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Sample records for lumbosacral radiculopathy preganglionic

  1. [Comorbid state in coal miners suffering from lumbosacral radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Yakovleva, N V; Gorbljansky, Yu Yu; Pictushanskaya, T E

    2016-01-01

    The authors considered topics of occupational and general comorbidity of occupational lumbosacral radiculopathy in coal miners (2791 examinees) observed over 1976-2014 in occupational center. In patients having lumbosacral radiculopathy without occupational mixed diseases, the occupational disease was diagnosed at the age 3-5 years younger, and 2-4 years earlier from primary visit. Analysis of occurrence of general comorbid conditions with lumbosacral radiculopathy revealed some regularities: patients manifested with symptoms due to vibration have more frequent arterial hypertension than in those with lumbalgia, whereas in risk group of hearing affected by noise IHD was more possible. PMID:27048141

  2. Magnetic stimulation in the diagnosis of lumbosacral radiculopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chokroverty, S; Sachdeo, R; Dilullo, J; Duvoisin, R C

    1989-01-01

    Five patients presenting with sensory-motor disturbances consistent with a clinical diagnosis of L5 or S1 radiculopathy were studied. All had conventional nerve conduction tests and electromyography. The lumbosacral roots were stimulated in the lumbosacral region by using the Cadwell MES-10 Magneto-electric stimulator. The compound muscle action potentials were recorded bilaterally by surface electrodes applied to the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles. The latencies to the affected muscles were significantly prolonged. The appropriate root dysfunction was confirmed at operation or by the imaging techniques. It was concluded that surface stimulation of the lumbosacral roots by a magnetic coil is a potentially useful technique for the non-invasive evaluation of the function of the lumbosacral roots. Images PMID:2746269

  3. Focal neuromyotonia as a presenting feature of lumbosacral radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Tushar Premraj; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Chaudhari, Tejendra Singh; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Singh, Maneesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyotonia is characterized by motor, sensory, and autonomic features along with characteristic electrophysiologic findings, resulting from hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerves. We describe the case of a 36-year-old man, who presented with the disabling symptoms suggestive of focal neuromyotonia involving both the lower limbs. His neurological examination revealed continuous rippling of both the calf muscles with normal power, reflexes, and sensory examination. Electrophysiology revealed spontaneous activity in the form of doublets, triplets, and neuromyotonic discharges along with the neurogenic motor unit potentials in bilateral L5, S1 innervated muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging lumbosacral spine revealed lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion with severe foraminal and spinal canal stenosis. Patient had good response to steroids and carbamazepine. The disabling focal neuromyotonia, occurring as a result of chronic active radiculopathy, brought the patient to medical attention. Patient responded to medical management. PMID:24339612

  4. [Rehabilitation of radiculopathy of the spine lumbosacral region complicated with herniated disc depending on the type of hernia].

    PubMed

    Dovhyĭ, I L

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 168 patients with radiculopathy lumbosacral spine, complicated hernias of intervertebral disc nucleus on the developed technique. The results show high efficacy of the treatment of this disease. PMID:23350123

  5. Intrasubstance Schwannoma of Posterior Tibial Nerve Presenting as Lumbo-Sacral Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Banshelkikar, Santosh; Nistane, Pruthviraj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Peripheral nerve tumours are rarely acknowledged as a cause of radiating pain in lower limbs and suspicion is almost always pointed towards lumbo-sacral causes. Schwannomas are tumours of peripheral nerve sheaths occurring anywhere along the peripheral nervous system. Often it can produce symptoms, which can be misleading in cases where obvious swelling is not present. The diagnosis may therefore be delayed by several years of emergence of symptoms. Very few such cases have been reported previously and none of them had an intrasubstance location of the tumour as in our case. Case Report: We present a case of a middle aged female patient presenting with radiating pain in left lower limb, which was diagnosed and treated as lumbo-sacral radiculopathy for five years before an obvious swelling appeared, which on further investigations led to diagnosis of schwannoma of tibial nerve. Intraoperatively, the schwannoma was found to be intrasubstance in location which has never been reported in the past literatures making its excision, without damaging the conducting elements, a challenge. Conclusion: The possibility of peripheral nerve tumour should always be kept in mind while dealing with long standing cases diagnosed as radiculopathy and which do not get better with treatment on similar lines. A thorough clinical examination of the entire limb including Tinel’s sign can clinch the diagnosis earlier in cases where obvious swelling is not present. Even unusual presentations, as in our case, can be dealt surgically with good results. PMID:27299039

  6. [Electrophysiologic analysis of the lumbosacral radiculopathy using nerve root conduction velocity (NRCV) and cauda equina action potentials (CEAP)].

    PubMed

    Kamitani, K; Baba, H; Shimada, T; Chiba, H

    1993-07-01

    Nerve root conduction velocity (NRCV) and cauda equina action potential (CEAP) have been measured to assess the severity of lumbosacral radiculopathy, the level-specific diagnosis of the symptomatic roots, and to predict the outcome. This study included 71 patients (40 males, 31 females, average age of 54 years at the time of surgery) who underwent decompressive surgery for lumbar radiculopathy. The NRCV and CEAP were directly measured during the operation. The NRCV decreased significantly with progression of radicular symptoms. The NRCV showed a marked reduction in the nerve roots of the patients with a two years or longer history of radicular symptoms; or those with compression of the nerve roots on the imaging examinations; or nerve roots that were considered to have been subjected to persistent compression over a prolonged period with severe inflammation and adhesions. Multivariative analyses suggested that the NRCV correlated closely to the postoperative neurologic recovery, and the outcome of the lumbosacral radiculopathy could be predicted to some extent by measurements of NRCV. The level-specific diagnosis of the radiculopathy could be determined when the CEAP showed a more than 30% left-right potentials difference. PMID:8409633

  7. Pelvic radiculopathies, lumbosacral plexopathies, and neuropathies in oncologic disease: a multidisciplinary approach to a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jonathan; Nisbet, Angus; Bloomfield, David; Burkill, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to familiarize the reader with the anatomy of the major pelvic nerves and the clinical features of associated lumbosacral plexopathies. To demonstrate this we illustrate several cases of malignant lumbosacral plexopathy on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A new lumbosacral plexopathy in a patient with a prior history of abdominal or pelvic malignancy is usually of malignant etiology. Biopsies may be required to definitively differentiate tumour from posttreatment fibrosis, and in cases of inconclusive sampling or where biopsies are not possible, follow-up imaging may be necessary. In view of the complexity of clinical findings often confounded by a history of prior surgery and/or radiotherapy, a multidisciplinary approach between oncologists, neurologists, and radiologists is often required for what can be a diagnostic challenge. PMID:24433993

  8. Incremental value of magnetic resonance neurography of Lumbosacral plexus over non-contributory lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging in radiculopathy: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Farahani, Sahar J; Thawait, Gaurav K; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Belzberg, Allan J; Carrino, John A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the incremental value of 3T magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in a series of unilateral radiculopathy patients with non-contributory magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Ten subjects (3 men, 7 women; mean age 54 year and range 22-74 year) with unilateral lumbar radiculopathy and with previous non-contributory lumbar spine MRI underwent lumbosacral (LS) plexus MRN over a period of one year. Lumbar spine MRI performed as part of the MRN LS protocol as well as bilateral L4-S1 nerves, sciatic, femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves were evaluated in each subject for neuropathy findings on both anatomic (nerve signal, course and caliber alterations) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tensor maps (nerve signal and caliber alterations). Minimum fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean apparent diffusion coeffcient (ADC) of L4-S2 nerve roots, sciatic and femoral nerves were recorded. RESULTS: All anatomic studies and 80% of DTI imaging received a good-excellent imaging quality grading. In a blinded evaluation, all 10 examinations demonstrated neural and/or neuromuscular abnormality corresponding to the site of radiculopathy. A number of contributory neuropathy findings including double crush syndrome were observed. On DTI tensor maps, nerve signal and caliber alterations were more conspicuous. Although individual differences were observed among neuropathic appearing nerve (lower FA and increased ADC) as compared to its contralateral counterpart, there were no significant mean differences on statistical comparison of LS plexus nerves, femoral and sciatic nerves (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: MRN of LS plexus is useful modality for the evaluation of patients with non-contributory MRI of lumbar spine as it can incrementally delineate the etiology and provide direct objective and non-invasive evidence of neuromuscular pathology. PMID:26834949

  9. Paraplegia following lumbosacral steroid epidural injections.

    PubMed

    AbdeleRahman, Kader Tawfiq; Rakocevic, Goran

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord ischemia is a rare but possible neurological complication following routine conservative treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. A case of a 46 year old woman with chronic L5 radiculopathy, who developed spinal cord ischemia following epidural steroid injection, is reported. Two months after the epidural injection, she required crutches for walking and had neurogenic bladder and bowel. PMID:25200706

  10. Cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sravisht; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common clinical scenario. Patients with radiculopathy typically present with neck pain, arm pain, or both. We review the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy and discuss the diagnosis of this condition. This includes an overview of the pertinent findings on the patient history and physical examination. We also discuss relevant clinical syndromes that must be considered in the differential diagnosis including peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes and shoulder pathology. The natural history of cervical radiculopathy is reviewed and options for management are discussed. These options include conservative management, non-operative modalities such as physical therapy, steroid injections, and operative intervention. While the exact indications for surgical intervention have not yet been elucidated, we provide an overview of the available literature regarding indications and discuss the timing of intervention. The surgical outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) are discussed. PMID:27250042

  11. Painful Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Edvard; Vyšata, Oldřich; Včelák, Radek; Pazdera, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients frequently suffer from lumbosacral plexus disorder. When conducting a neurological examination, it is essential to assess the extent of muscle paresis, sensory disorder distribution, pain occurrence, and blocked spine. An electromyography (EMG) can confirm axonal lesions and their severity and extent, root affliction (including dorsal branches), and disorders of motor and sensory fiber conduction. Imaging examination, particularly gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination, ensues. Cerebrospinal fluid examination is of diagnostic importance with radiculopathy, neuroinfections, and for evidence of immunoglobulin synthesis. Differential diagnostics of lumbosacral plexopathy (LSP) include metabolic, oncological, inflammatory, ischemic, and autoimmune disorders. In the presented case study, a 64-year-old man developed an acute onset of painful LSP with a specific EMG finding, MRI showing evidence of plexus affliction but not in the proximal part of the roots. Painful plexopathy presented itself with severe muscle paresis in the femoral nerve and the obturator nerve innervation areas, and gradual remission occurred after 3 months. Autoimmune origin of painful LSP is presumed. We describe a rare case of patient with painful lumbar plexopathy, with EMG findings of axonal type, we suppose of autoimmune etiology. PMID:25929915

  12. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal CT; CT - lumbosacral spine ... In other cases, a CT of the lumbosacral spine may be done after injecting contrast dye into ... of the body. A CT of the lumbosacral spine can evaluate fractures and changes of the spine, ...

  13. Taking it to the next level: lumbar radiculopathy from thoracic nerve schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Ukaigwe, Anene; Olugbodi, Akintomi; Alweis, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve and its branches, the common fibular and tibial nerves, causes sciatica which is a common syndrome characterized most often by radiating pain from the lower back down the legs and also manifesting as sensory and motor deficits. Sciatica is a common presentation of lumbosacral disc prolapse and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in ambulatory settings. Schwannomas rarely cause sciatica; hence, it is seldom considered in evaluation of a patient with radiculopathy. Our patient presented with lumbar radiculopathy, mild degenerative changes on lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, and failed conservative treatment. Myelopathy was confirmed with electromyogram (EMG). Thoracolumbar spine MRI revealed the schwannoma in the thoracic region. He recovered neurologic function after tumor excision. This case highlights the diagnostic challenge that may arise in evaluating a patient with lumbar radiculopathy, negative lumbosacral spine imaging, and failure of conservative therapy. PMID:25656663

  14. Mimickers of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Bennett Douglas; Blessinger, Brian Joseph; Darden, Bruce Vaiden; Brigham, Craig D; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Laxer, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons frequently treat patients who report pain that radiates from the back into the lower extremity. Although the most common etiology is either a herniated disk or spinal stenosis, a myriad of pathologies can mimic the symptoms of radiculopathy, resulting in differences in the clinical presentation and the workup. Therefore, the clinician must be able to distinguish the signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy from pathologies that may have a similar presentation. Being cognizant of these other possible conditions enables the physician to consider a breadth of alternative diagnoses when a patient presents with radiating lower extremity pain. PMID:25538126

  15. Distinguishing Radiculopathies from Mononeuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Robblee, Jennifer; Katzberg, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Identifying “where is the lesion” is particularly important in the approach to the patient with focal dysfunction where a peripheral localization is suspected. This article outlines a methodical approach to the neuromuscular patient in distinguishing focal neuropathies versus radiculopathies, both of which are common presentations to the neurology clinic. This approach begins with evaluation of the sensory examination to determine whether there are irritative or negative sensory signs in a peripheral nerve or dermatomal distribution. This is followed by evaluation of deep tendon reflexes to evaluate if differential hyporeflexia can assist in the two localizations. Finally, identification of weak muscle groups unique to a nerve or myotomal pattern in the proximal and distal extremities can most reliably assist in a precise localization. The article concludes with an application of the described method to the common scenario of distinguishing radial neuropathy versus C7 radiculopathy in the setting of a wrist drop and provides additional examples for self-evaluation and reference. PMID:27468275

  16. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease. PMID:17048153

  17. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... be placed over the lower part of your spine. You will be asked to hold your breath ... x-ray. The most common reason for lumbosacral spine x-ray is to look for the cause ...

  18. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  19. Central Pupillary Light Reflex Circuits in the Cat: II. Morphology, Ultrastructure and Inputs of Preganglionic Motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wensi; May, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Preganglionic motoneurons supplying the ciliary ganglion control lens accommodation and pupil diameter. In cats, these motoneurons make up the preganglionic Edinger-Westphal population, which lies rostral, dorsal and ventral to the oculomotor nucleus. A recent cat study suggested that caudal motoneurons control the lens and rostral motoneurons control the pupil. This led us to examine the morphology, ultrastructure and pretectal inputs of these populations. Preganglionic motoneurons retrogradely labeled by introducing tracer into the cat ciliary ganglion generally fell into two morphologic categories. Fusiform neurons were located rostrally, in the anteromedian nucleus and between the oculomotor nuclei. Multipolar neurons were found caudally, dorsal and ventral to the oculomotor nucleus. The dendrites of preganglionic motoneurons within the anteromedian nucleus crossed the midline, providing a possible basis for consensual responses. Ultrastructurally, several different classes of synaptic profiles contact preganglionic motoneurons, suggesting their activity may be modified by a variety of inputs. Furthermore, there were differences between the synaptic populations contacting the rostral and caudal populations, supporting the contention that these populations display functional differences. Anterogradely labeled pretectal terminals were observed in close association with labeled preganglionic motoneurons, particularly in the rostral population. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that these terminals, packed with clear, spherical vesicles, made asymmetric synaptic contacts onto motoneurons in the rostral population indicating these cells serve the pupillary light reflex. Thus, the preganglionic motoneurons found in the cat display morphologic, ultrastructural and connectional differences suggesting that this rostral preganglionic population is specialized for pupil control, while more caudal elements control the lens. PMID:24706263

  20. Central pupillary light reflex circuits in the cat: II. Morphology, ultrastructure, and inputs of preganglionic motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wensi; May, Paul J

    2014-12-15

    Preganglionic motoneurons supplying the ciliary ganglion control lens accommodation and pupil diameter. In cats, these motoneurons make up the preganglionic Edinger-Westphal population, which lies rostral, dorsal, and ventral to the oculomotor nucleus. A recent cat study suggested that caudal motoneurons control the lens and rostral motoneurons control the pupil. This led us to examine the morphology, ultrastructure, and pretectal inputs of these populations. Preganglionic motoneurons retrogradely labeled by introducing tracer into the cat ciliary ganglion generally fell into two morphologic categories. Fusiform neurons were located rostrally, in the anteromedian nucleus and between the oculomotor nuclei. Multipolar neurons were found caudally, dorsal and ventral to the oculomotor nucleus. The dendrites of preganglionic motoneurons within the anteromedian nucleus crossed the midline, providing a possible basis for consensual responses. Ultrastructurally, several different classes of synaptic profiles contact preganglionic motoneurons, suggesting that their activity may be modified by a variety of inputs. Furthermore, there were differences in the synaptic populations contacting the rostral vs. caudal populations, supporting the contention that these populations display functional differences. Anterogradely labeled pretectal terminals were observed in close association with labeled preganglionic motoneurons, particularly in the rostral population. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that these terminals, packed with clear, spherical vesicles, made asymmetric synaptic contacts onto motoneurons in the rostral population, indicating that these cells serve the pupillary light reflex. Thus, the preganglionic motoneurons found in the cat display morphologic, ultrastructural, and connectional differences suggesting that this rostral preganglionic population is specialized for pupil control, whereas more caudal elements control the lens. PMID:24706263

  1. Far caudally migrated extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniation treated by a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach: case report.

    PubMed

    Tschugg, Anja; Tschugg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sebastian; Rhomberg, Paul; Thomé, Claudius

    2016-03-01

    A 33-year-old man presented with moderate low-back pain and L-5 radiculopathy that progressed to severe paresis of L-5. On initial imaging, a corresponding spinal lesion was overlooked. Further CT and contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated a presacral mass along the L-5 root far extraforaminally. A herniated disc was suspected, but with standard imaging a schwannoma could not be ruled out. The presacral L-5 root was explored via a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports of sequestered extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniations that herniated into the presacral region. PMID:26637061

  2. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  3. Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motoneurons labeled after voluntary diving.

    PubMed

    Panneton, W Michael; Anch, A Michael; Panneton, Whitney M; Gan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    A dramatic bradycardia is induced by underwater submersion in vertebrates. The location of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons driving this aspect of the diving response was investigated using cFos immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde transport of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) to double-label neurons. After pericardial injections of CTB, trained rats voluntarily dove underwater, and their heart rates (HR) dropped immediately to 95 ± 2 bpm, an 80% reduction. After immunohistochemical processing, the vast majority of CTB labeled neurons were located in the reticular formation from the rostral cervical spinal cord to the facial motor nucleus, confirming previous studies. Labeled neurons caudal to the rostral ventrolateral medulla were usually spindle-shaped aligned along an oblique line running from the dorsal vagal nucleus to the ventrolateral reticular formation, while those more rostrally were multipolar with extended dendrites. Nine percent of retrogradely-labeled neurons were positive for both cFos and CTB after diving and 74% of these were found rostral to the obex. CTB also was transported transganglionically in primary afferent fibers, resulting in large granular deposits in dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and commissural subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and finer deposits in lamina I and IV-V of the trigeminocervical complex. The overlap of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons activated by diving with those activated by baro- and chemoreceptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is discussed. Thus, the profound bradycardia seen with underwater submersion reinforces the notion that the mammalian diving response is the most powerful autonomic reflex known. PMID:24478721

  4. Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motoneurons labeled after voluntary diving

    PubMed Central

    Panneton, W. Michael; Anch, A. Michael; Panneton, Whitney M.; Gan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    A dramatic bradycardia is induced by underwater submersion in vertebrates. The location of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons driving this aspect of the diving response was investigated using cFos immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde transport of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) to double-label neurons. After pericardial injections of CTB, trained rats voluntarily dove underwater, and their heart rates (HR) dropped immediately to 95 ± 2 bpm, an 80% reduction. After immunohistochemical processing, the vast majority of CTB labeled neurons were located in the reticular formation from the rostral cervical spinal cord to the facial motor nucleus, confirming previous studies. Labeled neurons caudal to the rostral ventrolateral medulla were usually spindle-shaped aligned along an oblique line running from the dorsal vagal nucleus to the ventrolateral reticular formation, while those more rostrally were multipolar with extended dendrites. Nine percent of retrogradely-labeled neurons were positive for both cFos and CTB after diving and 74% of these were found rostral to the obex. CTB also was transported transganglionically in primary afferent fibers, resulting in large granular deposits in dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and commissural subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and finer deposits in lamina I and IV-V of the trigeminocervical complex. The overlap of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons activated by diving with those activated by baro- and chemoreceptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is discussed. Thus, the profound bradycardia seen with underwater submersion reinforces the notion that the mammalian diving response is the most powerful autonomic reflex known. PMID:24478721

  5. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  6. Recurrent lumbosacral herpes simplex virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Vassantachart, Janna M.

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 54-year-old white woman with episodic lumbosacral lesions that she had been treating as psoriasis. Evaluation revealed classic herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. The discussion reviews the significance and potential complications of recurrent lumbosacral HSV infection. PMID:26722168

  7. Introduction to Lumbosacral and Sacropelvic Fixation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Patrick C; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    We are pleased to present this Neurosurgical Focus video supplement on lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation strategies. Despite advancement in surgical techniques and technologies in spine, achieving consistent solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction remains a major challenge. The anatomy of the lumbosacral junction allows for a higher range of motion compared to other areas of the thoracolumbar spine. The L5-S1 interspace is exposed to significant shear forces. As a result, complications such as pseudoarthrosis, screw pull-out, implant fracture, or sacral fractures can occur. Complications are particularly seen in long fusion constructs ending across the lumbosacral junction. To reduce these complications, various lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation techniques have been developed and utilized. The current supplement is intended to provide instructional videos that illustrate several current techniques for lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation. The collection includes techniques for anterior L5-S1 interbody fusion, minimally invasive L5-S1 interbody fusions, lumbosacral pedicle screw placement, sacroiliac fusion, and sacro-alar-iliac screw placement. The authors of the videos in the supplement have provided detailed narration and video illustration to describe the nuances of the various open and minimally invasive techniques for lumbosacral and sacral-pelvic fixation. We are pleased to have such a collection of quality video illustration from experts in the field. It's been our privilege to serve as guest editors for this supplement and we believe that you will enjoy the contents of this supplement. PMID:27364425

  8. Spinally projecting preproglucagon axons preferentially innervate sympathetic preganglionic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Llewellyn-Smith, I.J.; Marina, N.; Manton, R.N.; Reimann, F.; Gribble, F.M.; Trapp, S.

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and medullary reticular formation, produce GLP-1. In transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), these brainstem PPG neurons project to many central autonomic regions where GLP-1 receptors are expressed. The spinal cord also contains GLP-1 receptor mRNA but the distribution of spinal PPG axons is unknown. Here, we used two-color immunoperoxidase labeling to examine PPG innervation of spinal segments T1–S4 in YFP-PPG mice. Immunoreactivity for YFP identified spinal PPG axons and perikarya. We classified spinal neurons receiving PPG input by immunoreactivity for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and/or Fluorogold (FG) retrogradely transported from the peritoneal cavity. FG microinjected at T9 defined cell bodies that supplied spinal PPG innervation. The deep dorsal horn of lower lumbar cord contained YFP-immunoreactive neurons. Non-varicose, YFP-immunoreactive axons were prominent in the lateral funiculus, ventral white commissure and around the ventral median fissure. In T1–L2, varicose, YFP-containing axons closely apposed many ChAT-immunoreactive sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) in the intermediolateral cell column (IML) and dorsal lamina X. In the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, about 10% of ChAT-immunoreactive preganglionic neurons received YFP appositions, as did occasional ChAT-positive motor neurons throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the ventral horn. YFP appositions also occurred on NOS-immunoreactive spinal interneurons and on spinal YFP-immunoreactive neurons. Injecting FG at T9 retrogradely labeled many YFP-PPG cell bodies in the medulla but none of the spinal YFP-immunoreactive neurons. These results show that brainstem PPG neurons

  9. The Effectiveness of Transforaminal Versus Caudal Routes for Epidural Steroid Injections in Managing Lumbosacral Radicular Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hengxing; Lu, Lu; Li, Xueying; Jia, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Yao, Xue; Wu, Qiuli; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is one of the most commonly used treatments for radiculopathy. Previous studies have described the effectiveness of ESI in the management of radiculopathy. However, controversy exists regarding the route that is most beneficial and effective with respect to the administration of epidural steroids, as both transforaminal (TF) and caudal (C) routes are commonly used. This analysis reviewed studies comparing the effectiveness of TF-ESIs with that of C-ESIs in the treatment of radiculopathy as a means of providing pain relief and improving functionality. This meta-analysis was performed to guide clinical decision-making. The study was a systematic review of comparative studies. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases for trials written in English. The randomized trials and observational studies that met our inclusion criteria were subsequently included. Two reviewers, respectively, extracted data and estimated the risk of bias. All statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.3. Six prospective and 2 retrospective studies involving 664 patients were included. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing only the 6 prospective studies. Although slight pain and functional improvements were noted in the TF-ESI groups compared with the C-ESI groups, these improvements were neither clinically nor statistically significant. The limitations of this meta-analysis resulted primarily from the weaknesses of the comparative studies and the relative paucity of patients included in each study. Both the TF and C approaches are effective in reducing pain and improving functional scores, and they demonstrated similar efficacies in the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. PMID:27149443

  10. Neurochemical codes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons activated by glucoprivation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lindsay M; Kumar, Natasha N; Lonergan, Tina; Goodchild, Ann K

    2013-08-15

    Glucoprivation or hypoglycemia induces a range of counterregulatory responses, including glucose mobilization, reduced glucose utilization, and de novo glucose synthesis. These responses are mediated in part by the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical codes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) activated by glucoprivation, induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG). SPN controlling the adrenal glands and celiac ganglia, which ultimately can innervate the liver and pancreas, were targeted together with the superior cervical ganglia (control). 23.9% ± 1.3% of SPN in the T4-T11 region contained c-Fos immunoreactivity following 2DG; 70.3% ± 1.8% of SPN innervating the adrenal glands and 37.4% ± 3% of SPN innervating celiac ganglia were activated. 14.8% ± 3.5% of SPN (C8-T3) innervating superior cervical ganglia were activated. In the C8-T3 region 55% ± 10% of SPN activated contained PPCART, with only 12% ± 3% expressing PPE mRNA, whereas, in the T4-T11 region, 78% ± 4% contained PPE, with only 6.0% ± 0.6% expressing PPCART mRNA. Thus CART is not involved in glucose mobilization. Two chemically distinct populations of SPN (PPE⁺ 57.4% ± 5%, PPE⁻ ∼40%) were identified to regulate adrenaline release in response to glucoprivation. Multiple chemically distinct SPN populations innervating a specific target could suggest their graded recruitment. The two distinct populations of SPN (PPE⁺ 67.6% ± 9%, PPE⁻ ∼30%) projecting to celiac ganglia activated by glucoprivation could direct pancreatic and hepatic or other counterregulatory responses. Nearly all SPN that expressed PPE mRNA and projected to the adrenal glands or celiac ganglia were activated, suggesting a role for the inhibitory peptide enkephalin in responses evoked by glucoprivation. PMID:23348748

  11. Operative Outcomes for Cervical Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, J. G.; Butler, J. S.; Dolan, A. M.; O'Byrne, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy are common disorders which can lead to significant clinical morbidity. Conservative management, such as physical therapy, cervical immobilisation, or anti-inflammatory medications, is the preferred and often only required intervention. Surgical intervention is reserved for those patients who have intractable pain or progressive neurological symptoms. The goals of surgical treatment are decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots and deformity prevention by maintaining or supplementing spinal stability and alleviating pain. Numerous surgical techniques exist to alleviate symptoms, which are achieved through anterior, posterior, or circumferential approaches. Under most circumstances, one approach will produce optimal results. It is important that the surgical plan is tailored to address each individual's unique clinical circumstance. The objective of this paper is to analyse the major surgical treatment options for cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy focusing on outcomes and complications. PMID:22046575

  12. Cervical radiculopathy: epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Woods, Barrett I; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2015-06-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a relatively common neurological disorder resulting from nerve root dysfunction, which is often due to mechanical compression; however, inflammatory cytokines released from damaged intervertebral disks can also result in symptoms. Cervical radiculopathy can often be diagnosed with a thorough history and physical examination, but an magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic myelogram should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Because of the ubiquity of degenerative changes found on these imaging modalities, the patient's symptoms must correlate with pathology for a successful diagnosis. In the absence of myelopathy or significant muscle weakness all patients should be treated conservatively for at least 6 weeks. Conservative treatments consist of immobilization, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, cervical traction, and epidural steroid injections. Cervical radiculopathy typically is self-limiting with 75%-90% of patients achieving symptomatic improvement with nonoperative care. For patients who are persistently symptomatic despite conservative treatment, or those who have a significant functional deficit surgical treatment is appropriate. Surgical options include anterior cervical decompression and fusion, cervical disk arthroplasty, and posterior foraminotomy. Patient selection is critical to optimize outcome. PMID:25985461

  13. An electrophysiological analysis of the storage of acetylcholine in preganglionic nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M. R.; McLachlan, Elspeth M.

    1972-01-01

    1. An electrophysiological analysis has been made of the storage of acetylcholine (ACh) in the preganglionic nerve terminals of the isolated superior cervical ganglion of the guinea-pig. The mean amplitude of excitatory post-synaptic potentials recorded intracellularly was taken as a measure of the ACh output per impulse from the terminals of a preganglionic axon. 2. Prolonged repetitive stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk at 10 and 20 Hz in the presence of hemicholinium No. 3 led to an exponential decline of ACh output as the transmitter formed before the beginning of stimulation was depleted. 3. The rate of decline of ACh output during stimulation at 20 Hz (τ = 0·83-1·95 min) was about twice as fast as that at 10 Hz (τ = 1·00-6·83 min). 4. The results suggest that, during prolonged stimulation, ACh is released from a single store in the preganglionic nerve terminal and that each impulse releases a constant fraction of the store of the transmitter. PMID:4335804

  14. A symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst -A case report-

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byung Hee; Kim, Jin Mo

    2012-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts are formed by the arachnoid membrane of the nerve root at the lumbosacral level. Most of these cysts are asymptomatic and are found incidentally during computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for other causes of chronic lower back pain. This type of cyst requires a differential diagnosis to distinguish it from other causes of radiating pain and neurological symptoms. In the present case, a symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cyst was found, and pain relief was achieved by non-surgical treatment. A lumbosacral perineural cyst was identified from a differential diagnosis of a lumbar disc disorder that presented as radiating pain and neurological symptoms. PMID:22679550

  15. [Antalgic radiotherapy in lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Russi, E G; Gaeta, M; Pergolizzi, S; Settineri, N; Frosina, P; De Renzis, C

    1994-06-01

    Lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathy (LCN) may be caused by infiltration or compression of the lumbosacral plexi and nerves from intrapelvic or paraaortic neoplasms. The authors submitted 23 patients complaining of LCN with CT documented intrapelvic or paraaortic tumors to palliative radiotherapy. Megavoltage external beam irradiation was administered using a 6-MV linear accelerator. Treatment field sizes ranged from 56 cm2 to 235 cm2 (mean: 150.54 cm2) and encompassed only the site where the disease involved the lumbosacral plexus or its branches. > or = 3 Gy/day fractions were used. Twenty-one of 22 assessable patients (95.4%) obtained LCN pain relief; 19 (86.3%) obtained complete LCN pain relief. The median time to pain progression (TPP) was 150 days (range: 39-510 days). The median survival was 165 days. Seven patients were LCN pain-free at death. Two patients are alive and LCN pain-free. The remaining 12 patients had recurrent LCN pain: four of them were reirradiated at the site of previous neuropathy and only two had partial relief again. The authors conclude that it is advisable to submit to palliative radiotherapy the inoperable disseminated and/or recurrent cancer patients complaining of LCN, to use large fractions not to occupy the extant time of their already short life-expectancy, and to design small fields to avoid acute side-effects. PMID:7518934

  16. Lateral Pectoral Nerve Injury Mimicking Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Ilknur; Palamar, Deniz; Akgun, Kenan

    2015-07-01

    The lateral pectoral nerve (LPN) is commonly injured along with the brachial plexus, but its isolated lesions are rare. Here, we present a case of an isolated LPN lesion confused with cervical radiculopathy. A 41-year-old man was admitted to our clinic because of weakness in his right arm. Previous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination revealed right posterolateral protrusion at the C6-7 level. At the initial assessment, atrophy of the right pectoralis major muscle was evident, and mild weakness of the right shoulder adductor, internal rotator, and flexor muscles was observed. Therefore, electrodiagnostic evaluation was performed, and a diagnosis of isolated LPN injury was made. Nerve injury was thought to have been caused by weightlifting exercises and traction injury. Lateral pectoral nerve injury can mimic cervical radiculopathy, and MRI examination alone may lead to misdiagnosis. Repeated physical examinations during the evaluation and treatment phase will identify the muscle atrophy that occurs 1 or more months after the injury. PMID:25290103

  17. Arachnoiditis following caudal epidural injections for the lumbo-sacral radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Nanjayan, Shashi Kumar; Swamy, Girish Nanjunda; Yallappa, Sachin; Bommireddy, Rajendra

    2013-12-01

    Caudal epidural steroid injection is a very common intervention in treatment of low back pain and sciatica symptoms. Although extensively used, it is not devoid of complications. A few reports of chemical and infective arachnoiditis exist following lumbar epidural anaesthesia, but none following a caudal epidural steroid injection.We report a case of arachnoiditis following caudal epidural steroid injections for lumbar radiculopathy. The patient presented with contralateral sciatica, worsening low back pain and urinary retention few days following the injection, followed by worsening motor functions in L4/L5/S1 myotomes with resultant dense foot drop. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested infective arachnoiditis with diffuse enhancement and clumping of the nerve roots within the lumbar and sacral thecal sac. As the number of injections in the management of back pain and lumbo-sacral radicular pain is increasing annually, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of this potentially dangerous complication and educate the patients appropriately. PMID:24353855

  18. Analysis of evoked lumbosacral potentials in man.

    PubMed Central

    Delbeke, J; McComas, A J; Kopec, S J

    1978-01-01

    Surface electrodes have been used to record potentials evoked in the lumbosacral region of 15 healthy volunteers after tibial nerve stimulation. By monitoring the M waves and H reflexes in the triceps surae muslces and by comparing the responses recorded over the roots with those over the lower cord, it was possible to identify the neural substrates responsible for several of the components in the responses. The findings are compared with those of previous studies in man and in other mammalian preparations. PMID:650237

  19. Analysis of evoked lumbosacral potentials in man.

    PubMed

    Delbeke, J; McComas, A J; Kopec, S J

    1978-04-01

    Surface electrodes have been used to record potentials evoked in the lumbosacral region of 15 healthy volunteers after tibial nerve stimulation. By monitoring the M waves and H reflexes in the triceps surae muslces and by comparing the responses recorded over the roots with those over the lower cord, it was possible to identify the neural substrates responsible for several of the components in the responses. The findings are compared with those of previous studies in man and in other mammalian preparations. PMID:650237

  20. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbosacral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-07-01

    In minimally invasive spinal fusion surgery, transforaminal lumbar (sacral) interbody fusion (TLIF) is one of the most common procedures that provides both anterior and posterior column support without retraction or violation to the neural structure. Direct and indirect decompression can be done through this single approach. Preoperative plain radiographs and MR scan should be carefully evaluated. This video demonstrates a standard approach for how to perform a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbosacral interbody fusion. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/bhEeafKJ370 . PMID:27364426

  1. Effects of preganglionic denervation and postganglionic axotomy on acetylcholine receptors in the chick ciliary ganglion

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The regulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in chick ciliary ganglia was examined by using a radiolabeled anti-AChR mAb to quantitate the amount of receptor in ganglion detergent extracts after preganglionic denervation or postganglionic axotomy. Surgical transection of the preganglionic input to the ciliary ganglion in newly hatched chicks caused a threefold reduction in the total number of AChRs within 10 d compared with that present in unoperated contralateral control ganglia. Surgical transection of both the choroid and ciliary nerves emerging from the ciliary ganglion in newly hatched chicks to establish postganglionic axotomy led to a nearly 10-fold reduction in AChRs within 5 d compared with unoperated contralateral ganglia. The declines were specific since they could not be accounted for by changes in ganglionic protein or by decreases in neuronal survival or size. Light microscopy revealed no gross morphological differences between neurons in operated and control ganglia. A second membrane component of cholinergic relevance on chick ciliary ganglion neurons is the alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-Bgt)-binding component. The alpha-Bgt-binding component also declined in number after either postganglionic axotomy or preganglionic denervation, but appeared to do so with a more rapid time course than did ganglionic AChRs. The results imply that cell-cell interactions in vivo specifically regulate both the number of AChRs and the number of alpha-Bgt-binding components in the ganglion. Regulation of these neuronal cholinergic membrane components clearly differs from that previously described for muscle AChRs. PMID:3667699

  2. In vitro relation between preganglionic sympathetic stimulation and activity of cutaneous glands in the bullfrog.

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, P; Horn, J P

    1996-01-01

    1. Activation of cutaneous glands was studied by measuring changes in transepithelial potentiation (TEP) after pre- and postganglionic sympathetic stimulation in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. 2. In normal Ringer solution, TEP was 20-90 mV with the basolateral (inside) surface positive. Single shocks to the preganglionic B pathway decreased TEP by up to 3 mV. Cutaneous depolarizations had a latency of 1.2 s, a rise time of 2.5 s, and decayed with an exponential time constant of 15 s. Similar depolarizations were evoked by postganglionic stimulation. 3. Cutaneous depolarizations summed during repetitive stimulation and > 0.05 Hz. For trains of three stimuli, peak amplitude increased with frequency and saturated at 2 Hz. In some preparations, longer trains evoked polyphasic changes in TEP. Preganglionically evoked cutaneous responses were abolished by (+)-tubocurarine. Postganglionically evoked cutaneous depolarizations were antagonized by phentolamine, but not propranolol. 4. Repetitive preganglionic stimulation of the C pathway (> 100 at 20 Hz) evoked little change in TEP and did not modulate depolarizations evoked through the B pathway. In nicotine, peptidergic cotransmission was enhanced in the ganglia, and repetitive C pathway stimulation evoked cutaneous depolarizations whose time course mirrored that of the postganglionic peptidergic after-discharge. The after-discharge and associated cutaneous depolarization were blocked by a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist. 5. The results show cutaneous glands are selectively innervated by B neurones and respond to low levels of neural activity. Asynchronous postganglionic firing mediated by peptidergic cotransmission can provide a basis for heterosynaptic interactions between the B and C pathways. PMID:8814622

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct-current stimulation in neuropathic pain due to radiculopathy: a randomized sham-controlled comparative study.

