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Sample records for lung cancer growth

  1. Neuropeptides as lung cancer growth factors.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript is written in honor of the Festschrift for Abba Kastin. I met Abba at a Society for Neuroscience meeting and learned that he was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Peptides. I submitted manuscripts to the journal on "Neuropeptides as Growth Factors in Cancer" and subsequently was named to the Editorial Advisory Board. Over the past 30 years I have published dozens of manuscripts in Peptides and reviewed hundreds of submitted manuscripts. It was always rewarding to interact with Abba, a consummate professional. When I attended meetings in New Orleans I would sometimes go out to dinner with him at the restaurant "Commanders Palace". When I chaired the Summer Neuropeptide Conference we were honored to have him receive the Fleur Strand Award one year in Israel. I think that his biggest editorial contribution has been the "Handbook of Biologically Active Peptides." I served as a Section Editor on "Cancer/Anticancer Peptides" and again found that it was a pleasure working with him. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which bombesin-like peptides, neurotensin and vasoactive intestinal peptide regulate the growth of lung cancer. PMID:25836991

  2. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  3. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor family in lung cancer and premalignancy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Wilbur A; Veve, Robert; Hirsch, Fred R; Helfrich, Barbara A; Bunn, Paul A

    2002-02-01

    Lung cancer, like many other epithelial malignancies, is thought to be the outcome of genetic and epigenetic changes that result in a constellation of phenotypic abnormalities in bronchial epithelium. These include morphologic epithelial dysplasia, angiogenesis, increased proliferative rate, and changes in expression of cell surface proteins, particularly overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family proteins. The EFGR family is a group of four structurally similar tyrosine kinases (EGFR, HER2/neu, ErbB-3, and ErbB-4) that dimerize on binding with a number of ligands, including EGF and transforming growth factor alpha. Epidermal growth factor receptor overexpression is pronounced in virtually all squamous carcinomas and is also found in > or = 65% of large cell and adenocarcinomas. It is not expressed in situ by small cell lung carcinoma. Overexpression of EGFR is one of the earliest and most consistent abnormalities in bronchial epithelium of high-risk smokers. It is present at the stage of basal cell hyperplasia and persists through squamous metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. Recent studies of the effect of inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinases suggest that patterns of coexpression of multiple members of the EGFR family could be important in determining response. Intermediate endpoints of such trials could include monitoring of phosphorylation levels in signal transduction molecules downstream of the receptor dimers. These trials represent a new targeted approach to lung cancer treatment and chemoprevention that will require greater attention to molecular endpoints than required in past trials. PMID:11894009

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition in lung cancer: status 2012.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Fred R; Jänne, Pasi A; Eberhardt, Wilfried E; Cappuzzo, Federico; Thatcher, Nick; Pirker, Robert; Choy, Hak; Kim, Edward S; Paz-Ares, Luis; Gandara, David R; Wu, Yi-Long; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Shepherd, Frances A; Mok, Tony S

    2013-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths. Most patients present with advanced-stage disease, and the prognosis is generally poor. However, with the understanding of lung cancer biology, and development of molecular targeted agents, there have been improvements in treatment outcomes for selected subsets of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have demonstrated significantly improved tumor responses and progression-free survival in subsets of patients with advanced NSCLC, particularly those with tumors harboring activating EGFR mutations. Testing for EGFR mutations is a standard procedure for identification of patients who will benefit from first-line EGFR TKIs. For patients with advanced NSCLC and no activating EGFR mutations (EGFR wild-type) or no other driving oncogenes such as ALK-gene rearrangement, chemotherapy is still the standard of care. A new generation of EGFR TKIs, targeting multiple receptors and with irreversible bindings to the receptors, are in clinical trials and have shown encouraging effects. Research on primary and acquired resistant mechanisms to EGFR TKIs are ongoing. Monoclonal antibodies (e.g. cetuximab), in combination with chemotherapy, have demonstrated improved outcomes, particularly for subsets of NSCLC patients, but further validations are needed. Novel monoclonal antibodies are combined with chemotherapy, and randomized comparative studies are ongoing. This review summarizes the current status of EGFR inhibitors in NSCLC in 2012 and some of the major challenges we are facing. PMID:23370315

  6. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  7. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of ... in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  8. Lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Kislinger, Thomas; Jurisica, Igor; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2010-01-01

    High-throughput genomic data for both lung development and lung cancer continue to accumulate. Significant molecular intersection between these two processes has been hypothesized due to overlap in phenotypes and genomic variation. Examining the network biology of both cancer and development of the lung may shed functional light on the individual signaling modules involved. Stem cell biology may explain a portion of this network intersection and consequently studying lung organogenesis may have relevance for understanding lung cancer. This review summarizes our understanding of the potential overlapping mechanisms involved in lung development and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:19202349

  9. CREB-binding protein regulates lung cancer growth by targeting MAPK and CPSF4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhipeng; Yu, Wendan; Zhang, Changlin; Zhao, Shilei; Yu, Zhenlong; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Tang, Ranran; Xuan, Yang; Yang, Wenjing; Hao, Jiaojiao; Xu, Tingting; Zhang, Qianyi; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo; Guo, Wei

    2016-02-01

    CBP (CREB-binding protein) is a transcriptional co-activator which possesses HAT (histone acetyltransferases) activity and participates in many biological processes, including embryonic development, growth control and homeostasis. However, its roles and the underlying mechanisms in the regulation of carcinogenesis and tumor development remain largely unknown. Here we investigated the molecular mechanisms and potential targets of CBP involved in tumor growth and survival in lung cancer cells. Elevated expression of CBP was detected in lung cancer cells and tumor tissues compared to the normal lung cells and tissues. Knockdown of CBP by siRNA or inhibition of its HAT activity using specific chemical inhibitor effectively suppressed cell proliferation, migration and colony formation and induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells by inhibiting MAPK and activating cytochrome C/caspase-dependent signaling pathways. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses revealed the co-localization and interaction between CBP and CPSF4 (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 4) proteins in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CPSF4 inhibited hTERT transcription and cell growth induced by CBP, and vice versa, demonstrating the synergetic effect of CBP and CPSF4 in the regulation of lung cancer cell growth and survival. Moreover, we found that high expression of both CBP and CPSF4 predicted a poor prognosis in the patients with lung adenocarcinomas. Collectively, our results indicate that CBP regulates lung cancer growth by targeting MAPK and CPSF4 signaling pathways. PMID:26628108

  10. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  11. What Is Lung Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ... lung cancer. For more information, visit the National Cancer Institute’s Lung Cancer. Previous Basic Information Basic Information Basic Information ...

  12. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  13. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpressionmore » of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.« less

  14. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpression of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Following the identification of a group of patients in the initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) trials for lung cancer, there has been detailed focus on which patients may benefit from inhibitor therapy. This article reviews the background, genetics and prevalence of epidermal growth factor mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Additionally, the prevalence in unselected patients is compared against various other reviews. PMID:25870793

  16. Adenovirus-delivered wwox inhibited lung cancer growth in vivo in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Shou, F; Zhang, H; You, Q

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent and deadly malignancy worldwide. This study investigated the possibility of inhibiting lung cancer in vivo with adenovirus-delivered WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (wwox). The lung cancer model was established by inoculating A549 lung cancer cells into the pleural space of nude mice. The control or wwox adenovirus was injected into the pleural space 7 days after cell inoculation and 14 days after first injection. The tumor number and burdens were measured 2 weeks after second virus injection. The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-feto protein (AFP) levels in pleural effusion were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Apoptosis, proliferation and angiogenesis of tumor cells were assessed by terminal deoxinucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick end labeling assay, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and CD31 staining, respectively. Ectopic wwox significantly reduced both the number and size of lung tumors accompanied by substantially lower CEA and AFP levels in pleural effusion. The expression levels of Bcl2, Bcl-xL, vascular endothelial growth factor, PCNA-positive and CD31-positive cells in the tumors were significantly decreased, whereas levels of p21 and p73 and apoptotic cells markedly increased in mice receiving the wwox virus. These data demonstrated that wwox delivered by adenovirus was able to inhibit the growth of lung cancer in vivo, indicating the potential of using wwox as a gene therapy agent for lung cancer. PMID:26516139

  17. Gefitinib in the treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the main cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with most patients present with advanced disease and poor long-term prognosis. The aim of lung cancer treatment is to slow down the progression of the disease, to relieve the patients from the lung cancer symptoms and whenever possible, to increase the overall survival. The discovery of small molecule targeting tyrosine kinase of epidermal growth factor receptor opens a new way in the management of advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This review will discuss several Phase II and III trials evaluated the clinical efficacy of gefitinib as monotherapy in pretreated patients with advanced NSCLC, as well as both monotherapy and combined with chemotherapy in chemotherapy-naive patients. PMID:27433059

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in Brazilian lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Carlos E.; Ciol, Heloísa; Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Benine, Lucimara C.; Silva, Luciana H.; Ojopi, Elida B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer and has recently emerged as an important target for molecular therapeutics. The KRAS oncogene also plays an important role in the development of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a population of Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: A total of 207 specimens from Brazilian patients with non-small cell lung cancer were analyzed for activating epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS somatic mutations, and their associations with clinicopathological characteristics (including age, gender, ethnicity, smoking habits, and histological subtype) were examined. RESULTS: We identified 63 cases (30.4%) with epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and 30 cases (14.6%) with KRAS mutations. The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor mutation we detected was a deletion in exon 19 (60.3%, 38 patients), followed by an L858R amino acid substitution in exon 21 (27%, 17 patients). The most common types of KRAS mutations were found in codon 12. There were no significant differences in epidermal growth factor receptor or KRAS mutations by gender or primary versus metastatic lung cancer. There was a higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in the non-Asian patients. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were more prevalent in adenocarcinomas than in non-adenocarcinoma histological types. Being a non-smoker was significantly associated with the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations, but the prevalence of KRAS mutations was significantly associated with smoking. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to examine the prevalence of epidermal growth factor receptor and KRAS mutations in a Brazilian population sample with non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:22666783

  19. Lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Akhurst, Tim; MacManus, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J

    2015-04-01

    (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) plays a key role in the evaluation of undiagnosed lung nodules, when primary lung cancer is strongly suspected, or when it has already been diagnosed by other techniques. Although technical factors may compromise characterization of small or highly mobile lesions, lesions without apparent FDG uptake can generally be safely observed, whereas FDG-avid lung nodules almost always need further evaluation. FDG-PET/CT is now the primary staging imaging modality for patients with lung cancer who are being considered for curative therapy with either surgery or definitive radiation therapy. PMID:25829084

  20. Implications of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor Activation in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Andarini, Sita; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Syahruddin, Elisna; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) has been intensively investigated in many preclinical studies using cell lines and animal models, and the results have provided important knowledge to help improve the understanding of cancer biology. IGF1R is highly expressed in patients with lung cancer, and high levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), the main ligand for IGF1R, increases the risk of developing lung malignancy in the future. Several phase I clinical trials have supported the potential use of an IGF1R-targeted strategy for cancer, including lung cancer. However, the negative results from phase III studies need further attention, especially in selecting patients with specific molecular signatures, who will gain benefits from IGF1R inhibitors with minimal side effects. This review will discuss the basic concept of IGF1R in lung cancer biology, such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction and cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance, and also the clinical implications of IGF1R for lung cancer patients, such as prognostic value and cancer therapy resistance. PMID:27418865

  1. RFPL3 and CBP synergistically upregulate hTERT activity and promote lung cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wendan; Cai, Xin; Dai, Meng; Xu, Tingting; Huang, Wenlin; Guo, Wei; Deng, Wuguo; Wu, Taihua

    2015-01-01

    hTERT is the key component of telomerase and its overactivation contributes to maintaining telomere length and cell immortalization. Previously, we identified RFPL3 as a new transcription activator of hTERT in lung cancers. However, the exact mechanism of RFPL3 in mediating hTERT activation and its associated signal regulatory network remain unclear. In this study, we found that RFPL3 colocalized and interacted directly with CBP in the nucleus of lung cancer cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays of lung cancers revealed the simultaneous overexpression of both RFPL3 and CBP predicted relatively poor prognosis. Furthermore, we confirmed their synergistic stimulation on hTERT expression and tumor cell growth. The binding of RFPL3 to hTERT promoter was reduced markedly when CBP was knocked down by its specific siRNA or suppressed by its inhibitor in lung cancer cells with stable overexpression of RFPL3. When one of the two proteins RFPL3 and CBP was upregulated or downregulated, whereas the another remains unchanged, hTERT expression and telomerase activity were activated or repressed accordingly. In the meantime, the growth of lung cancer cells was also promoted or attenuated accordingly. Furthermore, we also found that RFPL3 coordinated with CBP to upregulate hTERT through the CBP-induced acetylation of RFPL3 protein and their co-anchoring at hTERT promoter region. Collectively, our results reveal a new mechanism of hTERT regulation in lung cancer cells and suggest the RFPL3/CBP/hTERT signaling pathway may be a new targets for lung cancer treatment. PMID:26318425

  2. miR-5100 promotes tumor growth in lung cancer by targeting Rab6.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haili; Jiang, Yun; Wang, Yahong; Chen, Ting; Yang, Lawei; He, Huijuan; Lin, Ziying; Liu, Tie; Yang, Teng; Kamp, David W; Wu, Bin; Liu, Gang

    2015-06-28

    Our previous study demonstrated that microRNA 5100 (miR-5100) is overexpressed in lung cancer tissues; however, the function of miR-5100 remained elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-5100 is highly expressed in a wide variety of lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines. Exogenous expression of miR-5100 in A549 and H1299 lung cancer cells enhanced proliferation and colony formation, and conversely, suppression of miR-5100 exhibited inhibitory effects. Furthermore, we demonstrate that miR-5100 promotes tumor growth in nude mice. These effects may result from the ability of miR-5100 to promote G1/S transition and downregulate cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinases 2 (CDK2) expressions in lung cancer stable cells. Using a bioinformatics target prediction tool, we identified Rab6 as a potential target of miR-5100. Consistently, overexpression of miR-5100 specifically reduced the expression of a luciferase reporter containing the predicted binding site from the 3'untranslated region (3'UTR) of Rab6 and decreased the accumulation of endogenous Rab6 in A549 and H1299 cells. Moreover, exogenous expression of Rab6 compromised the effects of miR-5100 on cell proliferation and colony formation. Our data suggest that miR-5100 promotes tumor growth by facilitating the G1/S transition and targeting Rab6. PMID:25754817

  3. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC ...

  4. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  5. Fas signal promotes lung cancer growth by recruiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells via cancer cell-derived PGE2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Liu, Qiuyan; Zhang, Minggang; Yu, Yizhi; Liu, Xia; Cao, Xuetao

    2009-03-15

    Fas/FasL system has been extensively investigated with respect to its capacity to induce cellular apoptosis. However, accumulated evidences show that Fas signaling also exhibits nonapoptotic functions, such as induction of cell proliferation and differentiation. Lung cancer is one of cancer's refractory to the immunotherapy, however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully understood. In this study, we show that Fas overexpression does not affect in vitro growth of 3LL cells, but promotes lung cancer growth in vivo. However, such tumor-promoting effect is not observed in FasL-deficient (gld) mice, and also not observed in the immune competent mice once inoculation with domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, suggesting the critical role of Fas signal in the promotion of lung cancer growth in vivo. More accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells is found in tumors formed by inoculation with Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells, but not domain-negative Fas-overexpressing 3LL cells. Accordingly, Fas-ligated 3LL lung cancer cells can chemoattract more MDSC but not regulatory T cells in vitro. Furthermore, Fas ligation induces 3LL lung cancer cells to produce proinflammatory factor PGE(2) by activating p38 pathway, and in turn, 3LL cells-derived PGE(2) contribute to the Fas ligation-induced MDSC chemoattraction. Furthermore, in vivo administration of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor can significantly reduce MDSC accumulation in the Fas-overexpressing tumor. Therefore, our results demonstrate that Fas signal can promote lung cancer growth by recruiting MDSC via cancer cell-derived PGE(2), thus providing new mechanistic explanation for the role of inflammation in cancer progression and immune escape. PMID:19265159

  6. Itraconazole inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aftab, Blake T.; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Liu, Jun O.; Rudin, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    The anti-angiogenic agent bevacizumab has been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, although the survival benefit associated with this agent is marginal, and toxicities and cost are substantial. A recent screen for selective inhibitors of endothelial cell proliferation identified the oral anti-fungal drug itraconazole as a novel agent with potential anti-angiogenic activity. Here we define and characterize the anti-angiogenic and anti-cancer activities of itraconazole in relevant preclinical models of angiogenesis and lung cancer. Itraconazole consistently demonstrated potent, specific, and dose-dependent inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation in response to both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-mediated angiogenic stimulation. In vivo, using primary xenograft models of human non-small cell lung cancer, oral itraconazole showed single agent growth-inhibitory activity associated with induction of tumor HIF1α expression and marked inhibition of tumor vascularity. Itraconazole significantly enhanced the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in the same model systems. Taken together, these data suggest that itraconazole has potent and selective inhibitory activity against multiple key aspects of tumor-associated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, and strongly support clinical translation of its use. Based on these observations we have initiated a randomized phase II study comparing the efficacy of standard cytotoxic therapy with or without daily oral itraconazole in patients with recurrent metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:21896639

  7. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  8. Human lung cancer-derived microparticles enhanced angiogenesis and growth of hepatoma cells in rodent lung parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Meng-Shen TongYen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lo; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that human lung cancer-derived microparticles (LcD-MPs) played an important role in tumor angiogenesis and growth. Fischer 344 rats (F344, n=18) were equally categorized into group 1 [Sham Control (3.0 mL normal saline intravenous injection (IV))], group 2 [hepatoma cell line (2.0 x 106 cells, IV)], and group 3 [hepatoma cell line + LcD-MPs (3.0 x 106, IV)]. Animals were euthanized by day 28 after hepatoma cells transfusion. Our result showed that the gross pathology confirmed growth of hepatoma cell line in lung parenchyma. The size and weight of the lungs were significantly increased in group 2 and further elevated in group 3 than in group 1 (all p<0.001). Histopathological analysis demonstrated that the lung crowded score and number of small vessel exhibited an identical pattern, whereas the number of alveolar sacs showed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among the three groups (all p<0.0001). The cellular expressions of CD34+, CXCR4+, c-Kit+, CK19+, VEGF+ and vimentin+ cells in lung parenchyma exhibited an identical pattern compared to those of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The protein expressions of apoptotic (Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and c-PARP), fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β), and tumor suppression (PTEN) biomarkers showed an identical pattern, whereas that of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) and anti-fibrotic (Smad1/5, BMP-2) biomarkers were displayed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The MPs could enhance angiogenesis and accelerated hepatoma cell growth in rodent lung parenchyma. PMID:27186261

  9. Human lung cancer-derived microparticles enhanced angiogenesis and growth of hepatoma cells in rodent lung parenchyma.

