (69 vs. 16%, p<0.001). Among individuals who did not use LTA, the main reasons were lack of staff, such as radiologists, who can assist and/or perform the procedure (64%); and lack of expertise with the procedure (62%). Among urologists who had access to LTA, percutaneous radiofrequency and cryoablation were the most commonly used (72% and 21%, respectively); however, urologists were rarely involved in those procedures (12%). Conclusions: In this national survey, we found that a significant proportion of Canadian urologists did not have access to LTA. We also found that when LTA was performed, urologists were rarely involved in the procedures. Those findings represent significant areas for improvement in the access to LTA. The conclusions of this study are limited by the low response rate. PMID:26788232

  19. Pressure locking test results

    SciTech Connect

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  20. SPEAR results, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Scharre, D.L.

    1981-09-01

    New results from SPEAR on the inclusive photon spectrum at the psi' and on J/psi radiative transitions are presented. Evidence for an eta/sub c/' candidate is observed in the psi' inclusive photon spectrum at a mass M = 3592 +- 5 MeV. A new resonance, the theta(1640) which is observed to decay into eta eta, has been seen in radiative transitions from the J/psi. The spin-parity of the l(1440), previously observed in J/psi radiative transitions and originally identified as the E(1420), has been determined to be 0/sup -/.

  1. Lithium cell test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    Three lithium SO2 cells, two lithium CF cells, and a vinyl chloride cell, all with crimped seals, and all strictly experimental, were independently discharged on resistors. Three temperatures were used and several different storage temperatures. Discharge rate generally on the nominal discharges were 0.1 amp, 0.5 amp, and 1 amp. Tests results show that the crimp seals are inadequate, especially for the SO2 cells. Normal discharges present no hazards. All cells discharge to zero. The problem of lithium cell explosions, such as occurred during off-limits testing, is discussed.

  2. Recent result from RENO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyunkwan; RENO Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    The Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation (RENO) started data-taking from August, 2011 and has measured the smallest neutrino mixing angle θ13 by observing the disappearance of reactor antineutrinos. Antineutrinos from the six reactors at Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant in Korea are detected and compared by the two identical detectors located in the near and far distances from the reactor array center. We present new results on precisely measured sin 22θ13 value and |Δm2 ee| based on spectral analysis using the 800 days of data sample, which are taken from August, 2011 to Dec., 2013.

  3. Recent BABAR Results

    SciTech Connect

    Eigen, Gerald

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xsγ, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xs+-, on a search for B → π/ηℓ+- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ → X-+ℓ'+ modes and a study of B0 →ωω and B0 → ωφ decays.

  4. Results of railgun experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    During the 1979 Megagauss II conference the hypervelocity potential of railguns and the pulsed power technology needed to power them were discussed. Since then, many laboratories have initiated railgun R and D projects for a variety of potential applications. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories initiated a collaborative experimental railgun project which resulted in several successes in accelerating projectiles to high velocities, emphasized the limits on railgun operation, and indicated that the numerical modeling of railgun operation was in good agreement with the experiments.

  5. Results from AMANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebusch, Christopher; Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bertrand, D.; Bernadini, E.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chen, A.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D. F.; Davour, A.; de Clercq, C.; De Young, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Doksus, P.; Ekström, P.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaug, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, P.; Hill, G. C.; Hulth, P. O.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Koci, B.; Köpke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kuehn, K.; Lamoureux, J. I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Madsen, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H. S.; McParland, C. P.; Minaeva, Y.; Miočinović, P.; Mock, P. C.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Neunhöffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Pohl, A. C.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodríguez Martino, J.; Ross, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R. G.; Sudhoff, P.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Yodh, G.; Young, S.

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) is a high-energy neutrino telescope operating at the geographic South Pole. It is a lattice of photo-multiplier tubes buried deep in the polar ice. The primary goal of this detector is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos. We describe the detector methods of operation and present results from the AMANDA-B10 prototype. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of the current AMANDA-II detector. We conclude with an outlook to the envisioned sensitivity of the future IceCube detector.

  6. Spacelab Science Results Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Lundquist, C. A.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Horwitz, J. L.; Germany, G. A.; Cruise, J. F.; Lewis, M. L.; Murphy, K. L.

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with OSTA-1 in November 1981 and ending with Neurolab in March 1998, a total of 36 Shuttle missions carried various Spacelab components such as the Spacelab module, pallet, instrument pointing system, or mission peculiar experiment support structure. The experiments carried out during these flights included astrophysics, solar physics, plasma physics, atmospheric science, Earth observations, and a wide range of microgravity experiments in life sciences, biotechnology, materials science, and fluid physics which includes combustion and critical point phenomena. In all, some 764 experiments were conducted by investigators from the U.S., Europe, and Japan. The purpose of this Spacelab Science Results Study is to document the contributions made in each of the major research areas by giving a brief synopsis of the more significant experiments and an extensive list of the publications that were produced. We have also endeavored to show how these results impacted the existing body of knowledge, where they have spawned new fields, and if appropriate, where the knowledge they produced has been applied.

  7. Latest Double Chooz results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasserre, Thierry; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    I report the latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the θ13 neutrino mixing angle. Two detectors are located at distances of 400 m and 1050 m from the reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power station (France) to measure the disappearance of electron antineutrinos. The far detector has been taking data since 2011, accumulating a live time of 467.90 days (66.5 GW-ton-year). In this article we focus on the latest measurement using neutrino-induced neutron capture on hydrogen. A new analysis improved the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties, leading to sin2 2θ 13 = 0.095+0.039 -0.038. When combined with the Gadolinium-based analysis this leads to sin2 2θ13 = 0.088+0.33 -0.033. The distortion from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is confirmed. The near detector started data taking in 2014 and first results shall be reported in 2016.

  8. AMT experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Pinck, Deborah S.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) Mobile Terminal (AMT) experiments have provided a terminal technology testbed for the evaluation of K- and Ka-band mobile satellite communications (satcom). Such a system could prove to be highly beneficial for many different commercial and government mobile satcom users. Combining ACTS' highly concentrated spotbeams with the smaller, higher-gain Ka-band antenna technology, results in a system design that can support a much higher throughput capacity than today's commercial configurations. To date, experiments in such diverse areas as emergency medical applications, enhanced Personal Communication Services (PCS), disaster recovery assistance, military applications, and general voice and data services have already been evaluated. Other applications that will be evaluated over the next year include telemedicine, ISDN, and television network return feed. Baseline AMT performance results will be presented, including Bit Error Rate (BER) curves and mobile propagation data characterizing the K- and Ka-band mobile satcom channel. In addition, observations from many of the application-specific experiments will also be provided.

  9. Unfavourable results in pollicisation

    PubMed Central

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Nehete, Sushil; Garude, Kirti; Mehta, Rujuta

    2013-01-01

    Pollicisation of the index finger is perhaps one of the most complex and most rewarding operations in hand and plastic surgery. It however has a steep learning curve and demands very high skill levels and experience. There are multiple pitfalls and each can result in an unfavourable result. In essence we need to: Shorten the Index, recreate the carpo metacarpal joint from the metacarpo phalangeal (MP) joint, rotate the digit by about 120° for pulp to pulp pinch, palmarly abduct by 40-50° to get a new first web gap, Shorten and readjust the tension of the extensors, re attach the intrinsics to form a thenar eminence capable of positioning the new thumb in various functional positions and finally close the flaps forming a new skin envelope. The author has performed over 75 pollicisations personally and has personal experience of some of the issues raised there. The steps mentioned therefore are an algorithm for helping the uninitiated into these choppy waters. PMID:24501467

  10. Archeomagnetic Results From Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, A.; Gomez-Paccard, M.; Lanos, P.; Osete, M.; McIntosh, G.; Thiriot, J.

    2007-05-01

    A first secular variation (SV) curve for the Iberian Peninsula was computed by hierarchical Bayesian method using a total of 134 archaeomagnetic directions with ages ranging from 775 BC to 1959 A.D. A general agreement is observed between the Iberian curve and the French and German SV curves, excepted between the 11th and 14th centuries. The analysis of these three reference curves indicates that SV in western Europe is characterized by three major directional changes at 125, 200, and 1350 A.D. It is suggested that these cusps are regional features of the geomagnetic field. Archeointensity studies were also conducted on 24 Spanish archeomagnetic sites (220 AD to 1959 AD). Intensity data were obtained using the original Thellier method with anisotropy and cooling rates corrections. Our new 24 data, together with 62 previously published results, were used to recover, by Bayesian modelling, the geomagnetic field intensity evolution over the past two millennia for western Europe. Our results indicate that the geomagnetic intensity remains more or less constant between the 1st and 4th centuries, and between the 13th and 15th centuries, whereas an important decrease occurs during the last 5 centuries. The evolution of the Earth's magnetic field intensity during High Middle Ages remains uncertain. The available geomagnetic global models predict reasonably well our data.

  11. GOSAT TANSO operation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Masakatsu; Kuze, Akiihiko; Suto, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Kei

    2010-05-01

    The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) observes carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) globally from space. It was launched on January 23, 2009 from Tanegashima Space Center. Since February 7, 2009, the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI) have been continuously operated. They acquire global data every three days. For the first six months after the launch, on-orbit function, performance, calibration, and validation have been checked-out. The brief summary of instrument design, pre-launch test results, observation plan (grid and sun glint observation and special target mode), onboard calibration schemes, and the initial on-orbit results of radiometric, geometric and spectroscopic performances are presented. TANSO-FTS Level 1A and 1B data processing algorithm and its updates on the ground are also presented. In addition we will show recent on orbit instrument status such as pointing accuracy, interferogram quality, and radiometric accuracy.

  12. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  13. Results from TOTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eggert, Karsten

    2013-06-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the CERN LHC is focussed on the measurement of the elastic proton-proton scattering, the total pp cross-section, and all kinds of diffractive phenomena. Detectors housed in "Roman Pots" which can be moved close to the outgoing proton beams allow to trigger on elastic and diffractive protons and to determine their parameters like the momentum loss and the transverse momentum transfer. In addition, charged particle detectors in the forward regions detect almost all inelastic events. Together with the CMS detector, a large solid angle is covered enabling precise studies of Min. Bias as well as Single Diffractive and Double Pomeron Interactions. The results will considerably help the interpretation of the Cosmic Ray Showers at highest energies and will give insight into the proton structure and the QCD theory of strong interactions. TOTEM measured the elastic pp- scattering over a large range of t (the squared momentum transfer) from 10-3 - 4 GeV2. Noneof the considered models could yield a satisfactory fit over the complete range. However, the exponential slope at low |t|-values and the position of the diffractiveminimum are well within the extrapolation from lower energies. The total pp cross-section has been determined in different ways from the extrapolation of the elasticscattering to t=0 (optical point) and the inelastic rate: (i) From the elastic scattering using the optical theorem and the CMS, (ii) luminosity independently, usingthe inelastic rate, elastic scattering and the optical theorem, (iii)ρ independently, by using elastic scattering, inelastic rate and the CMS luminosity. The results for the total crosssection obtained from the different methods are in excellent agreement with each other. First studies of the data on diffractive phenomena havebeen performed by correlating the momentum loss of the forward protons with the topology of the particle flux. The data look very promising and further studies will follow. Since the

  14. Recent Results from Phobos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Edmundo; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.

    2007-02-01

    The PHOBOS detector is one of four heavy ion experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this paper we will review some of the results of PHOBOS from the data collected in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies up to 200 GeV. Evidence is found of the formation of a very high energy density and highly interactive system, which can not be described in terms of hadrons, and has a relatively low baryon density. There is evidence that the system formed is thermalized to a certain degree. Scaling with the number of participants and extended longitudinal scaling behavior are also observed in distributions of produced charged particles.

  15. 2012 election results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Robert; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2012-10-01

    On 4 October 2012, AGU members completed voting for the 2013-2014 leadership term. Union officers, Board members, section and focus group officers, and student and early career representatives to the Council were elected. All members who joined or renewed their membership by 1 July 2012 were eligible to vote in this year's leadership election. The vote was held electronically, and access to voting was provided to all eligible voters for a period of 31 days. The voting was conducted by Survey and Ballot Systems, Inc. (SBS). SBS, which offers election planning and management services, provided unique login credentials and other support services for eligible voters throughout the election. Voting results were certified by SBS on 8 October and by the AGU Tellers Committee on 9 October. The overall participation rate was 21.9%, an increase over previous AGU elections.

  16. Top physics: CDF results

    SciTech Connect

    K. Bloom

    2004-06-23

    The top quark plays an important role in the grand scheme of particle physics, and is also interesting on its own merits. We present recent results from CDF on top-quark physics based on 100-200 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data. We have measured the t{bar t} cross section in different decay modes using several different techniques, and are beginning our studies of top-quark properties. New analyses for this conference include a measurement of {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} in the lepton-plus-jets channel using a neural net to distinguish signal and background events, and measurements of top-quark branching fractions.

  17. [Vitrification: Principles and results].

    PubMed

    Griveau, J F; Lopes, M; Jouve, G; Veau, S; Ravel, C; Morcel, K

    2015-06-01

    Sperm and embryos cryopreservation is a commonly applied technique for several years. Recently authorized in France, vitrification tends to replace gradually the conventional technique of slow freezing, so upsetting the practices in the management of patients. It allows from now on the cryopreservation of oocytes and opens new perspectives in egg donation either still in fertility preservation. This review thus attempted to examine the contribution of vitrification in the freezing of oocytes and human embryos at various stages of development. If obviously vitrification appears as the current method of choice for the cryopreservation of oocytes as well as blastocysts, the results are less cut as regards embryos to early stages. No increase in adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes in children conceived from vitrified oocytes or embryos is noted in the literature. PMID:25869444

  18. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  19. Overview of HERMES results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hulse, Charlotte

    2016-03-01

    The HERMES experiment has collected a wealth of deep-inelastic scattering data using the 27.6 GeV polarized lepton beam at HERA and various pure gas targets, both unpolarized and polarized. This allowed for a series of diverse and unique measurements. Among them are measurements that provide information on the threedimensional structure of the nucleon, both in momentum space and in position space. Results of measurements of exclusive ω production on an unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon target, sensitive to the distribution in transverse-position and longitudinalmomentum space, are discussed as well as the three-dimensional extraction of azimuthal asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, sensitive to twist-2 and twist-3 distributions in three-dimensional momentum space.

  20. Fish community results

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Scott, E.M. Jr.; Brown, A.M.

    1991-05-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) operates 9 reservoirs on the Tennessee River and 37 reservoirs on its tributaries. TVA is committed to maintaining the health of aquatic resources created when the reservoir system was built. To that end, TVA in cooperation with Valley states, operates a water resource monitoring program that includes physical, chemical, and biological data collection components. Biological monitoring will target the following selected elements within three zones of the reservoir (inflow, transition, and forebay): Sediment/Water-column Acute Toxicity Screening, Benthic macroinvertebrates, and Fish. Reservoir fisheries monitoring is divided into the following activities: Fish Biomass, Fish Tissue Contamination, Fish Community Monitoring, and Fish Health Assessment. This report presents the results of fish community monitoring and fish health assessments.

  1. System results from FRECOPA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durin, Christian; Berthoud, Lucinda; Mandeville, Jean-Claude

    1995-01-01

    The work carried out over the past three years on FRECOPA and the LDEF has enabled a large quantity of information to be collected, part of which has already been exploited. As far as CNES is concerned, the major spin-offs of this mission mainly focus on the orbital environment and the behavior of materials in such an environment. With respect to the environment, the authors shall develop the lessons learned from expert appraisals on impacts by microparticles, which are the main feature observed in this area. As for the materials, the results show a variety of behavior when subjected to the space environment and even now constitute a wealth of information for the designing and validation of future mechanical systems. Apart from these direct spin-offs, there are repercussions on in-flight and ground testing, the calibration of test benches and improvements to simulation models.

  2. Recent results from ANTARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trovato, Agata

    2015-08-01

    Operating 40 km off the coast of France since 2007, the ANTARES detector is the largest deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere with an instrumented volume of more than 0.01 cubic kilometers. It consists of an array of 885 photomultipliers detecting the Cherenkov light induced by charged leptons produced by neutrino interactions in and around the detector. The primary goal of ANTARES is to search for astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV-PeV range. This comprises generic searches for any diffuse cosmic neutrino flux as well as more specific searches for astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The search program also includes multi-messenger analyses based on time and/or space coincidences with other cosmic probes. The ANTARES observatory is sensitive to a wide-range of other phenomena, from atmospheric neutrino oscillations to dark matter annihilation. In this contribution, recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope will be presented.

  3. FIRE Science Results 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, David S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) is a U.S. cloud-radiation research program formed in 1984 to increase the basic understanding of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems, to develop realistic parameterizations for these systems, and to validate and improve ISCCP cloud product retrievals. Presentations of results culminating the first 5 years of FIRE research activities were highlighted. The 1986 Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO), the 1987 Marine Stratocumulus IFO, the Extended Time Observations (ETO), and modeling activities are described. Collaborative efforts involving the comparison of multiple data sets, incorporation of data measurements into modeling activities, validation of ISCCP cloud parameters, and development of parameterization schemes for General Circulation Models (GCMs) are described.

  4. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; LSND Collaboration

    1997-11-01

    The LSND experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations using {anti v}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest. The {anti v}{sub e} are detected via the reaction {anti v}{sub e} p {yields} e{sup +}n, correlated with the 2.2 MeV {gamma} from n p {yields} d {gamma}. The use of tight cuts to identify e{sup +} events with correlated {gamma} rays yielded 22 events with e{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}. A {chi}{sup 2} fit to the entire e{sup +} sample results in a total excess of 51.8{sub {minus}16.9}{sup +18.7} {+-} 8.0 events with e{sup +} energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05%.

  5. NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subhash, Saini; Bailey, David H.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) were developed in 1991 at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a pencil and paper fashion i.e. the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. In this paper, we present new NPB performance results for the following systems: (a) Parallel-Vector Processors: Cray C90, Cray T'90 and Fujitsu VPP500; (b) Highly Parallel Processors: Cray T3D, IBM SP2 and IBM SP-TN2 (Thin Nodes 2); (c) Symmetric Multiprocessing Processors: Convex Exemplar SPP1000, Cray J90, DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/300, and SGI Power Challenge XL. We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks. We also mention NAS future plans of NPB.

  6. Simpler images, better results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  7. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  8. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, D. T.; Alice Tpc Collaboration

    2010-05-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90 m3 Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  9. ESR teleradiology survey: results.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    With recent developments of teleradiology technology and services, it has become necessary to better evaluate its extent and use among different countries in Europe. With this goal in mind, the ESR launched two specific surveys intended to gather the current state of adoption and implementation of teleradiology in clinical practice. A special focus on differentiating between insourcing teleradiology services among partners of the same organisation and outsourcing to external services was an essential part of the design of these surveys. The first survey was addressed to 44 national societies of different countries in Europe, while the second survey was intended for all practicing radiologist ESR members. While the results of these surveys reported here may provide a wealth of information to better understand the trends in adoption of teleradiology in Europe, they only represent a snapshot at a certain point in time. The rapid development of telecommunication tools as well as a fundamental change in practice and healthcare economics will certainly influence these observations in the upcoming years. These data, however, will provide objective and relevant parameters for supporting the efforts of experts and policy makers in promoting appropriate criteria and guidelines for adequate use of teleradiology in clinical practice. Main Messages • Understand concepts and challenges of teleradiology • Provide insight into current trends and solutions for teleradiology • Compare differences in teleradiolgy strategies between countries in Europe • Establish a reference on statistical data of usage of teleradiology in Europe. PMID:27188379

  10. Results from hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pondrom, L.G. )

    1990-12-14

    The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. CTF Challenge: Result Summary

    PubMed Central

    Marabini, Roberto; Carragher, Bridget; Chen, Shaoxia; Chen, James; Cheng, Anchi; Downing, Kenneth H.; Frank, Joachim; Grassucci, Robert A.; Heymann, J. Bernard; Jiang, Wen; Jonic, Slavica; Liao, Hstau Y.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Patwari, Shail; Piotrowski, Angela L.; Quintana, Adrian; Sorzano, Carlos O.S.; Stahlberg, Henning; Vargas, Javier; Voss, Neil R.; Chiu, Wah; Carazo, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Image formation in bright field electron microscopy can be described with the help of the contrast transfer function (CTF). In this work the authors describe the “CTF Estimation Challenge”, called by the Madrid Instruct Image Processing Center (I2PC) in collaboration with the National Center for Macromolecular Imaging (NCMI) at Houston. Correcting for the effects of the CTF requires accurate knowledge of the CTF parameters, but these have often been difficult to determine. In this challenge, researchers have had the opportunity to test their ability in estimating some of the key parameters of the electron microscope CTF on a large micrograph data set produced by well-known laboratories on a wide set of experimental conditions. This work presents the first analysis of the results of the CTF Estimation Challenge, including an assessment of the performance of the different software packages under different conditions, so as to identify those areas of research where further developments would be desirable in order to achieve high-resolution structural information. PMID:25913484

  12. ALOS-2 initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  13. SAA drift: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  14. Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.

    2011-06-07

    The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

  15. Overview of MAST results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; Wyk, L. V.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved

  16. Staphylococcal LTA-Induced miR-143 Inhibits Propionibacterium acnes-Mediated Inflammatory Response in Skin.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiaoli; Li, Zhiheng; Liu, Kewei; Wu, Yelin; Jiang, Deming; Lai, Yuping

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis) plays a critical role in modulating cutaneous inflammatory responses in skin. Although S. epidermidis has been shown to co-colonize with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in acne lesions, it is unclear whether S. epidermidis is involved in the regulation of P. acnes-induced inflammatory responses. In this study, we demonstrated that S. epidermidis inhibited P. acnes-induced inflammation in skin. P. acnes induced the expression of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α via the activation of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 in both keratinocytes and mouse ears. Staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid activated TLR2 to induce miR-143 in keratinocytes, and miR-143, in turn, directly targeted 3' UTR of TLR2 to decrease the stability of TLR2 mRNA and then decreased TLR2 protein, thus inhibiting P. acnes-induced proinflammatory cytokines. The inhibitory effect of miR-143 was further confirmed in vivo as the administration of miR-143 antagomir into mouse ears abrogated the inhibitory effect of lipoteichoic acid on P. acnes-induced inflammation in skin. Taken together, these observations demonstrate that staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid inhibits P. acnes-induced inflammation via the induction of miR-143, and suggest that local modulation of inflammatory responses by S. epidermidis at the site of acne vulgaris might be a beneficial therapeutic strategy for management of P. acnes-induced inflammation. PMID:26739093

  17. In ovo delivery of Toll-like receptor 2 ligand, lipoteichoic acid induces pro-inflammatory mediators reducing post-hatch infectious laryngotracheitis virus infection.