    PubMed

    Attal, Nadine; Ayache, Samar S; Ciampi De Andrade, Daniel; Mhalla, Alaa; Baudic, Sophie; Jazat, Frédérique; Ahdab, Rechdi; Neves, Danusa O; Sorel, Marc; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Bouhassira, Didier

    2016-06-01

    No study has directly compared the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) in neuropathic pain (NP). In this 2-centre randomised double-blind sham-controlled study, we compared the efficacy of 10-Hz rTMS and anodal 2-mA tDCS of the motor cortex and sham stimulation contralateral to the painful area (3 daily sessions) in patients with NP due to lumbosacral radiculopathy. Average pain intensity (primary outcome) was evaluated after each session and 5 days later. Secondary outcomes included neuropathic symptoms and thermal pain thresholds for the upper limbs. We used an innovative design that minimised bias by randomly assigning patients to 1 of 2 groups: active rTMS and tDCS or sham rTMS and tDCS. For each treatment group (active or sham), the order of the sessions was again randomised according to a crossover design. In total, 51 patients were screened and 35 (51% women) were randomized. Active rTMS was superior to tDCS and sham in pain intensity (F = 2.89 and P = 0.023). Transcranial direct-current stimulation was not superior to sham, but its analgesic effects were correlated to that of rTMS (P = 0.046), suggesting common mechanisms of action. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation lowered cold pain thresholds (P = 0.04) and its effect on cold pain was correlated with its analgesic efficacy (P = 0.006). However, rTMS had no impact on individual neuropathic symptoms. Thus, rTMS is more effective than tDCS and sham in patients with NP due to lumbosacral radiculopathy and may modulate the sensory and affective dimensions of pain. PMID:26845524

  4. Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis without rupture in a pure spinal epidural cavernous angioma: a rare cause of acute lumbal radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Floeth, Frank; Riemenschneider, Markus; Herdmann, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Pure spinal epidural cavernous angiomas are extremely rare lesions, and their normal shape is that of a fusiform mass in the dorsal aspects of the spinal canal. We report a case of a lumbo-sacral epidural cavernous vascular malformation presenting with acute onset of right-sided S1 radiculopathy. Clinical aspects, imaging, intraoperative findings, and histology are demonstrated. The patient, a 27-year-old man presented with acute onset of pain, paraesthesia, and numbness within the right leg corresponding to the S1 segment. An acute lumbosacral disc herniation was suspected, but MRI revealed a cystic lesion with the shape of a balloon, a fluid level and a thickened contrast-enhancing wall. Intraoperatively, a purple-blue tumor with fibrous adhesions was located between the right S1 and S2 nerve roots. Macroscopically, no signs of epidural bleedings could be denoted. After coagulation of a reticular venous feeder network and dissection of the adhesions the rubber ball-like lesion was resected in total. Histology revealed a prominent venous vessel with a pathologically thickened, amuscular wall surrounded by smaller, hyalinized, venous vessels arranged in a back-to-back position typical for the diagnosis of a cavernous angioma. Lumina were partially occluded by thrombi. The surrounding fibrotic tissue showed signs of recurrent bleedings. There was no obvious mass hemorrhage into the surrounding tissue. In this unique case, the pathologic mechanism was not the usual rupture of the cavernous angioma with subsequent intraspinal hemorrhage, but acute mass effect by intralesional bleedings and thrombosis with subsequent increase of volume leading to nerve root compression. Thus, even without a sudden intraspinal hemorrhage a spinal cavernous malformation can cause acute symptoms identical to the clinical features of a soft disc herniation. PMID:20213297

  5. Upright magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Back pain and radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Baisden, Jamie; Wolfla, Christopher; Paskoff, Glenn; Shender, Barry; Stemper, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar back pain and radiculopathy are common diagnoses. Unfortunately, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical symptoms do not necessarily correlate in the lumbar spine. With upright imaging, disc pathologies or foraminal stenosis may become more salient, leading to improvements in diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Seventeen adults (10 asymptomatic and 7 symptomatic volunteers) provided their informed consent and participated in the study. A 0.6T upright MRI scan was performed on each adult in the seated position. Parameters were obtained from the L2/3 level to the L5/S1 level including those pertaining to the foramen [cross-sectional area (CSA), height, mid-disc width, width, thickness of ligamentum flavum], disc (bulge, height, width), vertebral body (height and width), and alignment (lordosis angle, wedge angle, lumbosacral angle). Each parameter was compared based on the spinal level and volunteer group using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). Bonferroni post hoc analysis was used to assess the differences between individual spinal levels. Results: Mid-disc width accounted for 56% of maximum foramen width in symptomatic volunteers and over 63% in asymptomatic volunteers. Disc bulge was 48% greater in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers. CSA was generally smaller in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers, particularly at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels. Thickness of ligamentum flavum (TLF) generally increased from the cranial to caudal spinal levels where the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels were significantly thicker than the L1-L2 spinal level. Conclusions: The data implied that upright MRI could be a useful diagnostic option, as it can delineate pertinent differences between symptomatic volunteers and asymptomatic volunteers, especially with respect to foraminal geometry. PMID:27041883

  6. DEATH OF INTERMEDIOLATERAL SPINAL CORD NEURONS FOLLOWS SELECTIVE COMPLEMENT-MEDIATED DESTRUCTION OF PERIPHERAL PREGANGLIONIC SYMPATHETIC TERMINALS BY ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ANTIBODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systemically administered antibodies to acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) cause a selective complement-mediated destruction of preganglionic sympathetic nerve terminals. o assess neurologic integrity, rats given murine monoclonal AChE-antibodies or normal mouse IgG (1.5 mg,i.v.) were e...

  7. The Effectiveness of Transforaminal Versus Caudal Routes for Epidural Steroid Injections in Managing Lumbosacral Radicular Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hengxing; Lu, Lu; Li, Xueying; Jia, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Yao, Xue; Wu, Qiuli; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-05-01

    Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is one of the most commonly used treatments for radiculopathy. Previous studies have described the effectiveness of ESI in the management of radiculopathy. However, controversy exists regarding the route that is most beneficial and effective with respect to the administration of epidural steroids, as both transforaminal (TF) and caudal (C) routes are commonly used.This analysis reviewed studies comparing the effectiveness of TF-ESIs with that of C-ESIs in the treatment of radiculopathy as a means of providing pain relief and improving functionality. This meta-analysis was performed to guide clinical decision-making.The study was a systematic review of comparative studies.A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases for trials written in English. The randomized trials and observational studies that met our inclusion criteria were subsequently included. Two reviewers, respectively, extracted data and estimated the risk of bias. All statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.3.Six prospective and 2 retrospective studies involving 664 patients were included. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing only the 6 prospective studies. Although slight pain and functional improvements were noted in the TF-ESI groups compared with the C-ESI groups, these improvements were neither clinically nor statistically significant.The limitations of this meta-analysis resulted primarily from the weaknesses of the comparative studies and the relative paucity of patients included in each study.Both the TF and C approaches are effective in reducing pain and improving functional scores, and they demonstrated similar efficacies in the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. PMID:27149443

  8. Lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, S. K.; Sundar, I. Vijay; Sharma, Vinod; Goel, Ravishankar S.

    2012-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms or be discovered accidentally. Intradural location of such cysts especially in the lumbosacral region is relatively rare. The association of such cysts with other congenital anomalies such as tethered cord lends evidence to the developmental origin of arachnoid cysts. We report a case of lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord in a 6-year-old male child and discuss the etiopathogenesis and management options. PMID:24082689

  9. The role of tonic preganglionic neuron firing in the turnover of the large dense-cored vesicle store in sympathetic preganglionic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Weldon, P; Bachoo, M; Polosa, C

    1994-09-01

    Large dense-cored vesicles are transported centrifugally in the cervical sympathetic trunk and are depleted in a calcium-dependent manner from synaptic boutons of the cat superior cervical ganglion during orthodromic stimulation at 20-40 Hz [P. Weldon et al. (1993) Neuroscience 55, 1045-1054]. In the present study, we tested in awake cats whether the normal tonic firing of the sympathetic preganglionic neuron contributes to the turnover of large dense-cored vesicles in synaptic boutons of the superior cervical ganglion. Tetrodotoxin was applied with a mini-osmotic pump to one cervical sympathetic trunk, while vehicle alone was applied to the contralateral cervical sympathetic trunk, for two, four or seven days. The appearance of Horner syndrome ipsilateral to the tetrodotoxin application demonstrated block of action potential propagation. Both superior cervical ganglia were excised and processed for electron microscopy. The number of large dense-cored vesicles per bouton cross-section was higher in the ganglion with tetrodotoxin-treated input than in the control. The content at four days was higher than at two days; the content at seven days was similar to that at four days. The number of lysosomes per bouton profile also increased in the ganglion with tetrodotoxin-treated input. No changes were observed in size of bouton profiles, number of boutons or of synapses per grid square and length of the presynaptic densities in the ganglion with tetrodotoxin-treated input.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7830896

  10. The natural history of lumbar disc herniation and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Benoist, Michel

    2002-03-01

    The majority of patients suffering from a radiculopathy caused by a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) heal spontaneously without surgery or chemonucleolysis. The clinical course of the radiculopathy varies as well as the efficacy of conservative treatment. In some patients the symptoms decline after a week or two; in others the pain may continue for many months or years. Despite an abundant literature there is still a controversy concerning the treatment of radiculopathies related to ruptured lumbar intervertebral discs. Obviously knowledge of the natural history of discal herniation, and of the mechanisms leading to the changes of the extruded discal tissue, would be of great help in planning the therapeutic procedure. The purpose of this article is to review the reliable data concerning the clinical and pathomorphological evolution and the biological mechanisms associated with the morphologic changes of discal herniation. PMID:12027305

  11. The chiropractic management of two cases of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dufton, John A.; Giantomaso, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is one of the potential sources of radiculopathy, particularly in patients aged 40 to 60 years. The hallmark sign of cervical-brachial pain presents in the majority of the cases, however a definitive clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of reliable and valid diagnostic tests. Two cases of presumed CSR illustrate the usefulness of applying a comprehensive mechanical assessment that guides the patient's rehabilitation regardless of the traditional anatomical diagnosis. A brief overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of CSR is also presented.

  12. Radiculopathy as Delayed Presentations of Retained Spinal Bullet

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Bang; Choi, Man Kyu; Kim, Kee D

    2015-01-01

    Bullet injuries to the spine may cause injury to the anatomical structures with or without neurologic deterioration. Most bullet injuries are acute, resulting from direct injury. However, in rare cases, delayed injury may occur, resulting in claudication. We report a case of intradural bullet at the L3-4 level with radiculopathy in a 30-year-old male. After surgical removal, radicular and claudicating pain were improved significantly, and motor power of the right leg also improved. We report the case of intradural bullet, which resulted in delayed radiculopathy. PMID:26587197

  13. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  14. Operative treatment of new onset radiculopathy secondary to combat injury.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Van Blarcum, Gregory S; Kang, Daniel G; Lehman, Ronald A

    2015-02-01

    We set out to describe combat-related spine trauma over a 10-year period, and thereby determine the frequency of new onset radiculopathy secondary to injuries sustained in support of combat operations. We performed a retrospective analysis of a surgical database at three military institutions. Patients undergoing spine surgery following a combat-related injury in Afghanistan or Iraq between July 2003 and July 2013 were evaluated. We identified 105 patients with combat-related (Operations Enduring and Iraqi Freedom) spine trauma requiring operative intervention. Of these, 15 (14.3%) patients had radiculopathy as their primary complaint after injury. All patients were diagnosed with herniated nucleus pulposus. The average age was 39 years, with 80% injured in Iraq and 20% in Afghanistan. The most common mechanism of injury was mounted improvised explosive device (33%). The cervical spine was most commonly involved (53%), followed by lumbar spine (40%). Average time from injury to surgery was 23.4 months; 53% of patients had continued symptoms following surgery, and two patients had at least one revision surgery. Two patients were medically retired because of their symptoms. This study is the only of its kind evaluating the operative treatment of traumatic radiculopathy following combat-related trauma. We identified a relatively high rate of radiculopathy in these patients. PMID:25643379

  15. Clinical analysis of cervical radiculopathy causing deltoid paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Han; Park, Jong-Beom; Hwang, Jin-Yeun; Song, Kyung-Jin

    2003-10-01

    In general, deltoid paralysis develops in patients with cervical disc herniation (CDH) or cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) at the level of C4/5, resulting in compression of the C5 nerve root. Therefore, little attention has been paid to CDH or CSR at other levels as the possible cause of deltoid paralysis. In addition, the surgical outcomes for deltoid paralysis have not been fully described. Fourteen patients with single-level CDH or CSR, who had undergone anterior cervical decompression and fusion for deltoid paralysis, were included in this study. The severity of deltoid paralysis was classified into five grades according to manual motor power test, and the severity of radiculopathy was recorded on a visual analog scale (zero to ten points). The degree of improvement in both the severity of deltoid paralysis and radiculopathy following surgery was evaluated. Of 14 patients, one had C3/4 CDH, four had C4/5 CDH, three had C4/5 CSR, one had C5/6 CDH, and five had C5/6 CSR. Both deltoid paralysis and radiculopathy improved significantly with surgery (2.57+/-0.51 grades vs 4.14+/-0.66, P=0.001, and 7.64+/-1.65 points vs 3.21+/-0.58, P=0.001, respectively). In conclusion, the current study demonstrates that deltoid paralysis can develop due to CDH or CSR not only C4/5, but also at the levels of C3/4 and C5/6, and that surgical decompression significantly improves the degree of deltoid paralysis due to cervical radiculopathy. PMID:12734743

  16. Peroneal neuropathy misdiagnosed as L5 radiculopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented with a case of peroneal neuropathy that was originally diagnosed and treated as a L5 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 53-year old female registered nurse presented to a private chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral leg pain. Three months earlier she underwent elective left L5 decompression surgery without relief of symptoms. Intervention and outcome Lumbar spine MRI seven months prior to lumbar decompression surgery revealed left neural foraminal stenosis at L5-S1. The patient symptoms resolved after she stopped crossing her legs. Conclusion This report discusses a case of undiagnosed peroneal neuropathy that underwent lumbar decompression surgery for a L5 radiculopathy. This case study demonstrates the importance of a thorough clinical examination and decision making that ensures proper patient diagnosis and management. PMID:23618508

  17. A rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy: spinal gas collection.

    PubMed

    Tamburrelli, F; Leone, A; Pitta, L

    2000-10-01

    The presence of gas in the intervertebral disk space, known as the vacuum phenomenon, is a relatively common radiologic finding, especially on computed tomographic investigation. In a few cases, the gas can be collected into the lumbar spinal canal and can also compress the nerve root. To date only seven cases of symptomatic lumbar radiculopathy caused by a bubble of gas are reported in the literature. The presence of gas inside a narrowed disk and the collection of gas in the spinal canal suggest a communication between the two structures. A case of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a collection of gas in the spinal canal provided the authors the opportunity to study this rare condition by magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging had not been used before in the referred cases and proved conclusively the discal origin of the gas. PMID:11052357

  18. Horseradish peroxidase localization of sympathetic postganglionic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons innervating the monkey heart.

    PubMed

    Chuang, King-Shun; Liu, Wan-Cherng; Liou, Nien-Hsien; Liu, Jiang-Chuan

    2004-06-30

    The localization of the sympathetic postganglionic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons innervating the monkey heart were investigated through retrograde axonal transport with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP (4 mg or 30 mg) was injected into the subepicardial and myocardial layers in four different cardiac regions. The animals were euthanized 84-96 hours later and fixed by paraformaldehyde perfusion via the left ventricle. The brain stem and the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia from the superior cervical, middle cervical, and stellate ganglia down to the T9 ganglia were removed and processed for HRP identification. Following injection of HRP into the apex of the heart, the sinoatrial nodal region, or the right ventricle, HRP-labeled sympathetic neurons were found exclusively in the right superior cervical ganglion (64.8%) or in the left superior cervical ganglion (35%). Fewer labeled cells were found in the right stellate ganglia. After HRP injection into the left ventricle, labeled sympathetic cells were found chiefly in the left superior cervical ganglion (51%) or in the right superior cervical ganglion (38.6%); a few labeled cells were seen in the stellate ganglion bilaterally and in the left middle cervical ganglion. Also, in response to administration of HRP into the anterior part of the apex, anterior middle part of the right ventricle, posterior upper part of the left ventricle, or sinoatrial nodal region, HRP-labeled parasympathetic neurons were found in the nucleus ambiguus on both the right (74.8%) and left (25.2%) sides. No HRP-labeled cells were found in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus on either side. PMID:15481792

  19. Enkephalin-immunoreactive interneurons extensively innervate sympathetic preganglionic neurons regulating the pelvic viscera.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J; Dicarlo, Stephen E; Collins, Heidi L; Keast, Janet R

    2005-08-01

    Enkephalin (ENK)-immunoreactive (IR) axons occur in regions containing spinal autonomic neurons and endogenous opiates contribute to spinal regulation of bladder function. To identify possible spinal sites of opiate action, we used immunocytochemistry for ENK with retrograde tracing from the major pelvic ganglion (MPG), a key location for postganglionic neurons controlling pelvic viscera, with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) or CTB-horseradish peroxidase (CTB-HRP). We compared the relationship of ENK-IR axons with sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) projecting to the MPG between intact spinal cords and cords with 2- or 11-week complete transections between thoracic segments 4 and 5. By light microscopy, sections of intact cord showed dense networks of ENK-IR axons surrounding CTB-IR SPNs in the intermediolateral cell column (IML), intercalated nucleus, and central autonomic area of lower thoracic and upper lumbar cord. This staining pattern was similar in rats with 2- or 11-week transections. Ultrastructurally, ENK-IR axons formed synapses on SPNs in all three autonomic subnuclei of intact cord. In the IML, ENK-IR varicosities contributed 52% of the synapses on the somata of MPG-projecting SPNs. In 2-week transected cord, synapses from ENK-IR axons persisted on SPNs and the proportion of input to IML SPNs had increased to 67%, probably reflecting loss of supraspinal input. These results suggest that endogenous opioids could play a major role in controlling sympathetic outflow to the bladder through a direct action on SPNs. The persistence of the dense ENK innervation after complete cord transection indicates that the ENK-IR input to SPNs arises predominantly from intraspinal sources. PMID:15952166

  20. Airway-related vagal preganglionic neurons express multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Ozra; Kc, Prabha; Balan, Kannan V.; Haxhiu, Musa A.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotine acting centrally increases bronchomotor tone and airway secretion, suggesting that airway-related vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) within the rostral nucleus ambiguus (rNA) express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present study, we examined the three main functionally characterized subtypes of nAChRs in the CNS, the α7 homomeric and α4β2 heteromeric receptors. First, we characterized the expression of these subunits at the message (mRNA) and protein levels in brain tissues taken from the rNA region, the site where AVPNs are located. In addition, double labeling fluorescent immunohistochemistry and confocal laser microscopy were used to define the presence of α7, α4, and β2 nAChRs on AVPNs that were retrogradely labeled with cholera toxin h subunit (CTb), injected into the upper lung lobe (n = 4) or extrathoracic trachea (n = 4). Our results revealed expression of all three studied subunits at mRNA and protein levels within the rNA region. Furthermore, virtually all identified AVPNs innervating intrapulmonary airways express α7 and α4 nAChR subunits. Similarly, a majority of labeled AVPNs projecting to extrathoracic trachea contain α7 and β2 subunits, but less than half of them show detectable α4 nAChR traits. These results suggest that AVPNs express three major nAChR subunits (α7, α4, and β2) that could assemble into functional homologous or heterologous pentameric receptors, mediating fast and sustained nicotinic effects on cholinergic outflow to the airways. PMID:16616705

  1. Epidural steroid injections compared with gabapentin for lumbosacral radicular pain: multicenter randomized double blind comparative efficacy study

    PubMed Central

    Hanling, Steven; Bicket, Mark C; White, Ronald L; Veizi, Elias; Kurihara, Connie; Zhao, Zirong; Hayek, Salim; Guthmiller, Kevin B; Griffith, Scott R; Gordin, Vitaly; White, Mirinda Anderson; Vorobeychik, Yakov; Pasquina, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether an epidural steroid injection or gabapentin is a better treatment for lumbosacral radiculopathy. Design A multicenter randomized study conducted between 2011 and 2014. Computer generated randomization was stratified by site. Patients and evaluating physicians were blinded to treatment outcomes. Settings Eight military, Veterans Administration, and civilian hospitals. Participants 145 people with lumbosacral radicular pain secondary to herniated disc or spinal stenosis for less than four years in duration and in whom leg pain is as severe or more severe than back pain. Interventions Participants received either epidural steroid injection plus placebo pills or sham injection plus gabapentin. Main outcome measures Average leg pain one and three months after the injection on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. A positive outcome was defined as a ≥2 point decrease in leg pain coupled with a positive global perceived effect. All patients had one month follow-up visits; patients whose condition improved remained blinded for their three month visit. Results There were no significant differences for the primary outcome measure at one month (mean pain score 3.3 (SD 2.6) and mean change from baseline −2.2 (SD 2.4) in epidural steroid injection group versus 3.7 (SD 2.6) and −1.7 (SD 2.6) in gabapentin group; adjusted difference 0.4, 95% confidence interval −0.3 to 1.2; P=0.25) and three months (mean pain score 3.4 (SD 2.7) and mean change from baseline −2.0 (SD 2.6) versus 3.7 (SD 2.8) and −1.6 (SD 2.7), respectively; adjusted difference 0.3, −0.5 to 1.2; P=0.43). Among secondary outcomes, one month after treatment those who received epidural steroid injection had greater reductions in worst leg pain (−3.0, SD 2.8) than those treated with gabapentin (−2.0, SD 2.9; P=0.04) and were more likely to experience a positive successful outcome (66% v 46%; number needed to treat=5.0, 95% confidence interval 2.8 to 27.0; P=0.02). At three

  2. The effect of preganglionic nerve stimulation on the accumulation of certain analogues of choline by a sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Collier, B; Ilson, D

    1977-01-01

    1. Cat superior cervical ganglia were perfused with a Krebs solution containing 10(-6) M [3H]homocholine (2-hydroxypropyl-trimethylammonium) or 10(-5) M [14C]triethylcholine (2-hydroxyethyl-triethylammonium). Preganglionic nerve stimulation (20 Hz) increased the accumulation of homocholine (3-2-fold) and of triethylcholine (2-1-fold). This increased accumulation during stimulation was not the result of increased metabolism. 2. The increased accumulation of homocholine or triethylcholine induced by pregnaglionic nerve stimulation was not reduced by tubocurarine or by atropine, but it was blocked by choline and by hemicholinium. These results suggested that preganglionic nerve stimulation increased choline analogue accumulation into cholinergic nerve terminals. 3. The increased accumulation of homocholine or of triethylcholine induced by preganglionic nerve stimulation was reduced when the Ca2+ concentration was reduced and was abolished in the absence of Ca2+. However, changes in the Mg2+ concentration which depressed acetylcholine (ACh) release by amounts comparable to those induced by altered Ca2+ concentrations did not alter the uptake of homocholine or triethylcholine. It is concluded that the uptake of choline analogues is not regulated by transmitter release but that stimulation increases the uptake of the choline analogues by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. 4. The accumulation of ACh by ganglia perfused with a Krebs solution containing choline and high MgSO4 (18 mM) was measured. The ACh content of these ganglia did not increase, although choline transport presumably exceeded that necessary for ACh synthesis to replace released ACh. It is concluded that choline transport does not limit ACh synthesis in ganglia. PMID:839464

  3. Transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly (Castellvi type 2A) resulting in extraforaminal impingement of the spinal nerve: a pathoanatomical study of four specimens and report of two clinical cases.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jochen; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo

    2010-04-01

    The spinal nerve can be pinched between the transverse process of the fifth lumbar vertebra and the sacral ala. The patients are divided into two types: elderly persons with degenerative scoliosis and somewhat younger adults with isthmic spondylolisthesis. For the first time, we describe extraforaminal impingement of the spinal nerve in transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly. Selective nerve root blocks were performed in two clinical cases. One patient underwent nerve root decompression via a posterior approach. One year after operation, this patient reported no radicular or lumbar pain. The pathoanatomical study demonstrated pseudoarthrosis between the transverse process and the ala of the sacrum and showed dysplastic facet joints at the level below the transitional vertebra in all specimens. Furthermore, we present the oldest illustration of this pathological condition, published in a book by Carl Wenzel in 1824. Extraforaminal entrapment of the spinal nerve in transitional lumbosacral segment with unilateral transverse process anomaly can cause radiculopathy, and osteophytes are the cause of the entrapment. Dysplastic facet joints on the level below the transitional vertebra could be one reason for "micromotion" resulting in pseudoarthrosis with osteophytes. Sciatica relief was obtained by means of selective nerve root blocks or posterior decompression via a dorsomedial approach. PMID:21128090

  4. High resolution neurography of the lumbosacral plexus on 3T magneteic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Escobar, I; Serra, M; Barroso, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance neurography is a technique that complements clinical and electrophysiological study of the peripheral nerves and brachial and lumbosacral plexuses. Numerous focal processes (inflammatory, traumatic, primary tumors, secondary tumors) and diffuse processes (diabetic polyneuropathy, chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy due to amyloidosis or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) can involve the lumbosacral plexus. This article reviews the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus, describes the technique for neurography of the plexus at our institution, and shows the diverse diseases that affect it. PMID:25447367

  5. Conjoint Lumbosacral Nerve Root-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jokhi, Vispi.H.; Ponde, Saurabh Vilas; Sonawane, Chandrashekhar; Bansal, Samarjit Singh; Chavhan, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Conjoint nerve root is embryological nerve root anomaly mainly involving lumbosacral region. The anomalous roots present primarily as a bifid, conjoined structure arising from a wide area of the dura. Because of their size and attachment to surrounding structures, they are uniquely susceptible to trauma. The effects of compression and entrapment are amplified in the presence of stenosis of the lateral recesses where developmental changes and disc herniations deplete the available reserve space [1]. Case Report: We report a case of conjoint lumbosacral nerve root which was missed on MRI and diagnosed intra-operatively. Conclusion: The importance of the case report lies in the fact that one must be aware of finding conjoint nerve root directly while operating and do appropriate level of surgery, misinterpretation can lead to devastating results. PMID:27299088

  6. The evolution of image-guided lumbosacral spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Austin R.; Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques and approaches of spinal fusion have considerably evolved since their first description in the early 1900s. The incorporation of pedicle screw constructs into lumbosacral spine surgery is among the most significant advances in the field, offering immediate stability and decreased rates of pseudarthrosis compared to previously described methods. However, early studies describing pedicle screw fixation and numerous studies thereafter have demonstrated clinically significant sequelae of inaccurate surgical fusion hardware placement. A number of image guidance systems have been developed to reduce morbidity from hardware malposition in increasingly complex spine surgeries. Advanced image guidance systems such as intraoperative stereotaxis improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a variety of surgical approaches, however their clinical indications and clinical impact remain debated. Beginning with intraoperative fluoroscopy, this article describes the evolution of image guided lumbosacral spinal fusion, emphasizing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) navigational methods. PMID:25992368

  7. [Brachioradial pruritus as a symptom of cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Mataix, J; Silvestre, J F; Climent, J M; Pastor, N; Lucas, A

    2008-11-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is characterized by the presence of pruritus on the lateral aspect of the arms. The etiology of this enigmatic entity is the subject of some debate some authors claim that brachioradial pruritus is a photodermatosis whereas others attribute it to the presence of underlying cervical radiculopathy. In these case reports, we present our experience with brachioradial pruritus and discuss the role of underlying neuropathy in its etiology and that of other types of localized pruritus such as notalgia paresthetica, anogenital pruritus, and burning mouth syndrome. PMID:19087811

  8. Segmental overlap: foot drop in S1 radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Voermans, N C; Koetsveld, A C; Zwarts, M J

    2006-07-01

    Knowledge of segmental innervation of skeletal muscles is essential for diagnosing lumbar radiculopathy. Myotomes and dermatomes are traditionally thought to be innervated by a single spinal segment, but experimental studies have shown that this pattern of segmental innervation allows considerable overlap. This implies that muscles (or dermatomes) are innervated not only by axons of one spinal segment, but also partially by axons of adjacent spinal levels. We describe a patient in whom overlap in segmental innervation complicated adequate diagnosis of a recurrent lumbar hernia. Further, we present an outline of electrophysiological and anatomical studies on segmental innervation. PMID:16523224

  9. Evaluation and Management of Lumbosacral Myelomeningoceles in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kural, Cahit; Solmaz, Ilker; Tehli, Ozkan; Temiz, Caglar; Kutlay, Murat; Daneyemez, Mehmet K.; Izci, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Myelomeningoceles are the common form of open neural tube defects that are usually associated with neurological deficits. Many techniques of repair and methods of prevention have been proposed with respect to the size of defect and the neurological condition of patient. The aim of this study was to report our experience on the management of lumbosacral myelomeningoceles in children. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analysed the data of 36 paediatric cases of surgically lumbosacral myelomeningocele treated in our department between 1998 and 2013. Twenty (56%) patients were female and sixteen were male, with a mean age of 4 months (ranged between 0 and 24 months). All patients had neurological deficits in the preoperative period. Computed tomography was performed in 33 (92%) patients and magnetic resonance imaging in 15 (42%) patients in the preoperative period. Repair of the myelomeningocele and closure of the skin defect were performed in all patients. The mean follow-up period was 36 months. Results: Thirty (83%) patients were operated for hydrocephalus and 10 (28%) patients were re-operated for tethered cord syndrome during the follow-up period. Neurological worsening was not observed in any patient while cerebrospinal fluid fistula was detected in 2 patients. Conclusion: Surgical treatment using appropriate microsurgical techniques is crucial for lumbosacral myelomeningoceles in children. Early surgical intervention with close follow-up will improve the neurological condition of the patients. PMID:26644765

  10. Study on lumbosacral nerve root compression using DTI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Yonghao; Wang, Yueyi; Lv, Yang; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can objectively describe the distribution of nerve roots in morphology, and provide a set of objective reference data on the quantitative indicators. The present study aimed to investigate the value of DTI in lumbosacral nerve root compression in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. DTI was performed in 45 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in compressed and normal nerve roots. Fiber tracking imaging was also applied to observe the lumbosacral nerve roots. ADC value was significantly lower in the compressed group (1.314±0.14 mm2/sec) compared to in the uncompressed group (1.794±0.11 mm2/sec) (P<0.05). The FA value was significantly lower in the compressed group (0.196±0.020) compared to the uncompressed group (0.272±0.016) (P<0.05). DTI can evidently reveal the compressed nerve roots. DTI could be used to evaluate the lumbosacral nerve injury in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration to quantitatively assess nerve roots. PMID:27602215

  11. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  12. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  13. Resolution of cervical radiculopathy in a woman after chiropractic manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, Wayne M.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe a case regarding a woman with 2-level cervical disk herniation with radicular symptoms conservatively treated with chiropractic care including high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation with complete resolution of her symptoms. Clinical Features A 40-year-old woman developed right finger paresthesia and neck pain. Results of electrodiagnostics were normal, but clinical examination revealed subtle findings of cervical radiculopathy. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large right posterolateral disk protrusion and spur impinging on the right hemicord with moderate to severe central canal and right neuroforaminal stenosis at C5-6 and C6-7. She was treated with HVLA manipulation to the cervical spine, as well as soft tissue techniques, traction, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and exercise. Intervention and Outcome Her clinical findings and symptoms resolved within 90 days of initiating care and did not return in 1 year. There were no untoward effects, including transient ones. Conclusion This case describes the clinical presentation and course of a patient with multilevel large herniated disks and associated radiculopathy who was treated with HVLA manipulation and other conservative approaches and appeared to have good outcomes. PMID:19674715

  14. Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy in a Mounted Police Officer: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bednar, Drew A.; Almansoori, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Objective To present a unique case of L5 radiculopathy caused by a sacral stress fracture without neurologic compression. Methods We present our case and its clinical evolution and review the available literature on similar pathologies. Results Relief of the unusual mechanical loading causing sacral stress fracture led to rapid resolution of radiculopathy. Conclusion L5 radiculopathy can be caused by a sacral stress fracture and can be relieved by simple mechanical treatment of the fracture. PMID:26430605

  15. Comparing Utility Scores in Common Spinal Radiculopathies: Results of a Prospective Valuation Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Nikhil R.; Stephen, James H.; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Stein, Sherman C.; Malhotra, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Objective To determine whether preference-based health utility scores for common spinal radiculopathies vary by specific spinal level. Methods We employed a standard gamble study using the general public to calculate individual preference-based quality of life for four common radiculopathies: C6, C7, L5, and S1. We compared utility scores obtained for each level of radiculopathy with analysis of variance and t test. Multivariable regression was used to test the effects of the covariates age, sex, and years of education. We also reviewed the literature for publications reporting EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) scores for patients with radiculopathy. Results Two hundred participants were included in the study. Average utility for the four spinal levels fell within a narrow range (0.748 to 0.796). There were no statistically significant differences between lumbar and cervical radiculopathies, nor were there significant differences among the different spinal levels (F = 0.0850, p = 0.086). Age and sex had no significant effect on utility scores. There was a significant correlation between years of education and utility values for S1 radiculopathy (p = 0.037). On review of the literature, no study separated utility values by specific spinal level. EQ-5D utilities for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy were considerably lower than the results of our study. Conclusions Utility values associated with the most common levels of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy do not significantly differ from each other, validating the current practice of grouping utility by spinal segment rather than by specific root levels. The discrepancy in average utility values between our study and the EQ-5D highlights the need to be mindful of the underlying instruments used when assessing outcomes studies from different sources. PMID:27099818

  16. Comparing Utility Scores in Common Spinal Radiculopathies: Results of a Prospective Valuation Study.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Nikhil R; Stephen, James H; Abdullah, Kalil G; Stein, Sherman C; Malhotra, Neil R

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Objective To determine whether preference-based health utility scores for common spinal radiculopathies vary by specific spinal level. Methods We employed a standard gamble study using the general public to calculate individual preference-based quality of life for four common radiculopathies: C6, C7, L5, and S1. We compared utility scores obtained for each level of radiculopathy with analysis of variance and t test. Multivariable regression was used to test the effects of the covariates age, sex, and years of education. We also reviewed the literature for publications reporting EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) scores for patients with radiculopathy. Results Two hundred participants were included in the study. Average utility for the four spinal levels fell within a narrow range (0.748 to 0.796). There were no statistically significant differences between lumbar and cervical radiculopathies, nor were there significant differences among the different spinal levels (F = 0.0850, p = 0.086). Age and sex had no significant effect on utility scores. There was a significant correlation between years of education and utility values for S1 radiculopathy (p = 0.037). On review of the literature, no study separated utility values by specific spinal level. EQ-5D utilities for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy were considerably lower than the results of our study. Conclusions Utility values associated with the most common levels of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy do not significantly differ from each other, validating the current practice of grouping utility by spinal segment rather than by specific root levels. The discrepancy in average utility values between our study and the EQ-5D highlights the need to be mindful of the underlying instruments used when assessing outcomes studies from different sources. PMID:27099818

  17. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of lumbosacral perineural cysts].