    PubMed

    Ko, Sheung-Fat; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Hung; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Zhen, Meng-Shen TongYen-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Chen, Hong-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lo; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Yip, Hon-Kan

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that human lung cancer-derived microparticles (LcD-MPs) played an important role in tumor angiogenesis and growth. Fischer 344 rats (F344, n=18) were equally categorized into group 1 [Sham Control (3.0 mL normal saline intravenous injection (IV))], group 2 [hepatoma cell line (2.0 x 10(6) cells, IV)], and group 3 [hepatoma cell line + LcD-MPs (3.0 x 10(6), IV)]. Animals were euthanized by day 28 after hepatoma cells transfusion. Our result showed that the gross pathology confirmed growth of hepatoma cell line in lung parenchyma. The size and weight of the lungs were significantly increased in group 2 and further elevated in group 3 than in group 1 (all p<0.001). Histopathological analysis demonstrated that the lung crowded score and number of small vessel exhibited an identical pattern, whereas the number of alveolar sacs showed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among the three groups (all p<0.0001). The cellular expressions of CD34(+), CXCR4(+), c-Kit(+), CK19(+), VEGF(+) and vimentin+ cells in lung parenchyma exhibited an identical pattern compared to those of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The protein expressions of apoptotic (Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and c-PARP), fibrotic (Smad3, TGF-β), and tumor suppression (PTEN) biomarkers showed an identical pattern, whereas that of anti-apoptotic (Bcl-2) and anti-fibrotic (Smad1/5, BMP-2) biomarkers were displayed an opposite pattern compared to that of total lung weight among all groups (all p<0.001). The MPs could enhance angiogenesis and accelerated hepatoma cell growth in rodent lung parenchyma. PMID:27186261

  10. Osteoactivin (GPNMB) ectodomain protein promotes growth and invasive behavior of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oyewumi, Moses O.; Manickavasagam, Dharani; Novak, Kimberly; Wehrung, Daniel; Paulic, Nikola; Moussa, Fouad M.; Sondag, Gregory R.; Safadi, Fayez F.

    2016-01-01

    The potential application of GPNMB/OA as a therapeutic target for lung cancer will require a greater understanding of the impact of GPNMB/OA ectodomain (ECD) protein shedding into tumor tissues. Thus, in this work we characterized GPNMB/OA expression and extent of shedding of its ECD protein while evaluating the impact on lung cancer progression using three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: A549, SK-MES-1 and calu-6. We observed a direct correlation (R2 = 0.89) between GPNMB/OA expression on NSCLC cells and the extent of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding. Meanwhile, siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPNMB/OA in cancer cells significantly reduced GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding, migration, invasion and adhesion to extracellular matrix materials. Also, exogenous treatment of cancer cells (expressing low GPNMB/OA) with recombinant GPNMB/OA protein (rOA) significantly facilitated cell invasion and migration, but the effects of rOA was negated by inclusion of a selective RGD peptide. Further studies in athymic (nu/nu) mice-bearing calu-6 showed that intratumoral supplementation with rOA effectively facilitated in vivo tumor growth as characterized by a high number of proliferating cells (Ki67 staining) coupled with a low number of apoptotic cells. Taken together, our results accentuate the relevance of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding to progression of lung cancer. Thus, strategies that suppress GPNMB/OA expression on lung cancer cells as well as negate shedding of GPNMB/OA ECD protein are worthy of consideration in lung cancer therapeutics. PMID:26883195

  11. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next ...

  13. Impact of age on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tsuyoshi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Suda, Kenichi; Soh, Junichi; Yatabe, Yasushi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Aging is one of the best, but rarely referred, risk factors for various types of cancer including lung cancer, because age could be a surrogate for accumulation of genetic events in cancers. Smoking inversely associates with the presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in lung cancer, but its strong confounding with age and sex makes it difficult to evaluate sole impact of age. To clarify an impact of age on EGFR mutation, we conducted a cross-sectional study based on data of 1262 lung cancer patients. The associations between EGFR mutation and age, considering sex, smoking and histology, were evaluated using logistic regression models. In multivariate analysis, we found a significant increase of EGFR mutation prevalence by increase of age (p-trend=0.0004). Consistent trend was observed among never-smoking females (p-trend=0.011) and never-smoking males also showed similar trend although not significant. These were consistently observed when we limit the subject to those with adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, age independently associates with EGFR mutation among lung cancer. Positive association between EGFR mutation and age among never-smokers regardless of sex might indicate that EGFR mutation occurs cumulatively by unidentified internal/external factors other than smoking. PMID:23036155

  14. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptors in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Veale, D.; Ashcroft, T.; Marsh, C.; Gibson, G. J.; Harris, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is homologous to the oncogene erb-beta and is the receptor for a class of tumour growth factors (TGF-alpha). The clinical correlations with its expression were studied in 77 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). They were stained for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) by means of an indirect immunoperoxidase technique using a monoclonal antibody against the receptor. Normal lung tissue and normal bronchus were stained for comparison. Cancer tissue showed significantly increased staining compared to normal lung (P less than 0.05). Staining for EGFr in 40 squamous carcinomas was significantly stronger than in 37 specimens of other types of NSCLC (P less than 0.05), and staining in stage three NSCLC was stronger than in stage 1 and 2 (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that the presence of a high intensity of staining for EGF receptor is associated with spread of human non-small cell lung cancer and this receptor may be a suitable target for therapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3038157

  16. Serum vascular endothelial growth factor is related to systemic oxidative stress in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Katsabeki-Katsafli, A; Kerenidi, T; Kostikas, K; Dalaveris, E; Kiropoulos, T S; Gogou, E; Papaioannou, A I; Gourgoulianis, K I

    2008-05-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is known to play crucial role in tumour angiogenesis. It is demonstrated that VEGF can be up-regulated by oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to determine the serum VEGF levels and oxidative stress in patients with primary lung cancer and to investigate their association with clinicopathologic factors. We measured serum VEGF levels and oxidative stress in 63 patients (age 63.02+/-1.12 S.E.M.) with primary lung cancer before any treatment (39 NSCLC and 24 SCLC; 6 patients stage I, 3 stage II, 25 stage III and 29 stage IV) and 25 normal subjects. The serum VEGF levels were measured with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Serum oxidative stress levels were detected by a commercially available assay (D-ROMs test, Diacron, Grossetto, Italy). The levels of oxidative stress in patients were higher than those in normal subjects (555.3+/-30.35 UCarr vs. 360.1+/-17.46 UCarr). Additionally, a significant difference was found in serum VEGF levels between lung cancer patients and healthy control subjects (428.1+/-38.42pg/ml vs. 298.8+/-19.89pg/ml, respectively, p=0.040). Interestingly, serum oxidative stress presented a significant correlation with serum VEGF levels in patients with lung cancer (r=0.542, p=0.002). Serum VEGF levels were significantly associated with the clinical staging (N-stage) of the patients (p=0.023), performance status (p=0.004) and age (p=0.004). In conclusion, oxidative stress and VEGF are significantly increased in patients with primary lung cancer. The correlation between them might implicate new aspects of the mechanisms controlling tumour angiogenesis and may present clinical interest in the future. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the role of oxidative stress and VEGF as possible biomarkers for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with lung cancer. PMID:18242763

  17. Pazopanib diminishes non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and metastases in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wang; Wang, Yuli; Li, Xuebing; You, Jiacong; Zhou, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenesis has been demonstrated to have a critical role in lung cancer pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the effect of the small-molecule angiogenesis inhibitor pazopanib on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods NSCLC cells were tested for viability and migration after incubation with varying concentrations of pazopanib. Further, the phosphorylation status of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase B, and MEK were assessed in vitro. For in vivo testing, mice grafted with NSCLC cell lines L9981 and A549 were treated orally with pazopanib. Results Pazopanib inhibits signaling pathways in tumor cells, thus blocking NSCLC cell growth and migration in vitro and inducing tumor cell arrest at G0/G1 phase. We show that pazopanib could inhibit tumor cell growth, decrease metastases, and prolong survival in two mouse xenograft models of human NSCLC. Conclusion These preclinical studies of pazopanib show the possibility of clinical application and, ultimately, improvement in patient outcome. PMID:26273349

  18. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A Regulates the Secretion of Different Angiogenic Factors in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Frezzetti, Daniela; Gallo, Marianna; Roma, Cristin; D'Alessio, Amelia; Maiello, Monica R; Bevilacqua, Simona; Normanno, Nicola; De Luca, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is one of the main mediators of angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, it has been described an autocrine feed-forward loop in NSCLC cells in which tumor-derived VEGFA promoted the secretion of VEGFA itself, amplifying the proangiogenic signal. In order to investigate the role of VEGFA in lung cancer progression, we assessed the effects of recombinant VEGFA on proliferation, migration, and secretion of other angiogenic factors in A549, H1975, and HCC827 NSCLC cell lines. We found that VEGFA did not affect NSCLC cell proliferation and migration. On the other hand, we demonstrated that VEGFA not only produced a strong and persistent increase of VEGFA itself but also significantly induced the secretion of a variety of angiogenic factors, including follistatin (FST), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-8, leptin (LEP), platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), and platelet-derived growth factor bb (PDGF-BB). PI3K/AKT, RAS/ERK, and STAT3 signalling pathways were found to mediate the effects of VEGFA in NSCLC cell lines. We also observed that VEGFA regulation mainly occurred at post-transcriptional level and that NSCLC cells expressed different isoforms of VEGFA. Collectively, our data suggested that VEGFA contributes to lung cancer progression by inducing a network of angiogenic factors, which might offer potential for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26542886

  19. The Motor Protein KIF14 Inhibits Tumor Growth and Cancer Metastasis in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Pei-Fang; Hong, Tse-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chang, Yih-Leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Chang, Gee-Chen; Jou, Yuh-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively), and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001). The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:23626713

  20. The motor protein KIF14 inhibits tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pei-Fang; Hong, Tse-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chang, Yih-Leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Chang, Gee-Chen; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Pan, Szu-Hua; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively), and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001). The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:23626713

  1. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusong; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Meng, Qinghui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jiaying; Fan, Saijun

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24348867

  2. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Ding, Lan-Bao; Zhou, Xi

    2015-10-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. PMID:26341266

  3. Imperatorin sensitizes anoikis and inhibits anchorage-independent growth of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choochuay, Kanuengnit; Chunhacha, Preedakorn; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Luechapudiporn, Rataya; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2013-07-01

    The anoikis-sensitization activity of imperatorin, an active furanocoumarin component of Angelica dahurica root, is reported herein for the first time. The present study demonstrated that the imperatorin treatment at sub-toxic concentrations enhanced human lung cancer H23 cell apoptosis after detachment. A Western blot analysis showed that imperatorin significantly enhanced the p53 protein level, which subsequently down-regulated Mcl-1 protein and up-regulated Bax, while it had a minimal effect on Bcl-2 expression. In addition, an anchorage-independent growth assay was performed to support the anti-metastasis potential of imperatorin. Consistent with anoikis assay, imperatorin exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on the anchorage-independent growth of the cells. Further, this study demonstrated that imperatorin sensitizes anoikis in other lung cancer cells, namely, H292 and A549. Because anoikis was shown to be a critical hindrance in preventing cancer cell metastasis, the knowledge regarding such an activity and an underlying mechanism may lead to the development of this compound for a cancer therapy. PMID:23108812

  4. Knockdown of Aurora-B inhibits the growth of non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    YU, JING JING; ZHOU, LONG DIAN; ZHAO, TIAN TIAN; BAI, WEI; ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    Elevated expression of Aurora-B affects cell apoptosis and proliferation in a variety of solid tumors. However, the role of Aurora-B has been poorly evaluated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present study, it was found that Aurora-B was overexpressed in tissue specimens obtained from 174 patients with lung cancer. It was also demonstrated that knockdown of Aurora-B induces apoptosis and inhibits the growth of lung cancer A549 cells in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it was found that silencing Aurora-B decreased the activity of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway. Therefore, it was concluded that knockdown of Aurora-B induces apoptosis and inhibits growth in NSCLC A549 cells, in addition to inhibiting the activity of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Targeting Aurora-B may provide a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:26622725

  5. Ceftriaxone, an FDA-approved cephalosporin antibiotic, suppresses lung cancer growth by targeting Aurora B.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Li, Haitao; Li, Shengqing; Zhu, Feng; Kim, Dong Joon; Xie, Hua; Li, Yan; Nadas, Janos; Oi, Naomi; Zykova, Tatyana A; Yu, Dong Hoon; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Kim, Myoung Ok; Wang, Lei; Ma, Weiya; Lubet, Ronald A; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Ziming; Dong, Zigang

    2012-12-01

    Ceftriaxone, an FDA-approved third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic, has antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Generally, ceftriaxone is used for a variety of infections such as community-acquired pneumonia, meningitis and gonorrhea. Its primary molecular targets are the penicillin-binding proteins. However, other activities of ceftriaxone remain unknown. Herein, we report for the first time that ceftriaxone has antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Kinase profiling results predicted that Aurora B might be a potential 'off' target of ceftriaxone. Pull-down assay data confirmed that ceftriaxone could bind with Aurora B in vitro and in A549 cells. Furthermore, ceftriaxone (500 µM) suppressed anchorage-independent cell growth by targeting Aurora B in A549, H520 and H1650 lung cancer cells. Importantly, in vivo xenograft animal model results showed that ceftriaxone effectively suppressed A549 and H520 lung tumor growth by inhibiting Aurora B. These data suggest the anticancer efficacy of ceftriaxone for the treatment of lung cancers through its inhibition of Aurora B. PMID:22962305

  6. RNAi-mediated silencing of praline-rich gene causes growth reduction in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingbo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer ranks among one of the most frequent causes of cancer death in the world. Here, we investigated PRR11, one novel gene, with no functional annotation, was found to be over-expressed in lung cancer patients suggesting its potential implication in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, high PRR11 levels predict shorter survival of lung cancer patients. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of PRR11 in lung cancer using the technique of RNA silencing via small interfering RNA (siRNA). Synthetic siRNA duplexes against PRR11 were introduced into 3 lung cancer cell lines, which subsequently resulted in a significant depletion in PRR11 expression in the cells. We found that the targeted depletion of PRR11 caused a dramatic cell cycle arrest followed by massive apoptotic cell death, and eventually resulted in a significant decrease in growth and viability of all 2 lung cancer cell lines. In summary, our study strongly suggests that PRR11 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in human lung cancer. PMID:25973065