    PubMed

    Thapa, S; Nagy, E; Abdul-Careem, M F

    2015-04-15

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands are pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognized by the TLRs resulting in induction of host innate immune responses. One of the PAMPs that binds to TLR2 and cluster of differentiation (CD) 14 is lipotechoic acid (LTA), which activates downstream signals culminating in the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether in ovo LTA delivery leads to the induction of antiviral responses against post-hatch infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV) infection. We first delivered the LTA into embryo day (ED)18 eggs via in ovo route so that the compound is available at the respiratory mucosa. Then the LTA treated and control ED18 eggs were allowed to hatch and the hatched chicken was infected with ILTV intratracheally on the day of hatch. We found that in ovo delivered LTA reduces ILTV infection post-hatch. We also found that in ovo delivery of LTA significantly increases mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in pre-hatch embryo lungs as well as mononuclear cell infiltration, predominantly macrophages, in lung of post-hatch chickens. Altogether, the data suggest that in ovo delivered LTA could be used to reduce ILTV infection in newly hatched chickens. PMID:25764942

  18. Lactobacillus sakei lipoteichoic acid inhibits MMP-1 induced by UVA in normal dermal fibroblasts of human.

    PubMed

    You, Ga-Eun; Jung, Bong-Jun; Kim, Hye-Rim; Kim, Han-Geun; Kim, Tae-Rahk; Chung, Dae-Kyun

    2013-10-28

    Human skin is continuously exposed to ultraviolet (UV)-induced photoaging. UVA increases the activity of MMP-1 in dermal fibroblasts through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), p38, signaling. The irradiation of keratinocytes by UVA results in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and the stimulation of MMP-1 in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs). Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a component of the cell wall of gram-positive Lactobacillus spp. of bacteria. LTA is well known as an anti-inflammation molecule. LTA of the bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum has an anti-photoaging effect, but the potential anti-photoaging effect of the other bacteria has not been examined to date. The current study showed that L. sakei LTA (sLTA) has an immune modulating effect in human monocyte cells. Our object was whether inhibitory effects of sLTA on MMP-1 are caused from reducing the MAPK signal in NHDFs. It inhibits MMP-1 and MAPK signaling induced by UVA in NHDFs. We also confirmed effects of sLTA suppressing TNF-α inducing MMP-1 in NHDFs. PMID:23851272

  19. Ability of Lactobacillus plantarum lipoteichoic acid to inhibit Vibrio anguillarum-induced inflammation and apoptosis in silvery pomfret (Pampus argenteus) intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Quanxin; Gao, Qian; Min, Minghua; Zhang, Chenjie; Peng, Shiming; Shi, Zhaohong

    2016-07-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is a major constituent of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria. The structure and immunomodulation of LTA vary greatly between different species. LTA from Lactobacillus plantarum has been shown to exert anti-pathogenic effects. Vibrio anguillarum is a major causative agent of vibriosis, one of the most prevalent fish diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of L. plantarum LTA on V. anguillarum growth, adhesion, and induced inflammation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells of silvery pomfret (Pampus argenteus). Our results showed that L. plantarum LTA was unable to inhibit V. anguillarum growth; however, it significantly inhibited adhesion of V. anguillarum. It also showed significant inhibitory effects on EHEC-induced inflammation and apoptosis by modulating the expression of NF-κB (nuclear factor kappa B), IκB (inhibitor of NF-κB), Bcl2 (B-cell leukemia/lymphoma-2), BAX (Bcl-2-associated X protein), IL-8 (interleukin 8) and TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α), and via inhibition of caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. These data extend our understanding of the beneficial effects of L. plantarum LTA, which is related to the inhibition of V. anguillarum, and suggest that L. plantarum LTA has potential as a new therapeutic agent against V. anguillarum-caused vibriosis in fish. PMID:27179425

  20. Preliminary Results from the iMUSH Active Source Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, Alan; Kiser, Eric; Palomeras, Imma; Zelt, Colin; Schmandt, Brandon; Hansen, Steve; Harder, Steven; Creagar, Kenneth; Vidale, John; Abers, Geoffrey

    2015-04-01

    iMUSH (imaging Magma Under Saint Helens) is a US NSF sponsored multi-disciplinary investigation of Mount Saint Helens (MSH), currently the most active volcano in the Cascades arc in the northwestern United States. The project consists of active and passive seismic experiments, extensive magnetotelluric sounding, and geological/geochemical studies involving scientists at 7 institutions in the U.S. and Europe. The long-term goal of the seismic project is to combine analysis of the active source data with that of data from the 70 element broadband seismograph operating from summer 2014 until 2016. Combining seismic and MT analyses with other data, we hope to image the MSH volcanic plumbing system from the surface to the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Here we describe preliminary results of the iMUSH active source seismic experiment, conducted in July and August 2014. The active source experiment consisted of twenty-three 454 or 908 kg weight shots recorded by ~3500 seismographs deployed at ~6,000 locations. Of these instruments, ~900 Nodal Seismic instruments were deployed continuously for two weeks in an areal array within 10 km of the MSH summit. 2,500 PASSCAL Texan instruments were deployed twice for five days in 3 areal arrays and 2 dense orthogonal linear arrays that extended from MSH to distances > 80 km. Overall the data quality from the shots is excellent. The seismograph arrays also recorded dozens of micro-earthquakes beneath the MSH summit and along the MSH seismic zone, and numerous other local and regional earthquakes. In addition, at least one low frequency event beneath MSH was recorded during the experiment. At this point we have begun various types of analysis of the data set: We have determined an average 1D Vp structure from stacking short-term/long-term average ratios, we have determined the 2-D Vp structure from ray-trace inversions along the two orthogonal profiles (in the NW-SE and NE-SW directions), and we have made low-fold CMP stacks of the

  1. Comparison of laser transit anemometry data analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Gartrell, Luther R.

    1991-01-01

    Two techniques for the extraction of two-dimensional flow information from laser transit anemometry (LTA) data sets are presented and compared via a simulation study and experimental investigation. The methods are a probability density function (PDF) estimation technique and a marginal distribution analysis technique. The simulation study builds on the results of previous work and provides a quantification of the accuracy of both techniques for various LTA data acquisition scenarios. The experimental comparison consists of using an LTA system to survey the flow downstream of a turbulence generator in a small low-speed wind tunnel. The collected data sets are analyzed and compared.

  2. Role of leukotriene A4 hydrolase aminopeptidase in the pathogenesis of emphysema1

    PubMed Central

    Paige, Mikell; Wang, Kan; Burdick, Marie; Park, Sunhye; Cha, Josiah; Jeffrey, Erin; Sherman, Nicholas; Shim, Y. Michael

    2014-01-01

    The leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H) is a bi-functional enzyme with an epoxy hydrolase and aminopeptidase activities. We hypothesize that the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity alleviates neutrophilic inflammation, which contributes to cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema by clearing Proline-Glycine-Proline (PGP), a tri-amino acid chemokine known to induce chemotaxis of neutrophils. To investigate the biological contributions made by the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity in CS-induced emphysema, we exposed wild type mice to CS over five months while treating them with a vehicle or a pharmaceutical agent (4MDM) that selectively augments the LTA4H aminopeptidase without affecting the bio-production of leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Emphysematous phenotypes were assessed by pre mortem lung physiology with a small animal ventilator and by postmortem histologic morphometry. CS exposure acidified the airspaces and induced localization of the LTA4H protein into the nuclei of the epithelial cells. This resulted in accumulation of PGP in the airspaces by suppressing the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity. When the LTA4H aminopeptidase activity was selectively augmented by 4MDM, the levels of PGP in the BALF and infiltration of neutrophils into the lungs were significant reduced without affecting the levels of LTB4. This protected murine lungs from CS-induced emphysematous alveolar remodeling. In conclusion, CS exposure promotes the development of CS-induced emphysema by suppressing the enzymatic activities of the LTA4H aminopeptidase in lung tissues and accumulating PGP and neutrophils in the airspaces. However, restoring the LTA4 aminopeptidase activity with a pharmaceutical agent protected murine lungs from developing CS-induced emphysema. PMID:24771855

  3. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M. PMID:25840438

  4. Development of Commercial-Length Nuclear Fuel Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, Larry J; Spellman, Donald J; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Chesser, Joel B; Morris, Robert Noel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Fissile Materials Disposition Program is pursuing disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium by reactor irradiation as the fissile constituent of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. Lead test assemblies (LTAs) have been irradiated for approximately 36 months in Duke Energy s Catawba-1 nuclear power plant. Per the MOX fuel qualification plan, destructive post-irradiation examinations (PIEs) are to be performed on second-cycle rods (irradiated to an average burnup of approximately 42 GWd/MTHM). These LTA bundles are planned to be returned to the reactor and further irradiated to approximately 52 GWd/MTHM. Nondestructive and destructive PIEs of these commercially irradiated weapons-derived MOX fuel rods will be conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL). PIE began in early 2009. In order to support the examination of the irradiated full-length (~3.66 m) MOX fuel rods, ORNL in 2004 began to develop the necessary infrastructure and equipment for the needed full-scope PIE capabilities. The preparations included modifying the IFEL building to handle a commercial spent-fuel shipping cask; procurement of cask-handling equipment and a skid to move the cask inside the building; development of in-cell handling equipment for cask unloading; and design, fabrication, and testing of the automated, state-of-the-art PIE examination equipment. This paper describes these activities and the full-scope PIE capabilities available at ORNL for commercial full-length fuel rods.

  5. Channel Bow in Boiling Water Reactors - Hot Cell Examination Results and Correlation to Measured Bow

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, S.T.; Lin, Y.P.; Dubecky, M.A.; Mader, E.V.

    2007-07-01

    An increase in frequency of fuel channel-control blade interference has been observed in Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) in recent years. Many of the channels leading to interference were found to bow towards the control blade in a manner that was inconsistent with the expected bow due to other effects. The pattern of bow appeared to indicate a new channel bow mechanism that differed from the predominant bow mechanism caused by differential growth due to fast-fluence gradients. In order to investigate this new type of channel bow, coupons from several channels with varying degrees of bow were returned to the GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center (VNC) for Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE). This paper describes the characteristics of channel corrosion and hydrogen pickup observed, and relates the observations to the channel exposure level, control history, and measured channel bow. The channels selected for PIE had exposures in the range of 36-48 GWd/MTU and covered a wide range of measured bow. The coupons were obtained at 4 elevations from opposing channel sides adjacent and away from the control blade. The PIE performed on these coupons included visual examination, metallography, and hydrogen concentration measurements. A new mechanism of control-blade shadow corrosion-induced channel bow was found to correlate with differences in the extent of corrosion and corresponding differences in the hydrogen concentration between opposite sides of the channels. The increased corrosion on the control blade sides was found to be dependent on the level of control early in the life of the channel. The contributions of other potential factors leading to increased channel bow and channel-control blade interference are also discussed in this paper. (authors)

  6. Fuel and fission product behaviour in early phases of a severe accident. Part II: Interpretation of the experimental results of the PHEBUS FPT2 test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubourg, R.; Barrachin, M.; Ducher, R.; Gavillet, D.; De Bremaecker, A.

    2014-10-01

    One objective of the FPT2 test of the PHEBUS FP Program was to study the degradation of an irradiated UO2 fuel bundle and the fission product behaviour under conditions of low steam flow. The results of the post-irradiation examinations (PIE) at the upper levels (823 mm and 900 mm) of the test section previously reported are interpreted in the present paper. Solid state interactions between fuel and cladding have been compared with the characteristics of interaction identified in the previous separate-effect tests. Corium resulting from the interaction between fuel and cladding was formed. The uranium concentration in the corium is compared to analytical tests and a scenario for the corium formation is proposed. The analysis showed that, despite the rather low fuel burn up, the conditions of temperature and oxygen potential reached during the starvation phase are able to give an early very significant release fraction of caesium. A significant part (but not all) of the molybdenum was segregated at grain boundaries and trapped in metallic inclusions from which they were totally removed in the final part of the experiment. During the steam starvation phase, the conditions of oxygen potential were favourable for the formation of simple Ba and BaO chemical forms but the temperature was too low to provoke their volatility. This is one important difference with out-of-pile experiments such as VERCORS for which only a combination of high temperature and low oxygen potential induced a significant barium release. Finally another significant difference with analytical out-of-pile experiments comes from the formation of foamy zones due to the fission gas presence in FPT2-type experiments which give an additional possibility for the formation of stable fission product compounds.

  7. RESULTATIVE VERBS AND OTHER PROBLEMS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HASHIMOTO, ANNE YUE

    THE SO-CALLED RESULTATIVE VERBS IN MANDARIN CHINESE ARE STUDIED WITHIN THE GENERAL FRAMEWORK OF A TRANSFORMATIONAL GRAMMAR. THE RESULTATIVE VERBS ARE GENERALLY CONSIDERED AS CONSISTING OF TWO COMPONENTS--A VERBAL COMPONENT FOLLOWED BY A RESULTATIVE OR DIRECTIONAL COMPLEMENT. OTHER PROBLEMS RELATED TO COMPLEMENTS ARE ALSO TOUCHED UPON, FOR EXAMPLE,…

  8. Paradoxical Results and Item Bundles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hooker, Finkelman, and Schwartzman ("Psychometrika," 2009, in press) defined a paradoxical result as the attainment of a higher test score by changing answers from correct to incorrect and demonstrated that such results are unavoidable for maximum likelihood estimates in multidimensional item response theory. The potential for these results to…

  9. Kinetic energy density dependent approximations to the exchange energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1999-07-01

    Two nonempirical kinetic energy density dependent approximations are introduced. First, the local τ approximation (LTA) is proposed in which the exchange energy Ex depends only on a kinetic energy density τ. This LTA scheme appears to be complementary to the local spin density (LSD) approximation in the sense that its exchange contribution to the atomization energy ΔEx=Exatoms-Exmolecule is fairly accurate for systems where LSD fails. On the other hand, in cases where LSD works well LTA results for ΔEx are worse. Secondly, the τPBE approximation to Ex is developed which combines some of the advantages of LTA and of the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange functional. Like the PBE exchange functional, τPBE is free of empirical parameters. Furthermore, it yields improved atomization energies compared to the PBE approximation.

  10. The cytotoxic activity of Bacillus anthracis lethal factor is inhibited by leukotriene A4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Menard, A; Papini, E; Mock, M; Montecucco, C

    1996-01-01

    The lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis is central to the pathogenesis of anthrax. Its mechanism of action is still unknown. Recently, on the basis of sequence similarities, we suggested that lethal factor might act similarly to leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4), a bifunctional enzyme also endowed with a metallopeptidase activity. Here we show that some inhibitors of the LTA4 hydrolase and metallopeptidase activities of LTA4 hydrolase also affect the cytotoxicity of the anthrax lethal factor on macrophage cell lines, without interfering with the ability of the lethal factor to enter cells. These results support the proposal that anthrax lethal factor might display in the cytosol of intoxicated cells a peptidase activity similar to that of LTA4 hydrolase. PMID:8973585

  11. Aesthetic rhinoplasty: Avoiding unfavourable results.

    PubMed

    Bhangoo, Kulwant S

    2013-05-01

    Rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in plastic surgery. It is not surprising that a significant number of patients end up with unfavourable outcomes. Many of these unfavourable outcomes could be the result of poor judgment and wrong decision making. Most frequently, the unfavourable outcome is the result of errors in surgical technique. In this paper, unfavourable outcomes resulting from errors in surgical technique are discussed under the heading of each operative step. Poor placement of intra-nasal incision can result in internal valve obstruction. Bad columellar scars can result from errors during open rhinoplasty. Unfavourable results associated with skeletonisation are mentioned. Tip plasty, being the most difficult part of rhinoplasty, can result in lack of tip projection, asymmetry and deformities associated with placement of tip grafts. Over-resection of the lower lateral cartilages during tip plasty can also result in pinched nose, alar collapse causing external valve obstruction and other alar rim deformities. Humpectomy can result in open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and over-resection resulting in saddle nose. The so-called poly beak deformity is also a preventable unfavourable outcome when dealing with a large dorsal hump. Complications resulting from osteotomies include narrowing of nasal airway, open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and asymmetry of the bony wall resulting from incomplete or green stick fractures. Judicious use of grafts can be very rewarding. By the same token, grafts also carry with them the risk of complications. Allografts can result in recurrent infection, atrophy of the overlying skin and extrusion resulting in crippling deformities. Autografts are recommended by the author. Unfavourable results from autografts include displacement of graft, visibility of the graft edges, asymmetry, warping, and resorption. PMID:24501471

  12. Misleading biochemical laboratory test results

    PubMed Central

    Nanji, Amin A.

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the general and specific factors that interfere with the performance of common biochemical laboratory tests and the interpretation of their results. The clinical status of the patient, drug interactions, and in-vivo and in-vitro biochemical interactions and changes may alter the results obtained from biochemical analysis of blood constituents. Failure to recognize invalid laboratory test results may lead to injudicious and dangerous management of patients. PMID:6375845

  13. Top physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  14. Measurement Services Association Questionnaire Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Lewis J.; Gillis, Rod

    This paper presents the results of a questionnaire sent to 211 Measurement Services Association members. Sixty-four centers responded. The main purpose of the questionnaire was to find out what hardware and software are used by testing centers throughout the country. Results indicate that 52 institutions use mainframe computers, 50 use…

  15. Site Testing Results and Automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Michael M.; Storey, John W.; Burton, Michael G.

    NOTE: this is highly preliminary just to get the abstract in by the deadline! - brief summary of the AASTO program - key points from the site testing results at South Pole - very brief introduction to ICECAM and the AASTINO - key results from ICECAM and the AASTINO instruments - next year's instrument plans at South Pole and Dome C including a brief mention of Doug Caldwell's experiment

  16. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  17. FORWARD PHYSICS AND BRAHMS RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    DEBBE, R.

    2005-02-03

    We report here the BRAHMS measurements of particle production in d+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC. The results presented here are compared to previous p+A measurements at lower energies in fixed target mode. Some preliminary results on abundances of identified particles at high rapidity are also presented.

  18. MER ARA pyroshock test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Kurng Y.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the shock test results achieved in the MER ARA/brush motor pyroshock qualification. The results of MER flight system pyrofiring tests in comparison with the ARA shock test requirements are discussed herein. Alternate test methods were developed in an effort to qualify the critical MER equipment for adequate performance in the actual flight pyroshock condition.

  19. [The "incorrect" laboratory result. II: Common misinterpretations of laboratory results].

    PubMed

    Thiery, J; Fiedler, G M

    2004-04-01

    In the second part of our review the most frequent misinterpretations of laboratory results in the daily clinical practise are discussed. Special attention has been given to frequent misinterpretations in the analysis of electrolytes, enzymes and hormones in plasma/serum (pseudohyperkalemia, macroenzymes, macroprolactinemia). Misinterpretations of the testing of blood gases, serum glucose, lipid concentrations, and calcium are described in greater detail. In addition, potential errors in the urinanalysis and the importance of adequate sampling of blood specimens for coagulation testing are described. The hematological results can be misinterpreted in the presence of EDTA-induced pseudothrombocytenia and of irregular immunoglobulines. Immunological methods themselves can lead to misinterpretations of the laboratory result, e. g. caused by the high dose hook effect and interferences in the presence of rheumatoid factor or HAMA. Finally clinical relevant errors in the therapeutic drug monitoring are discussed which are associated with the limited specificity of the antibodies in the commonly used immunological tests. PMID:15151138

  20. Growth, molecular structure, NBO analysis and vibrational spectral analysis of l-tartaric acid single crystal.

    PubMed

    Sasikala, V; Sajan, D; Vijayan, N; Chaitanya, K; Babu Raj, M S; Selin Joy, B H

    2014-04-01

    Single crystal of l-tartaric acid (LTA) has been grown by slow evaporation technique. The experimental and theoretical studies on molecular structure, vibrational spectra, electronic absorption spectra and non-linear optical property of the crystal are studied. The FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV-Vis-NIR experimental spectra of LTA crystal have been recorded in the range 400-4000cm(-1), 100-3700cm(-1) and 190-1100nm, respectively. Density functional theory calculations with B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) basis sets was used to determine ground state molecular geometries, vibrational frequencies, ICT interactions, Mulliken population analysis on atomic charge, HOMO-LUMO analysis, non-linear optical response properties and thermodynamic properties for LTA and the results were discussed. Vibrational analysis confirms the formation of intramolecular OH⋯O hydrogen bonding. The stability of the molecule has been analyzed using NBO analysis. The results of electronic absorptions in gas phase and water phase LTA were calculated using TD-DFT method. The third-order nonlinear absorption behaviour of LTA was studied using open aperture Z-scan technique, with 5ns laser pulses at 532nm and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the grown crystal was measured. The predicted NLO properties, UV absorption and Z-scan studies indicate that LTA is an attractive material for laser frequency doubling and optical limiting applications. PMID:24394529

  1. Pentaquarks: the latest experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    M. Battaglieri; R. De Vita; Valery Kubarovsky

    2006-01-01

    After the claim of the possible discovery of a pentaquark state, many experiments reported positive and negative results opening a discussion about the pentaquark existence. New experiments with high resolution and high statistics are needed in the reaction channels and for the kinematics of the positive results to solve the controversy. Jefferson Lab started a comprehensive program to search for pentaquark in photoproduction at threshold on proton and deuteron targets, collecting more than 10 times the existing statistics. The first experiment on the proton (g11) just finished to analyze the data, and the first results of the pentaquark search are reported here.

  2. Contradictory results in interferon research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports on immunologically related interferon research, both in the areas of basic science and clinical research, are briefly reviewed, and it is noted that in many cases the results obtained are contradictory. It is argued, however, that the contradictory results are not surprising since interferon is a biological response modifier and has been known to produce opposite results even when the same interferon prepartion is used. It is emphasized that dosage, timing, route, and other experimental conditions are essential factors in planning immunological studies with interferon. Careful planning of future experiments with interferon should be required to prevent the possible generation of effects that are opposite to those expected.

  3. Some recent results from ICARUS

    SciTech Connect

    Farnese, Christian

    2015-07-15

    ICARUS T600 is the largest Liquid Argon (LAr) Time Projection Chamber (TPC) ever built. Thanks to the excellent spatial and calorimetric resolutions and the three-dimensional visualization capabilities ICARUS T600 represents a major milestone towards the realization of future LAr detectors for neutrino physics and for the search of rare events. Three new important results from the analysis of the events collected by this detector will be here shortly presented: in particular the new improved results on the electron neutrino search, the results on the determination of the muon momentum using the Multiple Scattering and the new LAr purification methods and improvements of the electron lifetime.

  4. Spacelab Life Sciences 1 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seddon, Rhea

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from the experiments conducted by the first Shuttle/Spacelab mission dedicated entirely to the life sciences, the Spacelab Life Sciences 1, launched on June 5, 1991. The experiments carried out during the 9-day flight included investigations of changes in the human cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal/endocrine, blood, and vestibular systems that were brought about by microgravity. Results were also obtained from the preflight and postflight complementary experiments performed on rats, which assessed the suitability of rodents as animal models for humans. Most results verified, or expanded on, the accepted theories of adaptation to zero gravity.

  5. TCIQ: An identification by intensity and frequency of potent testing cues in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermis, William J.

    Everyone experiences some anxiety while taking an examination. High-test-anxious (HTA) and low-test-anxious (LTA) students are described by two characteristic differences: frequency and intensity of anxious responses and attentional direction to testing cues. The purposes of this study were threefold: (1) to report potent testing cues (i.e., 90% response agreement for both intensity and frequency) that were identified by HTA and LTA students; (2) to report differences between HTA and LTA students for frequencies and intensities of responses to testing cues; and (3) to report differences between HTA and LTA students of attentional direction to testing cues. A pool of 396 males and females who were enrolled in physical geology completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A random sample consisting of 93 HTA and 40 LTA subjects completed the Test Cues Identification Questionnaire (TCIQ). The TCIQ consists of 28 disruptive items and 27 helpful items. Subjects responded with both frequency and intensity ratings for all of the 55 items in the TCIQ. Results revealed that 22 items were viewed by subjects as potent testing cues. Empirical evidence obtained did not support previous theoretical reports of differences between HTA and LTA students for either frequency and intensity of anxious responses or attentional direction to the set of disruptive and helpful testing cues. Although test anxiousness did not appear to be associated with those two characteristics differences, a discriminant analysis revealed 24 items in the TCIQ which significantly, 2 (24) = 47.59, p < 0.004, separated HTA and LTA subjects responses. Apparently, HTA and LTA students differ in their responses to specific disruptive and helpful cues but not in their responses to the set of testing cues as was previously postulated.

