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Sample records for lti kanavabrik valmistub

  1. Some Properties and Stability Results for Sector-Bounded LTI Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sandeep; Joshi, Suresh M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents necessary and sufficient conditions for a linear, time-invariant (LTI) system to be inside sector (n, b) in terms of linear matrix inequalities in its state-space realization matrices, which represents a generalization of similar conditions for bounded H(sub infinity)-norm systems. Further, a weaker definition of LTI systems strictly inside closed sector (a, b) is proposed, and state-space characterization of such systems is presented. Sector conditions for stability of the negative feedback interconnection of two LTI systems and for stability of LTI systems with feedback nonlinearities are investigated using the Lyapunov function approach. It is shown that the proposed weaker conditions for an LTI system to be strictly inside a sector are sufficient to establish closed-loop stability of these systems.

  2. Gastric LTi cells promote lymphoid follicle formation but are limited by IRAK-M and do not alter microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Shiu, J; Piazuelo, M B; Ding, H; Czinn, S J; Drakes, M L; Banerjee, A; Basappa, N; Kobayashi, K S; Fricke, W F; Blanchard, T G

    2015-09-01

    Lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells are activated by accessory cell IL-23, and promote lymphoid tissue genesis and antibacterial peptide production by the mucosal epithelium. We investigated the role of LTi cells in the gastric mucosa in the context of microbial infection. Mice deficient in IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, were investigated for increased LTi cell activity, and antibody mediated LTi cell depletion was used to analyze LTi cell dependent antimicrobial activity. H. pylori infected IRAK-M deficient mice developed increased gastric IL-17 and lymphoid follicles compared to wild type mice. LTi cells were present in naive and infected mice, with increased numbers in IRAK-M deficient mice by two weeks. Helicobacter and Candida infection of LTi cell depleted rag1(-/-) mice demonstrated LTi-dependent increases in calprotectin but not RegIII proteins. However, pathogen and commensal microbiota populations remained unchanged in the presence or absence of LTi cell function. These data demonstrate LTi cells are present in the stomach and promote lymphoid follicle formation in response to infection, but are limited by IRAK-M expression. Additionally, LTi cell mediated antimicrobial peptide production at the gastric epithelium is less efficacious at protecting against microbial pathogens than has been reported for other tissues. PMID:25603827

  3. On the LTI Properties of Adaptive Feedforward Systems with Tap Delay-Line Regressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D.

    1998-01-01

    It is shown that an adaptive system whose regressor is formed by tap delay-line (TDL) filtering of a multitone sinusoidal signal is representable as a parallel connection of a linear time-invariant (LTI) block and a linear time-varying (LTV) block.

  4. On The LTI Properties of Adaptive Feedforward Systems With Tap Delay-Line Regressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that an adaptive system whose regressor is formed by tap delay-line (TDL) filtering of a multitone sinusoidal signal is representable as a parallel connection of a linear time-invariant (LTI) block and a linear time-varying (LTV) block.

  5. Membrane-Induced Folding of the Plant Stress Dehydrin Lti301[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eremina, Nadejda

    2016-01-01

    Dehydrins are disordered proteins that are expressed in plants as a response to embryogenesis and water-related stress. The molecular function and structural action of the dehydrins are yet elusive, but increasing evidence points to a role in protecting the structure and functional dynamics of cell membranes. An intriguing example is the cold-induced dehydrin Lti30 that binds to membranes by its conserved K segments. Moreover, this binding can be regulated by pH and phosphorylation and shifts the membrane phase transition to lower temperatures, consistent with the protein’s postulated function in cold stress. In this study, we reveal how the Lti30-membrane interplay works structurally at atomic level resolution in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis suggests that negatively charged lipid head groups electrostatically capture the protein’s disordered K segments, which locally fold up into α-helical segments on the membrane surface. Thus, Lti30 conforms to the general theme of structure-function relationships by folding upon binding, in spite of its disordered, atypically hydrophilic and repetitive sequence signatures. Moreover, the fixed and well-defined structure of the membrane-bound K segments suggests that dehydrins have the molecular prerequisites for higher level binding specificity and regulation, raising new questions about the complexity of their biological function. PMID:27208263

  6. Integral-based event triggering controller design for stochastic LTI systems via convex optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. H.; Marquez, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    The presence of measurement noise in the event-based systems can lower system efficiency both in terms of data exchange rate and performance. In this paper, an integral-based event triggering control system is proposed for LTI systems with stochastic measurement noise. We show that the new mechanism is robust against noise and effectively reduces the flow of communication between plant and controller, and also improves output performance. Using a Lyapunov approach, stability in the mean square sense is proved. A simulated example illustrates the properties of our approach.

  7. A switched state feedback law for the stabilization of LTI systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Santarelli, Keith R.

    2009-09-01

    Inspired by prior work in the design of switched feedback controllers for second order systems, we develop a switched state feedback control law for the stabilization of LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. The control law operates by switching between two static gain vectors in such a way that the state trajectory is driven onto a stable n - 1 dimensional hyperplane (where n represents the system dimension). We begin by briefly examining relevant geometric properties of the phase portraits in the case of two-dimensional systems to develop intuition, and we then show how these geometric properties can be expressed as algebraic constraints on the switched vector fields that are applicable to LTI systems of arbitrary dimension. We then derive necessary and sufficient conditions to ensure stabilizability of the resulting switched system (characterized primarily by simple conditions on eigenvalues), and describe an explicit procedure for designing stabilizing controllers. We then show how the newly developed control law can be applied to the problem of minimizing the maximal Lyapunov exponent of the corresponding closed-loop state trajectories, and we illustrate the closed-loop transient performance of these switched state feedback controllers via multiple examples.

  8. Parameterised controller synthesis for SISO-LTI uncertain plants using frequency domain information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parastvand, Hossein; Khosrowjerdi, Mohammad-Javad

    2016-01-01

    This paper extends the results of a new model-free approach which has been applied to guarantee nominal stability and performance. In this paper, using a particular controller structure, the robust stability (RS) and robust performance (RP) criteria for single input single output linear time invariant (SISO-LTI) plants with multiplicative uncertainty are transformed to affine functions in terms of controller parameters. It is shown that solving the feasibility problem of these new criteria will lead to controllers that guarantee the RS and performance. There is no need for a plant mathematical model. The required data for controller synthesis are just the frequency responses corresponding to limited samples of the uncertain plant. Also, there is no need for exact data at each frequency for the whole set of frequency responses. The approach is also applicable for designing both low- and high-order controllers. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is illustrated by simulation results.

  9. A new 3-D ray tracing method based on LTI using successive partitioning of cell interfaces and traveltime gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Yan; Hu, Ying; Qin, Qian-Qing

    2013-05-01

    We present a new method of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic ray tracing, based on an improvement to the linear traveltime interpolation (LTI) ray tracing algorithm. This new technique involves two separate steps. The first involves a forward calculation based on the LTI method and the dynamic successive partitioning scheme, which is applied to calculate traveltimes on cell boundaries and assumes a wavefront that expands from the source to all grid nodes in the computational domain. We locate several dynamic successive partition points on a cell's surface, the traveltimes of which can be calculated by linear interpolation between the vertices of the cell's boundary. The second is a backward step that uses Fermat's principle and the fact that the ray path is always perpendicular to the wavefront and follows the negative traveltime gradient. In this process, the first-arriving ray path can be traced from the receiver to the source along the negative traveltime gradient, which can be calculated by reconstructing the continuous traveltime field with cubic B-spline interpolation. This new 3-D ray tracing method is compared with the LTI method and the shortest path method (SPM) through a number of numerical experiments. These comparisons show obvious improvements to computed traveltimes and ray paths, both in precision and computational efficiency.

  10. The OsLti6 genes encoding low-molecular-weight membrane proteins are differentially expressed in rice cultivars with contrasting sensitivity to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Morsy, Mustafa R; Almutairi, Abeer M; Gibbons, James; Yun, Song Joon; de Los Reyes, Benildo G

    2005-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is sensitive to chilling particularly at early stages of seedling establishment. Two closely related genes (OsLti6a, OsLti6b), which are induced by low temperature during seedling emergence were isolated from a cold tolerant temperate japonica rice cultivar. These genes are closely related to the Arabidopsis rare cold-inducible (RCI2) and barley low-temperature-inducible (BLT101) genes. Based on direct biochemical and indirect physiological evidence and similarity with a conserved protein domain in the Cluster of Orthologous Groups (COG) database (e.g., yeast PMP3), the rice genes belong to a class of low-molecular-weight hydrophobic proteins involved in maintaining the integrity of the plasma membrane during cold, dehydration and salt stress conditions. Both genes exhibit a genotype-specific expression signature characterized by early and late stress-inducible expression in tolerant and intolerant genotypes, respectively. The differences in temporal expression profiles are consistent with cultivar differences in cold-induced membrane leakiness and seedling vigor. The presence of CRT/DRE promoter cis-elements is consistent with the synchronized expression of OsLti6 genes with the C-repeat binding factor/drought responsive element-binding protein (CBF/DREB) transcriptional activator. The present results indicate that the Oslti6 genes are part of a battery of cold stress defense-related genes regulated by a common switch. PMID:15656983

  11. The all0458/lti46.2 gene encodes a low temperature-induced Dps protein homologue in the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Anabaena variabilis M3.

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Moriyama, Takashi; Toyoshima, Masakazu; Mizusawa, Mika; Tajima, Naoyuki

    2012-10-01

    DNA-binding proteins from starved cells (Dps), which are encoded by many bacterial genomes, protect genomic DNA via non-specific DNA binding, as well as inhibition of free radical formation by chelating Fe(II). In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena, the second gene (lti46.2) in the low temperature-induced gene operon lti46 in strain M3 was found to encode a homologue of Dps, but for a long time this gene remained poorly characterized. A gene cluster, all0459-all0458-all0457, was found later to be 100% identical to the lti46 gene cluster in a closely related strain, PCC 7120. In the present study, we detected ferroxidase activity of the Lti46.2/All0458 protein, which formed a dodecamer, as found in other Dps proteins. In addition, three homologues of all0458 were found in strain PCC 7120, namely, all1173, alr3808 and all4145. We analysed expression of the lti46 or all0459-8-7 gene cluster in both strains, M3 and PCC 7120, and confirmed its induction by low temperature. We found that the All0458-GFP fusion protein and the All1173-GFP fusion protein were localized to the nucleoids. In the all0458 null mutant, the transcript of the alr3808 gene accumulated. These results suggest that there might be complex cooperation of various members of the dps family in protecting the genome from environmental stresses such as changing temperature. PMID:22837304

  12. Thermodynamics of native protein/foreign surface interactions. IV. Calorimetric and microelectrophoretic study of human fibrinogen sorption onto glass and LTI-carbon.

    PubMed

    Chiu, T H; Nyilas, E; Lederman, D M

    1976-01-01

    1. According to a working hypothesis put forward in the previous papers of this series2-4, the initial phases of native blood/foreign surface interactions have been considered within the framework of a physicochemical model of contact activation at the molecular level. The salient features of this hypothesis are: a) the arrival and adsorption of native plasma proteins on a contact surface overwhelmingly precedes that of the cellular blood components; b) the interaction energy that arises between a particular foreign surface and native plasma proteins settling on it, is a characteristic quantity depending upon the effective surface molecular structure as well as the nature of the proteins; c) the "intensity" of native protein/foreign surface interactions can be treated in terms of thermodynamic quantities since these energy terms are independent of the type of forces acting between protein and surface; and d) depending upon the degree to which the adsorption of a native protein is thermodynamically favored by enthalpy and/or entropy factors, the interaction energy can be utilized to induce conformational changes of varying degree in the sorbed protein. 2. Using glass and low temperature isotropic (LTI) carbon adsorbents, i.e., a known procoagulant and a relevant biomaterial, respectively, the adsorption properties and the potential surface-induced conformational changes of high-purity native human fibrinogen (clottability greater than or equal to 92%) were studied, at 25 degrees C, by 3 independent methods. In all of the experiments performed, a) both adsorbents were employed in the form of particles less than or equal to 1.0 mu representing specific surface areas of 9.85 M2/Gm and 27.7 (nominal) M2/Gm for the glass and LTI-carbon powders, respectively, and b) the fibrinogen was absorbed from a standaridized buffer (pH = 7.2, ionic strength 0.05) using the same fixed surface area/protein solution volume ratio with a given adsorbent. 3. The 25 degrees C adsorption

  13. Cholera toxin, LT-I, LT-IIa, and LT-IIb: the critical role of ganglioside-binding in immunomodulation by Type I and Type II heat-labile enterotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Connell, Terry D.

    2010-01-01

    The heat-labile enterotoxins (HLT) expressed by Vibrio cholerae (cholera toxin) and Escherichia coli (LT-I, LT-IIa, and LT-IIb) are potent systemic and mucosal adjuvants. Co-administration of the enterotoxins with a foreign antigen (Ag) produces an augmented immune response to that antigen. Although each enterotoxin has potent adjuvant properties, the means by which the enterotoxins induce various immune responses are distinctive for each adjuvant. Various mutants have been engineered to dissect the functions of the enterotoxins required for their adjuvanticity. The capacity to strongly bind to one or more specific ganglioside receptors appears to drive the distinctive immunomodulatory properties associated with each enterotoxin. Mutant enterotoxins with ablated or altered ganglioside binding affinities have been employed to investigate the role of gangliosides in enterotoxin-dependent immunomodulation. PMID:17931161

  14. Feedback-based, muLti-dimensional Interface as a General Human-Computer Tech.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Tom

    2002-05-13

    FLIGHT is a 3D human-computer interface and application development software that can be used by both end users and programmers. It is based on advanced feedback and a multi-dimensional nature that more closely resembles real life interactions. The software uses a craft metaphor and allows multimodal feedback for advanced tools and navigation techniques. Overall, FLIGHT is a software that is based on the principle that as the human-computer interface is strengthened through the use of more intuitive inputs and more effective feedback, the computer itself will be for more valuable. FLIGHT has been used to visualize scientific data sets in 3D graphics at Sandia National Laboratories.

  15. Immunoprotection of cattle vaccinated with rRmLTI against Rhipicephalus microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhipicephalus microplus is arguably the most economically important cattle ectoparasite. There is interest in the development of second-generation anti-R. microplus vaccines with an improved product profile. Genes coding for trypsin inhibitors in R. microplus have diverse patterns of expression acro...

  16. Feedback-based, muLti-dimensional Interface as a General Human-Computer Tech.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-05-13

    FLIGHT is a 3D human-computer interface and application development software that can be used by both end users and programmers. It is based on advanced feedback and a multi-dimensional nature that more closely resembles real life interactions. The software uses a craft metaphor and allows multimodal feedback for advanced tools and navigation techniques. Overall, FLIGHT is a software that is based on the principle that as the human-computer interface is strengthened through the use ofmore » more intuitive inputs and more effective feedback, the computer itself will be for more valuable. FLIGHT has been used to visualize scientific data sets in 3D graphics at Sandia National Laboratories.« less

  17. Robustness Analysis of Integrated LPV-FDI Filters and LTI-FTC System for a Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khong, Thuan H.; Shin, Jong-Yeob

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes an analysis framework for robustness analysis of a nonlinear dynamics system that can be represented by a polynomial linear parameter varying (PLPV) system with constant bounded uncertainty. The proposed analysis framework contains three key tools: 1) a function substitution method which can convert a nonlinear system in polynomial form into a PLPV system, 2) a matrix-based linear fractional transformation (LFT) modeling approach, which can convert a PLPV system into an LFT system with the delta block that includes key uncertainty and scheduling parameters, 3) micro-analysis, which is a well known robust analysis tool for linear systems. The proposed analysis framework is applied to evaluating the performance of the LPV-fault detection and isolation (FDI) filters of the closed-loop system of a transport aircraft in the presence of unmodeled actuator dynamics and sensor gain uncertainty. The robustness analysis results are compared with nonlinear time simulations.

  18. Gifts, Talents, and the Very Young: Early Childhood Education for Gifted/Talented N/S-LTI-G/T Brief No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Willard; And Others

    Compiled are presentations given at the Institute on Gifted/Talented Early Childhood Education in January, 1977. Considered in "Current Myths Concerning Gifted Children" by H. Robinson are the myth of the "giftedness syndrome", the myth of the qualitatively different gifted individual, and myths about educating children with special gifts. M.…

  19. Evaluation of the National/State Leadership Training Institute on the Gifted and Talented. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plantec, P.; Hospodar, J.

    Presented is the first year evaluation of the National State Leadership Training Institute for the gifted and talented (N/S-LTI-G/T). Sections provide information on the background and purpose of the LTI and the report, the general evaluation plan (including research design and integrated analysis plan of the LTI), planning and early operational…

  20. Long Term Illness and Wages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, Robert; Elliott, Robert R.

    2005-01-01

    Long-term illness (LTI) is a more prevalent workplace risk than fatal accidents but there is virtually no evidence for compensating differentials for a broad measure of LTI. In 1990 almost 3.4 percent of the U.K. adult population suffered from a LTI caused solely by their working conditions. This paper provides the first estimates of compensating…

  1. Nutritional Markers and Body Composition in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Valtuille, Rodolfo; Casos, Maria Elisa; Fernandez, Elmer Andres; Guinsburg, Adrian; Marelli, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse body composition, to detect the presence of undernutrition, and to establish a relationship between undernutrition and the biological markers routinely used as indicators of nutritional status in hemodialysis (HD) patients (pts). We used a body composition monitor (BCM) that expresses body weight in terms of lean tissue mass (LTM) and fat tissue mass (FTM) independent of hydration status. From nine HD units, 934 pts were included. Undernutrition was defined as having a lean tissue index (LTI = LTM/height2) below the 10th percentile of a reference population. Biochemical markers and parameters delivered by BCM were used to compare low LTI and normal LTI groups. Undernutrition prevalence was 58.8% of the population studied. Low LTI pts were older, were significantly more frequently overhydrated, and had been on HD for a longer period of time than the normal LTI group. FTI (FTI = FTM/ height2) was significantly higher in low LTI pts and increased according to BMI. LTI was not influenced by different BMI levels. Albumin and C-reactive protein correlated inversely (r = −0.28). However neither of them was statistically different when considering undernourished and normal LTI pts. Our BCM study was able to show a high prevalence of undernutrition, as expressed by low LTI. In our study, BMI and other common markers, such as albumin, failed to predict malnutrition as determined by BCM. PMID:27347538

  2. Leadership Training Institute in Learning Disabilities. Volume II. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, N. Dale; Kass, Corrine E.

    Provided are the appendixes to the final report of the Leadership Training Institute (LTI) in Learning Disabilities at the University of Arizona. Sections cover the following areas: (1) reports of LTI meetings and conferences; (2) contracted papers on research in the field of learning disabilities (such as "Neurological Factors in Learning…

  3. Conceptualization of an R&D Based Learning-to-Innovate Model for Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Oiki Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to conceptualize an R & D based learning-to-innovate (LTI) model. The problem to be addressed was the lack of a theoretical L TI model, which would inform science pedagogy. The absorptive capacity (ACAP) lens was adopted to untangle the R & D LTI phenomenon into four learning processes: problem-solving via…

  4. Linear Time Invariant Models for Integrated Flight and Rotor Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olcer, Fahri Ersel

    2011-12-01

    Recent developments on individual blade control (IBC) and physics based reduced order models of various on-blade control (OBC) actuation concepts are opening up opportunities to explore innovative rotor control strategies for improved rotor aerodynamic performance, reduced vibration and BVI noise, and improved rotor stability, etc. Further, recent developments in computationally efficient algorithms for the extraction of Linear Time Invariant (LTI) models are providing a convenient framework for exploring integrated flight and rotor control, while accounting for the important couplings that exist between body and low frequency rotor response and high frequency rotor response. Formulation of linear time invariant (LTI) models of a nonlinear system about a periodic equilibrium using the harmonic domain representation of LTI model states has been studied in the literature. This thesis presents an alternative method and a computationally efficient scheme for implementation of the developed method for extraction of linear time invariant (LTI) models from a helicopter nonlinear model in forward flight. The fidelity of the extracted LTI models is evaluated using response comparisons between the extracted LTI models and the nonlinear model in both time and frequency domains. Moreover, the fidelity of stability properties is studied through the eigenvalue and eigenvector comparisons between LTI and LTP models by making use of the Floquet Transition Matrix. For time domain evaluations, individual blade control (IBC) and On-Blade Control (OBC) inputs that have been tried in the literature for vibration and noise control studies are used. For frequency domain evaluations, frequency sweep inputs are used to obtain frequency responses of fixed system hub loads to a single blade IBC input. The evaluation results demonstrate the fidelity of the extracted LTI models, and thus, establish the validity of the LTI model extraction process for use in integrated flight and rotor control

  5. Seismic ray tracing using linear traveltime interpolation

    SciTech Connect

    Asakawa, Eiichi; Kawanaka, Taku )

    1993-01-01

    A new ray-tracing method called linear traveltime interpolation (LTI) is proposed. This method computes traveltimes and raypaths in a 2D velocity structure more rapidly and accurately than other conventional methods. The LTI method is formulated for a 2D cell model, and calculations of traveltimes and raypaths are carried out only on cell boundaries. Therefore a raypath is considered to be always straight in a cell with uniform velocity. This approach is suitable to tomography analysis. The algorithm of LTI consists of two separate steps: step 1 calculates traveltimes on all cell boundaries; step 2 traces raypaths for all pairs of receivers and the shot. A traveltime at an arbitrary point on a cell boundary is assumed to be linearly interpolated between traveltimes at the adjacent discrete points at which traveltimes were calculated. Fermat's principle is used as the criterion for choosing the correct traveltimes and raypaths from several candidates routinely. The LTI method has been compared numerically with the shooting method and the finite-difference method (FDM) of the eikonal equation. The results show that the LTI method has great advantages of high speed and high accuracy in the calculation of both traveltimes and raypaths. The LTI method can be regarded as an advanced version of the conventional FDM of the eikonal equation because the formulae of FDM are independently derived from LTI. In the process of derivation, it is shown theoretically that LTI is more accurate than FDM. Moreover in the LTI method, they can avoid the numerical instability that occurs in Vidale's method where the velocity changes abruptly.

  6. Visual control of stable and unstable loads: what is the feedback delay and extent of linear time-invariant control?

    PubMed Central

    Loram, Ian D; Lakie, Martin; Gawthrop, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    Human balance is commonly described using linear-time-invariant (LTI) models. The feedback time delay determines the position of balance in the motor-control hierarchy. The extent of LTI control illuminates the automaticity of the control process. Using non-parametric analysis, we measured the feedback delay, extent of LTI control and visuo-motor transfer function in six randomly disturbed, visuo-manual compensatory tracking tasks analogous to standing with small mechanical perturbations and purely visual information. The delay depended primarily on load order (2nd: 220 ± 30 ms, 1st: 124 ± 20 ms), and secondarily on visual magnification (extent 2nd: 34 ms, 1st: 8 ms) and was unaffected by load stability. LTI control explained 1st order and stable loads relatively well. For unstable (85% passive stabilisation) 2nd order loads, LTI control accounted for 40% of manual output at 0.1 Hz decreasing below 10% as frequency increased through the important 1–3 Hz region where manual power and visuo-motor gain are high. Visual control of unstable 2nd order loads incurs substantial feedback delays and the control process will not be LTI. These features do not result from exclusive use of visual inputs because we found much shorter delays and a greater degree of LTI control when subjects visually controlled a 1st order load. Rather, these results suggest that delay and variability are inevitable when more flexible, intentional mechanisms are required to control 2nd order unstable loads. The high variability of quiet standing, and movement generally, may be indicative of flexible, variable delay, intentional mechanisms rather than the automatic LTI responses usually reported in response to large perturbations. PMID:19171654

  7. Crystal structure of a non-toxic mutant of heat-labile enterotoxin, which is a potent mucosal adjuvant.

    PubMed

    van den Akker, F; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R; Hol, W G

    1997-12-01

    Two closely related bacterial toxins, heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-I) and cholera toxin (CT), not only invoke a toxic activity that affects many victims worldwide but also contain a beneficial mucosal adjuvant activity that significantly enhances the potency of vaccines in general. For the purpose of vaccine design it is most interesting that the undesirable toxic activity of these toxins can be eliminated by the single-site mutation Ser63Lys in the A subunit while the mucosal adjuvant activity is still present. The crystal structure of the Ser63Lys mutant of LT-I is determined at 2.0 A resolution. Its structure appears to be essentially the same as the wild-type LT-I structure. The substitution Ser63Lys was designed, based on the wild-type LT-I crystal structure, to decrease toxicity by interfering with NAD binding and/or catalysis. In the mutant crystal structure, the newly introduced lysine side chain is indeed positioned such that it could potentially obstruct the productive binding mode of the substrate NAD while at the same time its positive charge could possibly interfere with the critical function of nearby charged groups in the active site of LT-I. The fact that the Ser63Lys mutant of LT-I does not disrupt the wild-type LT-I structure makes the non-toxic mutant potentially suitable, from a structural point of view, to be used as a vaccine to prevent enterotoxigenic E. coli infections. The structural similarity of mutant and wild-type toxin might also be the reason why the inactive Ser63Lys variant retains its adjuvant activity. PMID:9416617

  8. Maternal retinoids control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and set the offspring immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Pavert, Serge A.; Ferreira, Manuela; Domingues, Rita G.; Ribeiro, Hélder; Molenaar, Rosalie; Moreira-Santos, Lara; Almeida, Francisca F.; Ibiza, Sales; Barbosa, Inês; Goverse, Gera; Labão-Almeida, Carlos; Godinho-Silva, Cristina; Konijn, Tanja; Schooneman, Dennis; O'Toole, Tom; Mizee, Mark R.; Habani, Yasmin; Haak, Esther; Santori, Fabio R.; Littman, Dan R.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Dzierzak, Elaine; Simas, J. Pedro; Mebius, Reina E.; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2014-04-01

    The impact of nutritional status during fetal life on the overall health of adults has been recognized; however, dietary effects on the developing immune system are largely unknown. Development of secondary lymphoid organs occurs during embryogenesis and is considered to be developmentally programmed. Secondary lymphoid organ formation depends on a subset of type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) named lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. Here we show that mouse fetal ILC3s are controlled by cell-autonomous retinoic acid (RA) signalling in utero, which pre-sets the immune fitness in adulthood. We found that embryonic lymphoid organs contain ILC progenitors that differentiate locally into mature LTi cells. Local LTi cell differentiation was controlled by maternal retinoid intake and fetal RA signalling acting in a haematopoietic cell-autonomous manner. RA controlled LTi cell maturation upstream of the transcription factor RORγt. Accordingly, enforced expression of Rorgt restored maturation of LTi cells with impaired RA signalling, whereas RA receptors directly regulated the Rorgt locus. Finally, we established that maternal levels of dietary retinoids control the size of secondary lymphoid organs and the efficiency of immune responses in the adult offspring. Our results reveal a molecular link between maternal nutrients and the formation of immune structures required for resistance to infection in the offspring.