  7. Lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frödin, J E

    1996-01-01

    This synthesis of the literature on radiotherapy for lung cancer is based on 80 scientific articles, including 2 meta-analyses, 29 randomized studies, 19 prospective studies, and 21 retrospective studies. These studies involve 28172 patients. Basic treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), is chemotherapy. Addition of radiotherapy to the primary tumor and mediastinum reduces local recurrence, prolongs long-term survival, and is often indicated. Current, and future, studies can be expected to show successive improvements in results for SCLC by optimizing the combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Should these treatments be given simultaneously or sequentially, and in which order? Which fractionation is best? Probably, no change in resource requirements for radiotherapy will be necessary, with the possible exception of changes in fractionation. Surgery constitutes primary treatment for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stages I and II. Radiotherapy may provide an alternative for patients who are inoperable for medical reasons. The value of radiotherapy following radical surgery for NSCLC remains to be shown. It is not indicated based on current knowledge. For NSCLC stage III, radiotherapy shrinks tumors and prolongs survival at 2 and 3 years. Whether it influences long-term survival after 5 years has not been shown. Considering the side effects of treatment, one must question whether limited improvements in survival motivate routine radiotherapy in these patients. Earlier attempts to add chemotherapy to radiotherapy to improve treatment results of NSCLC have not yielded convincing results. Several studies are currently on-going. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) greatly reduces the risk for brain metastases from SCLC. However, it has little influence on survival. Many treatment centers give PCI to SCLC patients who have achieved complete remission. This practice may be questioned since PCI is associated with serious complications. PCI is

  8. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ha; Xu, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth. PMID:27446967

  9. Silymarin suppressed lung cancer growth in mice via inhibiting myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tiancong; Liu, Wen; Guo, Wenjie; Zhu, Xixu

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the antitumor activity of Silymarin in a mouse model of colon cancer xenograft of Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells. Silymarin significantly suppressed tumor growth and induced apoptosis of cells in tumor tissues at a dose of 25 and 50mg/kg. Silymarin treatment enhanced the infiltration and function of CD8(+) T cells. In the meantime, Silymarin decreased the level of IL-10 while elevated the level of IL-2 and IFN-γ in the serum of tumor-bearing mice. Finally, Silymarin reduced the proportion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the tumor tissue and also the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthases-2 (iNOS2), arginase-1 (Arg-1) and MMP9, which indicated that the function of MDSC in tumor tissues were suppressed. Altogether, our data here showed that Silymarin inhibited the MDSC and promoted the infiltration and function of CD8(+) T cells thus suppressed the growth of LLC xenografts, which provides evidence for the possible use of Silymarin against lung cancer. PMID:27261626

  10. Clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 protein expression in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Changjun; Sun, Dawei; Bai, Xue; Li, Yingbin; Xu, Hai; Xu, Shidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 (beta-IGH3) protein expression in lung cancer remain unclear. This study investigated beta-IGH3 protein expression levels and biological function, as well as lung cancer prognosis. Methods Beta-IGH3 protein expression levels were measured in 236 lung cancers and were matched with adjacent noncancerous tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Subsequently, the relationship between beta-IGH3 protein expression, clinical–pathological parameters, and lung cancer prognosis was evaluated. Results Beta-IGH3 protein expression was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (61.86% vs 22.88%; P=0.01). Of the 236 enrolled cases, 146 (61.86%) showed high beta-IGH3 levels. Tumor size, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis were significantly related to beta-IGH3 protein expression in univariate analysis (P=0.001, 0.044, and 0.029, respectively), whereas age, sex, and histological type were not (P=0.038, 0.756, and 0.889, respectively). Finally, a Cox regression model also identified beta-IGH3 as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.01). Conclusion Beta-IGH3 is highly expressed in lung cancers and may be a potential target for lung cancer treatments. PMID:27563252

  11. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Jorge, S E D C; Kobayashi, S S; Costa, D B

    2014-09-01

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC. PMID:25211582

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Jorge, S E D C; Kobayashi, S S; Costa, D B

    2014-11-01

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC. PMID:25296354

  13. Very Long-Chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 3: Overexpression and Growth Dependence in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Zhengtong; Fraisl, Peter; Shi, Xiaohai; Gabrielson, Edward; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Berger, Johannes; Watkins, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. In the United States, only one in six lung cancer patients survives five years after diagnosis. These statistics may improve if new therapeutic targets are identified. We previously reported that an enzyme of fatty acid metabolism, very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSVL3), is overexpressed in malignant glioma, and that depleting glioblastoma cells of ACSVL3 diminishes their malignant properties. To determine whether ACSVL3 expression was also increased in lung cancer, we studied tumor histologic sections and lung cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemical analysis of normal human lung showed moderate ACSVL3 expression only in bronchial epithelial cells. In contrast, all of 69 different lung tumors tested, including adeno-, squamous cell, large cell, and small cell carcinomas, had robustly elevated ACSVL3 levels. Western blot analysis of lung cancer cell lines derived from these tumor types also had significantly increased ACSVL3 protein compared to normal bronchial epithelial cells. Decreasing the growth rate of lung cancer cell lines did not change ACSVL3 expression. However, knocking down ACSVL3 expression by RNA interference reduced cell growth rates in culture by 65–76%, and the ability of tumor cells to form colonies in soft agar suspension by 65–80%. We also conducted studies to gain a better understanding of the biochemical properties of human ACSVL3. ACSVL3 mRNA was detected in many human tissues, but the expression pattern differed somewhat from that of the mouse. The enzyme activated long- and very long-chain saturated fatty acid substrates, as well as long-chain mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids to their respective coenzyme A derivatives. Endogenous human ACSVL3 protein was found in a punctate subcellular compartment that partially colocalized with mitochondria as determined by immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation. From these studies, we conclude that ACSVL3 is

  14. Frondoside a suppressive effects on lung cancer survival, tumor growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Gélaude, An; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Bracke, Marc; Collin, Peter; Takahashi, Takashi; Adrian, Thomas E; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop less toxic drugs that will improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa and was shown to be a highly safe compound. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo alone and in combination with cisplatin. Frondoside A caused concentration-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35, A549, NCI-H460-Luc2, MDA-MB-435, MCF-7, and HepG2 over 24 hours through a caspase 3/7-dependent cell death pathway. The IC50 concentrations (producing half-maximal inhibition) at 24 h were between 1.7 and 2.5 µM of Frondoside A. In addition, Frondoside A induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Frondoside A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg/day i.p. for 25 days) significantly decreased the growth, the angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of LNM35 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without obvious toxic side-effects. Frondoside A (0.1-0.5 µM) also significantly prevented basal and bFGF induced angiogenesis in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Moreover, Frondoside A enhanced the inhibition of lung tumor growth induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer. PMID:23308143

  15. Frondoside A Suppressive Effects on Lung Cancer Survival, Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, Invasion, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; Gélaude, An; Al Sultan, Mahmood Ahmed; Bracke, Marc; Collin, Peter; Takahashi, Takashi; Adrian, Thomas E.; De Wever, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for oncologists and pharmacologists is to develop less toxic drugs that will improve the survival of lung cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa and was shown to be a highly safe compound. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth, metastasis and angiogenesis in vivo alone and in combination with cisplatin. Frondoside A caused concentration-dependent reduction in viability of LNM35, A549, NCI-H460-Luc2, MDA-MB-435, MCF-7, and HepG2 over 24 hours through a caspase 3/7-dependent cell death pathway. The IC50 concentrations (producing half-maximal inhibition) at 24 h were between 1.7 and 2.5 µM of Frondoside A. In addition, Frondoside A induced a time- and concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis in vitro. Frondoside A (0.01 and 1 mg/kg/day i.p. for 25 days) significantly decreased the growth, the angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of LNM35 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without obvious toxic side-effects. Frondoside A (0.1–0.5 µM) also significantly prevented basal and bFGF induced angiogenesis in the CAM angiogenesis assay. Moreover, Frondoside A enhanced the inhibition of lung tumor growth induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for lung cancer. PMID:23308143

  16. Specific immunotherapy generates CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells to suppress lung cancer growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Jing; Chen, Huiguo; Wu, Weibin; Li, Xiaojun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Kai; Li, Yun; Weng, Yimin; Liao, Hongying; Gu, Lijia

    2016-08-01

    That specific immunotherapy can inhibit cancer growth has been recognized; its efficiency is to be improved. This study aimed to inhibit lung cancer (LC) growth in a mouse model by using an LC-specific vaccination. In this study, a LC mouse model was created by adoptive transplantation with LC cells. The tumor-bearing mice were vaccinated with LC cell extracts plus adjuvant TNBS or adoptive transplantation with specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells. The results showed that the vaccination with LC extracts (LCE)/TNBS markedly inhibited the LC growth and induced CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells in LC tissue and the spleen. These CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells proliferated and produce high levels of perforin upon exposure to LCE and specifically induced LC cell apoptosis. Exposure to TNBS induced RAW264.7 cells to produce macrophage inflammatory protein-3α; the latter activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and further induced perforin expression in the CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer with specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells suppressed LC growth in mice. In conclusion, immunization with LC extracts and TNBS can induce LC-specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells in LC-bearing mice and inhibit LC growth. PMID:26910585

  17. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of NUPR1 inhibits human nonsmall cell lung cancer growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaotong; Wang, Wei; Hu, Jing; Feng, Kejian; Pan, Yanming; Zhang, Linyou; Feng, Yukuan

    2012-12-01

    NUPR1 (nuclear protein 1) was found to play a key role in the development of several malignancies including pancreas, breast, and prostate cancers. However, the functional role of NUPR1 in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) progression and development is little known. Here, lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) was employed to downregulate endogenous NUPR1 expression to study the function of NUPR1 in growth of nonsmall cell lung cancer. A lentivirus-mediated RNAi technology was used to specifically knock down the expression of NUPR1 in H1299 cells. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry, western blot and cell count assays were studied to characterize NUPR1 expression in vitro. Furthermore, nonsmall cell lung cancer xenograft models in nude mice were established to investigate whether knockdown of NUPR1 reduces the tumor growth in vivo. We found that downregulation of NUPR1 expression significantly inhibited nonsmall cell lung cancer H1299 cells proliferation and colony formation in vitro. Moreover, the specific downregulation of NUPR1 arrested cells in G0 phase of cell cycle and increased apoptosis rate. Silencing of NUPR1 also suppressed tumor growth by tail vein injection of lentivirus encoded shRNA against NUPR1 in vivo. Our findings revealed that the NUPR1 gene represents a promising target for gene silencing therapy in nonsmall cell lung cancer. PMID:22961798

  18. Pyrogallol induces G2-M arrest in human lung cancer cells and inhibits tumor growth in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Jen; Wang, Chuan-Sheng; Hung, Jen-Yu; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Chia, Yi-Chen; Wang, Pei-Hui; Weng, Ching-Feng; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2009-11-01

    Pyrogallol, a catechin compound, is an active component of Emblica officinalis extracts and has an anti-proliferative effect on some human cancer cell lines. In our preliminary study, pyrogallol had highly cytotoxic effect on human lung cancer cell lines and less effect on human bronchial epithelium cell line. This study was performed to investigate the beneficial effect of pyrogallol on human lung cancer cell lines - H441 (lung adenocarcinoma) and H520 (lung squamous cell carcinoma). The MTT (cytotoxic) data showed the inhibition growth of lung cancer cells followed pyrogallol treatment. The cell cycle of lung cancer cells was arrested in G2/M phase using flow cytometry. Using Western blot analysis, the cell cycle related proteins - cyclin B1 and Cdc25c were decreased in a time-dependent manner and the phosphorylated Cdc2 (Thr14) was increased within 4h pyrogallol treatment. Moreover, the higher cleavage of poly (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP), the increased of Bax concurrent with the decreased of Bcl-2 indicated that pyrogallol treatment resulted in apoptosis of lung cancer cells. The cell apoptosis was also directly demonstrated using Annexin V-FITC and TUNEL stain. Additionally, the tumoricidal effect of pyrogallol was measured using a xenograft nude mice model. After 5 weeks of pyrogallol treatment could cause the regression of tumor. Taken in vitro and in vivo studies together, these results suggest that pyrogallol can be developed as a promising anti-lung cancer drug particular for the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PMID:19233505

  19. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Carole A.; McErlean, Aoife M.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promising molecular targets for treatment. PMID:24436524

  20. Effect of Disrupting Seven-in-Absentia Homolog 2 Function on Lung Cancer Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Atique U.; Schmidt, Rebecca L.; Park, Cheol Hong; Reed, Nanette R.; Hesse, Shayla E.; Thomas, Charles F.; Molina, Julian R.; Deschamps, Claude; Yang, Ping; Aubry, Marie C.

    2008-01-01

    Background Hyperactivated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and/or RAS signaling drives cellular transformation and tumorigenesis in human lung cancers, but agents that block activated EGFR and RAS signaling have not yet been demonstrated to substantially extend patients’ lives. The human homolog of Drosophila seven-in-absentia—SIAH-1 and SIAH-2—are ubiquitin E3 ligases and conserved downstream components of the RAS pathway that are required for mammalian RAS signal transduction. We examined whether inhibiting SIAH-2 function blocks lung cancer growth. Methods The antiproliferative and antitumorigenic effects of lentiviral expression of anti-SIAH-2 molecules (ie, a dominant-negative protease-deficient mutant of SIAH-2 [SIAH-2PD] and short hairpin RNA [shRNA]–mediated gene knockdown against SIAH-2) were assayed in normal human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells and in human lung cancer BZR, A549, H727, and UMC11 cells by measuring cell proliferation rates, by assessing MAPK and other activated downstream components of the RAS pathway by immunoblotting, assessing apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase–mediated UTP end-labeling (TUNEL) assay, quantifying anchorage-independent cell growth in soft agar, and assessing A549 cell–derived tumor growth in athymic nude mice (groups of 10 mice, with two injections of 1 × 106 cells each at the dorsal left and right scapular areas). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results SIAH-2 deficiency in human lung cancer cell lines reduced MAPK signaling and statistically significantly inhibited cell proliferation compared with those in SIAH-proficient cells (P < .001) and increased apoptosis (TUNEL-positive A549 cells 3 days after lentivirus infection: SIAH-2PD vs control, 30.1% vs 0.0%, difference = 30.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 23.1% to 37.0%, P < .001; SIAH-2-shRNA#6 vs control shRNA, 27.9% vs 0.0%, difference = 27.9%, 95% CI = 23.1% to 32.6%, P < .001). SIAH-2 deficiency also reduced anchorage

  1. Biosynthesized Platinum Nanoparticles Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Lung-Cancer Cells in vitro and Delay the Growth of a Human Lung-Tumor Xenograft in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yogesh, Bendale; Vineeta, Bendale; Rammesh, Natu; Saili, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer remains a deadly disease with unsatisfactory overall survival. Cisplatin, a standard platinum (Pt)-based chemotherapeutic agent, has the potential to inhibit the growth of lung cancer. Its use, however, is occasionally limited by severe organ toxicity. However, until now, no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy with proper experimental support in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether biosynthesized Pt nanoparticles (NPs) inhibited human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo to validate their use in alternative and complementary medicine. Methods: We evaluated the in vitro and the in vivo anticancer efficiencies of biosynthesized Pt NPs in a subcutaneous xenograft model with A549 cells. Severe combined immune deficient mice (SCID) were divided into four groups: group 1 being the vehicle control group and groups 2, 3 and 4 being the experimental groups. Once the tumor volume had reached 70 ─ 75 mm3, the progression profile of the tumor growth kinetics and the body weights of the mice were measured every week for 6 weeks after oral administration of Pt NPs. Doses of Pt NPs of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups and a dose of honey was administered to the vehicle control group. The efficacy was quantified by using the delay in tumor growth following the administration of Pt NPs of A549 human-lung-cancer xenografts growing in SCID mice. Results: The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that Pt NPs, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of A549 cells, and the in vivo evaluation showed that Pt NPs at the mid and high doses effectively inhibited and delayed the growth of lung cancer in SCID mice. Conclusion: These findings confirm the antitumor properties of biosynthesized Pt NPs and suggest that they may be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of patients with lung cancer. PMID:27386144

  2. Lung cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Slatore, Christopher; Sockrider, Marianna

    2014-11-15

    Lung cancer is a common form of cancer.There are things you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Stop smoking tobacco. Ask your health care provider for help in quitting, including use of medicines to help with nicotine dependence. discuss with your healthcare provider,what you are taking or doing to decrease your risk for lung cancer PMID:25398122

  3. The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor causes acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancer cells with the wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Katsuaki; Takemoto, Toshiki; Iwasaki, Takuya; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2014-08-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy often provides a dramatic response in lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations. In addition, moderate clinical efficacy of the EGFR-TKI, erlotinib, has been shown in lung cancer patients with the wild-type EGFR. Numerous molecular mechanisms that cause acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations; however, few have been reported in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. We used H358 lung adenocarcinoma cells lacking EGFR mutations that showed modest sensitivity to erlotinib. The H358 cells acquired resistance to erlotinib via chronic exposure to the drug. The H358 erlotinib-resistant (ER) cells do not have a secondary EGFR mutation, neither MET gene amplification nor PTEN downregulation; these have been identified in lung cancers with the EGFR mutations. From comprehensive screening of receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation, we observed increased phosphorylation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) in H358ER cells compared with parental H358 cells. H358ER cells responded to combined therapy with erlotinib and NVP-AEW541, an IGF1R-TKI. Our results indicate that IGF1R activation is a molecular mechanism that confers acquired resistance to erlotinib in lung cancers with the wild-type EGFR. PMID:24458568