  6. In vitro and in vivo downregulation of C3 by lipoteichoic acid isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum K8 suppressed cytokine-mediated complement system activation.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Boram; Kim, Hye Rim; Kim, Hangeun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-07-01

    Complement component 3 (C3) is one of the proteins associated with complement cascades. C3 plays an essential role in three different pathways-the alternative, classical and lectin pathways. It is well known that cytokines activate complement system and increase complement component C3 production. In the current study, we found that lipoteichoic acid isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum K8 (pLTA) inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ)-mediated C3 mRNA and protein expression in HaCaT cells. pLTA inhibited C3 expression through the inhibition of the phosphorylation of p65 and p38 in the TNF-α-treated cells, while the inhibition of STAT1/2 and JAK2 phosphorylation by pLTA contributed to the reduction of C3 in IFN-γ-treated cells. When mice were pre-injected with pLTA followed by re-injection of TNF-α, serum C3 level was decreased as compared to TNF-α-injected only. Further studies revealed that membrane attack complex (MAC) increased by TNF-α injection was lessened in pLTA-pre-injected mice. A bactericidal assay using mouse sera showed that MAC activity in pLTA-pre-injected mice was lower than in TNF-α only-injected mice. These results suggest that pLTA can suppress inflammatory cytokine-mediated complement activation through the inhibition of C3 synthesis. pLTA application has the potential to alleviate complement-mediated diseases caused by excessive inflammation. PMID:27231239

  7. Delayed circulatory failure due to the induction of nitric oxide synthase by lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed Central

    De Kimpe, S J; Hunter, M L; Bryant, C E; Thiemermann, C; Vane, J R

    1995-01-01

    1. This study investigates the effect of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus, a micro-organism without endotoxin, on haemodynamics and induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the anaesthetized rat. 2. Intravenous injection of LTA (10 mg kg-1) resulted in a decrease in blood pressure from 123 +/- 1 mmHg to 83 +/- 7 mmHg after 270 min (P < 0.001) and a reduction of the pressor response to noradrenaline (1 microgram kg-1) from 33 +/- 1 mmHg.min to 23 +/- 3 mmHg.min after 270 min (P < 0.05). 3. The delayed circulatory failure (hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity) caused by LTA was prevented by pretreatment of rats with dexamethasone (10 mg kg-1, 60 min prior to LTA) or the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, 10 mg kg-1 h-1, i.v. infusion starting 30 min prior to LTA). 4. In contrast, treatment of rats with polymyxin B (0.05 mg kg-1), an agent which binds endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS), did not affect the delayed circulatory failure caused by LTA. Polymyxin B, however, attenuated the hypotension and vascular hyporeactivity to noradrenaline afforded by endotoxaemia (2 mg kg-1 LPS, i.v.) for 270 min. 5. The delayed circulatory failure caused by LTA was associated with a time-dependent increase in (i) the expression of iNOS protein in the lung (Western blot analysis), and (ii) iNOS activity. This increase in iNOS protein and activity was prevented by pretreatment of LTA-rats with dexamethasone (10 mg kg-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 6 PMID:7542534

  8. Implications of Results from the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program on Licensing of Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    David Petti

    2001-10-01

    The high level of safety of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs is achieved by passively maintaining core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all envisioned accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude relative to other reactor types but is predicated on exceptionally high coated-particle fuel fabrication quality and excellent fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program decided to qualify for uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) TRISO coated-particle fuel in an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic modular HTGR options. By using a mixture of uranium oxide and uranium carbide, the kernel composition is engineered to minimize CO formation and fuel kernel migration, which is key to maintain to fuel integrity at the higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients anticipated in prismatic HTGRs. Fuel fabrication conducted at both laboratory and engineering scale has demonstrated the ability to fabricate high quality UCO TRISO fuel with very low defects. The first irradiation (AGR 1) exposed about 300,000 TRISO fuel particles to a peak burnup of 19.6% FIMA, a peak fast-neutron fluence of about 4.3 × 1025 n/m2, and a maximum time-averaged fuel temperature of about 1,200°C without a single particle failure. The very low release of key metallic fission products (except silver) measured in post-irradiation examination (PIE) confirms the excellent performance measured under irradiation. Very low releases have been measured in accident simulation heatup testing (''safety testing'') after hundreds of hours at 1600 and 1700°C and no particle failures (no noble gas release measured) have been observed. Even after hundreds of hours at 1800°C, the releases are still very low

  9. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts and fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release from

  10. Comparison of silver, cesium, and strontium release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collin, Blaise P.; Petti, David A.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Maki, John T.

    2015-08-22

    The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, and strontium from tristructural isotropic coated fuel particles and compacts during the first irradiation experiment (AGR-1) of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification program. The PARFUME model for the AGR-1 experiment used the fuel compact volume average temperature for each of the 620 days of irradiation to calculate the release of silver, cesium, and strontium from a representative particle for a select number of AGR-1 compacts. Post-irradiation examination measurements provided data on release of these fission products from fuel compacts andmore » fuel particles, and retention of silver in the compacts outside of the silicon carbide (SiC) layer. PARFUME-predicted fractional release of silver, cesium, and strontium was determined and compared to the PIE measurements. For silver, comparisons show a trend of over-prediction at low burnup and under-prediction at high burnup. PARFUME has limitations in the modeling of the temporal and spatial distributions of the temperature and burnup across the compacts, which affects the accuracy of its predictions. Nevertheless, the comparisons on silver release lie in the same order of magnitude. Results show an overall over-prediction of the fractional release of cesium by PARFUME. For particles with failed SiC layers, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 3, corresponding to a potential over-estimation of the diffusivity in uranium oxycarbide (UCO) by a factor of up to 250. For intact particles, whose release is much lower, the over-prediction is by a factor of up to 100, which could be attributed to an over-estimated diffusivity in SiC by about 40% on average. The release of strontium from intact particles is also over-predicted by PARFUME, which also points towards an over-estimated diffusivity of strontium in either SiC or UCO, or possibly both. The measured strontium fractional release

  11. Results of Neptunium Disposal Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    2003-10-07

    Researchers investigated the neutralization of neptunium solution from H-Canyon Tank 16.4 and the properties of the resulting slurry. This work investigated slurry properties from a single neutralization protocol and limited storage times.

  12. Interpreting Results from Multiscore Batteries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Describes the role of information on score reliabilities, significance of score differences, intercorrelations of scores, and differential validity of score patterns on the interpretation of results from multiscore batteries. (Author)

  13. Results from Neutrino Oscillations Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis

    2010-09-10

    The interpretation of the results of early solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments in terms of neutrino oscillations has been verified by several recent experiments using both, natural and man-made sources. The observations provide compelling evidence in favor of the existence of neutrino masses and mixings. These proceedings give a general description of the results from neutrino oscillation experiments, the current status of the field, and some possible future developments.

  14. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  15. Analysis of EUVE Experiment Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horan, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    A series of tests to validate an antenna pointing concept for spin-stabilized satellites using a data relay satellite are described. These tests show that proper antenna pointing on an inertially-stabilized spacecraft can lead to significant access time through the relay satellite even without active antenna pointing. We summarize the test results, the simulations to model the effects of antenna pattern and space loss, and the expected contact times. We also show how antenna beam width affects the results.

  16. New CDF results on diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  17. Lipoteichoic Acid Isolated from Weissella cibaria Increases Cytokine Production in Human Monocyte-Like THP-1 Cells and Mouse Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yi-Fan; Lee, Yoon-Doo; Park, Jae-Yeon; Kim, Seongjae; Lee, Youn-Woo; Jeon, Boram; Jagdish, Deepa; Kim, Hangeun; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2016-07-28

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have beneficial effects on intestinal health and skin diseases. Lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria, is known to induce the production of several cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 and affect the intestinal microflora, anti-aging, sepsis, and cholesterol level. In this study, Weissella cibaria was isolated from Indian dairy products, and we examined its immune-enhancing effects. Live and heatkilled W. cibaria did not induce the secretion of immune-related cytokines, whereas LTA isolated from W. cibaria (cLTA) significantly increased the secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. cLTA increased the phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappalight-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases in THP-1 cells. The secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 was also increased in the cLTA-treated mouse splenocytes. These results suggest that cLTA, but not W. cibaria whole cells, has immune-boosting potential and can be used to treat immunosuppression diseases. PMID:27012236

  18. ACTS: Technology Description and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald; Gargione, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The ACTS Project was originated at NASA Glenn Research Center in the early 1980's to sponsor the development and application of technology that was intended to be used by the private sector. The program was formulated with the underlying philosophy of maintaining US leadership in satellite communications while focusing technology development for efficient use of the frequency spectrum. This report chronicles the execution and results of the program from the perspective of its technology managers, from inception through hardware and system development to on-orbit experiments and demonstrations of the technology. The first eight sections of the report discuss programmatic background, the specific satellite and ground terminal technology and the results generated by the program including industry relevance. A federally funded program of this type attracted strong advocates and adversaries and the resulting impact on the project schedule is also discussed. The last two sections are a list of useful acronyms and extensive references.

  19. New NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Saphir, William; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Woo, Alex; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NPB2 (NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks 2) is an implementation, based on Fortran and the MPI (message passing interface) message passing standard, of the original NAS Parallel Benchmark specifications. NPB2 programs are run with little or no tuning, in contrast to NPB vendor implementations, which are highly optimized for specific architectures. NPB2 results complement, rather than replace, NPB results. Because they have not been optimized by vendors, NPB2 implementations approximate the performance a typical user can expect for a portable parallel program on distributed memory parallel computers. Together these results provide an insightful comparison of the real-world performance of high-performance computers. New NPB2 features: New implementation (CG), new workstation class problem sizes, new serial sample versions, more performance statistics.

  20. Catastrophic disruption experiments: Recent results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martelli, G.; Ryan, E. V.; Nakamura, A. M.; Giblin, I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progress in the field of catastrophic disruption experiments over the past 4 years, since the publication of the review paper by Fujiwara et al. (1989). We describe the development of new techniques to produce shattering impacts relevant to the study of the collisional evolution of the asteroids, and summarize the results from numerous experiments which have been performed to date, using a variety of materials for both the impactor and the targets. Some of these, such as ice-on-ice, loose aggregates and pressurized targets, are quite new and have provided novel and exciting results. Some of the gaps existing previously in the data on fragment ejection-angle distributions, as well as translational and rotational velocity fields (including fine fragments) have been filled, and these new results will be surveyed.

  1. New results from FRECOPA analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durin, Christian

    1993-01-01

    New results from the ongoing analysis of the FRECOPA's (FREnch COoperative PAssive payload) system hardware are discussed. FRECOPA (AO138) was one of the 57 experiments flown on the LDEF satellite. The experiment was located on the trailing edge (Tray B3) and was exposed to UV radiation (11,100 equivalent sun hours), approximately equal to 34,000 thermal cycles, higher vacuum levels than the leading edge, a low atomic oxygen flux, and minor doses of protons and electrons. Due to LDEF's extended mission (5.8 years), CNES decided to set up a team to analyze the FRECOPA system. Initial results were presented at the First Post-Retrieval Conference, June, 1991. The results obtained since then are summarized.

  2. [Submitting studies without significant results].

    PubMed

    Texier, Gaëtan; Meynard, Jean-Baptiste; Michel, Rémy; Migliani, René; Boutin, Jean-Paul

    2007-03-01

    When a study finds that no exposure factor or therapy is significantly related to a given effect, researchers legitimately wonder if the results should be submitted for publication and to what journal. Clinical trials that report significant associations have a higher probability of publication, a phenomenon known as selective publication. The principal reasons of this selective publication include author self-censorship, peer-reviewing, trials not intended for publication, interpretation of the p value, cost of journal subscriptions, and policies. Subsequent reviews and meta-analyses are biased by the unavailability of nonsignificant results. Suggestions for preventing this risk include university training, trial registries, an international standard randomised controlled trial number (ISRCTN), Cochrane collaboration, and the gray literature. Journals (including electronic journals) interested in studies with nonsignificant results are listed. New technologies are changing the relations between publishers, libraries, authors and readers. PMID:17287106

  3. Data Mining Citizen Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    Scientific discovery from big data is enabled through multiple channels, including data mining (through the application of machine learning algorithms) and human computation (commonly implemented through citizen science tasks). We will describe the results of new data mining experiments on the results from citizen science activities. Discovering patterns, trends, and anomalies in data are among the powerful contributions of citizen science. Establishing scientific algorithms that can subsequently re-discover the same types of patterns, trends, and anomalies in automatic data processing pipelines will ultimately result from the transformation of those human algorithms into computer algorithms, which can then be applied to much larger data collections. Scientific discovery from big data is thus greatly amplified through the marriage of data mining with citizen science.

  4. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25σ. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (σ8) derived from

  5. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  6. Improved non-approximability results

    SciTech Connect

    Bellare, M.; Sudan, M.

    1994-12-31

    We indicate strong non-approximability factors for central problems: N{sup 1/4} for Max Clique; N{sup 1/10} for Chromatic Number; and 66/65 for Max 3SAT. Underlying the Max Clique result is a proof system in which the verifier examines only three {open_quotes}free bits{close_quotes} to attain an error of 1/2. Underlying the Chromatic Number result is a reduction from Max Clique which is more efficient than previous ones.

  7. Tau physics results from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-10

    Results on {tau} physics at SLD are presented. They are based on 4,316 {tau}-pair events selected from a 150 k Z{sup 0} data sample collected at the SLC. These results include measurements of the {tau} lifetime ({tau}{sub r} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1 {+-} 3.3 fs), the {tau} Michel parameters ({rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05, and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05), and the {tau} neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}} = {minus}0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03).

  8. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  9. Spaghetti calorimeter results and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Desalvo, R.

    1992-12-31

    In the guidelines of the SPACAL-LAA project the authors have built and beam-tested a prototype of spaghetti calorimeter with full hadronic shower containment. The results proved that the spaghetti technology (lead and scintillating fibers) can perform very accurate calorimetric measurements at the 15 ns LHC or SSC crossing rate and can compete with advantage over the other calorimetric technologies. In this paper they present the experimental results obtained so far and some future development foreseen in view of a hermetic supercollider detector.

  10. Recent CMS results on diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoît, Roland

    2015-03-01

    Recent CMS results on diffraction are presented. These include the measurements of the soft diffractive cross sections, of the forward rapidity gap cross section, of the diffractive dijet cross section, the measurement of a large rapidity gap in W and Z boson events and the measurement of the pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles in a single diffractive enhanced sample. This last measurement is the first common result of the CMS and TOTEM collaborations. Some prospects of common CMS-TOTEM data taking are also discussed.

  11. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.

    1994-07-01

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sub {minus}18}{sup +21} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sub {minus}12}{sup +13} (stat) {sub {minus}7}{sup +5} (sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models.

  12. Communicating Performance Assessments Results - 13609

    SciTech Connect

    Layton, Mark

    2013-07-01

    The F-Area Tank Farms (FTF) and H-Area Tank Farm (HTF) are owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and operated by Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR), Liquid Waste Operations contractor at DOE's Savannah River Site (SRS). The FTF and HTF are active radioactive waste storage and treatment facilities consisting of 51 carbon steel waste tanks and ancillary equipment such as transfer lines, evaporators and pump tanks. Performance Assessments (PAs) for each Tank Farm have been prepared to support the eventual closure of the underground radioactive waste tanks and ancillary equipment. PAs provide the technical bases and results to be used in subsequent documents to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements for final closure of the Tank Farms. The Tank Farms are subject to a number of regulatory requirements. The State regulates Tank Farm operations through an industrial waste water permit and through a Federal Facility Agreement approved by the State, DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Closure documentation will include State-approved Tank Farm Closure Plans and tank-specific closure modules utilizing information from the PAs. For this reason, the State of South Carolina and the EPA must be involved in the performance assessment review process. The residual material remaining after tank cleaning is also subject to reclassification prior to closure via a waste determination pursuant to Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005. PAs are performance-based, risk-informed analyses of the fate and transport of FTF and HTF residual wastes following final closure of the Tank Farms. Since the PAs serve as the primary risk assessment tools in evaluating readiness for closure, it is vital that PA conclusions be communicated effectively. In the course of developing the FTF and HTF PAs, several lessons learned have emerged regarding communicating PA results. When communicating PA results it is

  13. CDF results on electroweak physics

    SciTech Connect

    Frisch, H.J.; CDF Collaboration

    1993-11-01

    The second major run of the {bar p}p Fermilab Tevatron collider has just ended on June 1. The CDF detector has accumulated almost five times the data sample of its previous 1988--1989 run. We present new results on the ratio of W to Z boson production cross-sections and on the charge asymmetry in W decay. We give a progress report on the measurement of the W mass. New results from the 1988--1989 data on Drell-Yan production and on W {gamma} production are also presented.

  14. Comparison of fission product release predictions using PARFUME with results from the AGR-1 safety tests

    SciTech Connect

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    Safety tests were conducted on fourteen fuel compacts from AGR-1, the first irradiation experiment of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program, at temperatures ranging from 1600 to 1800°C to determine fission product release at temperatures that bound reactor accident conditions. The PARFUME (PARticle FUel ModEl) code was used to predict the release of fission products silver, cesium, strontium, and krypton from fuel compacts containing tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles during the safety tests, and the predicted values were compared with experimental results. Preliminary comparisons between PARFUME predictions and post-irradiation examination (PIE) results of the safety tests show different trends in the prediction of the fractional release depending on the species, and it leads to different conclusions regarding the diffusivities used in the modeling of fission product transport in TRISO-coated particles: • For silver, the diffusivity in silicon carbide (SiC) might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C and 1700°C, and at least 10 to 102 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of silver in uranium oxy-carbide (UCO) might also be over-estimated, but the available data are insufficient to allow definitive conclusions to be drawn. • For cesium, the diffusivity in UCO might be over-estimated by a factor of at least 102 to 103 at 1600°C, 105 at 1700°C, and 103 at 1800°C. The diffusivity of cesium in SiC might also over-estimated, by a factor of 10 at 1600°C and 103 at 1700°C, based upon the comparisons between calculated and measured release fractions from intact particles. There is no available estimate at 1800°C since all the compacts heated up at 1800°C contain particles with failed SiC layers whose release dominates the release from intact particles. • For strontium, the diffusivity in SiC might be over-estimated by a factor of 10 to 102 at 1600 and 1700°C, and 102 to 103 at 1800°C. These

  15. Block Scheduling that Gets Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    All children can learn. When principals and faculties fully embrace this core belief and demonstrate it to students, parents, and each other, significant improvements in academic performance can result. However, while it is certainly true that all children are capable of academic success, it is also true that learning occurs at different rates.…

  16. FFTF startup: status and results

    SciTech Connect

    Noordhoff, B.H.; Moore, C.E.

    1980-03-01

    Startup testing on the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during the past three years has progressed beyond initial criticality toward the principal goal of power demonstration in 1980. An overview is presented of technical results to date and project plans to achieve power demonstration and complete the startup test program.

  17. Results of Computer Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    This report compares the projected savings of using computer based training to conduct training for newly hired pilots to the results of that application. New Hire training, one of a number of programs conducted continuously at the United Airline Flight Operations Training Center, is designed to assure that any newly hired pilot will be able to…

  18. The Latest Results from DAMPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin

    2016-07-01

    DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) successfully launched on Dec.17, 2015 is the first Chinese astronomical satellite that can measure 2 GeV-10 TeV electrons and gamma-rays with unprecedented energy resolution. In this talk I will introduce the design, the beam-test, the on-orbit calibration and some preliminary results of DAMPE.

  19. State Test Results Are Predictable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-school, community demographic and family-level variables have an important influence on student achievement as measured by large-scale standardized tests. Studies described here demonstrated that about half of the test score is accounted for by variables outside the control of teachers and school administrators. The results from these…

  20. Perseids 2006 results in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, Valentin; Berinde, Stefan; Conu, Alexandru

    2007-12-01

    The results of 14th edition of the Perseide (Perseid) project organized by SARM are presented. PERSEIDE 2006 - the national astronomical camp for yought had two distinct parts: a summer astronomical school and a national Perseid network. Over 60 persons attended this event which lasted for four weeks and had both a training and observing component.

  1. Recent diffractive results from HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkárová, Alice

    2016-07-01

    The diffractive dijet cross sections for photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering were studied and compared with theoretical NLO QCD predictions. The results of exclusive dijet production were compared to predictions from models which are based on different assumptions about the nature of diffractive exchange. Isolated prompt photons in diffractive photoproduction produced inclusively or together with a jet were studied for the first time.

  2. Recent results from DORIS II

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  3. First Results of Submillimeter Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.; Dragovan, M.; Novak, G.

    1984-01-01

    Airborne results of submillimeter polarization at one wavelength, 270 micro m for just three points in the sky are presented. Polarizations of 1.7% at each of two points in Orion are shown. A null result at 400 micro m from ground-based observations of Mars at opposition is also presented. A null result for W3(OH) is given. The Kleinmann-Low Nebula (KL) was chosen for one of the measurements because it is bright and polarization had been observed 10 micro m. Airborne results of submillimeter polarimetry indicate that: (1) Cool, dense interstellar clouds can emit polarized submillimeter radiation; (2) The direction of the magnetic field, averaged over the 90 beams, is the same for the Kleinmann-Low Nebula and the 400 micro m peak 1.5 south of the Nebula; and (3) The effectiveness of the grain alignment mechanism, averaged over the 90 beams, is the same for the Kleinmann-Low Nebula and the 400 micro m peak.

  4. Results from the HARP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radicioni, E.

    2008-07-01

    Hadron production is a key ingredient for precise prediction of atmospheric ν fluxes, characterization of accelerator ν beams, and quantification of π production and capture for ν-factory designs. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. We briefly describe here its most recent results.

  5. The Planck Mission: Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Marco Bersanelli

    2012-03-07

    The ESA Planck space mission, launched on May 14, 2009, is dedicated to high precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the first light of the universe, both in temperature and polarization. The satellite observes the full sky from a far-Earth orbit with two cryogenic instruments in the 30-850 GHz range at the focal plane of a 1.5-meter telescope. The primary objective of Planck is to measure with unprecedented precision the key cosmological parameters and to provide accurate tests of physics in the early universe. Planck has recently completed the fifth full-sky survey. The data analysis is underway. The first cosmology results are expected in early 2013 while a number of astrophysical results have been recently delivered to the community, including galactic and extragalactic astrophysics and a rich catalogue of radio and infrared sources. These results demonstrate the excellent in-orbit performance of the instruments and give excellent prospects for the forthcoming cosmological results.

  6. Recent Results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demorden, L.

    1998-06-01

    We review recent results from fixed-target and collider experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron. Among the topics discussed are jet production rates, {alpha}{sub S} measurements, the {anti d}/{anti u} ratio in the proton sea, diffraction, heavy quark physics and leptoquark searches.

  7. Optical Telescope Design Study Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livas, J.; Sankar, S.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the results of a study conducted from Nov 2012-Apr 2013 to develop a telescope design for a space-based gravitational wave detector. The telescope is needed for efficient power delivery but since it is directly in the beam path, the design is driven by the requirements for the overall displacement sensitivity of the gravitational wave observatory. Two requirements in particular, optical pathlength stability and scattered light performance, are beyond the usual specifications for good image quality encountered in traditional telescopic systems. An important element of the study was to tap industrial expertise to develop an optimized design that can be reliably manufactured. Key engineering and design trade-offs and the sometimes surprising results will be presented.

  8. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  9. First results from SAGE II

    SciTech Connect

    Aburashitov, J.N.; Faizov, E.L.; Gavrin, V.N.; Gusev, A.O.; Kalikhov, A.V.; Knodel, T.V.; Knyshenko, I.I.; Kornoukhov, V.N.; Mirmov, I.N.; Pshukov, A.M.; Shalagin, A.M.; Shikhin, A.A.; Timofeyev, P.V.; Veretenkin, E.P.; Vermul, V.M.; Zatsepin, G.T.; Bowles, T.J.; Nico, J.S.; Teasdale, W.A.; Wark, D.L.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Cleveland, B.T.; Daily, T.; Davis, R. Jr.; Lande, K.; Lee, C.K.; Wildenhain, P.W.; Elliott, S.R.; Cherry, M.L.

    1995-07-10

    The Russian-American Gallium solar neutrino Experiment (SAGE) began the second phase of operation (SAGE II) in September of 1992. Monthly measurements of the integral flux of solar neutrinos have been made with 55 tonnes of gallium. The K-peak results of the first five runs of SAGE II give a capture rate of 76{sup +21}{sub {minus}18}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. Combined with the SAGE I result, the capture rate is 74{sup +13}{sub {minus}12}(stat){sup +5}{sub {minus}7}(sys) SNU. This represents only 56%--60% of the capture rate predicted by different Standard Solar Models. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  10. Forget about data, deliver results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Roland

    2015-12-01

    High-energy astrophysics space missions have pioneered and demonstrated the power of legacy data sets for generating new discoveries, especially when analysed in ways original researchers could not have anticipated. The only way to ensure that the data of present observatories can be effectively used in the future is to allow users to perform on-the-fly data analysis to produce straightforwardly scientific results for any sky position, time and energy intervals without requiring mission specific software or detailed instrumental knowledge. Providing a straightforward interface to complex data and data analysis makes the data and the process of generating science results available to the public and higher education and promotes the visibility of the investment in science to the society. This is a fundamental step to transmit the values of science and to evolve towards a knowledge society.