  9. Characterization of Mode I Fracture and Morphological Properties of PLLA Blends with Addition of Lysine Triisocyanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannaladsaysy, Vilay; Todo, Mitsugu

    Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) was toughened by blending with three different ductile biopolymers such as poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(butylene succinate-co-e-caprolactone) (PBSC), poly (butylene succinate-co-L-lactate) (PBSL). The blend ratio was fixed to 50:50. Lysine triisocyanate (LTI) was added to the blends as a compatibilizer. Characterizations such as Fourier transform infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, field-emission electron microscope (FE-SEM), and mode I fracture test were used to characterize the effectiveness of LTI on the mechanical and morphological properties of various PLLA blends. It was found that PLLA/PCL blend shows the highest toughness energy among the binary blends. On the other hand, addition of LTI in PLLA/PBSC blend exhibits the best toughness property. Based on the FE-SEM observation, fractured surfaces of PLLA blends with LTI indicate ductile fracture with dense elongated fibrils. The largest damage zone is generated in the vicinity of crack-trip, suggesting that high energy dissipation occurred in the crack-trip region. FT-IR analysis also suggested that the NCO groups of LTI were acted as a compatibilizer, as the results of interaction between the two phases of the polymer blends.

  10. Maternal retinoids control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and set the offspring immunity

    PubMed Central

    van de Pavert, Serge A.; Ferreira, Manuela; Domingues, Rita G.; Ribeiro, Hélder; Molenaar, Rosalie; Moreira-Santos, Lara; Almeida, Francisca F.; Ibiza, Sales; Barbosa, Inês; Goverse, Gera; Labão-Almeida, Carlos; Godinho-Silva, Cristina; Konijn, Tanja; Schooneman, Dennis; O’Toole, Tom; Mizee, Mark R.; Habani, Yasmin; Haak, Esther; Santori, Fabio R.; Littman, Dan R.; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Dzierzak, Elaine; Simas, J. Pedro; Mebius, Reina E.; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the nutritional status during foetal life in the overall health of adults has been recognised1. However dietary effects on the developing immune system are largely unknown. Development of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) occurs during embryogenesis and is considered to be developmentally programmed2,3. SLO formation dependents on a subset of type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) named lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells2,3,4,5. Here we show that foetal ILC3s are controlled by cell-autonomous retinoic acid (RA) signalling in utero pre-setting the immune fitness in adulthood. We found that embryonic lymphoid organs contain ILC progenitors that differentiate locally into mature LTi cells. Local LTi differentiation was controlled by maternal retinoid intake and foetal RA signalling acting in a haematopoietic cell-autonomous manner. RA controlled LTi cell maturation upstream of the transcription factor RORγt. Accordingly, enforced expression of Rorgt restored maturation of LTi cells with impaired RA signalling, while RA receptors directly regulated the Rorc locus. Finally, we established that maternal levels of dietary retinoids control the size of secondary lymphoid organs and the efficiency of immune responses in the adult offspring. Our results reveal a molecular link between maternal nutrients and the formation of immune structures required for resistance to infection in the offspring. PMID:24670648

  11. Evidence for adaptive evolution of low-temperature stress response genes in a Pooideae grass ancestor

    PubMed Central

    Vigeland, Magnus D; Spannagl, Manuel; Asp, Torben; Paina, Cristiana; Rudi, Heidi; Rognli, Odd-Arne; Fjellheim, Siri; Sandve, Simen R

    2013-01-01

    Adaptation to temperate environments is common in the grass subfamily Pooideae, suggesting an ancestral origin of cold climate adaptation. Here, we investigated substitution rates of genes involved in low-temperature-induced (LTI) stress responses to test the hypothesis that adaptive molecular evolution of LTI pathway genes was important for Pooideae evolution. Substitution rates and signatures of positive selection were analyzed using 4330 gene trees including three warm climate-adapted species (maize (Zea mays), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and rice (Oryza sativa)) and five temperate Pooideae species (Brachypodium distachyon, wheat (Triticum aestivum), barley (Hordeum vulgare), Lolium perenne and Festuca pratensis). Nonsynonymous substitution rate differences between Pooideae and warm habitat-adapted species were elevated in LTI trees compared with all trees. Furthermore, signatures of positive selection were significantly stronger in LTI trees after the rice and Pooideae split but before the Brachypodium divergence (P < 0.05). Genome-wide heterogeneity in substitution rates was also observed, reflecting divergent genome evolution processes within these grasses. Our results provide evidence for a link between adaptation to cold habitats and adaptive evolution of LTI stress responses in early Pooideae evolution and shed light on a poorly understood chapter in the evolutionary history of some of the world's most important temperate crops. PMID:23701123

  12. Robust Stabilization of Uncertain Systems Based on Energy Dissipation Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sandeep

    1996-01-01

    Robust stability conditions obtained through generalization of the notion of energy dissipation in physical systems are discussed in this report. Linear time-invariant (LTI) systems which dissipate energy corresponding to quadratic power functions are characterized in the time-domain and the frequency-domain, in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMls) and algebraic Riccati equations (ARE's). A novel characterization of strictly dissipative LTI systems is introduced in this report. Sufficient conditions in terms of dissipativity and strict dissipativity are presented for (1) stability of the feedback interconnection of dissipative LTI systems, (2) stability of dissipative LTI systems with memoryless feedback nonlinearities, and (3) quadratic stability of uncertain linear systems. It is demonstrated that the framework of dissipative LTI systems investigated in this report unifies and extends small gain, passivity, and sector conditions for stability. Techniques for selecting power functions for characterization of uncertain plants and robust controller synthesis based on these stability results are introduced. A spring-mass-damper example is used to illustrate the application of these methods for robust controller synthesis.

  13. Single-cell analysis defines the divergence between the innate lymphoid cell lineage and lymphoid tissue-inducer cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Chea, Sylvestre; Gudjonson, Herman; Constantinides, Michael G; Dinner, Aaron R; Bendelac, Albert; Golub, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    The precise lineage relationship between innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells is poorly understood. Using single-cell multiplex transcriptional analysis of 100 lymphoid genes and single-cell cultures of fetal liver precursor cells, we identified the common proximal precursor to these lineages and found that its bifurcation was marked by differential induction of the transcription factors PLZF and TCF1. Acquisition of individual effector programs specific to the ILC subsets ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 was initiated later, at the common ILC precursor stage, by transient expression of mixed ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 transcriptional patterns, whereas, in contrast, the development of LTi cells did not go through multilineage priming. Our findings provide insight into the divergent mechanisms of the differentiation of the ILC lineage and LTi cell lineage and establish a high-resolution 'blueprint' of their development. PMID:26779601

  14. A Decision Tool for Selecting a Sustainable Learning Technology Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raji, Maryam; Zualkernan, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Education is a basic human right. In pursuit of this right, governments in developing countries and their donors often invest scarce resources in educational initiatives that are sometimes not sustainable. This paper addresses the problem of selecting a sustainable learning technology intervention (LTI) for a typical developing country. By solving…

  15. A Singular Perturbation Approach for Time-Domain Assessment of Phase Margin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, J. Jim; Yang, Xiaojing; Hodel, A Scottedward

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of time-domain assessment of the Phase Margin (PM) of a Single Input Single Output (SISO) Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) system using a singular perturbation approach, where a SISO LTI fast loop system, whose phase lag increases monotonically with frequency, is introduced into the loop as a singular perturbation with a singular perturbation (time-scale separation) parameter Epsilon. First, a bijective relationship between the Singular Perturbation Margin (SPM) max and the PM of the nominal (slow) system is established with an approximation error on the order of Epsilon(exp 2). In proving this result, relationships between the singular perturbation parameter Epsilon, PM of the perturbed system, PM and SPM of the nominal system, and the (monotonically increasing) phase of the fast system are also revealed. These results make it possible to assess the PM of the nominal system in the time-domain for SISO LTI systems using the SPM with a standardized testing system called "PM-gauge," as demonstrated by examples. PM is a widely used stability margin for LTI control system design and certification. Unfortunately, it is not applicable to Linear Time-Varying (LTV) and Nonlinear Time-Varying (NLTV) systems. The approach developed here can be used to establish a theoretical as well as practical metric of stability margin for LTV and NLTV systems using a standardized SPM that is backward compatible with PM.

  16. Determination of Lakeshore Technical Institute Associate Degree Nursing Graduates' Nursing Competencies Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Marvin A.

    In an effort to determine the effectiveness of Lakeshore Technical Institute's (LTI's) Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program, questionnaires were administered to 1982 program graduates (N=45) and their employers (N=43) requesting an assessment of the graduates' preparedness to perform 39 nursing functions. Responses were submitted to a…

  17. Contingent Learning for Creative Music Technologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This article will review educational literature relevant to the design and implementation of a learning technology interface (LTI) into an undergraduate music technology curriculum. It also explores through empirical enquiry some of the advantages and disadvantages of using learning technology. This case study adopted a social-constructivist…

  18. Evaluating Self-Funded Health Insurance for the Lakeshore Technical Institute as a Cost-Containment Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstein, Karen E.

    In response to the rising costs of health care and large increases in insurance premiums, a study was conducted at Lakeshore Technical Institute (LTI) to investigate the feasibility of using a self-funded health insurance plan at the college. Data were obtained through a literature review; telephone and on-site discussions with a personnel…

  19. "Grow Your Own Community College Leaders": How One College Did It. HCCS Leadership Training Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Connie

    The Leadership Training Institute (LTI) at the College without Walls, in Houston, Texas, was created to provide information and training for individuals interested in growing professionally and to establish a structured program for preparing college employees to assume leadership roles in the Houston Community College System. Participants in the…

  20. Study on Turbulent Premixed Flame Regimes with Ignition Using a Reactor Assisted Turbulent Slot Burner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Sang Hee; Reuter, Christopher; Windom, Bret; Ju, Yiguang

    2015-11-01

    Turbulent premixed flames of n-heptane/air and toluene/air mixtures affected by ignition have been experimentally investigated by using a reactor-assisted turbulent slot (RATS) burner at two burner temperatures, 450 K and 700 K. Turbulent burning velocities (ST) and flame structures have been measured by the simultaneous OH and CH2O planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging at various equivalence ratios and turbulent Reynolds numbers. Three distinct turbulent premixed flame regimes are identified for n-heptane/air mixture; chemical frozen (CF) regime at low temperature, low temperature ignition (LTI) regime, and high temperature ignition (HTI) regime for respectively lean and rich conditions at 700 K. For CF regime, the measured turbulent burning velocities of n-heptane and toluene at 450 K follow a conventional correlation of turbulent intensity (defined as u'/SL). In LTI regime, substantial changes in chemical composition alter the laminar flame speed and transport property, leading to rapid increase of turbulent burning velocity. In HTI regime, it is found that the turbulent premixed flame structure is significantly modified by the appearance of volumetric ignition kernel structures associated with the transition from LTI to HTI. The turbulent premixed flame regime in HTI is no longer represented by the thin reaction zone regime. The measured turbulent burning velocities in HTI regime increase substantially as increasing ignition Damkőhler number over those in LTI regime.

  1. Accurate frequency domain measurement of the best linear time-invariant approximation of linear time-periodic systems including the quantification of the time-periodic distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louarroudi, E.; Pintelon, R.; Lataire, J.

    2014-10-01

    Time-periodic (TP) phenomena occurring, for instance, in wind turbines, helicopters, anisotropic shaft-bearing systems, and cardiovascular/respiratory systems, are often not addressed when classical frequency response function (FRF) measurements are performed. As the traditional FRF concept is based on the linear time-invariant (LTI) system theory, it is only approximately valid for systems with varying dynamics. Accordingly, the quantification of any deviation from this ideal LTI framework is more than welcome. The “measure of deviation” allows us to define the notion of the best LTI (BLTI) approximation, which yields the best - in mean square sense - LTI description of a linear time-periodic LTP system. By taking into consideration the TP effects, it is shown in this paper that the variability of the BLTI measurement can be reduced significantly compared with that of classical FRF estimators. From a single experiment, the proposed identification methods can handle (non-)linear time-periodic [(N)LTP] systems in open-loop with a quantification of (i) the noise and/or the NL distortions, (ii) the TP distortions and (iii) the transient (leakage) errors. Besides, a geometrical interpretation of the BLTI approximation is provided, leading to a framework called vector FRF analysis. The theory presented is supported by numerical simulations as well as real measurements mimicking the well-known mechanical Mathieu oscillator.

  2. Method for diagnosis and control of aerobic training in rats based on lactate threshold.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Joyce F; Masuda, Masako O; Pompeu, Fernando A M S

    2005-04-01

    We propose a protocol for determination of lactate threshold (LT) and test the validity of one aerobic training based on LT in rats. In group I, V(LTi) (velocity at LT before training) was determined in all rats (n=10), each rat training at its own V(LTi) and in group II, animals (n=7) ran at 15 m min(-1), the mean V(LTi) of group I. The training consisted of daily runs at V(LTi) for 50 min, 5 days/week, for 4 weeks. In group I, this program increased V(LT) (V(LTi) 14.90+/-1.49 m min(-1) and V(LTf), after training, 22.60+/-1.17 m min(-1)) and the velocity at exhaustion (19.50+/-1.63 m min(-1) and 27.60+/-1.17 m min(-1)). [Lactate] at LT (2.62+/-0.43 mmol L(-1) versus 2.11+/-0.15 mmol L(-1)) and relative values of LT (76+/-3% versus 82+/-2%) stayed unaltered. In group II the V(LTf) was 20+/-1.8 m.mim(-1), the [lactate] at the LT, 2.02+/-0.17 mmol.L(-1); the exhaustion speed, 23.57+/-2.11 m.mim(-1) and relative value of LT, 82.71+/-2.29%. There were no significant differences in these parameters between groups I and II. Thus, this protocol based on LT is effective and the mean V(LT) determined in a small number of healthy untrained rats can be used for aerobic training in a larger group of healthy animals of same gender and age. PMID:15936699

  3. The Predictive Value of Mitral Leaflet Motion and Thickness Index Scores on Early Restenosis after Mitral Balloon Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Mustafa; Sagcan, Abdi; Nalbantgil, Sanem; Ozerkan, Filiz; Akilli, Azem; Yavuzgil, Oguz; Zoghi, Mehdi

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is any association between mitral leaflet motion (LMI) and leaflet thickness index (LTI) scores and the rate of restenosis 3 months after successful mitral balloon valvuloplasty. The study population consisted of 46 patients with symptomatic rheumatic mitral stenosis who underwent balloon valvuloplasty (37 women, 9 men; mean age, 36 ± 9 years). Two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography were performed in all patients on the day before, immediately after, and 3 months after valvuloplasty. The severity of restriction of leaflet motion and the severity of leaflet thickening were classified into grades of mild (a score of 0), moderate (a score of 1), and severe (a score of 2). Subvalvular disease and commissural involvement were homogeneous in all patients. Before and immediately after mitral balloon valvuloplasty, there were no significant differences in mitral valve area among the groups with different LMI and LTI scores. However, at 3 months after valvuloplasty, reduction in mitral valve area was more significant in patients who had higher pre-procedural LMI and LTI scores (P < 0.05). The rates of early restenosis were 0 with a total score of 0, 14.2% with a total score of 1–2, and 32% with a total score of 3. In conclusion, quantitative assessment of LMI and LTI scores by 2-dimensional echocardiography may be helpful in predicting early restenosis after mitral balloon valvuloplasty. Early reduction in mitral valve area is significant in patients who have higher total LMI and LTI scores. PMID:15562845

  4. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ch14.18/CHO in relapsed/refractory high-risk neuroblastoma patients treated by long-term infusion in combination with IL-2.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Nikolai; Eger, Christin; Seidel, Diana; Jüttner, Madlen; Zumpe, Maxi; Wegner, Danilo; Kietz, Silke; Ehlert, Karoline; Veal, Gareth J; Siegmund, Werner; Weiss, Michael; Loibner, Hans; Ladenstein, Ruth; Lode, Holger N

    2016-04-01

    Ch14.18 manufactured in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Short-term infusion (STI) (8-20 h/day; 4-5 days) of 100 mg/m2 ch14.18/CHO (dinutiximab β) per cycle in combination with cytokines is standard treatment of neuroblastoma (NB) patients. As pain is a limiting factor, we investigated a novel delivery method by continuous long-term infusion (LTI) of 100 mg/m2 over 10 days. 53 NB patients were treated with 5-6 cycles of 6 × 106 IU/m2 subcutaneous interleukin-2 (d 1-5, 8-12), LTI of 100 mg/m2 ch14.18/CHO (d 8-18) and 160 mg/m2 oral 13-cis-retinoic acid (d 22-35). Human anti-chimeric antibody (HACA), antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity were determined. With LTI, we observed a maximum concentration of ch14.18/CHO (Cmax) of 12.56 ± 0.68 µg/ml and a terminal half-life time (t1/2 β) of 32.7 ± 16.2 d. The clearance values for LTI and STI of 0.54 ± 0.13 and 0.41 ± 0.29 L/d m2 and area under the serum concentration-time curve (AUC) values of 189.6 ± 41.4 and 284.8 ± 156.8 µg×d/ml, respectively, were not significantly different. Importantly, we detected ch14.18/CHO trough concentration of ≥ 1 µg/ml at time points preceding subsequent antibody infusions after cycle 1, allowing a persistent activation of antibody effector mechanisms over the entire treatment period of 6 months. HACA responses were observed in 10/53 (19%) patients, similar to STI (21%), indicating LTI had no effect on the immunogenicity of ch14.18/CHO. In conclusion, LTI of ch14.18/CHO induced effector mechanisms over the entire treatment period, and may therefore emerge as the preferred delivery method of anti-GD2 immunotherapy to NB patients. PMID:26785755

  5. Effects of Phenytoin Therapy on Bispectral Index and Haemodynamic Changes Following Induction and Tracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Bithal, Parmod K; Pandia, Mihir P; Chouhan, Rajendra S; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Rath, Girija P; Dash, Hari Hara; Marda, Manish K

    2009-01-01

    Summary Laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation (LTI) increase blood pressure and heart rate (HR). Intensity of these changes is influenced by the anaesthetic depth assessed by the bispectral index (BIS). We determined the effect of phenytoin on anaesthetic depth and its influence on haemodynamics following LTI. Fifty patients of ASA grades I and II on oral phenytoin 200 to 300mg per day for more than one week were compared with 48 control patients. Standard anaesthesia technique was followed. BIS, non invasive mean blood pressure (MBP) and HR were recorded 30, 60, 90 and 120 sec after LTI. Phenytoin group needed lesser thiopentone for induction, 5 mg (1.1) vs. 4.3 mg (0.7) [p=0.036]. BIS was significantly lower in the phenytoin group vs. the control 30, 60, 90 and 120 sec after LTI [43.1 (16.0) vs. 48.9 (14.9), p=0.068, 56.3 (16.7) vs. 64.3 (14.4), p=0.013, 59.8 (15.8) vs. 67.5 (12.1), p=0.008, 62.6 (14) vs. 68.9 (11.2), p=0.017, and 64.2 (11.3) vs. 69 (11.7), p=0.033], respectively. MBP was also lower in the phenytoin group 30, 60, 90 and 120 sec after LTI [112.8 mmHg (13.8), vs. 117.9 mmHg (18) p=0.013, 108.6 (12.8) vs. 117.5 (16) p=0.003, 106.1 mmHg (14.1) vs. 113.2 mmHg (14.9), p=0.017, 101.8 mmHg (13.8) vs. 109.5 mmHg (14.1), p=0.007], respectively. HR was lower in phenytoin group at 30 sec. (p=0.027), 60 sec (p=0.219), and again at 120 sec (p=0.022). Oral phenytoin therapy for over a week results in greater anaesthetic depth as observed using BIS, which also attenuated haemodynamic response of LTI. PMID:20640121

  6. Colonic Patch and colonic SILT development are independent and differentially-regulated events

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, AP; Olivier, BJ; Goverse, G; Greuter, M; Knippenberg, M; Kusser, K; Domingues, RG.; Veiga-Fernandes, H; Luster, AD; Lugering, A; Randall, TD; Cupedo, T; Mebius, RE

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal lymphoid tissues have to simultaneously ensure protection against pathogens and tolerance towards commensals. Despite such vital functions, their development in the colon is poorly understood. Here, we show that the two distinct lymphoid tissues of the colon–colonic patches and colonic SILTs–can easily be distinguished based on anatomical location, developmental timeframe and cellular organization. Furthermore, whereas colonic patch development depended on CXCL13-mediated LTi cell clustering followed by LTα-mediated consolidation, early LTi clustering at SILT anlagen did not require CXCL13, CCR6 or CXCR3. Subsequent dendritic cell recruitment to and gp38+VCAM-1+ lymphoid stromal cell differentiation within SILTs required LTα; B cell recruitment and follicular dendritic cell differentiation depended on MyD88-mediated signalling, but not the microflora. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that different mechanisms, mediated mainly by programmed stimuli, induce the formation of distinct colonic lymphoid tissues, therefore suggesting that these tissues may have different functions. PMID:22990625

  7. A method for designing robust multivariable feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milich, David Albert; Athans, Michael; Valavani, Lena; Stein, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the synthesis of linear, time-invariant (LTI) controllers for multivariable LTI systems. The aim is to achieve stability and performance robustness of the feedback system in the presence of multiple unstructured uncertainty blocks; i.e., to satisfy a frequency-domain inequality in terms of the structured singular value. The design technique is referred to as the Causality Recovery Methodology (CRM). Starting with an initial (nominally) stabilizing compensator, the CRM produces a closed-loop system whose performance-robustness is at least as good as, and hopefully superior to, that of the original design. The robustness improvement is obtained by solving an infinite-dimensional, convex optimization program. A finite-dimensional implementation of the CRM was developed, and it was applied to a multivariate design example.

  8. Stabilising compensators for linear time-varying differential systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a constructive test to decide whether a given linear time-varying (LTV) differential system admits a stabilising compensator for the control tasks of tracking, disturbance rejection or model matching and construct and parametrise all of them if at least one exists. In analogy to the linear time-invariant (LTI) case, the ring of stable rational functions, noncommutative in the LTV situation, and the Kučera-Youla parametrisation play prominent parts in the theory. We transfer Blumthaler's thesis from the LTI to the LTV case and sharpen, complete and simplify the corresponding results in the book 'Linear Time-Varying Systems' by Bourlès and Marinescu.

  9. Coarse mode aerosol measurement using a Low Turbulence Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, J.; Bart, M.; Trembath, J.; McQuaid, J. B.; Brooks, B. J.; Osborne, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Sahara desert is a major natural source of global mineral dust emissions (Forster et al., 2007) through the mobilisation and lifting of dust particles into the atmosphere from dust storms. A significant fraction of this dust is in the aerosol coarse mode (Weinzierl et al., 2009). It is highlighted of the difficulty in making accurate and reliable measurements from an aircraft platform, particularly that of coarse mode aerosol (Wendisch et al., 2004). To achieve the measurement of a representative aerosol sample an aerosol inlet, on an aircraft, is required for the delivery of the sample to the instruments making the measurements. Inlet design can modify aerosol size distribution through either underestimating due to aerosol losses or overestimation due to enhancements. The Low Turbulence Inlet (LTI) was designed to improve inlet efficiency. This is achieved by reducing turbulence flow within the tip of the inlet, reducing impaction of particles to the walls of the inlet (Wilson et al., 2004). The LTI further maintains isokinetic sampling flow (free stream velocity, U0 and sampling velocity, U are equal to 1). Dust aerosol over the Sahara desert provides an excellent environment to test and quantify the capabilities of the LTI on the FAAM BAe 146, whilst enabling in-situ dust measurement. The LTI was operated during the Fennec field campaign in June 2011 with 11 flights during the campaign over Mauritania and Mali. We are using the LTI to provide critical information on the sampling characteristics of the inlet used by nearly all aerosol instruments inside the aircraft (AMS, Nephelometer, PSAP, and CCN). Inlet experiments were performed with identical Optical Particle Counters (OPC) connected to the rosemount and LTI with size distribution for each inlet measured and Rosemount enhancements determined. Rosemount inlet enhancements were determined to be 2 to 4 times for particles up to 2.5 µm. A key parameter in aerosol measurement is size distribution, in which

  10. A method for designing robust multivariable feedback systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milich, David A.; Athans, Michael; Valavani, Lena; Stein, Gunter

    1988-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the synthesis of linear, time-invariant (LTI) controllers for multivariable LTI systems. The aim is to achieve stability and performance robustness of the feedback system in the presence of multiple unstructured uncertainty blocks; i.e., to satisfy a frequency-domain inequality in terms of the structured singular value. The design technique is referred to as the causality recovery methodology (CRM). Starting with an initial (nominally) stabilizing compensator, the CRM produces a closed-loop system whose performance-robustness is at least as good as, and hopefully superior to, that of the original design. The robustness improvement is obtained by solving an infinite-dimensional, convex optimization program. A finite-dimensional implementation of the CRM was developed, and it was applied to a multivariate design example.