  4. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  5. Dietary intake of a plant phospholipid/lipid conjugate reduces lung cancer growth and tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shuman Moss, Laurie A; Jensen-Taubman, Sandra; Rubinstein, Danielle; Viole, Gary; Stetler-Stevenson, William G

    2014-07-01

    It is well recognized that early detection and cancer prevention are significant armaments in the 'war against cancer'. Changes in lifestyle and diet have significant impact on the global incidence of cancer. For over 30 years, many investigators have studied the concept of chemoprevention. More recently, with the demonstration that antiangiogenic activity reduces tumor growth, the concept of angioprevention has emerged as a novel strategy in the deterrence of cancer development (carcinogenesis). In this study, we utilized a fast growing, highly aggressive murine Lewis lung cancer model to examine the in vivo antitumor effects of a novel, dietary supplement, known as plant phospholipid/lipid conjugate (pPLC). Our goal was to determine if pPLC possessed direct antitumor activity with relatively little toxicity that could be developed as a chemoprevention therapy. We used pPLC directly in this in vivo model due to the lack of aqueous solubility of this novel formulation, which precludes in vitro experimentation. pPLC contains known antioxidants, ferulic acid and lipoic acid, as well as soy sterols, formulated in a unique aqueous-insoluble matrix. The pPLC dietary supplement was shown to suppress in vivo growth of this tumor model by 30%. We also demonstrated a significant decrease in tumor angiogenesis accompanied by increased apoptosis and present preliminary evidence of enhanced expression of the hypoxia-related genes pentraxin-3 and metallothionein-3, by 24.9-fold and 10.9-fold, respectively, compared with vehicle control. These findings lead us to propose using this plant phosolipid/lipid conjugate as a dietary supplement that may be useful in cancer prevention. PMID:24510111

  6. The EphB4 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Promotes Lung Cancer Growth: A Potential Novel Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Benjamin D.; Liu, Ren; Rolle, Cleo E.; Tan, Yi-Hung Carol; Krasnoperov, Valery; Kanteti, Rajani; Tretiakova, Maria S.; Cervantes, Gustavo M.; Hasina, Rifat; Hseu, Robyn D.; Iafrate, A. John; Karrison, Theodore; Ferguson, Mark K.; Husain, Aliya N.; Faoro, Leonardo; Vokes, Everett E.; Gill, Parkash S.; Salgia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Despite progress in locoregional and systemic therapies, patient survival from lung cancer remains a challenge. Receptor tyrosine kinases are frequently implicated in lung cancer pathogenesis, and some tyrosine kinase inhibition strategies have been effective clinically. The EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase has recently emerged as a potential target in several other cancers. We sought to systematically study the role of EphB4 in lung cancer. Here, we demonstrate that EphB4 is overexpressed 3-fold in lung tumors compared to paired normal tissues and frequently exhibits gene copy number increases in lung cancer. We also show that overexpression of EphB4 promotes cellular proliferation, colony formation, and motility, while EphB4 inhibition reduces cellular viability in vitro, halts the growth of established tumors in mouse xenograft models when used as a single-target strategy, and causes near-complete regression of established tumors when used in combination with paclitaxel. Taken together, these data suggest an important role for EphB4 as a potential novel therapeutic target in lung cancer. Clinical trials investigating the efficacy of anti-EphB4 therapies as well as combination therapy involving EphB4 inhibition may be warranted. PMID:23844053

  7. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  8. Effects of theanine on growth of human lung cancer and leukemia cells as well as migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Duan, Huiying; Luan, Jinling; Yagasaki, Kazumi; Zhang, Guoying

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of theanine, a tea characteristic amino acid, on human lung cancer and leukemia cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated that theanine suppressed the in vitro and ex vivo growth of human non-small cell lung cancer A549 and leukemia K562 cell lines in dose- and time-dependant manners. In addition, theanine displayed the inhibitory effect on the migration of A549 cells. More importantly, theanine enhanced the anticancer activity of anticancer agents such as trichostatin A (the histone deacetylase inhibitor), berbamine and norcantharidin (the anticancer drugs in China) by strongly reducing the viability and/or migration rate in A549 cells. In addition, theanine significantly suppressed A549 cell invasion. Suppression of A549 cell migration may be one of the important mechanisms of action of theanine against the A549 cell invasion. Our present results suggest that theanine may have the wide therapeutic and/or adjuvant therapeutic application in the treatment of human lung cancer and leukemia. PMID:19760127

  9. NK Cell-Dependent Growth Inhibition of Lewis Lung Cancer by Yu-Ping-Feng, an Ancient Chinese Herbal Formula

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yingbin; Wu, Jianchun; Zhu, Xiaowen; Gong, Chenyuan; Yao, Chao; Ni, Zhongya; Wang, Lixin; Ni, Lulu; Li, Yan; Zhu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about Yu-Ping-Feng (YPF), a typical Chinese herbal decoction, for its antitumor efficacy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here, we found that YPF significantly inhibited the growth of Lewis lung cancer, prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice, promoted NK cell tumor infiltration, increased the population of NK cells in spleen, and enhanced NK cell-mediated killing activity. The growth suppression of tumors by YPF was significantly reversed by the depletion of NK cells. Furthermore, we found that YPF significantly downregulated the expression of TGF-β, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and IL-10 in tumor microenvironment. These results demonstrated that YPF has a NK cell-dependent inhibitory effect on Lewis lung cancer. PMID:27034590

  10. Dietary intake of a plant phospholipid/lipid conjugate reduces lung cancer growth and tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen-Taubman, Sandra; Rubinstein, Danielle; Viole, Gary; Stetler-Stevenson, William G.

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that early detection and cancer prevention are significant armaments in the ‘war against cancer’. Changes in lifestyle and diet have significant impact on the global incidence of cancer. For over 30 years, many investigators have studied the concept of chemoprevention. More recently, with the demonstration that antiangiogenic activity reduces tumor growth, the concept of angioprevention has emerged as a novel strategy in the deterrence of cancer development (carcinogenesis). In this study, we utilized a fast growing, highly aggressive murine Lewis lung cancer model to examine the in vivo antitumor effects of a novel, dietary supplement, known as plant phospholipid/lipid conjugate (pPLC). Our goal was to determine if pPLC possessed direct antitumor activity with relatively little toxicity that could be developed as a chemoprevention therapy. We used pPLC directly in this in vivo model due to the lack of aqueous solubility of this novel formulation, which precludes in vitro experimentation. pPLC contains known antioxidants, ferulic acid and lipoic acid, as well as soy sterols, formulated in a unique aqueous-insoluble matrix. The pPLC dietary supplement was shown to suppress in vivo growth of this tumor model by 30%. We also demonstrated a significant decrease in tumor angiogenesis accompanied by increased apoptosis and present preliminary evidence of enhanced expression of the hypoxia-related genes pentraxin-3 and metallothionein-3, by 24.9-fold and 10.9-fold, respectively, compared with vehicle control. These findings lead us to propose using this plant phosolipid/lipid conjugate as a dietary supplement that may be useful in cancer prevention. PMID:24510111

  11. Calcium-dependent growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cells by neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Gudermann, Thomas; Roelle, Susanne

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 15-25% of all primary cancers of the lung are classified histologically as small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), a subtype characterized by rapid growth and a poor prognosis. Neuropeptide hormones like bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide, bradykinin or galanin are the principal mitogenic stimuli of this tumour entity. The mitogenic signal is transmitted into the cell via heptahelical neuropeptide hormone receptors, which couple to the heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gq/11 familiy. Subsequent activation of phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) entails the activation of protein kinase C and the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration. There is mounting evidence to support the notion that calcium mobilization is the key event that initiates different mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. Neuropeptide-dependent proliferation of SCLC cells relies on parallel activation of the Gq/11/PLCbeta/Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and the c-jun N-terminal kinase pathways, while selective engagement of either signalling cascade alone results in growth arrest and differentiation or apoptotic cell death. Basic experimental research has the potential to identify and validate novel therapeutic targets located at critical points of convergence of different mitogenic signal transduction pathways. In the case of SCLC, targeting the distinct components of the Ca2+ influx pathway as well as critical Ca2+-dependent cellular effectors may be rewarding in this regard. PMID:17158754

  12. Occupational lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cone, J E

    1987-01-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed. PMID:3303381

  13. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    The author addresses the attribution of lung cancer to cigarette smoking and the problems of confounding synergistic effects of occupational and other carcinogenic risk factors, as well as the divergent trends of declining smoking rates and increasing rates of lung cancer. He also reviews the existing literature to document associations between lung cancer and occupational exposures. Finally, interventions for prevention of occupational lung cancer are discussed.

  14. Lung cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Coscio, Angela M; Garst, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in both men and women; however, there are some clear gender-based differences. As the incidence of lung cancer is declining in men, the incidence of lung cancer is increasing in women. Women are more likely than men to have adenocarcinoma, a histologic subtype that correlates with worsened prognosis, but women have improved survival compared with men. Genetic predisposition and the presence of estrogen receptors in lung cancer cells may predispose women to developing lung cancer. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanism and significance of these findings. PMID:17254523

  15. Lung Cancer – Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ronan J.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer, early attempts to modulate the immune system via vaccine based therapeutics have to date, been unsuccessful. An improved understanding of tumor immunology has facilitated the production of more sophisticated lung cancer vaccines. It is anticipated, that it will likely require multiple epitopes of a diverse set of genes restricted to multiple haplotypes to generate a truly effective vaccine that is able to overcome the various immunologic escape mechanisms that tumors employ. Other issues to overcome include optimal patient selection, which adjuvant agent to use and how to adequately monitor for an immunological response. This review discusses the most promising vaccination strategies for non small cell lung cancer including the allogeneic tumor cell vaccine belagenpumatucel-L, which is a mixture of 4 allogeneic non small cell lung cancer cell lines genetically modified to secrete an antisense oligonucleotide to TGF-β2 and three other target protein-specific vaccines designed to induce responses against melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3), mucin 1 (MUC1) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). PMID:21952280

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Kazuhiro; Atagi, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    First-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), including gefitinib and erlotinib, have proven to be highly effective agents for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients harboring an activating EGFR mutation such as the exon 19 deletion mutation and L858R. Although those reversible small molecular targeted agents provide a significant response and survival benefit, all responders eventually acquire resistance. Second-generation EGFR-targeting agents, such as irreversible EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors and pan-HER TKIs, may improve survival further and be useful for patients who acquired resistance to first-generation EGFR-TKIs. This review discusses novel therapeutic strategies for EGFR-mutated advanced NSCLC using first- and second-generation EGFR-TKIs. PMID:25302168

  17. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 and Related Ligands in Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Yu, Hui; Badzio, Andrzej; Boyle, Theresa A.; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Lu, Xian; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Heasley, Lynn E.; Kowalewski, Ashley A.; Ellison, Kim; Chen, Gang; Zhou, Caicun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 15% of all lung cancers and has been understudied for novel therapies. Signaling through fibroblast growth factors (FGF2, FGF9) and their high-affinity receptor has recently emerged as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis and progression of non–small-cell lung cancer. In this study, we evaluated fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and ligand expression in primary SCLC samples. Methods: FGFR1 protein expression, messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, and gene copy number were determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC), mRNA in situ hybridization, and silver in situ hybridization, respectively, in primary tumors from 90 patients with SCLC. Protein and mRNA expression of the FGF2 and FGF9 ligands were determined by IHC and mRNA in situ hybridization, respectively. In addition, a second cohort of 24 SCLC biopsy samples with known FGFR1 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization was assessed for FGFR1 protein expression by IHC. Spearman correlation analysis was performed to evaluate associations of FGFR1, FGF2 and FGF9 protein levels, respective mRNA levels, and FGFR1 gene copy number. Results: FGFR1 protein expression by IHC demonstrated a significant correlation with FGFR1 mRNA levels (p < 0.0001) and FGFR1 gene copy number (p = 0.03). The prevalence of FGFR1 mRNA positivity was 19.7%. FGFR1 mRNA expression correlated with both FGF2 (p = 0.0001) and FGF9 (p = 0.002) mRNA levels, as well as with FGF2 (p = 0.01) and FGF9 (p = 0.001) protein levels. There was no significant association between FGFR1 and ligands with clinical characteristics or prognosis. In the second cohort of specimens with known FGFR1 amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization, 23 of 24 had adequate tumor by IHC, and 73.9% (17 of 23) were positive for FGFR1 protein expression. Conclusions: A subset of SCLCs is characterized by potentially activated FGF/FGFR1 pathways, as evidenced by positive FGF2, FGF9, and FGFR1 protein

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in small cell lung cancers: Two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Siegele, Bradford J; Shilo, Konstantin; Chao, Bo H; Carbone, David P; Zhao, Weiqiang; Ioffe, Olga; Franklin, Wilbur A; Edelman, Martin J; Aisner, Dara L

    2016-05-01

    Activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are exceedingly rare in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We present two cases of SCLC harboring EGFR mutations, one in an 82 year-old male smoker with a combined SCLC and adenocarcinoma with a novel D855H point mutation in exon 21, and the second in a 68 year-old female never smoker with the L858R point mutation in exon 21. The cases, accompanied by a review of the literature, highlight the importance of integration of clinicopathologic considerations and adherence to recently promulgated Guideline recommendations for molecular testing in lung cancer. PMID:27040854

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor and angiogenesis in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, K J; Koukourakis, M I; Giatromanolaki, A; Cox, G; Turley, H; Steward, W P; Gatter, K; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    High microvessel density, an indirect measure of angiogenesis, has been shown to correlate with increased tumour size, lymph node involvement and poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumour cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) expression correlate with angiogenesis and a poor outcome in this disease. In a retrospective study VEGF and PD-ECGF expression and microvessel density were evaluated immunohistochemically in surgically resected specimens (T1–3, N0–2) from 223 patients with operable NSCLC using the VG1, P-GF.44C and JC70 monoclonal antibodies respectively. High VEGF immunoreactivity was seen in 104 (46.6%) and PD-ECGF in 72 (32.3%) cases and both were associated with high vascular grade tumours (P = 0.009 and P = 0.05 respectively). Linear regression analysis revealed a weak positive correlation between VEGF and PD-ECGF expression in cancer cells (r = 0.21;P = 0.002). Co-expression of VEGF and PD-ECGF was not associated with a higher microvessel density than VEGF or PD-ECGF only expressing tumours. Furthermore a proportion of high vascular grade tumours expressed neither growth factor. Univariate analysis revealed tumour size, nodal status, microvessel density and VEGF and PD-ECGF expression as significant prognostic factors. Tumour size (P< 0.02) and microvessel density (P< 0.04) remained significant on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, VEGF and PD-ECGF are important angiogenic growth factors and have prognostic significance in NSCLC. Furthermore the study underlines the prognostic significance of microvessel density in operable NSCLC. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10780522

  20. Celecoxib-erlotinib combination delays growth and inhibits angiogenesis in EGFR-mutated lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi Xiao; Wang, Jia Le; Gao, Meng; Tang, Hao; Gui, Rong; Fu, Yun Feng

    2016-01-01

    Combination treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is becoming more popular due to the anticipation that it may be more effective than single drug treatment. In addition, there are efforts to genetically screen patients for specific mutations in light of attempting to administer specific anticancer agents that are most effective. In this study, we evaluate the anticancer and anti-angiogenic effects of low dose celecoxib-erlotinib combination in NSCLC in vitro and in vivo. In NSCLC cells harboring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, combination celecoxib-erlotinib treatment led to synergistic cell death, but there was minimal efficacy in NSCLC cells with wild-type EGFR. In xenograft models, combination treatment also demonstrated greater inhibition of tumor growth compared to individual treatment. The anti-tumor effect observed was secondary to the targeting of angiogenesis, evidenced by decreased vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) levels and decreased levels of CD31 and microvessel density. Combination treatment targets angiogenesis through the modulation of of the PI3K/AKT and ERK/Raf1-1 pathway in NSCLC with EGFR exon 19 deletions. These findings may have significant clinical implications in patients with tumors harboring EGFR exon 19 deletions as they may be particularly sensitive to this regimen. PMID:27508092

  1. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bladder cancer Breast cancer Colon cancer Kidney cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Sarcoma Wilms tumor Symptoms Symptoms may ... Breast cancer Cancer Chemotherapy Colon cancer Lung cancer Neuroblastoma Prostate cancer Radiation therapy Wilms tumor Update Date ...

  2. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  3. Lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... any symptoms. Symptoms depend on the type of cancer you have, but may include: Chest pain Cough that does not go away Coughing up blood Fatigue Losing weight without trying Loss of appetite Shortness of breath ...