  11. Top physics results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2005-05-01

    The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. They present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The t{bar t} cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. they have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

  12. Recent results from SND detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achasov, M. N.; Barnyakov, A. Yu.; Beloborodov, K. I.; Berdyugin, A. V.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Botov, A. A.; Dimova, T. V.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kardapoltsev, L. V.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Koop, I. A.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Kovrizhin, D. P.; Kupich, A. S.; Martin, K. A.; Obrazovsky, A. E.; Pakhtusova, E. V.; Rogozina, E. V.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Shatunov, Yu. M.; Shtol, D. A.; Silagadze, Z. K.; Surin, I. K.; Usov, Yu. V.; Vasiljev, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the SND detector obtained in experiments at the VEPP-2000 e+e- collider are presented. The reactions e+e- → ηπ+π-, e+e- → K+K-, e+e- → π+π-π0, e+e- → ωπ0, e+e- → ωη have been studied in the energy region 1.05-2.00 GeV. The neutron and proton electromagnetic form factors have been measured in the energy range from the threshold up to 2 GeV. The result of the search of the rare process e+e- → η' is also presented.

  13. Planck 2015 results and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchet, François R.

    2015-12-01

    The Planck mission prime objective was a very accurate and complete measurement of the temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Cosmological results from the intensity data of the nominal mission of a duration of 15 months were disclosed on 21 March 2013. Fortunately, the satellite kept acquiring data for at least twice longer, and we announced in February 2015 new results based on all the data acquired, both in temperature and polarization. I provide a short overview of the latest data and findings of most interest for inflation, as a basis for the other contributions to this volume. This overview is entirely based on the published or submitted works of the Planck collaboration. xml:lang="fr"

  14. Airborne laser topographic mapping results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krabill, W. B.; Collins, J. G.; Link, L. E.; Swift, R. N.; Butler, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    The results of terrain mapping experiments utilizing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) over forested areas are presented. The flight tests were conducted as part of a joint NASA/U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (CE) investigation aimed at evaluating the potential of an airborne laser ranging system to provide cross-sectional topographic data on flood plains that are difficult and expensive to survey using conventional techniques. The data described in this paper were obtained in the Wolf River Basin located near Memphis, TN. Results from surveys conducted under winter 'leaves off' and summer 'leaves on' conditions, aspects of day and night operation, and data obtained from decidous and coniferous tree types are compared. Data processing techniques are reviewed. Conclusions relative to accuracy and present limitations of the AOL, and airborne lidar systems in general, to terrain mapping over forested areas are discussed.

  15. Surveyor 3 Preliminary Science Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Surveyor III soft-landed on the Moon at 00:04 GMT on April 20, 1967. Data obtained have significantly increased our knowledge of the Moon. The Surveyor III spacecraft was similar to Surveyor I; the only major change in scientific instrumentation was the addition of a soil mechanics surface sampler. Surveyor III results at this preliminary evaluation of data give valuable information about the relation between the surface skin of under-dense material responsible for the photometric properties and the deeper layers of material whose properties resemble those of ordinary terrestrial soils. In addition, they provide new insight into the relation between the general lunar surface as seen by Surveyor I and the interior of a large subdued crater. The new results have also contributed to our understanding of the mechanism of downhill transport. Many critical questions cannot, however, be answered until final reduction of experimental data.

  16. Open cherry picker simulation results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The simulation program associated with a key piece of support equipment to be used to service satellites directly from the Shuttle is assessed. The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform mounted at the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) and is used to enhance extra vehicular activities (EVA). The results of simulations performed on the Grumman Large Amplitude Space Simulator (LASS) and at the JSC Water Immersion Facility are summarized.

  17. Recent QCD results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Huston, J. |; CDF Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    CDF has recently concluded a very successful 1992--93 data run in which an integrated luminosity of 21.3 pb {sup {minus}1} was written to tape. The large data sample allows for a greater discovery potential for new phenomena and for better statistical and systematic precision in analysis of conventional physics. This paper summarizes some of the new results from QCD analyses for this run.

  18. Measuring the results of faith.

    PubMed

    Hudson, T

    1996-09-20

    Guiding patients to health takes more than technological wizardry, wonder drugs, and pleasantly decorated surroundings. In fact, to an increasing number of institutions, faith is the missing ingredient. Faith in a higher power. Faith in oneself. Faith in the possibilities for recovery. Welcome, then, to the new high-tech, high-touch world, where pastoral care meets managed care. The results may startle you. PMID:8924945

  19. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2014-06-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  20. Recent DIII-D results

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, P.I.

    1994-07-01

    This paper summarizes the recent DIII-D experimental results and the development of the relevant hardware systems. The DIII-D program focuses on divertor solutions for next generation tokamaks such as International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), and on developing configurations with enhanced confinement and stability properties that will lead to a more compact and economical fusion reactor. The DIII-D program carries out this research in an integrated fashion.

  1. Electroweak results from D0

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.; D0 Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Preliminary results from D0 are presented on properties of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} electroweak gauge bosons, using final states containing electrons and muons. In particular, preliminary measurements of the W{sup {plus_minus}} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections with decay into final states containing electrons are shown and a status report on the determination of M{sub w}/M{sub z} is given.

  2. Cassini Imaging Results at Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, A.; Turtle, E.; Perry J.; Fussner, S.; Porco, C.; West, R.; Johnson, T.; Collins, G.; DelGenio, T.; Barbara, J.

    2005-01-01

    The Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images show striking albedo markings on the surface of Titan. In equatorial regions the albedo patterns have high contrast and exhibit prominent lineaments and linear/angular boundaries suggestive of tectonic influences or fracturing of brittle surficial materials. There are intriguing dark curving lines near the south pole. Here we present several working hypotheses to explain these patterns. We also briefly summarize atmospheric science results.

  3. A-3 scientific results - extragalactic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the HEAO A-3 experiment are summarized. Specific contributions of the experiment to extragalactic astronomy are emphasized. The discovery of relatively condensed X-ray emission in the cores of those clusters of galaxies which are dominated by a giant elliptical or cD galaxy, the discovery of extended X-ray emitting plasma in groups of galaxies, and the demonstration that BL Lac objects are a class of X-ray sources are among the topics discussed.

  4. B0s Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Willocq, Stephane

    2002-08-09

    The authors review new studies of the time dependence of B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mixing by the ALEPH, DELPHI and SLD Collaborations, with an emphasis on the different analysis methods used. Combining all available results yields a preliminary lower limit on the oscillation frequency of {Delta}m{sub s} > 14.4 ps{sup -1} at the 95% C.L.

  5. Rethinking Reinforcement: Allocation, Induction, and Contingency

    PubMed Central

    Baum, William M

    2012-01-01

    The concept of reinforcement is at least incomplete and almost certainly incorrect. An alternative way of organizing our understanding of behavior may be built around three concepts: allocation, induction, and correlation. Allocation is the measure of behavior and captures the centrality of choice: All behavior entails choice and consists of choice. Allocation changes as a result of induction and correlation. The term induction covers phenomena such as adjunctive, interim, and terminal behavior—behavior induced in a situation by occurrence of food or another Phylogenetically Important Event (PIE) in that situation. Induction resembles stimulus control in that no one-to-one relation exists between induced behavior and the inducing event. If one allowed that some stimulus control were the result of phylogeny, then induction and stimulus control would be identical, and a PIE would resemble a discriminative stimulus. Much evidence supports the idea that a PIE induces all PIE-related activities. Research also supports the idea that stimuli correlated with PIEs become PIE-related conditional inducers. Contingencies create correlations between “operant” activity (e.g., lever pressing) and PIEs (e.g., food). Once an activity has become PIE-related, the PIE induces it along with other PIE-related activities. Contingencies also constrain possible performances. These constraints specify feedback functions, which explain phenomena such as the higher response rates on ratio schedules in comparison with interval schedules. Allocations that include a lot of operant activity are “selected” only in the sense that they generate more frequent occurrence of the PIE within the constraints of the situation; contingency and induction do the “selecting.” PMID:22287807

  6. PACOSS program status and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, K. E., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Future large space systems (LSS), both civilian and military, will have performance objectives which require stringent pointing accuracies, relatively fast retargeting times, short settling times, accurate dynamic shape requirements, or combinations thereof. Many of these structures will be large but lightweight and will exhibit a dense, low-frequency modal spectrum with significant content within the control bandwidth. Although it is possible in principle to achieve structural vibration control with purely active means, experience with complex structures has shown that the realities of plant model inaccuracies and real sensor and actuator dynamics frequently combine to produce disappointing results. It was shown that a combination of passive and active control will result in a simpler system which can be expected to be more reliable and less expensive than a corresponding system utilizing active control exclusively. The goals of the Passive and Active Control of Space Structures (PACOSS) program consist of a thorough investigation of the relative roles of passive active vibration control, and the development of validated means of vibration control. The program approach, representative system article, dynamic test article, and test status and results are outlined.

  7. Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

    2012-06-01

    The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

  8. Recent results from the Microscopic Imagers on the Mars Exploration Rovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Ashley, J. W.; Cabrol, N. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Athena science payload on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) includes the Microscopic Imager (MI), designed to simulate a geologist’s hand lens. The fixed-focus MI is mounted on the instrument arm and can resolve objects 0.1 mm in size or larger. Spirit MI observations of the rocks on “Home Plate” continue to be consistent with a volcaniclastic origin. A total of 124 individual soil samples were analyzed using MI images acquired between landing and Sol 1980, including 28 bedforms, 35 composite soils, 49 unstructured soils, and 6 trenches including natural vertical exposures and those dug by Spirit’s wheels. Six outcrops and rocks were also analyzed as plausible source areas for the spherules and other particles observed in the soil around Home Plate, or when associated with large patches of soils. The rocks on Home Plate were covered by enough dust that RAT brushing was required to allow textures to be seen by the MI, such as the dark, moderately sorted and rounded grains (lapilli?) of the rock “Pecan Pie.” The MI also monitored the MER magnets and solar panels at the 2008 winter haven on the north side of Home Plate. After solar power was sufficient to allow Spirit to drive again, the MI was used to examine the silica-rich rock “Stapledon” just north of Home Plate. The texture of Stapledon appears similar to that seen in the silica-rich rocks on the east side of Home Plate, suggestive of secondary mineralization through precipitation from hydrothermal fluids. While plans for extracting Spirit from the sands of “Troy” are being made, the MI has been extensively used to examine the rocks and soils accessible to the instrument arm. These data show that moderately sorted, salty aggregate soils at depth are overlain by a thin crust near the present surface. These observations, along with MI images showing Spirit’s underbelly, are being used to inform extraction testing in the MER testbed at JPL. While the MI was not designed to take images of

  9. Phenomena resulting from hypergolic contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forness, Jordan M.

    Understanding hypergolic ignition is critical for the safe and successful operation of hypergolic engines. The complex coupling of physical and chemical processes during hypergolic ignition complicates analysis of the event. Presently, hypergolic ignition models cannot simulate liquid contact and mixing or liquid-phase chemical reactions, and rely on experimental results for validation. In some cases, chemical kinetics of hypergolic propellants and fluid dynamics of droplet collisions couple to produce unexpected phenomena. This research investigates contact between droplets and pools of liquid hypergolic propellants under various conditions in order to investigate these liquid-phase reactions and categorize the resulting interaction. During this experiment, 142 drop tests were performed to investigate phenomena associated with hypergolic contact of various propellants. A drop of fuel impacted a semi-ellipsoidal pool of oxidizer at varying impact velocities and impact geometries. The temperature, pressure, ambient atmosphere, and propellant quality were all controlled during the experiment, as these factors have been shown to influence hypergolic ignition delay. Three distinct types of impacts were identified: explosions, bounces, and splashes. The impact type was found to depend on the impact Weber number and impact angle. Splashes occurred above a critical Weber number of 250, regardless of impact angle. Explosions occurred for Weber numbers less than 250, and for impact angles less than seven degrees. If the impact angle was greater than seven degrees then the test resulted in a bounce. Literature related to explosions induced by hypergolic contact was reviewed. Explosions were observed to occur inconsistently, a feature that has never been addressed. Literature related to non-reactive splashing, bouncing, and coalescence was reviewed for insight into the explosion phenomenon. I propose that the dependence of impact angle on the transition between explosion and

  10. Science verification results from PMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, M. M.; Becker, T.; Böhm, P.; Kelz, A.

    2004-02-01

    PMAS, the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer, is a new integral field instrument which was commissioned at the Calar Alto 3.5m Telescope in May 2001. We report on results obtained from a science verification run in October 2001. We present observations of the low-metallicity blue compact dwarf galaxy SBS0335-052, the ultra-luminous X-ray Source X-1 in the Holmberg;II galaxy, the quadruple gravitational lens system Q2237+0305 (the ``Einstein Cross''), the Galactic planetary nebula NGC7027, and extragalactic planetary nebulae in M31. PMAS is now available as a common user instrument at Calar Alto Observatory.

  11. Implicit Media Knowledge Experiments & Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Muy-Chu; Germaneau, Alexis

    2011-08-01

    Implicit Media Knowledge aims to provide relevant information related to visual media without effort. It is based on the analysis of media usage from several users (e.g. a community). Algorithms based on clustering methods that extract relevant information (e.g. tags, taxonomy trees) related to a media from its usage are detailed. To validate our new approach, we propose to apply our concept and algorithms on a specific media use such as the analysis of how multiple users organize their media files. Significant results of two experiments will be highlighted. Perspectives of our work will be finally presented.

  12. Recent Results in Solar Neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Solar neutrinos are an invaluable tool for studying neutrino oscillations in matter as well as probing the nuclear reactions that fuel the Sun. In this talk I will give an overview of solar neutrinos and discuss the latest results in the field. I will highlight the recent precision measurement of the ^7Be solar neutrino interaction rate with the Borexino solar neutrino detector and present the status of the analysis of pep and CNO neutrinos. I will also briefly describe future experiments and their potential to detect low energy solar neutrinos.

  13. Lightcurve Results for Eleven Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartrelle, Gordon M.

    2012-04-01

    Differential photometry techniques were used to develop lightcurves, rotation periods and amplitudes for eleven main-belt asteroids: 833 Monica, 962 Aslog, 1020 Arcadia, 1082 Pirola, 1097 Vicia, 1122 Lugduna, 1145 Robelmonte, 1253 Frisia, 1256 Normannia, 1525 Savolinna, and 2324 Janice. Ground-based observations from Badlands Observatory (BLO) in Quinn, SD, as well as the University of North Dakota Observatory (UND) in Grand Forks, ND, provided the data for the project. A search of the asteroid lightcurve database (LCDB) did not reveal any previously reported results for seven of the eleven targets in this study.

  14. Results from IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, Tyce

    2016-04-01

    Data from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have revealed the existence of a flux of high energy neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin, which is observed in a number of analyses spanning different energy ranges, fields of view, and neutrino flavors. The current data are consistent with an isotropic, equal-flavor flux described by a simple power law spectrum, but deviations from this simple model cannot yet be constrained with high precision. The existing observations in this area are reviewed, along with recent results on dark matter searches and observations of cosmic rays.

  15. Macular changes resulting from papilloedema.

    PubMed

    Morris, A T; Sanders, M D

    1980-03-01

    Six cases are presented with macular changes in association with papilloedema; 4 suffered permanent visual loss. The present paper emphasises this previously infrequent finding and discusses the haemodynamic and mechanical factors responsible. The macular changes consisted of haemorrhages situated in front, within, or behind the retina, and occasionally the results of neovascular membrane formation produced secondary visual loss. Changes in the pigment epithelium were seen in 3 cases associated with choroidal folds. Macular stars rarely produce visual loss. Recognition of these changes is important in the assessment of the visual loss in papilloedema. PMID:7387954

  16. Results from the HARP Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Catanesi, M. G.

    2008-02-21

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of {nu} physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric {nu} fluxes, characterization of accelerator {nu} beams, quantification of {pi} production and capture for {nu}-factory designs, all of these would profit from hadron production measurements. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. It combines a large, full phase space acceptance with low systematic errors and high statistics. HARP was operated in the range from 3 GeV to 15 GeV. We briefly describe here the most recent results.

  17. RSG Deployment Case Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Owsley, Stanley L.; Dodson, Michael G.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Seim, Thomas A.; Alexander, David L.; Hawthorne, Woodrow T.

    2005-09-01

    The RSG deployment case design is centered on taking the RSG system and producing a transport case that houses the RSG in a safe and controlled manner for transport. The transport case was driven by two conflicting constraints, first that the case be as light as possible, and second that it meet a stringent list of Military Specified requirements. The design team worked to extract every bit of weight from the design while striving to meet the rigorous Mil-Spec constraints. In the end compromises were made primarily on the specification side to control the overall weight of the transport case. This report outlines the case testing results.

  18. Results from the VISA project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, G. J.

    1993-09-01

    The small lidar system has been used to measure the vertical structure of the atmospheric extinction in a dune area bordering The Hague (The Netherlands), at about 2.6 km from the North Sea. The atmospheric optical properties at this location are determined by a mixture of industrial, urban, rural and marine aerosols, which composition depends on the air mass history. The measurements were made unattended, around the clock, five days a week. About 250 extinction profiles were recorded every day. This report reviews the data base obtained and presents some selected results. The lidar system is described briefly. Factors influencing the accuracy of the inversion of lidar signals are discussed.

  19. CP violation results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Austin; /Tufts U.

    2012-01-01

    We present world-leading results on CP-violating asymmetries and branching fractions of several decay modes of B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0}, and {Lambda}{sub b} hadrons into charmless two-body, and of B{sup {+-}} into charm, final states collected by the CDF detector. We also report a new measurement of CP-violating asymmetries in D*{sup {+-}}-tagged D{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} (h = K or {pi}) decays, where any enhancement from the Standard Model prediction would be unambiguous evidence for New Physics.

  20. Data bases for LDEF results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) carried 57 experiments and 10,000 specimens for some 200 LDEF experiment investigators. The external surface of LDEF had a large variety of materials exposed to the space environment which were tested preflight, during flight, and post flight. Thermal blankets, optical materials, thermal control paints, aluminum, and composites are among the materials flown. The investigations have produced an abundance of analysis results. One of the responsibilities of the Boeing Support Contract, Materials and Systems Special Investigation Group, is to collate and compile that information into an organized fashion. The databases developed at Boeing to accomplish this task is described.

  1. Results from the HARP Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanesi, M. G.

    2008-02-01

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of ν physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric ν fluxes, characterization of accelerator ν beams, quantification of π production and capture for ν-factory designs, all of these would profit from hadron production measurements. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. It combines a large, full phase space acceptance with low systematic errors and high statistics. HARP was operated in the range from 3 GeV to 15 GeV. We briefly describe here the most recent results.

  2. Results from the HARP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catanesi, M. G.

    2007-06-01

    Hadron production is a key ingredient in many aspects of ν physics. Precise prediction of atmospheric ν fluxes, characterization of accelerator ν beams, quantification of π production and capture for ν-factory designs, all of these would profit from hadron production measurements. HARP at the CERN PS was the first hadron production experiment designed on purpose to match all these requirements. It combines a large, full phase space acceptance with low systematic errors and high statistics. HARP was operated in the range from 3 GeV to 15 GeV. We briefly describe here the most recent results.

  3. Long Trace Profiler survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, Steve.

    1999-07-01

    Today the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is widely accepted as a viable way to measure X-ray mirrors, and at some institutions is the only instrument available for measuring long, high-curvature aspheres. Although some questions of absolute accuracy over the entire LTP measurement range remain unanswered, a comparison of LTPs can still be made to assess measurement variation. Recently a round robin survey of some LTPs within the United States has been made using a single set of mirrors. These mirrors were used to characterize the performance of an LTP over its advertised range of operation. The results of this survey are presented here.

  4. Electroweak results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Demarteau, M.

    1995-10-01

    Results from the CDF and D{O} experiments are presented on properties of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} gauge bosons using final states containing electrons and muons based on large integrated luminosities. In particular, measurements of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup 0} production cross sections, the W-charge asymmetry and the CDF measurement of the W-mass are summarized. Gauge boson self interactions axe measured by studying di-gauge boson production and limits on anomalous gauge boson couplings axe discussed.

  5. Some Recent Results with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Maurik Holtrop

    2010-10-01

    The CLAS is a multipurpose, large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, instrumented with detector systems sensitive to charged and neutral particles. The experimental program at CLAS is aimed at furthering our understanding of hadronic and nuclear physics, through electron and photon scattering experiments, which cover a large range of topics, including meson and baryon spectroscopy, nucleon structure through elastic and deep inelastic scattering, nuclear transparency, nuclear correlations and nuclear structure. This talk will briefly describe the detector and the collaboration that uses it and will highlight some recent results.

  6. Double Chooz and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meregaglia, A.; Double Chooz Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The reactor bar{{ν}}e^{} disappearance experiment Double Chooz, located in France near the power plant of Chooz, has as main goal the measurement of the θ_{{13}}^{} mixing angle. For the first time, in 2011, the experimental results gave an indication for a non-zero value of such an oscillation parameter. The mixing angle was successively measured using only the far detector finding the best fit value of sin2(2 θ_{{13}}^{}) = 0.090+0.033-0.029 . The near detector started data taking in December 2014 and it will allow to reduce the systematic errors so far dominated by the reactor flux uncertainty. In this paper a review of the experiment is presented focusing on the so-called Gadolinium-III results (DOUBLE CHOOZ COLLABORATION (ABE Y. et al.), JHEP, 10 (2014) 086; 02 (2015) 074). Furthermore additional physics measurements are presented such as the capability of Double Chooz to identify the ortho-positronium state on event by event basis.

  7. [Assessment of bariatric surgery results].

    PubMed

    Barros, Lívia Moreira; Frota, Natasha Marques; Moreira, Rosa Aparecida Nogueira; de Araújo, Thiago Moura; Caetano, Joselany Áfio

    2015-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the results of bariatric surgery in patients in the late postoperative period using the Bariatric Analysis and Reporting Outcome System (BAROS). This cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2011 to June 2012 at a hospital in the state of Ceará, Brazil. Data were collected from 92 patients using the BAROS protocol, which analyzes weight loss, improved comorbidities, complications, reoperations and Quality of Life (QoL). Data were analysed using the chi-squared test, Fischer's exact test and the Mann-Whitney test. There was a reduction in the Body Mass Index (47.2±6.8 kg/m2 in the pre-operatory and 31.3±5.0 kg/m2 after surgery, p<0.001). The comorbidity with the highest resolution was arterial hypertension (p<0.001), and QV improved in 94.6% of patients. The main complications were hair loss, incisional hernia and cholelithiasis. The surgery provided satisfactory weight loss and improvements in the comorbidities associated to a better QL. Use of the BAROS protocol allows nurses to plan interventions and maintain the good results. PMID:26098798

  8. AXAF hypervelocity impact test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Cynthia L.; Rodriguez, Pedro I.

    1997-01-01

    Composite and honeycomb panels are commonly used for spacecraft structural components. The impact test results and analysis of six different composite and honeycomb combinations for use on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF) are reported. The AXAF consists of an X-ray telescope and the associated detecting devices attached to an octagonal spacecraft with an internal propulsion system. The spacecraft's structural panels and optical bench are made of two different graphite fiber reinforced polyimides or composite panels bonded to either side of an aluminum honeycomb. The instrument is required to have at least a 0.92 probability of no failure of any of the critical elements due to meteoroids and debris. In relation to the no-failure probability determination in its low earth orbit environment, hypervelocity impact testing was performed to determine the ballistic limit range and the extent of damage due to impact. The test results for a power and signal cable bundle located behind a panel are presented. Tests planned for a multilayer insulation (MLI) blanket and four types of cable bundles are discussed.

  9. APS undulator radiation: First results

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Dejus, R.J.; Hartog, P.D.

    1995-12-31

    The first undulator radiation has been extracted from the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The results from the characterization of this radiation are very satisfactory. With the undulator set at a gap of 15.8 mm (K=1.61), harmonics as high as the 17th were observed using a crystal spectrometer. The angular distribution of the third-harmonic radiation was measured, and the source was imaged using a zone plate to determine the particle beam emittance. The horizontal beam emittance was found to be 6.9 {plus_minus} 1.0 nm-rad, and the vertical emittance coupling was found to be less than 3%. The absolute spectral flux was measured over a wide range of photon energies, and it agrees remarkably well with the theoretical calculations based on the measured undulator magnetic field profile and the measured beam emittance. These results indicate that both the emittance of the electron beam and the undulator magnetic field quality exceed the original specifications.

  10. REMS Wind Sensor Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De La Torre Juarez, M.; Gomez-Elvira, J.; Navarro, S.; Marin, M.; Torres, J.; Rafkin, S. C.; Newman, C. E.; Pla-García, J.