    PubMed

    Prestar, F J

    1989-01-01

    Perineurial cysts are sometimes space-occupying cystic dilatations of the lumbo-sacral nerve roots at or distal to the junction of the posterior root and the dorsal ganglion. The wall is composed of perineurium and neural tissue. We report on 2 cases of upper sacral perineurial cysts with their computed tomography and myelography findings. Indication for operation is discussed: perineurial cysts should only be operated on if their clinical symptoms are clearly attributable to them and other causes like degeneration of the lumbar spine can be excluded. PMID:2922094

  18. The lumbosacral segment as a vulnerable region in various postures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosemeyer, B.

    1978-01-01

    The lumbosacral region in man is exposed to special static and dynamic load. In a supine position, the disc size increases because of the absence of axial load. In a standing position, with physiological posture of the spine, strain discomfort occurs which is increased even more in the sitting position due to the curvature of the lumbar region of the spine and the irregular distribution of pressure in the discs as a result of this. This special problem of sitting posture can be confirmed by examinations.

  19. [Critical approach to diagnostics and treatment of lumbar radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Bosković, Ksenija

    2008-01-01

    Although the majority of patients suffering lumbar radiculopathy have a very good prospective outcome, some 20-30% persist having problems even in two or three years time. Diagnosis is based on anamnesis and physical examination. Imaging screening with additional diagnostic methods is indicated only in patients with the extremely complicated illnesses, or in cases where the surgical intervention is inevitable. Passive (bed rest) treatment is replaced by active one. In general, there is a consensus that the initial treatment during 6-8 weeks has to be conservative. Surgical intervention of discal lesion can bring faster pain relief in patients, but in a year or two after the medical treatment, there is no clear distinction between these two approaches. PMID:19368270

  20. Evaluation of the dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential in the diagnosis of lumbo-sacral root compression.

    PubMed Central

    Katifi, H A; Sedgwick, E M

    1987-01-01

    The dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential from the lumbo-sacral dermatomes was recorded from 21 patients with radiographically and surgically (20) proven lumbo-sacral root compression due to prolapsed intervertebral disc or canal stenosis. The potential was abnormal in 19 of the 20 surgically proven cases. The dermatomal somatosensory evoked potential is as accurate as myelography for diagnosis but has the advantage of being non-invasive and repeatable. It provides useful additional diagnostic and pathophysiological information about lumbo-sacral root compression. PMID:3668570

  1. Optimal duration of conservative management prior to surgery for cervical and lumbar radiculopathy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Alentado, Vincent J; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Since the 1970s, spine surgeons have commonly required 6 weeks of failed conservative treatment prior to considering surgical intervention for various spinal pathologies. It is unclear, however, if this standard has been validated in the literature. The authors review the natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the current standard of 6 weeks of nonoperative care prior to surgery for patients with spinal pathologies. Methods A systematic Medline search from 1953 to 2013 was performed to identify natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the optimal period of conservative management prior to surgical intervention for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Demographic information, operative indications, and clinical outcomes are reviewed for each study. Results A total of 5,719 studies were identified; of these, 13 studies were selected for inclusion. Natural history studies demonstrated that 88% of patients with cervical radiculopathy and 70% of patients with lumbar radiculopathy showed improvement within 4 weeks following onset of symptoms. Outcomes and cost-effectiveness studies supported surgical intervention within 8 weeks of symptom onset for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Conclusions There are limited studies supporting any optimal duration of conservative treatment prior to surgery for cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Therefore, evidence-based conclusions cannot be made. Based on the available literature, we suggest that an optimal timing for surgery following cervical radiculopathy is within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms. A shorter period of 4 weeks may be appropriate based on natural history studies. Additionally, we found that optimal timing for surgery following lumbar radiculopathy is between 4 and 8 weeks. A prospective study is needed to explicitly identify the optimal duration of conservative therapy prior to surgery so that costs

  2. The application of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy and changes on MRI findings in a patient with cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Spanos, G; Zounis, M; Natsika, M; May, S

    2013-12-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is an unusual presentation for patients with neck pain. Its diagnosis and management is uncertain. This case report presents an example of a patient with cervical radiculopathy who responded to Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy, and whose MRI findings changed over time. PMID:23127992

  3. Lumbosacral Osteomyelitis and Discitis with Phlegmon Following Laparoscopic Sacral Colpopexy.

    PubMed

    Jenson M D, Amanda V; Scranton, Robert; Antosh, Danielle D; Simpson, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Lumbosacral osteomyelitis and discitis are usually a result of hematogenous spread; rarely it can result from direct inoculation during a surgical procedure. Bacteria may also track along implanted devices to a different location. This is a rare complication seen from pelvic organ prolapse surgery with sacral colpopexy. A 67-year-old female developed increasing lower back pain four months following a laparoscopic sacral colpopexy. Imaging revealed lumbar 5-sacral 1 (L5-S1) osteomyelitis and discitis with associated phlegmon confirmed by percutaneous biopsy and culture. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics, but required laparoscopic removal of the pelvic and vaginal mesh followed by twelve weeks of intravenous antibiotics. The patient has experienced clinical improvement of her back pain. This is an uncommon complication of sacral colpopexy, but physicians must be vigilant and manage aggressively to avoid more serious complications and permanent deficit. PMID:27551651

  4. Lumbosacral Osteomyelitis and Discitis with Phlegmon Following Laparoscopic Sacral Colpopexy

    PubMed Central

    Scranton, Robert; Antosh, Danielle D; Simpson, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Lumbosacral osteomyelitis and discitis are usually a result of hematogenous spread; rarely it can result from direct inoculation during a surgical procedure. Bacteria may also track along implanted devices to a different location. This is a rare complication seen from pelvic organ prolapse surgery with sacral colpopexy. A 67-year-old female developed increasing lower back pain four months following a laparoscopic sacral colpopexy. Imaging revealed lumbar 5-sacral 1 (L5-S1) osteomyelitis and discitis with associated phlegmon confirmed by percutaneous biopsy and culture. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics, but required laparoscopic removal of the pelvic and vaginal mesh followed by twelve weeks of intravenous antibiotics. The patient has experienced clinical improvement of her back pain. This is an uncommon complication of sacral colpopexy, but physicians must be vigilant and manage aggressively to avoid more serious complications and permanent deficit. PMID:27551651

  5. Cytogenetic telomere and telomerase studies in lumbo-sacral chordoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, H.S.; Dahir, G.A.; Miller, L.K.

    1994-09-01

    Lumbo-sacral chordomas are rare skeletal sarcomas that originate from the remnant notochord. There are approximately 35 lumbo-sacral chordomas reported annually in the U.S.A. The understanding of this rare human cancer is limited to observations of its clinical behavior and embryonic link. We performed chromosome and molecular analyses from five surgically harvested chordomas in an effort to document genetic abnormalities and to further understand its tumor biology. Cytogenetically, four of five patients had entirely normal chromosomes. One patient had several abnormalities seen in one of 100 cells including a translocation with breakpoints at bands 5q13 and 7q22, loss of one X chromosome and an extra chromosome 14. There was no evidence of monosomy X or trisomy 14 seen with interphase in situ hybridization using biotin-labeled alpha satellite chromosome specific probes for chromosome 14/22 and X. Telomere integrity is required to protect termini from illegitimate recombination. Typically telomeric reduction occurs in senescent fibroblasts in vivo aging and several human solid tumors. A telomeric probe (TTAGGG){sub 50} was hybridized to genomic DNA isolated from chordoma cells and digested with Hinf I which allows the telomeric DNA to remain intact. The tumor DNA was paired with leukocyte DNA from age-matched controls and revealed telomere elongation in all four patients studied with molecular genetic techniques. Telomerase activity is required to maintain telomere integrity and is not present in normal somatic cells. It is determined by visualizing the sizes of the electrophoresis gel-separated radioactive telomeric fragments assembled during incubation of cytoplasmic extracts containing telomerase. Telomerase activity was detected when compared with HeLa cells, a positive control. In addition, no telomerase activity was detected from the chordoma patient`s fibroblasts.

  6. A Review of Symptomatic Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae: Bertolotti's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jancuska, Jeffrey M.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are increasingly recognized as a common anatomical variant associated with altered patterns of degenerative spine changes. This review will focus on the clinical significance of LSTV, disruptions in normal spine biomechanics, imaging techniques, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods A Pubmed search using the specific key words “LSTV,” “lumbosacral transitional vertebrae,” and “Bertolotti's Syndrome” was performed. The resulting group of manuscripts from our search was evaluated. Results LSTV are associated with alterations in biomechanics and anatomy of spinal and paraspinal structures, which have important implications on surgical approaches and techniques. LSTV are often inaccurately detected and classified on standard AP radiographs and MRI. The use of whole-spine images as well as geometric relationships between the sacrum and lumbar vertebra increase accuracy. Uncertainty regarding the cause, clinical significance, and treatment of LSTV persists. Some authors suggest an association between LSTV types II and IV and low back pain. Pseudoarticulation between the transverse process and the sacrum creates a “false joint” susceptible to arthritic changes and osteophyte formation potentially leading to nerve root entrapment. The diagnosis of symptomatic LSTV is considered with appropriate patient history, imaging studies, and diagnostic injections. A positive radionuclide study along with a positive effect from a local injection helps distinguish the transitional vertebra as a significant pain source. Surgical resection is reserved for a subgroup of LSTV patients who fail conservative treatment and whose pain is definitively attributed to the anomalous pseudoarticulation. Conclusions Due to the common finding of low back pain and the wide prevalence of LSTV in the general population, it is essential to differentiate between symptoms originating from an anomalous psuedoarticulation from other potential

  7. Jingtong Granule: A Chinese Patent Medicine for Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liguo; Gao, Jinghua; Yu, Jie; Feng, Minshan; Li, Jinyu; Wang, Shangquan; Wei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper systematically assessed the efficacy and safety of Jingtong granule (JG) for cervical radiculopathy (CR). Methods. Randomized controlled trials comparing JG with no intervention, placebo, or conventional therapies were retrieved. The trials testing JG combined with conventional therapies versus conventional therapies were also enrolled. Study selection, methodological assessment, data extraction, and analysis were conducted in accordance with the Cochrane standards. The strength of evidence was evaluated according to GRADE approach. Results. Three trials with 400 participants were included. Methodological quality was evaluated as generally low. One study found that JG showed significant difference on decreasing pain scores compared with placebo. Meta-analysis indicated that JG plus conventional analgesic exhibited a significant immediate effect on the pain scores (WMD = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.98; P < 0.00001). Additionally, JG combined with analgesic presented beneficial immediate effect on neck disability index. However, the treatment effects of JG demonstrated in the trials were not large, and the safety of JG was unproven. Finally the evidence level was evaluated to be low. Conclusions. Our results indicated that JG showed some potential benefits for CR. Nevertheless, treatment effects are uncertain due to both the methodological concerns and the very modest reported improvements. PMID:26064154

  8. Jingtong Granule: A Chinese Patent Medicine for Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liguo; Gao, Jinghua; Yu, Jie; Feng, Minshan; Li, Jinyu; Wang, Shangquan; Wei, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper systematically assessed the efficacy and safety of Jingtong granule (JG) for cervical radiculopathy (CR). Methods. Randomized controlled trials comparing JG with no intervention, placebo, or conventional therapies were retrieved. The trials testing JG combined with conventional therapies versus conventional therapies were also enrolled. Study selection, methodological assessment, data extraction, and analysis were conducted in accordance with the Cochrane standards. The strength of evidence was evaluated according to GRADE approach. Results. Three trials with 400 participants were included. Methodological quality was evaluated as generally low. One study found that JG showed significant difference on decreasing pain scores compared with placebo. Meta-analysis indicated that JG plus conventional analgesic exhibited a significant immediate effect on the pain scores (WMD = 1.63; 95% CI: 1.29 to 1.98; P < 0.00001). Additionally, JG combined with analgesic presented beneficial immediate effect on neck disability index. However, the treatment effects of JG demonstrated in the trials were not large, and the safety of JG was unproven. Finally the evidence level was evaluated to be low. Conclusions. Our results indicated that JG showed some potential benefits for CR. Nevertheless, treatment effects are uncertain due to both the methodological concerns and the very modest reported improvements. PMID:26064154

  9. Impact of overweight and obesity on the musculoskeletal system using lumbosacral angles

    PubMed Central

    Onyemaechi, Ndubuisi OC; Anyanwu, Godson E; Obikili, Emmanuel N; Onwuasoigwe, Okechukwu; Nwankwo, Okechukwu E

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have been identified as independent risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders. However, the association between obesity and low back pain remains controversial. Little is known about the effects of overweight and obesity on the angles of the lumbosacral spine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI) and waist–hip ratio (WHR) on lumbosacral angles. Methods The effects of BMI and WHR on the lumbar lordosis angle (LLA), lumbosacral angle (LSA), sacral inclination angle (°°), and lumbosacral disc angle (LSDA) of 174 overweight and obese subjects (test group) and 126 underweight and normal-weight subjects (control group) were analyzed. Results The test group had a significantly higher mean LSA, LLA, sacral inclination angle (SIA), and LSDA (P=0.001). A significant correlation was noted between BMI and LSA (P=0.001), LLA (P=0.001), SIA (P=0.001), and LSDA (P=0.03). There was also a positive relationship between WHR and LSA (P=0.012), LLA (P=0.009), SIA (P=0.02), and LSDA (P=0.01). Conclusion There was an increase in lumbosacral angles in individuals with raised BMI and WHR. This may result in biomechanical changes in the lumbosacral spine, which increase the incidence of low back pain. PMID:27022251

  10. Antinociceptive effects of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in healthy ponies.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Johannes P A M; Menke, Eveline S; Doornenbal, Arie; Back, Willem; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine in ponies. Antinociceptive effects of epidural ropivacaine were evaluated by means of mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNTs) at several spinal levels in conscious ponies. The effects of ropivacaine on nociceptive afferent transmission to the spinal cord were also assessed by measuring spinal cord somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in anaesthetised ponies. Ataxia scores were determined in conscious ponies to assess the effects on motor function. A randomised, placebo controlled, double blind cross-over design was used. Low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine led to increases in MNTs at various anatomical locations with a maximum effect at the lumbosacral and sacrococcygeal regions, both with respect to increase in threshold and duration of effect. Analysis of SSEPs showed that epidural ropivacaine influenced both Aβ- and Aδ-mediated afferent transmission to the spinal cord at the level of the lumbosacral junction. Ponies showed mild ataxia after low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine, but all ponies remained standing. Application of low dose lumbosacral epidural ropivacaine provided safe and efficacious antinociceptive effects in conscious and anaesthetised ponies, and could therefore be a valuable addition to multimodal analgesic protocols in Equidae. PMID:22398129

  11. Cervical Radiculopathy: Incidence and Treatment of 1,420 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Vargas, Samuel Romero; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine the incidence of cervical radiculopathy requiring operative intervention by level and to report on the methods of treatment. Overview of Literature Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain and can result in progressive neurological deficits. Although the pathology is well understood, the actual incidence of cervical radiculopathy at particular spinal levels ultimately requiring operative intervention is unknown. Methods A large consecutive series of patients operated on by a single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed. The incidence of cervical radiculopathy at each level was defined for every patient. Procedures used for operative treatment were noted. Health related quality of life (HRQL) scores were collected both pre-operatively and postoperatively. Results There were 1305 primary and 115 revision operations performed. The most common primary procedures performed were anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF, 50%) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF, 28%). The most commonly affected levels were C6 (66%) and C7 (62%). Reasons for revision were pseudarthrosis (27%), clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP, 63%), persistent radiculopathy (11%), and hardware-related (2.6%). The most common procedures performed in the revision group were posterior cervical decompression and fusion (PCDF, 42%) and ACDF (40%). The most commonly affected levels were C7 (43%) and C5 (30%). Among patients that had their index surgery at our institution, the revision rate was 6.4%. In both primary and revision cases there was a significant improvement in Neck Disability Index and visual analogue scale scores postoperatively. Postoperative HRQL scores in the revision cases were significantly worse than those in the primary cases (p <0.01). Conclusions This study provides the largest description of the incidence of cervical radiculopathy by level and operative outcomes in patients undergoing cervical

  12. Postfixed Brachial Plexus Radiculopathy Due to Thoracic Disc Herniation in a Collegiate Wrestler: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Scott A.; Doberstein, Scott T.; Rushlow, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1–T2 disc herniation. Background: A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Differential Diagnosis: Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. Treatment: The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1–T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Uniqueness: Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. Conclusions: The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1–T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for

  13. Effectiveness of neural mobilization in patients with spinal radiculopathy: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, Michalis A; Stefanakis, Manos; Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis

    2015-04-01

    Spinal radiculopathy (SR) is a multifactorial nerve root injury that can result in significant pain, psychological stress and disability. It can occur at any level of the spinal column with the highest percentage in the lumbar spine. Amongst the various interventions that have been suggested, neural mobilization (NM) has been advocated as an effective treatment option. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine pathophysiological aspects of spinal roots and peripheral nerves, (2) analyze the proposed mechanisms of NM as treatment of injured nerve tissues and (3) critically review the existing research evidence for the efficacy of NM in patients with lumbar or cervical radiculopathy. PMID:25892373

  14. TECHNIQUE, DIFFICULTY, AND ACCURACY OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY-GUIDED TRANSLAMINAR AND TRANSFORAMINAL LUMBOSACRAL EPIDURAL AND INTRAARTICULAR LUMBAR FACET JOINT INJECTIONS IN DOGS.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Sandersen, Charlotte; Couvreur, Thierry; Bolen, Géraldine

    2016-01-01

    In human medicine, spinal pain and radiculopathy are commonly managed by computed tomography (CT)-guided facet joint injections and by transforaminal or translaminar epidural injections. In dogs, CT-guided lumbosacral epidural or lumbar facet joint injections have not been described. The aim of this experimental, ex vivo, feasibility study was to develop techniques and to assess their difficulty and accuracy. Two canine cadavers were used to establish the techniques and eight cadavers to assess difficulty and accuracy. Contrast medium was injected and a CT scan was performed after each injection. Accuracy was assessed according to epidural or joint space contrast opacification. Difficulty was classified as easy, moderately difficult, or difficult, based on the number of CT scans needed to guide insertion of the needle. A total of six translaminar and five transforaminal epidural and 53 joint injections were performed. Translaminar injections had a high success rate (100%), were highly accurate (75%), and easy to perform (100%). Transforaminal injections had an moderately high success rate (75%), were accurate (75%), and moderately difficult to perform (100%). Success rate of facet joint injections was 62% and was higher for larger facet joints, such as L7-S1. Accuracy of facet joint injections ranged from accurate (37-62%) to highly accurate (25%) depending on the volume injected. In 77% of cases, injections were moderately difficult to perform. Possible complications of epidural and facet joint injections were subarachnoid and vertebral venous plexus puncture and periarticular spread, respectively. Further studies are suggested to evaluate in vivo feasibility and safety of these techniques. PMID:26693948

  15. Mini posterior lumbar interbody fusion with presacral screw stabilization in early lumbosacral instability

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Arjun; Kini, Abhishek R; Chacko, A; Sunil, Upadhyaya; Vinod, K; Geover, Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical options for the management of early lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability vary from open lumbar interbody fusion with transpedicular fixation to a variety of minimal access fusion and fixation procedures. We have used a combination of micro discectomy and axial lumbosacral interbody fusion with presacral screw fixation to treat symptomatic patients with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis or lumbosacral degenerative disc disease, which needed surgical stabilization. This study describes the above technique along with analysis of results. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients with symptomatic lumbosacral (L5-S1) instability and degenerative lumbosacral disc disease were treated by micro discectomy and interbody fusion using presacral screw stabilization. Patients with history of bowel, bladder dysfunction and local anorectal diseases were excluded from this study. Postoperatively all patients were evaluated neurologically and radiologically for screw position, fusion and stability. Oswestry disability index was used to evaluate results. Results: We had nine females and three males with a mean age of 47.33 years (range 26–68 years). Postoperative assessment revealed three patients to have screw placed in anterior 1/4th of the 1st sacral body, in rest nine the screws were placed in the posterior 3/4th of sacral body. At 2 years followup, eight patients (67%) showed evidence of bridging trabeculae at bone graft site and none of the patients showed evidence of instability or implant failure. Conclusion: Presacral screw fixation along with micro discectomy is an effective procedure to manage early symptomatic lumbosacral spondylolisthesis and degenerative disc disease with instability. PMID:26015626

  16. Heterogeneity of Membrane Properties in Sympathetic Preganglionic Neurons of Neonatal Mice: Evidence of Four Subpopulations in the Intermediolateral Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) integrate activity from descending and sensory systems to determine the final central output of the sympathetic nervous system. The intermediolateral column (IML) has the highest number and density of SPNs and, within this region, SPN somas are found in distinct clusters within thoracic and upper lumbar spinal segments. Whereas SPNs exhibit a rostrocaudal gradient of end-target projections, individual clusters contain SPNs with diverse functional roles. Here we explored diversity in the electrophysiological properties observed in Hb9-eGFP–identified SPNs in the IML of neonatal mice. Overall, mouse SPN intrinsic membrane properties were comparable with those seen in other species. A wide range of values was obtained for all measured properties (up to a 10-fold difference), suggesting that IML neurons are highly differentiated. Using linear regression we found strong correlations between many cellular properties, including input resistance, rheobase, time constant, action potential shape, and degree of spike accommodation. The best predictor of cell function was rheobase, which correlated well with firing frequency–injected current (f–I) slopes as well as other passive and active membrane properties. The range in rheobase suggests that IML neurons have a recruitment order with stronger synaptic drives required for maximal recruitment. Using cluster analysis, we identified at least four subpopulations of SPNs, including one with a long time constant, low rheobase, and high f–I gain. We thus propose that the IML contains populations of neurons that are differentiable by their membrane properties and hypothesize they represent diverse functional classes. PMID:19923248

  17. Increased intrinsic excitability of muscle vasoconstrictor preganglionic neurons may contribute to the elevated sympathetic activity in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Briant, Linford J B; Stalbovskiy, Alexey O; Nolan, Matthew F; Champneys, Alan R; Pickering, Anthony E

    2014-12-01

    Hypertension is associated with pathologically increased sympathetic drive to the vasculature. This has been attributed to increased excitatory drive to sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) from brainstem cardiovascular control centers. However, there is also evidence supporting increased intrinsic excitability of SPN. To test this hypothesis, we made whole cell recordings of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVClike) SPN in the working-heart brainstem preparation of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The MVClike SPN have a higher spontaneous firing frequency in the SH rat (3.85 ± 0.4 vs. 2.44 ± 0.4 Hz in WKY; P = 0.011) with greater respiratory modulation of their activity. The action potentials of SH SPN had smaller, shorter afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and showed diminished transient rectification indicating suppression of an A-type potassium conductance (IA). We developed mathematical models of the SPN to establish if changes in their intrinsic properties in SH rats could account for their altered firing. Reduction of the maximal conductance density of IA by 15-30% changed the excitability and output of the model from the WKY to a SH profile, with increased firing frequency, amplified respiratory modulation, and smaller AHPs. This change in output is predominantly a consequence of altered synaptic integration. Consistent with these in silico predictions, we found that intrathecal 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased sympathetic nerve activity, elevated perfusion pressure, and augmented Traube-Hering waves. Our findings indicate that IA acts as a powerful filter on incoming synaptic drive to SPN and that its diminution in the SH rat is potentially sufficient to account for the increased sympathetic output underlying hypertension. PMID:25122704

  18. Increased intrinsic excitability of muscle vasoconstrictor preganglionic neurons may contribute to the elevated sympathetic activity in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford J. B.; Stalbovskiy, Alexey O.; Nolan, Matthew F.; Champneys, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with pathologically increased sympathetic drive to the vasculature. This has been attributed to increased excitatory drive to sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) from brainstem cardiovascular control centers. However, there is also evidence supporting increased intrinsic excitability of SPN. To test this hypothesis, we made whole cell recordings of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVClike) SPN in the working-heart brainstem preparation of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The MVClike SPN have a higher spontaneous firing frequency in the SH rat (3.85 ± 0.4 vs. 2.44 ± 0.4 Hz in WKY; P = 0.011) with greater respiratory modulation of their activity. The action potentials of SH SPN had smaller, shorter afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and showed diminished transient rectification indicating suppression of an A-type potassium conductance (IA). We developed mathematical models of the SPN to establish if changes in their intrinsic properties in SH rats could account for their altered firing. Reduction of the maximal conductance density of IA by 15–30% changed the excitability and output of the model from the WKY to a SH profile, with increased firing frequency, amplified respiratory modulation, and smaller AHPs. This change in output is predominantly a consequence of altered synaptic integration. Consistent with these in silico predictions, we found that intrathecal 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased sympathetic nerve activity, elevated perfusion pressure, and augmented Traube-Hering waves. Our findings indicate that IA acts as a powerful filter on incoming synaptic drive to SPN and that its diminution in the SH rat is potentially sufficient to account for the increased sympathetic output underlying hypertension. PMID:25122704

  19. Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Marie; Kierkegaard, Marie; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety.” The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety” had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy.

  20. Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Marie; Kierkegaard, Marie; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety.” The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety” had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26091482

  1. Internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm: an unusual cause of sciatica and lumbosacral plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Melikoglu, Meltem Alkan; Kocabas, Hilal; Sezer, Ilhan; Akdag, Ali; Gilgil, Erdal; Butun, Bulent

    2008-08-01

    This report describes an unusual case of lumbosacral plexopathy resulting from internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm. A 50-yr-old woman presented with multiple penetrating trauma to the thorax, abdomen, and left buttock. Several weeks after the injury, severe sciatica and motor dysfunction developed in her left leg. Progressively worsening pain was followed by left foot drop. An electrodiagnostic evaluation suggested a lower lumbosacral plexopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hematoma extending adjacent to the left lumbosacral plexus. Computerized tomographic angiography revealed a left internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm. The pseudoaneurysm was excised surgically. In the early postoperative period, the patient reported total relief of pain. Her motor function recovered gradually over several weeks; however, some residual weakness of foot dorsiflexion persisted. With this case presentation, we underscore that an arterial pseudoaneurysm should be remembered as an etiologic possibility of lumbosacral plexopathy and sciatica, especially in patients with history of iatrogenic or accidental trauma. An increased awareness of this rare cause of sciatica and lumbosacral plexopathy may enable early intervention alternatives. PMID:18388559

  2. Effectiveness of conservative treatments for the lumbosacral radicular syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Arianne P.; Ostelo, Raymond W. J. G.; van Os, Ton A. G.; Peul, Wilco C.; Koes, Bart W.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with a lumbosacral radicular syndrome are mostly treated conservatively first. The effect of the conservative treatments remains controversial. To assess the effectiveness of conservative treatments of the lumbosacral radicular syndrome (sciatica). Relevant electronic databases and the reference lists of articles up to May 2004 were searched. Randomised clinical trials of all types of conservative treatments for patients with the lumbosacral radicular syndrome selected by two reviewers. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality and the clinical relevance. Because the trials were considered heterogeneous we decided not to perform a meta-analysis but to summarise the results using the rating system of levels of evidence. Thirty trials were included that evaluated injections, traction, physical therapy, bed rest, manipulation, medication, and acupuncture as treatment for the lumbosacral radicular syndrome. Because several trials indicated no evidence of an effect it is not recommended to use corticosteroid injections and traction as treatment option. Whether clinicians should prescribe physical therapy, bed rest, manipulation or medication could not be concluded from this review. At present there is no evidence that one type of treatment is clearly superior to others, including no treatment, for patients with a lumbosacral radicular syndrome. PMID:17415595

  3. Pharmacological evidence that NaHS inhibits the vasopressor responses induced by stimulation of the preganglionic sympathetic outflow in pithed rats.