  11. The stabilization of electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominey, L. A.; Goldman, J. L.; Koch, V. R.; Nanjundiah, C.

    1990-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of Li secondary cells are reviewed, focusing on (1) the novel anion lithium trifluoromethanesulfonyl imide (LTI) and (2) the use of KO2 and KOH additives to stabilize the electrolyte. Sample data are presented in tables and graphs and briefly characterized. The charging limits of LTI were found to compare favorably with those of LiAsFe6/THF and 2-MeTHF. Significant improvements were also obtained with the additives, but the results were erratic, with 2-3-fold variations among identical preparations. These differences are tentatively attributed to Li-film inhomogeneities and reactions of O2(-) with the solvent and impurities, especially in the cathode pores.

  12. Reduced venous compliance: an important determinant for orthostatic intolerance in women with vasovagal syncope.

    PubMed

    Skoog, Johan; Lindenberger, Marcus; Ekman, Mikael; Holmberg, Bengt; Zachrisson, Helene; Länne, Toste

    2016-02-01

    The influence of lower limb venous compliance on orthostatic vasovagal syncope (VVS) is uncertain. The most widespread technique to calculate venous compliance uses a nonphysiological quadratic regression equation. Our aim was therefore to construct a physiologically derived venous wall model (VWM) for calculation of calf venous compliance and to determine the effect of venous compliance on tolerance to maximal lower body negative pressure (LBNP). Venous occlusion plethysmography was used to study calf volume changes in 15 women with VVS (25.5 ± 1.3 yr of age) and 15 controls (22.8 ± 0.8 yr of age). The fit of the VWM and the regression equation to the experimentally induced pressure-volume curve was examined. Venous compliance was calculated as the derivative of the modeled pressure-volume relationship. Graded LBNP to presyncope was used to determine the LBNP tolerance index (LTI). The VWM displayed a better fit to the experimentally induced pressure-volume curve (P < 0.0001). Calf blood pooling was similar in the groups and was not correlated to the LTI (r = 0.204, P = 0.30). Venous compliance was significantly reduced at low venous pressures in women with VVS (P = 0.042) and correlated to the LTI (r = 0.459, P = 0.014) in the low pressure range. No correlation was found between venous compliance at high venous pressures and the LTI. In conclusion, the new VWM accurately adopted the curvilinear pressure-volume curve, providing a valid characterization of venous compliance. Reduced venous compliance at low venous pressures may adversely affect mobilization of peripheral venous blood to the central circulation during hypovolemic circulatory stress in women with VVS. PMID:26561647

  13. Mitigation and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Thoracic Injury With a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor, Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Nancy R.; Valdecanas, David; Liao Zhongxing; Milas, Luka; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test whether a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) could reduce mortality resulting from radiation-induced pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Celecoxib was given to mice twice daily for 40 consecutive days starting on the day of local thoracic irradiation (LTI) or 40 or 80 days later. C3Hf/KamLaw mice were observed for morbidity, and time to death was determined. Results were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Timing of celecoxib relative to LTI determined efficacy. A significant reduction in time to death was achieved only when celecoxib was started 80 days after LTI, corresponding to the time when pneumonitis is expressed. For these mice the reduction in mortality was quantified as a hazard ratio for mortality of treated vs untreated of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.53), thus significantly less than 1.0. Correspondingly, the median lethal dose for treated mice (12.9 Gy; 95% CI 12.55-13.25 Gy) was significantly (P=.026) higher than for untreated mice (12.4 Gy; 95% CI 12.2-12.65 Gy). Conclusions: Celecoxib significantly reduced lung toxicity when administered months after LTI when the deleterious effects of radiation were expressed. The schedule-dependent reduction in fatal pneumonitis suggests that celecoxib could be clinically useful by reintroduction of treatment months after completion of radiation therapy. These findings may be important for designing clinical trials using cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to treat radiation-induced lung toxicity as a complement to concurrent radiation therapy of lung cancers.

  14. Characterization of the Degradation Mechanisms of Lysine-derived Aliphatic Poly(ester urethane) Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J.; Zachman, Angela L.; Sung, Hak-Joon; Nanney, Lillian B.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (<20%) increase in degradation rate in oxidative medium, LTI scaffolds degrade six times faster in oxidative medium. Furthermore, the in vitro rate of degradation of LTI scaffolds in oxidative medium approximates the in vivo rate in rat excisional wounds, and histological sections show macrophages expressing myeloperoxidase at the material surface. While recent preclinical studies have underscored the potential of injectable PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body. PMID:20864156

  15. Characterization of the degradation mechanisms of lysine-derived aliphatic poly(ester urethane) scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hafeman, Andrea E; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Zachman, Angela L; Sung, Hak-Joon; Nanney, Lillian B; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Guelcher, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the degradation mechanism of polymeric scaffolds and delivery systems for regenerative medicine is essential to assess their clinical applicability. Key performance criteria include induction of a minimal, transient inflammatory response and controlled degradation to soluble non-cytotoxic breakdown products that are cleared from the body by physiological processes. Scaffolds fabricated from biodegradable poly(ester urethane)s (PEURs) undergo controlled degradation to non-cytotoxic breakdown products and support the ingrowth of new tissue in preclinical models of tissue regeneration. While previous studies have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine-derived polyisocyanates degrade faster under in vivo compared to in vitro conditions, the degradation mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we have shown that PEUR scaffolds prepared from lysine triisocyanate (LTI) or a trimer of hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDIt) undergo hydrolytic, esterolytic, and oxidative degradation. Hydrolysis of ester bonds to yield α-hydroxy acids is the dominant mechanism in buffer, and esterolytic media modestly increase the degradation rate. While HDIt scaffolds show a modest (<20%) increase in degradation rate in oxidative medium, LTI scaffolds degrade six times faster in oxidative medium. Furthermore, the in vitro rate of degradation of LTI scaffolds in oxidative medium approximates the in vivo rate in rat excisional wounds, and histological sections show macrophages expressing myeloperoxidase at the material surface. While recent preclinical studies have underscored the potential of injectable PEUR scaffolds and delivery systems for tissue regeneration, this promising class of biomaterials has a limited regulatory history. Elucidation of the macrophage-mediated oxidative mechanism by which LTI scaffolds degrade in vivo provides key insights into the ultimate fate of these materials when injected into the body. PMID:20864156

  16. Synthesis Methods for Robust Passification and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Joshi, Suresh M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The research effort under this cooperative agreement has been essentially the continuation of the work from previous grants. The ongoing work has primarily focused on developing passivity-based control techniques for Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) systems. During this period, there has been a significant progress made in the area of passivity-based control of LTI systems and some preliminary results have also been obtained for nonlinear systems, as well. The prior work has addressed optimal control design for inherently passive as well as non- passive linear systems. For exploiting the robustness characteristics of passivity-based controllers the passification methodology was developed for LTI systems that are not inherently passive. Various methods of passification were first proposed in and further developed. The robustness of passification was addressed for multi-input multi-output (MIMO) systems for certain classes of uncertainties using frequency-domain methods. For MIMO systems, a state-space approach using Linear Matrix Inequality (LMI)-based formulation was presented, for passification of non-passive LTI systems. An LMI-based robust passification technique was presented for systems with redundant actuators and sensors. The redundancy in actuators and sensors was used effectively for robust passification using the LMI formulation. The passification was designed to be robust to an interval-type uncertainties in system parameters. The passification techniques were used to design a robust controller for Benchmark Active Control Technology wing under parametric uncertainties. The results on passive nonlinear systems, however, are very limited to date. Our recent work in this area was presented, wherein some stability results were obtained for passive nonlinear systems that are affine in control.

  17. Innate lymphoid cells in secondary lymphoid organs.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ephraïm, Yotam E; Mebius, Reina E

    2016-05-01

    The family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) has attracted attention in recent years as its members are important regulators of immunity, while they can also cause pathology. In both mouse and man, ILCs were initially discovered in developing lymph nodes as lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. These cells form the prototypic members of the ILC family and play a central role in the formation of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs). In the absence of LTi cells, lymph nodes (LN) and Peyer's Patches (PP) fail to form in mice, although the splenic white pulp can develop normally. Besides LTi cells, the ILC family encompasses helper-like ILCs with functional distinctions as seen by T-helper cells, as well as cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells. ILCs are still present in adult SLOs where they have been shown to play a role in lymphoid tissue regeneration. Furthermore, ILCs were implicated to interact with adaptive lymphocytes and influence the adaptive immune response. Here, we review the recent literature on the role of ILCs in secondary lymphoid tissue from the formation of SLOs to mature SLOs in adults, during homeostasis and pathology. PMID:27088915

  18. Joint deconvolution and classification with applications to passive acoustic underwater multipath.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Hyrum S; Gupta, Maya R

    2008-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of classifying signals that have been corrupted by noise and unknown linear time-invariant (LTI) filtering such as multipath, given labeled uncorrupted training signals. A maximum a posteriori approach to the deconvolution and classification is considered, which produces estimates of the desired signal, the unknown channel, and the class label. For cases in which only a class label is needed, the classification accuracy can be improved by not committing to an estimate of the channel or signal. A variant of the quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) classifier is proposed that probabilistically accounts for the unknown LTI filtering, and which avoids deconvolution. The proposed QDA classifier can work either directly on the signal or on features whose transformation by LTI filtering can be analyzed; as an example a classifier for subband-power features is derived. Results on simulated data and real Bowhead whale vocalizations show that jointly considering deconvolution with classification can dramatically improve classification performance over traditional methods over a range of signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:19045785

  19. Lagrangian simulations and interannual variability of anchovy egg and larva dispersal in the Sicily Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palatella, Luigi; Bignami, Francesco; Falcini, Federico; Lacorata, Guglielmo; Lanotte, Alessandra S.; Santoleri, Rosalia

    2014-02-01

    The interannual variability in the transport of anchovy eggs and larvae in the Sicily Channel, relatively to the period 1999-2012, is studied by means of numerical simulations of the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) circulation model provided by INGV. Subgrid-scale dynamics not resolved by the MFS model is parameterized in terms of kinematic fields. The latter affect small-scale tracer relative dispersion, while leaving the mean large-scale advection substantially unchanged. A Lagrangian Transport Index (LTI) can be defined to characterize the efficiency of the main currents, e.g., the Atlantic Ionian Stream, in connecting spawning and nursery areas to each other. In our case, this indicator comes from the first arrival time statistics of tracers traveling from a spawning area near Sciacca to a nursery area in proximity of Cape Passero. We observe, on the basis of LTI values, that there are years when the Lagrangian connectivity is very efficient (2004, 2008, 2012) and years when it is weak (2000, 2001, 2003, 2010). Lagrangian indicators like the LTI concur to explain observed fluctuations of larval density and, also, can be employed, more in general, in multivariate models of population dynamics.

  20. An in vitro model of innate lymphoid cell function and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Allan, D S J; Kirkham, C L; Aguilar, O A; Qu, L C; Chen, P; Fine, J H; Serra, P; Awong, G; Gommerman, J L; Zúñiga-Pflücker, J C; Carlyle, J R

    2015-03-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are RAG-independent lymphocytes with important roles in innate immunity, and include group-1 (natural killer (NK) cell, ILC1), group-2 (ILC2), and group-3 (lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi), NCR(+) ILC3) subsets. Group-3 ILC express Rorγt, produce interleukin (IL)-22, and are critically important in the normal function of mucosal tissues. Here, we describe a novel model cell line for the study of ILC function and differentiation. The parental MNK cell line, derived from NKR-P1B(+) fetal thymocytes, shows a capacity to differentiate in γc cytokines. One IL-7-responsive subline, designated MNK-3, expresses Rorγt and produces high levels of IL-22 in response to IL-23 and IL-1β stimulation. MNK-3 cells display surface markers and transcript expression characteristic of group-3 ILC, including IL-7Rα (CD127), c-kit (CD117), CCR6, Thy1 (CD90), RANK, RANKL, and lymphotoxin (LTα1β2). Using an in vitro assay of LTi cell activity, MNK-3 cells induce ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression on stromal cells in a manner dependent upon LTα1β2 expression. A second IL-2-responsive subline, MNK-1, expresses several NK cell receptors, perforin and granzymes, and shows some cytotoxic activity. Thus, MNK-1 cells serve as a model of ILC1/NK development and differentiation, whereas MNK-3 cells provide an attractive in vitro system to study the function of ILC3/LTi cells. PMID:25138665

  1. Response of Archaeal and Bacterial Soil Communities to Changes Associated with Outdoor Cattle Overwintering

    PubMed Central

    Chroňáková, Alica; Schloter-Hai, Brigitte; Radl, Viviane; Endesfelder, David; Quince, Christopher; Elhottová, Dana; Šimek, Miloslav; Schloter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Archaea and bacteria are important drivers for nutrient transformations in soils and catalyse the production and consumption of important greenhouse gases. In this study, we investigate changes in archaeal and bacterial communities of four Czech grassland soils affected by outdoor cattle husbandry. Two show short-term (3 years; STI) and long-term impact (17 years; LTI), one is regenerating from cattle impact (REG) and a control is unaffected by cattle (CON). Cattle manure (CMN), the source of allochthonous microbes, was collected from the same area. We used pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to assess the composition of archaeal and bacterial communities in each soil type and CMN. Both short- and long- term cattle impact negatively altered archaeal and bacterial diversity, leading to increase of homogenization of microbial communities in overwintering soils over time. Moreover, strong shifts in the prokaryotic communities were observed in response to cattle overwintering, with the greatest impact on archaea. Oligotrophic and acidophilic microorganisms (e.g. Thaumarchaeota, Acidobacteria, and α-Proteobacteria) dominated in CON and expressed strong negative response to increased pH, total C and N. Whereas copiotrophic and alkalophilic microbes (e.g. methanogenic Euryarchaeota, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) were common in LTI showing opposite trends. Crenarchaeota were also found in LTI, though their trophic interactions remain cryptic. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Methanobacteriaceae, and Methanomicrobiaceae indicated the introduction and establishment of faecal microbes into the impacted soils, while Chloroflexi and Methanosarcinaceae suggested increased abundance of soil-borne microbes under altered environmental conditions. The observed changes in prokaryotic community composition may have driven corresponding changes in soil functioning. PMID:26274496

  2. Response of Archaeal and Bacterial Soil Communities to Changes Associated with Outdoor Cattle Overwintering.

    PubMed

    Chroňáková, Alica; Schloter-Hai, Brigitte; Radl, Viviane; Endesfelder, David; Quince, Christopher; Elhottová, Dana; Šimek, Miloslav; Schloter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Archaea and bacteria are important drivers for nutrient transformations in soils and catalyse the production and consumption of important greenhouse gases. In this study, we investigate changes in archaeal and bacterial communities of four Czech grassland soils affected by outdoor cattle husbandry. Two show short-term (3 years; STI) and long-term impact (17 years; LTI), one is regenerating from cattle impact (REG) and a control is unaffected by cattle (CON). Cattle manure (CMN), the source of allochthonous microbes, was collected from the same area. We used pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to assess the composition of archaeal and bacterial communities in each soil type and CMN. Both short- and long- term cattle impact negatively altered archaeal and bacterial diversity, leading to increase of homogenization of microbial communities in overwintering soils over time. Moreover, strong shifts in the prokaryotic communities were observed in response to cattle overwintering, with the greatest impact on archaea. Oligotrophic and acidophilic microorganisms (e.g. Thaumarchaeota, Acidobacteria, and α-Proteobacteria) dominated in CON and expressed strong negative response to increased pH, total C and N. Whereas copiotrophic and alkalophilic microbes (e.g. methanogenic Euryarchaeota, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) were common in LTI showing opposite trends. Crenarchaeota were also found in LTI, though their trophic interactions remain cryptic. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Methanobacteriaceae, and Methanomicrobiaceae indicated the introduction and establishment of faecal microbes into the impacted soils, while Chloroflexi and Methanosarcinaceae suggested increased abundance of soil-borne microbes under altered environmental conditions. The observed changes in prokaryotic community composition may have driven corresponding changes in soil functioning. PMID:26274496

  3. Frequency of virulence factors in Escherichia coli isolated from suckling pigs with diarrhoea in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenxin; Yuan, Chaowen; Meng, Xiangqiu; Du, Yuance; Gao, Ruize; Tang, Jie; Shi, Dongfang

    2014-02-01

    Escherichia coli-associated diarrhoea is an important disease adversely affecting the pig industry. This study was conducted to investigate the frequency of virulence factors expressed by E. coli strains isolated from suckling pigs with diarrhoea in China. A total of 381 E. coli strains, obtained from 290 faecal samples from pigs on 38 farms, were tested for fimbriae (K88, K99, 987P, F41, F18, F17), non-fimbrial adhesins (AIDA-I, paa, CS31A, eae, saa), enterotoxin (LT-I, LT-II, STa, STb, EAST1), Shiga toxin (Stx1, Stx2, Stx2e), pathogenicity islands (HPI, LEE), α-haemolysin (hlyA), afa8 gene cluster (afaD, afaE) and sepA genes by PCR. Out of the 381 isolates, 206 carried at least one virulence gene. Of the 206 virulence positive isolates, the virulence factor genes detected were EAST1 (n=120), irp2 (n=59), paa (n=50), STb (n=41), AIDA-I (n=34), LT-I (n=23), ler (n=11), hlyA (n=9), K88 (n=8), eae (n=8), STa (n=7), sepA (n=6), F18 (n=5), afaD (n=3), afaE (n=3), K99 (n=2) and Stx2e (n=1), with most isolates carrying multiple virulence genes. These results demonstrate that relatively few isolates from the study population express K88, K99, LT-I or STa, but that EAST1 (58%), irp2 (29%), AIDA-I (16.5%), paa (24%) and STb (20%) are frequent virulence factors expressed by E. coli strains isolated from suckling pigs with diarrhoea in China. PMID:24378293

  4. Low titanium magmatism in northwest region of Paraná continental flood basalts (Brazil): volcanological aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, F. B.; Viana Rocha-Júnior, E. R.; Ranalli Nardy, A. J.; Soares Marques, L.

    2014-08-01

    The early Cretaceous Paraná Continental Flood Basalts (PCFB) is considered as one of the largest volcanic provinces in the world. In Brazil, it completes the last sequence of the sedimentary Paraná Basin (Serra Geral Fm.). The geological unit is contemporary to desert sandstones of Botucatu Fm. and precedes the continental sediments of the Bauru Basin. This Large Igneous Province (LIP) is divided into different types of geochemical magmas which basically are based on TiO2 content (higher - HTi or lower LTi than 2 wt.% in TiO2) and incompatible trace elements ratio. Therefore, we studied the magma LTi (TiO2 < 2.0 wt.%), denominated Ribeira which occurs in the northwestern portion of PCFP which is poorly researched mainly in volcanological and geochemical aspects. This basaltic magma, a short expression in PCFB, occurs in the form of multiple pahoehoe flows with thicknesses ranging from 1.5 to 30 m in compound type flows under low surface slope. Peperites zones are common when associated with the first flows, and sand-filled cracks in the lower and upper edges at all pahoehoe levels when in contact with the sediment. Upward these first sequences of interactions with sediment, on the inside direction basin, simple pahoehoe flows occur being associated with Pitanga magma type (HTi, with TiO2 > 2.0 wt.%). Based on rheology data considering anhydrous environment and the composition of plagioclase (An(42-67)) and clinopyroxene (Wo(30-40)En(34-46)Fs(17-32)) showed that the LTi magma is hotter than HTi, with temperatures that range from 1069 °C to 1248 °C while for the second range from 1020 °C to 1201 °C.

  5. Temporal chemical variations within lowermost jurassic tholeiitic magmas of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salters, Vincent J. M.; Ragland, P. C.; Hames, W. E.; Milla, K.; Ruppel, C.

    The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), of greater extent than any other large igneous province (LIP) yet identified surrounds the Central Atlantic in eastern North America, northeastern South America, western Africa, and southwestern Europe. It covers over 7×109 km2 and was active for no more than 4 Ma. Virtually all CAMP rocks are mafic tholeiites, and include both intrusives and extrusives. The most extensive intrusives, diabase (dolerite) dikes, occur in three main swarms on Pangaea: NW-, NE-, and NS trending. These mafic tholeiites can be classified based on their Ti contents into low-Ti (LTi), intermediate-Ti (ITi), and high-Ti (HTi). The NE swarm contains primarily the ITi magma type, whereas the NW swarm is heterogeneous and contains all three types. The N-S swarm contains highly evolved (high-Fe) quartz tholeiites in North America and ITi rocks in South America. These dike swarms can be correlated across the Atlantic basin on the basis of composition and attitude. The two principal magma types within the CAMP, LTi and ITi, were derived from mantle sources that were compositionally similar and contained both continental lithospheric and asthenospheric components. Compared with other large igneous provinces the CAMP basalts show depleted geochemical characteristics. Compositional differences between them are primarily due to differences in depth and degree of melting; LTi represents the deepest and greatest degrees of melting. The temporal progression of the chemical characteristics indicate deeper melting with time, which is consistent with a shallow (such as crustal thinning) and passive origin for the break-up of the Pangaean continent.

  6. Conceptualization of an R&D Based Learning-to-Innovate Model for Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Oiki Sylvia

    The purpose of this research was to conceptualize an R & D based learning-to-innovate (LTI) model. The problem to be addressed was the lack of a theoretical L TI model, which would inform science pedagogy. The absorptive capacity (ACAP) lens was adopted to untangle the R & D LTI phenomenon into four learning processes: problem-solving via knowledge acquisition, incremental improvement via knowledge participation, scientific discovery via knowledge creation, and product design via knowledge productivity. The four knowledge factors were the latent factors and each factor had seven manifest elements as measured variables. The key objectives of the non experimental quantitative survey were to measure the relative importance of the identified elements and to explore the underlining structure of the variables. A questionnaire had been prepared, and was administered to more than 155 R & D professionals from four sectors - business, academic, government, and nonprofit. The results showed that every identified element was important to the R & D professionals, in terms of improving the related type of innovation. The most important elements were highlighted to serve as building blocks for elaboration. In search for patterns of the data matrix, exploratory factor analysis (EF A) was performed. Principal component analysis was the first phase of EF A to extract factors; while maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) was used to estimate the model. EF A yielded the finding of two aspects in each kind of knowledge. Logical names were assigned to represent the nature of the subsets: problem and knowledge under knowledge acquisition, planning and participation under knowledge participation, exploration and discovery under knowledge creation, and construction and invention under knowledge productivity. These two constructs, within each kind of knowledge, added structure to the vague R & D based LTI model. The research questions and hypotheses testing were addressed using correlation

  7. Physical - mechanical characterization of poly(lactide)/poly (ɛ-caprolactone) blends with ethyl ester L-lysine triisocyanate as reactive agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocita, Davide; Visco, Annamaria; Espro, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    A study on physical and mechanical properties of PLA/PCL polyesters reactive blends, obtained by adding LTI was made with the aim to apply these blends in biomedical field, for example for absorbable suture threads or scaffolds for cellular growth. Polyesters based reactive blends were obtained by internal mixing, and it was find out the possibility of finely control the characteristic properties of those materials by varying the weight fraction of the two components and the amount of reactive agent. Blends of different composition were characterized by torque measurements, uniaxial traction test and wet-ability.

  8. Passivity-based Robust Control of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelkar, Atul G.; Joshi, Suresh M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of the research work performed over the duration of the cooperative research agreement between NASA Langley Research Center and Kansas State University. The cooperative agreement which was originally for the duration the three years was extended by another year through no-cost extension in order to accomplish the goals of the project. The main objective of the research was to develop passivity-based robust control methodology for passive and non-passive aerospace systems. The focus of the first-year's research was limited to the investigation of passivity-based methods for the robust control of Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) single-input single-output (SISO), open-loop stable, minimum-phase non-passive systems. The second year's focus was mainly on extending the passivity-based methodology to a larger class of non-passive LTI systems which includes unstable and nonminimum phase SISO systems. For LTI non-passive systems, five different passification. methods were developed. The primary effort during the years three and four was on the development of passification methodology for MIMO systems, development of methods for checking robustness of passification, and developing synthesis techniques for passifying compensators. For passive LTI systems optimal synthesis procedure was also developed for the design of constant-gain positive real controllers. For nonlinear passive systems, numerical optimization-based technique was developed for the synthesis of constant as well as time-varying gain positive-real controllers. The passivity-based control design methodology developed during the duration of this project was demonstrated by its application to various benchmark examples. These example systems included longitudinal model of an F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) for pitch axis control, NASA's supersonic transport wind tunnel model, ACC benchmark model, 1-D acoustic duct model, piezo-actuated flexible link model, and NASA

  9. Real-time assessment of a linear pyroelectric sensor array for object classication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, William E., III; Brown, Jeremy B.; Chari, Srikant; Jacobs, Eddie L.