    2015-12-01

    The REMS instrument is part of the Mars Science Laboratory payload. It is a sensor suite distributed over several parts of the rover. The wind sensor, which is composed of two booms equipped with a set of hot plate anemometers, is installed on the Rover Sensing Mast (RSM). During landing most of the hot plates of one boom were damaged, most likely by the pebbles lifted by the Sky Crane thruster. The loss of one wind boom necessitated a full review of the data processing strategy. Different algorithms have been tested on the readings of the first Mars year, and these results are now archived in the Planetary Data System (PDS), The presentation will include a description of the data processing methods and of the resulting products, including the typical evolution of wind speed and direction session-by-session, hour-by-hour and other kinds of statistics . A review of the wind readings over the first Mars year will also be presented.

  11. Seismic monitoring of Poland - temporary seismic project - first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojanowski, J.; Plesiewicz, B.; Wiszniowski, J.; Suchcicki, J.; Tokarz, A.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the project is to develop national database of seismic activity for seismic hazard assessment. Poland is known as a region of very low seismicity, however some earthquakes occur from time to time. The historical catalogue consists of less than one hundred earthquakes in the time span of almost one thousand years. Due to such a low occurrence rate, the study has been focussing on events at magnitudes lower than 2 which are more likely to occur during a few-year-long project. There are 24 mobile seismic stations involved in the project which are deployed in temporary locations close to humans neighbourhood. It causes a high level of noise and disturbances in recorded seismic signal. Moreover, the majority of Polish territory is covered by a thick sediments. It causes the problem of a reliable detection method for small seismic events in noisy data. The majority of algorithms is based on the concept of STA/LTA ratio and is designed for strong teleseismic events registered on many stations. Unfortunately they fail on the problem of weak events in the signal with noise and disturbances. It has been decided to apply Real Time Recurrent Neural Network (RTRN) to detect small natural seismic events from Poland. This method is able to assess relations of seismic signal in frequency domains as well as in time of seismic phases. The RTRN was taught by wide range of seismic signals - regional, teleseismic as well as blasts. The method is routinely used to analyse data from the project. In the firs two years of the project the seismic network was set in southern Poland, where relatively large seismicity in known. Since the mid-2010 the stations have been working in several regions of central and northern Poland where some minor historical earthquakes occurred. Over one hundred seismic events in magnitude range from 0.5 to 2.3 confirms the activity of Podhale region (Tatra Mountains, Carpathians), where an earthquake of magnitude 4.3 occurred in 2004. Initially three

  12. Status of Transuranic Bearing Metallic Fuel Development

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Hayes; Bruce Hilton; Heather MacLean; Debbie Utterbeck; Jon Carmack; Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

    2009-09-01

    This paper summarizes the status of the metallic fuel development under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The metallic fuel development program includes fuel fabrication, characterization, advanced cladding research, irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination (PIE). The focus of this paper is on the recent irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor and some PIE results from these tests.

  13. Recent results from telescope array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Masaki

    2015-08-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) is an experiment to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). TA's recent results, the energy spectrum and anisotropy based on the 6-year surface array data, and the primary composition obtained from the shower maximum (XMAX) are reported. The spectrum demonstrates a clear dip and cutoff. The shape of the spectrum is well described by the energy loss of extra-galactic protons interacting with the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Above the cutoff, a medium-scale (20∘ radius) flux enhancement was observed near the Ursa-Major. A chance probability of creating this hotspot from the isotropic flux is 4.0 σ. The measured ⟨XMAX⟩ is consistent with the primary being proton or light nuclei for energies 1018.2 eV-1019.2 eV.

  14. Excavating Culture: Summary of Results

    PubMed Central

    Ceballo, Rosario; Chao, Ruth; Hill, Nancy E.; Le, Huynh-Nhu; Murry, Velma McBride; Pinderhughes, Ellen E.

    2013-01-01

    This is a companion paper to the seven articles also published in this special issue of Applied Developmental Science This paper summarizes and discusses the results from common analyses that were conducted on different datasets. The common analyses were designed to disentangle contextual and ethnic influences on parenting. Initial ethnic group differences were found in many of the datasets with multiple ethnic groups. Although certain ethnic group differences were explained by contextual influences, some ethnic group differences remained after contextual influences were controlled. Follow-up analyses with datasets containing cultural variables reveal within group differences in the degree to which ethnic differences in parenting may be accounted for by contextual factors versus culturally-specific processes. Methodological and theoretical implications are discussed and future directions are offered. PMID:24163576

  15. SPA Meteor Section Results: 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2013-08-01

    Information extracted from analyses carried out by the SPA Meteor Section from 2007 is presented and discussed. Events covered include: the radio Quadrantid maximum on January 4; a bright fireball seen from parts of England and imaged from the Netherlands at 19h56m UT on February 6, for which an approximate trajectory was established; radio results from the Lyrids in late April; the Perseid near-peak activity from August and a note on some daylight Perseid observing from Britain using thermal imagers; the radio α-Aurigid maximum on September 1; the Orionid return, which again provided enhanced activity over several consecutive dates in October for visual and radio observers; the radio Leonids, although the probably main peak found visually on November 19 was not recorded thus due to its timing; the typically protracted Geminid maximum period around December 13-15 as observed visually and by radio; and the Ursid outburst, primarily as detected by radio on December 22.

  16. Results from the Magsat mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The results of analyses of the data gathered by Magsat on the geomagnetic field, crustal magnetic anomalies, fields arising from external current systems, and in investigations of the earth's core, mantle, and core-mantle boundary are presented. A least squares potential function showed that the geomagnetic field was 30,000-50,000 nanoteslas at the Magsat altitude, while fields from external sources were 0-1000 nanoteslas and those from crustal sources 0-50 nanoteslas. Long-wavelength magnetic anomalies were correlated with tectonic features, sometimes reflecting undulations in the Curie isotherm at other times changes in the structure of the lower crust. Detailed anomaly maps from regional data analyses are provided, and possible future spacecraft missions for improving the resolution of contours and strengths of the anomalies are described.

  17. Cryogenic Brush Seal Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Walker, James F.

    1996-01-01

    Brush seals are compliant, contact seals that have long-life, low-leakage characteristics desirable for use in rocket engine turbopumps. 50.8-mm (2.0 inch) diameter brush seals with a nominal initial radial interference of 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) were tested in liquid nitrogen at shaft speeds up to 35,000 rpm and differential pressure loads up to 1.21 MPa (175 psi) per brush. The measured leakage rate of a single brush was 2-3 times less than that measured for a 12-tooth, 0.127-mm (0.005 inch) radial clearance labyrinth seal used as a baseline. Stage effects were studied and it was found that two brush seals with a large separation distance leaked less than two brushes tightly packed together. The maximum measured groove depth on the Inconel 718 rotor was 25.4 (mu)m (0.001 inch) after 4.31 hours of shaft rotation. The Haynes-25 bristles wore approximately 25.4-76.2 (mu)m (0.001-0.003 inch) under the same conditions. Three seal runner coatings, chromium carbide, Teflon impregnated chromium, and zirconium oxide, were tested in liquid hydrogen at 35,000 and 65,000 rpm with separate 50.8 mm diameter brush seals made of Haynes-25 bristles and having a nominal initial radial interference of 129 rpm. Two bare Inconel-718 rotors were also tested as a baseline. The test results revealed significant differences between the wear characteristics of the uncoated and coated seal runners. At both speeds the brush seal with the bare Inconel-718 seal runner exhibited significant bristle wear with excessive material transferring to the runner surface. In contrast, the coated seal runners inhibited the transfer and deposit of bristle material. The chromium carbide coating showed only small quantities of bristle material transferring to its surface. The Teflon impregnated chromium coating also inhibited material transfer and provided some lubrication. This coating, however, is self-sacrificing. The Teflon remained present on the low speed runner, but it was completely removed from the

  18. MITG test procedure and results

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, M.B.; Mukunda, M.

    1983-01-01

    Elements and modules for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator have been performance tested since the inception of the RTG program. These test articles seldom resembled flight hardware and often lacked adequate diagnostic instrumentation. Because of this, performance problems were not identified in the early stage of program development. The lack of test data in an unexpected area often hampered the development of a problem solution. A procedure for conducting the MITG Test was developed in an effort to obtain data in a systematic, unambiguous manner. This procedure required the development of extensive data acquisition software and test automation. The development of a facility to implement the test procedure, the facility hardware and software requirements, and the results of the MITG testing are the subject of this paper.

  19. Research Results and Information Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    Research Results Monsoon behavior balanced by glaciers Research Discovers Frequent Mutations of Chromatin Significant Progress in Water Photochemistry Research Structural signature in amorphous alloy formation and plastic deformation The neural basis of Drosophila larval light/darkness preference Important roles of brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase and ceramide metabolism in leptin hypothalamic control of feeding Integrin activation and internalization on soft ECM as a mechanism of induction of stem cell differentiation by ECM elasticity Determination of electron pairing symmetry of iron-based superconductor FeSe Long-Range Topological Order in Metallic Glass Information Update List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and CNRS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and ESRC in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RS in 2011 List of Projects Jointly Funded by NSFC and RSE in 2011 Funding of Major Program Projects in 2010 Funding of Key Program Projects in 2010

  20. Airfreight forecasting methodology and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A series of econometric behavioral equations was developed to explain and forecast the evolution of airfreight traffic demand for the total U.S. domestic airfreight system, the total U.S. international airfreight system, and the total scheduled international cargo traffic carried by the top 44 foreign airlines. The basic explanatory variables used in these macromodels were the real gross national products of the countries involved and a measure of relative transportation costs. The results of the econometric analysis reveal that the models explain more than 99 percent of the historical evolution of freight traffic. The long term traffic forecasts generated with these models are based on scenarios of the likely economic outlook in the United States and 31 major foreign countries.

  1. Gravitational microlensing searches and results

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, C.

    1997-05-08

    Baryonic matter, in the form of Machos (MAssive Compact Halo Objects), might be a significant constituent of the dark matter that dominates the Milky Way. This article describes how surveys for Machos exploit the gravitational microlens magnification of extragalactic stars. The experimental searches for this effect monitor millions of stars, in some cases every night, looking for magnification events. The early results of these surveys indicate that Machos make up a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Milky Way, and that these objects have stellar masses. Truly substellar objects do not contribute much to the total. Additionally, the relatively high event rate towards the Galactic bulge seems to require that the bulge be elongated, and massive.

  2. Preliminary Results of the Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    The preliminary results of the photometry of CaII K spectroheliograms taken at the NationalSolar Observatory at Sacramento peak are presented in this paper. We have digitizedspectroheliograms for 1980 (maximum of SC21), 1985 (minimum of SC21), 1987 (beginning of theascending phase of SC22), 1988 and 1989 (ascending phase and maximum of SC22), and 1992(declining phase of SC22). We have analyzed images for 1992 and separated the plages, the magneticnetwork, internetwork elements and the chromospheric background using histogram method. Wehave derived the intensity and area of these features as well as the full disk intensity (Spatial KIndex). The Spatial K Index has been compared to the spectral Ca K index derived from the lineprofiles and total solar and UV irradiance measured by the UARS and NOAA9 satellites. Thecontribution of plages, the magnetic network and internetwork element to the changes observed intotal solar and UV irradiances are also estimated.

  3. Wake Vortex Algorithm Scoring Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robins, R. E.; Delisi, D. P.; Hinton, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report compares the performance of two models of trailing vortex evolution for which interaction with the ground is not a significant factor. One model uses eddy dissipation rate (EDR) and the other uses the kinetic energy of turbulence fluctuations (TKE) to represent the effect of turbulence. In other respects, the models are nearly identical. The models are evaluated by comparing their predictions of circulation decay, vertical descent, and lateral transport to observations for over four hundred cases from Memphis and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airports. These observations were obtained during deployments in support of NASA's Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The results of the comparisons show that the EDR model usually performs slightly better than the TKE model.

  4. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  5. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  6. Initial Blackbeard power survey results

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, T.; Devenport, J.; Holden, D.

    1996-06-01

    The Blackbeard broadband VHF radio receiver is in low-earth orbit aboard the ALEXIS satellite. The receiver has been used to measure the transmitted power in four VHF bands (55.2-75.8, 28.0-94.8, 132.3-152.2, and 107.7-166.0 MHz) over quiet and noisy parts of the earth. The authors present the results of the survey and discuss their implications. They find that there are remote ocean areas over which the observed spectrum is largely free of man-made interference, but that the spectrum over most of the earth is dominated by broadcast VHF signals. The signal characteristics observed over a given area are quite constant when observed at different times of day and at intervals of several weeks to months. It appears that in many cases the bulk of the signal power is coming from a small number of sources.

  7. Results from KASCADE-Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaina, M.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Bekk, K.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F. G.; Sima, O.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2012-11-01

    The KASCADE-Grande experiment, located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany) is a multi-component extensive air-shower experiment devoted to the study of cosmic rays and their interactions at primary energies 1014-1018 eV. Main goals of the experiment are the measurement of the all-particle energy spectrum and mass composition in the 1016-1018 eV range by sampling charged (Nch) and muon (Nμ) components of the air shower. The method to derive the energy spectrum and its uncertainties, as well as the implications of the obtained result, is discussed. An overview of the analyses performed by KASCADE-Grande to derive the mass composition of the measured high-energy comic rays is presented as well.

  8. SMART-1 Payload First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, B. H.; SMART-1 Science Technology Working Team

    We present first results from SMART-1's science and technology payload, with a total mass of some 19 kg, featuring many innovative instruments and advanced technologies. A miniaturised high-resolution camera (AMIE) for lunar surface imaging, a near-infrared point-spectrometer (SIR) for lunar mineralogy investigation, and a very compact X-ray spectrometer (D-CIXS) with a new type of detector and micro-collimator which will provide fluorescence spectroscopy and imagery of the Moon's surface elemental composition. The payload also includes an experiment (KaTE) aimed at demonstrating deep-space telemetry and telecommand communications in the X and Ka-bands, a radio-science experiment (RSIS), a deep space optical link (Laser-Link Experiment), using the ESA Optical Ground station in Tenerife, and the validation of a system of autonomous navigation (OBAN) based on image processing. SMART-1 lunar science investigations include studies of the chemical composition of the Moon, of geophysical processes (volcanism, tectonics, cratering, erosion, deposition of ices and volatiles) for comparative planetology, and high resolution studies in preparation for future steps of lunar exploration. The mission could address several topics such as the accretional processes that led to the formation of rocky planets, and the origin and evolution of the Earth-Moon system. The SMART-1 observations will be coordinated with Japanese missions Lunar-A and SELENE, to answer open questions about comparative planetology, the origin of the Earth --Moon system, the early evolution of life, the planetary environment and the existence of in-situ resources necessary to support human presence (e.g. water, oxygen). With their science and technology results, these missions can be considered as preparatory missions for future robotic and human exploration of the solar system.

  9. Huygens GCMS Results from Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niemann, Hasso B.; Demick, Jaime; Kasprzak, Wayne; Atreya, Sushil; Owen, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    The Huygens Probe executed a successful entry, descent and impact on the Saturnian moon of Titan on January 14, 2005. The Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) instrument conducted isotopic and compositional measurements throughout the two and one half hour descent from 146 km altitude, and on the surface for 69 minutes until loss of signal from the orbiting Cassini spacecraft. The GCMS incorporated a quadrupole mass filter with a secondary electron multiplier detection system. The gas sampling system provided continuous direct atmospheric composition measurements and batch sampling through three gas chromatographic (GC) columns, a chemical scrubber and a hydrocarbon enrichment cell. The GCMS gas inlet was heated to prevent condensation, and to evaporate volatiles from the surface after impact. Data products from the GCMS included altitude profiles of the major atmospheric constituents dinitrogen (N2) and methane (CH4), isotope ratios of 14N/15N, 12C/13C, and D/H, mole fractions of radiogenic argon (40Ar) and primordial argon (36Ar), and upper limits on the mole fractions of neon, krypton and xenon, which were found to be absent. Surface measurements confirmed the presence of ethane (C2H6) and cyanogen (C2N2). Later data products expanded atmospheric profiles to include the surface response of C2N2. C2H6, acetylene (C2H2), and carbon dioxide (CO2). More recent results include the profiles of benzene (C6H6) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The GCMS data are being further analyzed to obtain higher precision results and to identify other trace species ion the atmosphere and evaporating from the surface.

  10. Comparative Soot Diagnostics: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Griffin, DeVon W.; Gard, Melissa Y.

    1997-01-01

    detected and suppressed. Prior to CSD, no combustion-generated particulate samples had been collected near the flame zone for well-developed microgravity flames. All of the extant data either came from drop tower tests and therefore only corresponded to the early stages of a fire or were collected far from the flame zone. The fuel sources in the drop tower tests were restricted to laminar gas-jet diffusion flames and very rapidly overheated wire insulation. The gas-jet tests indicated, through thermophoretic sampling, (2) that soot primaries and aggregates (groups of primary particles) in low-gravity may be significantly larger than those in normal gravity (1-g). This raises new scientific questions about soot processes as well as practical issues for particulate size sensitivity and detection alarm threshold levels used in on-orbit smoke detectors. Preliminary tests in the 2.2 second drop tower suggest that particulate generated by overheated wire insulation may be larger in low-g than in 1-g. Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) grids downstream of the fire region in the Wire Insulation Flammability experiment as well as visual observation of long string-like aggregates, further confirm this suggestion. The combined impact of these limited results and theoretical predictions is that, as opposed to extrapolation from l-g data, direct knowledge of low-g combustion particulate is needed for more confident design of smoke detectors for spacecraft. This paper describes the operation and preliminary results of the CSD, a project conceived and developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. The CSD flight experiment was conducted in the Middeck Glovebox Facility (MGBX) on USMP-3. The project is support by NASA Headquarters Microgravity Science and Applications Division and Code Q. The results presented here are from the microgravity portion of the experiment, including the temporal response of the detectors and average sizes of the primary and aggregate particles captured on the

  11. Geophysical Model Research and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pasyanos, M; Walter, W; Tkalcic, H; Franz, G; Flanagan, M

    2004-07-07

    Geophysical models constitute an important component of calibration for nuclear explosion monitoring. We will focus on four major topics: (1) a priori geophysical models, (2) surface wave models, (3) receiver function derived profiles, and (4) stochastic geophysical models. The first, a priori models, can be used to predict a host of geophysical measurements, such as body wave travel times, and can be derived from direct regional studies or even by geophysical analogy. Use of these models is particularly important in aseismic regions or regions without seismic stations, where data of direct measurements might not exist. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed the Western Eurasia and North Africa (WENA) model which has been evaluated using a number of data sets, including travel times, surface waves, receiver functions, and waveform analysis (Pasyanos et al., 2004). We have joined this model with our Yellow Sea - Korean Peninsula (YSKP) model and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) East Asia model to construct a model for all of Eurasia and North Africa. Secondly, we continue to improve upon our surface wave model by adding more paths. This has allowed us to expand the region to all of Eurasia and into Africa, increase the resolution of our model, and extend results to even shorter periods (7 sec). High-resolution models exist for the Middle East and the YSKP region. The surface wave results can be inverted either alone, or in conjunction with other data, to derive models of the crust and upper mantle structure. We are also using receiver functions, in joint inversions with the surface waves, to produce profiles directly under seismic stations throughout the region. In a collaborative project with Ammon, et al., they have been focusing on stations throughout western Eurasia and North Africa, while we have been focusing on LLNL deployments in the Middle East, including Kuwait, Jordan, and the United Arab Emirates. Finally, we have been

  12. Results of Deposition Scoping Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, M.Z.

    2003-03-04

    The processes of crystallization and solid deposit formation that led to the shutdown of the 2H evaporator operation at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and that could possibly cause similar problems in the future or in other evaporators need to be better understood. Through experimentation, thermodynamic modeling, and correlation of scaling to historical tank farm operations, progress has been made in developing guidelines as to the concentrations of silicon and aluminum that can be processed by evaporators while avoiding unacceptable levels of scale formation. However, because of limitations of the thermodynamic model and an insufficient amount of operational data at slightly supersaturated concentration levels, uncertainty still exists regarding acceptable feed concentrations. The objective of this effort is to provide information that can be used in defining acceptable levels of silicon and aluminum in evaporator feed solutions. Data collected previously showed that particle formation reactions can be rapid at evaporator temperatures for elevated silicon and aluminum concentrations. However, insufficient data exists to estimate the silicon and aluminum concentrations above which solids will form in the time frame of evaporator processing. The work described in this report was designed to determine the induction period for solutions of decreasing aluminum and silicon concentration such that the supersaturation level corresponding to a 4-h induction time for particle nucleation/growth in bulk solution can be estimated. In addition, experiments were conducted to explore the supersaturation levels that can result in deposition of solids on metal surfaces at varying aluminum-to-silicon concentration ratios. Laboratory studies of particle growth in solution were conducted at relatively low supersaturation levels. Dynamic-light-scattering (DLS) studies and deposition tests, similar to those performed in FY 2001, were conducted with solutions at relatively low

  13. Results of NSTX Heating Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Mueller; M. Ono; M.G. Bell; R.E. Bell; M. Bitter; C. Bourdelle; D.S. Darrow; P.C. Efthimion; E.D. Fredrickson; D.A Gates; R.J. Goldston; L.R. Grisham; R.J. Hawryluk; K.W. Hill; J.C. Hosea; S.C. Jardin; H. Ji; S.M. Kaye; R. Kaita; H.W. Kugel; D.W. Johnson; B.P. LeBlanc; R. Majeski; E. Mazzucato; S.S. Medley; J.E. Menard; H.K. Park; S.F. Paul; C.K. Phillips; M.H. Redi; A.L. Rosenberg; C.H. Skinner; V.A. Soukhanovskii; B. Stratton; E.J Synakowski; G. Taylor; J.R. Wilson; S.J. Zweben; Y-K.M. Peng; R. Barry; T. Bigelow; C.E. Bush; M. Carter; R. Maingi; M. Menon; P.M. Ryan; D.W. Swain; J. Wilgen; 37 additional authors

    2002-06-18

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton is designed to assess the potential of the low-aspect-ratio spherical torus concept for magnetic plasma confinement. The plasma has been heated by up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection, NBI, at an injection energy of 90 keV and up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave, HHFW, at 30 MHz. NSTX has achieved beta T of 32%. A variety of MHD phenomena have been observed to limit eta. NSTX has now begun addressing E scaling, eta limits and current drive issues. During the NBI heating experiments, a broad Ti profile with Ti up to 2 keV, Ti > Te and a large toroidal rotation. Transport analysis suggests that the impurity ions have diffusivities approaching neoclassical. For L-Mode plasmas, E is up to two times the ITER-89P L-Mode scaling and exceeds the ITER-98pby2 H-Mode scaling in some cases. Transitions to H-Mode have been observed which result in an approximate doubling of tE. after the transition in some conditions. During HH FW heating, Te > Ti and Te up to 3.5 keV were observed. Current drive has been studied using coaxial helicity injection (CHI), which has produced 390 kA of toroidal current and HHFW, which has produced H-modes with significant bootstrap current fraction at low Ip, high q and high{sub etap}.

  14. Cosmic radioactivity and INTEGRAL results

    SciTech Connect

    Diehl, Roland

    2014-05-02

    Gamma-ray lines from radioactive decay of unstable isotopes co-produced by nucleosynthesis in massive stars and supernova have been measured since more than thirty years. Over the past ten years, INTEGRAL complemented the first sky survey made by COMPTEL. The {sup 26}A1 isotope with 1 My decay time had been first direct proof of currently-ongoing nucleosynthesis in our Galaxy. This has now become a tool to study the ∼My history of specific source regions, such as massive-star groups and associations in nearby regions which can be discriminated from the galactic-plane background, and the inner Galaxy, where Doppler shifted lines add to the astronomical information about bar and spiral structure. Recent findings suggest that superbubbles show a remarkable asymmetry, on average, in the spiral arms of our galaxy. {sup 60}Fe is co-produced by the sources of {sup 26}A1, and the isotopic ratio from their nucleosynthesis encodes stellar-structure information. Annihilation gamma-rays from positrons in interstellar space show a puzzling bright and extended source region central to our Galaxy, but also may be partly related to nucleosynthesis. {sup 56}Ni and {sup 44}Ti isotope gamma-rays have been used to constrain supernova explosion mechanisms. Here we report latest results using the accumulated multi-year database of INTEGRAL observations, and discuss their astrophysical interpretations, connecting to other traces of cosmic radioactivity and to other cosmic messengers.