    PubMed

    Centurión, David; De la Cruz, Saúl Huerta; Gutiérrez-Lara, Erika J; Beltrán-Ornelas, Jesús H; Sánchez-López, Araceli

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that i.v. administration of NaHS, a donor of H2S, elicited dose-dependent hypotension although the mechanisms are not completely understood. In this regard, several mechanisms could be involved including the inhibition of the vasopressor sympathetic outflow. Thus, this study was designed to determine the potential capability of NaHS to mediate inhibition of the vasopressor responses induced by preganglionic sympathetic stimulation. For this purpose, Wistar rats were anaesthetised, pithed and cannulated for drug administration. In animals pre-treated with gallamine, the effect of i.v. infusion of NaHS (310 and 560μg/kgmin) or its vehicle (phosphate buffer) was determined on the vasopressor responses induced by: (1) sympathetic stimulation (0.03-10Hz); (2) i.v. bolus injections of exogenous noradrenaline (0.03-3μg/kg); or (3) methoxamine (1-100μg/kg). The vasopressor responses induced by preganglionic sympathetic stimulation were dose-dependently inhibited by i.v. infusion of NaHS (310 and 560μg/kgmin), but not by vehicle, particularly at high frequencies. In marked contrast, the vasopressor responses to exogenous noradrenaline or methoxamine were not inhibited by the above doses of NaHS or its vehicle. The above results, taken together, demonstrate that NaHS inhibited the vasopressor responses induced by preganglionic sympathetic outflow by a prejunctional mechanism. This is the first evidence demonstrating this effect by NaHS that may contribute, at least in part, to the hypotension induced by NaHS. PMID:26643171

  4. Subclinical CT abnormalities in the lumbosacral spine of older large-breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Jones, J C; Inzana, K D

    2000-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the L5-S3 vertebral levels was performed in six, large-breed dogs presented for problems unrelated to the lumbosacral spine. All dogs were asymptomatic for lumbosacral stenosis on neurologic examination. Breeds included German Shepherd, Golden Retriever, Boxermix and Belgian Malinois. Ages ranged from 5-12 years. Five out of six dogs exhibited CT abnormalities. Among the 18 disc levels examined, the most common findings were idiopathic stenosis, loss of vertebral canal epidural fat, and nerve tissue displacement. Less common abnormalities were vertebral canal or foraminal bone proliferation, loss of intervertebral foramen fat, vertebral canal disc bulging, degenerative articular process joint disease, transitional vertebra, dural ossification, foraminal disc bulging, Schmorl's nodes, calcified extruded disc fragment, and sacroiliac joint osteophytes. Vertebral subluxation was absent in all dogs. Findings indicate that some lumbosacral CT abnormalities may be clinically insignificant, especially in older dogs. PMID:10695875

  5. Lumbosacral evoked potentials and vesicourethral function in patients with chronic suprasacral spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, M G; Thomas, D G

    1990-01-01

    Persistent detrusor acontractility despite normal somatic reflex activity in some patients with high spinal cord injury is an enigma. Previous work has suggested disordered integration of afferent activity in sacral roots or the sacral spinal cord. Forty male patients with chronic stable suprasacral cord lesions were studied by filling and voiding videocystometrography, and recording lumbosacral evoked potentials from posterior tibial nerve stimulation. Only five of 15 patients with decreased detrusor contractility had abnormal lumbosacral evoked potentials. Similar abnormalities were found in four of 11 patients with efficient hyperreflexic bladders. The finding of normal lumbosacral evoked potentials in the majority of patients with suprasacral cord injuries and decreased detrusor contractility supports the argument that the pathophysiology of this specific form of neurogenic bladder dysfunction is multifactorial. PMID:2283530

  6. Radiological evaluation of lumbosacral spine for post discectomy segmental instability.

    PubMed

    Skomorac, Rasim; Delić, Jasmin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin

    2016-08-01

    Aim To establish presence of segmental instability in patients operated with standard discectomy comparing measurement of translation and rotation on postoperative functional radiographs of lumbosacral spine with reference values,and to explore difference between patients operated on one or two levels. Methods The study included 71 patients, who were operated due to herniated lumbar disc. They were divided into two groups operated on one level (group A) or two adjacent levels (group B). All patients had been imaged in a standing position with functional lateral radiography. Radiographic images were digitized and then computerized measurement of translation and rotation was made. Measurement data were compared between the groups and with reference values obtained in healthy adults. Results Standard lumbar discectomy leads to an increase in translation, however, it reached statistical significance only for L4/L5 level and a decrease of rotation, which showed statistical significance for all samples, relative to the reference values. There was no statistically significant difference in the values of translation and rotation between the groups for corresponding levels, except for the value of the rotation for L4/L5 level as adjacent, unoperated level. Comparison of translation and rotation between the operated and adjacent levels did not show a statistically significant difference. When it comes to comparing the measured and predicted translation, there was a statistically significant difference only at the L5/S1 as anunoperated level. Conclusion Standard discectomy does not lead to radiologically significant segmental instability, and two-level surgery has not caused more pronounced signs of instability comparing to onelevel surgery. PMID:27452325

  7. Reevaluation of the lumbosacral region of Oreopithecus bambolii.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gabrielle A; Shapiro, Liza J

    2013-09-01

    Functional interpretations of the postcranium of the late Miocene ape Oreopithecus bambolii are controversial. The claim that Oreopithecus practiced habitual terrestrial bipedalism is partly based on restored postcranial remains originally recovered from Baccinello, Tuscany (Köhler and Moyà-Solà, 1997). The lower lumbar vertebrae of BA#72 were cited as evidence that Oreopithecus exhibits features indicative of a lordotic lumbar spine, including dorsal wedging of the vertebral bodies and a caudally progressive increase in postzygapophyseal interfacet distance. Here, we demonstrate why the dorsal wedging index value obtained by Köhler and Moyà-Solà (1997) for the BA#72 last lumbar vertebra is questionable due to distortion in that region, present a more reliable way to measure postzygapophyseal interfacet distance, and include an additional metric (laminar width) with which to examine changes in the transverse dimensions of the neural arches. We also quantify the external morphology of the BA#72 proximal sacrum, which, despite well-documented links between sacral morphology and bipedal locomotion, and excellent preservation of the sacral prezygapophyses, first sacral vertebral body, and right ala, was not evaluated by Köhler and Moyà-Solà (1997). Measures of postzygapophyseal interfacet distance and laminar width on the penultimate and last lumbar vertebrae of BA#72 reveal a pattern encompassed within the range of living nonhuman hominoids and unlike that of modern humans, suggesting that Oreopithecus did not possess a lordotic lumbar spine. Results further show that the BA#72 sacrum exhibits relatively small prezygapophyseal articular facet surface areas and mediolaterally narrow alae compared with modern humans, indicating that the morphology of the Oreopithecus sacrum is incompatible with the functional demands of habitual bipedal stance and locomotion. The Oreopithecus lumbosacral region does not exhibit adaptations for habitual bipedal locomotion. PMID

  8. Activation and integration of bilateral GABA-mediated synaptic inputs in neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whyment, Andrew D; Wilson, Jennifer M M; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2004-01-01

    The role of GABA receptors in synaptic transmission to neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) was investigated utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques in longitudinal and transverse spinal cord slice preparations. In the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (NBQX, 5 μm and D-APV, 10 μm), electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral or contralateral lateral funiculi (iLF and cLF, respectively) revealed monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in 75% and 65% of SPNs, respectively. IPSPs were sensitive to bicuculline (10 μm) in all neurones tested and reversed polarity around −55 mV, the latter indicating mediation via chloride conductances. In three neurones IPSPs evoked by stimulation of the iLF (n = 1) or cLF (n = 2) were partly sensitive to strychnine (2 μm). The expression of postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors were confirmed by the sensitivity of SPNs to agonists, GABA (2 mm), muscimol (10–100 μm) or baclofen (10–100 μm), in the presence of TTX, each of which produced membrane hyperpolarization in all SPNs tested. Muscimol-induced responses were sensitive to bicuculline (1–10 μm) and SR95531 (10 μm) and baclofen-induced responses were sensitive to 2-hydroxy-saclofen (100–200 μm) and CGP55845 (200 nm). The GABAC receptor agonist CACA (200 μm) was without significant effect on SPNs. These results suggest that SPNs possess postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors and that subsets of SPNs receive bilateral GABAergic inputs which activate GABAA receptors, coupled to a chloride conductance. At resting or holding potentials close to threshold either single or bursts (10–100 Hz) of IPSPs gave rise to a rebound excitation and action potential firing at the termination of the burst. This effect was mimicked by injection of small (10–20 pA) rectangular-wave current pulses, which revealed a time-dependent, Cs+-sensitive inward rectification and rebound excitation at the termination of the response to

  9. Cervical Radiculopathy Caused by Vertebral Artery Loop Formation : A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hoon Soo; Cheh, Gene; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Vertebral artery loop formation causing encroachment on cervical neural foramen and canal is a rare cause of cervical radiculopathy. We report a case of 61-year-old woman with vertebral artery loop formation who presented with right shoulder pain radiating to her arm for 2 years. Plain radiograph and computed tomography scan revealed widening of the right intervertebral foramen at the C5-6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging and angiogram confirmed the vertebral artery loop formation compressing the right C6 nerve root. We had considered microdecompressive surgery, but the patient's symptoms resolved after conservative management. Clinician should keep in mind that vertebral artery loop formation is one of important causes of cervical radiculopathy. Vertebral artery should be visualized using magnetic resonance angiography in suspected case. PMID:21286489

  10. Isolated Proximal Fibular Stress Fracture In Osteoarthritis Knee Presenting As L5 Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Manish K, Kothari; Agnivesh, Tikoo; Pramod P, Saini; Samir S, Dalvie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Isolated proximal fibular stress fractures are rare and usually seen only in athletes and military recruits. Its occurrence with osteoarthritis of the knee is not documented. Diagnosis of stress fractures is not difficult, but they can mimic other pathologies at times. Case Report: A 45-year-old male patient presented with pain and paresthesias in left lower thigh and leg. He was previously treated as L5 radiculopathy confirmed with lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). He received analgesics followed by nerve root blocks at another center. He was referred to our center for L4-5 root decompression. Due to atypical spine symptoms, leg radiographs and MRI was done, which showed isolated stress fracture of the left proximal fibula. Conclusion: We conclude that isolated stress fractures of the proximal fibula can present as L5 radiculopathy. A high level of suspicion is required for diagnosis. MRI is the investigation of choice when in doubt. PMID:27299077

  11. Development and Validation of a Method to Measure Lumbosacral Motion Using Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    van den Hoorn, Wolbert; Coppieters, Michel W; van Dieën, Jaap H; Hodges, Paul W

    2016-05-01

    The study aim was to validate an ultrasound imaging technique to measure sagittal plane lumbosacral motion. Direct and indirect measures of lumbosacral angle change were developed and validated. Lumbosacral angle was estimated by the angle between lines through two landmarks on the sacrum and lowest lumbar vertebrae. Distance measure was made between the sacrum and lumbar vertebrae, and angle was estimated after distance was calibrated to angle. This method was tested in an in vitro spine and an in vivo porcine spine and validated to video and fluoroscopy measures, respectively. R(2), regression coefficients and mean absolute differences between ultrasound measures and validation measures were, respectively: 0.77, 0.982, 0.67° (in vitro, angle); 0.97, 0.992, 0.82° (in vitro, distance); 0.94, 0.995, 2.1° (in vivo, angle); and 0.95, 0.997, 1.7° (in vivo, distance). Lumbosacral motion can be accurately measured with ultrasound. This provides a basis to develop measurements for use in humans. PMID:26895754

  12. Massive Lumbosacral Subcutaneous Exudate After Surgical Treatment of a Large Lipomyelocele: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Kong, Xiangyi; Yang, Yi; Ma, Wenbin; Wang, Renzhi; Li, Yongning

    2015-09-01

    Lipomyelocele is an uncommon type of lipoma that occurs with spina bifida. We present the clinical course and therapeutic process of a female who underwent resection of a lipomyelocele and developed a massive lumbosacral subcutaneous exudate postoperatively. The therapeutic process is described in detail, and a review of the relevant literature on lipomyelocele is presented. A 23-year-old woman presented to our institution complaining of a large lumbosacral subcutaneous mass. She underwent surgical resection of the mass and untethering of the spinal cord under intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring. A massive lumbosacral subcutaneous exudate developed postoperatively. After excluding cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage, we placed a suction drain. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this case report and any accompanying images. A copy of the written consent is available for review by the editor of this journal. Because of this, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. Postoperative pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of lipomyelocele. Continuation of the negative-pressure drain for 1 week yielded >1000 mL of fluid. The patient recovered well and developed no further subcutaneous exudate. In a patient with massive lumbosacral subcutaneous exudate after surgical treatment of a large lipomyelocele, continuous negative-pressure drainage can be an effective treatment method after excluding CSF leakage. PMID:26426667

  13. The Sacral Hiatus Approach for Drainage of Anterior Lumbo-Sacral Epidural Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, M.S.; Ospina, J.; Suzuki, S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lumbosacral epidural abscesses are managed either conservatively with IV antibiotics or with open surgery, particularly in the presence of acute neurological symptoms. Their location makes it difficult for image-guided interventional approaches either for biopsy or evacuation. We report the sacral hiatus and canal as a corridor for image-guided minimally invasive abscess of lumbosacral epidural abscess for aspiration. A 56-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of six weeks of worsening low back pain. MRI of the patient’s lumbosacral spine showed osteomyelitis involving his L5, S1 vertebrae, L5-S1 discitis, as well as an anterior epidural abscess extending from L4-5 disc space to the S2 vertebral level. Blood cultures grew out gram-positive cocci. For drainage, a 5-French micropuncture kit was utilized to access the hiatus. Under fluoroscopic guidance a microwire was then advanced along the sacral canal. An 18-gauge needle curved to approximate the contours of the sacral canal was then advanced over the guidewire. Once anatomic access was established 2 ml of thick purulent material was aspirated. The patient tolerated the procedure well, and no focal nerve root symptoms were noted following the procedure. Image-guided aspiration of lumbosacral epidural abscesses can thus be carried out in a safe and effective manner using a sacral hiatus approach. PMID:22192554

  14. Posterior Cervical Microscopic Foraminotomy and Discectomy with Laser for Unilateral Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Suk-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2015-12-01

    Surgical decompression for cervical radiculopathy includes anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior or posterior cervical foraminotomy, and cervical arthroplasty after decompression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a CO2 laser in posterior-approach surgery for unilateral cervical radiculopathy. From January 2006 to December 2008, 12 consecutive patients with unilateral cervical radiculopathy from either foraminal stenosis or disc herniation, which was confirmed with imaging studies, underwent posterior foraminotomy and discectomy with the use of a microscope and CO2 laser. For annulotomy and discectomy, we used about 300 joules of CO2 laser energy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the extent of disc removal or foraminal decompression. Clinical outcome was evaluated by using visual analogue scale scores for radicular pain and Odom's criteria. For evaluation of spinal stability, cervical flexion and extension radiographs were obtained. Single-level foraminotomy was performed in 10 patients and two-level foraminotomies were performed in 2 patients. Preoperative radicular symptoms were improved immediately after surgery in all patients. No surgery-related complications developed in our cases. Postoperative MRI demonstrated effective decompression of ventral lesions and widened foraminal spaces in all cases. There was no development of cervical instability during the follow-up period. Posterior foraminotomy and discectomy using a microscope and CO2 laser is an effective surgical tool for unilateral cervical radiculopathy caused by lateral or foraminal disc herniations or spondylotic stenosis. Long-term follow-up with radiographs showed no significant kyphotic changes or spinal instability. PMID:26730364

  15. The short term effects of preoperative neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently a preoperative pain neuroscience education (NE) program was developed for lumbar surgery (LS) for radiculopathy as a means to decrease postoperative pain and disability. This study attempts to determine the short term effects, if any, of providing NE before surgery on patient outcomes. Methods A case series of 10 patients (female = 7) received preoperative one-on-one educational session by a physical therapist on the neuroscience of pain, accompanied by an evidence-based booklet, prior to LS for radiculopathy. Post-intervention data was gathered immediately after NE, as well as 1, 3 and 6 months following LS. Primary outcome measures were Pain Catastrophization Scale (PCS), forward flexion, straight leg raise (SLR) and beliefs regarding LS. Results Immediately following NE for LS for radiculopathy, all patients had lower PCS scores, with 5 patients exceeding the MDC score of 9.1 and 8 of the patients had PCS change scores exceeding the MDC by the 1, 3 and 6 month follow ups. Physical changes showed that fingertip-to-floor test in 6 patients had changes in beyond the MDC of 4.5 cm and 6 patients had changes in SLR beyond the MDC of 5.7°. The main finding, however, indicated a positive and more realistic shift in expectations regarding pain after the impending LS by all patients. Conclusions The results of the case series suggest that immediately after NE, patients scheduled for LS for radiculopathy had meaningful detectable changes in pain catastrophizing, fingertip-to-floor test, passive SLR and positive shifts in their beliefs about LS. PMID:26056626

  16. Mini Open Foraminotomy for Cervical Radiculopathy: A Comparison of Large Tubular and TrimLine Retractors

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Masashi; Kuraishi, Shugo; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Aoki, Kaoru; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Ogihara, Nobuhide; Hashidate, Hiroyuki; Hirabayashi, Hiroki; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective chart review. Purpose A comparison of mini open foraminotomy (MOF) for cervical radiculopathy using either large tubular (LT) or TrimLine (TL) retractors. Overview of Literature Posterior foraminotomy relieves compression of the cervical nerve root in radiculopathy patients. However, invasion of the paravertebral muscle may cause major problems in these patients. To address these problems, we performed MOF. Methods Twenty cervical radiculopathy patients (16 male and 4 female) who underwent MOF between May 2004 and August 2011 were assigned to LT and TL groups. Each group contained 10 subjects. Surgical and clinical outcomes were compared. Results The average operating time in the TL group was significantly shorter than that in the LT group. The final follow-up mean neck disability indices significantly improved compared to the preoperative values (LT group, 12.0±7.8 vs. 28.0±9.4; TL group, 6.0±5.9 vs. 21.9±10). The final follow-up neck pain visual analog scale (VAS) scores also decreased significantly from the preoperative of 8.0±1.5 and 2.5±2.5 to the final follow-up values of 2.2±2.2 and 1.0±2.5 in the LT and TL groups, respectively. The recovery rate for the neck pain VAS score was 70.0±31.9 in the LT group and 87.0±32.0 in the TL group, thus suggesting no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions MOF with the TL retractor is an easy and safe procedure. Furthermore, the use of the TL retractor allows for a minimally invasive and effective surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy patients. PMID:26240713

  17. Posterior Cervical Microscopic Foraminotomy and Discectomy with Laser for Unilateral Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Suk-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju

    2015-01-01

    Surgical decompression for cervical radiculopathy includes anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior or posterior cervical foraminotomy, and cervical arthroplasty after decompression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a CO2 laser in posterior-approach surgery for unilateral cervical radiculopathy. From January 2006 to December 2008, 12 consecutive patients with unilateral cervical radiculopathy from either foraminal stenosis or disc herniation, which was confirmed with imaging studies, underwent posterior foraminotomy and discectomy with the use of a microscope and CO2 laser. For annulotomy and discectomy, we used about 300 joules of CO2 laser energy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the extent of disc removal or foraminal decompression. Clinical outcome was evaluated by using visual analogue scale scores for radicular pain and Odom's criteria. For evaluation of spinal stability, cervical flexion and extension radiographs were obtained. Single-level foraminotomy was performed in 10 patients and two-level foraminotomies were performed in 2 patients. Preoperative radicular symptoms were improved immediately after surgery in all patients. No surgery-related complications developed in our cases. Postoperative MRI demonstrated effective decompression of ventral lesions and widened foraminal spaces in all cases. There was no development of cervical instability during the follow-up period. Posterior foraminotomy and discectomy using a microscope and CO2 laser is an effective surgical tool for unilateral cervical radiculopathy caused by lateral or foraminal disc herniations or spondylotic stenosis. Long-term follow-up with radiographs showed no significant kyphotic changes or spinal instability. PMID:26730364

  18. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5–6 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5–6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5–6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2–3 degenerative disease. C5–6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2–3 segment involved in the patient’s scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2–3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  19. Prospective medium-term results of multimodal pain management in patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, A.; Madl, M.; Loher, M.; Grifka, J.; Boluki, D.; Linhardt, O.

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is one of the most common diseases of modern civilisation. Multimodal pain management (MPM) represents a central approach to avoiding surgery. Only few medium-term results have been published in the literature so far. This study compared subjective and objective as well as anamnestic and clinical parameters of 60 patients who had undergone inpatient MPM because of lumbar radiculopathy before and 1 year ±2 weeks after treatment. The majority of patients were very satisfied (35%) or satisfied (52%) with the treatment outcome. Merely 8 patients commented neutrally and none negatively. The finger-floor distance had decreased significantly (p < 0.01), and 30 patients (50%) had shown improved mobility of the spine after therapy. The need for painkillers had also been significantly reduced after 1 year. The arithmetical average of pain on a visual analogue scale was 7.21 before treatment, which had significantly decreased to 3.58 at follow-up (p < 0.01). MPM is an effective approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy by mechanical nerve root irritation. Therefore, in the absence of an absolute indication for surgery or an absolute contradiction for MPM, patients should first be treated with this minimally invasive therapy. PMID:27305956

  20. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5-6 fusion.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5-6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5-6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2-3 degenerative disease. C5-6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2-3 segment involved in the patient's scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2-3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  1. Sacral radiculopathy due to cement leakage from percutaneous sacroplasty, successfully treated with surgical decompression.

    PubMed

    Barber, Sean M; Livingston, Andrew D; Cech, David A

    2013-05-01

    Percutaneous sacroplasty is a procedure adapted from vertebroplasty, which is designed to ameliorate the painful morbidity associated with sacral insufficiency fractures without the invasiveness of open surgery. Early estimates of efficacy, according to several case reports and small series, appear promising, but the procedure is not without risk. Several cases of radiculopathy due to nerve root compression by extravasated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been reported. The authors present a case of radiculopathy caused by cement leakage from sacroplasty, treated with surgical decompression of the compromised nerve root. The patient presented with left S-1 radiculopathy and was found on CT to have a left S-1 nerve root completely encased in PMMA over a portion of its length. The patient underwent sacral laminectomy with the removal of PMMA and experienced pain relief and the return of function postoperatively. Surgical removal of PMMA extravasated during sacroplasty is feasible and should be considered when nerve root compression or canal stenosis causes pain or neurological deficit refractory to conservative therapy. PMID:23521686

  2. Treatment strategies for early neurological deficits related to malpositioned pedicle screws in the lumbosacral canal

    PubMed Central

    Du, J-Y.; Wu, J-S.; Wen, Z-Q.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To employ a simple and fast method to evaluate those patients with neurological deficits and misplaced screws in relatively safe lumbosacral spine, and to determine if it is necessary to undertake revision surgery. Methods A total of 316 patients were treated by fixation of lumbar and lumbosacral transpedicle screws at our institution from January 2011 to December 2012. We designed the criteria for post-operative revision scores of pedicle screw malpositioning (PRSPSM) in the lumbosacral canal. We recommend the revision of the misplaced pedicle screw in patients with PRSPSM = 5′ as early as possible. However, patients with PRSPSM < 5′ need to follow the next consecutive assessment procedures. A total of 15 patients were included according to at least three-stage follow-up. Results Five patients with neurological complications (PRSPSM = 5′) underwent revision surgery at an early stage. The other ten patients with PRSPSM < 5′ were treated by conservative methods for seven days. At three-month follow-up, only one patient showed delayed onset of neurological complications (PRSPSM 7′) while refusing revision. Seven months later, PRSPSM decreased to 3′ with complete rehabilitation. Conclusions This study highlights the significance of consecutively dynamic assessments of PRSPSMs, which are unlike previous implementations based on purely anatomical assessment or early onset of neurological deficits.and also confirms our hypothesis that patients with early neurological complications may not need revision procedures in the relatively broad margin of the lumbosacral canal. Cite this article: X-J. Lin. Treatment strategies for early neurological deficits related to malpositioned pedicle screws in the lumbosacral canal: A pilot study. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:46–51. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000477. PMID:26868892

  3. Outcomes and Treatment of Lumbosacral Spinal Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Study of 53 Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Maolin; Wang, Kun; Fowdur, Mitra; Wu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Study Strategy A retrospective clinic study. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of conservative and surgical treatment for lumbosacral tuberculosis. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 53 patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis who were treated in our institution between January 2005 and January 2011. There were 29 males and 24 females with average ages of 37.53 ± 17.28 years (range 6–72 years). 11 patients were given only anti-TB drugs; the remainder underwent anterior debridement, interbody fusion with and without instrumentation, or one-stage anterior debridement combined with posterior instrumentation. Outcome data for these patients included neurologic status, lumbosacral angle, erythrocyte sedimentation rate value(ESR) and C-reactive protein value(CRP) were assessed before and after treatment. Results The mean lumbosacral angles were 23.00°± 2.90°in the conservatively treated patients and 22.36°± 3.92o in the surgically treated patients. At the final follow-up, this had improved to 24.10o ± 2.96°in the conservatively treated patients and 28.13° ± 1.93°in the surgically treated patients (all P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences before and after treatment in terms of ESR and CRP (all P < 0.05). All patients achieved bone fusion. The mean follow-up period was 32.34 ± 8.13 months (range 18 to 55 months). The neurological deficit did not worsen in any of the patients. Conclusions It has been proven that conservative and surgical treatments are safe and effective and produce good clinical outcomes for patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis. The advantages of operation include thoroughness of debridement, decompression of the spinal cord, and adequate spinal stabilization. PMID:26121685

  4. Headache in patients with cervical radiculopathy: a prospective study with selective nerve root blocks in 275 patients

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, Jane Y.; Anderberg, Leif

    2006-01-01

    Since many years we routinely use diagnostic selective nerve root blocks (SNRB) at our department when evaluating patients with cervical radiculopathy. Frequently patients who also presented with headache reported that the headache disappeared when the nerve root responsible for the radicular pain was blocked with local anaesthetics. Headache has been described as a companioning symptom related to cervical radiculopathy but has never before been evaluated with SNRB performed in the lower cervical spine. For this reason we added to our routine an evaluation of the response from the SNRB on headache in patients with cervical radiculopathy. The aim was to describe the frequency of headache in patients with cervical radiculopathy and its response to a selective nerve root block of the nerve root/roots responsible for the radiculopathy. Can nerve root compression in the lower cervical spine produce headache? In this consecutive series of 275 patients with cervical radiculopathy, 161 patients reported that they also suffered from daily or recurrent headache located most often unilaterally on the same side as the radiculopathy. All patients underwent a careful clinical examination by a neurosurgeon and a MRI of the cervical spine. The significantly compressed root/roots, according to the MRI, underwent SNRB with a local anaesthetic. The effect of the nerve root block on the radiculopathy and the headache was carefully noted and evaluated by a physiotherapist using visual analogue scales (VAS) before and after the SNRB. All patients with headache had tender points in the neck/shoulder region on the affected side. Patients with headache graded significantly more limitations in daily activities and higher pain intensity in the neck/shoulder/arm than patients without headache. After selective nerve root block, 59% of the patients with headache reported 50% or more reduction of headache and of these 69% reported total relief. A significant correlation was seen between reduced

  5. Ultrastructural circuitry of cardiorespiratory reflexes: there is a monosynaptic path between the nucleus of the solitary tract and vagal preganglionic motoneurons controlling atrioventricular conduction in the cat.

    PubMed

    Blinder, K J; Gatti, P J; Johnson, T A; Lauenstein, J M; Coleman, W P; Gray, A L; Massari, V J

    1998-02-23

    We have tested the hypothesis: (1) that presumptive negative dromotropic vagal preganglionic neurons in the ventrolateral nucleus ambiguus (NA-VL) can be selectively labelled from the heart, by injecting one of two fluorescent tracers into the two intracardiac ganglia which independently control sino-atrial (SA) rate or atrioventricular (AV) conduction; i.e., the SA and AV ganglia, respectively. The NA-VL was examined for the presence of single and/or double labelled cells. Over 91% of vagal preganglionic neurons in the NA-VL projecting to either intracardiac ganglion did not project to the second ganglion. Consequently, we also tested the hypothesis: (2) that there is a monosynaptic connection between neurons of the medial, and/or dorsolateral nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), rostral to obex, and negative dromotropic neurons in the NA-VL. An anterograde tracer was injected into the NTS, and a retrograde tracer into the AV ganglion. The anterograde marker was found in both myelinated and unmyelinated axons in the NA-VL, as well as in nerve terminals. Axo-somatic and axo-dendritic synapses were detected between terminals labelled from the NTS, and retrogradely labelled negative dromotropic neurons in the NA-VL. This is the first ultrastructural demonstration of a monosynaptic pathway between neurons in the NTS and functionally associated (negative dromotropic) cardioinhibitory neurons. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the neuroanatomical circuitry mediating the vagal baroreflex control of AV conduction may be composed of as few as four neurons in series, although interneurons may also be interposed within the NTS. PMID:9526069

  6. Multiple congenital anomalies syndrome with multicystic renal dysplasia, postaxial polydactyly and lumbosacral meningocoele. Difficulties in nosological classification and genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Witters, I; Moerman, Ph; Natens, R; Van Assche, F A; Fryns, J P

    2002-01-01

    In this report we describe a 17 weeks old female fetus with a lumbosacral meningocoele, multicystic renal dysplasia (Potter type IIb) and postaxial polydactyly type A at the left hand and left foot. There was no hepatic fibrosis. Although multicystic renal dysplasia and postaxial polydactyly are often present in the Meckel syndrome, a lumbosacral neural tube defect is not a typical finding in this syndrome. PMID:12150214

  7. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine. PMID:25187175

  8. Differences of Sagittal Lumbosacral Parameters between Patients with Lumbar Spondylolysis and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jin; Peng, Bao-Gan; Li, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Nai-Yang; Yang, Liang; Li, Duan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested an association between elevated pelvic incidence (PI) and the development of lumbar spondylolysis. However, there is still lack of investigation for Han Chinese people concerning the normal range of spinopelvic parameters and relationship between abnormal sagittal parameters and lumbar diseases. The objective of the study was to investigate sagittal lumbosacral parameters of adult lumbar spondylolysis patients in Han Chinese population. Methods: A total of 52 adult patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis treated in the General Hospital of Armed Police Force (Beijing, China) were identified as the spondylolysis group. All the 52 patients were divided into two subgroups, Subgroup A: 36 patients with simple lumbar spondylolysis, and Subgroup B: 16 patients with lumbar spondylolysis accompanying with mild lumbar spondylolisthesis (slip percentage <30%). Altogether 207 healthy adults were chosen as the control group. All patients and the control group took lumbosacral lateral radiographs. Seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters, including PI, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis (LL), L5 incidence, L5 slope, and sacral table angle (STA), were measured in the lateral radiographs. All the parameters aforementioned were compared between the two subgroups and between the spondylolysis group and the control group with independent-sample t-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences of all seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters between Subgroup A and Subgroup B. PI, PT, SS, and LL were higher (P < 0.05) in the spondylolysis group than those in the control group, but STA was lower (P < 0.001) in the spondylolysis group. Conclusions: Current study results suggest that increased PI and decreased STA may play important roles in the pathology of lumbar spondylolysis in Han Chinese population. PMID:27174324

  9. Evaluation of Outcome of Posterior Decompression and Instrumented Fusion in Lumbar and Lumbosacral Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ravikant; Kiyawat, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background For surgical treatment of lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis, the anterior approach has been the most popular approach because it allows direct access to the infected tissue, thereby providing good decompression. However, anterior fixation is not strong, and graft failure and loss of correction are frequent complications. The posterior approach allows circumferential decompression of neural elements along with three-column fixation attained via pedicle screws by the same approach. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome (functional, neurological, and radiological) in patients with lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis operated through the posterior approach. Methods Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis of the lumbar and lumbosacral region from August 2012 to August 2013. Of these, 13 patients had progressive neurological deterioration or increasing back pain despite conservative measures and underwent posterior decompression and pedicle screw fixation with posterolateral fusion. Antitubercular therapy was given till signs of radiological healing were evident (9 to 16 months). Functional outcome (visual analogue scale [VAS] score for back pain), neurological recovery (Frankel grading), and radiological improvement were evaluated preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Results The mean VAS score for back pain improved from 7.89 (range, 9 to 7) preoperatively to 2.2 (range, 3 to 1) at 1-year follow-up. Frankel grading was grade B in 3, grade C in 7, and grade D in 3 patients preoperatively, which improved to grade D in 7 and grade E in 6 patients at the last follow-up. Radiological healing was evident in the form of reappearance of trabeculae formation, resolution of pus, fatty marrow replacement, and bony fusion in all patients. The mean correction of segmental kyphosis was 9.85° postoperatively. The mean loss of correction at final follow-up was 3.15°. Conclusions

  10. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W.