    2010-10-01

    Pyroelectric linear arrays can be used to generate profiles of targets. Simulations have shown that generated profiles can be used to classify human and animal targets. A pyroelectric array system was used to collect data and classify targets as either human or non-human in real time. The pyroelectric array system consists of a 128-element Dias 128LTI pyroelectric linear array, an F/0.86 germanium lens, and an 18F4550 pic microcontroller for A/D conversion and communication. The classifier used for object recognition was trained using data collected in petting zoos and tested using data collected at the US-Mexico border in Arizona.

  10. Standardized Methods for Electronic Shearography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Matthew D.

    1997-01-01

    Research was conducted in development of operating procedures and standard methods to evaluate fiber reinforced composite materials, bonded or sprayed insulation, coatings, and laminated structures with MSFC electronic shearography systems. Optimal operating procedures were developed for the Pratt and Whitney Electronic Holography/Shearography Inspection System (EH/SIS) operating in shearography mode, as well as the Laser Technology, Inc. (LTI) SC-4000 and Ettemeyer SHS-94 ISTRA shearography systems. Operating practices for exciting the components being inspected were studied, including optimal methods for transient heating with heat lamps and other methods as appropriate to enhance inspection capability.

  11. Leader-following consensus of high-order multi-agent linear systems with bounded transmission channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wei; Xiong, Chun; Yang, Jie

    2013-09-01

    The leader-following consensus of high-order multi-agent linear systems with bounded transmission channels is considered. Agents modelled as LTI dynamics exchange information according to a network which can be described as a graph with agents as its vertices and information transmission channels as its edges. The transmission channels are bounded. The objective is leader-following in the sense that the state of all agents should converge to that of the leader vehicle. Detailed analysis of the leader-following consensus under bounded transmission channels is investigated for both fixed and switching network topologies.

  12. Incorporation of SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) Aeroservoelastic Models into SAREC-ASV Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christhilf, David M.; Pototzky, Anthony S.; Stevens, William L.

    2010-01-01

    The Simulink-based Simulation Architecture for Evaluating Controls for Aerospace Vehicles (SAREC-ASV) was modified to incorporate linear models representing aeroservoelastic characteristics of the SemiSpan SuperSonic Transport (S4T) wind-tunnel model. The S4T planform is for a Technology Concept Aircraft (TCA) design from the 1990s. The model has three control surfaces and is instrumented with accelerometers and strain gauges. Control laws developed for wind-tunnel testing for Ride Quality Enhancement, Gust Load Alleviation, and Flutter Suppression System functions were implemented in the simulation. The simulation models open- and closed-loop response to turbulence and to control excitation. It provides time histories for closed-loop stable conditions above the open-loop flutter boundary. The simulation is useful for assessing the potential impact of closed-loop control rate and position saturation. It also provides a means to assess fidelity of system identification procedures by providing time histories for a known plant model, with and without unmeasured turbulence as a disturbance. Sets of linear models representing different Mach number and dynamic pressure conditions were implemented as MATLAB Linear Time Invariant (LTI) objects. Configuration changes were implemented by selecting which LTI object to use in a Simulink template block. A limited comparison of simulation versus wind-tunnel results is shown.

  13. Identity, regulation and in vivo function of gut NKp46+RORγt+ and NKp46+RORγt- lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Reynders, Ana; Yessaad, Nadia; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Dalod, Marc; Fenis, Aurore; Aubry, Camille; Nikitas, Georgios; Escalière, Bertrand; Renauld, Jean Christophe; Dussurget, Olivier; Cossart, Pascale; Lecuit, Marc; Vivier, Eric; Tomasello, Elena

    2011-07-20

    The gut is a major barrier against microbes and encloses various innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), including two subsets expressing the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp46. A subset of NKp46(+) cells expresses retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and produces IL-22, like lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. Other NKp46(+) cells lack RORγt and produce IFN-γ, like conventional Natural Killer (cNK) cells. The identity, the regulation and the in vivo functions of gut NKp46(+) ILCs largely remain to be unravelled. Using pan-genomic profiling, we showed here that small intestine (SI) NKp46(+)RORγt(-) ILCs correspond to SI NK cells. Conversely, we identified a transcriptional programme conserved in fetal LTi cells and adult SI NKp46(+)RORγt(+) and NKp46(-)RORγt(+) ILCs. We also demonstrated that the IL-1β/IL-1R1/MyD88 pathway, but not the commensal flora, drove IL-22 production by NKp46(+)RORγt(+) ILCs. Finally, oral Listeria monocytogenes infection induced IFN-γ production in SI NK and IL-22 production in NKp46(+)RORγt(+) ILCs, but only IFN-γ contributed to control bacteria dissemination. NKp46(+) ILC heterogeneity is thus associated with subset-specific transcriptional programmes and effector functions that govern their implication in gut innate immunity. PMID:21685873

  14. Identity, regulation and in vivo function of gut NKp46+RORγt+ and NKp46+RORγt− lymphoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Ana; Yessaad, Nadia; Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Dalod, Marc; Fenis, Aurore; Aubry, Camille; Nikitas, Georgios; Escalière, Bertrand; Renauld, Jean Christophe; Dussurget, Olivier; Cossart, Pascale; Lecuit, Marc; Vivier, Eric; Tomasello, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The gut is a major barrier against microbes and encloses various innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), including two subsets expressing the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp46. A subset of NKp46+ cells expresses retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) and produces IL-22, like lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. Other NKp46+ cells lack RORγt and produce IFN-γ, like conventional Natural Killer (cNK) cells. The identity, the regulation and the in vivo functions of gut NKp46+ ILCs largely remain to be unravelled. Using pan-genomic profiling, we showed here that small intestine (SI) NKp46+RORγt− ILCs correspond to SI NK cells. Conversely, we identified a transcriptional programme conserved in fetal LTi cells and adult SI NKp46+RORγt+ and NKp46−RORγt+ ILCs. We also demonstrated that the IL-1β/IL-1R1/MyD88 pathway, but not the commensal flora, drove IL-22 production by NKp46+RORγt+ ILCs. Finally, oral Listeria monocytogenes infection induced IFN-γ production in SI NK and IL-22 production in NKp46+RORγt+ ILCs, but only IFN-γ contributed to control bacteria dissemination. NKp46+ ILC heterogeneity is thus associated with subset-specific transcriptional programmes and effector functions that govern their implication in gut innate immunity. PMID:21685873

  15. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells continuously require the transcription factor GATA3 after commitment

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Chao; Cui, Kairong; Wilhelm, Christoph; Hu, Gangqing; Mao, Kairui; Belkaid, Yasmine; Zhao, Keji; Zhu, Jinfang

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is indispensable for the development of all interleukin-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα)-expressing innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). However, the functional role of low GATA3 expression in committed ILC3s has not been identified. We report that GATA3 regulates homeostasis of ILC3s by controlling IL-7Rα expression. In addition, GATA3 is critical for the development of the NKp46+ ILC3 subset by regulating the balance between the transcription factors T-bet and RORγt. Alhough GATA3 positively regulates NKp46+ ILC3 subset-specific genes, it negatively regulates CCR6+ ILC3 subset lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi)-specific genes in NKp46+ ILC3s. Furthermore, GATA3 is required for IL-22 production in both LTi and NKp46+ ILC3s. Thus, despite its low expression, GATA3 is critical for the homeostasis, development and function of ILC3 subsets. PMID:26595886

  16. Ultimate capacity of linear time-invariant bosonic channels with additive Gaussian noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Bardhan, Bhaskar; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2016-03-01

    Fiber-optic communications are moving to coherent detection in order to increase their spectral efficiency, i.e., their channel capacity per unit bandwidth. At power levels below the threshold for significant nonlinear effects, the channel model for such operation a linear time-invariant filter followed by additive Gaussian noise is one whose channel capacity is well known from Shannon's noisy channel coding theorem. The fiber channel, however, is really a bosonic channel, meaning that its ultimate classical information capacity must be determined from quantum-mechanical analysis, viz. from the Holevo-Schumacher-Westmoreland (HSW) theorem. Based on recent results establishing the HSW capacity of a linear (lossy or amplifying) channel with additive Gaussian noise, we provide a general continuous-time result, namely the HSW capacity of a linear time-invariant (LTI) bosonic channel with additive Gaussian noise arising from a thermal environment. In particular, we treat quasi-monochromatic communication under an average power constraint through a channel comprised of a stable LTI filter that may be attenuating at all frequencies or amplifying at some frequencies and attenuating at others. Phase-insensitive additive Gaussian noise-associated with the continuous-time Langevin noise operator needed to preserve free-field commutator brackets is included at the filter output. We compare the resulting spectral efficiencies with corresponding results for heterodyne and homodyne detection over the same channel to assess the increased spectral efficiency that might be realized with optimum quantum reception.

  17. Investigation of the effect of flow shear and the ITG on gyrokinetic MAST turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, Louis; Highcock, Edmund; Field, Anthony; Schekochihin, Alexander; Roach, Colin

    2015-11-01

    We study the effect of flow shear γE and ion temperature gradient a /LTi on L-mode turbulence in MAST using gyrokinetic simulations. These parameters play a crucial role in regulating and driving turbulence and together with the ratio of the safety factor to the inverse aspect ratio, q / ɛ , define a ``zero-turbulence manifold'' (ZTM) that represents the critical values needed to sustain turbulence. Nonlinear simulations show that by varying γE and a /LTi within experimental errors the turbulence crosses the ZTM, implying that the experiment operates close to marginality. In this parameter regime flow shear is very effective at regulating the turbulence, which is found to be subcritical. Finally the structure of the turbulence was studied: statistical parameters such as radial, perpendicular and parallel correlation lengths and the correlation time were calculated and found to be in reasonable agreement with experimental results obtained using Beam Emission Spectroscopy. Work supported by STFC and CCFE. Computing time provided by IFERC grant MULTEIM, The Hartree Centre, and EPSRC grants EP/ H002081/1 and EP/L000237/1.

  18. Ikaros Inhibits Group 3 Innate Lymphoid Cell Development and Function by Suppressing the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiyang; Heller, Jennifer J; Bostick, John W; Lee, Aileen; Schjerven, Hilde; Kastner, Philippe; Chan, Susan; Chen, Zongming E; Zhou, Liang

    2016-07-19

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) expressing the transcription factor (TF) RORγt are important for the defense and homeostasis of host intestinal tissues. The zinc finger TF Ikaros, encoded by Ikzf1, is essential for the development of RORγt(+) fetal lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and lymphoid organogenesis, but its role in postnatal ILC3s is unknown. Here, we show that small-intestinal ILC3s had lower Ikaros expression than ILC precursors and other ILC subsets. Ikaros inhibited ILC3s in a cell-intrinsic manner through zinc-finger-dependent inhibition of transcriptional activity of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, a key regulator of ILC3 maintenance and function. Ablation of Ikzf1 in RORγt(+) ILC3s resulted in increased expansion and cytokine production of intestinal ILC3s and protection against infection and colitis. Therefore, in contrast to being required for LTi development, Ikaros inhibits postnatal ILC3 development and function to regulate gut immune responses at steady state and in disease. PMID:27438771

  19. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells continuously require the transcription factor GATA-3 after commitment.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Chao; Cui, Kairong; Wilhelm, Christoph; Hu, Gangqing; Mao, Kairui; Belkaid, Yasmine; Zhao, Keji; Zhu, Jinfang

    2016-02-01

    The transcription factor GATA-3 is indispensable for the development of all innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) that express the interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα). However, the function of low GATA-3 expression in committed group 3 ILCs (ILC3 cells) has not been identified. We found that GATA-3 regulated the homeostasis of ILC3 cells by controlling IL-7Rα expression. In addition, GATA-3 served a critical function in the development of the NKp46(+) ILC3 subset by regulating the balance between the transcription factors T-bet and RORγt. Among NKp46(+) ILC3 cells, although GATA-3 positively regulated genes specific to the NKp46(+) ILC3 subset, it negatively regulated genes specific to lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) or LTi-like ILC3 cells. Furthermore, GATA-3 was required for IL-22 production in both ILC3 subsets. Thus, despite its low expression, GATA-3 was critical for the homeostasis, development and function of ILC3 subsets. PMID:26595886

  20. A study of Helmholtz resonators to stabilize thermoacoustically driven pressure oscillations.

    PubMed

    Zalluhoglu, Umut; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-04-01

    This paper studies passive control of thermoacoustic instabilities from an unconventional mathematical perspective. These instabilities are notoriously known to result from the complex dynamic exchange between the unsteady heat release and the acoustic waves within a finite volume such as a combustor. One possible passive control strategy is to utilize Helmholtz resonators. Under certain simplifications, the ensemble combustion dynamics including the resonators reduces to a linear-time invariant-multiple time-delayed system (LTI-MTDS). As the main contribution of the paper, an exact analytical procedure is proposed to determine the placement of the resonators to avoid instabilities. A unique mathematical paradigm, called the cluster treatment of characteristic roots, is used to accomplish this task. It declares exactly the necessary and sufficient stability conditions for an LTI-MTDS in the space of the system parameters. This concept paper is written with the mindset that this analytical tool can invite yet unexplored design capabilities for similar noise control applications where acoustic dampers are used. PMID:27106342

  1. Emotional reactivity modulates autonomic responses to an acoustic challenge in quail.

    PubMed

    Valance, D; Boissy, A; Després, G; Constantin, P; Leterrier, C

    2007-01-30

    Emotional reactivity modulates autonomic responses to an acoustic challenge in quail. Physio Behav 00(0) 000-000, 2006. This study investigated the relationship between emotional reactivity and behavioral and autonomic responses to an acoustic stimulus in quail. It was hypothesized that birds with high emotional reactivity would have higher motor inhibition combined with higher sympathetic activation than birds with low emotional reactivity. Two experiments were performed. The first looked for correlations between emotional reactivity, evaluated by a tonic immobility test, and motor and Heart Rate Variability in relation to an acoustic stimulus. The second experiment compared the motor and autonomic responses to the acoustic stimulus of quail selected on either long (LTI) or short (STI) duration of tonic immobility. The first experiment showed that the acoustic stimulation induced motor inhibition and cardiac activation. Correlations were found between tonic immobility duration and both autonomic activity before stimulation and sympathovagal balance after stimulation. In the second experiment, LTI quail showed strong sympathetic activation, whereas STI quail showed parasympathetic and sympathetic activation. The activation of the parasympathetic system induced by the noise in STI quail can be explained by the predominance of this system at rest in this line. In conclusion, both the basal autonomic activity and the autonomic responses differed according to the emotional reactivity, and changes in autonomic activity appear to be related to the genetic selection process. PMID:17070877

  2. A solid frame for the window on cognition: Modelling event-related pupil responses

    PubMed Central

    Korn, Christoph W.; Bach, Dominik R.

    2016-01-01

    Pupil size is often used to infer central processes, including attention, memory, and emotion. Recent research spotlights its relation to behavioral variables from decision-making models and to neural variables such as locus coeruleus activity or cortical oscillations. As yet, a unified and principled approach for analyzing pupil responses is lacking. Here, we seek to establish a formal, quantitative forward model for pupil responses by describing them with linear time invariant (LTI) systems. Based on empirical data from human participants, we show that a combination of two LTI systems can parsimoniously explain approximately all variance evoked by illuminance changes. Notably, the model makes a counter-intuitive prediction that pupil constriction dominates the responses to darkness flashes, as in previous empirical reports. This prediction was quantitatively confirmed for responses to light and darkness flashes in an independent group of participants. Crucially, illuminance- and non-illuminance-related inputs to the pupillary system are presumed to share a common final pathway, comprised of muscles and nerve terminals. Hence, we can harness our illuminance-based model to estimate the temporal evolution of this neural input for an auditory oddball task, an emotional words task, and a visual detection task. Onset and peak latencies of the estimated neural inputs furnish plausible hypotheses for the complexity of the underlying neural circuit. To conclude, this mathematical description of pupil responses serves as a prerequisite to refine their relation to behavioral and brain indices of cognitive processes. PMID:26894512

  3. Design and control of a bio-inspired soft wearable robotic device for ankle-foot rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Lae; Chen, Bor-rong; Pérez-Arancibia, Néstor O; Young, Diana; Stirling, Leia; Wood, Robert J; Goldfield, Eugene C; Nagpal, Radhika

    2014-03-01

    We describe the design and control of a wearable robotic device powered by pneumatic artificial muscle actuators for use in ankle-foot rehabilitation. The design is inspired by the biological musculoskeletal system of the human foot and lower leg, mimicking the morphology and the functionality of the biological muscle-tendon-ligament structure. A key feature of the device is its soft structure that provides active assistance without restricting natural degrees of freedom at the ankle joint. Four pneumatic artificial muscles assist dorsiflexion and plantarflexion as well as inversion and eversion. The prototype is also equipped with various embedded sensors for gait pattern analysis. For the subject tested, the prototype is capable of generating an ankle range of motion of 27° (14° dorsiflexion and 13° plantarflexion). The controllability of the system is experimentally demonstrated using a linear time-invariant (LTI) controller. The controller is found using an identified LTI model of the system, resulting from the interaction of the soft orthotic device with a human leg, and model-based classical control design techniques. The suitability of the proposed control strategy is demonstrated with several angle-reference following experiments. PMID:24434598

  4. Elastic Model Transitions: a Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, T. Jason; Ottander, John A.

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes both quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) algorithms to determine physical displacements. This approach is applicable to the simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize multiple LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data for discrete segments of the launch vehicle trajectory presents a problem of how to properly transition between models while preserving motion across the transition. In addition, energy may vary between flex models when using a truncated mode set. The LSQI-DSM algorithm can accommodate significant changes in energy between FEM models and carries elastic motion across FEM model transitions. Compared with previous approaches, the LSQI-DSM algorithm shows improvements ranging from a significant reduction to a complete removal of transients across FEM model transitions as well as maintaining elastic motion from the prior state.

  5. Carbohydrate concentrations and freezing stress resistance of silver birch buds grown under elevated temperature and ozone.

    PubMed

    Riikonen, Johanna; Kontunen-Soppela, Sari; Vapaavuori, Elina; Tervahauta, Arja; Tuomainen, Marjo; Oksanen, Elina

    2013-03-01

    The effects of slightly elevated temperature (+0.8 °C), ozone (O3) concentration (1.3 × ambient O3 concentration) and their combination on over-wintering buds of Betula pendula Roth were studied after two growing seasons of exposure in the field. Carbohydrate concentrations, freezing stress resistance (FSR), bud dry weight to fresh weight ratio, and transcript levels of cytochrome oxidase (COX), alternative oxidase (AOX) and dehydrin (LTI36) genes were studied in two clones (clones 12 and 25) in December. Elevated temperature increased the bud dry weight to fresh weight ratio and the ratio of raffinose family oligosaccharides to sucrose and the transcript levels of the dehydrin (LTI36) gene (in clone 12 only), but did not alter the FSR of the buds. Genotype-specific alterations in carbohydrate metabolism were found in the buds grown under elevated O3. The treatments did not significantly affect the transcript level of the COX or AOX genes. No clear pattern of an interactive effect between elevated temperature and O3 concentration was found. According to these data, the increase in autumnal temperatures and slightly increasing O3 concentrations do not increase the risk for freeze-induced damage in winter in silver birch buds, although some alterations in bud physiology occur. PMID:23425688

  6. A methodology for the synthesis of robust feedback systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milich, David Albert

    1988-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the synthesis of linear, time-variant (LTI) controllers for multivariable LTI systems. The resulting closed-loop system is nominally stable and exhibits a known level of performance. In addition, robustness of the feedback system is guaranteed, i.e., stability and performance are retained in the presence of multiple unstructured uncertainty blocks located at various points in the feedback loop. The design technique is referred to as the Causality Recovery Methodology (CRM). The CRM relies on the Youla parameterization of all stabilizing compensators to ensure nominal stability of the feedback system. A frequency-domain inequality in terms of the structured singular value mu defines the robustness specification. The optimal compensator, with respect to the mu condition, is shown to be noncausal in general. The aim of the CRM is to find a stable, causal transfer function matrix that approximates the robustness characteristics of the optimal solution. The CRM, via a series of infinite-dimensional convex programs, produces a closed-loop system whose performance robustness is at least as good as that of any initial design. The algorithm is approximated by a finite dimensional process for the purposes of implementation. Two numerical examples confirm the potential viability of the CRM concept; however, the robustness improvement comes at the expense of increased computational burden and compensator complexity.

  7. Non-linear dynamic analysis of geared systems, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Rajendra; Houser, Donald R.; Kahraman, Ahmet

    1990-01-01

    A good understanding of the steady state dynamic behavior of a geared system is required in order to design reliable and quiet transmissions. This study focuses on a system containing a spur gear pair with backlash and periodically time-varying mesh stiffness, and rolling element bearings with clearance type non-linearities. A dynamic finite element model of the linear time-invariant (LTI) system is developed. Effects of several system parameters, such as torsional and transverse flexibilities of the shafts and prime mover/load inertias, on free and force vibration characteristics are investigated. Several reduced order LTI models are developed and validated by comparing their eigen solution with the finite element model results. Several key system parameters such as mean load and damping ratio are identified and their effects on the non-linear frequency response are evaluated quantitatively. Other fundamental issues such as the dynamic coupling between non-linear modes, dynamic interactions between component non-linearities and time-varying mesh stiffness, and the existence of subharmonic and chaotic solutions including routes to chaos have also been examined in depth.

  8. Stability Assessment and Tuning of an Adaptively Augmented Classical Controller for Launch Vehicle Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZwieten, Tannen; Zhu, J. Jim; Adami, Tony; Berry, Kyle; Grammar, Alex; Orr, Jeb S.; Best, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a robust and practical adaptive control scheme for launch vehicles [ [1] has been introduced. It augments a classical controller with a real-time loop-gain adaptation, and it is therefore called Adaptive Augmentation Control (AAC). The loop-gain will be increased from the nominal design when the tracking error between the (filtered) output and the (filtered) command trajectory is large; whereas it will be decreased when excitation of flex or sloshing modes are detected. There is a need to determine the range and rate of the loop-gain adaptation in order to retain (exponential) stability, which is critical in vehicle operation, and to develop some theoretically based heuristic tuning methods for the adaptive law gain parameters. The classical launch vehicle flight controller design technics are based on gain-scheduling, whereby the launch vehicle dynamics model is linearized at selected operating points along the nominal tracking command trajectory, and Linear Time-Invariant (LTI) controller design techniques are employed to ensure asymptotic stability of the tracking error dynamics, typically by meeting some prescribed Gain Margin (GM) and Phase Margin (PM) specifications. The controller gains at the design points are then scheduled, tuned and sometimes interpolated to achieve good performance and stability robustness under external disturbances (e.g. winds) and structural perturbations (e.g. vehicle modeling errors). While the GM does give a bound for loop-gain variation without losing stability, it is for constant dispersions of the loop-gain because the GM is based on frequency-domain analysis, which is applicable only for LTI systems. The real-time adaptive loop-gain variation of the AAC effectively renders the closed-loop system a time-varying system, for which it is well-known that the LTI system stability criterion is neither necessary nor sufficient when applying to a Linear Time-Varying (LTV) system in a frozen-time fashion. Therefore, a

  9. Activation of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins by native and recombinant adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factors, 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C M; Chang, P P; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Price, S R; Kunz, B C; Moss, J; Twiddy, E M; Holmes, R K

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) are responsible in part for "traveler's diarrhea" and related diarrheal illnesses. The family of LTs comprises two serogroups termed LT-I and LT-II; each serogroup includes two or more antigenic variants. The effects of LTs result from ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, a stimulatory component of adenylyl cyclase; the mechanism of action is identical to that of cholera toxin (CT). The ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of CT is enhanced by 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. These proteins directly activate the CTA1 catalytic unit and stimulate its ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, other proteins, and simple guanidino compounds (e.g., agmatine). Because of the similarities between CT and LTs, we investigated the effects of purified bovine brain ARF and a recombinant form of bovine ARF synthesized in Escherichia coli on LT activity. ARF enhanced the LT-I-, LT-IIa-, and LT-IIb-catalyzed ADP ribosylation of agmatine, as well as the auto-ADP ribosylation of the toxin catalytic unit. Stimulation of ADP-ribosylagmatine formation by LTs and CT in the presence of ARF was GTP dependent and enhanced by sodium dodecyl sulfate. With agmatine as substrate, LT-IIa and LT-IIb exhibited less than 1% the activity of CT and LT-Ih. CT and LTs catalyzed ADP-ribosyl-Gs alpha formation in a reaction dependent on ARF, GTP, and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/cholate. With Gs alpha as substrate, the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of the toxins were similar, although CT and LT-Ih appeared to be slightly more active than LT-IIa and LT-IIb. Thus, LT-IIa and LT-IIb appear to differ somewhat from CT and LT-Ih in substrate specificity. Responsiveness to stimulation by ARF, GTP, and phospholipid/detergent as well as the specificity of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity are functions of LTs from serogroups LT-I and LT-II that are shared with CT. Images PMID:1902492

  10. Input to state stability in reservoir models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus; Sierra, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Models in ecology and biogeochemistry, in particular models of the global carbon cycle, can be generalized as systems of non-autonomous ordinary differential equations (ODEs). For many applications, it is important to determine the stability properties for this type of systems, but most methods available for autonomous systems are not necessarily applicable for the non-autonomous case. We discuss here stability notions for non-autonomous nonlinear models represented by systems of ODEs explicitly dependent on time and a time-varying input signal. We propose Input to State Stability (ISS) as candidate for the necessary generalization of the established analysis with respect to equilibria or invariant sets for autonomous systems, and show its usefulness by applying it to reservoir models typical for element cycling in ecosystem, e.g. in soil organic matter decomposition. We also show how ISS generalizes existent concepts formerly only available for Linear Time Invariant (LTI) and Linear Time Variant (LTV) systems to the nonlinear case.