  15. Immunological results in myocardial diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Bolte, H. D.; Schultheiss, P.

    1978-01-01

    Immunological studies have shown new diagnostically important changes in alcoholic and viral myocarditis, as well as in congestive cardiomyopathy. Increased heart size correlated with the degree of congestive heart failure, as well as with negative immunofluorescence and an increased IgA concentration in the serum. These findings may serve as a diagnostic aid in patients with myocardial disease due to alcohol abuse. Viral heart disease is characterized by a variety of symptoms and nuclear antibodies (IgM) can be of help in the differential diagnosis. Heart muscle tissue of patients with congestive cardiomyopathy preferentially binds IgG and IgA. In addition to the other changes these findings are of diagnostic importance. It seems likely that results similar to those obtained for humoral antibodies in congestive cardiomyopathy will apply in the correlation of the haemodynamic status of the patients. The pathophysiological implication of these findings is not clear at present, but the evolution of congestive cardiomyopathy appears to be associated with binding of immunoglobulin to the myocardium, as well as with humoral antiheart antibodies. PMID:704517

  16. First Results From EUNIS 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, D. M.; Thomas, R. J.; Davila, J. M.; Brosius, J. W.; Swartz, M.; Jordan, S. D.

    2005-12-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Normal-Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS) is a sounding rocket experiment to investigate the energetics of the solar corona and hotter transition region through high-resolution imaging spectroscopy with a rapid (2 second) cadence. Pre-flight characterization of throughput has demonstrated that EUNIS is the most sensitive solar EUV spectrograph in existence, having over 100 times the throughput of its predecessor, the Solar Extreme ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph (SERTS). We report initial results from the first flight in November 2005 from White Sands Missile Range. The main scientific goal of the first EUNIS flight is to extend the investigation of transient phenomena, such as nanoflares and blinkers, to shorter timescales than has been possible with previous EUV spectrographs. The two independent optical systems of EUNIS record spatially co-aligned spectra over two passbands (170--205 Å and 300--370 Å) simultaneously with spectral resolution of 60 mÅ or 120 mÅ, respectively. The longwave passband includes He II 304 Å and strong lines from Fe XI--XVI. The shortwave passband has a sequence of very strong Fe IX--XIII lines. Together, the EUNIS telescopes furnish a wide range of temperature and density diagnostics and enable underflight calibration of instrumental passbands on the SOHO, TRACE, Solar-B, and STEREO missions.

  17. Results from the NEXT prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, C. A. B.; NEXT Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    NEXT-100 is an electroluminescent high pressure Time Projection Chamber currently under construction. It will search for the neutrino-less double beta decay in 136Xe at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory. NEXT-100 aims to achieve nearly intrinsic energy resolution and to highly suppress background events by taking advantage of the unique properties of xenon in the gaseous phase as the detection medium. In order to prove the principle of operation and to study which are the best operational conditions, two prototypes were constructed: NEXT-DEMO and NEXT-DBDM. In this paper we present the latest results from both prototypes. We report the improvement in terms of light collection (~ 3×) achieved by coating the walls of NEXT-DEMO with tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB), the outstanding energy resolution of 1 % (Full Width Half Maximum) from NEXT-DBDM as well as the tracking capabilities of this prototype (2.1 mm RMS error for point-like depositions) achieved by using a square array of 8 × 8 SiPMs.

  18. Visible Nulling Coronagraph Testbed Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker; Woodruff, Robert; Vasudevan, Gopal; Rizzo, Maxime; Thompson, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The Extrasolar Planetary Imaging Coronagraph (EPIC) is a NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept study and a proposed NASA Discovery mission to image and characterize extrasolar giant planets in orbits with semi-major axes between 2 and 10 AU. EPIC would provide insights into the physical nature of a variety of planets in other solar systems complimenting radial velocity (RV) and astrometric planet searches. It will detect and characterize the atmospheres of planets identified by radial velocity surveys, determine orbital inclinations and masses, characterize the atmospheres around A and F stars, observed the inner spatial structure and colors of inner Spitzer selected debris disks. EPIC would be launched to heliocentric Earth trailing drift-away orbit, with a 5-year mission lifetime. The starlight suppression approach consists of a visible nulling coronagraph (VNC) that enables starlight suppression in broadband light from 480-960 nm. To demonstrate the VNC approach and advance it's technology readiness we have developed a laboratory VNC and have demonstrated white light nulling. We will discuss our ongoing VNC work and show the latest results from the VNC testbed.

  19. SPA Meteor Section Results: 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair

    2013-10-01

    A report based on meteor data analyses from 2008 performed by the SPA Meteor Section is given with some discussion. Items detailed comprise: the Quadrantid peak on January 4 which may have had an unusual dip in activity partway through; the Perseid maximum, which seemed to produce two peaks, by far the strongest-recorded of which was around 02h UT on August 13; a meteor outburst on September 9 probably due to the September epsilon-Perseids, for which the radio results suggested activity was present at a stronger level for longer than previous visual and video findings had supposed, perhaps with more than one maximum; another stronger than expected return from the Orionids during October, part of the sequence of unusual events begun in 2006; a fresh Taurid ``swarm'' return in late October to early November, which probably produced somewhat higher activity than normal, if without the increased bright-meteor component observed at some previous returns; strong Leonid activity later in November, from the radio reports, possibly with two peaks; a Geminid maximum in December which showed some curious discrepancies between the limited visual and radio observations; and the Ursids, which may have provided another moderately-enhanced return, with up to four potential peaks recorded by radio observations in the first twelve hours UT of December 22.

  20. ALOHA Cabled Observatory: Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, B. M.; Lukas, R.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2011-12-01

    The ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) was installed 6 June 2011, extending power, network communications and timing to a seafloor node and instruments at 4726 m water depth 100 km north of Oahu. The system was installed using ROV Jason operated from the R/V Kilo Moana. Station ALOHA is the field site of the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) program that has investigated temporal dynamics in biology, physics, and chemistry since 1988. HOT conducts near monthly ship-based sampling and makes continuous observations from moored instruments to document and study climate and ecosystem variability over semi-diurnal to decadal time scales. The cabled observatory system will provide the infrastructure for continuous, interactive ocean sampling enabling new measurements as well as a new mode of ocean observing that integrates ship and cabled observations. The ACO is a prototypical example of a deep observatory system that uses a retired first-generation fiber-optic telecommunications cable. Sensors provide live video, sound from local and distant sources, and measure currents, pressure, temperature, and salinity. Preliminary results will be presented and discussed.

  1. Overview of recent HERMES results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marukyan, Hrachya

    2016-02-01

    An overview of more recent and important results from the HERMES experiment are presented in this paper. HERMES collected a wealth of data using the 27.6 GeV polarized HERA lepton beam and various polarized and unpolarized gaseous targets. This unique data set opens the door to the measurements of observables sensitive to the multidimensional structure of the nucleon. Among them are semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements of azimuthal modulations sensitive to the transverse momentum distributions, such as the leading- twist Sivers and Collins distributions and distributions sensitive to the convolutions of the twist-2 and twist-3 functions. They all provide an information on the three-momentum-dependent quark distributions. Knowledge on the quark distribution as a function of longitudinal momentum and transverse position in impact-parameter space can be accessed, e.g., through exclusive ω—meson leptoproduction, particularly through the measurement of spin density matrix elements and the measurement of azimuthal modulations on transversely polarized proton target. The measurement of Bose-Einstein correlations of hadron pairs in quasi-real leptoproduction are also presented. The transverse polarization of Λ hyperons measured again in quasi-real leptoproduction regime are presented as well. Finally, the new analysis for the search on pentaquark at HERMES are mentioned.

  2. EUPORIAS: plans and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buontempo, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding and ability to forecast climate variability have meant that skilful predictions are beginning to be routinely made on seasonal to decadal (s2d) timescales. Such forecasts have the potential to be of great value to a wide range of decision-making, where outcomes are strongly influenced by variations in the climate. In 2012 the European Commission funded EUPORIAS, a four year long project to develop prototype end-to-end climate impact prediction services operating on a seasonal to decadal timescale, and assess their value in informing decision-making. EUPORIAS commenced on 1 November 2012, coordinated by the UK Met Office leading a consortium of 24 organisations representing world-class European climate research and climate service centres, expertise in impacts assessments and seasonal predictions, two United Nations agencies, specialists in new media, and commercial companies in climate-vulnerable sectors such as energy, water and tourism. The poster describes the setup of the project, its main outcome and some of the very preliminary results.

  3. SAA drift:experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Kudela, K.; Romashova, V. V.; Drozdov, A. Yu.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth's magnetic field connected with magnetic momentum changing. Besides these variations affects on the trapped belt South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations including Space Shuttle short-time flights approved the existence SAA westward drift with speed 0.1-1.0 (deg/year) and northward drift with speed approximately 0.1 (deg/year). In this work we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in SINP MSU in 1972-2003 from different satellites. There were analyzed the fluxes of protons with energy > 50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy > 500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1-1.0 MeV in SAA area and their maxima location. The data about fluxes were obtained onboard the orbital stations ``Salut-6'' (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the identical experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact of the SAA westward drift. Moreover the same analysis of maximum flux location of electrons with hundreds keV energy (satellites ``Kosmos-484'' (1972), ``Interkosmos-17'' (1977) and ``Activny'' (``Interkosmos-24'', 1991)) confirmed not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  4. Bell Canyon test and results

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, C. L.; Hunter, T. O.

    1980-01-01

    The purposes of the Borehold Plugging Program are: to identify issues associated with sealing boreholes and shafts; to establish a data base from which to assess the importance of these issues; and to develop sealing criteria, materials, and demonstrative test for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The Bell Canyon Test described in this report is one part of that program. Its purpose was to evaluate, in situ, the state of the art in borehole plugs and to identify and resolve problems encountered in evaluating a typical plug installation in anhydrite. The test results are summarized from the work of Peterson and Christensen and divided into two portions: system integrity and wellbore characterization tests prior to plug installation, and a series of tests to evaluate isolation characteristics of the 1.8-m-long plug. Conclusions of the Bell Canyon Test are: brine and fresh-water grouts, with acceptable physical properties in the fluid and hardened states, have been developed; the field data, taken together with laboratory data, suggest that the predominant flow into the test region occurs through the cement plug/borehold interface region, with lesser contributions occurring through the wellbore damage zone, the plug core, and the surrounding undisturbed anhydrite bed; and the 1.8-m-long by 20-cm-diameter grout plug, installed in anhydrite at a depth of 1370 m in the AEC-7 borehole, limits flow from the high pressure Bell Canyon aquifer to 0.6 liters/day.

  5. Results of PLACES data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettie, C. W.

    1982-09-01

    The results of analyses performed to support PLACES data reduction and data interpretation are presented. Beacon receiver measurements of the scattering of a 100 MHz pseudo-noise beacon signal BPSK modulated at a 10 MHz rate were made during an occulatation by the structured IRIS ion cloud. The scattering produced features in the received St. George Island signal that are shown to be in good quantitative agreement with propagation effect predictions produced from an optically derived model of the ion cloud extent. The features in the received data are also in qualitative agreement with the optical features in a coincident St. George Island photograph. Neutral wind shear rate is determined in the optical analyses to be directed with a 351 deg azimuth with a 1.5 meter per second per kilometer of altitude magnitude. Aircraft propagation measurements of the JAN ion cloud reveal a steady decay of the TEC until the cloud effects vanish at roughly 200 minutes after release. The following mechanism is proposed to explain late time barium cloud decay: Barium ions are removed from the ion cloud as current carriers and are replaced by molecular air ions which quickly recombine. The mechanism is found to be highly efficient. The kHz frequency spurs in the NRL density probe data from JAN are briefly investigated. The spur frequency is found to have no clear-cut dependence on local density, is not confined to the ion cloud region, and at times two spurs are visible in the data.

  6. First results from Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Preliminary results of physical experiments carried out during the Spacelab 2 Shuttle mission are summarized. Attention is given to experiments in the fields of plasma dynamics; solar physics; high-energy astrophysics; and astronomy. Plasma experiments included an ejectable plasma diagnosics package and measurements of the passive charging of the Shuttle vehicle in the surrounding space plasma. The solar physics instrument package consisted of a solar spectral irradiance monitor; a solar optical universal polarimeter (SOUP); and a solar helium abundance high-resolution telescope and spectrograph (HRTS). Astronomical observations were performed using a scanning infrared telescope (IRT) which consisted of a highly baffled herschelian telescope and 10 detectors covering wavelengths from 2 to 120 microns. Cosmic-ray nuclei were detected and analyzed using gas Cerenkov counters and a transition radiation detector. Addition experiments included a thin film fluid dynamics payload and analysis of blood samples taken from the mission specialists. Complete data records from the experiments have now been distributed for an analysis period which will take at least a year. A table listing the Spacelab 2 experiments and their principal investigators is provided.

  7. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  8. Collaborative Behavioral Teratology Study: results.

    PubMed

    Buelke-Sam, J; Kimmel, C A; Adams, J; Nelson, C J; Vorhees, C V; Wright, D C; St Omer, V; Korol, B A; Butcher, R E; Geyer, M A

    1985-01-01

    Behavioral measures used in the Collaborative Behavioral Teratology Study (CBTS) were negative geotaxis (PNDs 7-10), olfactory discrimination (PNDs 9-11), auditory startle habituation (PNDs 18-19 and 57-58), 1-hr activity (PNDs 21, 60, 100 and 120), 23-hr activity (PND 100), activity following a pharmacological challenge (PND 120), and an operant, discrete trial visual discrimination task. Maternal and offspring body weights and the appearance of certain physical landmarks of development were also monitored. The design of the CBTS allowed evaluation of the reproducibility and detection sensitivity of these behavioral test methods, as well as the impact of early testing experience on later behavioral assessment, offspring sex differences in response levels and variability, and the contribution of litter-to-litter and animal-to-animal variation to behavioral measures in a standardized test protocol. The results obtained in this test system are discussed in relation to each of these factors and to the degree of overt toxicity obtained using prenatal treatment with 0, 0.5 or 2.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine sulfate, SC, on gestation days 12-15 (Study 1) or methylmercuric chloride, 0, 2.0 or 6.0 mg/kg by gavage, on gestation days 6-9 (Study 2). PMID:3835454

  9. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zohm, H.; Angioni, C.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V.; Bolshukhin, D.; Bolzonella, T.; Borrass, K.; Brambilla, M.; Braun, F.; Buhler, A.; Carlson, A.; Conway, G. D.; Coster, D. P.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Eich, T.; Engelhardt, K.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Finken, K. H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Fournier, K. B.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Goodman, T.; Gruber, O.; Gude, A.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heger, B.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L. D.; Igochine, V.; Jacchia, A.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Keller, A.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurki-Suonio, T.; Kurzan, B.; Lang, P. T.; Lasnier, C.; Lauber, P.; Laux, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Leuterer, F.; Lohs, A.; Lorenz, A.; Lorenzini, R.; Maggi, C.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Mantica, P.; Maraschek, M.; Martines, E.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, P.; Merkel, R.; Merkl, D.; Mertens, V.; Monaco, F.; Mück, A.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Na, Y.-S.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Nguyen, F.; Nishijima, D.; Nishimura, Y.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S. D.; Poli, E.; Proschek, M.; Pugno, R.; Quigley, E.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Saarelma, S.; Sandmann, W.; Savtchkov, A.; Sauter, O.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schwarz, E.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A. C. C.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Urano, H.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, D.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Westerhof, E.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Würsching, E.; Yoon, S.-W.; Yu, Q.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.

    2003-12-01

    Recent results from the ASDEX Upgrade experimental campaigns 2001 and 2002 are presented. An improved understanding of energy and particle transport emerges in terms of a 'critical gradient' model for the temperature gradients. Coupling this to particle diffusion explains most of the observed behaviour of the density profiles, in particular, the finding that strong central heating reduces the tendency for density profile peaking. Internal transport barriers (ITBs) with electron and ion temperatures in excess of 20 keV (but not simultaneously) have been achieved. By shaping the plasma, a regime with small type II edge localized modes (ELMs) has been established. Here, the maximum power deposited on the target plates was greatly reduced at constant average power. Also, an increase of the ELM frequency by injection of shallow pellets was demonstrated. ELM free operation is possible in the quiescent H-mode regime previously found in DIII-D which has also been established on ASDEX Upgrade. Regarding stability, a regime with benign neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) was found. During electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization of NTMs, bgrN could be increased well above the usual onset level without a reappearance of the NTM. Electron cyclotron resonance heating and ECCD have also been used to control the sawtooth repetition frequency at a moderate fraction of the total heating power. The inner wall of the ASDEX Upgrade vessel has increasingly been covered with tungsten without causing detrimental effects on the plasma performance. Regarding scenario integration, a scenario with a large fraction of noninductively driven current (geq50%), but without ITB has been established. It combines improved confinement (tgrE/tgrITER98 ap 1.2) and stability (bgrN les 3.5) at high Greenwald fraction (ne/nGW ap 0.85) in steady state and with type II ELMy edge and would offer the possibility for long pulses with high fusion power at reduced current in ITER.

  10. Recent Results on Singularity Strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, Brien

    2002-12-01

    In this contribution, we review some recent results on strengths of singularities. In a space-time (M,g), let γ[τ0, 0) → M be an incomplete, inextendible causal geodesic, affinely parametrised by τ, tangent ěc k. Let Jτ1 :=set of Jacobi fields along γ, orthogonal to γ and vanishing at time τ1 ≥ τ0 i.e. ěc ξ ∈ J{τ 1 } iff D2ξa = -Rbcdakbkdξc, gabξakb = 0, and ěc ξ (τ 1 ) = 0. Vτ1(τ) := volume element defined by full set of independent elements of Jτ1 (2-dim for null geodesies, 3-dim for time-like); Vτ1 := ∥Vτ1∥. Definition (Tipler 1977): γ terminates in a gravitationally strong singularity if for all 0 > τ1 ≥ τ0, lim infτ→0- Vτ1(τ) = 0. γ... gravitationally weak ... lim infτ→0- Vτ1(τ) > 0. The interpretation is that at a strong singularity, an extended body, e.g. a gravitational wave detector, is crushed to zero volume by the singularity. Tipler's definition does not take account of the possibility that (i) V → ∞ or (ii) V → finite, non-zero value, but with infinite stretching/crushing in orthogonal directions ('spaghettifying singularity'). Extended definition (Nolan 1999): strong if either V → 0,∞ or if for every τ1, there is an element ěc ξ of Jτ1 satisfying ||ěc ξ || -> 0. Otherwise weak. (Ori 2000): singularity is 'deformationally strong' if either (i) it is Tipler-strong or (ii) for every τ1, there is an element ěc ξ of Jτ1 satisfying ||ěc ξ || -> ∞ . Otherwise, deformationally weak...

  11. Mobile evaporator corrosion test results

    SciTech Connect

    Rozeveld, A.; Chamberlain, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Laboratory corrosion tests were conducted on eight candidates to select a durable and cost-effective alloy for use in mobile evaporators to process radioactive waste solutions. Based on an extensive literature survey of corrosion data, three stainless steel alloys (304L, 316L, AL-6XN), four nickel-based alloys (825, 625, 690, G-30), and titanium were selected for testing. The corrosion tests included vapor phase, liquid junction (interface), liquid immersion, and crevice corrosion tests on plain and welded samples of candidate materials. Tests were conducted at 80{degrees}C for 45 days in two different test solutions: a nitric acid solution. to simulate evaporator conditions during the processing of the cesium ion-exchange eluant and a highly alkaline sodium hydroxide solution to simulate the composition of Tank 241-AW-101 during evaporation. All of the alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the alkaline test solution. Corrosion rates were very low and localized corrosion was not observed. Results from the nitric acid tests showed that only 316L stainless steel did not meet our performance criteria. The 316L welded interface and crevice specimens had rates of 22.2 mpy and 21.8 mpy, respectively, which exceeds the maximum corrosion rate of 20 mpy. The other welded samples had about the same corrosion resistance as the plain samples. None of the welded samples showed preferential weld or heat-affected zone (HAZ) attack. Vapor corrosion was negligible for all alloys. All of the alloys except 316L exhibited either {open_quotes}satisfactory{close_quotes} (2-20 mpy) or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} (<2 mpy) corrosion resistance as defined by National Association of Corrosion Engineers. However, many of the alloys experienced intergranular corrosion in the nitric acid test solution, which could indicate a susceptibility to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in this environment.

  12. Pouchitis: result of microbial imbalance?

    PubMed Central

    Ruseler-van Embden, J G; Schouten, W R; van Lieshout, L M

    1994-01-01

    To elucidate the role of microbiological factors in pouchitis, this study investigated the composition of ileal reservoir microflora, the mucus degrading capacity of bacterial enzymes as well as the pH and the proteolytic activity of pouch effluent. Stool samples were collected from five patients with pouchitis and nine patients without pouchitis. The flora of patients with pouchitis had an increased number of aerobes, a decreased ratio anaerobes to aerobes, less bifidobacteria and anaerobic lactobacilli, more Clostridium perfringens, and several species that were not found in control patients (for example, fungi). Furthermore the pH was significantly higher in patients with pouchitis (median value 6.5) than in control patients (5.4). To find out if the pH might influence the breakdown of intestinal mucus glycoproteins, the activity of glycosidases and proteases, and the degradation of hog gastric mucin by the pouch flora was tested at pH 5.2-7.6. Some glycosidases were inhibited, others were stimulated by a low pH, however, in each sample the proteolytic activity was inhibited for 75% at pH 5.2 compared with pH 6.8 and 7.6. Degradation of hog gastric mucin by the pouch flora was an active process at pH 7.2: within two to four hours of incubation more than half of the mucin was degraded. At pH 5.2 it took twice as long. It is concluded that pouchitis possibly results from instability of the flora in the pouch, which causes homeostasis to disappear (dysbiosis), and the protection of the pouch epithelium by the mucus layer becomes affected by increased activity of bacterial and host derived enzymes. PMID:8200561

  13. An overview of FTU results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, P.; Alessi, E.; Amicucci, L.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Artaserse, G.; Barbato, E.; Belli, F.; Bertocchi, A.; Bin, W.; Boncagni, L.; Botrugno, A.; Briguglio, S.; Bruschi, A.; Calabrò, G.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Cianfarani, C.; Cirant, S.; Crisanti, F.; D'Arcangelo, O.; De Angeli, M.; De Angelis, R.; Di Matteo, L.; Di Troia, C.; Esposito, B.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Fogaccia, G.; Frigione, D.; Fusco, V.; Gabellieri, L.; Galperti, C.; Garavaglia, S.; Giovannozzi, E.; Granucci, G.; Grossetti, G.; Grosso, G.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Iannone, F.; Krivska, A.; Kroegler, H.; Lazzaro, E.; Lontano, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Marchetto, C.; Marinucci, M.; Marocco, D.; Mazzitelli, G.; Mazzotta, C.; Milovanov, A.; Minelli, D.; Mirizzi, F. C.; Moro, G. A.; Napoli, F.; Nowak, S.; Orsitto, F. P.; Pacella, D.; Panaccione, L.; Panella, M.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Podda, S.; Pizzuto, A.; Pucella, G.; Ramogida, G.; Ravera, G.; Romano, A.; Sozzi, C.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.; Viola, B.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zanza, V.; Zerbini, M.; Zonca, F.; Aquilini, M.; Cefali, P.; Di Ferdinando, E.; Di Giovenale, S.; Giacomi, G.; Gravanti, F.; Grosso, A.; Mellera, V.; Mezzacappa, M.; Pensa, A.; Petrolini, P.; Piergotti, V.; Raspante, B.; Rocchi, G.; Sibio, A.; Tilia, B.; Torelli, C.; Tulli, R.; Vellucci, M.; Zannetti, D.