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure. PMID:26396612

  11. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure. PMID:26396612

  12. Biomechanical loading of the shoulder complex and lumbosacral joints during dynamic cart pushing task.

    PubMed

    Nimbarte, Ashish D; Sun, Yun; Jaridi, Majid; Hsiao, Hongwei

    2013-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to quantify the effect of dynamic cart pushing exertions on the biomechanical loading of shoulder and low back. Ten participants performed cart pushing tasks on flat (0°), 5°, and 10° ramped walkways at 20 kg, 30 kg, and 40 kg weight conditions. An optoelectronic motion capturing system configured with two force plates was used for the kinematic and ground reaction force data collection. The experimental data was modeled using AnyBody modeling system to compute three-dimensional peak reaction forces at the shoulder complex (sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and glenohumeral) and low back (lumbosacral) joints. The main effect of walkway gradient and cart weight, and gradient by weight interaction on the biomechanical loading of shoulder complex and low back joints was statistically significant (all p < 0.001). At the lumbosacral joint, negligible loading in the mediolateral direction was observed compared to the anterioposterior and compression directions. Among the shoulder complex joints, the peak reaction forces at the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints were comparable and much higher than the sternoclavicular joint. Increased shear loading of the lumbosacral joint, distraction loading of glenohumeral joint and inferosuperior loading of the acromioclavicular joint may contribute to the risk of work-related low back and shoulder musculoskeletal disorder with prolonged and repetitive use of carts. PMID:23566675

  13. An Application of Keystone Perforator Island Flap for Closure of Lumbosacral Myelomeningocele Defects.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sung; Morrison, Edwin; Lo, Cheng; Leong, James

    2016-09-01

    Myelomeningocele, also known as spina bifida, is the commonest form of neural tube defect in which both meninges and spinal cord herniate through a large vertebral defect. It may be located at any spinal level; however; lumbosacral involvement is most common. After birth, the closure of spinal lesion is preferably undertaken in the first 48 hours to minimize the risk of injury and central nervous system infection. Relatively small skin defects overlying the dural repair may be directly closed. However, larger defects require reconstructive closure. Numerous methods of reconstruction have been described, such as split skin graft, local flaps or lumbosacral fasciocutaneous flaps, muscle flaps using latissimus dorsi, gluteal or paraspinous muscles, and perforator flaps namely superior gluteal artery perforators, and dorsal intercostal artery perforator flaps. At Monash Health, Victoria, we have used the keystone perforator island flaps to reconstruct lumbosacral myelomeningocele defects on 5 newborns between January 2008 and January 2014. This article evaluates the short-term and long-term outcomes of these patients who were followed up for 10 to 66 months. PMID:26418773

  14. Lumbosacral fixation using sacroiliac buttress screws: a modification to the Jackson technique with intrasacral rods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of intrasacral rods has been previously reported for posterior lumbosacral fixation. However, problems associated with this technique include poor stability of the rod in the sacrum, difficulty in contouring the rod to fit the lateral sacral mass, and the complicated assembly procedure for the rod and pedicle screws in the thoracolumbar segments after insertion of the rod into the sacrum. Methods We used a screw with a polyaxial head instead of an intrasacral rod, which was inserted into the lateral sacral mass and assembled to the rod connected cephalad to pedicle screws. The dorsal side of the screw was stabilized by the sacral subchondral bone at the sacroiliac joint with iliac buttress coverage, and the tip of the screw was anchored by the sacral cortex. Results Three different cases were used to illustrate lumbosacral fixation using intrasacral screws as an anchor for the spinal instrumentation. Effective resistance of flexural bending moment and fusion were achieved in these patients at the lumbosacral level. Conclusions An intrasacral screw can be stabilized by subchondral bone with iliac buttress coverage at the dorsal and ventral sacral cortex. Posterior spinal fusion with this screw technique enables easier assembly of the instrumentation and presents better stabilization than that provided by the previously reported intrasacral rod technique for correction and fusion of thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis. PMID:25050132

  15. Diabetic thoracic radiculopathy: an unusual cause of post-thoracotomy pain.

    PubMed

    Brewer, R; Bedlack, R; Massey, E

    2003-05-01

    Persistent pain is common following thoracotomy. A 64-year-old retired electrician with Type 2 diabetes presented with chest wall and abdominal pain 3 months following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Postoperatively the patient had suffered pain despite a functioning thoracic epidural catheter. Following investigation, his persistent pain was due to diabetic thoracic radiculopathy (DTR). The disorder is characterized by pain, sensory loss, abdominal and thoracic muscle weakness in patients with diabetes. As in this patient, the pain and sensory loss usually resolve within one year after onset. The disorder may be distinguished from intercostal neuralgia based upon clinical and electromyographic features. PMID:12749978

  16. Microsurgical anterior cervical foraminotomy for radiculopathy: a new approach to cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Jho, H D

    1996-02-01

    A new technique of microsurgical anterior foraminotomy was developed to improve the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. This technique provides direct anatomical decompression of the compressed nerve root by removing the compressive spondylotic spur or disc fragment. The nerve root is decompressed from its origin in the spinal cord to the point at which it passes behind the vertebral artery laterally. Because most of the disc within the intervertebral space is undisturbed, a functioning motion segment of the disc remains intact. This technique differs from that of Verbiest in that it does not directly transpose the vertebral artery. Unlike Hakuba's technique, the disc within the intervertebral disc space is not removed. PMID:8592215

  17. Isolated Painless Foot Drop due to Cerebral Infarction Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yong; Kim, Do Keun

    2015-01-01

    Although they usually originate from peripheral problems, foot drop is caused by lesions affecting the neural pathway related to dorsiflexor muscles, whether of central or peripheral origin. We present a patient with sudden isolated foot drop caused by a small infarct in the primary motor cortex mimicking a peripheral origin. This report indicates that patients presenting isolated foot drop should be managed carefully and the possibility of both central and peripheral causes should be considered. To our knowledge, this is the first report of sudden isolated foot drop caused by a cortical infarction mimicking lumbar radiculopathy. PMID:26512287

  18. A novel sling technique for microvascular decompression of a rare anomalous vertebral artery causing cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Adesh; Chandela, Sid; Langer, David; Sen, Chandranath

    2013-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy secondary to compression from congenital anomalous vertebral arteries (VAs) is a known entity. Patients present with a variety of symptoms ranging from upper-extremity numbness to true occipital neuralgia. Treatment options for extracranial tortuous VAs include conservative management or some form of surgical microvascular decompression (MVD). The authors report on a patient with a congenital anomalous VA loop causing cervical nerve root compression. Successful MVD was conducted with relief of the patient's symptoms. A novel sling technique was used for mobilization of the VA. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first MVD described utilizing this technique. PMID:23991815

  19. Complementary and Alternative Medicine for the Management of Cervical Radiculopathy: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xu; Wang, Shangquan; Li, Jinxue; Gao, Jinghua; Yu, Jie; Feng, Minshan; Zhu, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Background. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is widely applied in the clinical practice of neck pain owing to cervical radiculopathy (CR). While many systematic reviews exist in CAM to improve CR, research is distributed across population, intervention, comparison, and setting. Objective. This overview aims to summarize the characteristics and evaluate critically the evidence from systematic reviews. Methods. A comprehensive literature search was performed in the six databases without language restrictions on February 24, 2015. We had identified relevant systematic reviews that examined the subjects with neck pain due to cervical radiculopathy undergoing CAM. Two authors independently appraised the methodological quality using the revised assessment of multiple systematic reviews instrument. Results. We had included eight systematic reviews. The effectiveness and safety of acupotomy, acupuncture, Jingfukang granule, manual therapies, and cervical spine manipulation were investigated. Based on available evidence, the systematic reviews supported various forms of CAM for CR. Nevertheless, the methodological quality for most of systematic reviews was low or moderate. In addition, adverse reactions of primary studies were infrequent. Conclusions. Current systematic reviews showed potential advantages to CAM for CR. Due to the frequently poor methodological quality of primary studies, the conclusions should be treated with caution for clinical practice. PMID:26345336

  20. The comparison of the efficacy of radiofrequency nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression in lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adakli, Barıs; Turhan, K. Sanem Cakar; Asik, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common clinical condition causing medical, socioeconomic, and treatment difficulties. In our study, we aimed to compare early and long-term efficacy of lumbar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC) nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression (TDD) in patients with lumbar radiculopathy in whom previous conventional therapy had failed. The medical records of 37 patients undergoing TDD and 36 patients undergoing lumbar RFTC nucleoplasty were retrospectively examined and assigned to the Group D and Group N, respectively. In all patients Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Functional Rating Index (FRI) were recorded before treatment and after one, six and twelve months after the procedure. The North American Spine Society Satisfaction Scale (NASSSS) was also recoreded twelve months after the therapeutic procedure. Statistically significant postprocedural improvement in VAS and FRI was evident in both groups. VAS scores after one, six, and twelve month were slightly higher in Group N, compared to Group D. The overall procedure-related patient satisfaction ratio was 67.5% in the Group D, compared to 75% in the Group N. Regardless of the different mechanism of action, both methods are effective therapies for lumbar radiculopathy, with TDD showing long-term lower pain scores. PMID:26042514

  1. Comparison of histopathologic changes following X-irradiation of mid-thoracic and lumbosacral levels of neonatal rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, J.K.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1985-02-01

    Light microscopic changes were studied in the dorsal funiculi of spinal cords from rats irradiated (4000 R) at 3 days of age and killed from 9-60 days postirradiation (P-I). The irradiated site was limited to a 5-mm length of mid-thoracic spinal cord (T only) in one group of rats, to a 5-mm length of lumbosacral spinal cord (L only) in a second group, and to 5-mm lengths of both mid-thoracic and lumbosacral spinal cord (T/L) in the third group. Changes in the lumbosacral regions were essentially the same in both L only and T/L irradiated groups. These changes included a decreased neuroglial population and a concurrent state of hypomyelination from 9-30 days P-I. In contrast, in the mid-thoracic regions of T only and T/L irradiated groups the decrease in the neuroglial population was obvious only through 13 days P-I, and by 30 days this population resembled that of the controls. The irradiated mid-thoracic areas were hypomyelinated, with the fasciculus gracilis showing a greater degree of hypomyelination than the fasciculus cuneatus. By 25 days P-I, myelination appeared to be normal in these areas. Scattered hemorrhages were noted in both lumbosacral and mid-thoracic regions, but necrotic areas occurred only at the lumbosacral level. In general, the mid-thoracic area appeared to be less sensitive to x-radiation at 3 days of age than the lumbosacral area. These data suggest that there may be marked differences in the developmental states of cells at these two levels at 3 days of age.

  2. Feasibility of a deepithelialized superior gluteal artery perforator propeller flap for various lumbosacral defects.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Ho; Choi, Jang-Youn; Lee, Jung-Ho; Oh, Deuk-Young; Rhie, Jong-Won; Ahn, Sang-Tae

    2015-05-01

    Skin and soft tissue defects in the lumbosacral area are commonly encountered in the field of reconstructive surgery, and it is well documented that the superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap provides excellent coverage of these defects. In this article, we describe our experience using a modified version of the SGAP propeller flap, in which the distal redundant portion of an elevated SGAP flap is deepithelialized, thereby maximizing the effect of the soft tissue augmentation. Thirteen patients with lumbosacral soft tissue defects treated between May 2010 and June 2012 were included in this study. The wound causes were pressure ulcer (n = 9), pseudomeningocele (n = 2), and hardware exposure (n = 2). In all patients, an elevated SGAP flap was rotated 180 degrees over the defect area and the extra distal portion of the flap was deepithelialized and used as a soft tissue filler or tamponade. During the follow-up period (mean, 26 months), 12 of 13 flaps survived completely. One flap was totally necrosed due to progressive venous congestion and was reconstructed with local advancement flaps. No further complications were noted. Because of the redundancy and pliability of the tissue in the gluteal area, a flap relatively wider or longer than the defect can be elevated safely. Hence, the redundant tissue volume can be tucked inside to facilitate soft tissue augmentation of the area. We propose that the deepithelialized version of the SGAP propeller flap is an effective option for the reconstruction of various lumbosacral soft tissue defects because it offers thick and healthy soft tissue from a distant site to the defect areas. PMID:24149404

  3. A Consistent, Quantifiable, and Graded Rat Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Junxiang; Sun, Dongming; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop a rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury (SCI) model that causes consistent motoneuronal loss and behavior deficits. Most SCI models focus on the thoracic or cervical spinal cord. Lumbosacral SCI accounts for about one third of human SCI but no standardized lumbosacral model is available for evaluating therapies. Twenty-six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to three groups: sham (n=9), 25 mm (n=8), and 50 mm (n=9). Sham rats had laminectomy only, while 25 mm and 50 mm rats were injured by dropping a 10 g rod from a height of 25 mm or 50 mm, respectively, onto the L4-5 spinal cord at the T13/L1 vertebral junction. We measured footprint length (FL), toe spreading (TS), intermediate toe spreading (ITS), and sciatic function index (SFI) from walking footprints, and static toe spreading (STS), static intermediate toe spreading (SITS), and static sciatic index (SSI) from standing footprints. At six weeks, we assessed neuronal and white matter loss, quantified axons, diameter, and myelin thickness in the peroneal and tibial nerves, and measured cross-sectional areas of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. The result shows that peroneal and tibial motoneurons were respectively distributed in 4.71 mm and 5.01 mm columns in the spinal cord. Dropping a 10-g weight from 25 mm or 50 mm caused 1.5 mm or 3.75 mm gaps in peroneal and tibial motoneuronal columns, respectively, and increased spinal cord white matter loss. Fifty millimeter contusions significantly increased FL and reduced TS, ITS, STS, SITS, SFI, and SSI more than 25 mm contusions, and resulted in smaller axon and myelinated axon diameters in tibial and peroneal nerves and greater atrophy of gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis muscles, than 25 mm contusions. This model of lumbosacral SCI produces consistent and graded loss of white matter, motoneuronal loss, peripheral nerve axonal changes, and anterior tibialis

  4. A consistent, quantifiable, and graded rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury model.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junxiang; Sun, Dongming; Tan, Jun; Young, Wise

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury (SCI) model that causes consistent motoneuronal loss and behavior deficits. Most SCI models focus on the thoracic or cervical spinal cord. Lumbosacral SCI accounts for about one third of human SCI but no standardized lumbosacral model is available for evaluating therapies. Twenty-six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to three groups: sham (n=9), 25 mm (n=8), and 50 mm (n=9). Sham rats had laminectomy only, while 25 mm and 50 mm rats were injured by dropping a 10 g rod from a height of 25 mm or 50 mm, respectively, onto the L4-5 spinal cord at the T13/L1 vertebral junction. We measured footprint length (FL), toe spreading (TS), intermediate toe spreading (ITS), and sciatic function index (SFI) from walking footprints, and static toe spreading (STS), static intermediate toe spreading (SITS), and static sciatic index (SSI) from standing footprints. At six weeks, we assessed neuronal and white matter loss, quantified axons, diameter, and myelin thickness in the peroneal and tibial nerves, and measured cross-sectional areas of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. The result shows that peroneal and tibial motoneurons were respectively distributed in 4.71 mm and 5.01 mm columns in the spinal cord. Dropping a 10-g weight from 25 mm or 50 mm caused 1.5 mm or 3.75 mm gaps in peroneal and tibial motoneuronal columns, respectively, and increased spinal cord white matter loss. Fifty millimeter contusions significantly increased FL and reduced TS, ITS, STS, SITS, SFI, and SSI more than 25 mm contusions, and resulted in smaller axon and myelinated axon diameters in tibial and peroneal nerves and greater atrophy of gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis muscles, than 25 mm contusions. This model of lumbosacral SCI produces consistent and graded loss of white matter, motoneuronal loss, peripheral nerve axonal changes, and anterior tibialis and

  5. Effects of intrathecal baclofen on lumbosacral and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Kofler, M; Donovan, W H; Loubser, P G; Berić, A

    1992-04-01

    We analyzed lumbosacral and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials in three spinal cord injury patients undergoing evaluation of intrathecal baclofen infusion for management of spasticity. The cauda equina propagating root wave (R wave) and conus medullaris postsynaptic responses (S and P waves) were analyzed before and during baclofen infusion. Baclofen abolished the concomitantly recorded H-reflex and markedly suppressed the P wave amplitude and area. The S wave amplitude and area were suppressed to a lesser degree. In contrast, there were no significant changes in cortical somatosensory evoked potentials. PMID:1565243

  6. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous navigated guidewireless lumbosacral pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin S; Park, Paul

    2016-07-01

    This video details the minimally invasive approach for treatment of a symptomatic Grade II lytic spondylolisthesis with high-grade foraminal stenosis. In this procedure, the use of a navigated, guidewireless technique for percutaneous pedicle screw placement at the lumbosacral junction is highlighted following initial decompression and transforaminal interbody fusion. Key steps of the procedure are delineated that include positioning, exposure, technique for interbody fusion, intraoperative image acquisition, and use of a concise 2-step process for navigated screw placement without using guidewires. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/2u6H4Pc_8To . PMID:27364422

  7. Brain meningioma with initial manifestation similar to cervical radiculopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Hong, Chang-Zern; Wu, Wei-Ting; Li, Kun-Ta; Chou, Li-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Meningiomas are the most common benign brain tumors, and are characterized by slow growth and a long asymptomatic period. Once the tumor becomes symptomatic, the various presentations may be related to the location and compression of adjacent structures. Meningioma is primarily treated through surgical intervention, and thus earlier diagnosis is likely to result in better prognosis. The symptoms of the meningioma may mimic other diseases, making precise diagnosis difficult, which will then delay treatment. We report a case of brain meningioma that showed initial signs and symptoms similar to cervical radiculopathy. The symptoms extended gradually, and the ultimate diagnosis of meningioma was confirmed based on brain-image studies. After brain-tumor excision, postoperation radiotherapy, and aggressive rehabilitation, the patient was able to perform better in daily activities. PMID:25028552

  8. Preoperative education for lumbar radiculopathy: A survey of US spine surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S.; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J.

    2012-01-01

    Background We sought to determine current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Methods An online cross-sectional survey was used to study a random sample of spine surgeons in the United States. The Spinal Surgery Education Questionnaire (SSEQ) was developed based on previous related surveys and assessed for face and content validity by an expert panel. The SSEQ captured information on demographics, content, delivery methods, utilization, and importance of preoperative education as rated by surgeons. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the current utilization, importance, content, and delivery methods of preoperative education by spine surgeons in the United States for patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Results Of 200 surgeons, 89 (45% response rate) responded to the online survey. The majority (64.2%) provide preoperative education informally during the course of clinical consultation versus a formal preoperative education session. The mean time from the decision to undergo surgery to the date of surgery was 33.65 days. The highest rated educational topics are surgical procedure (96.3%), complications (96.3%), outcomes/expectations (93.8%), anatomy (92.6%), amount of postoperative pain expected (90.1%), and hospital stay (90.1%). Surgeons estimated spending approximately 20% of the preoperative education time specifically addressing pain. Seventy-five percent of the surgeons personally provide the education, and nearly all surgeons (96.3%) use verbal communication with the use of a spine model. Conclusions Spine surgeons believe that preoperative education is important and use a predominantly biomedical approach in preparing patients for surgery. Larger studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:25694882

  9. Role of 3D MRI with proset technique in the evaluation of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grasso, D; Borreggine, C; Melchionda, D; Bristogiannis, C; Stoppino, L P; Macarini, L

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate the effectiveness of 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (3D MRI) using the ProSet technique in the diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy and to compare morphological findings with clinical and neurophysiological data. 40 patients suffering from L5 or S1 mono-radiculopathy caused by a disc herniation were evaluated through preliminary clinical assessment and electromyography (EMG) technique. Both conventional spin-echo sequences and 3D coronal FFE with selective water excitation (ProSet imaging) were acquired. Indentation, swelling and tilt angle of the nerve root were assessed by means of a 3D MR radiculography. 3D ProSet multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) were used for quantitative measurements of L5 and S1 nerve root widths. Widths of the symptomatic nerve root were compared with those of the contralateral nerve. Data were processed using Epi Info 3.3 software (CDC, Atlanta, GA, USA) and were compared through a paired t-Student test. We observed an abnormal tilt angle in 22 patients (57,2 percent, P less than 0.05). Morphologic alterations such as monolateral swelling or indentation of the involved roots were found in 36 patients (90 percent, P less than0.01) using 3D MR radiculography. In 10 patients, EMG revealed more nerve roots involved, while 3D FFE with ProSet technique shows a single root involved. In 2 patients, alterations were demonstrated only through EMG technique. We suggest that 3D MR radiculography can provide more information than other techniques about symptomatic disc herniation, supporting the detection of morphological changes of all nerve segments. 3D FFE with ProSet technique demonstrates high sensibility to exactly identify the level of the root involved and can provide an extremely useful tool to lead a surgical planning. PMID:24152846

  10. MRI findings of lumbosacral metastasis from occult follicular thyroid cancer: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Çoban, Gökçen; Yildirim, Erkan; Gemici, Kazim; Erinanç, Hilal

    2014-03-01

    A 63-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with bowel and bladder incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 13 × 12 × 12 cm mass invading the posterior regions of the L4, L5, S1 and S2 vertebrae with broad paravertebral soft tissue invasion. A Tru-cut biopsy of the mass was performed. The histopathological examination revealed metastatic follicular carcinoma of the thyroid. Thyroid functional tests were within the normal limits. Thyroid sonography revealed a heterogeneous, ill-defined, 14 × 9 mm hypoechoic solid nodule in the right lobe of the thyroid gland. On thyroid scintigraphy, an area of focal hyperactivity was detected in the right lobe at the nodule localization. Total thyroidectomy was performed, and the primary tumor pathology was determined to be follicular thyroid cancer. To our knowledge, only a few cases of lumbosacral cord compression as the initial manifestation of follicular thyroid carcinoma have been reported in the literature. We aimed to discuss the MRI findings of tumors in this age group with lumbosacral localization. PMID:23129029

  11. The Influence of “wuqinxi” exercises on the Lumbosacral Multifidus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Bai, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of the five animals (wuqinxi) exercises on the lumbosacral multifidus. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled two groups of volunteers, 15 volunteers who did the five animals exercises, the experimental group, and 15 volunteers who did aerobic exercise (walking), the control group. Both before and after the 1 year exercise intervention, the average surface electromyography (ASEMG) of the two groups in the process of flexion and extension was recorded and analyzed using DASYLab10.0 software, and the flexion extension ratio (FER) was calculated. [Results] The ASEMG in the process of flexion was lower than the ASEMG in the process of extension both before and after the 1 year exercise intervention on both sides of all volunteers. There was no significant difference in FER between the experimental group and control group before the 1 year exercise intervention; however, the FER of experimental group was lower than that of the control group after the 1 year exercise intervention. There was no significant difference between the two sides in any individual both before and after the 1 year exercise intervention in both groups. [Conclusion] The “wuqinxi” exercises improved the function of the lumbosacral multifidus, and might be an alternative method of reducing low back pain. PMID:25013288

  12. Comparison between methods of assessing lumbosacral curve obtained by radiographic image

    PubMed Central

    Vacari, Daiane Aparecida; Neves, Eduardo Borba; Ulbricht, Leandra

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the correlation between different radiographic methods in the evaluation of the lumbosacral concavity. METHODS: The sample consisted of 52 individuals with ages ranging from 18 to 28 years old. The procedures related to radiographic image collection were carried out in collaboration with a diagnostic imaging center of a hospital in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. The angles of the lumbosacral concavity were evaluated by the following methods: Centroid, Cobb1L1-S1, Cobb2L1-L5, Cobb3L2-S1 Cobb4T12-S1, Posterior Tangent and Trall. RESULTS: High correlation coefficients (r ranging from 0.77 to 0.89) were found among variations of the Cobb method. Additionally, we propose a categorical classification of angle values obtained by each method. We also analyzed the influence of the level of the inflection point between the lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis in determining the evaluation method to be used. The inflection point had a higher incidence in the region between the twelfth thoracic vertebra and the first lumbar vertebra (63.5%). CONCLUSION: The correlation and agreement between methods vary considerably. Moreover, the thoracolumbar inflection point should be considered when choosing the method of assessing patients. Level of Evidence I, Diagnostic Study. PMID:27069403

  13. Mapping the cellular electrophysiology of rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones to their roles in cardiorespiratory reflex integration: a whole cell recording study in situ

    PubMed Central

    Stalbovskiy, Alexey O; Briant, Linford J B; Paton, Julian F R; Pickering, Anthony E

    2014-01-01

    Sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) convey sympathetic activity flowing from the CNS to the periphery to reach the target organs. Although previous in vivo and in vitro cell recording studies have explored their electrophysiological characteristics, it has not been possible to relate these characteristics to their roles in cardiorespiratory reflex integration. We used the working heart–brainstem preparation to make whole cell patch clamp recordings from T3–4 SPNs (n = 98). These SPNs were classified by their distinct responses to activation of the peripheral chemoreflex, diving response and arterial baroreflex, allowing the discrimination of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVClike, 39%) from cutaneous vasoconstrictor-like (CVClike, 28%) SPNs. The MVClike SPNs have higher baseline firing frequencies (2.52 ± 0.33 Hz vs. CVClike 1.34 ± 0.17 Hz, P = 0.007). The CVClike have longer after-hyperpolarisations (314 ± 36 ms vs. MVClike 191 ± 13 ms, P < 0.001) and lower input resistance (346 ± 49  MΩ vs. MVClike 496 ± 41 MΩ, P < 0.05). MVClike firing was respiratory-modulated with peak discharge in the late inspiratory/early expiratory phase and this activity was generated by both a tonic and respiratory-modulated barrage of synaptic events that were blocked by intrathecal kynurenate. In contrast, the activity of CVClike SPNs was underpinned by rhythmical membrane potential oscillations suggestive of gap junctional coupling. Thus, we have related the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of two classes of SPNs in situ to their roles in cardiorespiratory reflex integration and have shown that they deploy different cellular mechanisms that are likely to influence how they integrate and shape the distinctive sympathetic outputs. PMID:24665100

  14. Mapping the cellular electrophysiology of rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones to their roles in cardiorespiratory reflex integration: a whole cell recording study in situ.

    PubMed

    Stalbovskiy, Alexey O; Briant, Linford J B; Paton, Julian F R; Pickering, Anthony E

    2014-05-15

    Sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) convey sympathetic activity flowing from the CNS to the periphery to reach the target organs. Although previous in vivo and in vitro cell recording studies have explored their electrophysiological characteristics, it has not been possible to relate these characteristics to their roles in cardiorespiratory reflex integration. We used the working heart-brainstem preparation to make whole cell patch clamp recordings from T3-4 SPNs (n = 98). These SPNs were classified by their distinct responses to activation of the peripheral chemoreflex, diving response and arterial baroreflex, allowing the discrimination of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVC(like), 39%) from cutaneous vasoconstrictor-like (CVC(like), 28%) SPNs. The MVC(like) SPNs have higher baseline firing frequencies (2.52 ± 0.33 Hz vs. CVC(like) 1.34 ± 0.17 Hz, P = 0.007). The CVC(like) have longer after-hyperpolarisations (314 ± 36 ms vs. MVC(like) 191 ± 13 ms, P < 0.001) and lower input resistance (346 ± 49 MΩ vs. MVC(like) 496 ± 41 MΩ, P < 0.05). MVC(like) firing was respiratory-modulated with peak discharge in the late inspiratory/early expiratory phase and this activity was generated by both a tonic and respiratory-modulated barrage of synaptic events that were blocked by intrathecal kynurenate. In contrast, the activity of CVC(like) SPNs was underpinned by rhythmical membrane potential oscillations suggestive of gap junctional coupling. Thus, we have related the intrinsic electrophysiological properties of two classes of SPNs in situ to their roles in cardiorespiratory reflex integration and have shown that they deploy different cellular mechanisms that are likely to influence how they integrate and shape the distinctive sympathetic outputs. PMID:24665100

  15. Lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap: a salvage tool for extended lumbo-sacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization.

    PubMed

    di Summa, Pietro Giovanni; Schaffer, Clara; Zaugg, Patrice; Bauquis, Olivier; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old man presenting an extensive lumbosacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization following unstable pelvic fracture. Coverage of the defect was performed using two extended lumbar artery perforator flaps in a propeller fashion. Good functional and esthetic result was achieved at one-year follow-up. PMID:27583264

  16. Lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap: a salvage tool for extended lumbo-sacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization

    PubMed Central

    di Summa, Pietro Giovanni; Schaffer, Clara; Zaugg, Patrice; Bauquis, Olivier; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a 52-year-old man presenting an extensive lumbosacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization following unstable pelvic fracture. Coverage of the defect was performed using two extended lumbar artery perforator flaps in a propeller fashion. Good functional and esthetic result was achieved at one-year follow-up.

  17. Lumbosacral multiradiculopathy responsive to antibiotic therapy: description of four patients with lumbar spondylosis and a superimposed Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Luigetti, Marco; Vollaro, Stefano; Corbetto, Marzia; Salomone, Gaetano; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    Lyme disease is a diffuse zoonosis caused by spirochaetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex. Neurological manifestations of the disease, involving central or peripheral nervous system, are common. This study describes four consecutive patients with an MRI-proven lumbosacral spondylosis, who complained of progressive worsening of symptoms in the last months in which serological evaluation suggested a superimposed B. Burgdorferi infection. Four patients, all from the Lazio region, were admitted to the Department of Neurology. Extensive laboratory studies and clinical, anamnestic and neurophysiological evaluation were performed in all cases. In all cases, anamnesis revealed a previous diagnosis of lumbosacral foraminal stenosis. Clinical and neurophysiological findings were consistent with a lumbosacral multiradiculopathy. Considering serological evaluation suggestive of a superimposed B. burgdorferi infection a proper antibiotic therapy was started. All cases showed a marked improvement of symptoms. Clinicians should be aware that in all cases of lumbosacral multiradiculopathy, even if a mechanical cause is documented, B. burgdorferi may be a simply treatable condition. PMID:24515913

  18. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  19. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, Du Hwan; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-04-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  20. Epidural Steroid Injections for the Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy in Elite Wrestlers: Case Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Randy; Doyle, Matthew; Sybrowsky, Christian; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background Elite wrestlers place tremendous stress through their cervical spine. These athletes are at risk for cervical trauma and may develop radiculopathy from recurrent episodes of injury. Team physicians and athletic trainers are faced with the challenge of treating these injuries in such a way as to allow the athlete to safely and expeditiously return to competition. Epidural steroid injections can be a successful complement to a conservative treatment algorithm for these complex injuries. Study Design Case Series Methods Five upper-level NCAA collegiate wrestlers who experienced symptomatic cervical radiculopathy were identified from an archival review. The majority of the athletes had MRI evidence of cervical disc disease, with corresponding subjective complaints and physical examination findings including pain and weakness that precluded continued competition. All athletes were treated conservatively with initial activity modification, strengthening, rehabilitation, NSAIDs, and, ultimately, cervical epidural steroid injections. Results All five athletes successfully returned to competition without negative clinical sequelae or need for operative intervention. The athletes demonstrated subjective improvement in their symptoms and strength, and all were able to return to a high level of competition. The cervical epidural steroid injections were found to be safe, effective, and well tolerated in all of the athletes. Conclusions Elite wrestlers with cervical radiculopathy can be effectively and safely managed with a conservative regimen that includes cervical epidural steroid injections, which may allow them to continue to compete at a high level. PMID:23576942

  1. Effects of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on cervical radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a common symptom in most patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy. However, some conservative treatments are limited by their modest effectiveness. On the other hand, surgical intervention for cervical disc disorders is indicated when symptoms are refractory to conservative treatments and neurological symptoms are progressive. Many patients use complementary and alternative medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, to address their symptoms. The purpose of the present study is to examine the efficacy and safety of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, for neck pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Methods/design A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Qishe Pill is proposed. The study will include 240 patients from five sites across China and diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy, according to the following inclusion criteria: age 18 to 65 with pain or stiffness in the neck for at least 2 weeks (neck disability index score 25 or more) and accompanying arm pain that radiates distally from the elbow. Qualified participants will be randomly allocated into two groups: Qishe Pill group and placebo group. The prescription of the trial medications (Qishe Pill/placebo) are 3.75 g each twice a day for 28 consecutive days. The primary outcome is pain severity. Secondary outcomes are functional status, patient satisfaction, and adverse events as reported in the trial. Discussion Qishe Pill is composed of processed Radix Astragali, Muscone, Szechuan Lovage Rhizome, Radix Stephaniae Tetrandrae, Ovientvine, and Calculus Bovis Artifactus. According to modern research and preparation standards, Qishe Pill is developed to improve on the various symptoms of cervical radiculopathy, especially for neck pain. As it has a potential benefit in treating patients with neck pain, we designed a double-blind, prospective, randomized-controlled trial and

  2. Mass spectrometry analysis reveals non-mutated ApoA1 lumbosacral radiculoplexus amyloidoma

    PubMed Central

    Loavenbruck, Adam J.; Chaudhry, Vinay; Zeldenrust, Steven R.; Spinner, Robert J.; Theis, Jason D.; Klein, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Rarely, amyloidosis presents as a focal, macroscopic lesion involving peripheral neural tissues (amyloidoma). In all known reported cases, peripheral nerve amyloidomas have immunoglobulin light chain fibril composition and occurred in the context of paraproteinemia. Methods A 46 y.o. man presented with progressive insidious onset right lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy without paraproteinemia. MRI-targeted fascicular nerve biopsy was performed on an enlarged sciatic nerve after earlier distal fibular nerve biopsy was nondiagnostic. Laser dissected mass spectroscopy of the discovered amyloid protein was performed after immunohistochemistry failed to identify the specific amyloid protein. Complete gene sequencing of ApoA1 was performed. Results Only wild type ApoA1 amyloid was found in the congophilic component in the nerve. Discussion The case highlights the utility of MRI guided fascicular nerve biopsy combined with laser dissected mass spectrometric analysis. Importantly, the case expands the known causes of amyloidomas to include wild type ApoA1. PMID:23055319

  3. Methods for determining hip and lumbosacral joint centers in a seated position from external anatomical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junfeng; Panda, Jules; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Wang, Xuguang

    2015-01-21

    A global coordinate system (GCS) method is proposed to estimate hip and lumbosacral joint centers (HJC and LSJC) from at least three distances between joint center of interest and target anatomic landmarks (ALs). The distances from HJC and LSJC to relevant pelvis and femur ALs were analyzed with respect to usual pelvis and femur scaling dimensions. Forty six pelves and related pairs of femurs from a same sample of adult specimens were examined. The corresponding regression equations were obtained. These equations can be used to estimate HJC and LSJC in conditions where a very limited number of ALs are available: for example, during seated posture analysis as performed in the automotive industry. Compared to currently existing HJC and LSJC methods from ALs, the proposed method showed better results with an average error less than 11 mm. PMID:25497377

  4. Open pelvic fracture associated with lumbosacral dislocation and extensive perineal injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, Luigi; Castelli, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    Open pelvic fractures are caused by high-energy trauma. Injuries to other organs are common and the mortality rate can be as high as 50%. Perineal injury is reported in 5% of open pelvic fractures. We report a case of a 31-year-old man that had an open pelvic injury with Denis zone III fracture of the sacrum, lumbosacral dislocation, symphysis dislocation, bilateral pubic rami fractures and an extensile perineal wound. He underwent an early diverting colostomy in order to prevent pelvic sepsis and subsequent stage reconstruction of the pelvic ring. At a 4-year follow-up a full recovery was present. The aim of this paper is to underline the importance of a safe, approach to manage open pelvic fractures. PMID:26738461

  5. CT-guided interventional procedures for pain management in the lumbosacral spine.

    PubMed

    Gangi, A; Dietemann, J L; Mortazavi, R; Pfleger, D; Kauff, C; Roy, C

    1998-01-01

    The lumbosacral spine is the source of pain, suffering, and disability more frequently than any other part of the body. Pain in the lower back can be managed with computed tomography-guided analgesic interventional procedures, such as periradicular infiltration, percutaneous laser disk decompression, facet joint block, and percutaneous vertebroplasty. Periradicular injection of steroids provides short-term and sometimes even long-term relief of low back pain. Percutaneous laser disk decompression is used to treat radiculalgia caused by disk herniation. Facet joint block is useful in diagnosis and treatment of facet syndrome. Percutaneous vertebroplasty provides short- and long-term pain relief in patients with vertebral body disease. However, precise patient selection is essential to the success of each of these techniques. The interventional radiologist has an active role to play in minimally invasive management of lower back pain and should be part of an interdisciplinary team that determines the appropriate therapy. PMID:9599387

  6. Nationwide surveys of chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine radiography, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy: a summary of findings.