  11. Interaction of mature CD3+CD4+ T cells with dendritic cells triggers the development of tertiary lymphoid structures in the thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Marinkovic, Tatjana; Garin, Alexandre; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Fu, Yang-Xin; Ruddle, Nancy H.; Furtado, Glaucia C.; Lira, Sergio A.

    2006-01-01

    Ectopic expression of CC chemokine ligand 21 (CCL21) in the thyroid leads to development of lymphoid structures that resemble those observed in Hashimoto thyroiditis. Deletion of the inhibitor of differentiation 2 (Id2) gene, essential for generation of CD3–CD4+ lymphoid tissue–inducer (LTi) cells and development of secondary lymphoid organs, did not affect formation of tertiary lymphoid structures. Rather, mature CD3+CD4+ T cells were critical for the development of tertiary lymphoid structures. The initial stages of this process involved interaction of CD3+CD4+ T cells with DCs, the appearance of peripheral-node addressin–positive (PNAd+) vessels, and production of chemokines that recruit lymphocytes and DCs. These findings indicate that the formation of tertiary lymphoid structures does not require Id2-dependent conventional LTis but depends on a program initiated by mature CD3+CD4+ T cells. PMID:16998590

  12. Interleukin-22 drives endogenous thymic regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Hanash, Alan M.; Jenq, Robert R.; Young, Lauren F.; Ghosh, Arnab; Singer, Natalie V.; West, Mallory L.; Smith, Odette M.; Holland, Amanda M.; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Boyd, Richard L.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous thymic regeneration is a crucial function that allows for renewal of immune competence after stress, infection or immunodepletion. The mechanisms governing this regeneration, however, remain poorly understood. Here we detail a framework of thymic regeneration centred on IL-22 and triggered by depletion of CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) thymocytes. Intrathymic levels of IL-22 were increased following thymic insult, and thymic recovery was impaired in IL-22-deficient mice. IL-22, which signalled through thymic epithelial cells (TECs) and promoted their proliferation and survival, was upregulated by radio-resistant RORγ(t)+CCR6+NKp46− lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) after thymic injury in an IL-23 dependent manner. Importantly, administration of IL-22 enhanced thymic recovery following total body irradiation (TBI). These studies reveal mechanisms of endogenous thymic repair and offer innovative regenerative strategies for improving immune competence. PMID:22383805

  13. Circuit modeling of multimode semiconductor lasers and the effect of fiber dispersion on the intensity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamath, K. K.; Vaya, P. R.

    1992-12-01

    A c irclAl: L mode 1 for Laser diodes based ort nu I C z. mode ra t e eqtiat tons i. s presert t ed hre. be I ay 1 i ries are cornec t ed aL the outpt nodes iduch provide de Lays corresponding to reLative propaation de 1 ays D7i for L aser Lorii LILdZ. ia I modes L!. . ) . n w optical fiber. Th(s modeL s(iruLat. d lASCfl3 th* c(reut s(nwLa LLOTt pacha6e SPICE2. The results were compared with those resuLts by the dtrect rtv soLution of th muLti mode rate equations.

  14. Using Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Guide Quantitative Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortle, J. F.; Allocco, M.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative methods can be beneficial in many types of safety investigations. However, there are many difficulties in using quantitative m ethods. Far example, there may be little relevant data available. This paper proposes a framework for using quantitative hazard analysis to prioritize hazard scenarios most suitable for quantitative mziysis. The framework first categorizes hazard scenarios by severity and likelihood. We then propose another metric "modeling difficulty" that desc ribes the complexity in modeling a given hazard scenario quantitatively. The combined metrics of severity, likelihood, and modeling difficu lty help to prioritize hazard scenarios for which quantitative analys is should be applied. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for airplane operatio ns at closely spaced parallel runways.

  15. Model Structures and Algorithms for Identification of Aerodynamic Models for Flight Dynamics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasanth, Ravi K.; Klein, Vladislav; Murphy, Patrick C.; Mehra, Raman K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes model structures and parameter estimation algorithms suitable for the identification of unsteady aerodynamic models from input-output data. The model structures presented are state space models and include linear time-invariant (LTI) models and linear parameter-varying (LPV) models. They cover a wide range of local and parameter dependent identification problems arising in unsteady aerodynamics and nonlinear flight dynamics. We present a residue algorithm for estimating model parameters from data. The algorithm can incorporate apriori information and is described in detail. The algorithms are evaluated on the F-16XL wind-tunnel test data from NAS Langley Research Center. Results of numerical evaluation are presented. The paper concludes with a discussion major issues and directions for future work.

  16. Linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 for interaction analysis.

    PubMed

    Benhalla, Abdelhay; Houssou, Mohamed; Charif, Moussa

    2010-08-01

    This paper deals with the linearization of the full activated sludge model No 1 (ASM1) in the scope of interaction analysis. For consistency, the linearization procedure is developed and validated within the BSM1 simulation benchmark framework. It is based on reaction rate approximation by linear combinations of states. The linear rate models are identified and incorporated in the mass balance equations, yielding a linear locally equivalent to the ASM1 model. Linear models for anoxic and aerated compartments are proposed. It is observed that the presented models track very closely the nonlinear ASM1 responses to various influent data. The key feature of this linearization strategy is that the gotten linear version of the ASM1 model is linear time invariant (LTI) and that it conserves the states biological interpretation and the original ASM1 dimension. It allows, therefore, application of interaction analysis methods and makes it possible to determine motivated control configurations for the ASM1 model. PMID:20131068

  17. Transport coefficient computation based on input/output reduced order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Joshua L.

    The guiding purpose of this thesis is to address the optimal material design problem when the material description is a molecular dynamics model. The end goal is to obtain a simplified and fast model that captures the property of interest such that it can be used in controller design and optimization. The approach is to examine model reduction analysis and methods to capture a specific property of interest, in this case viscosity, or more generally complex modulus or complex viscosity. This property and other transport coefficients are defined by a input/output relationship and this motivates model reduction techniques that are tailored to preserve input/output behavior. In particular Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) based methods are investigated. First simulation methods are identified that are amenable to systems theory analysis. For viscosity, these models are of the Gosling and Lees-Edwards type. They are high order nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) that employ Periodic Boundary Conditions. Properties can be calculated from the state trajectories of these ODEs. In this research local linear approximations are rigorously derived and special attention is given to potentials that are evaluated with Periodic Boundary Conditions (PBC). For the Gosling description LTI models are developed from state trajectories but are found to have limited success in capturing the system property, even though it is shown that full order LTI models can be well approximated by reduced order LTI models. For the Lees-Edwards SLLOD type model nonlinear ODEs will be approximated by a Linear Time Varying (LTV) model about some nominal trajectory and both balanced truncation and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) will be used to assess the plausibility of reduced order models to this system description. An immediate application of the derived LTV models is Quasilinearization or Waveform Relaxation. Quasilinearization is a Newton's method applied to the ODE operator

  18. Real-Time Feedback Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Tones. Part 1; Fixed-Gain Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, M. A.; Cabell, R. H.; Cattafesta, L. N., III

    2006-01-01

    A generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm was formulated and applied to the cavity flow-tone problem. The control algorithm demonstrated multiple Rossiter-mode suppression at fixed Mach numbers ranging from 0.275 to 0.38. Controller performance was evaluated with a measure of output disturbance rejection and an input sensitivity transfer function. The results suggest that disturbances entering the cavity flow are collocated with the control input at the cavity leading edge. In that case, only tonal components of the cavity wall-pressure fluctuations can be suppressed and arbitrary broadband pressure reduction is not possible with the present sensor/actuator arrangement. In the control-algorithm development, the cavity dynamics were treated as linear and time invariant (LTI) for a fixed Mach number. The experimental results lend support to that treatment.

  19. Conversion of linear time-invariant time-delay feedback systems into delay-differential equations with commensurate delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Tatsuya; Hagiwara, Tomomichi

    2014-08-01

    A new stability analysis method of time-delay systems (TDSs) called the monodromy operator approach has been studied under the assumption that a TDS is represented as a time-delay feedback system consisting of a finite-dimensional linear time-invariant (LTI) system and a pure delay. For applying this approach to TDSs described by delay-differential equations (DDEs), the problem of converting DDEs into representation as time-delay feedback systems has been studied. With regard to such a problem, it was shown that, under discontinuous initial functions, it is natural to define the solutions of DDEs in two different ways, and the above conversion problem was solved for each of these two definitions. More precisely, the solution of a DDE was represented as either the state of the finite-dimensional part of a time-delay feedback system or a part of the output of another time-delay feedback system, depending on which definition of the DDE solution one is talking about. Motivated by the importance in establishing a thorough relationship between time-delay feedback systems and DDEs, this paper discusses the opposite problem of converting time-delay feedback systems into representation as DDEs, including the discussions about the conversion of the initial conditions. We show that the state of (the finite-dimensional part of) a time-delay feedback system can be represented as the solution of a DDE in the sense of one of the two definitions, while its 'essential' output can be represented as that of another DDE in the sense of the other type of definition. Rigorously speaking, however, it is also shown that the latter representation is possible regardless of the initial conditions, while some initial condition could prevent the conversion into the former representation. This study hence establishes that the representation of TDSs as time-delay feedback systems possesses higher ability than that with DDEs, as description methods for LTI TDSs with commensurate delays.

  20. Frequency response of lift control in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Graetzel, Chauncey F; Nelson, Bradley J; Fry, Steven N

    2010-11-01

    The flight control responses of the fruitfly represent a powerful model system to explore neuromotor control mechanisms, whose system level control properties can be suitably characterized with a frequency response analysis. We characterized the lift response dynamics of tethered flying Drosophila in presence of vertically oscillating visual patterns, whose oscillation frequency we varied between 0.1 and 13 Hz. We justified these measurements by showing that the amplitude gain and phase response is invariant to the pattern oscillation amplitude and spatial frequency within a broad dynamic range. We also showed that lift responses are largely linear and time invariant (LTI), a necessary condition for a meaningful analysis of frequency responses and a remarkable characteristic given its nonlinear constituents. The flies responded to increasing oscillation frequencies with a roughly linear decrease in response gain, which dropped to background noise levels at about 6 Hz. The phase lag decreased linearly, consistent with a constant reaction delay of 75 ms. Next, we estimated the free-flight response of the fly to generate a Bode diagram of the lift response. The limitation of lift control to frequencies below 6 Hz is explained with inertial body damping, which becomes dominant at higher frequencies. Our work provides the detailed background and techniques that allow optomotor lift responses of Drosophila to be measured with comparatively simple, affordable and commercially available techniques. The identification of an LTI, pattern velocity dependent, lift control strategy is relevant to the underlying motion computation mechanisms and serves a broader understanding of insects' flight control strategies. The relevance and potential pitfalls of applying system identification techniques in tethered preparations is discussed. PMID:20462877

  1. Construction of energy-stable projection-based reduced order models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew F.; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.

    2014-12-15

    Our paper aims to unify and extend several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs) using the energy method and the concept of “energy-stability”. Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. First, an approach for building energy stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is proposed. The key idea is to apply to the system a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The result of this procedure will be a ROM that is energy-stablemore » for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the “symmetry inner product”. Next, attention is turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, termed the “Lyapunov inner product”, is derived. Moreover, it is shown that the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system ari sing from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. Projection in this inner product guarantees a ROM that is energy-stable, again for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. We also made comparisons between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. Performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.« less

  2. Characterisation of Runoff - Storage Relationships By Satellite-Gravimetry and Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegger, J. M.; Tourian, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    GRACE observations of the time dependent gravity field provide a direct measurement of the monthly state of mass and thus monthly total water storage in a catchment. This for the first time allows for a direct comparison of monthly runoff and water storage. Investigations of global scale Runoff-Storage (R-S) relationships for different climatic conditions show distinct periodic characteristics with hysteresis for total water storage. For fully humid tropical catchments hysteresis reveals a time invariant temporal delay from storage to runoff. An adjustment of time lag leads to a linear (R-S) relationship with correlation 0.98. Confirmed by the coherence of Fourier spectra, this allows to characterize this R-S relationship as a Linear Time invariant System (LTI). Based hereon, the hypothesis of a R-S relationship characterized by the superposition of linear contributions from coupled/liquid storage and nonlinear contributions from uncoupled storages is investigated by means of remote sensing. For boreal catchments MODIS snow coverage is used to separate total storage into coupled/liquid and uncoupled/solid components either directly by assigning frozen solid storage to the snow covered areas or indirectly by a model based aggregation of snow and liquid according to snow coverage. Both methods show, that the nonlinear part of the R-S relationship can be fully assigned to the uncoupled/solid storage while the relationship of runoff and liquid storage can also be characterized as LTI. This system behavior thus allows for a direct determination of river runoff from GRACE mass or vice versa of water storage from measured runoff for unmanaged catchments, provided that the coupled/uncoupled storage components can be quantified by remote sensing. Examples for river runoff time series determined from GRACE mass are presented for Amazon sub-catchments and with the additional integration of MODIS snow coverage also for the boreal catchments of Sibiria and North America.

  3. Advanced Atherogenic Index for the Assessment of Consolidated Lipid Risk in Premature Coronary Artery Disease Patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Sanjiv Kumar; Agarwal, Sarita; Daga, Mridul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The high prevalence, severity, and prematurity of coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Indian population cannot be completely explained by the conventional lipid parameters and the existing lipid indices. Aims and Objectives: To calculate newly defined advanced atherogenic index (AAI) in premature CAD patients and compare it between cases and controls and Correlate its values with the existing indices. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty premature CAD patients and an equal number of age and sex matched healthy individuals were included in this study. Lipid profile and nonconventional lipid parameters like oxidized Low density lipoprotein (OX LDL), small dense LDL (SD LDL), lipoprotein (a) apolipoprotein B (Apo B), and apolipoprotein A1 (Apo A1) were estimated and their values were used to define AAI and existing lipid indices like AI, lipid tetrad index (LTI) and lipid pentad index (LPI). Results: The mean age of cases and controls was 37.29 + 4.50 and 36.13 + 3.53 years, respectively. The value of AAI was highly significant in cases (3461.22 ± 45.20) as compared to controls (305.84 ± 21.80). AAI has shown better statistical significance and correlation (P < 0.0001, r = 0.737) as compared to the earlier indices such as AI (P < 0.01, r = 0.52), LTI (P < 0.001, r = 0.677) and LPI (P < 0.001, r = 0.622) in premature CAD. Kolmogorov D statistic and cumulative distribution function plot has shown that AAI can discriminate cases and controls more accurately as compared to the earlier indices. Conclusion: Statistically AAI appears to be a better marker of consolidated lipid risk in premature CAD patients as compared to the earlier indices. PMID:27365915

  4. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latency-associated nuclear antigen induction by hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Veeranna, Ravindra P; Haque, Muzammel; Davis, David A; Yang, Min; Yarchoan, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) play an important role in the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) life cycle. In particular, hypoxia can activate lytic replication of KSHV and specific lytic genes, including the replication and transcription activator (RTA), while KSHV infection in turn can increase the levels and activity of HIFs. In the present study, we show that hypoxia increases the levels of mRNAs encoding KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) cell lines and also increases the levels of LANA protein. Luciferase reporter assays in Hep3B cells revealed a moderate activation of the LANA promoter region by hypoxia as well as by cotransfection with degradation-resistant HIF-1α or HIF-2α expression plasmids. Computer analysis of a 1.2-kb sequence upstream of the LANA translational start site identified six potential hypoxia-responsive elements (HRE). Sequential deletion studies revealed that much of this activity was mediated by one of these HREs (HRE 4R) oriented in the 3' to 5' direction and located between the constitutive (LTc) and RTA-inducible (LTi) mRNA start sites. Site-directed mutation of this HRE substantially reduced the response to both HIF-1α and HIF-2α in a luciferase reporter assay. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated binding of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α to this region. Also, HIF-1α was found to associate with RTA, and HIFs enhanced the activation of LTi by RTA. These results provide evidence that hypoxia and HIFs upregulate both latent and lytic KSHV replication and play a central role in the life cycle of this virus. PMID:22090111

  5. Frequency response of lift control in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Graetzel, Chauncey F.; Nelson, Bradley J.; Fry, Steven N.

    2010-01-01

    The flight control responses of the fruitfly represent a powerful model system to explore neuromotor control mechanisms, whose system level control properties can be suitably characterized with a frequency response analysis. We characterized the lift response dynamics of tethered flying Drosophila in presence of vertically oscillating visual patterns, whose oscillation frequency we varied between 0.1 and 13 Hz. We justified these measurements by showing that the amplitude gain and phase response is invariant to the pattern oscillation amplitude and spatial frequency within a broad dynamic range. We also showed that lift responses are largely linear and time invariant (LTI), a necessary condition for a meaningful analysis of frequency responses and a remarkable characteristic given its nonlinear constituents. The flies responded to increasing oscillation frequencies with a roughly linear decrease in response gain, which dropped to background noise levels at about 6 Hz. The phase lag decreased linearly, consistent with a constant reaction delay of 75 ms. Next, we estimated the free-flight response of the fly to generate a Bode diagram of the lift response. The limitation of lift control to frequencies below 6 Hz is explained with inertial body damping, which becomes dominant at higher frequencies. Our work provides the detailed background and techniques that allow optomotor lift responses of Drosophila to be measured with comparatively simple, affordable and commercially available techniques. The identification of an LTI, pattern velocity dependent, lift control strategy is relevant to the underlying motion computation mechanisms and serves a broader understanding of insects' flight control strategies. The relevance and potential pitfalls of applying system identification techniques in tethered preparations is discussed. PMID:20462877

  6. Construction of energy-stable projection-based reduced order models

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew F.; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart G.

    2014-12-15

    Our paper aims to unify and extend several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs) using the energy method and the concept of “energy-stability”. Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. First, an approach for building energy stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of partial differential equations (PDEs) using continuous projection is proposed. The key idea is to apply to the system a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The result of this procedure will be a ROM that is energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special inner product, termed the “symmetry inner product”. Next, attention is turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, termed the “Lyapunov inner product”, is derived. Moreover, it is shown that the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system ari sing from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. Projection in this inner product guarantees a ROM that is energy-stable, again for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. We also made comparisons between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. Performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.

  7. Non-linear dynamic analysis of geared systems. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Rajendra; Houser, Donald R.; Kahraman, Ahmet

    1990-01-01

    Under driving conditions, a typical geared system may be subjected to large dynamic loads. Also, the vibration level of the geared system is directly related to the noise radiated from the gear box. The steady state dynamic behavior of the system is examined in order to design reliable and quiet transmissions. The scope is limited to a system containing a spur gear pair with backlash and periodically time varying mesh stiffness, and rolling element bearings with clearance type nonlinearities. The internal static transmission error at the gear mesh, which is of importance from high frequency noise and vibration control view point, is considered in the formulation in sinusoidal or periodic form. A dynamic finite element model of the linear time invariant (LTI) system is developed. Effects of several system parameters, such as torsional and transverse flexibilities of the shafts and prime mover/load inertias, on free and forced vibration characteristics are investigated. Several reduced order LTI models are developed and validated by comparing their eigen solutions with the finite element model results. Using the reduced order formulations, a three degree of freedom dynamic model is developed which includes nonlinearities associated with radical clearances in the radial rolling element bearings, backlash between a spur gear pair and periodically varying gear mesh stiffness. As a limiting case, a single degree of freedom model of the spur gear pair with backlash is considered and mathematical conditions for tooth separation and back collision are defined. Both digital simulation technique and analytical models such as method of harmonic balance and the method of multiple scales were used to develop the steady state frequency response characteristics for various nonlinear and/or time varying cases.

  8. Type II heat-labile enterotoxins from 50 diverse Escherichia coli isolates belong almost exclusively to the LT-IIc family and may be prophage encoded.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Michael G; Holmes, Randall K

    2012-01-01

    Some enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) produce a type II heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-II) that activates adenylate cyclase in susceptible cells but is not neutralized by antisera against cholera toxin or type I heat-labile enterotoxin (LT-I). LT-I variants encoded by plasmids in ETEC from humans and pigs have amino acid sequences that are ≥ 95% identical. In contrast, LT-II toxins are chromosomally encoded and are much more diverse. Early studies characterized LT-IIa and LT-IIb variants, but a novel LT-IIc was reported recently. Here we characterized the LT-II encoding loci from 48 additional ETEC isolates. Two encoded LT-IIa, none encoded LT-IIb, and 46 encoded highly related variants of LT-IIc. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the predicted LT-IIc toxins encoded by these loci could be assigned to 6 subgroups. The loci corresponding to individual toxins within each subgroup had DNA sequences that were more than 99% identical. The LT-IIc subgroups appear to have arisen by multiple recombinational events between progenitor loci encoding LT-IIc1- and LT-IIc3-like variants. All loci from representative isolates encoding the LT-IIa, LT-IIb, and each subgroup of LT-IIc enterotoxins are preceded by highly-related genes that are between 80 and 93% identical to predicted phage lysozyme genes. DNA sequences immediately following the B genes differ considerably between toxin subgroups, but all are most closely related to genomic sequences found in predicted prophages. Together these data suggest that the LT-II loci are inserted into lambdoid type prophages that may or may not be infectious. These findings raise the possibility that production of LT-II enterotoxins by ETEC may be determined by phage conversion and may be activated by induction of prophage, in a manner similar to control of production of Shiga-like toxins by converting phages in isolates of enterohemmorhagic E. coli. PMID:22242186

  9. Predicting Modulation in Corticomotor Excitability and in Transcallosal Inhibition in Response to Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Travis W.; Bolic, Miodrag; Tremblay, François

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Responses to neuromodulatory protocols based either on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are known to be highly variable between individuals. In this study, we examined whether variability of responses to anodal tDCS (a-tDCS) could be predicted from individual differences in the ability to recruit early or late indirect waves (I-waves), as reflected in latency differences of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) evoked by TMS of different coil orientation. Methods: Participants (n = 20) first underwent TMS to measure latency of MEPs elicited at different coil orientations (i.e., PA, posterior-anterior; AP, anterior-posterior; LM, latero-medial). Then, participants underwent a-tDCS (20 min @ 2 mA) targeting the primary motor cortex of the contralateral preferred hand (right, n = 18). Individual responses to a-tDCS were determined by monitoring changes in MEP amplitude at rest and in the duration of the contralateral silent period (cSP) and ipsilateral silent period (iSP) during contraction; the latter providing an index of the latency and duration of transcallosal inhibition (LTI and DTI). Results: Consistent with previous reports, individual responses to a-tDCS were highly variable when expressed in terms of changes in MEP amplitude or in cSP duration with ~50% of the participants showing either little or no modulation. In contrast, individual variations in measures of transcallosal inhibition were less variable, allowing detection of significant after-effects. The reduced LTI and prolonged DTI observed post-tDCS were indicative of an enhanced excitability of the transcallosal pathway in the stimulated hemisphere. In terms of predictions, AP-LM latency differences proved to be good predictors of responses to a-tDCS when considering MEP modulation. Conclusion: The present results corroborate the predictive value of latency differences derived from TMS to determine who is likely to express

  10. Role of group 3 innate lymphoid cells during experimental otitis media in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang Gun; Gong, Sung Ho; Kim, Hee-Bok; Song, Jae-Jun; Park, Joo Hyun; Lim, Yun-Sung; Park, Seok-Won

    2016-09-01

    and IL-22 seemed to be lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. The results suggest that LTi cells release IL-17 and IL-22, and play a significant role in both the early phase of OM induction and recovery from it. PMID:27497403

  11. Actuator control of edgewise vibrations in wind turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staino, A.; Basu, B.; Nielsen, S. R. K.