  4. Expression and clinical significance of insulin-like growth factor 1 in lung cancer tissues and perioperative circulation from patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, S.; Tang, H.; Liao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Liu, C.; Deng, Y.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Fu, X.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We explored the role of insulin-like growth factor 1 (igf-1) in the development of lung cancer. Methods We used immunohistochemistry to measure the expression of igf-1 and igf-1 receptor (igf-1r) in specimens of tissue and perioperative circulation from 80 patients with primary non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) and from 45 patients with benign pulmonary lesions (bpls). Correlations of those measurements with clinicopathologic characteristics and clinical follow-up were analyzed. Circulating igf-1 was measured before and after surgery in all patients. Results Compared with bpl specimens, nsclc specimens showed overexpression of igf-1and igf-1r (p < 0.001). The expression levels of igf-1 and igf-1r were significantly associated with advanced-stage disease (p = 0.034 and 0.029 respectively) and lymph node metastasis (p = 0.012 and 0.017 respectively), and expression of igf-1 correlated with tumour differentiation and tumour diameter (p = 0.011 and 0.021 respectively). Specimens positive for igf-1 or igf-1r were significantly correlated with shorter patient survival (p = 0.0012 and 0.0016 respectively). After surgery, circulating igf-1 was significantly elevated in patients with bpl (p = 0.0346) and significantly lower in patients with nsclc (p = 0.0030), especially in those with advanced-stage disease, a larger tumour size, regional lymphoid node metastasis, or lesser differentiation (p = 0.0092, 0.0051, 0.0131, and p < 0.001 respectively). Conclusions In nsclc, igf-1 and igf-1r are upregulated, and expression of those factors is correlated with tumour progression and prognosis in nsclc patients. Radical resection of nsclc can directly influence the serum concentration of igf-1. Autocrine/paracrine igf-1 might be playing an important role in the development of lung cancer. PMID:26966399

  5. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer ... in lung cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate ( ...

  6. 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth through regulating VEGF-Src-FAK signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhengfu, He; Hu, Zhang; Huiwen, Miao; Zhijun, Li; Jiaojie, Zhou; Xiaoyi, Yan; Xiujun, Cai

    2015-08-21

    The search for safe, effective and affordable therapeutics against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and other lung cancers is important. Here we explored the potential effect of 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL), a novel extract from Inula britannica-F, on angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth. We demonstrated that ABL dose-dependently inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced proliferation, migration, and capillary structure formation of cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). In vivo, ABL administration suppressed VEGF-induced new vasculature formation in Matrigel plugs. For the mechanism investigations, we found that ABL largely inhibited VEGF-mediated activation of Src kinase and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in HUVECs. Furthermore, treatment of A549 NSCLC cells with ABL resulted in cell growth inhibition and Src-FAK in-activation. Significantly, administration of a single dose of ABL (12 mg/kg/day) remarkably suppressed growth of A549 xenografts in nude mice. In vivo microvessels formation and Src activation were also significantly inhibited in ABL-treated xenograft tumors. Taken together, our findings suggest that ABL suppresses angiogenesis and lung cancer cell growth possibly via regulating the VEGFR-Src-FAK signaling. - Highlights: • 1-o-acetylbritannilactone (ABL) inhibits VEGF-induced angiogenesis in vivo. • ABL inhibits VEGF-induced HUVEC migration, proliferation, capillary tube formation. • ABL inhibits VEGF-mediated activation of Src and FAK in HUVECs. • ABL inhibits growth and Src-FAK activation in A549 cells. • ABL administration inhibits A549 tumor angiogenesis and growth in nude mice.

  7. Immune-Modulation by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inhibitors: Implication on Anti-Tumor Immunity in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Amanda C.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.; Hong, Waun Ki; Perez-Soler, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Skin toxicity is the most common toxicity caused by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) inhibitors, and has been associated with clinical efficacy. As EGFR inhibitors enhance the expression of antigen presenting molecules in affected skin keratinocytes, they may concurrently facilitate neo-antigen presentation in lung cancer tumor cells contributing to anti-tumor immunity. Here, we investigated the modulatory effect of the EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib on antigen presenting molecules and PD-L1, prominent immune checkpoint protein, of skin keratinocytes and lung cancer cell lines to delineate the link between EGFR signaling pathway inhibition and potential anti-tumor immunity. Erlotinib up-regulated MHC-I and MHC-II proteins on IFNγ treated keratinocytes but abrogated IFNγ-induced expression of PD-L1, suggesting the potential role of infiltrating autoreactive T cells in the damage of keratinocytes in affected skin. Interestingly, the surface expression of MHC-I, MHC-II, and PD-L1 was up-regulated in response to IFNγ more often in lung cancer cell lines sensitive to erlotinib, but only expression of PD-L1 was inhibited by erlotinib. Further, erlotinib significantly increased T cell mediated cytotoxicity on lung cancer cells. Lastly, the analysis of gene expression dataset of 186 lung cancer cell lines from Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia demonstrated that overexpression of PD-L1 was associated with sensitivity to erlotinib and higher expression of genes related to antigen presenting pathways and IFNγ signaling pathway. Our findings suggest that the EGFR inhibitors can facilitate anti-tumor adaptive immune responses by breaking tolerance especially in EGFR driven lung cancer that are associated with overexpression of PD-L1 and genes related to antigen presentation and inflammation. PMID:27467256

  8. The prognostic significance of fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hong-ping; Feng, Hui; Qiao, Hong-bo; Ren, Ze-xiang; Zhu, Ge-dong

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) has been proved to be correlated with progression and prognosis in many cancers. However, the significance of FGFR4 in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still not well elucidated. Methods In our experiment, we detected FGFR4 expression in 237 samples of NSCLC with immunohistochemistry, and further analyzed the correlation between FGFR4 and clinicopathologic features of NSCLC with chi-square test. Moreover, we evaluated the prognostic value of FGFR4 by Kaplan–Meier survival curve and Cox regression model. By regulating the expression of FGFR4 by overexpression or knockdown, we assessed the role of FGFR4 on NSCLC cell proliferation. Results FGFR4 expression was high in NSCLC (46.8%, 111/237). FGFR4 expression was significantly associated with tumor diameter (P=0.039). With univariate (P=0.009) and multivariate (P=0.002) analysis, FGFR4 was identified as an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC (P=0.009). Moreover, FGFR4 can promote the proliferation of NSCLC cell lines. Conclusion FGFR4 is an independent prognostic biomarker in NSCLC. FGFR4 can accelerate the proliferation of NSCLC cell lines, indicating FGFR4 could be a potential drug target of NSCLC. PMID:26045670

  9. Synergistic inhibition of lung cancer cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis using aptamer-siRNA chimeras.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Yun; Wang, Wei-Ya; Chang, Yi-Chung; Chang, Cheng-Ju; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Peck, Konan

    2014-03-01

    Early metastasis is one of the major causes of mortality among patient with lung cancer. The process of tumor metastasis involves a cascade of events, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor cell migration and invasion, and angiogenesis. To specifically suppress tumor invasion and angiogenesis, two nucleolin aptamer-siRNA chimeras (aptNCL-SLUGsiR and aptNCL-NRP1siR) were used to block key signaling pathways involved in lung cancer metastasis that are pivotal to metastatic tumor cells but not to normal cells under ordinary physiologic conditions. Through nucleolin-mediated endocytosis, the aptNCL-siRNA chimeras specifically and significantly knocked down the expressions of SLUG and NRP1 in nucleolin-expressing cancer cells. Furthermore, simultaneous suppression of SLUG and NRP1 expressions by the chimeras synergistically retarded cancer cell motility and invasive ability. The synergistic effect was also observed in a xenograft mouse model, wherein the combined treatment using two chimeras suppressed tumor growth, the invasiveness, circulating tumor cell amount, and angiogenesis in tumor tissue without affecting liver and kidney functions. This study demonstrates that combined treatment of aptNCL-SLUGsiR and aptNCL-NRP1siR can synergistically suppress lung cancer cell invasion, tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer-specific targeting combined with gene-specific silencing. PMID:24397988

  10. mTOR Inhibitors Control the Growth of EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer Even after Acquiring Resistance by HGF

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Shinji; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Sano, Takako; Nakade, Junya; Nanjo, Shigeki; Yamada, Tadaaki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Zhao, Lu; Yasumoto, Kazuo; Nakamura, Takahiro; Matsumoto, Kunio; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Yano, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), gefitinib and erlotinib, is a critical problem in the treatment of EGFR mutant lung cancer. Several mechanisms, including bypass signaling by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-triggered Met activation, are implicated as mediators of resistance. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), is a downstream conduit of EGFR and MET signaling, and is thus considered a therapeutically attractive target in the treatment of various types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether 2 clinically approved mTOR inhibitors, temsirolimus and everolimus, overcome HGF-dependent resistance to EGFR-TKIs in EGFR mutant lung cancer cells. Both temsirolimus and everolimus inhibited the phosphorylation of p70S6K and 4E-BP1, which are downstream targets of the mTOR pathway, and reduced the viability of EGFR mutant lung cancer cells, PC-9, and HCC827, even in the presence of HGF in vitro. In a xenograft model, temsirolimus suppressed the growth of PC-9 cells overexpressing the HGF-gene; this was associated with suppression of the mTOR signaling pathway and tumor angiogenesis. In contrast, erlotinib did not suppress this signaling pathway or tumor growth. Multiple mechanisms, including the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production by tumor cells and suppression of endothelial cell viability, contribute to the anti-angiogenic effect of temsirolimus. These findings indicate that mTOR inhibitors may be useful for controlling HGF-triggered EGFR-TKI resistance in EGFR mutant lung cancer, and they provide the rationale for clinical trials of mTOR inhibitors in patients stratified by EGFR mutation and HGF expression status. PMID:23690929

  11. MicroRNA-137 inhibits tumor growth and sensitizes chemosensitivity to paclitaxel and cisplatin in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xin; Jiang, Cheng-Fei; Shi, Zhu-Mei; Li, Dong-Mei; Liu, Wei-Tao; Yu, Xiaobo; Shu, Yong-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance frequently drives tumour progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly characterized. In this study, we explored miR-137's role in the chemosensitivity of lung cancer. We found that the expression level of miR-137 is down-regulated in the human lung cancer tissues and the resistant cells strains: A549/paclitaxel(A549/PTX) and A549/cisplatin (A549/CDDP) when compared with lung cancer A549 cells. Moreover, we found that overe-expression of miR-137 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, cell survival and arrest the cell cycle in G1 phase in A549/PTX and A549/CDDP. Furthermore, Repression of miR-137 significantly promoted cell growth, migration, cell survival and cell cycle G1/S transition in A549 cells. We further demonstrated that the tumor suppressive role of miR-137 was mediated by negatively regulating Nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate1(NUCKS1) protein expression. Importantly, miR-137 inhibits A549/PTX, A549/CDDP growth and angiogenesis in vivo. Our study is the first to identify the tumor suppressive role of over-expressed miR-137 in chemosensitivity. Identification of a novel miRNA-mediated pathway that regulates chemosensitivity in lung cancer will facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26989074

  12. Postoperative intrapleural BCG in lung cancer: lack of efficacy and possible enhancement of tumour growth.

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, W; Nijhuis-Heddes, J M; Wever, A M; Brutel de la Rivière, A; van der Velde, E A; Dijkman, J H

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-six patients out of a group of 99 with lung cancer received postoperative intrapleural BCG (Pasteur strain) in three different dosages (16 X 10(6) culturable particles (cp), 32 X 10(6) cp, and 64 X 10(6) cp). When comparing the whole group of 99 patients with a historical control group of 126 patients no statistically significant differences were found in survival and disease-free interval. The two groups were well matched in respect of age, sex, histology, stage of disease, and type of operation. Patients with epidermoid carcinoma stage I receiving BCG, however, did significantly worse than those who had not received BCG in terms of disease-free interval. This unfavourable trend was caused by earlier local recurrences rather than metastases. The possible phenomenon of enhanced tumour growth noted in or patients with epidermoid carcinoma stage I might be related to the dosages used in this study, but the different BCG strain used hinders comparison with other studies. We conclude that BCG has no beneficial effect on survival or on disease-free interval; possible enhancement of tumour growth in stage I epidermoid carcinoma was found. PMID:7330812

  13. Aerosolised 5-azacytidine suppresses tumour growth and reprogrammes the epigenome in an orthotopic lung cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Reed, M D; Tellez, C S; Grimes, M J; Picchi, M A; Tessema, M; Cheng, Y S; March, T H; Kuehl, P J; Belinsky, S A

    2013-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic silencing by promoter methylation and chromatin remodelling affects hundreds of genes and is a causal event for lung cancer. Treatment of patients with low doses of the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine in combination with the histone deacetylase inhibitor entinostat has yielded clinical responses. The subcutaneous dosing route for consecutive days and reduced bioavailability of 5-azacytidine because of inactivation by cytidine deaminase may limit the expansion of epigenetic therapy into Phase III trials. To mitigate these barriers, an aerosol of 5-azacytidine was generated and characterised. Methods: The effect of aerosol vs systemic delivery of 5-azacytidine on tumour burden and molecular response of engrafted lung tumours in the nude rat was compared. Results: Pharmacokinetics revealed major improvement in the half-life of 5-azacytidine in lung tissue with aerosol delivery. Aerosolised 5-azacytidine significantly reduced lung tumour burden and induced global demethylation of the epigenome at one-third of the comparable effective systemic dose. High commonality for demethylation of genes was seen in tumours sampled throughout lung lobes and across treated animals receiving the aerosolised drug. Conclusion: Collectively, these findings show that aerosolised 5-azacytidine targets the lung, effectively reprogrammes the epigenome of tumours, and is a promising approach to combine with other drugs for treating lung cancer. PMID:24045660

  14. Prognostic Value of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) in Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Mingming; Hu, Ying; He, Jiabei; Li, Baolan

    2016-01-01

    Background Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is known to stimulate angiogenesis and thus to influence the proliferation, migration and survival of tumor cells. Many studies examined the relationship between human bFGF overexpression and survival in lung cancer patients, but the results have been mixed. To systematically summarize the clinical prognostic function of bFGF in lung cancer, we performed this systematic review with meta-analysis. Method Studies were identified by an electronic search of PubMed, EMBASE, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and Wanfang databases, including publications prior toAugust 2014. Pooled hazard ratios (HR) for overall survival (OS) were aggregated and quantitatively analyzed by meta-analysis. Results Twenty-two studies (n = 2154) were evaluated in the meta-analysis. Combined HR suggested that bFGF overexpression had an adverse impact on survival of patients with lung cancer(HR = 1.202,95%CI, 1.022–1.382). Our subgroup analysis revealed that the combined HR evaluating bFGF expression on OS in operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was 1.553 (95%CI, 1.120–1.986); the combined HR in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was 1.667 (95%CI, 1.035–2.299). There was no significant impact of bFGF expression on survival in advanced NSCLC. Conclusion This meta-analysis showed that bFGF overexpression is a potential indicator of worse prognosis for patients with operable NSCLC and SCLC, but is not associated with outcome in advanced NSCLC. The data suggests that high bFGF expression is highly related to poor prognosis. Nevertheless,more high-quality studies should be performed in order to provide additional evidence for the prognostic value of bFGF in lung cancer. PMID:26824699

  15. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  16. A novel derivative of betulinic acid, SYK023, suppresses lung cancer growth and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Chen, Ying-Jung; Hung, Chia-Yang; Wang, Yi-Chang; Lin, Sin-Jin; Su, Wu-Chou; Lai, Ming-Derg; Kim, Sang-Yong; Wang, Qiang; Qian, Keduo; Goto, Masuo; Zhao, Yu; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2015-05-30

    Herein, we evaluated the anti-cancer effect and molecular mechanisms of a novel betulinic acid (BA) derivative, SYK023, by using two mouse models of lung cancer driven by KrasG12D or EGFRL858R. We found that SYK023 inhibits lung tumor proliferation, without side effects in vivo or cytotoxicity in primary lung cells in vitro. SYK023 triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Blockage of ER stress in SYK023-treated cells inhibited SYK023-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that the expression of cell cycle-related genes, including cyclin A2, B1, D3, CDC25a, and CDC25b decreased but, while those of p15INK4b, p16INK4a, and p21CIP1 increased following SYK023 treatment. Finally, low doses of SYK023 significantly decreased lung cancer metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Expression of several genes related to cell migration, including synaptopodin, were downregulated by SYK023, thereby impairing F-actin polymerization and metastasis. Therefore, SYK023 may be a potentially therapeutic treatment for metastatic lung cancer. PMID:25909174

  17. Rare lung cancers.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    There are several different kinds of lung cancer, often referred to as lung cancer subtypes. Some of these occur more often than others. In this factsheet we will specifically look at the subtypes of cancers that do not happen very often and are considered 'rare'. PMID:27066129

  18. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  19. Monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated (MMD) targeted by miR-140-5p regulates tumor growth in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weina; He, Fei

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Expression of MMD is increased in lung cancer tissues. • Knockdown of MMD inhibits growth of A549 and LLC cells in vitro and in vivo. • MMD is a direct functional target of miR-140-5p. • MiR-140-5p/MMD axis regulates Erk1/2 signaling. - Abstract: Monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated (MMD) is identified in macrophages as a gene associated with the differentiation from monocytes to macrophages. Recent microarray analysis for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) suggests that MMD is an important signature associated with relapse and survival among patients with NSCLC. Therefore, we speculate that MMD likely plays a role in lung cancer. In this study, we found that the protein level of MMD was increased in lung cancer compared to benign lung tissues, and knockdown of MMD inhibited the growth of A549 and Lewis lung cancer cells (LLC) in vitro and in vivo. Integrated analysis demonstrated that MMD was a direct functional target of miR-140-5p. Furthermore, we found that miR-140-5p/MMD axis could affect the cell proliferation of lung cancer cells by regulating Erk signaling. Together, our results highlight the significance of miR-140-5p/MMD axis in lung cancer, and miR-140-5p/MMD axis could serve as new molecular targets for the therapy against lung cancer.