    PubMed

    Spelic, David C; Kaczmarek, Richard V; Hilohi, Mike C; Moyal, Albert E

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports findings from Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends surveys conducted in 2001, 2002, and 2003 of clinical facilities that perform routine radiographic examinations of the adult chest, abdomen, lumbosacral spine, and upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examinations. Randomly identified clinical facilities were surveyed in approximately 40 participating states. For the surveyed radiographic exams, additional facilities that use computed radiography or digital radiography were surveyed to ensure adequate sample sizes for determining comparative statistics. State radiation control personnel performed site visits and collected data on patient exposure, radiographic/fluoroscopic technique factors, image quality, and quality-control and quality-assurance practices. Results of the NEXT surveys are compared with those of previous surveys conducted in 1964 and 1970 by the U.S. Public Health Service and the Food and Drug Administration. An estimated 155 million routine adult chest exams were performed in 2001. Average patient entrance skin air kerma from chest radiography at facilities using digital-based imaging modalities was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.001), but not so for routine abdomen or lumbosacral spine radiography. Digital-based imaging showed a substantial reduction in patient exposure for the radiographic portion of the routine upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopy exam. Long-term trends in surveyed diagnostic examinations show that average patient exposures are at their lowest levels. Of concern is the observation that a substantial fraction of surveyed non-hospital sites indicated they do not regularly have a medical physics survey conducted on their radiographic equipment. These facilities are likely unaware of the radiation doses they administer to their patients. PMID:20147791

  7. Marsupialization and distal obliteration of a lumbosacral dural ectasia in a nonsyndromic, adult patient.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Lozen, Andrew; Doan, Ninh; Gelsomin, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Maiman, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Dural ectasia is frequently associated with connective tissue disorders or inflammatory conditions. Presentation in a patient without known risk factors is rare. Moreover, the literature regarding the treatment options for symptomatic dural ectasia is controversial, variable, and limited. A 62-year-old female presents with intractable, postural headaches for years. A lumbar puncture revealed opening pressure 3 cm of water. A computed tomography myelogram of the spine demonstrated erosion of her sacrum due to a large lumbosacral dural ectasia. An initial surgery was attempted to reduce the size of the expansile dura, and reconstruct the dorsal sacrum with a titanium plate (Depuy Synthes, Westchester, PA, USA) to prevent recurrence of thecal sac dilatation. Her symptoms initially improved, but shortly thereafter recurred. A second surgery was then undertaken to obliterate the thecal sac distal to the S2 nerve roots. This could not be accomplished through simple ligation of the thecal sac circumferentially as the ventral dura was noted to be incompetent and attempts to develop an extradural tissue plane were unsuccessful. Consequently, an abundance of fibrin glue was injected into the thecal sac distal to S2, and the dural ectasia was marsupialized rostrally, effectively obliterating the distal thecal sac while further reducing the size of the expansile dura. This approach significantly improved her symptoms at 5 months follow-up. Treatment of dural ectasia is not well-defined and has been variable based on the underlying manifestations. We report a rare patient without risk factors who presented with significant lumbosacral dural ectasia. Moreover, we present a novel method to treat postural headaches secondary to dural ectasia, where the thecal sac is obliterated distal to the S2 nerve roots using an abundance of fibrin glue followed by marsupialization of the thecal sac rostally. This method may offer an effective therapy option as it serves to limit the expansile

  8. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-07-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22-60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5-26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  9. Inhibitory effects of endomorphin-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in young rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Biao; Huang, Fen-Sheng; Fen, Ban; Yin, Jun-Bin; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The function of the urinary bladder is partly controlled by parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPNs) of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN). Our recent work demonstrated that endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-immunoreactive (IR) terminals form synapses with μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-expressing PPNs in the rat SPN. Here, we examined the effects of EM-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of the PPNs in young rats (24-30 days old) using a whole-cell patch-clamp approach. PPNs were identified by retrograde labeling with the fluorescent tracer tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR). EM-2 (3 μM) markedly decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of the spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and mEPSCs) of PPNs. EM-2 not only decreased the resting membrane potentials (RMPs) in 61.1% of the examined PPNs with half-maximal response at the concentration of 0.282 μM, but also increased the rheobase current and reduced the repetitive action potential firing of PPNs. Analysis of the current-voltage relationship revealed that the EM-2-induced current was reversed at -95 ± 2.5 mV and was suppressed by perfusion of the potassium channel blockers 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or BaCl2 or by the addition of guanosine 5'-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt (GDP-β-S) to the pipette solution, suggesting the involvement of the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel. The above EM-2-invoked inhibitory effects were abolished by the MOR selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), indicating that the effects of EM-2 on PPNs were mediated by MOR via pre- and/or post-synaptic mechanisms. EM-2 activated pre- and post-synaptic MORs, inhibiting excitatory neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic terminals and decreasing the excitability of PPNs due to hyperpolarization of their membrane potentials, respectively. These inhibitory effects of EM-2 on PPNs at the spinal cord level may explain

  10. Inhibitory effects of endomorphin-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in young rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Biao; Huang, Fen-Sheng; Fen, Ban; Yin, Jun-Bin; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The function of the urinary bladder is partly controlled by parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPNs) of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN). Our recent work demonstrated that endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-immunoreactive (IR) terminals form synapses with μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-expressing PPNs in the rat SPN. Here, we examined the effects of EM-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of the PPNs in young rats (24–30 days old) using a whole-cell patch-clamp approach. PPNs were identified by retrograde labeling with the fluorescent tracer tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR). EM-2 (3 μM) markedly decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of the spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and mEPSCs) of PPNs. EM-2 not only decreased the resting membrane potentials (RMPs) in 61.1% of the examined PPNs with half-maximal response at the concentration of 0.282 μM, but also increased the rheobase current and reduced the repetitive action potential firing of PPNs. Analysis of the current–voltage relationship revealed that the EM-2-induced current was reversed at −95 ± 2.5 mV and was suppressed by perfusion of the potassium channel blockers 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or BaCl2 or by the addition of guanosine 5′-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt (GDP-β-S) to the pipette solution, suggesting the involvement of the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel. The above EM-2-invoked inhibitory effects were abolished by the MOR selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), indicating that the effects of EM-2 on PPNs were mediated by MOR via pre- and/or post-synaptic mechanisms. EM-2 activated pre- and post-synaptic MORs, inhibiting excitatory neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic terminals and decreasing the excitability of PPNs due to hyperpolarization of their membrane potentials, respectively. These inhibitory effects of EM-2 on PPNs at the spinal cord level may

  11. Preoperative therapeutic neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a single-case fMRI report.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina; Peoples, Randal R

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mainly chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This case study aims to describe the changes in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning, before and after the application of a newly-designed preoperative TNE program. A 30-year-old female with a current acute episode of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy participated in a single preoperative TNE session. She completed pre- and post-education measures including visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP and leg pain; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ); Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and a series of Likert-scale questions regarding beliefs and attitudes to lumbar surgery (LS). After a 30-minute TNE session, ODI decreased by 10%, PCS decreased by 10 points and her beliefs and attitudes shifted positively regarding LS. Immediately following TNE straight leg raise increased by 7° and forward flexion by 8 cm. fMRI testing following TNE revealed 3 marked differences compared to pre-education scanning: (1) deactivation of the periaqueductal gray area; (2) deactivation of the cerebellum; and (3) increased activation of the motor cortex. The immediate positive fMRI, psychometric and physical movement changes may indicate a cortical mechanism of TNE for patients scheduled for LS. PMID:26395827

  12. Resolution of pronounced painless weakness arising from radiculopathy and disk extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lipetz, Jason S; Misra, Neelam; Silber, Jeff S

    2005-07-01

    In this retrospective, consecutive case series, we report the nonsurgical and rehabilitation outcomes of consecutive patients who presented with pronounced painless weakness arising from disk extrusion. Seven consecutive patients who chose physiatric care were followed clinically, and strength return was monitored. Each presented with predominantly painless radiculopathy, functionally significant strength loss, and radiographic evidence of disk extrusion or sequestration. Each patient participated in a targeted strengthening program, and in some cases, transforaminal injection therapy was employed. Each patient demonstrated an eventual full functional recovery. In most cases, electrodiagnostic studies were performed and included a needle examination of the affected limb and compound muscle action potentials from the most clinically relevant and weakened limb muscle. The electrodiagnostic findings and, in particular, the quantitative compound muscle action potential data seemed to correlate with the timing of motor recovery. Patients with predominantly painless and significant weakness arising from disk extrusion can demonstrate successful rehabilitation outcomes. Despite a relative absence of pain, such patients can present with a more rapidly reversible neurapraxic type of weakness. The more quantitative compound muscle action potential data obtained through electrodiagnostic studies may offer the treating physician an additional means of characterizing the type of neuronal injury at play and the likelihood and timing of strength return. PMID:15973090

  13. Technique and nuances of an S-2 alar iliac screw for lumbosacral fixation in patients with transitional and normal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Junichi; Vogel, Todd D; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berven, Sigurd; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screw fixation has recently been recognized as a useful technique for pelvic fixation. The authors demonstrate two cases where S2AI fixation was indicated: one case was a sacral insufficiency fracture following a long-segment fusion in a patient with a transitional S-1 vertebra; the other case involved pseudarthrosis following lumbosacral fixation. S2AI screws offer rigid fixation, low profile, and allow easy connection to the lumbosacral rod. The authors describe and demonstrate the surgical technique and nuances for the S2AI screw in a case with transitional S-1 anatomy and in a case with normal S-1 anatomy. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Sj21lk13_aw . PMID:27364429

  14. [In vitro assessment of the lumbo-sacral spine after posterior transpedicular stabilization and anterior cage implantation].

    PubMed

    Smoczyński, Maciej; Smoczyński, Andrzej; Luczkiewicz, Piotr; Pankowski, Rafał

    2006-01-01

    The biomechanical tests were performed on 9 cadaver specimens of lumbo-sacral spine. The specimens consisted of two lumbar motion segments, sacral bone together with the sacroiliac joint and parts of pelvis. The goal of the biomechanical tests was to estimate the motion of the lumbar spine, which was stabilised by the transpedicular implant and by the intervertebral cages. The tests showed that the traspedicular stabilisation is more effective than inervetebral with cages. PMID:17128766

  15. USE OF CONTRAST-ENHANCED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY TO STUDY THE CRANIAL MIGRATION OF A LUMBOSACRAL INJECTATE IN CADAVER DOGS.

    PubMed

    Kawalilak, Lukas T; Tucker, Russell L; Greene, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Volumes used in lumbosacral epidural injections for anesthesia have remained unchanged since the 1960s. The goals of this cross-sectional observational study were to characterize the three-dimensional spread of a lumbosacral epidural injection, as well as confirm that the commonly used volume of 0.2 ml/kg injected into the lumbosacral epidural space reaches the thoracolumbar (TL) junction in the majority (≥80%) of dogs. Ten clinically normal, adult, nonpregnant, mixed-breed dogs were obtained within five minutes of euthanasia and 0.2 ml/kg of radiopaque contrast medium was injected into the lumbosacral epidural space. A computed tomography scan of the TL spine was performed immediately following the injection. Migration of contrast reached the TL junction in 8 of 10 (80%) dogs. Contrast was well visualized in all epidural planes with contrast travelling predominantly in the dorsal epidural space in 7 of 10 (70%) dogs. There was no significant difference in the weight of dogs where the epidural injectate reached the TL junction and those where it did not (P = 0.16), or in the weight of dogs where the cranial-most point of the contrast column was in the dorsal versus the ventral epidural space (P = 0.32). This preliminary study supports the use of computed tomography to characterize injectate distribution in the canine thoracolumbar epidural space and provides evidence that a 0.2-ml/kg volume is likely to reache the TL junction in most dogs. Further studies are needed in live dogs to determine if variables affecting human epidural injectate doses have similar effects in the dog. PMID:25868075

  16. Autologous Conditioned Serum as a Novel Alternative Option in the Treatment of Unilateral Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G.; Y. K., Batra

    2015-01-01

    Study Design The study was conducted on patients who received autologous conditioned serum (ACS) as a line of treatment at the Orthopedics outpatient department of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER, Chandigarh) from January 2011 to June 2012. Of the 1,224 patients, 20 males or females were included in the study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The institutional board of PGIMER approved the study before it was initiated. Purpose To study the efficacy of ACS in the treatment of unilateral lumbar radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Interleukin (IL)-1 appears to be of special importance among the cytokines identified in orthopedic diseases. ACS contains high concentrations of IL-1 receptor antagonist, antagonist to IL-1 in that is a biochemical 'sensitizer' of nerve roots in radiculopathy. Methods We included 20 patients with unilateral lumbar radiculopathy after obtaining informed consent. We prepared ACS as described by Meijer et al. Under bi-planar fluoroscopic imaging in anterior-posterior and lateral views, ACS was administered via epidural perineural technique. Patients in both groups were evaluated by quadruple visual analogue scale, straight leg raising test, revised Oswestry disability index, and 12-Item Short Form of Health Survey before and after epidural injections at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Results There was a statistically significant change in all parameters from pre-injection to first, second, and third follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions ACS can modify the disease course in addition to reducing pain, disability and improving general health. PMID:26713125

  17. The scaling of postcranial muscles in cats (Felidae) II: hindlimb and lumbosacral muscles.

    PubMed

    Cuff, Andrew R; Sparkes, Emily L; Randau, Marcela; Pierce, Stephanie E; Kitchener, Andrew C; Goswami, Anjali; Hutchinson, John R

    2016-07-01

    In quadrupeds the musculature of the hindlimbs is expected to be responsible for generating most of the propulsive locomotory forces, as well as contributing to body support by generating vertical forces. In supporting the body, postural changes from crouched to upright limbs are often associated with an increase of body mass in terrestrial tetrapods. However, felids do not change their crouched limb posture despite undergoing a 300-fold size increase between the smallest and largest extant species. Here, we test how changes in the muscle architecture (masses and lengths of components of the muscle-tendon units) of the hindlimbs and lumbosacral region are related to body mass, to assess whether there are muscular compensations for the maintenance of a crouched limb posture at larger body sizes. We use regression and principal component analyses to detect allometries in muscle architecture, with and without phylogenetic correction. Of the muscle lengths that scale allometrically, all scale with negative allometry (i.e. relative shortening with increasing body mass), whereas all tendon lengths scale isometrically. Only two muscles' belly masses and two tendons' masses scale with positive allometry (i.e. relatively more massive with increasing body mass). Of the muscles that scale allometrically for physiological cross-sectional area, all scale positively (i.e. relatively greater area with increasing body mass). These muscles are mostly linked to control of hip and thigh movements. When the architecture data are phylogenetically corrected, there are few significant results, and only the strongest signals remain. None of the vertebral muscles scaled significantly differently from isometry. Principal component analysis and manovas showed that neither body size nor locomotor mode separate the felid species in morphospace. Our results support the inference that, despite some positively allometric trends in muscle areas related to thigh movement, larger cats have

  18. Using magnetic resonance imaging to identify the lumbosacral segment in children.

    PubMed

    Milicić, Gordana; Krolo, Ivan; Vrdoljak, Javor; Marotti, Miljenko; Roić, Goran; Hat, Josip

    2006-03-01

    Identification of the lumbosacral (L-S) segment on magnetic resonance (MR) images is important for appropriate treatment of disease in the lumbosacral (L-S) area. In the study, data obtained from plain A-P radiographs of the L-S spine and sagittal MR imaging scans (sagittal T1- and T2-weighted sequences) of the L-S spine and sacrum with the coccygeal bone, are analyzed. Twenty-six children aged 10 to 14 years were examined for back pain. On the standard A-P radiographs of the L-S spine, a L-S transitional vertebra as classified according to the method of Castellvi et al. was found in 17 subjects. The problem arose as to whether this was lumbalisation or sacralisation, and how to determine which vertebra was L5 wich S1. On the sagittal MR imaging studies the same question applied. A need emerged for a simple method which would identify the L-S segment on the sagittal MR imaging studies of the L-S spine in children so that in case of a tumor, inflammation, spondilolystesis, or protrusion of a disc, the level in the L-S spine where the problem is localized can be accurately identified. To this objective we selected the method using detection of the S1 vertebra. This involved that, in addition to the sagittal MR imaging scans of the L-S spine, sagittal images of the sacrum and coccygeal bone be also obtained. on the T2-weighted sequence, the sacrum can be clearly distinquished from the coccygeal bone. By counting from the S5 up, the S1 vertebra can be accurately identified. Determination of the S1 vertebra enables detection of the L5 vertebra and, in turn, of all other lumbar vertebrae. In patients in whom a T2-weighted MR studies were done S1 could be precisely determined and so could the L5 vertebra. In this process, whether the patient had a transitional vertebra or whether there was lumbarisation or sacralisation was irrelevant. PMID:16617576

  19. Quantitative evaluation of the lumbosacral sagittal alignment in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Makirov, Serik K.; Jahaf, Mohammed T.; Nikulina, Anastasia A.

    2015-01-01

    Goal of the study This study intends to develop a method of quantitative sagittal balance parameters assessment, based on a geometrical model of lumbar spine and sacrum. Methods One hundred eight patients were divided into 2 groups. In the experimental group have been included 59 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis on L1-5 level. Forty-nine healthy volunteers without history of any lumbar spine pathlogy were included in the control group. All patients have been examined with supine MRI. Lumbar lordosis has been adopted as circular arc and described either anatomical (lumbar lordosis angle), or geometrical (chord length, circle segment height, the central angle, circle radius) parameters. Moreover, 2 sacral parameters have been assessed for all patients: sacral slope and sacral deviation angle. Both parameters characterize sacrum disposition in horizontal and vertical axis respectively. Results Significant correlation was observed between anatomical and geometrical lumbo-sacral parameters. Significant differences between stenosis group and control group were observed in the value of the “central angle” and “sacral deviation” parameters. We propose additional parameters: lumbar coefficient, as ratio of the lordosis angle to the segmental angle (Kl); sacral coefficient, as ratio of the sacral tilt (ST) to the sacral deviation (SD) angle (Ks); and assessment modulus of the mathematical difference between sacral and lumbar coefficients has been used for determining lumbosacral balance (LSB). Statistically significant differences between main and control group have been obtained for all described coefficients (p = 0.006, p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, accordingly). Median of LSB value of was 0.18 and 0.34 for stenosis and control groups, accordingly. Conclusion Based on these results we believe that that spinal stenosis is associated with an acquired deformity that is measureable by the described parameters. It's possible that spinal stenosis occurs in patients with an

  20. Studying the Effectiveness of One Type of Iranian Traditional Massage on Lumbar Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Mamak; Jafarian, Ali Akbar; tofighi, Shahram; Mahluji, Kamran; Halabchi, Farzin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low-back pain is one of the most common human morbidities worldwide, which is damaging individually, socially and economically. Recent studies have shown that its prevalence is rising. Most of the low-back pains are non-specific though specific ones need more complicated and more expensive treatments. Sciatica or lumbar radiculopathy is one of these specific low-back pains and is explained in Iranian traditional medicine textbooks in detail. Massage is one of the therapeutic modalities, advised for sciatica. Due to different aspects of sciatica in modern medicine, massage is not indicated as treatment, but it is advised in Iranian traditional medicine. In Iran, many patients resort to traditional massage for sciatica and are satisfied. Thus, the effectiveness of one type of Iranian traditional massage “Kermanshahi family” and conventional treatment were compared based on three outcomes of pain, disability, and quality of life score. Methods: A total of 50 patients were observed in two groups (25 per group) of case (massage) and control (classic treatment) in a non-randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients suffering from lumbar radicular pain for 8 weeks or longer, before referring to each center (neurosurgery or traditional massage clinic), were enrolled continuously. In the case group, patients underwent traditional massage sessions whereas in the control group they were prescribed as routine. Three outcomes were observed during three periods of before intervention, 1-month, and 3-month after intervention. Results: The mean difference of pain severity decrease in both groups was meaningful (P=0/007). The mean difference of disability decrease in both groups was meaningful (P=0/003). However, the mean difference of quality of life increase in both groups was not meaningful. Conclusion: Iranian traditional massage may be useful for the treatment of non-acute sciatica, but more studies are required to confirm and clarify the protocols.

  1. Concomitant changes in formaldehyde-induced fluorescence of dopamine interneurones and in slow inhibitory post-synaptic potentials of the rabbit superior cervical ganglion, induced by stimulation of the preganglionic nerve or by a muscarinic agent

    PubMed Central

    Libet, B.; Owman, Ch.

    1974-01-01

    1. Dopamine was identified by formaldehyde histochemistry and cytospectrofluorometry in the rabbit's superior cervical ganglion. Dopamine was localized to the intraganglionic `small intensely fluorescent' cells, and also to the characteristically beaded fibres forming a network in close contact with virtually all ganglion cell bodies. The extensive beaded fibres are therefore presumed to be processes of the small intensely fluorescent cells. 2. Changes in the dopamine content of these interneurones were studied by recording alterations in their relative fluorescence intensity in conjunction with changes in the slow inhibitory post-synaptic potential (s.-i.p.s.p.) response of the ganglion to orthodromic nerve input. 3. Dopamine content was lower after several hours in vitro even without special stimulation; this was in accord with a regularly observed spontaneous reduction of the s.-i.p.s.p. response. 4. After a period of conditioning stimulation of the preganglionic nerve, in the presence of an anticholinesterase agent (eserine) and an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis (α-methyl-p-tyrosine), the s.-i.p.s.p. was selectively and markedly reduced. The dopamine fluorescence in the small intensely fluorescent cell interneurones was also significantly reduced, to a mean value of about 55 or 60% of the fluorescence in the dopamine interneurones of the paired but unstimulated control ganglion. A significant reduction in dopamine fluorescence was always accompanied by a marked loss of s.-i.p.s.p. response; the reverse was not always true. 5. Treatment with the muscarinic agent bethanechol for 30 min, with no α-methyl-p-tyrosine or eserine present, similarly resulted in reductions in the s.-i.p.s.p. response of the ganglia and in the formaldehyde-induced fluorescence of the dopamine interneurones. 6. A functional uptake of extrinsic dopamine by the dopamine interneurones was also demonstrated: temporary exposure to dopamine restored a large fraction of both the s

  2. Preventive effect of dexamethasone gelatin sponge on the lumbosacral epidural adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fuming; Dou, Changwu; Qi, Songtao; Zhao, Liqun; Chen, Bo; Yan, Haicheng; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the preventive effect of dexamethasone gelatin sponge on the lumbosacral epidural adhesion in the laminectomy. Methods: A total of 36 Wista rats were divided into A, B, C and D groups randomly. Dexamethasone was not used in group A, Dexamethasone was used in group B, Dexamethasone was not used in group C but covered with gelatin sponge, dexamethasone gelatin sponge was used in group D. 3 rats in each group were sacrificed at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after operation respectively and the wound was opened to observe the dural scar formation and the dura adhesion. Immunohistochemical technique was used for histology observation. The expressions of VEGF and VEGFR2 in the epidural scar and surrounding tissues were detected with western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. Results: According to the Rydell score standard, there were different degree of adhesion formation in A, B and C groups while there was no obvious adhesion formation in D group. It was confirmed that the expressions of VEGF and VEGFR2 in group D were lower than that of the other groups. Conclusions: Dexamethasone gelatin sponge could significantly reduce the occurrence of epidural scar tissue hyperplasia and adhesion after laminectomy in rats, and its mechanism may be related to the decreased expression of VEGF and VEGFR2. PMID:26131126

  3. Single-level transforaminal interbody fusion for traumatic lumbosacral fracture-dislocation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anthony J; Berry, Chirag A; Rao, Raj D

    2013-02-01

    L5S1 fracture-dislocations are rare three-column injuries. The infrequency of this injury has led to a lack of a universally accepted treatment strategy. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) has been shown to be an effective approach for interbody fusion in degenerative indications, but has not been previously reported in the operative management of traumatic lumbosacral dislocation. The authors report a case of traumatic L5S1 fracture-dislocation in a 30-year-old male, presenting with a right-sided L5 neurologic deficit, following a street sweeper accident. Imaging revealed an L5S1 fracture-dislocation with fracture of the S1 body. Open reduction with TLIF and L5S1 posterolateral instrumented fusion was carried out within 24 hours of injury. Excellent reduction was obtained, and maintained at long-term follow-up, with complete resolution of pain and neurologic deficit. In this patient, L5S1 fracture-dislocation was treated successfully, with an excellent outcome, with a single level TLIF and instrumented posterolateral fusion at L5S1. PMID:23547528

  4. Stability of lumbosacral somatosensory evoked potentials in a long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Berić, A

    1988-06-01

    Variability of the lumbosacral somatosensory evoked potential (LSEP) in test/retest situations was assessed in 49 patients with nonprogressive neurological disorder and 20 healthy subjects. The average time of LSEP follow-up in the patients was 16.2 months. The first group of healthy subjects had a short test/retest period of between 2 days and 2 weeks, and the second group had a long period between tests, with a mean of 35.7 months. The R and S waves of the LSEP were analyzed separately for latency and amplitude. Test/retest differences were statistically compared. The average correlation coefficient for healthy subjects was 0.84 and for patients was 0.78. These results suggested a remarkable stability of LSEPs in both healthy subjects and patients with nonprogressive neurological disorders. Therefore, we propose that LSEPs can be used in follow-up both to screen for initial dysfunction of the sensory system and to detect any changes in present dysfunction. PMID:3386671

  5. The distribution of calcific deposits in intervertebral discs of the lumbosacral spine.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, J; Boachie-Adjei, O; Bullough, P G; Boskey, A L

    1990-05-01

    The incidence of intervertebral disc calcifications (IVDCs) was examined in 52 lumbosacral spines obtained sequentially at autopsy. The presence of calcific deposits was detected by fine-grain roentgenograms. The nature of these deposits was determined by wide-angle x-ray diffraction, and histologic observations were made. A high prevalence of IVDC, 18 spines of 52, some with multiple deposits, was noted. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposits were found in 3% of the spines and accounted for 29% of the 42 deposits analyzed. The CPPD deposits occurred at multiple disc levels (an average of four per spine), were diffuse, and involved a major portion of the disc (nucleus pulposus, annulus fibrosus, and endplate) but were not generally associated with histologic disc degeneration. Hydroxyapatite (HA) deposits occurred in 12% of the spines, most often in the nucleus pulposus and endplate. The HA deposits appeared as small punctate radiodensities. Roentgenographic evidence of degenerative changes, i.e., disc space narrowing, endplate disruption, desiccation, and osteophyte formation, were present in all but one of the spines containing HA deposits. An additional 19% of the spines had deposits that could not be characterized by x-ray diffraction but were very similar in roentgenographic appearance to HA deposits. No conclusions could be drawn on the relationship between the presence of HA or CPPD and collagen or hexosamine content. PMID:2157573

  6. Effects of lumbosacral epidural ketamine and lidocaine in xylazine-sedated cats.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, R; Benites, A P; Ferreira, J Z; Neto, J M N; Hermeto, L C

    2009-06-01

    In order to determine the analgesic and cardiovascular effects of the combination of epidural ketamine and lidocaine, 6 sedated cats were studied. Six healthy, young cats were used in a prospective randomised study. Each cat underwent 3 treatments, at least 1 week apart, via epidural injection: (1) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg), (2) lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg), and (3) ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) plus lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg). Epidural injections were administered through the lumbosacral space. Analgesia, motor block, sedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. Rectal temperature was compared before and after sedation as well as after epidural administration of the drugs. Epidural administration of the ketamine/lidocaine combination induced prolonged analgesia extending from the coccygeal to the T13-L1 dermatomes, leading to severe ataxia. Cardiovascular effects were significant in all treatments: heart rate decreased, but there was a minimal reduction in arterial pressure. It was concluded that adding a dose of ketamine to epidural lidocaine in cats is feasible and effective. PMID:19831267

  7. Valgus knee stress in lumbosacral myelomeningocele: a gait-analysis evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lim, R; Dias, L; Vankoski, S; Moore, C; Marinello, M; Sarwark, J

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-five independent community-ambulating patients with lumbosacral-level myelomeningocele (N = 50 limbs) underwent gait analysis. The limbs of these patients were divided into two groups based on thigh-foot angle (TFA): Group I (n = 20) had marked external tibial torsion, TFA > or = 20 degrees, and group II had TFA between 10 and 20 degrees. Ten limbs were excluded because of neutral or internal alignment. Twenty normal limbs with TFA = 10 degrees served as controls. An abnormal internal varus knee stress during stance was identified in all group I limbs and 12 (70%) of 20 limbs group II limbs compared with controls, which demonstrated an internal valgus stress. This internal varus moment was greater in group I limbs than in the abnormal limbs in group II (p < 0.05). Knee flexion was the only other parameter found to correlate with this stress and only in group I limbs. We conclude that (a) in this patient group, increased external tibial torsion is likely to result in an abnormal internal varus knee stress; (b) TFA > 20 degrees appears significantly to increase this stress; and (c) knee flexion is an important related parameter, but only in limbs with TFA between 10 and 20 degrees. We believe that this abnormal stress may predispose the knee to late arthrosis and that derotational osteotomies to normalize the TFA may prove to have a favorable long-term effect. PMID:9661845

  8. [Skeletal muscle magnetic resonance imaging study in a patient with diabetic lumbosacral radiculoplexus neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Nozomu; Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus developed deep aching and numbness in the right hip and lower extremity with rapid body weight loss. Neurological examination revealed weakness of the right hamstrings, tibialis anterior, and peroneus longus muscles with diminished ankle tendon reflex. We diagnosed him with diabetic lumbosacral radicuoloplexus neuropathy (DLRPN) based on neurological, radiological, and neurophysiological findings. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of skeletal muscles showed high intensity signals on T2-weighted images in bilateral hamstrings, adductor magnus and right tensor fasciae latae, and lower leg extensor muscles. The MRI findings suggested muscle edema caused by acute denervation. DLRPN, or diabetic amyotrophy, is known to be caused by ischemic axonal degeneration. Our patient showed good functional recovery, and abnormal MRI signals in the involved muscles mostly disappeared in parallel to the clinical course. Distribution of the denervated muscles suggested that our patient had either patchy lesions in the lumbosacaral plexus or mononeuropathy multiplex in the nerve branches. The current study highlights the potential of skeletal muscle MRI for clinical evaluation of DLRPN. PMID:25283832

  9. H-reflex amplitude asymmetry is an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency in patients with S1 radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Based on our clinical experience, the H-reflex amplitude asymmetry might be an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency in patients with S1 radiculopathy. However, no data to support this assumption are available. The purpose of this study was to review and report the electrophysiological changes in H-reflex amplitude and latency in patients with radiculopathy in order to determine if there is any evidence to support the assumption that H-reflex amplitude is an earlier sign of nerve root involvement than latency. Results Patients with radiculopathy showed significant amplitude asymmetry when compared with healthy controls. However, latency was not always significantly different between patients and healthy controls. These findings suggest nerve root axonal compromise that reduced reflex amplitude earlier than the latency parameter (demyelination) during the pathologic processes. Conclusion Contrary to current clinical thought, H-reflex amplitude asymmetry is an earlier sign/parameter of nerve root involvement in patients with radiculopathy compared with latency. PMID:21466665

  10. In vivo characterization of colorectal and cutaneous inputs to lumbosacral dorsal horn neurons in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Farrell, K E; Rank, M M; Keely, S; Brichta, A M; Graham, B A; Callister, R J

    2016-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom of inflammatory bowel disease and often persists in the absence of gut inflammation. Although the mechanisms responsible for ongoing pain are unknown, clinical and preclinical evidence suggests lumbosacral spinal cord dorsal horn neurons contribute to these symptoms. At present, we know little about the intrinsic and synaptic properties of this population of neurons in either normal or inflammed conditions. Therefore, we developed an in vivo preparation to make patch-clamp recordings from superficial dorsal horn (SDH) neurons receiving colonic inputs in naïve male mice. Recordings were made in the lumbosacral spinal cord (L6-S1) under isoflurane anesthesia. Noxious colorectal distension (CRD) was used to determine whether SDH neurons received inputs from mechanical stimulation/distension of the colon. Responses to hind paw/tail cutaneous stimulation and intrinsic and synaptic properties were also assessed, as well as action potential discharge properties. Approximately 11% of lumbosacral SDH neurons in the cohort of neurons sampled responded to CRD and a majority of these responses were subthreshold. Most CRD-responsive neurons (80%) also responded to cutaneous stimuli, compared with <50% of CRD-non-responsive neurons. Furthermore, CRD-responsive neurons had more hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials, larger rheobase currents, and reduced levels of excitatory drive, compared to CRD-non-responsive neurons. Our results demonstrate that CRD-responsive neurons can be distinguished from CRD-non-responsive neurons by several differences in their membrane properties and excitatory synaptic inputs. We also demonstrate that SDH neurons with colonic inputs show predominately subthreshold responses to CRD and exhibit a high degree of viscerosomatic convergence. PMID:26708745

  11. Effects of Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing after Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rejc, Enrico; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Sensory and motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered functionally complete resulting in permanent paralysis with no recovery of voluntary movement, standing or walking. Previous findings demonstrated that lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation can activate the spinal neural networks in one individual with motor complete, but sensory incomplete SCI, who achieved full body weight-bearing standing with independent knee extension, minimal self-assistance for balance and minimal external assistance for facilitating hip extension. In this study, we showed that two clinically sensory and motor complete participants were able to stand over-ground bearing full body-weight without any external assistance, using their hands to assist balance. The two clinically motor complete, but sensory incomplete participants also used minimal external assistance for hip extension. Standing with the least amount of assistance was achieved with individual-specific stimulation parameters, which promoted overall continuous EMG patterns in the lower limbs’ muscles. Stimulation parameters optimized for one individual resulted in poor standing and additional need of external assistance for hip and knee extension in the other participants. During sitting, little or negligible EMG activity of lower limb muscles was induced by epidural stimulation, showing that the weight-bearing related sensory information was needed to generate sufficient EMG patterns to effectively support full weight-bearing standing. In general, electrode configurations with cathodes selected in the caudal region of the array at relatively higher frequencies (25–60 Hz) resulted in the more effective EMG patterns for standing. These results show that human spinal circuitry can generate motor patterns effective for standing in the absence of functional supraspinal connections; however the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters is critical. PMID:26207623

  12. Effects of paired transcutaneous electrical stimulation delivered at single and dual sites over lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Sayenko, Dimitry G; Atkinson, Darryn A; Floyd, Terrance C; Gorodnichev, Ruslan M; Moshonkina, Tatiana R; Harkema, Susan J; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury P

    2015-11-16

    It was demonstrated previously that transcutaneous electrical stimulation of multiple sites over the spinal cord is more effective in inducing robust locomotor behavior as compared to the stimulation of single sites alone in both animal and human models. To explore the effects and mechanisms of interactions during multi-site spinal cord stimulation we delivered transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the single or dual locations over the spinal cord corresponding to approximately L2 and S1 segments. Spinally evoked motor potentials in the leg muscles were investigated using single and paired pulses of 1ms duration with conditioning-test intervals (CTIs) of 5 and 50ms. We observed considerable post-stimulation modulatory effects which depended on CTIs, as well as on whether the paired stimuli were delivered at a single or dual locations, the rostro-caudal relation between the conditioning and test stimuli, and on the muscle studied. At CTI-5, the paired stimulation delivered at single locations (L2 or S1) provided strong inhibitory effects, evidenced by the attenuation of the compound responses as compared with responses from either single site. In contrast, during L2-S1 paradigm, the compound responses were potentiated. At CTI-50, the magnitude of inhibition did not differ among paired stimulation paradigms. Our results suggest that electrical stimuli delivered to dual sites over the lumbosacral enlargement in rostral-to-caudal order, may recruit different populations of motor neurons initially through projecting sensory and intraspinal connections and then directly, resulting in potentiation of the compound spinally evoked motor potentials. The interactive and synergistic effects indicate multi-segmental convergence of descending and ascending influences on the neuronal circuitries during electrical spinal cord stimulation. PMID:26453766

  13. Effect of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy: multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Tore K; Romner, Bertil; Wilsgaard, Tom; Twisk, Jos; Anke, Audny; Nygaard, Øystein; Hasvold, Toralf; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy of caudal epidural steroid or saline injection in chronic lumbar radiculopathy in the short (6 weeks), intermediate (12 weeks), and long term (52 weeks). Design Multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial. Setting Outpatient multidisciplinary back clinics of five Norwegian hospitals. Participants Between October 2005 and February 2009, 461 patients assessed for inclusion (presenting with lumbar radiculopathy >12 weeks). 328 patients excluded for cauda equina syndrome, severe paresis, severe pain, previous spinal injection or surgery, deformity, pregnancy, ongoing breast feeding, warfarin therapy, ongoing treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, body mass index >30, poorly controlled psychiatric conditions with possible secondary gain, and severe comorbidity. Interventions Subcutaneous sham injections of 2 mL 0.9% saline, caudal epidural injections of 30 mL 0.9% saline, and caudal epidural injections of 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide in 29 mL 0.9% saline. Participants received two injections with a two week interval. Main outcome measures Primary: Oswestry disability index scores. Secondary: European quality of life measure, visual analogue scale scores for low back pain and for leg pain. Results Power calculations required the inclusion of 41 patients per group. We did not allocate 17 of 133 eligible patients because their symptoms improved before randomisation. All groups improved after the interventions, but we found no statistical or clinical differences between the groups over time. For the sham group (n=40), estimated change in the Oswestry disability index from the adjusted baseline value was −4.7 (95% confidence intervals −0.6 to −8.8) at 6 weeks, −11.4 (−6.3 to −14.5) at 12 weeks, and −14.3 (−10.0 to −18.7) at 52 weeks. For the epidural saline intervention group (n=39) compared with the sham group, differences in primary outcome were −0.5 (−6.3 to 5.4) at 6 weeks, 1.4 (−4.5 to 7

  14. Cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review on treatment by spinal manipulation and measurement with the Neck Disability Index

    PubMed Central

    Rodine, Robert J.; Vernon, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy (CR), while less common than conditions with neck pain alone, can be a significant cause of neck pain and disability; thus the determination of adequate treatment options for patients is essential. Currently, inadequate scientific literature restricts specific conservative management recommendations for CR. Despite a paucity of evidence for high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation in the treatment for CR, this strategy has been frequently labeled as contraindicated. Scientific support for appropriate outcome measures for CR is equally deficient. While more scientific data is needed to draw firm conclusions, the present review suggests that spinal manipulation may be cautiously considered as a therapeutic option for patients suffering from CR. With respect to outcome measures, the Neck Disability Index appears well-suited for spinal manipulative treatment of CR. PMID:22457538

  15. Long Term Societal Costs of Anterior Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) versus Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) for Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Konopka, Joseph F.; Cha, Thomas D.; Bono, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) have comparable clinical outcomes for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Given similar outcomes, an understanding of differences in long-term societal costs can help guide resource utilization. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative long-term societal costs of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) to cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the treatment of single level cervical disc disease by considering upfront surgical costs, lost productivity, and risk of subsequent revision surgery. Methods We completed an economic and decision analysis using a Markov model to evaluate the long-term societal costs of ACDF and CDA in a theoretical cohort of 45-65 year old patients with single level cervical disc disease who have failed nonoperative treatment. Results The long-term societal costs for a 45-year old patient undergoing ACDF are $31,178 while long-term costs for CDA are $24,119. Long-term costs for CDA remain less expensive throughout the modeled age range of 45 to 65 years old. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that CDA remains less expensive than ACDF as long as annual reoperation rate remains below 10.5% annually. Conclusions Based on current data, CDA has lower long-term societal costs than ACDF for patients 45-65 years old by a substantial margin. Given reported reoperation rates of 2.5% for CDA, it is the preferred treatment for cervical radiculopathy from an economic perspective. PMID:26913221

  16. [The influence of segmental lumbosacral anatomy restoration on clinical outomes in the operative treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafał; Smoczyński, Andrzej; Jaskólski, Dawid; Rocławski, Marek; Samson, Lucjan; Piotrowski, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    The influence of lumbosacral spine segmental anatomy restoration on the outcome of the operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis was taken into evaluation. A series of 55 patients (29 males and 26 females) was examined. The long-term follow up period exceeded 3 years. The Oswestry Disability Questionaire was used to evaluate the objective clinical condition of the patients, while for the subjective assessment an analog pain score and the two questions survey concerning the evaluation of success of the operative treatment and a possible agreement to a following operation if necessary were used. The presence of neurological radical symptoms was evaluated. The radiological assessment was consisted of the evaluation of the degree of spondylolisthesis, the angle of lumbosacral lordosis, the height of the interbody space and intervertebral foramen. In conclusions, the proper spine anatomy restoration had the influence on the improvement of the outcome of operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis. A metal cage usage for the anterior interbody fusion of lumbar spine in the operative treatment of isthmic spondylolisthesis enables long-lasting proper anatomical relations of the fused segment. PMID:19241885

  17. The effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on lumbosacral alignment and the low back pain disability index in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong-Dae; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine the effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (group A) and a lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise group (group B). Group B did 15 min of lumbar stabilization exercises and 15 min of thoracic extension exercises, while group A did 30 min of lumbar stabilization exercises five times a week for 4 weeks. For assessing lumbosacral alignment, the lordotic angle, lumbosacral angle, and sacral angle were evaluated. The Oswestry disability index was used for assessment of disability due to low back pain. [Results] Both groups showed improvement in lumbosacral alignment and in the disability index. Group B showed greater changes in the lordotic angle and in the Oswestry disability index than group A, although the differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise can be recommended for improvement of chronic low back pain, although the improvements seen in lumbosacral alignment and low back pain disability index in this study did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:27065563

  18. Caudal medullary pathways to lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups in the cat: evidence for direct projections possibly representing the final common pathway for lordosis.