    2012-03-01

    Edgewise vibrations with low aerodynamic damping are of particular concern in modern multi-megawatt wind turbines, as large amplitude cyclic oscillations may significantly shorten the life-time of wind turbine components, and even lead to structural damages or failures. In this paper, a new blade design with active controllers is proposed for controlling edgewise vibrations. The control is based on a pair of actuators/active tendons mounted inside each blade, allowing a variable control force to be applied in the edgewise direction. The control forces are appropriately manipulated according to a prescribed control law. A mathematical model of the wind turbine equipped with active controllers has been formulated using an Euler-Lagrangian approach. The model describes the dynamics of edgewise vibrations considering the aerodynamic properties of the blade, variable mass and stiffness per unit length and taking into account the effect of centrifugal stiffening, gravity and the interaction between the blades and the tower. Aerodynamic loads corresponding to a combination of steady wind including the wind shear and the effect of turbulence are computed by applying the modified Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory. Multi-Blade Coordinate (MBC) transformation is applied to an edgewise reduced order model, leading to a linear time-invariant (LTI) representation of the dynamic model. The LTI description obtained is used for the design of the active control algorithm. Linear Quadratic (LQ) regulator designed for the MBC transformed system is compared with the control synthesis performed directly on an assumed nominal representation of the time-varying system. The LQ regulator is also compared against vibration control performance using Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF). Numerical simulations have been carried out using data from a 5-MW three-bladed Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) model in order to study the effectiveness of the proposed active controlled blade design in

  12. De novo Transcriptome Assembly of Floral Buds of Pineapple and Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Response to Ethephon Induction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-He; Fan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of pineapple is its ability to undergo floral induction in response to external ethylene stimulation. However, little information is available regarding the molecular mechanism underlying this process. In this study, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in plants exposed to 1.80 mL·L(-1) (T1) or 2.40 mL·L(-1) ethephon (T2) compared with Ct plants (control, cleaning water) were identified using RNA-seq and gene expression profiling. Illumina sequencing generated 65,825,224 high-quality reads that were assembled into 129,594 unigenes with an average sequence length of 1173 bp. Of these unigenes, 24,775 were assigned to specific KEGG pathways, of which metabolic pathways and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites were the most highly represented. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the annotated unigenes revealed that the majority were involved in metabolic and cellular processes, cell and cell part, catalytic activity and binding. Gene expression profiling analysis revealed 3788, 3062, and 758 DEGs in the comparisons of T1 with Ct, T2 with Ct, and T2 with T1, respectively. GO analysis indicated that these DEGs were predominantly annotated to metabolic and cellular processes, cell and cell part, catalytic activity, and binding. KEGG pathway analysis revealed the enrichment of several important pathways among the DEGs, including metabolic pathways, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and plant hormone signal transduction. Thirteen DEGs were identified as candidate genes associated with the process of floral induction by ethephon, including three ERF-like genes, one ETR-like gene, one LTI-like gene, one FT-like gene, one VRN1-like gene, three FRI-like genes, one AP1-like gene, one CAL-like gene, and one AG-like gene. qPCR analysis indicated that the changes in the expression of these 13 candidate genes were consistent with the alterations in the corresponding RPKM values, confirming the accuracy and credibility of the RNA-seq and gene

  13. Operational Forecast of Runoff from Large Scale Basins using Satellite-Gravimetry and Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegger, Johannes; Tourian, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    The forecast of river runoff is a major issue in hydrology and of considerable economic importance with respect to the management of floods and droughts. However an accurate and reliable forecast is a major challenge as runoff depends on climatic and physiographic conditions and on different driving forces such as present recharge, water storage in liquid and solid form, etc. Specifically the quantification of the solid and liquid water storage components and their transition has a major impact on the accuracy of runoff forcasts especially during melting periods. As groundbased measurements of groundwater levels, snow water equivalent and soil moisture are point measurements the determination of water storage is still is quite inaccurate and unreliable on large spatial scales. GRACE gravimetry provides a direct measure of water storage anomalies and thus a determination of runoff - storage (R-S) relationships on large scales catchments. For fully humid tropic regions the system behaviour can be described as a linear time invariant (LTI) system between runoff and total mass with a phase shift due to runoff routing time lag. For boreal regions runoff and liquid mass quantified on the basis of GRACE and MODIS snow coverage also behave as a LTI system. This allows for a direct determination of runoff from GRACE gravity measurements and remote sensing based on an adaption of the parameters time lag, hydraulic time constant and mass offset between the time series of runoff and liquid mass (Riegger & Tourian, 2014). Even though there are no operational GRACE measurements available at the moment, an approach for short term runoff forecasts using operational data is investigated here in order to explore the prediction potential of operational data. The approach is based on the R-S relationship for liquid storage components with the respective parameters taken from previous runoff, recharge, mass and snow coverage time series in a training period. These are used to predict

  14. Nonlinear time-periodic models of the longitudinal flight dynamics of desert locusts Schistocerca gregaria

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Graham K; Żbikowski, Rafał

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies of insect flight control have been statistical in approach, simply correlating wing kinematics with body kinematics or force production. Kinematics and forces are linked by Newtonian mechanics, so adopting a dynamics-based approach is necessary if we are to place the study of insect flight on its proper physical footing. Here we develop semi-empirical models of the longitudinal flight dynamics of desert locusts Schistocerca gregaria. We use instantaneous force–moment measurements from individual locusts to parametrize the nonlinear rigid body equations of motion. Since the instantaneous forces are approximately periodic, we represent them using Fourier series, which are embedded in the equations of motion to give a nonlinear time-periodic (NLTP) model. This is a proper mathematical generalization of an earlier linear-time invariant (LTI) model of locust flight dynamics, developed using previously published time-averaged versions of the instantaneous force recordings. We perform various numerical simulations, within the fitted range of the model, and across the range of body angles used by free-flying locusts, to explore the likely behaviour of the locusts upon release from the tether. Solutions of the NLTP models are compared with solutions of the nonlinear time-invariant (NLTI) models to which they reduce when the periodic terms are dropped. Both sets of models are unstable and therefore fail to explain locust flight stability fully. Nevertheless, whereas the measured forces include statistically significant harmonic content up to about the eighth harmonic, the simulated flight trajectories display no harmonic content above the fundamental forcing frequency. Hence, manoeuvre control in locusts will not directly reflect subtle changes in the higher harmonics of the wing beat, but must operate on a coarser time-scale. A state-space analysis of the NLTP models reveals orbital trajectories that are impossible to capture in the LTI and NLTI models

  15. Construction of energy-stable Galerkin reduced order models.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

    2013-05-01

    This report aims to unify several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs). Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. The model reduction procedure consists of two steps: the computation of a reduced basis, and the projection of the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) onto this reduced basis. Two kinds of reduced bases are considered: the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) basis and the balanced truncation basis. The projection step of the model reduction can be done in two ways: via continuous projection or via discrete projection. First, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of PDEs using continuous projection is proposed. The idea is to apply to the set of PDEs a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The resulting ROM will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special weighted L2 inner product, termed the %E2%80%9Csymmetry inner product%E2%80%9D. Attention is then turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, a weighted L2 inner product termed the %E2%80%9CLyapunov inner product%E2%80%9D, is derived. The weighting matrix that defines the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system arising from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. It is shown that a ROM constructed via discrete projection using the Lyapunov inner product will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. Comparisons are also made between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. The performance of ROMs constructed

  16. De novo Transcriptome Assembly of Floral Buds of Pineapple and Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Response to Ethephon Induction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan-He; Fan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    A remarkable characteristic of pineapple is its ability to undergo floral induction in response to external ethylene stimulation. However, little information is available regarding the molecular mechanism underlying this process. In this study, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in plants exposed to 1.80 mL·L−1 (T1) or 2.40 mL·L−1 ethephon (T2) compared with Ct plants (control, cleaning water) were identified using RNA-seq and gene expression profiling. Illumina sequencing generated 65,825,224 high-quality reads that were assembled into 129,594 unigenes with an average sequence length of 1173 bp. Of these unigenes, 24,775 were assigned to specific KEGG pathways, of which metabolic pathways and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites were the most highly represented. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis of the annotated unigenes revealed that the majority were involved in metabolic and cellular processes, cell and cell part, catalytic activity and binding. Gene expression profiling analysis revealed 3788, 3062, and 758 DEGs in the comparisons of T1 with Ct, T2 with Ct, and T2 with T1, respectively. GO analysis indicated that these DEGs were predominantly annotated to metabolic and cellular processes, cell and cell part, catalytic activity, and binding. KEGG pathway analysis revealed the enrichment of several important pathways among the DEGs, including metabolic pathways, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and plant hormone signal transduction. Thirteen DEGs were identified as candidate genes associated with the process of floral induction by ethephon, including three ERF-like genes, one ETR-like gene, one LTI-like gene, one FT-like gene, one VRN1-like gene, three FRI-like genes, one AP1-like gene, one CAL-like gene, and one AG-like gene. qPCR analysis indicated that the changes in the expression of these 13 candidate genes were consistent with the alterations in the corresponding RPKM values, confirming the accuracy and credibility of the RNA-seq and gene

  17. Follicular Dendritic Cells Emerge from Ubiquitous Perivascular Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Krautler, Nike Julia; Kana, Veronika; Kranich, Jan; Tian, Yinghua; Perera, Dushan; Lemm, Doreen; Schwarz, Petra; Armulik, Annika; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Tallquist, Michelle; Buch, Thorsten; Oliveira-Martins, José B.; Zhu, Caihong; Hermann, Mario; Wagner, Ulrich; Brink, Robert; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2013-01-01

    Summary The differentiation of follicular dendritic cells (FDC) is essential to the remarkable microanatomic plasticity of lymphoid follicles. Here we show that FDC arise from ubiquitous perivascular precursors (preFDC) expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRβ-Cre-driven reporter gene recombination resulted in FDC labeling, whereas conditional ablation of PDGFRβ+-derived cells abolished FDC, indicating that FDC originate from PDGFRβ+ cells. Lymphotoxin-α-overexpressing prion protein (PrP)+ kidneys developed PrP+ FDC after transplantation into PrP mice, confirming that preFDC exist outside lymphoid organs. Adipose tissue-derived PDGFRβ+ stromal-vascular cells responded to FDC maturation factors and, when transplanted into lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) kidney capsules, differentiated into Mfge8+CD21/35+ FcγRIIβ+PrP+ FDC capable of trapping immune complexes and recruiting B cells. Spleens of lymphocyte-deficient mice contained perivascular PDGFRβ+ FDC precursors whose expansion required both lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and lymphotoxin. The ubiquity of preFDC and their strategic location at blood vessels may explain the de novo generation of organized lymphoid tissue at sites of lymphocytic inflammation. PMID:22770220

  18. Beyond xMOOCs in healthcare education: study of the feasibility in integrating virtual patient systems and MOOC platforms

    PubMed Central

    Zary, Nabil; Kononowicz, Andrzej A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are an emerging trend in online learning. However, their technology is not yet completely adjusted to the needs of healthcare education. Integration of Virtual Patients within MOOCs to increase interactivity and foster clinical reasoning skills training, has been discussed in the past, but not verified by a practical implementation. Objective. To investigate the technical feasibility of integrating MOOCs with Virtual Patients for the purpose of enabling further research into the potential pedagogical benefits of this approach. Methods. We selected OpenEdx and Open Labyrinth as representative constituents of a MOOC platform and Virtual Patient system integration. Based upon our prior experience we selected the most fundamental technical requirement to address. Grounded in the available literature we identified an e-learning standard to guide the integration. We attempted to demonstrate the feasibility of the integration by designing a “proof-of-concept” prototype. The resulting pilot implementation was subject of verification by two test cases. Results. A Single Sign-On mechanism connecting Open Labyrinth with OpenEdx and based on the IMS LTI standard was successfully implemented and verified. Conclusion. We investigated the technical perspective of integrating Virtual Patients with MOOCs. By addressing this crucial technical requirement we set a base for future research on the educational benefits of using virtual patients in MOOCs. This provides new opportunities for integrating specialized software in healthcare education at massive scale. PMID:25405078

  19. Beyond xMOOCs in healthcare education: study of the feasibility in integrating virtual patient systems and MOOC platforms.

    PubMed

    Stathakarou, Natalia; Zary, Nabil; Kononowicz, Andrzej A

    2014-01-01

    Background. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are an emerging trend in online learning. However, their technology is not yet completely adjusted to the needs of healthcare education. Integration of Virtual Patients within MOOCs to increase interactivity and foster clinical reasoning skills training, has been discussed in the past, but not verified by a practical implementation. Objective. To investigate the technical feasibility of integrating MOOCs with Virtual Patients for the purpose of enabling further research into the potential pedagogical benefits of this approach. Methods. We selected OpenEdx and Open Labyrinth as representative constituents of a MOOC platform and Virtual Patient system integration. Based upon our prior experience we selected the most fundamental technical requirement to address. Grounded in the available literature we identified an e-learning standard to guide the integration. We attempted to demonstrate the feasibility of the integration by designing a "proof-of-concept" prototype. The resulting pilot implementation was subject of verification by two test cases. Results. A Single Sign-On mechanism connecting Open Labyrinth with OpenEdx and based on the IMS LTI standard was successfully implemented and verified. Conclusion. We investigated the technical perspective of integrating Virtual Patients with MOOCs. By addressing this crucial technical requirement we set a base for future research on the educational benefits of using virtual patients in MOOCs. This provides new opportunities for integrating specialized software in healthcare education at massive scale. PMID:25405078

  20. Adaptive cruise control with stop&go function using the state-dependent nonlinear model predictive control approach.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Payman; Ordys, Andrzej; Askari, Mohamad R

    2012-09-01

    In the design of adaptive cruise control (ACC) system two separate control loops - an outer loop to maintain the safe distance from the vehicle traveling in front and an inner loop to control the brake pedal and throttle opening position - are commonly used. In this paper a different approach is proposed in which a single control loop is utilized. The objective of the distance tracking is incorporated into the single nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) by extending the original linear time invariant (LTI) models obtained by linearizing the nonlinear dynamic model of the vehicle. This is achieved by introducing the additional states corresponding to the relative distance between leading and following vehicles, and also the velocity of the leading vehicle. Control of the brake and throttle position is implemented by taking the state-dependent approach. The model demonstrates to be more effective in tracking the speed and distance by eliminating the necessity of switching between the two controllers. It also offers smooth variation in brake and throttle controlling signal which subsequently results in a more uniform acceleration of the vehicle. The results of proposed method are compared with other ACC systems using two separate control loops. Furthermore, an ACC simulation results using a stop&go scenario are shown, demonstrating a better fulfillment of the design requirements. PMID:22704362

  1. A more exact analysis of Sandia Laser Tracker data

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, G.S.

    1994-05-01

    The Sandia Laser Tracker (LT) systems illuminate a cooperative target with a diverged Argon-ion laser beam and track the resulting bright target using a servo-controlled turning mirror. Raw data is digitally recorded in real time and analyzed later when more time is available. The recorded data consists of azimuth and elevation of the tracking mirror, tracking error signals, and range to the target. If the target is tracked perfectly, the error signals will always be zero. The data reduction for this simplified, zero-error condition can be accomplished with very few lines of code. To date, all data reduction for LTI has been done using this zero-error assumption. The more general data reduction problem using the tracking error signals is a much more involved calculation and is referred to as ``using the error foldback routine.`` Detailed theory and vector analysis behind the data reduction and error decoupling algorithms used in the LT systems are described. Errors and corrections to the original document uncovered in over ten years of use are also noted and corrected.

  2. On Time Delay Margin Estimation for Adaptive Control and Optimal Control Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for estimating time delay margin for adaptive control of input delay systems with almost linear structured uncertainty. The bounded linear stability analysis method seeks to represent an adaptive law by a locally bounded linear approximation within a small time window. The time delay margin of this input delay system represents a local stability measure and is computed analytically by three methods: Pade approximation, Lyapunov-Krasovskii method, and the matrix measure method. These methods are applied to the standard model-reference adaptive control, s-modification adaptive law, and optimal control modification adaptive law. The windowing analysis results in non-unique estimates of the time delay margin since it is dependent on the length of a time window and parameters which vary from one time window to the next. The optimal control modification adaptive law overcomes this limitation in that, as the adaptive gain tends to infinity and if the matched uncertainty is linear, then the closed-loop input delay system tends to a LTI system. A lower bound of the time delay margin of this system can then be estimated uniquely without the need for the windowing analysis. Simulation results demonstrates the feasibility of the bounded linear stability method for time delay margin estimation.

  3. Reverberation time measurement using integrated impulse response and sweep sine excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabuco, Marco; Brando, Paulo

    2002-11-01

    As the capacity and speed of digital processing systems becomes much higher, the integrated impulsive response for reverberation time measurements by the indirect method also becomes more feasible and faster. The MLS technique to obtain the impulse response for LTI has been developed during the last several years and it is very well reported by the bibliography. Some frequency analyzers available in the market are capable to generate and process MLS to get the impulse responses very easily. Sometimes, when the room to be tested is very reverberant, sequences of higher order and a certain number of average are necessary to assure acceptable signal-to-noise ratio. The sweep sine technique or the deconvolution method to obtain impulsive responses presents many new advantages, most of them still reported in various technical documents. This paper presents the results of application of this technique to measure the reverberation time in two different reverberation rooms. Comparisons with MLS, ensemble, and reverberation time averages are presented. The sweep sine technique repeatability was verified in a reverberation chamber for a polyurethane foam sample and showed smaller standard deviations when compared with other techniques. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  4. Follicular dendritic cells emerge from ubiquitous perivascular precursors.

    PubMed

    Krautler, Nike Julia; Kana, Veronika; Kranich, Jan; Tian, Yinghua; Perera, Dushan; Lemm, Doreen; Schwarz, Petra; Armulik, Annika; Browning, Jeffrey L; Tallquist, Michelle; Buch, Thorsten; Oliveira-Martins, José B; Zhu, Caihong; Hermann, Mario; Wagner, Ulrich; Brink, Robert; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2012-07-01

    The differentiation of follicular dendritic cells (FDC) is essential to the remarkable microanatomic plasticity of lymphoid follicles. Here we show that FDC arise from ubiquitous perivascular precursors (preFDC) expressing platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ). PDGFRβ-Cre-driven reporter gene recombination resulted in FDC labeling, whereas conditional ablation of PDGFRβ(+)-derived cells abolished FDC, indicating that FDC originate from PDGFRβ(+) cells. Lymphotoxin-α-overexpressing prion protein (PrP)(+) kidneys developed PrP(+) FDC after transplantation into PrP(-) mice, confirming that preFDC exist outside lymphoid organs. Adipose tissue-derived PDGFRβ(+) stromal-vascular cells responded to FDC maturation factors and, when transplanted into lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR)(-) kidney capsules, differentiated into Mfge8(+)CD21/35(+)FcγRIIβ(+)PrP(+) FDC capable of trapping immune complexes and recruiting B cells. Spleens of lymphocyte-deficient mice contained perivascular PDGFRβ(+) FDC precursors whose expansion required both lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and lymphotoxin. The ubiquity of preFDC and their strategic location at blood vessels may explain the de novo generation of organized lymphoid tissue at sites of lymphocytic inflammation. PMID:22770220

  5. Semi-active tuned liquid column damper implementation with real-time hybrid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riascos, Carlos; Marulanda Casas, Johannio; Thomson, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Real-time hybrid simulation (RTHS) is a modern cyber-physical technique used for the experimental evaluation of complex systems, that treats the system components with predictable behavior as a numerical substructure and the components that are difficult to model as an experimental substructure. Therefore it is an attractive method for evaluation of the response of civil structures under earthquake, wind and anthropic loads. In this paper, the response of three-story shear frame controlled by a tuned liquid column damper (TLCD) and subject to base excitation is considered. Both passive and semi-active control strategies were implemented and are compared. While the passive TLCD achieved a reduction of 50% in the acceleration response of the main structure in comparison with the structure without control, the semi-active TLCD achieved a reduction of 70%, and was robust to variations in the dynamic properties of the main structure. In addition, a RTHS was implemented with the main structure modeled as a linear, time-invariant (LTI) system through a state space representation and the TLCD, with both control strategies, was evaluated on a shake table that reproduced the displacement of the virtual structure. Current assessment measures for RTHS were used to quantify the performance with parameters such as generalized amplitude, equivalent time delay between the target and measured displacement of the shake table, and energy error using the measured force, and prove that the RTHS described in this paper is an accurate method for the experimental evaluation of structural control systems.

  6. Nfil3 is crucial for development of innate lymphoid cells and host protection against intestinal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Theresa L; Abt, Michael C; Gasteiger, Georg; Firth, Matthew A; O'Connor, Margaret H; Geary, Clair D; O'Sullivan, Timothy E; van den Brink, Marcel R; Pamer, Eric G; Hanash, Alan M; Sun, Joseph C

    2014-08-25

    The bZIP transcription factor Nfil3 (also known as E4BP4) is required for the development of natural killer (NK) cells and type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s). We find that Nfil3 plays a critical role in the development of other mucosal tissue-associated innate lymphocytes. Type 3 ILCs (ILC3s), including lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi)-like cells, are severely diminished in both numbers and function in Nfil3-deficient mice. Using mixed bone marrow chimeric mice, we demonstrate that Nfil3 is critical for normal development of gut-associated ILC3s in a cell-intrinsic manner. Furthermore, Nfil3 deficiency severely compromises intestinal innate immune defense against acute bacterial infection with Citrobacter rodentium and Clostridium difficile. Nfil3 deficiency resulted in a loss of the recently identified ILC precursor, yet conditional ablation of Nfil3 in the NKp46(+) ILC3 subset did not perturb ILC3 numbers, suggesting that Nfil3 is required early during ILC3 development but not for lineage maintenance. Lastly, a marked defect in type 2 ILCs (ILC2s) was also observed in the lungs and visceral adipose tissue of Nfil3-deficient mice, revealing a general requirement for Nfil3 in the development of all ILC lineages. PMID:25113970

  7. A new SSI algorithm for LPTV systems: Application to a hinged-bladed helicopter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhinaoui, Ahmed; Mevel, Laurent; Morlier, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Many systems such as turbo-generators, wind turbines and helicopters show intrinsic time-periodic behaviors. Usually, these structures are considered to be faithfully modeled as linear time-invariant (LTI). In some cases where the rotor is anisotropic, this modeling does not hold and the equations of motion lead necessarily to a linear periodically time-varying (referred to as LPTV in the control and digital signal field or LTP in the mechanical and nonlinear dynamics world) model. Classical modal analysis methodologies based on the classical time-invariant eigenstructure (frequencies and damping ratios) of the system no more apply. This is the case in particular for subspace methods. For such time-periodic systems, the modal analysis can be described by characteristic exponents called Floquet multipliers. The aim of this paper is to suggest a new subspace-based algorithm that is able to extract these multipliers and the corresponding frequencies and damping ratios. The algorithm is then tested on a numerical model of a hinged-bladed helicopter on the ground.

  8. Ratio of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuation Amplitudes During ECH in DIII-D Ohmic and L-mode Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; Doyle, E. J.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Zeng, L.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Deboo, J. C.; Staebler, G. M.

    2008-11-01

    An increase in the ratio of the amplitudes of two fluctuating fields, (Te/Te)/(n/n), is observed in DIII-D beam-heated (˜2.5 MW, co-injected) L-mode plasmas during ECH (˜2.5 MW deposited at ρ 0.17). The amplitude of long wavelength temperature fluctuations, Te/Te, measured with a correlation ECE diagnostic (CECE), increases significantly during ECH. In contrast, the amplitude of long wavelength density fluctuations, n/n, measured simultaneously with a BES diagnostic, does not change. Linear stability analysis with the TGLF code shows that during ECH the ratio of the TEM and ITG growth rates increases at long wavelengths in the range relevant for the CECE and BES diagnostics. These TGLF results are found to be more sensitive to changes in the TEM drive term a/Lne compared with changes in a/LTe or a/LTi. Sensitivity scans with TGLF and comparisons with experimental results for the ratio (Te/Te)/(n/n) measured in Ohmic plasmas with ECH will be presented.

  9. Real-Time Adaptive Control of Flow-Induced Cavity Tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Cattafesta, Louis N.

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive generalized predictive control (GPC) algorithm was formulated and applied to the cavity flow-tone problem. The algorithm employs gradient descent to update the GPC coefficients at each time step. The adaptive control algorithm demonstrated multiple Rossiter mode suppression at fixed Mach numbers ranging from 0.275 to 0.38. The algorithm was also able t o maintain suppression of multiple cavity tones as the freestream Mach number was varied over a modest range (0.275 to 0.29). Controller performance was evaluated with a measure of output disturbance rejection and an input sensitivity transfer function. The results suggest that disturbances entering the cavity flow are colocated with the control input at the cavity leading edge. In that case, only tonal components of the cavity wall-pressure fluctuations can be suppressed and arbitrary broadband pressure reduction is not possible. In the control-algorithm development, the cavity dynamics are treated as linear and time invariant (LTI) for a fixed Mach number. The experimental results lend support this treatment.

  10. Laser Shearography Inspection of TPS (Thermal Protection System) Cork on RSRM (Reusable Solid Rocket Motors)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingbloom, Mike; Plaia, Jim; Newman, John

    2006-01-01

    Laser Shearography is a viable inspection method for detection of de-bonds and voids within the external TPS (thermal protection system) on to the Space Shuttle RSRM (reusable solid rocket motors). Cork samples with thicknesses up to 1 inch were tested at the LTI (Laser Technology Incorporated) laboratory using vacuum-applied stress in a vacuum chamber. The testing proved that the technology could detect cork to steel un-bonds using vacuum stress techniques in the laboratory environment. The next logical step was to inspect the TPS on a RSRM. Although detailed post flight inspection has confirmed that ATK Thiokol's cork bonding technique provides a reliable cork to case bond, due to the Space Shuttle Columbia incident there is a great interest in verifying bond-lines on the external TPS. This interest provided and opportunity to inspect a RSRM motor with Laser Shearography. This paper will describe the laboratory testing and RSRM testing that has been performed to date. Descriptions of the test equipment setup and techniques for data collection and detailed results will be given. The data from the test show that Laser Shearography is an effective technology and readily adaptable to inspect a RSRM.