  20. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  1. Differential regulation of human Eag1 channel expression by serum and epidermal growth factor in lung and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Acuña-Macías, Isabel; Vera, Eunice; Vázquez-Sánchez, Alma Yolanda; Mendoza-Garrido, María Eugenia; Camacho, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic ether à-go-go-1 (Eag1) potassium channels are overexpressed in most primary human solid tumors. Low oxygen and nutrient/growth factor concentrations play critical roles in tumorigenesis. However, the mechanisms by which tumor cells survive and proliferate under growth factor-depleted conditions remain elusive. Here, we investigated whether serum-deprived conditions and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate Eag1 expression in human lung and breast cancer cells. The human cancer cell lines A549 and MCF-7 (from the lungs and breast, respectively) were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection and cultured following the manufacturer’s recommendations. Eag1 gene and protein expression were studied by real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry, respectively. Cell proliferation was evaluated using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation was investigated by Western blot. Serum-deprived conditions increased Eag1 mRNA and protein expression in both cell lines. This Eag1 upregulation was prevented by EGF and the ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in only lung cancer cells; vascular endothelial growth factor did not prevent Eag1 upregulation. Our results suggest that Eag1 may act as a survival and mitogenic factor under low-serum and nutrient conditions and may be a clinical target during the early stages of tumor development. PMID:26527881

  2. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries. PMID:27535387

  3. Transforming Growth Factor-β-Induced RBFOX3 Inhibition Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Eun; Kim, Jong Ok; Park, Ki-Sun; Won, Minho; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Kim, Kee K.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Rbfox3 is a well-known splicing regulator that is used as a marker for post-mitotic neurons in various vertebrate species. Although recent studies indicate a variable expression of Rbfox3 in non-neuronal tissues, including lung tissue, its cellular function in lung cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the number of RBFOX3-positive cells in tumorous lung tissue is lower than that in normal lung tissue. As the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway is important in cancer progression, we investigated its role in RBFOX3 expression in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. TGF-β1 treatment inhibited RBFOX3 expression at the transcriptional level. Further, RBFOX3 depletion led to a change in the expression levels of a subset of proteins related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), such as E-cadherin and Claudin-1, during TGF-β1-induced EMT. In immunofluorescence microscopic analysis, mesenchymal morphology was more prominent in RBFOX3-depleted cells than in control cells. These findings show that TGF-β-induced RBFOX3 inhibition plays an important role in EMT and propose a novel role for RBFOX3 in cancer progression. PMID:27432190

  4. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27101251

  5. Splenectomy inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth by modulating anti-tumor adaptive and innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Liran; Mishalian, Inbal; Bayuch, Rachel; Zolotarov, Lida; Michaeli, Janna; Fridlender, Zvi G

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that inhibitors of the immune system reside in the spleen and inhibit the endogenous antitumor effects of the immune system. We hypothesized that splenectomy would inhibit the growth of relatively large non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors by modulating the systemic inhibition of the immune system, and in particular Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSC). The effect of splenectomy was evaluated in several murine lung cancer models. We found that splenectomy reduces tumor growth and the development of lung metastases, but only in advanced tumors. In immune-deficient NOD-SCID mice the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth and metastatic spread disappeared. Splenectomy significantly reduced the presence of MDSC, and especially monocytic-MDSC in the circulation and inside the tumor. Specific reduction of the CCR2+ subset of monocytic MDSC was demonstrated, and the importance of the CCL2-CCR2 axis was further shown by a marked reduction in CCL2 following splenectomy. These changes were followed by changes in the macrophages contents of the tumors to become more antitumorigenic, and by increased activation of CD8+ Cytotoxic T-cells (CTL). By MDSC depletion, and adoptive transfer of MDSCs, we demonstrated that the effect of splenectomy on tumor growth was substantially mediated by MDSC cells. We conclude that the spleen is an important contributor to tumor growth and metastases, and that splenectomy can blunt this effect by depletion of MDSC, changing the amount and characteristics of myeloid cells and enhancing activation of CTL. PMID:26137413

  6. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lung cancer lung cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells ...

  7. Enhanced dimerization drives ligand-independent activity of mutant epidermal growth factor receptor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valley, Christopher C.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.; Karedla, Narain; Steinkamp, Mara P.; Chizhik, Alexey I.; Hlavacek, William S.; Wilson, Bridget S.; Lidke, Keith A.; Lidke, Diane S.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/erbB1/Her1) are often associated with tumorigenesis. In particular, a number of EGFR mutants that demonstrate ligand-independent signaling are common in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including kinase domain mutations L858R (also called L834R) and exon 19 deletions (e.g., ΔL747-P753insS), which collectively make up nearly 90% of mutations in NSCLC. The molecular mechanisms by which these mutations confer constitutive activity remain unresolved. Using multiple subdiffraction-limit imaging modalities, we reveal the altered receptor structure and interaction kinetics of NSCLC-associated EGFR mutants. We applied two-color single quantum dot tracking to quantify receptor dimerization kinetics on living cells and show that, in contrast to wild-type EGFR, mutants are capable of forming stable, ligand-independent dimers. Two-color superresolution localization microscopy confirmed ligand-independent aggregation of EGFR mutants. Live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer measurements revealed that the L858R kinase mutation alters ectodomain structure such that unliganded mutant EGFR adopts an extended, dimerization-competent conformation. Finally, mutation of the putative dimerization arm confirmed a critical role for ectodomain engagement in ligand-independent signaling. These data support a model in which dysregulated activity of NSCLC-associated kinase mutants is driven by coordinated interactions involving both the kinase and extracellular domains that lead to enhanced dimerization. PMID:26337388

  8. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yunguang; Zheng Siyuan; Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Carbone, David P.; Zhao Zhongming; Lu Bo

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  9. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  10. Combined MET inhibition and topoisomerase I inhibition block cell growth of small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rolle, Cleo E; Kanteti, Rajani; Surati, Mosmi; Nandi, Suvobroto; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; Yala, Soheil; Tretiakova, Maria; Arif, Qudsia; Hembrough, Todd; Brand, Toni M; Wheeler, Deric L; Husain, Aliya N; Vokes, Everett E; Bharti, Ajit; Salgia, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a devastating disease, and current therapies have not greatly improved the 5-year survival rates. Topoisomerase (Top) inhibition is a treatment modality for SCLC; however, the response is short lived. Consequently, our research has focused on improving SCLC therapeutics through the identification of novel targets. Previously, we identified MNNG HOS transforming gene (MET) to be overexpressed and functional in SCLC. Herein, we investigated the therapeutic potential of combinatorial targeting of MET using SU11274 and Top1 using 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38). MET and TOP1 gene copy numbers and protein expression were determined in 29 patients with limited (n = 11) and extensive (n = 18) disease. MET gene copy number was significantly increased (>6 copies) in extensive disease compared with limited disease (P = 0.015). Similar TOP1 gene copy numbers were detected in limited and extensive disease. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a significantly higher Top1 nuclear expression in extensive (0.93) versus limited (0.15) disease (P = 0.04). Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was detected between MET gene copy number and Top1 nuclear expression (r = 0.5). In vitro stimulation of H82 cells revealed hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced nuclear colocalization of p-MET and Top1. Furthermore, activation of the HGF/MET axis enhanced Top1 activity, which was abrogated by SU11274. Combination of SN-38 with SU11274 dramatically decreased SCLC growth as compared with either drug alone. Collectively, these findings suggest that the combinatorial inhibition of MET and Top1 is a potentially efficacious treatment strategy for SCLC. PMID:24327519

  11. ID1 facilitates the growth and metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer in response to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Smitha; Rizwani, Wasia; Li, Xueli; Rawal, Bhupendra; Nair, Sajitha; Schell, Michael J; Bepler, Gerold; Haura, Eric; Coppola, Domenico; Chellappan, Srikumar

    2011-07-01

    Expression of ID1 (inhibitor of differentiation) has been correlated with the progression of a variety of cancers, but little information is available on its role in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Here we show that ID1 is induced by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in a panel of NSCLC cell lines and primary cells from the lung. ID1 induction was Src dependent and mediated through the α7 subunit of nAChR; transfection of K-Ras or EGFR to primary cells induced ID1. ID1 depletion prevented nicotine- and EGF-induced proliferation, migration, and invasion of NSCLC cells and angiogenic tubule formation of human microvascular endothelial cells from lungs (HMEC-Ls). ID1 could induce the expression of mesenchymal markers such as vimentin and fibronectin by downregulating ZBP-89, a zinc finger repressor protein. ID1 levels were elevated in tumors from mice that were exposed to nicotine. Further, human lung tissue microarrays (TMAs) showed elevated levels of ID1 in NSCLC samples, with maximal levels in metastatic lung cancers. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) performed on patient lung tumors showed that ID1 levels were elevated in advanced stages of NSCLC and correlated with elevated expression of vimentin and fibronectin, irrespective of smoking history. PMID:21606196

  12. A novel long noncoding RNA AK001796 acts as an oncogene and is involved in cell growth inhibition by resveratrol in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Qiaoyuan; Xu, Enwu; Dai, Jiabin; Liu, Binbin; Han, Zhiyuan; Wu, Jianjun; Zhang, Shaozhu; Peng, Baoying; Zhang, Yajie; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer is the most common form of cancer throughout the world. The specific targeting of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) by resveratrol opened a new avenue for cancer chemoprevention. In this study, we found that 21 lncRNAs were upregulated and 19 lncRNAs were downregulated in lung cancer A549 cells with 25 μmol/L resveratrol treatment determined by microarray analysis. AK001796, the lncRNA with the most clearly altered expression, was overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and cell lines, but its expression was downregulated in resveratrol-treated lung cancer cells. By monitoring cell proliferation and growth in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, we observed a significant reduction in cell viability in lung cancer cells and a slow growth in the tumorigenesis following AK001796 knockdown. We also found that AK001796 knockdown caused a cell-cycle arrest, with significant increases in the percentage of cells in G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} in lung cancer cells. By using cell cycle pathway-specific PCR arrays, we detected changes in a number of cell cycle-related genes related to lncRNA AK001796 knockdown. We further investigated whether AK001796 participated in the anticancer effect of resveratrol and the results showed that reduced lncRNA AK001796 level potentially impaired the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on cell proliferation. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the changes in an lncRNA expression profile induced by resveratrol in lung cancer. - Highlights: • LncRNA AK001796 played an oncogenic role in lung carcinogenesis. • LncRNA AK001796 was downregulated in resveratrol-treated lung cancer cells. • LncRNA AK001796 was involved in the inhibition of cell growth by resveratrol.

  13. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  14. Inhibition of Calcium-Activated Chloride Channel ANO1/TMEM16A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasion in Human Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Linghan; Liu, Wen; Guan, Lizhao; Lu, Min; Wang, KeWei

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer or pulmonary carcinoma is primarily derived from epithelial cells that are thin and line on the alveolar surfaces of the lung for gas exchange. ANO1/TMEM16A, initially identified from airway epithelial cells, is a member of Ca2+-activated Cl- channels (CaCCs) that function to regulate epithelial secretion and cell volume for maintenance of ion and tissue homeostasis. ANO1/TMEM16A has recently been shown to be highly expressed in several epithelium originated carcinomas. However, the role of ANO1 in lung cancer remains unknown. In this study, we show that inhibition of calcium-activated chloride channel ANO1/TMEM16A suppresses tumor growth and invasion in human lung cancer. ANO1 is upregulated in different human lung cancer cell lines. Knocking-down ANO1 by small hairpin RNAs inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion of GLC82 and NCI-H520 cancel cells evaluated by CCK-8, would-healing, transwell and 3D soft agar assays. ANO1 protein is overexpressed in 77.3% cases of human lung adenocarcinoma tissues detected by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, the tumor growth in nude mice implanted with GLC82 cells was significantly suppressed by ANO1 silencing. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that ANO1 overexpression contributes to tumor growth and invasion of lung cancer; and suppressing ANO1 overexpression may have therapeutic potential in lung cancer therapy. PMID:26305547

  15. Staging of Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of N2 means cancer has spread to the middle part of the chest (called the mediastinum). A rating ... so that the surgeon can remove the cancerous part of the lung and/or lymph node ... biopsied are your lungs, bones, and brain. These types of biopsies can be done with ...

  16. Crosstalk with cancer-associated fibroblasts induces resistance of non-small cell lung cancer cells to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Chungyoul; Shin, Yong-Sung; Kim, Changhoon; Choi, So-Jung; Lee, Jinseon; Kim, So Young; Cho, Yong Beom; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Although lung cancers with activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are highly sensitive to selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), these tumors invariably develop acquired drug resistance. Host stromal cells have been found to have a considerable effect on the sensitivity of cancer cells to EGFR TKIs. Little is known, however, about the signaling mechanisms through which stromal cells contribute to the response to EGFR TKI in non-small cell lung cancer. This work examined the role of hedgehog signaling in cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF)-mediated resistance of lung cancer cells to the EGFR TKI erlotinib. PC9 cells, non-small cell lung cancer cells with EGFR-activating mutations, became resistant to the EGFR TKI erlotinib when cocultured in vitro with CAFs. Polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical assays showed that CAFs induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition phenotype in PC9 cells, with an associated change in the expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition marker proteins including vimentin. Importantly, CAFs induce upregulation of the 7-transmembrane protein smoothened, the central signal transducer of hedgehog, suggesting that the hedgehog signaling pathway is active in CAF-mediated drug resistance. Indeed, downregulation of smoothened activity with the smoothened antagonist cyclopamine induces remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton independently of Gli-mediated transcriptional activity in PC9 cells. These findings indicate that crosstalk with CAFs plays a critical role in resistance of lung cancer to EGFR TKIs through induction of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and may be an ideal therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:26676152

  17. Inhibition of the growth factor MDK/midkine by a novel small molecule compound to treat non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Huifang; Maeda, Yutaka; Fukazawa, Takuya; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Takaoka, Munenori; Bao, Xiao-Hong; Matsuoka, Junji; Okui, Tatsuo; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Takigawa, Nagio; Tomono, Yasuko; Nakajima, Motowo; Fink-Baldauf, Iris M; Nelson, Sandra; Seibel, William; Papoian, Ruben; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Midkine (MDK) is a heparin-binding growth factor that is highly expressed in many malignant tumors, including lung cancers. MDK activates the PI3K pathway and induces anti-apoptotic activity, in turn enhancing the survival of tumors. Therefore, the inhibition of MDK is considered a potential strategy for cancer therapy. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel small molecule compound (iMDK) that targets MDK. iMDK inhibited the cell growth of MDK-positive H441 lung adenocarcinoma cells that harbor an oncogenic KRAS mutation and H520 squamous cell lung cancer cells, both of which are types of untreatable lung cancer. However, iMDK did not reduce the cell viability of MDK-negative A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells or normal human lung fibroblast (NHLF) cells indicating its specificity. iMDK suppressed the endogenous expression of MDK but not that of other growth factors such as PTN or VEGF. iMDK suppressed the growth of H441 cells by inhibiting the PI3K pathway and inducing apoptosis. Systemic administration of iMDK significantly inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model in vivo. Inhibition of MDK with iMDK provides a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of lung cancers that are driven by MDK. PMID:23976985