    PubMed

    Vanderhorst, V G; Holstege, G

    1995-08-28

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) projects to distinct brainstem and cervical and thoracic cord motoneuronal cell groups. The present paper describes NRA projections to distinct motoneuronal cell groups in the lumbar enlargement. Lumbosacral injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) were made to localize and quantify the retrogradely labeled neurons in the caudal medullary lateral tegmentum. These injections were combined with spinal hemisections to distinguish between neurons having ipsi-or contralaterally descending axons. The NRA-lumbosacral fibers descend almost exclusively contralaterally, but neurons in areas surrounding the NRA project mainly ipsilaterally. In an anterograde tracing study, injections of WGA-HRP or tritiated leucine were made in the region of the NRA to determine the NRA targets in the lumbosarcral cord. Hemisections in C2 made it possible to distinguish between NRA projections and projections from neurons in the adjoining lateral tegmentum. The results show delicate NRA projections to distinct lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups innervating specific hindlimb muscles (iliopsoas, adductors, and hamstrings) as well as axial muscles (medial longissimus and proximal tail muscles). The projection is bilateral, with a contralateral predominance. Ipsilaterally terminating fibers are derived from NRA neurons whose axons cross the midline at the level of the obex, descend through the contralateral spinal white matter, and recross at the level of termination. A conceptual description is presented in which the periaqueductal gray-NRA-lumbosacral projections form the final common pathway for lordosis in the cat. PMID:7499541

  19. Limited Unilateral Decompression and Pedicle Screw Fixation with Fusion for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis with Unilateral Radiculopathy: A Retrospective Analysis of 25 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Miao, Hai-xiong; Wang, Yong; Chen, An-fu; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lumbar spinal stenosis is conventionally treated with surgical decompression. However, bilateral decompression and laminectomy is more invasive and may not be necessary for lumbar stenosis patients with unilateral radiculopathy. We aimed to report the outcomes of unilateral laminectomy and bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. Methods Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis with unilateral lower extremity radiculopathy who received limited unilateral decompression and bilateral pedicle screw fixation were included and evaluated using visual analog scale (VAS) pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores preoperatively and at follow-up visits. Ligamentum flavum thickness of the involved segments was measured on axial magnetic resonance images. Results Twenty-five patients were included. The mean preoperative VAS score was 6.6±1.6 and 4.6±3.1 for leg and back pain, respectively. Ligamentum flavum thickness was comparable between the symptomatic and asymptomatic side (p=0.554). The mean follow-up duration was 29.2 months. The pain in the symptomatic side lower extremity (VAS score, 1.32±1.2) and the back (VAS score, 1.75±1.73) significantly improved (p=0.000 vs. baseline for both). The ODI improved significantly postoperatively (6.60±6.5; p=0.000 vs. baseline). Significant improvement in VAS pain and ODI scores were observed in patients receiving single or multi-segment decompression fusion with fixation (p<0.01). Conclusion Limited laminectomy and unilateral spinal decompression followed by bilateral pedicle screw fixation with fusion achieves satisfactory outcomes in patients with spinal stenosis and unilateral radiculopathy. This procedure is less damaging to structures that are important for maintaining posterior stability of the spine. PMID:26279816

  20. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Mo Lin, Ruey; Chen, Hsiang-Ho; Tsai, Kai-Jow

    2007-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block) and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1) large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2) polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3) polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment is set at large lordotic

  1. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  2. Bilateral Maxillary, Sphenoid Sinuses and Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Extramedullary Relapse of CML Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Soudabeh; Ansari, Shahla; Vosough, Parvaneh; Bahoush, Gholamreza; Hamidieh, Amir Ali; Chahardouli, Bahram; Shamsizadeh, Morteza; Mehrazma, Mitra; Dorgalaleh, Akbar

    2016-04-01

    Isolated extramedullary relapse of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplant is rare. There is a case report of a child who developed a granulocytic sarcoma of the maxillary and sphenoid sinuses and lumbosacral spinal cord mass 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplant for CML. He was presented with per orbital edema and neurological deficit of lower extremities and a mass lesion was found on spinal cord imaging. No evidence of hematologic relapse was identified at that time by bone marrow histology or cytogenetic. The patient died 1 month later with a picture of pneumonia, left ventricular dysfunction and a cardiopulmonary arrest on a presumed underlying sepsis with infectious etiology. Granulocytic sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions presenting after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for CML, even if there is no evidence of bone marrow involvement. PMID:27252811

  3. Current trends in pedicle screw stimulation techniques: lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical levels.

    PubMed

    Isley, Michael R; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Leppanen, Ronald E

    2012-06-01

    justification" of intraoperative neuromonitoring"... is the perception that the safety and efficacy of pedicle screw fixation are enhanced..." (Resnick et al. 2005b). However in summarizing a massive (over 1000 papers taken from the National Library of Medicine), contemporary, literature review spanning nearly a decade (1996 to 2003), this invited panel (Resnick et al. 2005b) recognized that the evidence-based documents contributing to the parts related to pedicle screw fixation and neuromonitoring were "... full of potential sources of error ..." and lacked appropriate, randomized, prospective studies for formulating rigid standards and guidelines. Nevertheless, current trends support the routine use and clinical utility of these neuromonitoring techniques. In particular free-run and triggered EMG have been well recognized in numerous publications for improving both the accuracy and safety of pedicle screw implantation. Currently, treatment with pedicle screw instrumentation routinely involves all levels of the spine - lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical. Significant historical events, various neuromonitoring modalities, intraoperative alarm criteria, clinical efficacy, current trends, and caveats related to pedicle screw stimulation along the entire vertebral column will be reviewed. PMID:22808751

  4. Hybrid Surgery Combined with Dynamic Stabilization System and Fusion for the Multilevel Degenerative Disease of the Lumbosacral Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Hyun Jib

    2015-01-01

    Background As motion-preserving technique has been developed, the concept of hybrid surgery involves simultaneous application of two different kinds of devices, dynamic stabilization system and fusion technique. In the present study, the application of hybrid surgery for lumbosacral degenerative disease involving two-segments and its long-term outcome were investigated. Methods Fifteen patients with hybrid surgery (Hybrid group) and 10 patients with two-segment fusion (Fusion group) were retrospectively compared. Results Preoperative grade for disc degeneration was not different between the two groups, and the most common operated segment had the most degenerated disc grade in both groups; L4-5 and L5-S1 in the Hybrid group, and L3-4 and L4-5 in Fusion group. Over 48 months of follow-up, lumbar lordosis and range of motion (ROM) at the T12-S1 global segment were preserved in the Hybrid group, and the segmental ROM at the dynamic stabilized segment maintained at final follow-up. The Fusion group had a significantly decreased global ROM and a decreased segmental ROM with larger angles compared to the Hybrid group. Defining a 2-mm decrease in posterior disc height (PDH) as radiologic adjacent segment pathology (ASP), these changes were observed in 6 and 7 patients in the Hybrid and Fusion group, respectively. However, the last PDH at the above adjacent segment had statistically higher value in Hybrid group. Pain score for back and legs was much reduced in both groups. Functional outcome measured by Oswestry disability index (ODI), however, had better improvement in Hybrid group. Conclusion Hybrid surgery, combined dynamic stabilization system and fusion, can be effective surgical treatment for multilevel degenerative lumbosacral spinal disease, maintaining lumbar motion and delaying disc degeneration. PMID:26484008

  5. Comparison of Two Doses of Ropivacaine Hydrochloride for Lumbosacral Epidural Anaesthesia in Goats Undergoing Laparoscopy Assisted Embryo Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fazili, Mujeeb ur Rehman; Shah, Riaz Ahmad; Khan, Firdous Ahmad; Bhat, Maajid Hassan; Yaqoob, Syed Hilal; Naykoo, Niyaz Ahmad; Ganai, Nazir Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Goats (n = 12) undergoing laparoscopy assisted embryo transfer were randomly allotted to two groups (I and II) and injected same volume of ropivacaine hydrochloride at 1.0 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg body weight, respectively, at the lumbosacral epidural space. The hind quarters of all the animals were lifted up for the first 3.0 minutes following injection. Immediately after induction the animals were restrained in dorsal recumbency in Trendelenburg position in a cradle. Laparoscopy was performed after achieving pneumoperitoneum using filtered room air. Regional analgesia and changes in physiological parameters were recorded. The mean induction time in animals of group I (n = 6) was 12.666 ± 1.994 minutes. In these animals the analgesia extended up to the umbilical region and lasted for 60 minutes. Only two animals in group II were satisfactorily induced in 11.333 ± 2.333 minutes. In animals of group I, the time taken for regaining the full motor power was significantly long (405 ± 46.314 min) when compared to group II goats (95 ± 9.219 min). From this study it was concluded that ropivacaine did not produce adequate analgesia in most of the goats at 0.5 mg/kg. When used at 1.0 mg/kg, it produced satisfactory regional analgesia lasting for one hour but the prolonged motor loss precludes its use. Additional studies using ropivacaine hydrochloride at doses in between the two extremes used here may be undertaken before recommending it for lumbosacral anaesthesia in goats undergoing laparoscopy.

  6. Accuracy of Percutaneous Lumbosacral Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Oblique Fluoroscopic View Based on Computed Tomography Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koji; Kanemura, Tokumi; Iwase, Toshiki; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the oblique fluoroscopic view, based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) images for accurate placement of lumbosacral percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS). Overview of Literature Although PPS misplacement has been reported as one of the main complications in minimally invasive spine surgery, there is no comparative data on the misplacement rate among different fluoroscopic techniques, or comparing such techniques with open procedures. Methods We retrospectively selected 230 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw construct for degenerative lumbar disease, and divided them into 3 groups, those who had undergone: minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using biplane (lateral and anterior-posterior views using a single C-arm) fluoroscope views (group M-1), minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using the oblique fluoroscopic view based on preoperative CT (group M-2), and conventional open procedure using a lateral fluoroscopic view (group O: controls). The relative position of the screw to the pedicle was graded for the pedicle breach as no breach, <2 mm, 2–4 mm, or >4 mm. Inaccuracy was calculated and assessed according to the spinal level, direction and neurological deficit. Inter-group radiation exposure was estimated using fluoroscopy time. Results Inaccuracy involved an incline toward L5, causing medial or lateral perforation of pedicles in group M-1, but it was distributed relatively equally throughout multiple levels in groups M-2 and controls. The mean fluoroscopy time/case ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 minutes. Conclusions Minimally invasive lumbosacral PPS placement using the conventional fluoroscopic technique carries an increased risk of inaccurate screw placement and resultant neurological deficits, compared with that of the open procedure. Inaccuracy tended to be distributed between medial and lateral perforations of the L5 pedicle

  7. DISTRIBUTION AND SHORT- AND LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF INJECTED GELIFIED ETHANOL INTO THE LUMBOSACRAL INTERVERTEBRAL DISC IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Shawn D; Brisson, Brigitte A; Gaitero, Luis; Caswell, Jeff L; Liao, Penting; Sinclair, Melissa; Chalmers, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Radiopaque gelified ethanol preparation has been described as a useful agent for treatment of humans with intervertebral disc protrusion. The material is injected into the nucleus pulposus under image guidance with intention to cause the protruded disc material to recede. Because treatment options for dogs with chronic protrusions are limited, new and minimally invasive treatments are desirable. The aim of this experimental, descriptive, prospective study was to assess the feasibility and safety of percutaneous injection of gelified ethanol into the lumbosacral intervertebral disc of dogs. Lumbosacral intervertebral discs of normal dogs (n = 9) were imaged with magnetic resonance imaging and then injected with gelified ethanol using image guidance. The accuracy of gelified ethanol placement in the nucleus pulposus and presence of leakage of the injected material were documented. Postinjection computed tomography (CT) findings (n = 9), short-term (n = 9) and long-term (n = 4) follow-up magnetic resonance imaging and CT findings were compared to document the distribution of the injected preparation and identify effects on adjacent tissues. Percutaneous injection of the intervertebral disc was successful in delivering radiopaque gelified ethanol to the nucleus pulposus in all dogs. Leakage of the injected material into the vertebral canal was present in three dogs immediately following injection and in another additional dog at 1 year following injection. All dogs tolerated the injection well and had no clinical adverse reactions within the study period. Findings indicated that injection of the nucleus pulposus of healthy dogs was well tolerated, even in the presence of mild leakage of material from the intervertebral disc. PMID:26626409

  8. TREATMENT OUTCOMES OF INTRADISCAL STEROID INJECTION/SELECTIVE NERVE ROOT BLOCK FOR 161 PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL RADICULOPATHY

    PubMed Central

    ITO, KEIGO; YUKAWA, YASUTSUGU; MACHINO, MASAAKI; INOUE, TARO; OUCHIDA, JUN; TOMITA, KEISUKE; KATO, FUMIHIKO

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) were treated with intradiscal injection of steroids (IDIS) and/or selective nerve root block (SNRB) at our hospital. We retrospectively report the outcomes of these nonsurgical treatments for CR. 161 patients who were followed up for >2months were enrolled in this study. Patients’ clinical manifestations were classified as arm pain, arm numbness, neck and/or scapular pain, and arm paralysis. Improvement in each manifestation was classified as "disappeared," "improved," "poor," or "worsened." Responses of "disappeared" or "improved" manifestations suggested treatment effectiveness. Final clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Odom criteria. Changes in herniated disc size were evaluated by comparing the initial and final MRI scans. On the basis of these changes, the patients were divided into regression, no-change, or progression groups. We investigated the relationship between the Odom criteria and changes observed on MRI. Effectiveness rates were 89% for arm pain, 77% for arm numbness, 82% for neck and/or scapular pain, and 76% for arm paralysis. In total, 91 patients underwent repeated MRI. In 56 patients (62%), the size of the herniated disc decreased, but 31 patients (34%) exhibited no change in disc size. The regression group showed significantly better Odom criteria results than the no-change group. In conclusion, IDIS and SNRB for CR are not widely performed. However, other extremely effective therapies that can rapidly improve neuralgia should be considered before surgery. PMID:25797986

  9. Use of chemical shift encoded magnetic resonance imaging (CSE-MRI) for high resolution fat-suppressed imaging of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses

    PubMed Central

    Grayev, Allison; Reeder, Scott; Hanna, Amgad

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In the era of increasingly complex surgical techniques for peripheral nerve repair, there is a need for high spatial resolution imaging of the neural plexuses in the body. We describe our experience with chemical shift encoded MRI and its implications for patient management. Materials and methods IDEAL water-fat separation is a chemical shift based method of homogeneously suppressing signal from fat, while maintaining adequate signal. This technique was used in clinical practice and the patient images reviewed. Results IDEAL water-fat separation was shown to improve visualization of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses with good fat suppression and high signal to noise ratio. Conclusion IDEAL water − fat separation is an excellent technique to use in the imaging of the brachial and lumbosacral plexuses as it balances the need for homogeneous fat suppression with maintenance of excellent signal to noise ratio. PMID:27161071

  10. Sacral stress fracture after lumbar and lumbosacral fusion. How to manage it? A proposition based on three cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Scemama, C; D'astorg, H; Guigui, P

    2016-04-01

    Sacral fracture after lumbosacral instrumentation could be a source of prolonged pain and a late autonomy recovery in old patients. Diagnosis remains difficult and usually delayed. No clear consensus for efficient treatment of this complication has been defined. Aim of this study was to determine how to manage them. Three patients who sustained sacral fracture after instrumented lumbosacral fusion performed for degenerative disease of the spine are discussed. History, physical examinations' findings and radiographic features are presented. Pertinent literature was analyzed. All patients complained of unspecific low back and buttock pain a few weeks after index surgery. Diagnosis was done on CT-scan. We always choose revision surgery with good functional results. Sacral stress fracture has to be reminded behind unspecific buttock or low back pain. CT-scan seems to be the best radiological test to do the diagnosis. Surgical treatment is recommended when lumbar lordosis and pelvic incidence mismatched. PMID:26796998

  11. The identification and neurochemical characterization of central neurons that target parasympathetic preganglionic neurons involved in the regulation of choroidal blood flow in the rat eye using pseudorabies virus, immunolabeling and conventional pathway tracing methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E C; Del Mar, Nobel; Cuthbertson-Coates, Sherry; LeDoux, Mark S; Gong, Suzhen; Ryan, James P; Reiner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The choroidal blood vessels of the eye provide the main vascular support to the outer retina. These blood vessels are under parasympathetic vasodilatory control via input from the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG), which in turn receives its preganglionic input from the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) of the hindbrain. The present study characterized the central neurons projecting to the SSN neurons innervating choroidal PPG neurons, using pathway tracing and immunolabeling. In the initial set of studies, minute injections of the Bartha strain of the retrograde transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) were made into choroid in rats in which the superior cervical ganglia had been excised (to prevent labeling of sympathetic circuitry). Diverse neuronal populations beyond the choroidal part of ipsilateral SSN showed transneuronal labeling, which notably included the parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), the periaqueductal gray, the raphe magnus (RaM), the B3 region of the pons, A5, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), and the intermediate reticular nucleus of the medulla. The PRV+ neurons were located in the parts of these cell groups that are responsive to systemic blood pressure signals and involved in systemic blood pressure regulation by the sympathetic nervous system. In a second set of studies using PRV labeling, conventional pathway tracing, and immunolabeling, we found that PVN neurons projecting to SSN tended to be oxytocinergic and glutamatergic, RaM neurons projecting to SSN were serotonergic, and NTS neurons projecting to SSN were glutamatergic. Our results suggest that blood pressure and volume signals that drive sympathetic constriction of the systemic vasculature may also drive parasympathetic vasodilation of the choroidal vasculature, and may thereby contribute to choroidal baroregulation during low blood pressure. PMID:26082687

  12. The identification and neurochemical characterization of central neurons that target parasympathetic preganglionic neurons involved in the regulation of choroidal blood flow in the rat eye using pseudorabies virus, immunolabeling and conventional pathway tracing methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Cuthbertson-Coates, Sherry; LeDoux, Mark S.; Gong, Suzhen; Ryan, James P.; Reiner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The choroidal blood vessels of the eye provide the main vascular support to the outer retina. These blood vessels are under parasympathetic vasodilatory control via input from the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG), which in turn receives its preganglionic input from the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) of the hindbrain. The present study characterized the central neurons projecting to the SSN neurons innervating choroidal PPG neurons, using pathway tracing and immunolabeling. In the initial set of studies, minute injections of the Bartha strain of the retrograde transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) were made into choroid in rats in which the superior cervical ganglia had been excised (to prevent labeling of sympathetic circuitry). Diverse neuronal populations beyond the choroidal part of ipsilateral SSN showed transneuronal labeling, which notably included the parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), the periaqueductal gray, the raphe magnus (RaM), the B3 region of the pons, A5, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), and the intermediate reticular nucleus of the medulla. The PRV+ neurons were located in the parts of these cell groups that are responsive to systemic blood pressure signals and involved in systemic blood pressure regulation by the sympathetic nervous system. In a second set of studies using PRV labeling, conventional pathway tracing, and immunolabeling, we found that PVN neurons projecting to SSN tended to be oxytocinergic and glutamatergic, RaM neurons projecting to SSN were serotonergic, and NTS neurons projecting to SSN were glutamatergic. Our results suggest that blood pressure and volume signals that drive sympathetic constriction of the systemic vasculature may also drive parasympathetic vasodilation of the choroidal vasculature, and may thereby contribute to choroidal baroregulation during low blood pressure. PMID:26082687

  13. Initial clinical experience with a next-generation artificial disc for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Sanchez, Alejandro; Miramontes, Victor; Olivarez, Luis M. Rosales; Aquirre, Armando Alpizar; Quiroz, Alfredo Ortega; Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron

    2010-01-01

    Background A feasibility trial was conducted to evaluate the initial safety and clinical use of a next-generation artificial cervical disc (M6-C artificial cervical disc; Spinal Kinetics, Sunnyvale, CA) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy. A standardized battery of validated outcome measures was utilized to assess condition-specific functional impairment, pain severity, and quality of life. Methods Thirty-six consecutive patients were implanted with the M6-C disc and complete clinical and radiographic outcomes for 25 patients (mean age, 44.5 ± 10.1 years) with radiographically-confirmed cervical disc disease and symptomatic radiculopathy unresponsive to conservative medical management are included in this report. All patients had disc-osteophyte complex causing neural compression and were treated with discectomy and artificial cervical disc replacement at either single level (n = 12) or 2-levels (n = 13). Functional impairment was evaluated using the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Evaluation of arm and neck pain severity utilized a standard 11-point numeric scale, and health-related quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey. Quantitative radiographic assessments of intervertebral motion were performed using specialized motion analysis software, QMA (Quantitative Motion Analysis; Medical Metrics, Houston, TX). All outcome measures were evaluated pre-treatment and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results The mean NDI score improved from 51.6 ± 11.3% pre-treatment to 27.9 ± 16.9% at 24 months, representing an approximate 46% improvement (P <.0001). The mean arm pain score improved from 6.9 ± 2.5 pre-treatment to 3.9 ± 3.1 at 24 months (43%, P =.0006). The mean neck pain score improved from 7.8 ± 2.0 pre-treatment to 3.8 ± 3.0 at 24 months (51%, P <.0001). The mean PCS score of the SF-36 improved from 34.8 ± 7.8 pre-treatment to 43.8 ± 9.3 by 24 months (26%, P =.0006). Subgroup analyses found

  14. Radiotherapy-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in a patient with cervical cancer: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kosobucki, Radosław; Łuczyńska, Elżbieta; Bieda, Tomasz; Urbański, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer treatment is a very rare, but extremely serious complication. The clinical course is associated with severe bilateral lower leg pain, reduced sensation, different degrees of weakness, paresis or paralysis, and sometimes also urinary or fecal incontinence. Patient quality of life becomes significantly deteriorated. Escalating neurological disorders may make self-sufficient functioning impossible. Neurological symptoms, most often irreversible, may develop at different times after irradiation, even after more than 30 years. We present a case of neurological toxicity in a patient successfully treated for cervical cancer with pelvis and para-aortic lymph node irradiation and weekly cisplatin. Neurological symptoms developed a few weeks after completion of external irradiation, were gradually escalating and resulted in complete immobilization of the woman. We underline the significance of long-term, systematic physiotherapy and pharmacological therapy which has resulted in significant improvement of motion efficiency. The literature review concerns the questions of frequency, clinical course and mechanisms of radiation-induced plexopathy. PMID:23788877

  15. Extraspinal Type I Dural Arteriovenous Fistula with a Lumbosacral Lipomyelomeningocele: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Karsy, Michael; Ray, Wilson Z.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Seven cases of adult spinal vascular malformations presenting in conjunction with spinal dysraphism have been reported in the literature. Two of these involved male patients with a combined dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and lipomyelomeningocele. The authors present the third case of a patient with an extraspinal DAVF and associated lipomyelomeningocele in a lumbosacral location. A 58-year-old woman with rapid decline in bilateral motor function 10 years after a prior L4-5 laminectomy and cord detethering for diagnosed tethered cord underwent magnetic resonance imaging showing evidence of persistent cord tethering and a lipomyelomeningocele. Diagnostic spinal angiogram showed a DAVF with arterial feeders from bilateral sacral and the right internal iliac arteries. The patient underwent Onyx embolization of both feeding right and left lateral sacral arteries. At 6-month follow-up, MRI revealed decreased flow voids and new collateralized supply to the DAVF. The patient underwent successful lipomyelomeningocele exploration, resection, AV fistula ligation, and cord detethering. This report discusses management of this patient as well as the importance of endovascular embolization followed by microsurgery for the treatment of cases with combined vascular and dysraphic anomalies. PMID:25949837

  16. Inflammatory Pseudotumor in the Epidural Space of Lumbosacral Spine on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Suk; Park, Shin Young

    2014-01-01

    An inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a rare benign lesion, characterized by non-neoplastic proliferation of inflammatory cells and presence of intermingling collagen fibers. IPT commonly occurs in the lungs and orbita, while an intraspinal IPT is extremely rare. IPT can mimic both clinically and radiologically malignant processes, and making a definitive preoperative diagnosis is often difficult. Recently, 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) has been reported to accumulate in IPT in the lung, spleen, liver, pancreas, colon, orbit, mediastinum, and mesentery. However, to the best of our knowledge, accumulation of 18F-FDG has not been reported in lumbosacral intraspinal IPT. Herein, we report a case of IPT in the epidural space of the lumbar spine, using the imaging findings of 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This is the first case of IPT in the epidural space, depicted by 18F-FDG PET/CT, which revealed a homogeneous, intense 18F-FDG uptake.