    2013-10-01

    Since the 2010 IAEA-FEC Conference, FTU has exploited improvements in cleaning procedures and in the density control system to complete a systematic exploration of access to high-density conditions in a wide range of plasma currents and magnetic fields. The line-averaged densities at the disruptive limit increased more than linearly with the toroidal field, while no dependence on plasma current was found; in fact, the maximum density of 4.3 × 1020 m-3 was reached at B = 8 T even at the minimum current of 0.5 MA, corresponding to twice the Greenwald limit. The lack of plasma current dependence was due to the increase in density peaking with the safety factor. Experiments with the 140 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system were focused on the sawtooth (ST) period control and on the commissioning of a new launcher with real-time steering capability that will act as the front-end actuator of a real-time system for ST period control and tearing mode stabilization. Various ECRH and electron cyclotron current-drive modulation schemes were used; with the fastest one, the ST period synchronized with an 8 ms modulation period. The observed period variations were simulated using the JETTO code with a critical shear model for the crash trigger. The new launcher was of the plug-in type, allowing quick insertion and connection to the transmission line. Both beam characteristics and steering speed were in line with design expectation. Experimental results on the connection between improved coupling of lower hybrid waves in high-density plasmas and reduced wave spectral broadening were interpreted by fully kinetic, non-linear model calculations. A dual-frequency, time-of-flight diagnostic for the measurement of density profiles was developed and successfully tested. Fishbone-like instabilities driven by energetic electrons were simulated by the hybrid MHD-gyrokinetic XHMGC code.

  14. Corral Monitoring System assessment results

    SciTech Connect

    Filby, E.E.; Haskel, K.J.

    1998-03-01

    This report describes the results of a functional and operational assessment of the Corral Monitoring Systems (CMS), which was designed to detect and document accountable items entering or leaving a monitored site. Its development was motivated by the possibility that multiple sites in the nuclear weapons states of the former Soviet Union might be opened to such monitoring under the provisions of the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. The assessment was performed at three levels. One level evaluated how well the planned approach addressed the target application, and which involved tracking sensitive items moving into and around a site being monitored as part of an international treaty or other agreement. The second level examined the overall design and development approach, while the third focused on individual subsystems within the total package. Unfortunately, the system was delivered as disassembled parts and pieces, with very poor documentation. Thus, the assessment was based on fragmentary operating data coupled with an analysis of what documents were provided with the system. The system design seemed to be a reasonable match to the requirements of the target application; however, important questions about site manning and top level administrative control were left unanswered. Four weaknesses in the overall design and development approach were detected: (1) poor configuration control and management, (2) inadequate adherence to a well defined architectural standard, (3) no apparent provision for improving top level error tolerance, and (4) weaknesses in the object oriented programming approach. The individual subsystems were found to offer few features or capabilities that were new or unique, even at the conceptual level. The CMS might possibly have offered a unique combination of features, but this level of integration was never realized, and it had no unique capabilities that could be readily extracted for use in another system.

  15. VGOS operations and geodetic results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niell, A. E.; Beaudoin, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    The next generation geodetic VLBI instrument is being developed with a goal of 1 mm position uncertainty in twenty-four hours. The broadband signal chain, which is essential for obtaining the required delay accuracy from a network of relatively small antennas, has been implemented on the 12 meter antenna at Goddard Space Flight Center, Maryland, USA, and on the 18 meter Westford antenna at Haystack Observatory, Massachusetts, USA. Several observing sessions have been carried out to evaluate and demonstrate system performance as new capabilities are implemented. The first twenty-four hour session was conducted in 2013 May during which several new features of the VGOS system were demonstrated. These include automated data acquisition under Field System control, which will be essential for unattended operation. For that session more than 1100 observations were made at a rate of 48 scans per hour, a factor of three higher than for current geodetic sessions. This high density of observations is one of the main goals of the new systems and is expected to lead to better estimation of the atmosphere delays, a primary error source limiting the geodetic accuracy. To compensate for the smaller antennas needed for the high slew rates, the radio-frequency signals were recorded in four bands spanning 3.2 GHz to 8.8 GHz at a total data rate of 8 Gigabits per second. The total data volume at each site was about 40 Terabytes. Because of potential damage to the VLBI receiver from the Satellite Laser Ranging system aircraft avoidance radar at GSFC, observations within a 40 degree cone to the south of the VLBI site in the direction of the SLR were masked out. This loss of sky coverage increases the uncertainty in the site position estimate relative to that which could be made with full sky coverage. Geodetic results from this and subsequent sessions will be reported.

  16. [Results for SHEBA/FIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Atmospheric Research Laboratory's Radiation Measurement System (RAMS) was on the NCAR C-130 aircraft in May and July 1998, collecting radiometric data on the science flights conducted in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ship. These measurements were part of the FIRE Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE ACE). Analysis of some of the data focused on the absorption, reflection, and transmittance of Arctic clouds, especially compared to model results. In order to assess the absorption of solar radiation by the clear and cloudy atmosphere in the Arctic the measurements from the radiometers were combined in pairs of above-cloud segments and below-cloud segments. To get these pairs, the data for all sixteen of the flights (8 in May and 8 in July) were examined for occurrences of low-altitude segments in proximity to high-altitude segments. The low-altitude data are then treated as measurements of the bottom of a layer and the high-altitude data are taken as measurements of the top of the layer. With measurements of the upwelling and downwelling irradiances above and below a layer one can determine the reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance of the layer. Attachment: Doelling, D.R., P. Minnis, D.A. Spangenberg, V. Chakrapani, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, Cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere during FIRE ACE derived from AVHRR data, J. Geophys. Res. 106, 15,279-15,296,2001. Minnis, P., D.R. Doelling, D.A. Spangenberg, A. Mahesh, S.K. Pope, and F.P.J. Valero, AVHRR-derived cloud radiative forcing over the ARM NSA and SHEBA site during FIRE ACE, abstract submitted to the ARM Science Team Meeting, San Antonio, TX, M a . 13-17,2000. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic during FIRE-ACE, presented as a poster at the American Geophysical Union meeting, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 13-17, 1999. Pope, S.K., and F.P.J. Valero, Measured and modeled radiometric fluxes in the Arctic

  17. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Bosch, H.-S.; Günter, S.; Herrmann, A.; Kallenbach, A.; Kaufmann, M.; Krieger, K.; Lackner, K.; Mertens, V.; Neu, R.; Ryter, F.; Schweinzer, J.; Stäbler, A.; Suttrop, W.; Wolf, R.; Asmussen, K.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bessenrodt-Weberpals, M.; Borrass, K.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brückner, R.; Brüsehaber, B.; Büchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Callaghan, H. P.; Carlson, A.; Coster, D. P.; Cupido, L.; de Peña Hempel, S.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Feist, H.-U.; Franzen, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Fussmann, G.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Haas, G.; Hallatschek, K.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herppich, G.; Herrmann, W.; Hofmeister, F.; Holzhauer, E.; Jacobi, D.; Kakoulidis, M.; Karakatsanis, N.; Kardaun, O.; Khutoretski, A.; Kollotzek, H.; Kötterl, S.; Kraus, W.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L. L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Manso, M.; Maraschek, M.; Markoulaki, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Merkel, R.; Meskat, J. P.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Napiontek, B.; Neu, G.; Neuhauser, J.; Niethammer, M.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Raupp, G.; Reinmüller, K.; Riedl, R.; Rohde, V.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, H.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweizer, S.; Schwörer, R. R.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Thoma, A.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Verbeek, H.; Vollmer, O.; Wedler, H.; Weinlich, M.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zohm, H.; Zouhar, M.

    1999-09-01

    The closed ASDEX Upgrade Divertor II, `LYRA', is capable of handling heating powers of up to 20 MW or P/R of 12 MW/m, owing to a reduction of the maximum heat flux to the target plates by more than a factor of 2 compared with the open Divertor I. This reduction is caused by high radiative losses from carbon and hydrogen inside the divertor region and is in agreement with B2-EIRENE modelling predictions. At medium densities in the H mode, the type I ELM behaviour shows no dependence on the heating method (NBI, ICRH). ASDEX Upgrade-JET dimensionless identity experiments showed compatibility of the L-H transition with core physics constraints, while in the H mode confinement, inconsistencies with the invariance principle were established. At high densities close to the Greenwald density, the MHD limited edge pressures, the influence of divertor detachment on separatrix parameters and increasing edge transport lead to limited edge densities and finally to temperatures below the critical edge temperatures for H mode. This results in a drastic increase of the H mode threshold power and an upper H mode density limit with gas puff refuelling. The H mode confinement degradation approaching this density limit is caused by the ballooning mode limited edge pressures and `stiff' temperature profiles relating core and edge temperatures. Repetitive high field side pellet injection allows for H mode operation well above the Greenwald density; moreover, higher confinement than with gas fuelling is found up to the highest densities. Neoclassical tearing modes limit the achievable β depending on the collisionality at the resonant surface. In agreement with the polarization current model, the onset β is found to be proportional to the ion gyroradius in the collisionless regime, while higher collisionalities are stabilizing. The fractional energy loss connected with saturated modes at high pressures is about 25%. A reduction of neoclassical mode amplitude and an increase of β have

  18. Pluto System Surface Composition Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present an overview of surface composition discoveries from New Horizons' exploration of the Pluto system. The emphasis will be on results that could only have been obtained thanks to the uniquely high spatial resolution provided by a spacecraft visit. The Ralph instrument is New Horizons' primary tool for investigating surface compositions in the Pluto system. Ralph consists of a near-infrared spectral imager sharing a 75 mm aperture telescope assembly with a color CCD camera system. The Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) component of Ralph provides spectral coverage from 1.25 - 2.5 µm, at a resolving power (λ/Δλ) of 240. Ices such as CH4, N2, CO, CO2, C2H6, NH3, and H2O have uniquely diagnostic absorption bands in this wavelength region. The Multi-spectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) has 7 CCD arrays of which 4 have interference filters affixed directly on the focal plane. The filters pass wavelengths ranging from 400 through 975 nm, sensitive to coloration by tholin-type materials as well as a weak CH4 ice absorption band at 890 nm. Both Ralph components are usually operated in a scanning mode, rotating the spacecraft about its Z axis to sweep Ralph's field of view across the scene such that each point in the scene is eventually imaged at each wavelength. The width of the scanned region is 0.9 degrees divided into 256 spatial pixels for LEISA and 5.7 degrees spanned by 5000 pixels for MVIC. Over the course of the summer 2015 flyby, numerous Ralph observations targeted the various bodies in the Pluto system. As of late 2015, transmission of the data to Earth continues, but already a number of spectacular data sets are available for analysis, including LEISA scans of Pluto at 6 to 7 km/pixel and of Charon at 3 km/pixel, as well as MVIC scans of Pluto at 700 m/pixel and of Charon at 5 km/pixel. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  19. Recent Opportunity Microscopic Imager Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Yingst, R.; Team, A.

    2013-12-01

    Opportunity. The extremely soft bedrock exposed at a Whitewater Lake outcrop target dubbed 'Azilda' is mostly fine-grained, with dispersed 2-5 mm-diameter spherules and resistant veins. This target was easily abraded by the RAT, exposing a sandstone-like texture, but the sorting of grains is difficult to determine at MI resolution. Darker, erosion-resistant veneers, similar to desert varnishes on Earth, appear to record aqueous alteration that post-dates the formation of the Ca sulfate veins; they likely contain the nontronite that is observed by CRISM in this area. The inferred neutral pH and relatively low temperature of the fluids involved in these phases of alteration would have provided a habitable environment for life if it existed on Mars at that time. Because Opportunity can no longer directly sense phyllosilicate mineralogy with the MiniTES or Mössbauer spectrometers, it is focusing on characterizing the chemistry with the APXS and texture with the MI of potential phyllosilicate host rocks. The Athena MI continues to return useful images of Mars that are being used to study the textures of rocks and soils at Endeavour crater. Exploration by Opportunity continues, with the rover approaching 'Solander Point' and more exposures of phyllosilicates detected from orbit; the latest MI results will be presented at the conference.

  20. Overview of ASDEX Upgrade results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, O.; Arslanbekov, R.; Atanasiu, C.; Bard, A.; Becker, G.; Becker, W.; Beckmann, M.; Behler, K.; Behringer, K.; Bergmann, A.; Bilato, R.; Bolshukin, D.; Borrass, K.; Bosch, H.-S.; Braams, B.; Brambilla, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Braun, F.; Brinkschulte, H.; Brückner, R.; Brüsehaber, B.; Büchl, K.; Buhler, A.; Bürbaumer, H.; Carlson, A.; Ciric, M.; Conway, G.; Coster, D. P.; Dorn, C.; Drube, R.; Dux, R.; Egorov, S.; Engelhardt, W.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Fantz, U.; Faugel, H.; Foley, M.; Franzen, P.; Fu, P.; Fuchs, J. C.; Gafert, J.; Gantenbein, G.; Gehre, O.; Geier, A.; Gernhardt, J.; Gubanka, E.; Gude, A.; Günter, S.; Haas, G.; Hartmann, D.; Heinemann, B.; Herrmann, A.; Hobirk, J.; Hofmeister, F.; Hohenöcker, H.; Horton, L.; Hu, L.; Jacobi, D.; Jakobi, M.; Jenko, F.; Kallenbach, A.; Kardaun, O.; Kaufmann, M.; Kendl, A.; Kim, J.-W.; Kirov, K.; Kochergov, R.; Kollotzek, H.; Kraus, W.; Krieger, K.; Kurzan, B.; Kyriakakis, G.; Lackner, K.; Lang, P. T.; Lang, R. S.; Laux, M.; Lengyel, L.; Leuterer, F.; Lorenz, A.; Maier, H.; Mank, K.; Manso, M.-E.; Maraschek, M.; Mast, K.-F.; McCarthy, P. J.; Meisel, D.; Meister, H.; Meo, F.; Merkel, R.; Mertens, V.; Meskat, J. P.; Monk, R.; Müller, H. W.; Münich, M.; Murmann, H.; Neu, G.; Neu, R.; Neuhauser, J.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Nunes, I.; Pautasso, G.; Peeters, A. G.; Pereverzev, G.; Pinches, S.; Poli, E.; Pugno, R.; Raupp, G.; Ribeiro, T.; Riedl, R.; Riondato, S.; Rohde, V.; Röhr, H.; Roth, J.; Ryter, F.; Salzmann, H.; Sandmann, W.; Sarelma, S.; Schade, S.; Schilling, H.-B.; Schlögl, D.; Schmidtmann, K.; Schneider, R.; Schneider, W.; Schramm, G.; Schweinzer, J.; Schweizer, S.; Scott, B. D.; Seidel, U.; Serra, F.; Sesnic, S.; Sihler, C.; Silva, A.; Sips, A.; Speth, E.; Stäbler, A.; Steuer, K.-H.; Stober, J.; Streibl, B.; Strumberger, E.; Suttrop, W.; Tabasso, A.; Tanga, A.; Tardini, G.; Tichmann, C.; Treutterer, W.; Troppmann, M.; Tsois, N.; Ullrich, W.; Ulrich, M.; Varela, P.; Vollmer, O.; Wenzel, U.; Wesner, F.; Wolf, R.; Wolfrum, E.; Wunderlich, R.; Xantopoulos, N.; Yu, Q.; Zarrabian, M.; Zasche, D.; Zehetbauer, T.; Zehrfeld, H.-P.; Zeiler, A.; Zohm, H.

    2001-10-01

    Ion and electron temperature profiles in conventional L and H mode on ASDEX Upgrade are generally stiff and limited by a critical temperature gradient length ∇T/T as given by ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence. ECRH experiments indicate that electron temperature (Te) profiles are also stiff, as predicted by electron temperature gradient turbulence with streamers. Accordingly, the core and edge temperatures are proportional to each other and the plasma energy is proportional to the pedestal pressure for fixed density profiles. Density profiles are not stiff, and confinement improves with density peaking. Medium triangularity shapes (δ<0.45) show strongly improved confinement up to the Greenwald density nGW and therefore higher βvalues, owing to increasing pedestal pressure, and H mode density operation extends above nGW. Density profile peaking at nGW was achieved with controlled gas puffing rates, and first results from a new high field side pellet launcher allowing higher pellet velocities are promising. At these high densities, small type II ELMs provide good confinement with low divertor power loading. In advanced scenarios the highest performance was achieved in the improved H mode with HL-89PβN approx 7.2 at δ = 0.3 for five confinement times, limited by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) at low central magnetic shear (qmin approx 1). The T profiles are still governed by ITG and trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence, and confinement is improved by density peaking connected with low magnetic shear. Ion internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges - mostly with reversed shear (qmin>1) and L mode edge - achieved HL-89P <= 2.1 and are limited to βN <= 1.7 by internal and external ideal MHD modes. Turbulence driven transport is suppressed, in agreement with the E × B shear flow paradigm, and core transport coefficients are at the neoclassical ion transport level, where the latter was established by Monte Carlo simulations. Reactor relevant ion

  1. An overview of KSTAR results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jong-Gu; Oh, Y. K.; Yang, H. L.; Park, K. R.; Kim, Y. S.; Kim, W. C.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, S. G.; Na, H. K.; Kwon, M.; Lee, G. S.; Ahn, H. S.; Ahn, J.-W.; Bae, Y. S.; Bak, J. G.; Bang, E. N.; Chang, C. S.; Chang, D. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Cho, K. W.; Cho, M. H.; Choi, M.; Choe, W.; Choi, J. H.; Chu, Y.; Chung, K. S.; Diamond, P.; Delpech, L.; Do, H. J.; Eidietis, N.; England, A. C.; Ellis, R.; Evans, T.; Choe, G.; Grisham, L.; Gorelov, Y.; Hahn, H. S.; Hahn, S. H.; Han, W. S.; Hatae, T.; Hillis, D.; Hoang, T.; Hong, J. S.; Hong, S. H.; Hong, S. R.; Hosea, J.; Humphreys, D.; Hwang, Y. S.; Hyatt, A.; Ida, K.; In, Y. K.; Ide, S.; Jang, Y. B.; Jeon, Y. M.; Jeong, J. I.; Jeong, N. Y.; Jeong, S. H.; Jin, J. K.; Joung, M.; Ju, J.; Kawahata, K.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, Hee-Su; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. K.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J.; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Jong-Su; Kim, Jung-Su; Kim, J. H.; Kim, Kyung-Min; Kim, K. J.; Kim, K. P.; Kim, M. K.; Kim, S. T.; Kim, S. W.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. O.; Ko, J. S.; Ko, W. H.; Kogi, Y.; Kolemen, E.; Kong, J. D.; Kwak, S. W.; Kwon, J. M.; Kwon, O. J.; Lee, D. G.; Lee, D. R.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, K. D.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. I.; Lee, S. M.; Lee, T. G.; Lee, W.; Lee, W. L.; Lim, D. S.; Litaudon, X.; Lohr, J.; Mueller, D.; Moon, K. M.; Na, D. H.; Na, Y. S.; Nam, Y. U.; Namkung, W.; Narihara, K.; Oh, S. T.; Oh, D. G.; Ono, T.; Park, B. H.; Park, D. S.; Park, G. Y.; Park, H.; Park, H. T.; Park, J. K.; Park, J. S.; Park, M. K.; Park, S. H.; Park, S.; Park, Y. M.; Park, Y. S.; Parker, R.; Rhee, D. R.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sakamoto, K.; Shiraiwa, S.; Seo, D. C.; Seo, S. H.; Seol, J. C.; Shi, Y. J.; Son, S. H.; Song, N. H.; Suzuki, T.; Terzolo, L.; Walker, M.; Wallace, G.; Watanabe, K.; Wang, S. J.; Woo, H. J.; Woo, I. S.; Yagi, M.; Yu, Y. W.; Yamada, I.; Yonekawa, Y.; Yoo, C. M.; You, K. I.; Yoo, J. W.; Yun, G. S.; Yu, M. G.; Yoon, S. W.; Xiao, W.; Zoletnik, S.; the KSTAR Team

    2013-10-01

    Since the first H-mode discharges in 2010, the duration of the H-mode state has been extended and a significantly wider operational window of plasma parameters has been attained. Using a second neutral beam (NB) source and improved tuning of equilibrium configuration with real-time plasma control, a stored energy of Wtot ˜ 450 kJ has been achieved with a corresponding energy confinement time of τE ˜ 163 ms. Recent discharges, produced in the fall of 2012, have reached plasma βN up to 2.9 and surpassed the n = 1 ideal no-wall stability limit computed for H-mode pressure profiles, which is one of the key threshold parameters defining advanced tokamak operation. Typical H-mode discharges were operated with a plasma current of 600 kA at a toroidal magnetic field BT = 2 T. L-H transitions were obtained with 0.8-3.0 MW of NB injection power in both single- and double-null configurations, with H-mode durations up to ˜15 s at 600 kA of plasma current. The measured power threshold as a function of line-averaged density showed a roll-over with a minimum value of ˜0.8 MW at \\bar{n}_e\\sim 2\\times 10^{19}\\,m^{-3} . Several edge-localized mode (ELM) control techniques during H-mode were examined with successful results including resonant magnetic perturbation, supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), vertical jogging and electron cyclotron current drive injection into the pedestal region. We observed various ELM responses, i.e. suppression or mitigation, depending on the relative phase of in-vessel control coil currents. In particular, with the 90° phase of the n = 1 RMP as the most resonant configuration, a complete suppression of type-I ELMs was demonstrated. In addition, fast vertical jogging of the plasma column was also observed to be effective in ELM pace-making. SMBI-mitigated ELMs, a state of mitigated ELMs, were sustained for a few tens of ELM periods. A simple cellular automata (‘sand-pile’) model predicted that shallow deposition near the pedestal

  2. SMOS first results over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Yann; Waldteufel, Philippe; Cabot, François; Richaume, Philippe; Jacquette, Elsa; Bitar, Ahmad Al; Mamhoodi, Ali; Delwart, Steven; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    retrieve soil moisture over fairly large and thus inhomogeneous areas. The retrieval is carried out at nodes of a fixed Earth surface grid. To achieve this purpose, after checking input data quality and ingesting auxiliary data, the retrieval process per se can be initiated. This cannot be done blindly as the direct model will be dependent upon surface characteristics. It is thus necessary to first assess what is the dominant land use of a node. For this, an average weighing function (MEAN_WEF) which takes into account the "antenna"pattern is run over the high resolution land use map to assess the dominant cover type. This is used to drive the decision tree which, step by step, selects the type of model to be used as per surface conditions. All this being said and done the retrieval procedure starts if all the conditions are satisfied, ideally to retrieve 3 parameters over the dominant class (the so-called rich retrieval). If the algorithm does not converge satisfactorily, a new trial is made with less floating parameters ("poorer retrieval") until either results are satisfactory or the algorithm is considered to fail. The retrieval algorithm also delivers whenever possible a dielectric constant parameter (using the-so called cardioid approach). Finally, once the retrieval converged, it is possible to compute the brightness temperature at a given fixed angle (42.5°) using the selected forward models applied to the set of parameters obtained at the end of the retrieval process. So the output product of the level 2 soil moisture algorithm should be node position, soil moisture, dielectric constants, computed brightness temperature at 42.5°, flags and quality indices. During the presentation we will describe in more details the algorithm and accompanying work in particular decision tree principle and characteristics, the auxiliary data used and the special and "exotic"cases. We will also be more explicit on the algorithm validation and verification through the data

  3. Design of a modular tetrameric scaffold for the synthesis of membrane-localized D-peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Francis, J. Nicholas; Redman, Joseph S.; Eckert, Debra M.; Kay, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The highly conserved HIV-1 gp41 “pocket” region is a promising target for inhibiting viral entry. PIE12-trimer is a protease-resistant trimeric D-peptide inhibitor that binds to this pocket and potently blocks HIV entry. PIE12-trimer also possesses a reserve of binding energy that provides it with a strong genetic barrier to resistance (“resistance capacitor”). Here we report the design of a modular scaffold employing PEGs of discrete lengths for the efficient optimization and synthesis of PIE12-trimer. This scaffold also allows us to conjugate PIE12-trimer to several membrane-localizing cargoes, resulting in dramatically improved potency and retention of PIE12-trimer’s ability to absorb the impact of resistance mutations. This scaffold design strategy should be of broad utility for the rapid prototyping of multimeric peptide inhibitors attached to potency- or pharmacokinetic-enhancing groups. PMID:22545664

  4. 99Tcm-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile SPECT to evaluate a perfusion index from regional myocardial uptake after exercise and at rest. Results of a four hour protocol in patients with coronary heart disease and in controls.