  18. Inhibition of the Growth Factor MDK/Midkine by a Novel Small Molecule Compound to Treat Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Takuya; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Takaoka, Munenori; Bao, Xiao-Hong; Matsuoka, Junji; Okui, Tatsuo; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Takigawa, Nagio; Tomono, Yasuko; Nakajima, Motowo; Fink-Baldauf, Iris M.; Nelson, Sandra; Seibel, William; Papoian, Ruben; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Midkine (MDK) is a heparin-binding growth factor that is highly expressed in many malignant tumors, including lung cancers. MDK activates the PI3K pathway and induces anti-apoptotic activity, in turn enhancing the survival of tumors. Therefore, the inhibition of MDK is considered a potential strategy for cancer therapy. In the present study, we demonstrate a novel small molecule compound (iMDK) that targets MDK. iMDK inhibited the cell growth of MDK-positive H441 lung adenocarcinoma cells that harbor an oncogenic KRAS mutation and H520 squamous cell lung cancer cells, both of which are types of untreatable lung cancer. However, iMDK did not reduce the cell viability of MDK-negative A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells or normal human lung fibroblast (NHLF) cells indicating its specificity. iMDK suppressed the endogenous expression of MDK but not that of other growth factors such as PTN or VEGF. iMDK suppressed the growth of H441 cells by inhibiting the PI3K pathway and inducing apoptosis. Systemic administration of iMDK significantly inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model in vivo. Inhibition of MDK with iMDK provides a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of lung cancers that are driven by MDK. PMID:23976985

  19. SIRT2 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth through impairing Skp2-mediated p27 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hong; Chen, Zhiwei; Luo, Qingquan; Lu, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Skp2 is a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase which promotes the ubiquitination-associated degradation of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p27, resulting in increases in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell growth. We recently showed that down-regulation of Sirtuin deacetylases 2 (SIRT2) in NSCLC increased cancer cell growth through suppressing p27. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we examined the relationship between SIRT2 and Skp2 in regulation of NSCLC cell growth through p27. We found that the levels of SIRT2 significantly decreased, while the levels of Skp2 significantly increased in NSCLC specimens, compared to the paired non-tumor lung tissue. The levels of SIRT2 and Skp2 inversely correlated. Low SIRT2 levels were associated with poor patients' survival. Moreover, in several lung cancer cell lines, the SIRT2 levels significantly decreased and the Skp2 levels significantly increased. Overexpression of SIRT2 promoted Skp2 deacetylation and degradation, resulting in increases in p27 and suppression of NSCLC cell growth, whereas knockdown of Skp2 inhibited Skp2 deacetylation and degradation, resulting in decreases in p27 and increases in NSCLC cell growth. The deacetylation of Skp2 by SIRT2 and degradation of p27 by Skp2 were significantly inhibited by histone deacetylase inhibitor and proteasome inhibitor, respectively. Finally, SIRT2 and Skp2 co-immunoprecipitated in NSCLC cells. Together, our data suggest that SIRT2 may induce Skp2 deacetylation and subsequent degradation to abolish the effects of Skp2 on p27 to affect NSCLC cell growth. Thus, re-expression of SIRT2 may be a promising strategy for treating NSCLC. PMID:26942878

  20. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  1. E-Cadherin repression increases amount of cancer stem cells in human A549 lung adenocarcinoma and stimulates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Farmakovskaya, M; Khromova, N; Rybko, V; Dugina, V; Kopnin, B; Kopnin, P

    2016-04-17

    Here we show that cancer stem cells amount in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 depends on E-cadherin expression. In fact, downregulation of E-cadherin expression enhanced expression of pluripotent genes (c-MYC, NESTIN, OCT3/4 and SOX2) and enriched cell population with the cells possessing the properties of so-called 'cancer stem cells' via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Repression of E-cadherin also stimulated cell proliferation and migration in vitro, decreased cell amount essential for xenografts formation in nude mice, increased tumors vascularization and growth. On the other hand, E-cadherin upregulation caused opposite effects i.e. diminished the number of cancer stem cells, decreased xenograft vascularization and decelerated tumor growth. Therefore, agents restoring E-cadherin expression may be useful in anticancer therapy. PMID:26940223

  2. Lung Injury and Lung Cancer Caused by Cigarette Smoke-Induced Oxidative Stress: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities Involving the Ceramide-Generating Machinery and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2149–2174. PMID:24684526

  3. Inhibitory effect of ginsenoside Rg3 combined with gemcitabine on angiogenesis and growth of lung cancer in mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Ginsenoside Rg3, a saponin extracted from ginseng, inhibits angiogenesis. The combination of low-dose chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic inhibitors suppresses growth of experimental tumors more effectively than conventional therapy or anti-angiogenic agent alone. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose gemcitabine combined with ginsenoside Rg3 on angiogenesis and growth of established Lewis lung carcinoma in mice. Methods C57L/6 mice implanted with Lewis lung carcinoma were randomized into the control, ginsenoside Rg3, gemcitabine and combination group. The quality of life and survival of mice were recorded. Tumor volume, inhibitive rate and necrosis rate were estimated. Necrosis of tumor and signals of blood flow as well as dynamic parameters of arterial blood flow in tumors such as peak systolic velocity (PSV) and resistive index (RI) were detected by color Doppler ultrasound. In addition, expression of vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) and CD31 were observed by immunohistochemstry, and microvessel density (MVD) of the tumor tissues was assessed by CD31 immunohistochemical analysis. Results Quality of life of mice in the ginsenoside Rg3 and combination group were better than in the control and gemcitabine group. Combined therapy with ginsenoside Rg3 and gemcitabine not only enhanced efficacy on suppression of tumor growth and prolongation of the survival, but also increased necrosis rate of tumor significantly. In addition, the combination treatment could obviously decrease VEGF expression and MVD as well as signals of blood flow and PSV in tumors. Conclusion Ginsenoside Rg3 combined with gemcitabine may significantly inhibit angiogenesis and growth of lung cancer and improve survival and quality of life of tumor-bearing mice. The combination of chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic drugs may be an innovative and promising therapeutic strategy in the experimental treatment of human lung cancer. PMID:19624862

  4. AZD9291 in epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor—resistant non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in advanced EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer have an objective response rate (ORR) of approximately 60–70% and a median progression free-survival (PFS) of approximately 10-13 months. Studies of tumor biopsies performed after progression on EGFR TKI revealed that 50-60% of EGFR mutant NSCLC developed an EGFR exon 20 T790M mutation as a mechanism of acquired resistance. AZD9291 is a third generation irreversible EGFR TKI with activity against the activating EGFR mutation, the T790M acquired resistance mutation, and relative sparing of the wild-type EGFR. AZD9291 was investigated in a phase I trial with expansion cohorts in patients with disease progression after EGFR TKI. Patients with and without detectable T790M mutations were enrolled in the trial. The ORR in patients with centrally confirmed and without detectable T790M mutations was 61% (95% CI, 52–70%) and 21% (95% CI, 12–34%), respectively. The PFS observed in patients with centrally confirmed and without detectable T790M mutations was 9.6 months (95% CI, 8.3 to not reached) and 2.8 months (95% CI, 2.1–4.3 months), respectively. At the dose for further investigation, 80 mg daily, the rate of all grade 3-5 drug related adverse events was 11%, and the rates of grade 3 diarrhea and rash were 1% and 0%, respectively. The identification of the T790M resistance mutation and the subsequent development of an agent against the mechanism of resistance provide a template for future drug development for acquired resistance to targeted therapy. PMID:26958499

  5. AZD9291 in epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2016-02-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in advanced EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer have an objective response rate (ORR) of approximately 60-70% and a median progression free-survival (PFS) of approximately 10-13 months. Studies of tumor biopsies performed after progression on EGFR TKI revealed that 50-60% of EGFR mutant NSCLC developed an EGFR exon 20 T790M mutation as a mechanism of acquired resistance. AZD9291 is a third generation irreversible EGFR TKI with activity against the activating EGFR mutation, the T790M acquired resistance mutation, and relative sparing of the wild-type EGFR. AZD9291 was investigated in a phase I trial with expansion cohorts in patients with disease progression after EGFR TKI. Patients with and without detectable T790M mutations were enrolled in the trial. The ORR in patients with centrally confirmed and without detectable T790M mutations was 61% (95% CI, 52-70%) and 21% (95% CI, 12-34%), respectively. The PFS observed in patients with centrally confirmed and without detectable T790M mutations was 9.6 months (95% CI, 8.3 to not reached) and 2.8 months (95% CI, 2.1-4.3 months), respectively. At the dose for further investigation, 80 mg daily, the rate of all grade 3-5 drug related adverse events was 11%, and the rates of grade 3 diarrhea and rash were 1% and 0%, respectively. The identification of the T790M resistance mutation and the subsequent development of an agent against the mechanism of resistance provide a template for future drug development for acquired resistance to targeted therapy. PMID:26958499

  6. Betulinic acid delivered in liposomes reduces growth of human lung and colon cancers in mice without causing systemic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mullauer, Franziska B; van Bloois, Louis; Daalhuisen, Joost B; Ten Brink, Marieke S; Storm, Gert; Medema, Jan Paul; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Kessler, Jan H

    2011-03-01

    Betulinic acid (BetA) is a plant-derived pentacyclic triterpenoid with potent anticancer capacity that targets the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. BetA has a broad efficacy in vitro against prevalent cancer types, including lung, colorectal, prostate, cervix and breast cancer, melanomas, neuroblastomas, and leukemias. The cytotoxic effects of the compound against healthy cells are minimal, rendering BetA a promising potential anticancer drug. However, because of the weak hydrosolubility of BetA, it has been difficult to study its efficacy in vivo and a pharmaceutical formulation is not yet available. We report the development of a liposome formulation of BetA and show its successful application in mice. Large liposomes, assembled without cholesterol to reduce their rigidity, efficiently incorporated BetA. Nude mice xenografted with human colon and lung cancer tumors were treated intravenously with the BetA-containing liposomes. Tumor growth was reduced to more than 50% compared with the control treatment, leading to an enhanced survival of the mice. Oral administration of the liposomal formulation of BetA also slowed tumor growth. Any signs of systemic toxicity caused by BetA treatment were absent. Thus, liposomes are an efficient formulation vehicle for BetA, enabling its preclinical development as a nontoxic compound for the treatment of cancers. PMID:21263311

  7. Study of lung-metastasized prostate cancer cell line chemotaxis to epidermal growth factor with a BIOMEMS device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Uday; Rao, Smitha M. N.; Sharma, Akash; Pabba, Krishna; Pokhrel, Kushal; Adhikari, Bandita; Lin, Victor K.; Chiao, J.-C.

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the effects of different growth factors on cancer metastasis will enable researchers to develop effective post-surgery therapeutic strategies to stop the spread of cancer. Conventional Boyden chamber assays to evaluate cell motility in metastasis studies require high volumes of reagents and are impractical for high-throughput analysis. A microfluidic device was designed for arrayed assaying of prostate cancer cell migration towards different growth factors. The device was created with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and featured two wells connected by 10 micro channels. One well was for cell seeding and the other well for specific growth factors. Each channel has a width of 20 μm, a length of 1 mm and a depth of 10 μm. The device was placed on a culture dish and primed with growth media. Lung-metastasized cells in suspension of RPMI 1640 media1 supplemented with 2% of fetal bovine serum (FBS) were seeded in the cell wells. Cell culture media with epidermal growth factor (EGF) of 25, 50, 75, 100 and 125 ng ml‑1 concentrations were individually added in the respective growth factor wells. A 5-day time-lapsed study of cell migration towards the chemoattractant was performed. The average numbers of cells per device in the microchannels were obtained for each attractant condition. The results indicated migration of cells increased from 50 to 100 ng ml‑1 of EGF and significantly decreased at 125 ng ml‑1 of EGF, as compared to control.

  8. Lung cancer in Australia.

    PubMed

    McLennan, G; Roder, D M

    1989-02-20

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death of cancer in Australian men and the third leading cause in Australian women. Efforts are being made to reduce the incidence of this disease by smoking-cessation programmes and improved industrial hygiene, and these measures need to be encouraged strongly by all sectors of the community. On a population basis, insufficient evidence is available to justify screening procedures for the early detection of lung cancer in "at-risk" groups. Cure is possible by surgical resection in early cases. Improvements in therapeutic results with traditional cancer treatments largely have reached a plateau, but a number of newer therapies, and combinations of standard therapies, currently are being evaluated. Of particular interest is concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in localized non-small-cell lung cancer; laser "debulking" in conjunction with radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer, and biological response-modifying agents in non-small-cell and small-cell lung cancer. It is important that data be collected adequately to define epidemiological changes and to evaluate treatment results (including repeat bronchoscopy, to assess local control of tumour), and that the quality of life is recorded and reported in the evaluation process. Finally, phase-III studies in lung-cancer treatments require adequate numbers of subjects to enable meaningful conclusions to be achieve objectives within a reasonable study period. PMID:2469943

  9. Polymorphisms in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene and the risk of primary lung cancer: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin Eun; Ha Park, Sun; Kim, Kyung Mee; Lee, Won Kee; Kam, Sin; Cha, Sung Ick; Ho Kim, Chang; Mo Kang, Young; Kim, Young-Chul; Han, Sung Beom; Jung, Tae Hoon; Park, Jae Yong

    2007-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) gene may influence EGFR production and/or activity, thereby modulating susceptibility to lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the association between polymorphisms in the EGFR gene and the risk of lung cancer in a Korean population. Methods We first examined the frequencies of 39 candidate polymorphisms in the EGFR gene in 27 healthy Korean individuals. After then, we genotyped five polymorphisms (127378C>T, 142285G>A, 162093G>A, 181946C>T and 187114T>C) that have variant allele frequencies greater than 10%, in 582 lung cancer patients and in 582 healthy controls. Results Of the 5 polymorphisms, the 181946C>T genotype distribution was significantly different between the cases and controls (P = 0.04). Compared with the 181946 CC + CT genotype, the 181946 TT genotype was associated with a significantly decreased risk of lung cancer (adjusted OR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.45–0.88, P = 0.007). When the analyses were stratified by smoking status, the protective effect of the TT genotype was statistically significant in ever-smokers (adjusted OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.41–0.86, P = 0.007), but not in never-smokers (adjusted OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.45–1.75, P = 0.73; P = 0.08, test for homogeneity). Consistent with the results of the genotyping analysis, the CGGCT haplotype with the 181946C allele was associated with a significantly increased risk of lung cancer compared to the CGGTT haplotype carrying the 181946T allele (adjusted OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.09–2.07, P = 0.012 and Bonferroni corrected P-value = 0.048). Conclusion These results suggest that the EGFR polymorphisms, particularly the 181945C>T polymorphism, could be used as markers for the genetic susceptibility to lung cancer. PMID:17956637

  10. Lung and Bronchus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 224,390 % of All New Cancer Cases 13.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 158,080 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 415,707 people living with lung and bronchus ...

  11. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  12. Tyr1068-phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) predicts cancer stem cell targeting by erlotinib in preclinical models of wild-type EGFR lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sette, G; Salvati, V; Mottolese, M; Visca, P; Gallo, E; Fecchi, K; Pilozzi, E; Duranti, E; Policicchio, E; Tartaglia, M; Milella, M; De Maria, R; Eramo, A

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown strong activity against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, a fraction of EGFR wild-type (WT) patients may have an improvement in terms of response rate and progression-free survival when treated with erlotinib, suggesting that factors other than EGFR mutation may lead to TKI sensitivity. However, at present, no sufficiently robust clinical or biological parameters have been defined to identify WT-EGFR patients with greater chances of response. Therapeutics validation has necessarily to focus on lung cancer stem cells (LCSCs) as they are more difficult to eradicate and represent the tumor-maintaining cell population. Here, we investigated erlotinib response of lung CSCs with WT-EGFR and identified EGFR phosphorylation at tyrosine1068 (EGFRtyr1068) as a powerful biomarker associated with erlotinib sensitivity both in vitro and in preclinical CSC-generated xenografts. In contrast to the preferential cytotoxicity of chemotherapy against the more differentiated cells, in EGFRtyr1068 cells, erlotinib was even more active against the LCSCs compared with their differentiated counterpart, acquiring potential value as CSC-directed therapeutics in the context of WT-EGFR lung cancer. Although tumor growth was inhibited to a similar extent during erlotinib or chemotherapy administration to responsive tumors, erlotinib proved superior to chemotherapy in terms of higher tolerability and reduced tumor aggressiveness after treatment suspension, substantiating the possibility of preferential LCSC targeting, both in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors. We conclude that EGFRtyr1068 may represent a potential candidate biomarker predicting erlotinib response at CSC-level in EGFR-WT lung cancer patients. Finally, besides its invariable association with erlotinib sensitivity in EGFR-WT lung CSCs, EGFRtyr1068 was associated with

  13. Tyr1068-phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) predicts cancer stem cell targeting by erlotinib in preclinical models of wild-type EGFR lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sette, G; Salvati, V; Mottolese, M; Visca, P; Gallo, E; Fecchi, K; Pilozzi, E; Duranti, E; Policicchio, E; Tartaglia, M; Milella, M; De Maria, R; Eramo, A

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown strong activity against non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, a fraction of EGFR wild-type (WT) patients may have an improvement in terms of response rate and progression-free survival when treated with erlotinib, suggesting that factors other than EGFR mutation may lead to TKI sensitivity. However, at present, no sufficiently robust clinical or biological parameters have been defined to identify WT-EGFR patients with greater chances of response. Therapeutics validation has necessarily to focus on lung cancer stem cells (LCSCs) as they are more difficult to eradicate and represent the tumor-maintaining cell population. Here, we investigated erlotinib response of lung CSCs with WT-EGFR and identified EGFR phosphorylation at tyrosine1068 (EGFRtyr1068) as a powerful biomarker associated with erlotinib sensitivity both in vitro and in preclinical CSC-generated xenografts. In contrast to the preferential cytotoxicity of chemotherapy against the more differentiated cells, in EGFRtyr1068 cells, erlotinib was even more active against the LCSCs compared with their differentiated counterpart, acquiring potential value as CSC-directed therapeutics in the context of WT-EGFR lung cancer. Although tumor growth was inhibited to a similar extent during erlotinib or chemotherapy administration to responsive tumors, erlotinib proved superior to chemotherapy in terms of higher tolerability and reduced tumor aggressiveness after treatment suspension, substantiating the possibility of preferential LCSC targeting, both in adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors. We conclude that EGFRtyr1068 may represent a potential candidate biomarker predicting erlotinib response at CSC-level in EGFR-WT lung cancer patients. Finally, besides its invariable association with erlotinib sensitivity in EGFR-WT lung CSCs, EGFRtyr1068 was associated with

  14. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the breakdown of uranium in rocks and soil. It seeps up through the ground, and leaks ... substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. These ...