  11. Innate Lymphoid Cells in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vallentin, Blandine; Barlogis, Vincent; Piperoglou, Christelle; Cypowyj, Sophie; Zucchini, Nicolas; Chéné, Matthieu; Navarro, Florent; Farnarier, Catherine; Vivier, Eric; Vély, Frédéric

    2015-10-01

    The world of lymphocytes has recently expanded. A group of cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILC), has been defined. It includes lymphoid cells that have been known for decades, such as natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells. NK cells recognize a vast array of tumor cells, which they help to eliminate through cytotoxicity and the production of cytokines, such as IFNγ. Advances in our understanding of NK-cell biology have led to a growing interest in the clinical manipulation of these cells in cancer. The other ILCs are found mostly in the mucosae and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, where they rapidly initiate immune responses to pathogens without the need for specific sensitization. Here, we outline the basic features of ILCs and review the role of ILCs other than NK cells in cancer. Much of the role of these ILCs in cancer remains unknown, but several findings should lead to further efforts to dissect the contribution of different ILC subsets to the promotion, maintenance, or elimination of tumors at various anatomic sites. This will require the development of standardized reagents and protocols for monitoring the presence and function of ILCs in human blood and tissue samples. PMID:26438443

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-PHASE AND MULTI-COMPONENT FLOW MODEL WITH REACTION IN POROUS MEDIA FOR RISK ASSESSMENT ON SOIL CONTAMINATION DUE TO MINERAL OIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yasuhide; Nishiwaki, Junko; Hara, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Sugai, Yuichi; Komai, Takeshi

    In late years, soil contamination due to mineral oil in vacant lots of oil factory and oil field has become obvious. Measure for soil contamina tion and risk assessment are neces sary for sustainable development of industrial activity. Especially, in addition to contaminated sites, various exposure paths for human body such as well water, soil and farm crop are supposed. So it is very important to comprehend the transport phenomena of contaminated material under the environments of soil and ground water. In this study, mineral oil as c ontaminated material consisting of mu lti-component such as aliphatic and aromatic series was modeled. Then numerical mode l for transport phenomena in surface soil and aquifer was constructed. On the basis of modeling for mineral oil, our numerical model consists of three-phase (oil, water and gas) forty three-component. This numerical model becomes base program for risk assessment system on soil contamination due to mineral oil. Using this numerical model, we carried out some numerical simulation for a laboratory-scale experiment on oil-water multi-phase flow. Relative permeability that dominate flow behavior in multi-phase condition was formulated and the validity of the numerical model developed in this study was considered.

  13. Patterns of food and nutrient consumption in northern Iran, a high-risk area for esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Islami, Farhad; Malekshah, Akbar Fazeltabar; Kimiagar, Masoud; Pourshams, Akram; Wakefield, Jon; Goglani, Goharshad; Rakhshani, Nasser; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Salahi, Rasoul; Semnani, Shahryar; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Abnet, Christian C; Kamangar, Farin; Dawsey, Sanford M; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2009-01-01

    Our objectives were to investigate patterns of food and nutrient consumption in Golestan province, a high-incidence area for esophageal cancer (EC) in northern Iran. Twelve 24-h dietary recalls were administered during a 1-yr period to 131 healthy participants in a pilot cohort study. We compare here nutrient intake in Golestan with recommended daily allowances (RDAs) and lowest threshold intakes (LTIs). We also compare the intake of 27 food groups and nutrients among several population subgroups using mean values from the 12 recalls. Rural women had a very low level of vitamin intake, which was even lower than LTIs (P < 0.01). Daily intake of vitamins A and C was lower than LTI in 67% and 73% of rural women, respectively. Among rural men, the vitamin intakes were not significantly different from LTIs. Among urban women, the vitamin intakes were significantly lower than RDAs but were significantly higher than LTIs. Among urban men, the intakes were not significantly different from RDAs. Compared to urban dwellers, intake of most food groups and nutrients, including vitamins, was significantly lower among rural dwellers. In terms of vitamin intake, no significant difference was observed between Turkmen and non-Turkmen ethnics. The severe deficiency in vitamin intake among women and rural dwellers and marked differences in nutrient intake between rural and urban dwellers may contribute to the observed epidemiological pattern of EC in Golestan, with high incidence rates among women and people with low socioeconomic status and the highest incidence rate among rural women. PMID:19838919

  14. Fearfulness Affects Quail Maternal Care and Subsequent Offspring Development

    PubMed Central

    Pittet, Florent; Houdelier, Cécilia; Le Bot, Océane; Leterrier, Christine; Lumineau, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Our study investigated relationships between a precocial bird’s fearfulness and maternal care, and the implication of maternal care as a vector for non-genomic transmission of fearfulness to chicks. We compared care given to chicks between two sets of female Japanese quail selected to present either high (LTI) or low fearfulness (STI). Chicks, from a broiler line, were adopted by these females following a sensitization procedure. Chicks’ fearfulness after separation from their mother was assessed by well-established procedures. LTIs took longer to present maternal responses, pecked chicks more during the first days post-hatch, presented impaired maternal vocal behaviour and were globally less active than STI females. Chicks mothered by LTIs presented more fearful reactions than did chicks mothered by STIs, supporting the hypothesis of a non-genetic maternal transmission of fearfulness. We suggest that the longer latencies required by LTIs to become maternal are a consequence of their greater fear of chicks, and that their lower general and vocal activity could be components of a heightened antipredatory strategy. We discuss the transmission of maternal fearfulness to fostered chicks, taking into account the possible implication of several well-known mechanisms underlying maternal effects. PMID:25033292

  15. Data-driven output-feedback fault-tolerant L2 control of unknown dynamic systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Sheng; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2016-07-01

    This paper studies the data-driven output-feedback fault-tolerant L2-control problem for unknown dynamic systems. In a framework of active fault-tolerant control (FTC), three issues are addressed, including fault detection, controller reconfiguration for optimal guaranteed cost control, and tracking control. According to the data-driven form of observer-based residual generators, the system state is expressed in the form of the measured input-output data. On this basis, a model-free approach to L2 control of unknown linear time-invariant (LTI) discrete-time plants is given. To achieve tracking control, a design method for a pre-filter is also presented. With the aid of the aforementioned results and the input-output data-based time-varying value function approximation structure, a data-driven FTC scheme ensuring L2-gain properties is developed. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology, two simulation examples are employed. PMID:27178710

  16. Elastic Model Transitions: A Hybrid Approach Utilizing Quadratic Inequality Constrained Least Squares (LSQI) and Direct Shape Mapping (DSM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Mike R.; Jurenko, Robert J.; Bush, Jason; Ottander, John

    2014-01-01

    A method for transitioning linear time invariant (LTI) models in time varying simulation is proposed that utilizes a hybrid approach for determining physical displacements by augmenting the original quadratically constrained least squares (LSQI) algorithm with Direct Shape Mapping (DSM) and modifying the energy constraints. The approach presented is applicable to simulation of the elastic behavior of launch vehicles and other structures that utilize discrete LTI finite element model (FEM) derived mode sets (eigenvalues and eigenvectors) that are propagated throughout time. The time invariant nature of the elastic data presents a problem of how to properly transition elastic states from the prior to the new model while preserving motion across the transition and ensuring there is no truncation or excitation of the system. A previous approach utilizes a LSQI algorithm with an energy constraint to effect smooth transitions between eigenvector sets with no requirement that the models be of similar dimension or have any correlation. This approach assumes energy is conserved across the transition, which results in significant non-physical transients due to changing quasi-steady state energy between mode sets, a phenomenon seen when utilizing a truncated mode set. The computational burden of simulating a full mode set is significant so a subset of modes is often selected to reduce run time. As a result of this truncation, energy between mode sets may not be constant and solutions across transitions could produce non-physical transients. In an effort to abate these transients an improved methodology was developed based on the aforementioned approach, but this new approach can handle significant changes in energy across mode set transitions. It is proposed that physical velocities due to elastic behavior be solved for using the LSQI algorithm, but solve for displacements using a two-step process that independently addresses the quasi-steady-state and non

  17. Reduced Order Modeling for Prediction and Control of Large-Scale Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; Barone, Matthew Franklin; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2014-05-01

    -Stokes equations is derived, and it is demonstrated that if a Galerkin ROM is constructed in this inner product, the ROM system energy will be bounded in a way that is consistent with the behavior of the exact solution to these PDEs, i.e., the ROM will be energy-stable. The viability of the linear as well as nonlinear continuous projection model reduction approaches developed as a part of this project is evaluated on several test cases, including the cavity configuration of interest in the targeted application area. In the second part of this report, some POD/Galerkin approaches for building stable ROMs using discrete projection are explored. It is shown that, for generic linear time-invariant (LTI) systems, a discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product is a weighted L2 inner product obtained by solving a Lyapunov equation. This inner product was first proposed by Rowley et al., and is termed herein the “Lyapunov inner product“. Comparisons between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product are made, and the performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases. Also in the second part of this report, a new ROM stabilization approach, termed “ROM stabilization via optimization-based eigenvalue reassignment“, is developed for generic LTI systems. At the heart of this method is a constrained nonlinear least-squares optimization problem that is formulated and solved numerically to ensure accuracy of the stabilized ROM. Numerical studies reveal that the optimization problem is computationally inexpensive to solve, and that the new stabilization approach delivers ROMs that are stable as well as accurate. Summaries of “lessons learned“ and perspectives for future work motivated by this LDRD project are provided at the end of each of the two main chapters.

  18. Improved Power System Stability Using Backtracking Search Algorithm for Coordination Design of PSS and TCSC Damping Controller.

    PubMed

    Niamul Islam, Naz; Hannan, M A; Mohamed, Azah; Shareef, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Power system oscillation is a serious threat to the stability of multimachine power systems. The coordinated control of power system stabilizers (PSS) and thyristor-controlled series compensation (TCSC) damping controllers is a commonly used technique to provide the required damping over different modes of growing oscillations. However, their coordinated design is a complex multimodal optimization problem that is very hard to solve using traditional tuning techniques. In addition, several limitations of traditionally used techniques prevent the optimum design of coordinated controllers. In this paper, an alternate technique for robust damping over oscillation is presented using backtracking search algorithm (BSA). A 5-area 16-machine benchmark power system is considered to evaluate the design efficiency. The complete design process is conducted in a linear time-invariant (LTI) model of a power system. It includes the design formulation into a multi-objective function from the system eigenvalues. Later on, nonlinear time-domain simulations are used to compare the damping performances for different local and inter-area modes of power system oscillations. The performance of the BSA technique is compared against that of the popular particle swarm optimization (PSO) for coordinated design efficiency. Damping performances using different design techniques are compared in term of settling time and overshoot of oscillations. The results obtained verify that the BSA-based design improves the system stability significantly. The stability of the multimachine power system is improved by up to 74.47% and 79.93% for an inter-area mode and a local mode of oscillation, respectively. Thus, the proposed technique for coordinated design has great potential to improve power system stability and to maintain its secure operation. PMID:26745265

  19. The beauty of simple adaptive control and new developments in nonlinear systems stability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barkana, Itzhak

    2014-12-10

    Although various adaptive control techniques have been around for a long time and in spite of successful proofs of stability and even successful demonstrations of performance, the eventual use of adaptive control methodologies in practical real world systems has met a rather strong resistance from practitioners and has remained limited. Apparently, it is difficult to guarantee or even understand the conditions that can guarantee stable operations of adaptive control systems under realistic operational environments. Besides, it is difficult to measure the robustness of adaptive control system stability and allow it to be compared with the common and widely used measure of phase margin and gain margin that is utilized by present, mainly LTI, controllers. Furthermore, customary stability analysis methods seem to imply that the mere stability of adaptive systems may be adversely affected by any tiny deviation from the pretty idealistic and assumably required stability conditions. This paper first revisits the fundamental qualities of customary direct adaptive control methodologies, in particular the classical Model Reference Adaptive Control, and shows that some of their basic drawbacks have been addressed and eliminated within the so-called Simple Adaptive Control methodology. Moreover, recent developments in the stability analysis methods of nonlinear systems show that prior conditions that were customarily assumed to be needed for stability are only apparent and can be eliminated. As a result, sufficient conditions that guarantee stability are clearly stated and lead to similarly clear proofs of stability. As many real-world applications show, once robust stability of the adaptive systems can be guaranteed, the added value of using Add-On Adaptive Control along with classical Control design techniques is pushing the desired performance beyond any previous limits.

  20. [Colibacillosis in swine: proof of vaccine efficacy].

    PubMed

    Cicuta, M E; Miranda, A O; Roibón, W R; Benitez, M C; Boehringer, S I; Barceló, M C

    1999-01-01

    The damage caused in the economy and animal sanity by the porcine colibacilosis are significant and they deserve the investigation of preventive measures that give answers to the producers. Existing at the present time approximately 21,000 pigs in Corrientes and 110,000 in Chaco provinces of Argentine, the losses for diarrhea that exterminate whole litters, acquire relevance, specially if they can be prevented or cured. For that reason, having 21 strains of enteropathogenic and verocitotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC/VTEC) isolated from pigs of the North East of Argentine, that were recognized by PCR, two were selected, containing the genes for STIa, STIb, LTI, VT2e (SLT-IIv) and F4 (K88). They were spread on nutrient agar and Minca medium, to obtain the suspension in PBS, which was inactivated with formol. After the sterility and innocuity controls, it was diluted to a 12 x 10(8) concentration to make the mouse protection test in 20 mice, of 18-20 g, inoculating the vaccine the days 1, 4, 7 and 10, by the intraperitoneal route, doses of 0.25 ml each one. The day 21 after beginning the test the animals were challenged with 50 LD50, and a protection of 85% was obtained. To determine the LD50, we prepared a suspension in physiologic solution, corresponding to Mac Farland's tube No 10, making dilutions from 10(-1) to 10(-5) and applying the statistical method of Reed and Muench. These first results encourage us to continue working after a prophylactic measure that were effective, potent and elaborated with strains of this area. PMID:10932767

  1. Patterns of food and nutrient consumption in northern Iran, a high-risk area for esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Islami, Farhad; Malekshah, Akbar Fazeltabar; Kimiagar, Masoud; Pourshams, Akram; Wakefield, Jon; Goglani, Goharshad; Rakhshani, Nasser; Nasrollahzadeh, Dariush; Salahi, Rasoul; Semnani, Shahriar; Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra; Abnet, Christian C.; Kamangar, Farin; Dawsey, Sanford M.; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate patterns of food and nutrient consumption in Golestan province, a high-incidence area for esophageal cancer (EC) in northern Iran. Methods Twelve 24-hour dietary recalls were administered during a one year period to 131 healthy participants in a pilot cohort study. We compare here nutrient intake in Golestan with Recommended Daily Allowances (RDAs) and Lowest Threshold Intakes (LTIs). We also compare the intake of 27 food groups and nutrients among several population subgroups, using mean values from the twelve recalls. Results Rural women had a very low level of vitamin intake, which was even lower than LTIs (P < 0.01). Daily intake of vitamins A and C was lower than LTI in 67% and 73% of rural women, respectively. Among rural men, the vitamin intakes were not significantly different from LTIs. Among urban women, the vitamin intakes were significantly lower than RDAs, but were significantly higher than LTIs. Among urban men, the intakes were not significantly different from RDAs. Compared to urban dwellers, intake of most food groups and nutrients, including vitamins, was significantly lower among rural dwellers. In terms of vitamin intake, no significant difference was observed between Turkmen and non-Turkmen ethnics. Conclusions The severe deficiency in vitamin intake among women and rural dwellers and marked differences in nutrient intake between rural and urban dwellers may contribute to the observed epidemiological pattern of EC in Golestan, with high incidence rates among women and people with low socioeconomic status, and the highest incidence rate among rural women. PMID:19838919

  2. Bulk ion heating with ICRF waves in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantsinen, M. J.; Bilato, R.; Bobkov, V. V.; Kappatou, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Nocente, M.; Odstrčil, T.; Tardini, G.; Bernert, M.; Dux, R.; Hellsten, T.; Mantica, P.; Maraschek, M.; Nielsen, S. K.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Rasmussen, J.; Ryter, F.; Stejner, M.; Stober, J.; Tardocchi, M.

    2015-12-01

    Heating with ICRF waves is a well-established method on present-day tokamaks and one of the heating systems foreseen for ITER. However, further work is still needed to test and optimize its performance in fusion devices with metallic high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs) in preparation of ITER and DEMO operation. This is of particular importance for the bulk ion heating capabilities of ICRF waves. Efficient bulk ion heating with the standard ITER ICRF scheme, i.e. the second harmonic heating of tritium with or without 3He minority, was demonstrated in experiments carried out in deuterium-tritium plasmas on JET and TFTR and is confirmed by ICRF modelling. This paper focuses on recent experiments with 3He minority heating for bulk ion heating on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak with ITER-relevant all-tungsten PFCs. An increase of 80% in the central ion temperature Ti from 3 to 5.5 keV was achieved when 3 MW of ICRF power tuned to the central 3He ion cyclotron resonance was added to 4.5 MW of deuterium NBI. The radial gradient of the Ti profile reached locally values up to about 50 keV/m and the normalized logarithmic ion temperature gradients R/LTi of about 20, which are unusually large for AUG plasmas. The large changes in the Ti profiles were accompanied by significant changes in measured plasma toroidal rotation, plasma impurity profiles and MHD activity, which indicate concomitant changes in plasma properties with the application of ICRF waves. When the 3He concentration was increased above the optimum range for bulk ion heating, a weaker peaking of the ion temperature profile was observed, in line with theoretical expectations.

  3. Cu(II) binding by a pH-fractionated fulvic acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G.K.; Cabaniss, S.E.; MacCarthy, P.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between acidity, Cu(II) binding and sorption to XAD resin was examined using Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). The work was based on the hypothesis that fractions of SRFA eluted from an XAD column at various pH's from 1.0 to 12.0 would show systematic variations in acidity and possibly aromaticity which in turn would lead to different Cu(II) binding properties. We measured equilibrium Cu(II) binding to these fractions using Cu2+ ion-selective electrode (ISE) potentiometry at pH 6.0. Several model ligands were also examined, including cyclopentane-1,2,3,4-tetracarboxylic acid (CP-TCA) and tetrahydrofuran-2,3,4,5-tetracarboxylic acid (THF-TCA), the latter binding Cu(II) much more strongly as a consequence of the ether linkage. The SRFA Cu(II) binding properties agreed with previous work at high ionic strength, and binding was enhanced substantially at lower ionic strength, in agreement with Poisson-Boltzmann predictions for small spheres. Determining Cu binding constants (K(i)) by non-linear regression with total ligand concentrations (L(Ti)) taken from previous work, the fractions eluted at varying pH had K(i) similar to the unfractionated SRFA, with a maximum enhancement of 0.50 log units. We conclude that variable-pH elution from XAD does not isolate significantly strong (or weak) Cu(II)-binding components from the SRFA mixture. Copyright (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Deposition of intermediate (barrier) coatings of silicon and germanium on steel, titanium or aluminum substrates using laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, A. V.; Ivanov, D. A.; Malyuta, D. D.; Pavlov, S. P.; Sarkarov, N. E.; Shedrov, A. S.

    2012-07-01

    The paper presents the results of the first stage of the experimental research of intermediate (barrier) silicon and germanium coating deposition on the substrates not proned to the formation of carbides (steel, titanium, aluminum) by laser ablation. These experiments were carried out using modified YAG-Nd3+ solid state laser of LTI-130 type with the wave length of 1064.1 nm. It was shown that the sequence of large numbers of nanosecond pulses which composed the train of laser radiation provided the material ablation under the power of two orders of the magnitude less than that of the single pulse necessary for the ablation process. In the experiments, silicon coatings up to 5 μm in thickness and germanium coatings of 1-3 μm in thickness were produced on substrates from steel, aluminum and titanium. It was determined that the roughness of substrate surface for deposition of intermediate (barrier) coatings had a strong influence on the coating structure. Silicon films on substrate surfaces with the roughness ≤10 μm were denser and more homogeneous and looked like amorphous films without a crystal structure. On surfaces with the roughness >20 μm a silicon film had a crystal structure with the size of crystallites about 5 μm. It was shown that unlike the silicon the germanium in the same experimental conditions had the tendency to the formation of films with elements of a crystal structure. Germanium coatings were not homogeneous and consisted of the mixture accumulations of crystallites and amorphous fields.

  5. Improved Power System Stability Using Backtracking Search Algorithm for Coordination Design of PSS and TCSC Damping Controller

    PubMed Central

    Niamul Islam, Naz; Hannan, M. A.; Mohamed, Azah; Shareef, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Power system oscillation is a serious threat to the stability of multimachine power systems. The coordinated control of power system stabilizers (PSS) and thyristor-controlled series compensation (TCSC) damping controllers is a commonly used technique to provide the required damping over different modes of growing oscillations. However, their coordinated design is a complex multimodal optimization problem that is very hard to solve using traditional tuning techniques. In addition, several limitations of traditionally used techniques prevent the optimum design of coordinated controllers. In this paper, an alternate technique for robust damping over oscillation is presented using backtracking search algorithm (BSA). A 5-area 16-machine benchmark power system is considered to evaluate the design efficiency. The complete design process is conducted in a linear time-invariant (LTI) model of a power system. It includes the design formulation into a multi-objective function from the system eigenvalues. Later on, nonlinear time-domain simulations are used to compare the damping performances for different local and inter-area modes of power system oscillations. The performance of the BSA technique is compared against that of the popular particle swarm optimization (PSO) for coordinated design efficiency. Damping performances using different design techniques are compared in term of settling time and overshoot of oscillations. The results obtained verify that the BSA-based design improves the system stability significantly. The stability of the multimachine power system is improved by up to 74.47% and 79.93% for an inter-area mode and a local mode of oscillation, respectively. Thus, the proposed technique for coordinated design has great potential to improve power system stability and to maintain its secure operation. PMID:26745265

  6. Transcriptome Changes for Arabidopsis in Response to Salt, Osmotic, and Cold Stress1[w

    PubMed Central

    Kreps, Joel A.; Wu, Yajun; Chang, Hur-Song; Zhu, Tong; Wang, Xun; Harper, Jeff F.

    2002-01-01

    To identify genes of potential importance to cold, salt, and drought tolerance, global expression profiling was performed on Arabidopsis plants subjected to stress treatments of 4°C, 100 mm NaCl, or 200 mm mannitol, respectively. RNA samples were collected separately from leaves and roots after 3- and 27-h stress treatments. Profiling was conducted with a GeneChip microarray with probe sets for approximately 8,100 genes. Combined results from all three stresses identified 2,409 genes with a greater than 2-fold change over control. This suggests that about 30% of the transcriptome is sensitive to regulation by common stress conditions. The majority of changes were stimulus specific. At the 3-h time point, less than 5% (118 genes) of the changes were observed as shared by all three stress responses. By 27 h, the number of shared responses was reduced more than 10-fold (< 0.5%), consistent with a progression toward more stimulus-specific responses. Roots and leaves displayed very different changes. For example, less than 14% of the cold-specific changes were shared between root and leaves at both 3 and 27 h. The gene with the largest induction under all three stress treatments was At5g52310 (LTI/COR78), with induction levels in roots greater than 250-fold for cold, 40-fold for mannitol, and 57-fold for NaCl. A stress response was observed for 306 (68%) of the known circadian controlled genes, supporting the hypothesis that an important function of the circadian clock is to “anticipate” predictable stresses such as cold nights. Although these results identify hundreds of potentially important transcriptome changes, the biochemical functions of many stress-regulated genes remain unknown. PMID:12481097

  7. Cholera Holotoxin Assembly Requires a Hydrophobic Domain at the A-B5 Interface: Mutational Analysis and Development of an In Vitro Assembly System

    PubMed Central

    Tinker, Juliette K.; Erbe, Jarrod L.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Holmes, Randall K.

    2003-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) and related Escherichia coli enterotoxins LTI and LTIIb have a conserved hydrophobic region at the AB5 interface postulated to be important for toxin assembly. Hydrophobic residue F223 in the A subunit of CT (CTA) as well as residues 174, L77, and T78 in the B subunit of CT (CTB) were replaced individually with aspartic acid, and the resulting CTA and CTB variants were analyzed for their ability to assemble into holotoxin in vivo. CTA-F223D holotoxin exhibited decreased stability and toxicity and increased susceptibility to proteolysis by trypsin. CTB-L77D was unable to form functional pentamers. CTB-I74D and CTB-T78D formed pentamers that bound to GM1 and d-galactose but failed to assemble with CTA to form holotoxin. In contrast, CTB-T78D and CTA-F223H interacted with each other to form a significant amount of holotoxin in vivo. Our findings support the importance of hydrophobic interactions between CTA and CTB in holotoxin assembly. We also developed an efficient method for assembly of CT in vitro, and we showed that CT assembled in vitro was comparable to wild-type CT in toxicity and antigenicity. CTB-I74D and CTB-T78D did not form pentamers or holotoxin in vitro, and CTA-F223D did not form holotoxin in vitro. The efficient system for in vitro assembly of CT described here should be useful for future studies on the development of drugs to inhibit CT assembly as well as the development of chimeric CT-like molecules as potential vaccine candidates. PMID:12819100

  8. Combined herbicide and saline stress differentially modulates hormonal regulation and antioxidant defense system in Oryza sativa cultivars.