  17. Lumbar Intervertebral Discal Cyst: A Rare Cause of Low Back Pain and Radiculopathy. Case Report and Review of the Current Evidences on Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Certo, Francesco; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Borderi, Alessandro; Pennisi, Claudia; Albanese, Vincenzo; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case Report and review of the literature. Objective The objective of the article is to report an illustrative case successfully treated by microsurgery and to review the literature on the current evidence on diagnosis and management of lumbar discal cysts. Methods A 43-year-old male patient presented with severe back pain, radiating down to the right leg, as well as with paraesthesias in the right L3 and L4 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed an intraspinal, extradural space-occupying lesion at the L3–L4 disc level, causing compression of the neural structures. The lesion was surgically removed and a diagnosis of lumbar discal cyst was made. Postoperatively, symptoms improved and the patient was discharged with no complications. A systematic review of pertinent articles published up to February 2014 was performed. Key articles were searched to identify studies describing the diagnosis and management modalities of lumbar discal cysts and the comparative effectiveness and safety of microsurgery versus endoscopic treatment. Conclusions Discal cysts are rare causes of low back pain and radiculopathy. Few cases have been reported; however, conclusive information about their natural history is not available and the best mode of treatment remains controversial. We submit that lumbar intervertebral disc cysts, with their peculiar radiological and anatomic features, should be considered in the differential diagnosis among rare causes of low back pain and radiculopathy. PMID:25364328

  18. Cox Decompression Manipulation and Guided Rehabilitation of a Patient With a Post Surgical C6-C7 Fusion With Spondylotic Myelopathy and Concurrent L5-S1 Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe combined treatment utilizing Cox distraction manipulation and guided rehabilitation for a patient with spine pain and post-surgical C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and L5-S1 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 38-year-old man presented to a chiropractic clinic with neck pain and a history of an anterior cervical spine plate fusion at C6-7 after a work related accident 4 years earlier. He had signs and symptoms of spondolytic myelopathy and right lower back, right posterior thigh pain and numbness. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with Cox technique and rehabilitation. The patient experienced a reduction of pain on a numeric pain scale from 8/10 to 3/10. The patient was seen a total of 12 visits over 3 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusions A patient with a prior C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and concurrent L5-S1 radiculopathy improved after a course of rehabilitation and Cox distraction manipulation. Further research is needed to establish its efficiency. PMID:25685119

  19. Lumbar intervertebral discal cyst: a rare cause of low back pain and radiculopathy. Case report and review of the current evidences on diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Certo, Francesco; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Borderi, Alessandro; Pennisi, Claudia; Albanese, Vincenzo; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V

    2014-10-01

    Study Design Case Report and review of the literature. Objective The objective of the article is to report an illustrative case successfully treated by microsurgery and to review the literature on the current evidence on diagnosis and management of lumbar discal cysts. Methods A 43-year-old male patient presented with severe back pain, radiating down to the right leg, as well as with paraesthesias in the right L3 and L4 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed an intraspinal, extradural space-occupying lesion at the L3-L4 disc level, causing compression of the neural structures. The lesion was surgically removed and a diagnosis of lumbar discal cyst was made. Postoperatively, symptoms improved and the patient was discharged with no complications. A systematic review of pertinent articles published up to February 2014 was performed. Key articles were searched to identify studies describing the diagnosis and management modalities of lumbar discal cysts and the comparative effectiveness and safety of microsurgery versus endoscopic treatment. Conclusions Discal cysts are rare causes of low back pain and radiculopathy. Few cases have been reported; however, conclusive information about their natural history is not available and the best mode of treatment remains controversial. We submit that lumbar intervertebral disc cysts, with their peculiar radiological and anatomic features, should be considered in the differential diagnosis among rare causes of low back pain and radiculopathy. PMID:25364328

  20. [Anterior and posterior stabilization of the lumbosacral spine with the usage of interbody cages in the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafał; Smoczyński, Andrzej; Smoczyński, Maciej; Luczkiewicz, Piotr; Piotrowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    In the following work results of the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis by the posterior stabilization and anterior lumbosacral interbody fusion with the use of interbody implants--cages was taken under evaluation. The test group consisted of 21 patients (13 male and 8 male). The follow up period exceeded 2 years. The objective clinical outcome assessment was based on Oswestry disability questionnaire. Subjective clinical evaluation was done by the visual analog pain score and two questions concerning the evaluation of success of the operative treatment and a possible agreement to a following operation if necessary. The radiological results were done upon evaluation of the degree of the spondylolisthesis, the angle of the lumbosacral lordosis, the height of the interbody space and intervertebral foramen and the evaluation of the spinal fusion. The conclusion was that the usage of the distraction of the lumbosacral spine in the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis result in the reduction of the slippage and the dynamic decompression of the compressed neural roots. The usage of the interbody cages prevented the loss of slippage correction, permanently reconstructed the anatomical conditions in the area of the operated spinal segment and helped to achieve good and very good clinical results in over 95% of patients. The fusion rate was 100%. The restoration of the correct height of the intervertebral foramen in the slip segment caused an improvement of the neurologic state. The usage of two level stabilization in the operative treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis prevented the initiation of the secondary degenerative changes adjacent to the fusion. PMID:17128767

  1. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  2. Serotonin Concentrations in the Lumbosacral Spinal Cord of the Adult Rat Following Microinjection or Dorsal Surface Application

    PubMed Central

    Brumley, Michele R.; Hentall, Ian D.; Pinzon, Alberto; Kadam, Brijesh H.; Blythe, Anthony; Sanchez, Francisco J.; Taberner, Annette M.; Noga, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    Application of neuroactive substances, including monoamines, is common in studies examining the spinal mechanisms of sensation and behavior. However, affected regions and time courses of transmitter activity are uncertain. We measured the spatial and temporal distribution of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] in the lumbosacral spinal cord of halothane-anesthetized adult rats, following its intraspinal microinjection or surface application. Carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) were positioned at various locations in the spinal cord and oxidation currents corresponding to extracellular 5-HT were measured by fast cyclic voltammetry. Intraspinal microinjection of 5-HT (100μM, 1–3 μl) produced responses that were most pronounced at CFMEs positioned ≤800 μm from the drug micropipette: 5-HT concentration was significantly higher (1.43 vs. <0.28% of initial concentration) and response latency was shorter (67.1 vs. 598.2 s) compared with more distantly positioned CFMEs. Treatment with the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor clomipramine only slightly affected the spread of microinjected 5-HT. Surface application over several segments led to a transient rise in concentration that was usually apparent within 30 s and was dramatically attenuated with increasing depth: 0.25% of initial concentration (1 mM) within 400 μm of the dorsal surface and <0.001% between 1,170 and 2,000 μm. This initial response to superfusion was sometimes followed by a gradual increase to a new concentration plateau. In sum, compared with bath application, microinjection can deliver about tenfold higher transmitter concentrations, but to much more restricted areas of the spinal cord. PMID:17634342

  3. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  4. Single-level cervical radiculopathy: clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness of four techniques of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Arup K; Raman, A S; Casey, Adrian T H; Crawford, R J

    2009-02-01

    Although there are several accepted methods of surgical treatment for single-level cervical radiculopathy, the choice depend on the surgeon's preference. The techniques may vary in peri-operative morbidity, short- and long-term outcome, but no study so far has analyzed their cost-effectiveness. This study might give some insight in balancing cost and effectiveness and deciding the right technique. Sixty consecutive patients (15 each group), mean age 36 (range 24-76 years) with single-level cervical disc disease underwent surgical treatment with four different techniques in two centers over the period of 1999-2005. The four groups were--(1) plate and tricortical autograft, (2) plate, cage, and bone substitute, (3) cage only, and (4) disc arthroplasty. The data was collected prospectively according to our protocol and subsequently analyzed. The clinical outcome was assessed comparing visual analog scale (VAS) of neck pain and, short form 12 (SF12) questionnaire both pre- and postoperatively. The radiological assessment was done for fusion rate and postoperative related possible complications at 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and final follow-up. The cost analysis was done calculating the operative time, hospital stay, implant cost together. The mean follow-up period was 31 months (range 28-43 months). The clinical outcome in terms of VAS of neck and arm pain and SF12 physical and mental score improvement (P=0.001) were comparable with all four techniques. The radiological fusion rate was comparable to current available data. As the hospital stay was longer (average 5 days) with plate and autograft group, the total cost was maximum (average 2,920 pound sterling) with this group. There was satisfactory clinical and radiological outcome with all four techniques. Using the cage alone was the most cost-effective technique, but the disc arthroplasty was comparable to the use of cage and plate. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an established surgical treatment for

  5. The effect of sustained natural apophyseal glide (SNAG) combined with neurodynamics in the management of a patient with cervical radiculopathy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Anandkumar, Sudarshan

    2015-02-01

    This case report describes a 47-year-old female who presented with complaints of pain in the right elbow radiating down to the thumb. Physical examination revealed symptom reproduction with Spurling A test, upper limb neurodynamic testing-1 and right cervical rotation along with reduced symptoms with neck distraction. Clinical diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy (CR) was made based on a clinical prediction rule. This case report speculates a potentially first-time description of successful conservative management of CR in a patient utilizing simultaneous combination of sustained natural apophyseal glide and neurodynamic mobilization. Immediate improvements were seen in pain, cervical range of motion and functional abilities. The patient was discharged from physical therapy by the second week after four treatment sessions with complete pain resolution maintained at a four-month follow-up period. PMID:25329587

  6. Comparison of one-level microendoscopy laminoforaminotomy and cervical arthroplasty in cervical spondylotic radiculopathy: a minimum 2-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aims to compare the perioperative parameters and clinical results between microendoscopy laminoforaminotomy (MELF) and cervical arthroplasty (CA) in the treatment of one-level cervical spondylotic radiculopathy in a retrospective study. Methods From 2003 to 2007, a total of 97 patients with one-level cervical spondylotic radiculopathy were treated. Forty-five patients underwent CA. Fifty-two patients underwent MELF. Patient demographics and operative data were collected with a minimum 2-year follow-up. Perioperative parameters were compared. Clinical assessment in terms of neck disability index (NDI), short form (SF)-36, and visual analogue scale (VAS) of arm pain and neck pain was performed prior to surgery and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Results Fluoroscopy time (CA, 60.3 s; MELF, 12.1 s; P < 0.01) and surgical time (CA, 95.1 min; MELF, 24.0 min; P < 0.01) were significantly longer in the CA cases. Shorter hospitalized days (CA, 1.1 days; MELF, 0.13 days; P < 0.01) and less estimated blood loss (EBL; CA, 75.8 ml; MELF, 31.9 ml; P < 0.01) were observed in the MELF group. Both CA and MELF groups showed significant improvement in NDI, VAS of neck pain and arm pain, and SF-36 (P < 0.05 for each) at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery, but there was no significant difference between them (P > 0.05). Conclusions As alternatives of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), both CA and MELF can produce satisfactory clinical outcomes. MELF has the additional benefits of less blood loss, less surgical time, less X-ray time, and shorter hospital stay. PMID:24341633

  7. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Bucourt, Maximilian de Streitparth, Florian Collettini, Federico; Guettler, Felix; Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U. K.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  8. Grey and White Matter Magnetisation Transfer Ratio Measurements in the Lumbosacral Enlargement: A Pilot In Vivo Study at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Ugorji, Chinyere O.; Samson, Rebecca S.; Liechti, Martina D.; Panicker, Jalesh N.; Miller, David H.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.; Yiannakas, Marios C.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging of the central nervous system has provided further insight into the pathophysiology of neurological disease. However, the use of this method to study the lower spinal cord has been technically challenging, despite the important role of this region, not only for motor control of the lower limbs, but also for the neural control of lower urinary tract, sexual and bowel functions. In this study, the feasibility of obtaining reliable grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) measurements within the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE) was investigated in ten healthy volunteers using a clinical 3T MRI system. The mean cross-sectional area of the LSE (LSE-CSA) and the mean GM area (LSE-GM-CSA) were first obtained by means of image segmentation and tissue-specific (i.e. WM and GM) MTR measurements within the LSE were subsequently obtained. The reproducibility of the segmentation method and MTR measurements was assessed from repeated measurements and their % coefficient of variation (%COV). Mean (± SD) LSE-CSA across 10 healthy subjects was 59.3 (± 8.4) mm2 and LSE-GM-CSA was 17.0 (± 3.1) mm2. The mean intra- and inter-rater % COV for measuring the LSE-CSA were 0.8% and 2.3%, respectively and for the LSE-GM-CSA were 3.8% and 5.4%, respectively. Mean (± SD) WM-MTR was 43.2 (± 4.4) and GM-MTR was 40.9 (± 4.3). The mean scan-rescan % COV for measuring WM-MTR was 4.6% and for GM-MTR was 3.8%. Using a paired t-test, a statistically significant difference was identified between WM-MTR and GM-MTR in the LSE (p<0.0001). This pilot study has shown that it is possible to obtain reliable tissue-specific MTR measurements within the LSE using a clinical MR system at 3T. The MTR acquisition and analysis protocol presented in this study can be used in future investigations of intrinsic spinal cord diseases that affect the LSE. PMID:26230729

  9. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    MedlinePlus

    ... components: • Annulus fibrosus. This is the tough, flexible outer ring of the disk. • Nucleus pulposus. This is ... its jelly-like center (nucleus) pushes against its outer ring (annulus). If the disk is very worn ...

  10. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae, canine hip dysplasia, and sacroiliac joint degenerative changes on ventrodorsal radiographs of the pelvis in police working German shepherd dogs.

    PubMed

    Komsta, Renata; Łojszczyk-Szczepaniak, Anna; Dębiak, Piotr

    2015-03-01

    Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LTV) frequently occur in German shepherd dogs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and interdependence between LTV and canine hip dysplasia (CHD) as well as sacroiliac joint degenerative changes visualized on ventrodorsal radiographs of the pelvis in both working and companion German shepherd dogs. The presence of LTV was found in 12% of working dogs and in 33% of companion dogs. Similar incidence of hip dysplasia in both the groups was found. It has been shown that dogs with LTV have a higher frequency of severe CHD. A higher percentage of sacroiliac joint degenerative changes was observed in dogs with no signs of LTV and in working dogs. PMID:26041591

  11. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... machine's x-ray beam rotates around you. Small detectors inside the scanner measure the amount of x- ... You should remove all jewelry or other metal objects before the test. This is because they may cause inaccurate images.

  12. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group Pilot Study of Milnacipran for Chronic Radicular Pain (Sciatica) Associated With Lumbosacral Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pae, Chi-Un; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The current study investigates whether milnacipran, an equipotent serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is effective in reducing chronic radicular pain in patients (N = 11) with lumbosacral disc disease. Method: This study is a 10-week randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of milnacipran (100–200 mg/d, dosed twice a day). Subjects (enrolled from October 2010 to September 2011 through the Duke University Pain and Palliative Care Clinic, Durham, North Carolina) included patients with radiologically confirmed disc disease with nerve root compression. The primary outcome measure was radicular pain measured by visual analog scale score (VAS-Rad); patients were asked to specifically rate radicular pain (“shooting or electrical or prickly pain in 1 or both legs”). Secondary outcome measures included nociceptive low back pain by visual analog scale (VAS-Noc), Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Between-group changes in outcome measures between baseline and endpoint were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U nonparametric measure of central tendency. Results: Milnacipran treatment yielded statistically significant reduction in radicular pain (VAS-Rad, P = .01) and nociceptive low back pain (VAS-Noc, P = .04) compared to placebo. No statistically significant between-group differences were observed in the other secondary outcome measures. Conclusions: In this small pilot study, milnacipran treatment was associated with reduction in radicular and nociceptive low back pain in patients with lumbosacral disc disease. Larger studies of milnacipran in this population are warranted. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01777581. PMID:25664215

  13. Effects of Lumbosacral Manipulation on Isokinetic Strength of the Knee Extensors and Flexors in Healthy Subjects: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Grant D.; Nitz, Arthur J.; Abel, Mark G.; Symons, T. Brock; Shapiro, Robert; Black, W. Scott; Yates, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of manual manipulations targeting the lumbar spine and/or sacroiliac joint on concentric knee extension and flexion forces. Torque production was measured during isometric and isokinetic contractions. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover design with 21 asymptomatic, college-aged subjects who had never received spinal manipulation. During 2 separate sessions, subjects’ peak torques were recorded while performing maximal voluntary contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Isometric knee extension and flexion were recorded at 60° of knee flexion, in addition to isokinetic measurements obtained at 60°/s and 180°/s. Baseline measurements were acquired before either treatment form of lumbosacral manipulation or sham manipulation, followed by identical peak torque measurements within 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results A statistically significant difference did not occur between the effects of lumbosacral manipulation or the sham manipulation in the percentage changes of knee extension and flexion peak torques at 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Similar, nonsignificant results were observed in the overall percentage changes of isometric contractions (spinal manipulation 4.0 ± 9.5 vs sham 1.2 ± 6.3, P = .067), isokinetic contractions at 60°/s (spinal manipulation − 4.0 ± 14.2 vs sham − 0.3 ± 8.2, P = .34), and isokinetic contractions at 180°/s (spinal manipulation − 1.4 ± 13.9 vs sham − 5.5 ± 20.0, P = .18). Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that spinal manipulation does not yield an immediate strength-enhancing effect about the knee in healthy, college-aged subjects when measured with isokinetic dynamometry. PMID:26793035

  14. Delayed postirradiation camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Linda; Perju-Dumbrava, Laura D; Thyagarajan, Dominic; Lee, Yong Chern

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy may cause central or peripheral nervous system complications, reported examples being myelopathy, brachial/lumbosacral plexopathies or predominantly motor lumbosacral radiculopathy. In the literature some studies regard camptocormia as a paravertebral myopathy and others as of neurogenic origin. We present a patient who developed camptocormia, 42 years after radiation therapy to the para-aortic and inguinal area. PMID:23960150

  15. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Stand-Alone Trabecular Metal Cages as a Surgical Treatment for Cervical Radiculopathy: Mid-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    ElAbed, Khaldoun; Shawky, Ahmad; Ainscow, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case cohort study done between 2002 and 2012. Purpose To assess the mid-term clinical and radiological outcomes of 1-level and 2-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone trabecular metal cages. Overview of Literature ACDF is the gold standard surgical treatment for cervical degenerative disease. The usual surgical practice is to use an anteriorly placed fusion plate with or without interdiscal cages. Methods Patients between 36 and 64 years of age diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy who underwent ACDF using stand-alone trabecular metal cages with at least 3 years follow-up were included in this study. Recorded clinical outcomes included residual axial neck pain, radicular arm pain, upper extremity weakness, and upper extremity altered sensation. Visual Analogue scores were also recorded. Fusion was assessed by lateral radiographs looking for bone breaching and radiolucent lines around the device at the latest follow-up. Results Ninety patients were included in the study. Fifty-one patients underwent 2-level surgery and 39 patients underwent 1-level surgery. Mean age was 44±10.4 years and mean follow-up time was 4.5±2.6 years. Patients reported excellent or good outcomes (90%), as well as improvements in axial neck pain (80%), radicular arm pain (95%), upper extremity weakness (85%), and upper extremity altered sensation (90%). Most patients (90%) progressed to fusion at the 1-year follow-up. The reoperation rate was 3.6%. There was no reported persistent dysphagia, voice complaints, dural tear, or tracheal or oesophageal perforation in any of the patients. One patient developed a deep methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infectious infarction of the spinal cord, which was treated with antibiotics. Recovery was complete at the 1-year follow up. Conclusions Mid-term results show that surgical treatment with ACDF with trabecular metal cages is a safe and effective treatment of single and 2-level

  16. Treatment of radiculopathies: a study of efficacy and tollerability of paravertebral oxygen-ozone injections compared with pharmacological anti-inflammatory treatment.

    PubMed

    Melchionda, D; Milillo, P; Manente, G; Stoppino, L; Macarini, L

    2012-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of lumbar paravertebral injections of a gas mixture of Oxygen and Ozone in patients with lumbar radiculopathies caused by L4-L5 or L5-S1 disk herniations compared to a pharmacological therapy based on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by disc herniation is widely spread. Many therapeutic options are available before steering patients to the surgery. Low back pain and sciatica represent some of the most frequent causes of antinflammatory-analgesic drugs overuse. Recent findings have shown that medical Ozone can be used in the treatment of radicular syndrome caused by herniated intervertebral discs. Although widely spread, there are insufficient published data supporting the effectiveness of this approach in clinical practice. We studied 38 affected patients with acute L5 or S1 radicolopathy. The patients were randomly divided in two groups: A) 20 patients treated with lumbar paravertebral injections of Oxygen and Ozone; B) 18 patients treated pharmacologically with antinflammatory-analgesic drugs. All patients underwent a clinical and neurological examination at baseline (T1) and after 1 (T2), 2 (T3), 4 weeks (T4) and after 3 (T5) and 6 months (T6). An MRI and EMG examination were performed at baseline and after 6 months. The intensity of pain and the outcome of treatments were evaluated in all patients with the Visual Analogue Scale and with the Oswestry Disability Index. We found a reduction of pain and discomfort soon after one week with oxygen-ozone injections compared with pharmacological treatment, but this difference of response became statistically significant after two weeks (50 percent vs 16.6 percent) and is confirmed after 3 and 6 months, when 80 percent of patients treated with injections turned out pain free compared with half of the patients treated pharmacologically. No statistical difference were found in MRI and EMG examinations. No adverse effects were found in

  17. Acquired degenerative changes of the intervertebral segments at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction. A radioanatomic analysis of the nondiskal structures of the spinal column and perispinal soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Jinkins, J R

    2001-01-01

    In earlier evolutionary times, mammals were primarily quadrupeds. However, other bipeds have also been represented during the course of the Earth's several billion year history. In many cases, either the bipedal stance yielded a large tail and hypoplastic upper extremities (e.g., Tyrannosaurus rex and the kangaroo), or it culminated in hypoplasia of the tail and further development and specialization of the upper extremities (e.g., nonhuman primates and human beings). In the human species this relatively recently acquired posture resulted in a more or less pronounced lumbosacral kyphosis. In turn, certain compensatory anatomic features have since occurred. These include the normal characteristic posteriorly directed wedge-shape of the L5 vertebral body and the L5-S1 intervertebral disk; the L4 vertebral body and the L4-L5 disk may be similarly visibly affected. These compensatory mechanisms, however, have proved to be functionally inadequate over the long term of the human life span. Upright posture also leads to increased weight bearing in humans that progressively causes excess stresses at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction. These combined factors result in accelerated aging and degenerative changes and a predisposition to frank biomechanical failure of the subcomponents of the spinal column in these spinal segments. One other specific problem that occurs at the lumbosacral junction that predisposes toward premature degeneration is the singular relationship that exists between a normally mobile segment of spine (i.e., the lumbar spine) and a normally immobile one (i.e., the sacrum). It is well known that mobile spinal segments adjacent to congenitally or acquired fused segments have a predilection toward accelerated degenerative changes. The only segment of the spine in which this is invariably normally true is at the lumbosacral junction (i.e., the unfused lumbar spine adjoining the fused sacrum). Nevertheless, biomechanical failures of the human spine

  18. Variation in eligibility criteria from studies of radiculopathy due to a herniated disc and of neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis: A structured literature review

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, S.; Atlas, S.J.; Katz, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design A structured literature review. Summary of the Background Data Widely recognized classification criteria for rheumatologic disorders have resulted in well-defined patient populations for clinical investigation. Objectives We sought to determine whether similar criteria were needed for back pain disorders by examining variability in eligibility criteria in published studies Methods Studies involving radiculopathy due to lumbar herniated disc (HD) and for neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) were identified. Randomized controlled trials published between January 1, 2006 and October 1, 2008 in select peer reviewed journals were retrieved, their eligibility criteria were identified and categorized. Results Twelve eligible HD studies were identified. Thirteen unique categories of eligibility criteria were identified with a mean of 3.9 (+/−2.0) and a range from 0 to 8 categories per study. More categories were present for studies that included nonsurgical (5.6 +/− 2.5) treatment for studies with only surgical treatment (2.6 +/− 1.7) p= 0.04). Seven LSS studies met eligibility criteria, and 9 unique categories were identified. A mean of 5.0 (+/−2.2) categories with a range from 2 to 7 was used per study. Conclusion Wide variation in the number and type of eligibility criteria from randomized clinical trials of well defined back pain syndromes was identified. These results support the need for developing and disseminating international classification criteria for these clinical conditions. PMID:20228710

  19. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Sun K.; Mak, Walter; Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao; Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Do, Ly

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  20. Ultrasound versus fluoroscopy-guided caudal epidural steroid injection for the treatment of chronic low back pain with radiculopathy: A randomised, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Arindam Kumar; Bhattacharya, Dipasri; Mukherjee, Sayantan; Ghosh, Santanu; Mitra, Manasij; Mandal, Mohanchandra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural steroid administration is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP). Fluoroscopy guidance is the gold standard for pain procedures. Ultrasound guidance is recently being used in pain clinic procedures. We compared the fluoroscopy guidance and ultrasound guidance for caudal epidural steroid injection with respect to the time needed for correct placement of the needle and clinical effectiveness in patients with chronic LBP. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic LBP with radiculopathy, not responding to conventional medical management, were randomly allocated to receive injection depot methyl prednisolone (40 mg) through caudal route either using ultrasound guidance (Group U, n = 25) or fluoroscopy guidance (Group F, n = 25). Pre-procedural visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were noted. During the procedure, the time needed for correct placement of needle was observed. Adverse events, if any, were also noted. All patients were followed up for next 2 months to evaluate Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and ODI at the 2nd week and again at the end of 1st and 2nd month. Results: The needle-placement time was less using ultrasound guidance as compared to fluoroscopy guidance (119 ± 7.66 vs. 222.28 ± 29.65 s, respectively, P < 0.001). Significant reduction in VAS score and ODI (clinical improvement) was noted in the follow-up time points and comparable between the groups at all time points. Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance can be a safe alternative tool for achieving faster needle placement in caudal epidural space. Clinical effectiveness (reduction of VAS and ODI scores) remains comparable between both the techniques. PMID:27330199

  1. Navigated Transtubular Extraforaminal Decompression of the L5 Nerve Root at the Lumbosacral Junction: Clinical Data, Radiographic Features, and Outcome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stavrinou, P; Härtl, R; Krischek, B; Kabbasch, C; Mpotsaris, A; Goldbrunner, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root remains a challenge due to anatomic constraints, severe level-degeneration, and variable anatomy. The purpose of this study is to introduce the use of navigation for transmuscular transtubular decompression at the L5/S1 level and report on radiological features and clinical outcome. Methods. Ten patients who underwent a navigation-assisted extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root were retrospectively analyzed. Results. Six patients had an extraforaminal herniated disc and four had a foraminal stenosis. The distance between the L5 transverse process and the para-articular notch of the sacrum was 12.1 mm in patients with a herniated disc and 8.1 mm in those with a foraminal stenosis. One patient had an early recurrence and another developed dysesthesia that resolved after 3 months. There was a significant improvement from preoperative to postoperative NRS with the results being sustainable at follow-up. ODI was also significantly improved after surgery. According to the Macnab grading scale, excellent or good outcomes were obtained in 8 patients and fair ones in 2. Conclusions. The navigated transmuscular transtubular approach to the lumbosacral junction allows for optimal placement of the retractor and excellent orientation particularly for foraminal stenosis or in cases of complex anatomy. PMID:27127783

  2. Navigated Transtubular Extraforaminal Decompression of the L5 Nerve Root at the Lumbosacral Junction: Clinical Data, Radiographic Features, and Outcome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinou, P.; Härtl, R.; Krischek, B.; Kabbasch, C.; Mpotsaris, A.; Goldbrunner, R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root remains a challenge due to anatomic constraints, severe level-degeneration, and variable anatomy. The purpose of this study is to introduce the use of navigation for transmuscular transtubular decompression at the L5/S1 level and report on radiological features and clinical outcome. Methods. Ten patients who underwent a navigation-assisted extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root were retrospectively analyzed. Results. Six patients had an extraforaminal herniated disc and four had a foraminal stenosis. The distance between the L5 transverse process and the para-articular notch of the sacrum was 12.1 mm in patients with a herniated disc and 8.1 mm in those with a foraminal stenosis. One patient had an early recurrence and another developed dysesthesia that resolved after 3 months. There was a significant improvement from preoperative to postoperative NRS with the results being sustainable at follow-up. ODI was also significantly improved after surgery. According to the Macnab grading scale, excellent or good outcomes were obtained in 8 patients and fair ones in 2. Conclusions. The navigated transmuscular transtubular approach to the lumbosacral junction allows for optimal placement of the retractor and excellent orientation particularly for foraminal stenosis or in cases of complex anatomy. PMID:27127783

  3. A reliable measurement for identifying a lumbosacral transitional vertebra with a solid bony bridge on a single-slice midsagittal MRI or plain lateral radiograph.

    PubMed

    Farshad, M; Aichmair, A; Hughes, A P; Herzog, R J; Farshad-Amacker, N A

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to devise a simple but reliable radiological method of identifying a lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) with a solid bony bridge on sagittal MRI, which could then be applied to a lateral radiograph. The vertical mid-vertebral angle (VMVA) and the vertical anterior vertebral angle (VAVA) of the three most caudal segments of the lumbar spine were measured on MRI and/or on a lateral radiograph in 92 patients with a LSTV and 94 controls, and the differences per segment (Diff-VMVA and Diff-VAVA) were calculated. The Diff-VMVA of the two most caudal vertebrae was significantly higher in the control group (25° (sd 8) than in patients with a LSTV (type 2a+b: 16° (SD 9), type 3a+b: -9° (SD 10), type 4: -5° (SD 7); p < 0.001). A Diff-VMVA of ≤ +10° identified a LSTV with a solid bony bridge (type 3+4) with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 89% on MRI and a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 74% on a lateral radiograph. A sensitivity of 100% could be achieved with a cut-off value of 28° for the Diff-VAVA, but with a lower specificity (76%) on MRI than with Diff-VMVA. Using this simple method (Diff-VMVA ≤ +10°), solid bony bridging of the posterior elements of a LSTV, and therefore the first adjacent mobile segment, can be easily identified without the need for additional imaging. PMID:24151275

  4. Comparison of the Lumbosacral Plexus Nerves Formation in Pampas Fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) and Crab-Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous) in Relationship to Plexus Model in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Lorenzão, Caio José; Zimpel, Aline Veiga; Novakoski, Eduardo; da Silva, Aline Alves; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) were dissected in two species of South American wild canids (pampas fox-Pseudalopex gymnocercus, and crab-eating fox-Cerdocyon thous). The nerves origin and distribution in the pelvic limb were examined and compared with the LSP model of the dog described in the literature. The LSP was formed by whole ventral branches of L5 at L7 and S1, and a contribution of a one branch from S2, divided in three trunks. The trunk formed by union from L5-6 and S1 was divided into the cranial (cutaneus femoris lateralis nerve) medial (femoralis nerve) and lateral branches (obturatorius nerve). At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadicus plexus, was formed by contributions from L6-7 and S1-2. This root gives rise to the nerve branches which was disseminated to the pelvic limb (nerves gluteus cranial and gluteus caudal, cutaneus femoris caudalis and ischiadicus). The ischiadicus nerve was divided into fibularis communis and tibialis nerves. The tibialis nerve emits the cutaneus surae caudalis. The fibularis communis emits the cutaneus surae lateralis, fibularis superficialis and fibularis profundus. The pudendus nerve arises from S2 with contributions of one branch L7-S1 and one ramus of the cutaneus femoris lateralis. Still, one branch of S2 joins with S3 to form the rectales caudales nerve. These data provides an important anatomical knowledge of a two canid species of South American fauna, besides providing the effective surgical and clinical care of these animals. PMID:26692361

  5. Prenatal Ablation of Nicotinic Receptor alpha7 Cell Lineages Produces Lumbosacral Spina Bifida the Severity of Which is Modified by Choline and Nicotine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Scott W; Tvrdik, Petr; Capecchi, Mario R; Gahring, Lorise C

    2012-01-01

    Lumbosacral spina bifida is a common debilitating birth defect whose multiple causes are poorly understood. Here, we provide the first genetic delineation of cholinergic nicotinic receptor alpha7 (Chrna7) expression and link the ablation of the Chrna7 cell lineage to this condition in the mouse. Using homologous recombination, an IRES-Cre bi-cistronic cassette was introduced into the 3′ noncoding region of Chrna7 (Chrna7:Cre) for identifying cell lineages expressing this gene. This lineage first appears at embryonic day E9.0 in rhombomeres 3 and 5 of the neural tube and extends to cell subsets in most tissues by E14.5. Ablation of the Chrna7:Cre cell lineage in embryos from crosses with conditionally expressed attenuated diphtheria toxin results in precise developmental defects including omphalocele (89%) and open spina bifida (SB; 80%). We hypothesized that like humans, this defect would be modified by environmental compounds not only folic acid or choline but also nicotine. Prenatal chronic oral nicotine administration substantially worsened the defect to often include the rostral neural tube. In contrast, supplementation of the maternal diet with 2% choline decreased SB prevalence to 38% and dramatically reduced the defect severity. Folic acid supplementation only trended towards a reduced SB frequency. The omphalocele was unaffected by these interventions. These studies identify the Chrna7 cell lineage as participating in posterior neuropore closure and present a novel model of lower SB that can be substantially modified by the prenatal environment. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22473653

  6. Comparison of activation of corticospinal neurons and spinal motor neurons by magnetic and electrical transcranial stimulation in the lumbosacral cord of the anaesthetized monkey.

    PubMed

    Edgley, S A; Eyre, J A; Lemon, R N; Miller, S

    1997-05-01

    To illuminate the action of non-invasive stimuli on the human cerebral cortex, responses of corticospinal axons and of plantar alpha-motor neurons following transcranial magnetic (TMS) and electrical stimulation (TES) were recorded in the lumbosacral cord in the anaesthetized macaque monkey. A round coil was used for TMS, and the anode was located at the vertex for TES. The responses of 175 identified corticospinal axons (conduction velocities of 24-95 m/s) were recorded from the lateral corticospinal tract at the T12-L3 spinal level. A single magnetic or electrical stimulus could evoke an early spike corresponding to the direct (D) wave in surface recorded volleys and was termed a D response. In the same axon, up to four further spikes, termed indirect (I) responses, could also be evoked. At a given intensity of stimulation, D responses had clear thresholds and fixed latencies, whereas I responses were labile in both respects. For TMS and TES, the thresholds of both D and I responses were inversely correlated with axonal conduction velocity. For TMS, fast conducting axons (> 75 m/s) had lower thresholds for D responses, while more slowly conducting axons (< 55 m/s) had lower thresholds for I responses. Very few of the axons with a conduction velocity of < 40 m/s (three out of 23) gave a D response to TMS. For TES, the majority of axons had lower thresholds for D responses or a similar threshold for both D and I responses. At threshold, the latencies of D responses evoked by TMS and TES were consistent with activation within the cortex, while TES also excited some corticospinal axons deep to the cortex. At 2.5 times threshold for the D response, TMS still excited axons mostly within the cortex, but with TES the site of activation shifted by as much as 65 mm below the cortex (mode 20 mm). Intracellular responses were recorded in 23 plantar alpha motor neurons supplying intrinsic muscles of the foot. All showed monosynaptic excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSPs

  7. The Use of the Lumbosacral Enlargement as an Intrinsic Imaging Biomarker: Feasibility of Grey Matter and White Matter Cross-Sectional Area Measurements Using MRI at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Yiannakas, Marios C.; Kakar, Puneet; Hoy, Luke R.; Miller, David H.; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Histopathological studies have demonstrated the involvement of spinal cord grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) in several diseases and recent research has suggested the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a promising tool for in vivo assessment of the upper spinal cord. However, many neurological conditions would benefit from quantitative assessment of tissue integrity at different levels and relatively little work has been done, mainly due to technical challenges associated with imaging the lower spinal cord. In this study, the value of the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE) as an intrinsic imaging biomarker was determined by exploring the feasibility of obtaining within it reliable GM and WM cross-sectional area (CSA) measurements by means of a commercially available MRI system at 3 tesla (T). 10 healthy volunteers (mean age 27.5 years, 6 female) gave written informed consent and high resolution images of the LSE were acquired and analysed using an optimised MRI acquisition and analysis protocol. GM and WM mean CSA measurements were obtained from a 15 mm section at the level of the LSE and the reproducibility of the measurements was determined by means of scan-rescan, intra- and inter-observer assessments. Mean (±SD) LSE cross-sectional area (LSE-CSA) was 62.3 (±4.1) mm2 and mean (±SD) LSE grey matter cross-sectional area (LSE-GM-CSA) was 19.8 (±3.3) mm2. The mean scan-rescan, intra- and inter-observer % coefficient of variation (COV) for measuring the LSE-CSA were 2%, 2% and 2.5%, respectively and for measuring the LSE-GM-CSA were 7.8%, 8% and 8.6%, respectively. This study has shown that the LSE can be used reliably as an intrinsic imaging biomarker. The method presented here can be potentially extended to study the LSE in the diseased state and could provide a solid foundation for subsequent multi-parametric MRI investigations. PMID:25170763

  8. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance image of structures enclosed in the spinal canal relevant to anesthetists and estimation of the lumbosacral CSF volume.

    PubMed

    Puigdellívol-Sánchez, A; Prats-Galino, A; Reina, M A; Machés, F; Hernández, J M; De Andrés, J; van Zundert, A

    2011-01-01

    lumbosacral CSF volumes and other structures for anesthetic purposes. PMID:21612144

  9. A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL COMPARING EXTENSIBLE AND INEXTENSIBLE LUMBOSACRAL ORTHOSES AND STANDARD CARE ALONE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LOWER BACK PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Morrisette, David C.; Cholewicki, Jacek; Patenge, Walter F.; Logan, Sarah; Seif, Gretchen; McGowan, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single blinded, randomized clinical trial for the evaluation of lumbosacral orthoses (LSOs) in the management of lower back pain (LBP). Objective To evaluate the effects of two types of LSO on self-rated disability in patients with lower back pain. Summary of Background Data LSOs are commonly used for the management of LBP, but their effectiveness may vary due to design. An inextensible LSO (iLSO) reduce trunk motion and increases trunk stiffness, whereas an extensible LSO (eLSO) does not. Methods 98 participants with LBP were randomized to three groups: 1) Standard care group (SC), which included medication and physical therapy (n=29), 2) SC with eLSO (eLSO group) (n=32), and 3) SC with iLSO (iLSO group) (n=37). Outcome measures were evaluated before and after 2 weeks of treatment: modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Patient Specific Activity Score (PSAS), pain ratings, and Fear and Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ). Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups at baseline. Compared to the SC alone, iLSO group showed greater improvement on the ODI scores (p=.01), but not the eLSO group. The ODI scores improved by a mean of 2.4 (95% CI −2.2, 7.1), 8.1 (95% CI 2.8, 13.4), and 14.0 (95% CI 8.2, 19.8) points for SC, eLSO, and iLSO groups respectively. Individuals wearing the iLSO had 4.7 times higher odds of achieving 50% or greater improvement in the ODI scores compared to those assigned to SC (95% CI 1.2, 18.5, p=0.03). Both the eLSO and iLSO groups had a greater improvement in the PSAS scores compared to SC (p=.05 and p=.01, respectively), but the change did not meet the minimal clinically important difference. Pain ratings improved for all three groups, with no statistical difference between them. Finally, no significant differences across groups were found for the FABQ. Conclusions An iLSO led to greater improvement in ODI scores in comparison with SC and an eLSO. We surmise that the likely mechanism

  10. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... between the vertebrae results in narrowing of the space for the spinal cord and its branches, known ... and cervical stenosis refers to narrowing of the space for the spinal cord or nerve branches in ...