    PubMed

    Buell, U; Dupont, F; Uebis, R; Kaiser, H J; Kleinhans, E; Reske, S N; Hanrath, P

    1990-02-01

    In 70 patients with angiographically confirmed coronary heart disease and in 10 controls, a 4 h exercise (E) (injection of 150 MBq 99Tcm-MIBI) rest (R) (800 MBq) protocol was employed. Of these, 10 patients with 21 myocardial defects after E received a third injection 24 h after. SPECT was used to image myocardial distribution, and visual findings separated three patterns of perfusion defects after E v. R (reversible [REV], partial reversible (PREV), irreversible (IRR)). Relative regional uptake was obtained from a target-like (33 ROIs) evaluation of short-axis cuts, establishing a perfusion index (PI) by relating the defect uptake to individual maximum uptake (100%) after exercise (PIE), at rest (PIR) and the respective differences Delta PI (PIR-PIE, i.e. filling in by the second 99Tcm-MIBI injection). Visually, the sensitivity was 86% in patients or 69% in involved vessels (stenoses of greater than 33%). Vascular supply areas revealed minimal PIE values of 74.7 +/- 10.6% (control), 62.4 +/- 9.2% (REV), 46.1 +/- 7.7% (PREV) and 33.5 +/- 9.9% (IRR) (p less than 0.01). Delta PI was +13.2% or +10.1% in REV or PREV (n.s.) and +2.1% in IRR (p less than 0.01) or -0.2% in controls. PIE values did not correlate to the degree of stenosis. In areas with old myocardial infarction, the same sequence of significant decrease of PIE with reversibility occurred, independent of the patency of the supplying vessel. 33 of 35 IRR defects (94.3%) revealed PIE of less than 45%, thus predicting IRR already after the E examination. PIR values from the 4 h protocol correlated to PIR values 24 h thereafter with r = 0.94 (n = 21). 99Tcm-MIBI may be employed in a short one day E-R protocol in clinical routine. Evaluation of PI seems to be a promising tool to quantify visual defects aimed at describing the perfusional state of the terminal vascular supply area. PMID:2356070

  5. Results, Results, Results?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Dale

    2000-01-01

    Given the amount of time, energy, and money devoted to provincial achievement exams in Canada, it is disturbing that Alberta students and teachers feel so pressured and that the exams do not accurately reflect what students know. Research shows that intelligence has an (untested) emotional component. (MLH)

  6. Role of constitutive androstane receptor in Toll-like receptor-mediated regulation of gene expression of hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranav; Guo, Tao; Moore, David D; Ghose, Romi

    2014-01-01

    Impairment of drug disposition in the liver during inflammation has been attributed to downregulation of gene expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters. Inflammatory responses in the liver are primarily mediated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs). We have recently shown that activation of TLR2 or TLR4 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), respectively, leads to the downregulation of gene expression of DMEs/transporters. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this downregulation is not fully understood. The xenobiotic nuclear receptors, pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), regulate the expression of DMEs/transporter genes. Downregulation of DMEs/transporters by LTA or LPS was associated with reduced expression of PXR and CAR genes. To determine the role of CAR, we injected CAR(+/+) and CAR(-/-) mice with LTA or LPS, which significantly downregulated (~40%-60%) RNA levels of the DMEs, cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a11, Cyp2a4, Cyp2b10, uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1a1, amine N-sulfotransferase, and the transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, in CAR(+/+) mice. Suppression of most of these genes was attenuated in LTA-treated CAR(-/-) mice. In contrast, LPS-mediated downregulation of these genes was not attenuated in CAR(-/-) mice. Induction of these genes by mouse CAR activator 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene was sustained in LTA- but not in LPS-treated mice. Similar observations were obtained in humanized CAR mice. We have replicated these results in primary hepatocytes as well. Thus, LPS can downregulate DME/transporter genes in the absence of CAR, whereas the effect of LTA on these genes is attenuated in the absence of CAR, indicating the potential involvement of CAR in LTA-mediated downregulation of DME/transporter genes. PMID:24194512

  7. 49 CFR 40.391 - What is the scope of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... in the state in which the transit authority is located. Example 3 to § 40.391. Service Agent R provides a similar array of services. One or more of the following problems exists: R's activities in... serious noncompliance; DOT determines that R's management knew or should have known about...

  8. 49 CFR 40.391 - What is the scope of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... in the state in which the transit authority is located. Example 3 to § 40.391. Service Agent R provides a similar array of services. One or more of the following problems exists: R's activities in... serious noncompliance; DOT determines that R's management knew or should have known about...

  9. 49 CFR 40.391 - What is the scope of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... in the state in which the transit authority is located. Example 3 to § 40.391. Service Agent R provides a similar array of services. One or more of the following problems exists: R's activities in... serious noncompliance; DOT determines that R's management knew or should have known about...

  10. 49 CFR 40.391 - What is the scope of a PIE?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... in the state in which the transit authority is located. Example 3 to § 40.391. Service Agent R provides a similar array of services. One or more of the following problems exists: R's activities in... serious noncompliance; DOT determines that R's management knew or should have known about...

  11. A Patient with Phonologic Alexia Can Learn to Read "Much" from "Mud Pies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Susan Nitzberg; Sample, Diane M.; Oliver, Robyn T.; Lacey, Elizabeth H.; Friedman, Rhonda B.

    2008-01-01

    People with phonologic alexia often have difficulty reading functors and verbs, in addition to pseudowords. Friedman et al. [Friedman, R. B., Sample, D. M, & Lott, S. N. (2002). The role of level of representation in the use of paired associate learning for rehabilitation of alexia. "Neuropsychologia, 40", 223-234] reported a successful treatment…

  12. PIE-R[superscript 2]: The Area of a Circle and Good Behavior Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Robert G.; Allday, R. Allan

    2008-01-01

    When teachers consider behavior management issues in the classroom, they often focus primarily on student behavior. Nevertheless, managing inappropriate student behavior can often be improved by altering teacher behavior. Discussed in the present article are four components of teacher behavior that can lead to more effective management of student…

  13. Pie Graph Data: Number of Americans Dependent on or Abusing Alcohol and Illicit Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1,921 Sedatives / 162 Tranquilizers / 521 Stimulants / 357 Heroin / 359 Hallucinogens / 397 Cocaine / 1,003 Inhalants / 161 Source: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2005 National Survey on Drug Use ...

  14. Life of Pizza Pie: The Implications of Sub-Group Comparisons in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Tara N.

    2013-01-01

    Current educational statistics have pitted subgroups against one another without consideration of the actual population sizes of each group. This paper is intended to provided a clearer understanding of the current usage of sub-group comparisons in American education. (Contains 4 figures.)

  15. Muskox Milk, Ptarmigan Pie and Other Northern Delicacies (Kids Can Cook): Guide to Parents and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This guide for parents and teachers encourages the use of foods in children's learning activities, especially foods that are harvested in the Northwest Territories of Canada and that play a role in health maintenance. The activities also provide an opportunity for children to experience new foods. Sections in the guide discuss: (1) nutrition,…

  16. Serving up food safety: who wants a piece of the pie?

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C W

    2001-01-01

    A total of 12 federal agencies, plus their state counterparts, contribute to the regulatory snarl that governs the safety of the American food supply. With so much federal oversight, one might expect U.S. foods to be virtually risk-free. But this is hardly the case; contaminated food is responsible for 75 million illnesses, 325,000 hospitalizations, and 5,000 deaths in the United States each year. Recent reports from the General Accounting Office and the National Research Council claim that creation of a single agency with centralized authority is the best solution to U.S. food safety problems. Some experts agree that regulatory gaps in food safety highlight the need for centralized leadership, and that more money is necessary to fund the number of inspectors needed to adequately inspect the food supply before it reaches consumers. The single-agency concept has garnered congressional, industry, and scientific support, but the idea isn't without its skeptics, who believe that consolidating food safety under a single agency eliminates checks and balances offered by the current system and, more importantly, runs the risk of politicizing the agency. PMID:11485886

  17. Three Bolognas and a Pizza Pie: Notes on Institutionalization of the European Higher Education System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomusk, Voldemar

    2004-01-01

    Quietly, without attracting too much attention from educational sociologists in Europe, a massive process has been underway for five years that is expected to revolutionize European higher education to an unprecedented extent. Launched by a number of European governments and subsequently taken over by the European Commission, the so-called Bologna…

  18. L'Equin du Pied dans un Contexte de Brulure Grave - Interet du Bilan Photographique

    PubMed Central

    Girbon, J.P.; Maligot, B.; Coiffier, E.; Gonzalez-Gutierrez, L.; Gaussorgues, C.; Lacroix, P.; Braye, F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The incorrect position of the foot in talipes equinus is common in the framework of prolonged confinement to bed in a patient in deep sedation. In the context of severe burns, this incorrect position is difficult to prevent and its fixation by cutaneous shrinkage, which is often associated with a musculotendinous fibrosis, constitutes an important functional after-effect. The onset of talipes equinus is insidious and progressive, and it is therefore important to be watchful both in detection and in prevention. Regular photographic assessment makes it possible to predict its appearance and to take appropriate preventive or curative action. PMID:21991119

  19. Digital Revolution or Digital Divide: Will Rural Teachers Get a Piece of the Professional Development Pie?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadley, Tania

    2010-01-01

    In order to sustain the rural education community, access to high quality professional development opportunities must become a priority. Teachers in rural areas face many challenges in order to access professional learning equitable to their city counterparts. In the current climate, the Federal government of Australia is committed to initiatives…

  20. Payments for Improved Ecostructure (PIE): Funding for the Coexistence of Humans and Wolves in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiedanpää, Juha; Kalliolevo, Hanna; Salo, Matti; Pellikka, Jani; Luoma, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    The gray wolf ( Canis lupus) is a source of concern and a cause of damage to people's livelihoods. In Finland, as in most countries, actual damages are compensated according to the real lost value. However, often, the suffered damages are larger than what is compensated, and worries and fears are not accounted for at all. The purpose of our transdisciplinary action research is to contribute to the process of modifying the scientific, administrative, and everyday habits of mind in order to meet the practical prerequisites of living with the wolf. In 2014, we planned and participated in a process designed to update Finland's wolf population management plan. During our study, we applied e-deliberation, conducted a national wolf survey, and organized solution-oriented workshops in wolf territory areas around Finland. By applying abductive reasoning, we illustrate the basic features of an economic scheme that would help finance and coordinate practical modifications to the ecological, economic, and institutional circumstances and settings in wolf territory areas. The potential economic instrument is based on payments for improved ecostructures. In our paper, we describe the organization, functioning, and financing of this instrument in detail.

  1. The Pied Piper: A Parasitic Beetle’s Melodies Modulate Ant Behaviours

    PubMed Central

    Di Giulio, Andrea; Maurizi, Emanuela; Barbero, Francesca; Sala, Marco; Fattorini, Simone; Balletto, Emilio; Bonelli, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Ants use various communication channels to regulate their social organisation. The main channel that drives almost all the ants’ activities and behaviours is the chemical one, but it is long acknowledged that the acoustic channel also plays an important role. However, very little is known regarding exploitation of the acoustical channel by myrmecophile parasites to infiltrate the ant society. Among social parasites, the ant nest beetles (Paussus) are obligate myrmecophiles able to move throughout the colony at will and prey on the ants, surprisingly never eliciting aggression from the colonies. It has been recently postulated that stridulatory organs in Paussus might be evolved as an acoustic mechanism to interact with ants. Here, we survey the role of acoustic signals employed in the Paussus beetle-Pheidole ant system. Ants parasitised by Paussus beetles produce caste-specific stridulations. We found that Paussus can “speak” three different “languages”, each similar to sounds produced by different ant castes (workers, soldiers, queen). Playback experiments were used to test how host ants respond to the sounds emitted by Paussus. Our data suggest that, by mimicking the stridulations of the queen, Paussus is able to dupe the workers of its host and to be treated as royalty. This is the first report of acoustic mimicry in a beetle parasite of ants. PMID:26154266

  2. Graduate Education in 1984 or 1984 or Bye, Bye American Pie?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, D. Thomas; Civikly, Jean M.

    This essay suggests a new method of educating graduate students in communication. Students follow a prescribed program of courses and experience leading to the particular career they have chosen. Mastery of each stage must be demonstrated before a student goes to the next. Among the methods used are participation in task forces dealing with a…

  3. The Pied Piper of Jazz: Does Jazz Belong at School? Wynton Marsalis Thinks So.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurwitz, Sol

    2001-01-01

    Composer and classical/jazz musician Wynton Marsalis believes that jazz (of all art forms) requires the most democratic skills-such as manners and ability to negotiate with others. Jazz at Lincoln Center is launching a jazz curriculum in fall 2001 that will help kids realize who they are and how to act. (MLH)

  4. Dividing the pie: differential dung pat size utilization by sympatric Haematobia irritans and Musca autumnalis.

    PubMed

    Fowler, F E; Mullens, B A

    2016-06-01

    Horn flies [Haematobia irritans (Diptera: Muscidae) (L.)] and face flies [Musca autumnalis (Diptera: Muscidae) De Geer] use the same larval resource, but their interactions are poorly studied. Dung pats (n = 350) were core sampled in the summers of 2012 and 2013 from irrigated pastures in Pomona, California, U.S.A. (34°03'N, 117°48'W) and held for face fly and horn fly emergence. Surface areas and estimated weights were recorded for each whole pat. Almost half (42.0%) of the pat cores yielded neither fly, 29.7% yielded horn flies only, 12.9% yielded face flies only and 15.4% yielded both flies. Of the fly-positive pats, surface area and mass were larger for face fly-occupied pats, whereas horn fly-occupied pats were smaller. Pats shared by the two species were intermediate. Horn flies per positive core were unaffected by the absence/presence of face flies, but half as many face flies emerged when pats were co-inhabited by horn flies. Face flies inhabited larger pats, which might better resist heating and drying, to which they are susceptible; horn flies inhabited a broad pat size range. Horn fly tolerance of lower dung moisture probably allows horn flies to colonize and survive in a wide range of pats in dry areas like southern California. PMID:26947576

  5. Payments for Improved Ecostructure (PIE): Funding for the Coexistence of Humans and Wolves in Finland.

    PubMed

    Hiedanpää, Juha; Kalliolevo, Hanna; Salo, Matti; Pellikka, Jani; Luoma, Mikael

    2016-09-01

    The gray wolf (Canis lupus) is a source of concern and a cause of damage to people's livelihoods. In Finland, as in most countries, actual damages are compensated according to the real lost value. However, often, the suffered damages are larger than what is compensated, and worries and fears are not accounted for at all. The purpose of our transdisciplinary action research is to contribute to the process of modifying the scientific, administrative, and everyday habits of mind in order to meet the practical prerequisites of living with the wolf. In 2014, we planned and participated in a process designed to update Finland's wolf population management plan. During our study, we applied e-deliberation, conducted a national wolf survey, and organized solution-oriented workshops in wolf territory areas around Finland. By applying abductive reasoning, we illustrate the basic features of an economic scheme that would help finance and coordinate practical modifications to the ecological, economic, and institutional circumstances and settings in wolf territory areas. The potential economic instrument is based on payments for improved ecostructures. In our paper, we describe the organization, functioning, and financing of this instrument in detail. PMID:27329113

  6. Location, Location, Location! Identifying Materials in a Pie-Shaped Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Roxanne Myers

    2005-01-01

    Librarians often face challenges in library configuration and lack of space, collection management, and ease of use. This article briefly describes the challenges and solutions to managing a divided education collection at a comprehensive state university, part of which is housed in the center core of a round building. (Contains 2 figures and 5…

  7. Apple Pie and Ebonics: Language Diversity and Preparation for a Multicultural World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jennifer L.; Martin, Tabitha; Capel, Mandy

    2014-01-01

    All three of us, the authors, are white and do not speak Ebonics, (or African American Language, AAL). How the misperceptions of AAL impact our students inspired our interest in the subject. The title of this piece refers to the ubiquity of AAL, historically, culturally, as an influential cultural wellspring. Although AAL continues to influence…

  8. Act Now to Transform School Systems. 2011 PIE Network Summit Policy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Karen Hawley; Baroody, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The U.S.'s educational system is at a crossroads. Preparing every student for college and careers in the information age requires that school districts invest more and differently in teaching effectiveness, time, individual attention, and information systems. But even before a decline in revenue, district leaders face automatic increases in…

  9. Closing the Gap: Helping California's Veterans Get an Equal Share of the Benefits Pie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winston, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    To blame was a formula in the new GI Bill that provides funding equivalent to the highest-priced postsecondary undergraduate institution in the state. Because California's public schools have traditionally charged "fees" for services and not traditional tuition, many veterans attempting to attend California colleges were excluded from these…

  10. Getting a Piece of the Pie: Schools Need to Be Proactive, Flexible When Pursuing Stimulus Funding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turckes, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    On February 17, 2009, in the midst of economic turmoil and one of the worst recessions since the Great Depression, President Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). This law is intended to: (1) promote job preservation and creation; (2) invest in infrastructure projects; (3) increase economic efficiency;…

  11. Rethinking the Teacher Quality Challenge. 2011 PIE Network Summit Policy Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2011-01-01

    American schools are in a constant, unending race to recruit and then retain some 300,000 teachers annually. Given that U.S. colleges issue a grand total of perhaps 1.5 million four-year diplomas a year across all majors and disciplines, even non-mathematicians can see that the K-12 schools are seeking to recruit about one in five new college…

  12. Pie Suppers and Cake Walks: A Historical Perspective of a Closed Rural Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Ruby; Rud, A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Rural community schools and their educational mission have always provided a sort of connectivity for the rural community. This research takes a closer look at the closing of a small rural community school located in a southern Appalachian region and determines its effects upon the teachers, students, and community culture. Although these students…

  13. Muskox Milk, Ptarmigan Pie and Other Northern Delicacies (Kids Can Cook): Recipes and Related Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Territories Dept. of Education, Yellowknife.

    This profusely illustrated book of recipes encourages the use of foods in children's learning activities, especially foods that are harvested in the Northwest Territories of Canada and that play a role in health maintenance. The activities described also provide an opportunity for children to experience new foods. Introductory material includes…

  14. Getting a Piece of the Pie: R&D at the Apple Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ertel, Monica

    1990-01-01

    The Apple Library (the library at Apple Computer, Inc.) currently reports to the research and development arm of the company, a relationship that has been mutually advantageous. The library has been involved in research through a library users group, a grant program, and a laboratory within the library. (MES)

  15. Diversity [Activities]: The Social Justice Turning Initiative; Culture Shock; Pieces of the Pie; Pictures of Me.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Karen; Collard, Mark; Bigman, Lisa; Kilty, Katie; Chappelle, Sharon

    1999-01-01

    Describes four diversity-related group activities for adolescents or adults, used in adventure- and experiential-education settings. Includes target group, group size, time and space requirements, activity level, props, instructions, and tips for post-activity group reflection and processing. The activities are concerned with social-justice…

  16. Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop Summary to Support the Implementation Plan for PIE Thermal Conductivity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Braase, Lori; Papesch, Cynthia; Hurley, David

    2015-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE)-Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and associated nuclear fuels programs have invested heavily over the years in infrastructure and capability development. With the current domestic and international need to develop Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF), increasing importance is being placed on understanding fuel performance in irradiated conditions and on the need to model and validate that performance to reduce uncertainty and licensing timeframes. INL’s Thermal Properties Capability Development Workshop was organized to identify the capability needed by the various nuclear programs and list the opportunities to meet those needs. In addition, by the end of fiscal year 2015, the decision will be made on the initial thermal properties instruments to populate the shielded cell in the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).

  17. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay

    PubMed Central

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Morgan, Neil V.; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P.; Leo, Vincenzo C.; Jones, Matthew L.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Warner, Timothy D.; Watson, Steve P.; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Gissen, Paul; Daly, Martina E.; Lester, Will; Clark, Justin; Williams, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Marshall, Dianne; Nyatanga, Priscilla; Mann, Pat; Kirwan, Julie; Wilde, Jonathan; Dunkley, Tracey; Greenway, April; Makris, Michael; Pavord, Sue; Dattani, Rashesh; Grimley, Gerry Dolan Charlotte; Stokley, Simone; Astwood, Emma; Chang, Cherry; Foros, Merri; Trower, Linda; Thachil, Jecko; Hay, Charlie; Pike, Gill; Will, Andrew; Grainger, John; Foulkes, Matt; Fareh, Mona; Talks, Kate; Biss, Tina; Kesteven, Patrick; Hanley, John; Vowles, Julie; Basey, Lesley; Barnes, Michelle; Collins, Peter; Rayment, Rachel; Alikhan, Raza; Morris, Ana Guerrero Rebecca; Mansell, Dianne; Toh, Cheng Hock; Martlew, Vanessa; Murphy, Elaine; Lachmann, Robin; Rose, Peter; Chapman, Oliver; Lokare, Anand; Marshall, Kathryn; Khan, Naseem; Keeling, David; Giangrande, Paul; Austin, Steve; Bevan, David; Alamelu, Jayanthi

    2014-01-01

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  18. Characterization of multiple platelet activation pathways in patients with bleeding as a high-throughput screening option: use of 96-well Optimul assay.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Kirkby, Nicholas S; Chan, Melissa V; Lundberg, Martina H; Morgan, Neil V; Bem, Danai; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Jones, Matthew L; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E; Mumford, Andrew D; Warner, Timothy D; Watson, Steve P

    2014-02-20

    Up to 1% of the population have mild bleeding disorders, but these remain poorly characterized, particularly with regard to the roles of platelets. We have compared the usefulness of Optimul, a 96-well plate-based assay of 7 distinct pathways of platelet activation to characterize inherited platelet defects in comparison with light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Using Optimul and LTA, concentration-response curves were generated for arachidonic acid, ADP, collagen, epinephrine, Thrombin receptor activating-peptide, U46619, and ristocetin in samples from (1) healthy volunteers (n = 50), (2) healthy volunteers treated with antiplatelet agents in vitro (n = 10), and (3) patients with bleeding of unknown origin (n = 65). The assays gave concordant results in 82% of cases (κ = 0.62, P < .0001). Normal platelet function results were particularly predictive (sensitivity, 94%; negative predictive value, 91%), whereas a positive result was not always substantiated by LTA (specificity, 67%; positive predictive value, 77%). The Optimul assay was significantly more sensitive at characterizing defects in the thromboxane pathway, which presented with normal responses with LTA. The Optimul assay is sensitive to mild platelet defects, could be used as a rapid screening assay in patients presenting with bleeding symptoms, and detects changes in platelet function more readily than LTA. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.org as #ISRCTN 77951167. PMID:24408324

  19. Overall Plan for Physics Outlining Steps Necessary for Insertion of the LTA and Operation Using a 1/3 MOX Loaded Core

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlovichev, A.M.

    2001-04-09

    Document issued according to Work Release KI-WR04RTP. P. 00-1 describes physics tasks that are included in the current version of ''Roadmap.Level 2'' concerning Reactor tasks of Weapon-grade plutonium disposition problem for VVER-1000. On this base the objective is to identify the physical tasks in FY2000 and in future as a part of global activities on weapon-grade MOX fuel introduction into VVER-1000.

  20. Impurity and defect interactions during laser thermal annealing in Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, R.; Impellizzeri, G.; Piccinotti, D.; La Magna, A.; Fortunato, G.; De Salvador, D.; Carnera, A.; Portavoce, A.; Mangelinck, D.; Privitera, V.; Napolitani, E.

    2016-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms involving dopants, contaminants, and defects in Ge during pulsed melting laser thermal annealing (LTA) are investigated in detail. Samples both un-implanted and implanted with As or B are processed by LTA as well as characterized in terms of chemical (1D and 3D), electrical, and strain profiling. The clustering of As is directly measured by 3D chemical profiling and correlated with its partial electrical activation along with a reduction of the lattice strain induced by As atoms. A semi-quantitative microscopic model involving the interaction with mobile As-vacancy (AsV) complexes is proposed to describe the clustering mechanism. Boron is shown to follow different clustering behavior that changes with depth and marked by completely different strain levels. Oxygen penetrates from the surface into all the samples as a result of LTA and, only in un-implanted Ge, it occupies an interstitial position inducing also positive strain in the lattice. On the contrary, data suggest that the presence of As or B forces O to assume different configurations with negligible strain, through O-V or O-B interactions for the two dopant species, respectively. These data suggest that LTA does not inject a significant amount of vacancies in Ge, at variance with Si, unless As atoms or possibly other n-type dopants are present. These results have to be carefully considered for modeling the LTA process in Ge and its implementation in technology.