    PubMed

    Islam, Faisal; Ali, Basharat; Wang, Jian; Farooq, Muhammad A; Gill, Rafaqat A; Ali, Shafaqat; Wang, Danying; Zhou, Weijun

    2016-10-01

    Plants are simultaneously exposed to a combination of biotic and abiotic stresses in field conditions. Crops respond to the combined stress in a unique way which cannot be understood by extrapolating the results of individual stress. In the present study, effects of individual and combined stress of herbicide (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) and salinity (NaCl) on two Oryza sativa cultivars (ZJ 88 and XS 134) were investigated. Both herbicide and saline stress affected the plant growth differentially and produced oxidative stress in rice cultivars. Interestingly, the combination of herbicide and salinity showed a significant protection to both rice cultivars by reducing ROS (H2O2, O2(-)) and lipid peroxidation through modulation of enzymatic (SOD, POD, CAT and APX) and non-enzymatic (TSP, sugars, phenolic and proline) antioxidants. In addition, active regulation of transcript levels of genes encoding Na(+) and K(+) (OsHKT1;5, OsLti6a,b, OsHKT2;1, OsSOS1, OsCNGC1, OsNHX1 and OsAKT1) transporter proteins reduced sodium and enhanced potassium accumulation under combined stress, resulted a better growth and ionic homeostasis in both rice cultivars. The production of ABA and IAA was significantly higher in cultivar XS 134 compared to cultivar ZJ 88 under control conditions. However, combined herbicide and saline stress enhanced the accumulation of phytohormones (IAA and ABA) and transcription of ethylene in cultivar ZJ 88, which might be one of the factors responsible for poor salt tolerance in sensitive cultivar. These findings indicated that herbicide application under saline stress confers tolerance to salinity in rice cultivars, likely by reducing oxidative damage, modulating mineral absorption, upgradation of antioxidant defense and by dynamic regulation of key genes involved in Na(+) and K(+) homeostasis in plants. PMID:27258572

  9. Dietary alpha-ketoglutarate increases cold tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster and enhances protein pool and antioxidant defense in sex-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, Maria M; Lylyk, Maria P; Shmihel, Halyna V; Sorochynska, Oksana M; Manyukh, Oksana V; Pierzynowski, Stefan G; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) is an important intermediate in Krebs cycle which bridges the metabolism of amino acids and carbohydrates. Its effects as a dietary supplement on cold tolerance were studied in Drosophila melanogaster Canton S. Two-day-old adult flies fed at larval and adult stages with AKG at moderate concentrations (5-10mM) recovered faster from chill coma (0°C for 15min or 3h) than control ones. The beneficial effect of AKG on chill coma recovery was not found at its higher concentrations, which suggests hormetic like action of this keto acid. Time of 50% observed mortality after 2h recovery from continuous cold exposure (-1°C for 3-31h) (LTi50) was higher for flies reared on 10mM AKG compared with control ones, showing that the diet with AKG enhanced insect cold tolerance. In parallel with enhancement of cold tolerance, dietary AKG improved fly locomotor activity. Metabolic effects of AKG differed partly in males and females. In males fed on AKG, there were no differences in total protein and free amino acid levels, but the total antioxidant capacity, catalase activity and low molecular mass thiol content were higher than in control animals. In females, dietary AKG promoted higher total antioxidant capacity and higher levels of proteins, total amino acids, proline and low molecular mass thiols. The levels of lipid peroxides were lower in both fly sexes reared on AKG as compared with control ones. We conclude that both enhancement of antioxidant system capacity and synthesis of amino acids can be important for AKG-promoted cold tolerance in D. melanogaster. The involvement of AKG in metabolic pathways of Drosophila males and females is discussed. PMID:27503710

  10. Disseminating General Relativity for 21st century astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Mariateresa

    2015-08-01

    The talk aims to present two outreach projects - initially developed for the ESA Gaia satellite, a multidisciplinary mission launched on December 19, 2013 - available to the OAD community: NeST and "The Meaning of Light".NeST is an interactive educational tool, that displays how the theory of GR rules the Universe, it creates a performance physically "belonging" to the exhibition space and moving through it, materializing what J.A. Wheeler said "mass tells space-time how to curve, and space-time tells mass how to move"."The Meaning of Light" is a short motion comics, part of an extensive outreach program called "The History of Photons" whose main theme is the story of a beam of stellar photons that, after leaving the progenitor star, propagates through the Universe and, once intercepted come into contact with a team of scientists: here begins their adventure to be taken "back" home and in doing so the scientists, and the spectators, are driven to discover the wonders of which the light are the bearers.The description of the journey of the photons becomes, therefore, an opportunity to easily tell the fascinating topics of Astrophysics and General Relativity, i.e. the complexity and the infinite beauty of the Universe in which we live.For this movie a new theme song was produced, "Singing the Stars", whose refrain (Oh Be A Fine Girl / Guy Kiss Me Little Thing, Yeah) adds to the famous mnemonic for stellar classification (OBAFGKM) the new stellar types LTY discovered in recent years.

  11. Long pulse chemical laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardon, R.L.; Breidenthal, R.E.; Buonadonna, V.R.

    1989-02-01

    This report covers the technical effort through February, 1989. This effort was directed towards the technology associated with the development of a large scale, long pulse DF-CO{sub 2} chemical laser. Optics damage studies performed under Task 1 assessed damage thresholds for diamond-turned salt windows. Task 2 is a multi-faceted task involving the use of PHOCL-50 for laser gain measurements, LTI experiments, and detector testing by LANL personnel. To support these latter tests, PHOCL-50 was upgraded with Boeing funding to incorporate a full aperture outcoupler that increased its energy output by over a factor of 3, to a full kilojoule. The PHOCL-50 carbon block calorimeter was also recalibrated and compared with the LANL Scientech meter. Cloud clearing studies under Task 3 initially concentrated on delivering a Boeing built Cloud Simulation Facility to LANL, and currently involves design of a Cold Cloud Simulation Facility. A Boeing IRAD funded theoretical study on cold cloud clearing revealed that ice clouds may be easier to clear then warm clouds. Task 4 involves the theoretical and experimental study of flow system design as related to laser beam quality. Present efforts on this task are concentrating on temperature gradients induced by the gas filling process. General support for the LPCL field effort is listed under Task 5, with heavy emphasis on assuring reliable operation of the Boeing built Large Slide Valve and other device related tests. The modification of the PHOCL-50 system for testing long pulse DF (4{mu}m only) chemical laser operation is being done under Task 6.

  12. Automated motion estimation of root responses to sucrose in two Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes using confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wuyts, Nathalie; Bengough, A Glyn; Roberts, Timothy J; Du, Chengjin; Bransby, M Fraser; McKenna, Stephen J; Valentine, Tracy A

    2011-10-01

    Root growth is a highly dynamic process influenced by genetic background and environment. This paper reports the development of R scripts that enable root growth kinematic analysis that complements a new motion analysis tool: PlantVis. Root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana expressing a plasma membrane targeted GFP (C24 and Columbia 35S:LTI6b-EGFP) was imaged using time-lapse confocal laser scanning microscopy. Displacement of individual pixels in the time-lapse sequences was estimated automatically by PlantVis, producing dense motion vector fields. R scripts were developed to extract kinematic growth parameters and report displacement to ± 0.1 pixel. In contrast to other currently available tools, Plantvis-R delivered root velocity profiles without interpolation or averaging across the root surface and also estimated the uncertainty associated with tracking each pixel. The PlantVis-R analysis tool has a range of potential applications in root physiology and gene expression studies, including linking motion to specific cell boundaries and analysis of curvature. The potential for quantifying genotype × environment interactions was examined by applying PlantVis-R in a kinematic analysis of root growth of C24 and Columbia, under contrasting carbon supply. Large genotype-dependent effects of sucrose were recorded. C24 exhibited negligible differences in elongation zone length and elongation rate but doubled the density of lateral roots in the presence of sucrose. Columbia, in contrast, increased its elongation zone length and doubled its elongation rate and the density of lateral roots. PMID:21630041

  13. The beauty of simple adaptive control and new developments in nonlinear systems stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Itzhak

    2014-12-01

    Although various adaptive control techniques have been around for a long time and in spite of successful proofs of stability and even successful demonstrations of performance, the eventual use of adaptive control methodologies in practical real world systems has met a rather strong resistance from practitioners and has remained limited. Apparently, it is difficult to guarantee or even understand the conditions that can guarantee stable operations of adaptive control systems under realistic operational environments. Besides, it is difficult to measure the robustness of adaptive control system stability and allow it to be compared with the common and widely used measure of phase margin and gain margin that is utilized by present, mainly LTI, controllers. Furthermore, customary stability analysis methods seem to imply that the mere stability of adaptive systems may be adversely affected by any tiny deviation from the pretty idealistic and assumably required stability conditions. This paper first revisits the fundamental qualities of customary direct adaptive control methodologies, in particular the classical Model Reference Adaptive Control, and shows that some of their basic drawbacks have been addressed and eliminated within the so-called Simple Adaptive Control methodology. Moreover, recent developments in the stability analysis methods of nonlinear systems show that prior conditions that were customarily assumed to be needed for stability are only apparent and can be eliminated. As a result, sufficient conditions that guarantee stability are clearly stated and lead to similarly clear proofs of stability. As many real-world applications show, once robust stability of the adaptive systems can be guaranteed, the added value of using Add-On Adaptive Control along with classical Control design techniques is pushing the desired performance beyond any previous limits.

  14. Further Evidence for an Anisotropic Detachment Zone Within the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X.; Park, J.

    2004-05-01

    The structure of the Cascadia region is important because anisotropy and abnormal structures have been reported by numerous seismic studies associated with the Juan de Fuca subduction zone. Recent GPS observations addressed the movement of the Siletz terrane, which suggest a northward migration of the North American forearc margin, a puzzling intra-terrane deformation. So it is very interesting to know what anisotropy orientation is produced by the movement of slab and the forearc terrane above it. An earlier receiver function study of GSN station COR (Corvallis, Oregon) showed that two-lobed back azimuth variation in Ps amplitude and polarity indicates anisotropy with a tilted symmetry axis within a dipping anisotropic layer that lies above the subducting oceanic crust. This is a possible detachment zone for the northward slippage of the Siletz forearc terrace along the top of the descending slab. Attempts to model the converted wave amplitude suggest that serpentinite is involved in the anisotropic layer above the slab. We have analyzed 5 additional broadband stations (GNW, LON, LTY, TTW, WVOR) of the Pacific Northwest Regional Seismic Network (UW), which have operated between 1990 to 2003 and provided between 100 and 300 P-waves for study, depending on the station. We observe at these stations a Ps phase corresponding to a slab-conversion. We observe on the transverse receiver function that the slab-converted wave has a polarity reversal at north-south direction in some stations, which is consistent with observations at COR, suggesting a broader detachment zone associated with north-south GPS motion. We will model structure for each station to determine if a similar thin velocity layer exists above the slab in this area. This will is considered in our tectonic model and related to the GPS study.

  15. A longitudinal study of Vero cytotoxin producing Escherichia coli in cattle calves in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed Central

    Tokhi, A. M.; Peiris, J. S.; Scotland, S. M.; Willshaw, G. A.; Smith, H. R.; Cheasty, T.

    1993-01-01

    Two cohorts of 10 and 16 calves were followed at weekly or fortnightly intervals from 4-28 and 1-9 weeks respectively to determine whether natural infection by Vero cytotoxin (VT) producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) occurred. Ninety-one of 171 (53%) faecal specimens were VTEC positive and 20-80% of animals at any given time excreted VTEC. Of 104 VTEC strains studied further, 6 different serogroups (O 22.H16; O 25.H5; O 49.H-; O 86.H26; O 88.H25; O 153.H12) and an untypable strain (O? .H21) were identified. All strains belonging to the same serotype had identical profiles of reactivity with DNA probes to toxins VT1 or 2, LTI or II and a probe (CVD419) derived from a plasmid carried by enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli O 157.H7. Four of these serotypes were found in the faecal flora of the calves, taken as a group, throughout the 4-month study period. Sixty percent of the strains hybridized with the probe for VT1, 4% with the probe for VT2, and 36% with both probes. Faecal VTEC were significantly associated with overt diarrhoeal illness in animals < 10 weeks of age, but no characteristic profile of markers (serotype or hybridization pattern) in E. coli isolates was associated with diarrhoea. A serological response to VT1 was detected in some animals, but faecal VT1 VTEC excretion persisted in spite of seroconversion. VT1 seroconversion was not associated with diarrhoea. A serological response to VT2 was not detected even in those animals excreting VT2 VTEC in the faeces. PMID:8472764

  16. Collisionless reversed magnetic shear trapped electron instability and contribution of sidebands to anomalous transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogister, André L.; Singh, Raghvendra

    2005-11-01

    By keeping account of the trapped electron ∇B and curvature drifts, it is found that the spatial decay of the collisionless electron drift wave is governed either by the trapped electron response or by the resonant interaction of ions with the sidebands of the primary oscillation. In the former case, pairs of spatially bounded unstable and damped solutions are obtained for negative magnetic shear (ŝ<0) if, as usual, LTe=1/∂rlnTe<0; there are no bounded solutions if ŝLTe<0. In the latter case, there is either a set of bounded damped solutions if ηi>0 or a set of bounded unstable solutions if ηi<0. The unstable modes have a radiating character and the growth rates are γ ˜(2n+1)√1+2q2 ∣ŝ∣∣LNωe*/qR∣ (n is the Hermite polynomial solution index, q the safety factor, ŝ the magnetic shear parameter, R the major radius, ωe* the electron diamagnetic frequency, LN=1/∂rlnNe, and ηi=LN/LTi).The sidebands are responsible for unusually large ratios Qe/TeΓe, where Qe and Γe are the anomalous electron energy flux and the particle flux. These results may explain the box-type Te profile observed in lower hybrid current drive reversed magnetic shear plasmas on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak 60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [H. Ninomiya and the JT-60U Team, Phys. Fluids B 4, 2070 (1992)]. It is finally demonstrated that the ballooning hypothesis generally leads to conflicting requirements: it is thus hardly relevant for the electron drift branch! The "radiating" boundary condition that has formerly been imposed on the slab solution is finally discussed.

  17. "Concordia res parvae crescunt" or how different approaches can be combined to decrypt root water uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Félicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Draye, Xavier; Javaux, Mathieu; Lobet, Guillaume

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we developed a new operation pipe showing that the combined use of computer models and in vivo experiments allows one a better analysis of the water fluxes in the soil-plant system and can help researchers to decrypt the root water uptake dynamics. From an experimental point of view, we monitored in 2D the evolution of soil water content around roots of transpiring maize plants using a light transmission imaging (LTI) technique on a rhizotron. Subsequently, we digitized the entire root system in order to create an input file for the model RSWMS (HYDRUS-like model for soil-plant water transfers). In the other hand, we performed a global sensitivity analysis of the modeled experiment to highlight the plant parameters that can be measured thanks to such a procedure. Then fitting the simulated changes of distributed Sink term in Richards equation to experimental data enabled us to depict the local radial and axial conductivities. The use of the RSWMS model in association with experimental data gave us an insight on the water potential distribution in the plant and fluxes by and through individual segments during the entire duration of the experiment. Finally, this analysis can be optimized by changing the timing and/or types of measurements included in the protocol in order to maximize the information content of the experiment. A validation of the results can also take place: the optimized conductivities of the root segments are indeed sensitive to a global conductance measurement and to other root water uptake experiments. In the future, this experimental set-up will enable us to compare genotypes hydraulic architectures in order to answer questions such as: which genotype is the best adapted to avoid a drought stress occurring at a certain time in a given environment?

  18. The Influence of Crystal Anisotropy on Failure Stability: Evidence from Multiple-Cracking Noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, H.; Ghofrani Tabari, M.; Young, R. P.; Griffith, W. A.; Goodfellow, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Failure of crystals under some external loads often exploit cleavage planes as planes of weakness. The nucleation and extension of "defects" in most cases results in emission of acoustic (phonon) excitations. While X-ray diffraction methods describe the structure of crystals well, the relationship between cleavage planes and unstable failure during cracking of crystals is less well established. In this study, we analyze the polarization patterns of multiple acoustic excitations using functional acoustic network theory. The experiment involves fracturing a small sample placed on a thick aluminum plate using a sharp tip. A load is slowly applied to the testing material until failure inducing the propagation of elastic waves through the aluminum plate. Once the defects' disturbances have traveled to the opposite side of the plate, they are recorded by a symmetric array of 15 Panametrics V103 sensors. The V103 sensors were calibrated in-situ and showed a roughly flat displacement sensitivity of 73 mV/nm between 20 kHz and 1 MHz. We characterize the emitted noises from Graphite, Gypsum, and Halite and show that microscopic cracking noises carry a signature of plasticity (dislocation growth). We describe the analysis of defects' slip-direction and growth, inferred from polarization patterns in the weakening phase, and we relate these patterns to individual cleavage plane(s). Further, using multiplex complex networks, we explore the angular tendency of micro-cracking, and estimate the anisotropic nature of micro-defects. Next, we use elasto-dynamic and linear-time-invariant (LTI) systems theory to deconvolve the instrument response and wave propagation functions from the recorded waveform leaving only the source term. Finally, we compare the results from both methods, drawing conclusions about the relationship between crackling noises and plasticity.

  19. Avian extraintestinal Escherichia coli exhibits enterotoxigenic-like activity in the in vivo rabbit ligated ileal loop assay.

    PubMed

    Maluta, Renato Pariz; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Joazeiro, Paulo Pinto; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Silveira, Flávio; Houle, Sébastien; Kobayashi, Renata Katsuko Takayama; Dozois, Charles M; Dias da Silveira, Wanderley

    2014-06-01

    Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strains harbor a number of virulence genes and cause extraintestinal diseases, such as septicemia, swollen-head syndrome, salpingitis, and omphalitis in poultry. APEC strains are not known to cause intestinal diseases. Herein, for the first time, it is reported that APEC strains were able to induce an enterotoxigenic-like effect in rabbit ligated ileal loops. Strain SEPT362 caused cell detachment of the intestinal villi, which also showed a flattened and wilted appearance, but the integrity of the tight junctions was maintained. Additionally, this strain did not adhere to enterocytes in vivo, although adhesin encoding genes ( fimH, csgA, lpfA2-3, and ECP) were present while other lpfA types, sfa, afa, papC, and ral genes were not. This enterotoxigenic-like activity was conserved after thermal treatment of the supernatant at 65°C but not at 100°C. Moreover, experiments based on filtering with different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) pore sizes demonstrated that the component associated with the observed biological effect has a molecular weight >100 kDa. Blast search and polymerase chain reaction assays for known E. coli virulence factors showed that strain SEPT362 harbors the gene encoding for the toxin EAST-1 and the serine protease autotransporter (SPATE) Tsh, but is negative for genes encoding for the toxins LT-I, STh, STp, Stx1, Stx2, CNF-1, CNF-2, CDT and the SPATEs Sat, Pic, Vat, SigA, SepA, EatA, EspP, or EspC. A cloned copy of the tsh gene in E. coli K-12 was also tested and was shown to have an enterotoxic effect. These results suggest that APEC might induce fluid accumulation in the rabbit gut. The Tsh autotransporter seems to be one of the factors associated with this phenotype. PMID:24673684

  20. Evaluation of heat-labile enterotoxins type IIa and type IIb in the pathogenicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli for neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Casey, Thomas A; Connell, Terry D; Holmes, Randall K; Whipp, Shannon C

    2012-09-14

    Type II heat-labile enterotoxins (LT-II) have been reported in Escherichia coli isolates from humans, animals, food and water samples. The goal here was to determine the specific roles of the antigenically distinguishable LT-IIa and LT-IIb subtypes in pathogenesis and virulence of enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) which has not been previously reported. The prevalence of genes encoding for LT-II was determined by colony blot hybridization in a collection of 1648 E. coli isolates from calves and pigs with diarrhea or other diseases and from healthy animals. Only five isolates hybridized with the LT-II probe and none of these isolates contained genes for other enterotoxins or adhesins associated with porcine or bovine ETEC. Ligated intestinal loops in calves, pigs, and rabbits were used to determine the potential of purified LT-IIa and LT-IIb to cause intestinal secretion. LT-IIa and LT-IIb caused significant secretion in the intestinal loops in calves but not in the intestinal loops of rabbits or pigs. In contrast, neonatal pigs inoculated with isogenic adherent E. coli containing the cloned genes for LT-I, LT-IIa or LT-IIb developed severe watery diarrhea with weight loss that was significantly greater than pigs inoculated with the adherent, non-toxigenic parental or vector only control strains. The results demonstrate that the incidence of LT-II appeared to be very low in porcine and bovine E. coli. However, a potential role for these enterotoxins in E. coli-mediated diarrhea in animals was confirmed because purified LT-IIa and LT-IIb caused fluid secretion in bovine intestinal loops and adherent isogenic strains containing cloned genes encoding for LT-IIa or LT-IIb caused severe diarrhea in neonatal pigs. PMID:22480773

  1. Synchrophasor Sensing and Processing based Smart Grid Security Assessment for Renewable Energy Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huaiguang

    is feasible, convenient and effective. Conventionally, wind energy is highly location-dependent. Many desirable wind resources are located in rural areas without direct access to the transmission grid. By connecting MW-scale wind turbines or wind farms to the distributions system of SG, the cost of building long transmission facilities can be avoid and wind power supplied to consumers can be greatly increased. After the effective wide area monitoring (WAM) approach is built, an event-driven control strategy is proposed for renewable energy integration. This approach is based on support vector machine (SVM) predictor and multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) model predictive control (MPC) on linear time-invariant (LTI) and linear time-variant (LTV) systems. The voltage condition of the distribution system is predicted by the SVM classifier using synchrophasor measurement data. The controllers equipped with wind turbine generators are triggered by the prediction results. Both transmission level and distribution level are designed based on this proposed approach. Considering economic issues in the power system, a statistical scheduling approach to economic dispatch and energy reserves is proposed. The proposed approach focuses on minimizing the overall power operating cost with considerations of renewable energy uncertainty and power system security. The hybrid power system scheduling is formulated as a convex programming problem to minimize power operating cost, taking considerations of renewable energy generation, power generation-consumption balance and power system security. A genetic algorithm based approach is used for solving the minimization of the power operating cost. In addition, with technology development, it can be predicted that the renewable energy such as wind turbine generators and PV panels will be pervasively located in distribution systems. The distribution system is an unbalanced system, which contains single-phase, two-phase and three

  2. Electron Microscopic Study on the Suction Cast In Situ Ti-Fe-Sn Ultrafine Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, Sumanta; Mondal, Barnali; Biswas, Krishanu; Govind

    2013-01-01

    The current investigation reports detailed study on the microstructural evolution in the suction cast hypereutectic Ti71Fe29- x Sn x alloys during Sn addition with x = 0, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.85, 4.5, 6, and 10 at. pct and the solidification of these ternary alloys using SEM and TEM. These alloys have been prepared by melting high-purity elements using vacuum arc melting furnace under high-purity argon atmosphere. This was followed by suction casting these alloys in the water-cooled split Cu molds of diameters, ϕ = 1 and 3 mm, under argon atmosphere. The results indicate the formation of binary eutectic between bcc solid solution β-Ti and B2 FeTi in all alloys. β-Ti undergoes eutectoid transformation, β-Ti → α-Ti + FeTi, during subsequent solid-state cooling, leading to formation of hcp α-Ti and FeTi. For alloys x < 2, the primary FeTi forms from the liquid before the formation of eutectic with minute scale Ti3Sn phase. For alloys with 2 ≥ x ≤ 10, the liquid is found to undergo ternary quasi-peritectic reaction with primary Ti3Sn, L+Ti3Sn → β-Ti+FeTi, leading to formation of another kind of FeTi. In all the other alloy compositions (3.85 ≥ x ≤ 10), Ti3Sn and FeTi dendrites are observed in the suction cast alloys with profuse amount of Ti3Sn being formed for alloys with x ≥ 4.5. The current study conclusively proves that the liquid undergoes ternary quasi-peritectic reaction involving four phases, L + Ti3Sn → β-Ti + FeTi, which lies at the invariant point Ti69.2±0.8Fe27.4±0.7Sn3.4±0.2 (denoted by P). Below P, there is one univariant reaction, i.e., L → β-Ti + FeTi for all alloy compositions, whereas above P, liquid undergoes one of the univariant reactions, i.e., L + β-Ti → Ti3Sn (Sn = 2, 2.5, 3, and 4.5 at. pct) or L + FeTi → Ti3Sn for alloys (Sn = 6, 10 at. pct). For alloy with Sn = 3.85 at. pct, the ternary quasi-peritectic reaction is co-operated by two monovariant eutectic reactions, i.e., L → β-Ti + FeTi below P and L → Fe

  3. Adaptive Control for Autonomous Navigation of Mobile Robots Considering Time Delay and Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armah, Stephen Kofi

    second-order altitude models for the quadrotor, AR.Drone 2.0. Proportional (P), pole placement or proportional plus velocity (PV), linear quadratic regulator (LQR), and model reference adaptive control (MRAC) controllers are designed and validated through simulations using MATLAB/Simulink. Control input saturation and time delay in the controlled systems are also studied. MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) and Simulink programs are developed to implement the controllers on the drone. Thirdly, the time delay in the drone's control system is estimated using analytical and experimental methods. In the experimental approach, the transient properties of the experimental altitude responses are compared to those of simulated responses. The analytical approach makes use of the Lambert W function to obtain analytical solutions of scalar first-order delay differential equations (DDEs). A time-delayed P-feedback control system (retarded type) is used in estimating the time delay. Then an improved system performance is obtained by incorporating the estimated time delay in the design of the PV control system (neutral type) and PV-MRAC control system. Furthermore, the stability of a parametric perturbed linear time-invariant (LTI) retarded-type system is studied. This is done by analytically calculating the stability radius of the system. Simulation of the control system is conducted to confirm the stability. This robust control design and uncertainty analysis are conducted for first-order and second-order quadrotor models. Lastly, the robustly designed PV and PV-MRAC control systems are used to autonomously track multiple waypoints. Also, the robustness of the PV-MRAC controller is tested against a baseline PV controller using the payload capability of the drone. It is shown that the PV-MRAC offers several benefits over the fixed-gain approach of the PV controller. The adaptive control is found to offer enhanced robustness to the payload fluctuations.