  15. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Horrigan Conners Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, April, ... Lung Cancer in Women: The Differences in Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment Outcomes, Maria Patricia Rivera MD Expert ...

  16. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  17. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  18. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  19. Chemoprevention of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2009-04-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. While avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or inhibit the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung. Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to determine higher risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and pre-malignant biology continues to advance. Additional biomarkers of risk continue to be investigated and validated. The World Health Organization/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification for lung cancer now recognizes distinct histologic lesions that can be reproducibly graded as precursors of non-small cell lung cancer. For example, carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive squamous cell cancer. Similar precursor lesions exist for adenocarcinoma, and these pre-malignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. At this time, chemopreventive agents can only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials are currently in progress and additional trials are in the planning stages. This review will discuss the principles of chemoprevention, summarize the completed trials, and discuss ongoing and potential future trials with a focus on targeted pathways. PMID:19349487

  20. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  1. Immunotherapy in lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moundhri, M.; O'Brien, M.; Souberbielle, B. E.

    1998-01-01

    More research and new treatment options are needed in all stages of lung cancer. To this end immunotherapy needs a revival in view of recent improved technologies and greater understanding of the underlying biology. In this review we discuss mechanisms of tumour immunotherapy, non-specific, specific and adoptive, with particular reference to a direct therapeutic action on all subtypes of lung cancer. PMID:9703271

  2. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  3. Molecular oncology of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Toyooka, Shinichi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Soh, Junichi; Aokage, Keiju; Yamane, Masaomi; Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2011-08-01

    Progress in genetic engineering has made it possible to elucidate the molecular biological abnormalities in lung cancer. Mutations in KRAS and P53 genes, loss of specific alleles, and DNA methylation of the tumor suppressor genes were the major abnormalities investigated between 1980 and the 2000s. In 2004, mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that cause oncogene addiction were discovered in non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), especially in adenocarcinomas. Because they are strongly associated with sensitivity to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), a great deal of knowledge has been acquired in regard to both EGFR and other genes in the EGFR family and their downstream genes. Moreover, in 2007 the existence of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was discovered in NSCLC; and the same as EGFR-TKIs, ALK inhibitors are being found to be highly effective in lung cancers that have this translocation. These discoveries graphically illustrate that molecular biological findings are directly linked to the development of clinical oncology and to improving the survival rates of lung cancer patients. Here, we review the remarkable progress in molecular biological knowledge acquired thus far in regard to lung cancer, especially NSCLC, and the future possibilities. PMID:21850578

  4. IL-6 promotes growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of CD133+ cells of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yang, Xiaodong; Duan, Shanzhou; Tsai, Ying; Strojny, Laura R.; Keng, Peter; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2016-01-01

    We examined IL-6 effects on growth, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, and metastatic ability of CD133+ and CD133– cell subpopulations isolated from three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: A549, H157, and H1299. We developed IL-6 knocked-down and scramble (sc) control cells of A549 and H157 cell lines by lentiviral infection system, isolated CD133+ and CD133– sub-populations, and investigated the IL-6 role in self-renewal/growth of these cells. IL-6 showed either an inhibitory or lack of effect in modulating growth of CD133– cells depending on intracellular IL-6 levels, but there was higher self-renewal ability of IL-6 expressing CD133+ cells than IL-6 knocked down cells, confirming the promoter role of IL-6 in CD133+ cells growth. We then examined tumor growth of xenografts developed from CD133+ cells of A549IL-6si vs. A549sc cell lines. Consistently, there was retarded growth of tumors developed from A549IL-6si, CD133+ cells compared to tumors originating from A549sc, CD133+ cells. The effect of IL-6 in promoting CD133+ self-renewal was due to hedgehog (Hhg) and Erk signaling pathway activation and higher Bcl-2/Bcl-xL expression. We also investigated whether IL-6 regulates the EMT process of CD133− and CD133+ cells differently. Expression of the EMT/metastasis-associated molecules in IL-6 expressing cells was higher than in IL-6 knocked down cells. Together, we demonstrated dual roles of IL-6 in regulating growth of CD133– and CD133+ subpopulations of lung cancer cells and significant regulation of IL-6 on EMT/metastasis increase in CD133+ cells, not in CD133– cells. PMID:26675547

  5. Trichosanthes kirilowii fruits inhibit non-small cell lung cancer cell growth through mitotic cell-cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lulu; Zhu, Xiaowen; Gong, Chenyuan; Luo, Yinbin; Wang, Lixin; Zhou, Wuxiong; Zhu, Shiguo; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80% of lung cancer cases and the reported overall 5-year survival rate is less than 5%. Natural medicines have attracted much attention due to their lower toxicity and fewer side effects. Trichosanthes kirilowii Maxim (TKM) fruits are commonly used in cancer treatment in combination with other Chinese medicinal herbs. However, little is known about their biological functions and mechanisms in NSCLC cells. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of TKM fruits in NSCLC cells using cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and anchorage independent assays and a Xenograft NSCLC tumor model, and explored the possible biological mechanism by flow cytometric analysis, cDNA microarray and real-time PCR. Results showed that TKM fruits significantly suppressed NSCLC cell proliferation, migration, invasion, tumorigenicity and tumor growth, and significantly extended the survival time of NSCLC-bearing mice. Flow cytometric analysis showed that TKM fruits significantly induced G2-M arrest, necrosis and apoptosis in NSCLC cells. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that TKM fruits regulated the differential expression of 544 genes, and the differential expression of selected genes was also confirmed. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that 18 of first 20 biological processes were involved in cell cycle and mitosis. These results indicate that TKM fruits have certain inhibitory effect on NSCLC cells through cell-cycle and mitosis arrest, and suggest that TKM fruits may be an important resource for developing new antitumor drugs, and a potent natural product for treating patients with NSCLC. PMID:25779643

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factor and nitric oxide synthase expression in human lung cancer and the relation to p53.

    PubMed Central

    Ambs, S.; Bennett, W. P.; Merriam, W. G.; Ogunfusika, M. O.; Oser, S. M.; Khan, M. A.; Jones, R. T.; Harris, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and mutations of cancer-related genes increase with cancer progression. This correlation suggests the hypothesis that oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulate VEGF, and a significant correlation between p53 alteration and increased VEGF expression in human lung cancer was reported recently. To further examine this hypothesis, we analysed VEGF protein expression and mutations in p53 and K-ras in 27 non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC): 16 squamous cell, six adenocarcinomas, one large cell, two carcinoids and two undifferentiated tumours. VEGF was expressed in 50% of the squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and carcinoids but none of the others. p53 mutations occurred in 14 tumours (52%), and K-ras mutations were found in two adenocarcinomas and one SCC; there was no correlation between the mutations and VEGF expression. As nitric oxide also regulates angiogenesis, we examined NOS expression in NSCLC. The Ca2+-dependent NOS activity, which indicates NOS1 and NOS3 expression, was significantly reduced in lung carcinomas compared with adjacent non-tumour tissue (P < 0.004). Although the Ca2+-independent NOS activity, which indicates NOS2 expression, was low or undetectable in non-tumour tissues and most carcinomas, significant activity occurred in three SCC. In summary, our data do not show a direct regulation of VEGF by p53 in NSCLC. Finally, we did not find the up-regulation of NOS isoforms during NSCLC progression that has been suggested for gynaecological and breast cancers. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9683299

  7. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibits tumor growth of lung cancer through disrupting angiogenesis via BMP/Smad/Id-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Youchao; Wang, Zhigang; Zang, Aimin; Jiao, Shunchang; Chen, Sumei; Fu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of inhibitory effects induced by tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) on angiogenesis and tumor growth of lung cancer were investigated. In vitro cell proliferation, migration, and tube formation of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) were evaluated by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-dephenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), wound healing, Transwell, and Matrigel assays. The expression of BMP/Smad/Id-1 signals was detected by RT-PCR and western blotting. In an A549 xenograft tumor model, TMP (40 and 80 mg/kg/day) was intraperitoneally injected into mice. The expressions of CD31, phosphorylated Smad1/5/8, and Id-1 were measured by immunohistochemistry. We demonstrated that TMP inhibited proliferation, migration, and capillary tube formation of HMEC-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, treatment of HMEC-1 cells with TMP (0.4 mg/ml) significantly upregulated BMP2 expression and downregulated BMPRIA, BMPRII, phosphorylated Smad1/5/8, and Id-1 expression. In addition, administrations of TMP remarkably inhibited tumor growth of A549 xenograft in nude mice. The CD31, phosphorylated Smad1/5/8, and Id-1 expression were significantly inhibited in TMP-treated xenograft tumors compared with the vehicle. In conclusion, our results indicated that TMP suppressed angiogenesis and tumor growth of lung cancer via blocking the BMP/Smad/Id-1 signaling. PMID:26984046

  8. Evaluation of a novel saliva‐based epidermal growth factor receptor mutation detection for lung cancer: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Dan; Liang, Hao; Wei, Fang; Akin, David; Feng, Ziding; Yan, QingXiang; Li, Yin; Zhen, Yan; Xu, Lin; Dong, Gaochao; Wan, Huajing; Dong, Jingsi; Qiu, Xiaoming; Qin, Changlong; Zhu, Daxing; Wang, Xi; Sun, Tong; Zhang, Wenbiao; Li, Canjun; Tang, Xiaojun; Qiao, Youlin

    2016-01-01

    Background This article describes a pilot study evaluating a novel liquid biopsy system for non‐small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The electric field‐induced release and measurement (EFIRM) method utilizes an electrochemical biosensor for detecting oncogenic mutations in biofluids. Methods Saliva and plasma of 17 patients were collected from three cancer centers prior to and after surgical resection. The EFIRM method was then applied to the collected samples to assay for exon 19 deletion and p.L858 mutations. EFIRM results were compared with cobas results of exon 19 deletion and p.L858 mutation detection in cancer tissues. Results The EFIRM method was found to detect exon 19 deletion with an area under the curve (AUC) of 1.0 in both saliva and plasma samples in lung cancer patients. For L858R mutation detection, the AUC of saliva was 1.0, while the AUC of plasma was 0.98. Strong correlations were also found between presurgery and post‐surgery samples for both saliva (0.86 for exon 19 and 0.98 for L858R) and plasma (0.73 for exon 19 and 0.94 for L858R). Conclusion Our study demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing EFIRM to rapidly, non‐invasively, and conveniently detect epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in the saliva of patients with NSCLC, with results corresponding perfectly with the results of cobas tissue genotyping. PMID:27385985

  9. [Chemoprevention of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Takaaki; Saito, Makoto; Honda, Hidetoshi; Hirata, Takeshi; Kato, Harubumi

    2003-02-01

    Since a high concentration of beta-carotene in blood reduces the risk of lung cancer, a large-scale intervention examination containing beta-carotene was conducted, mainly by the National Cancer Institute. The results showed that the risk of lung cancer increased with administration of beta-carotene. This result demonstrates that continuation of smoking is an important factor in the increased risk, and not smoking is confirmed to be the most important prevention method. The authors examined the treatment effect of raising the concentration of folic acid and vitamin B12 in blood on bronchial dysplasia as a pre-cancerous lesion. A significant medical treatment effect was see in the folic acid and vitamin B12 medication groups, which seems promising for the chemoprevention of lung cancer. PMID:12610863

  10. The Clinical Significance of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Polymorphism in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tu-Chen; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Ming-Che; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling pathway mediates multiple cancer cell biological processes. IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) expression has been used as a reporter of the clinical significance of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, the association between IGF1R genetic variants and the clinical utility of NSCLC positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is not clear. The current study investigated the association between the IGF1R genetic variants, the occurrence of EGFR mutations, and clinicopathological characteristics in NSCLC patients. A total of 452 participants, including 362 adenocarcinoma lung cancer and 90 squamous cell carcinoma lung cancer patients, were selected for analysis of IGF1R genetic variants (rs7166348, rs2229765, and rs8038415) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)genotyping. The results indicated that GA + AA genotypes of IGF1R rs2229765 were significantly associated with EGFR mutation in female lung adenocarcinoma patients (odds ratio (OR) = 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.17–0.87). Moreover, The GA + AA genotype IGF1R rs2229765 was significantly associated with EGFR L858R mutation (p = 0.02) but not with the exon 19 in-frame deletion. Furthermore, among patients without EGFR mutation, those who have at least one polymorphic A allele of IGF1R rs7166348 have an increased incidence of lymph node metastasis when compared with those patients homozygous for GG (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.20–2.31). Our results showed that IGF1R genetic variants are related to EGFR mutation in female lung adenocarcinoma patients and may be a predictive factor for tumor lymph node metastasis in Taiwanese patients with NSCLC. PMID:27213344

  11. The Clinical Significance of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Polymorphism in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tu-Chen; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Liu, Ming-Che; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) signaling pathway mediates multiple cancer cell biological processes. IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) expression has been used as a reporter of the clinical significance of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, the association between IGF1R genetic variants and the clinical utility of NSCLC positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is not clear. The current study investigated the association between the IGF1R genetic variants, the occurrence of EGFR mutations, and clinicopathological characteristics in NSCLC patients. A total of 452 participants, including 362 adenocarcinoma lung cancer and 90 squamous cell carcinoma lung cancer patients, were selected for analysis of IGF1R genetic variants (rs7166348, rs2229765, and rs8038415) using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)genotyping. The results indicated that GA + AA genotypes of IGF1R rs2229765 were significantly associated with EGFR mutation in female lung adenocarcinoma patients (odds ratio (OR) = 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.17-0.87). Moreover, The GA + AA genotype IGF1R rs2229765 was significantly associated with EGFR L858R mutation (p = 0.02) but not with the exon 19 in-frame deletion. Furthermore, among patients without EGFR mutation, those who have at least one polymorphic A allele of IGF1R rs7166348 have an increased incidence of lymph node metastasis when compared with those patients homozygous for GG (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.20-2.31). Our results showed that IGF1R genetic variants are related to EGFR mutation in female lung adenocarcinoma patients and may be a predictive factor for tumor lymph node metastasis in Taiwanese patients with NSCLC. PMID:27213344

  12. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Tarsheen K; El-Ghamry, Moataz N; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following tobacco smoke. Radon is not only an independent risk factor; it also increases the risk of lung cancer in smokers. Numerous cohort, case-control, and experimental studies have established the carcinogenic potential of radon. The possibility of radon having a causative effect on other cancers has been explored but not yet proven. One of the postulated mechanisms of carcinogenesis is DNA damage by alpha particles mediated by the production of reactive oxygen species. The latter are also thought to constitute one of the common mechanisms underlying the synergistic effect of radon and tobacco smoke. With an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in the United States annually, the need for radon mitigation is well acknowledged. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an indoor limit of 4 picocuries (pCi)/L, and various methods are available for indoor radon reduction when testing shows higher levels. Radon mitigation should accompany smoking cessation measures in lung cancer prevention efforts. PMID:22402423

  13. Is there a role for epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in epidermal growth factor receptor wild-type non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Arriola, Edurne; Taus, Álvaro; Casadevall, David

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer with a world-wide annual incidence of around 1.3 million. The majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced disease and survival remains poor. However, relevant advances have occurred in recent years through the identification of biomarkers that predict for benefit of therapeutic agents. This is exemplified by the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of EGFR mutant patients. These drugs have also shown efficacy in unselected populations but this point remains controversial. Here we have reviewed the clinical data that demonstrate a small but consistent subgroup of EGFR wild-type patients with NSCLC that obtain a clinical benefit from these drugs. Moreover, we review the biological rationale that may explain this benefit observed in the clinical setting. PMID:26266101

  14. Prognostic value of vascularity and vascular endothelial growth factor expression in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, R; Carlile, J; Pendleton, N; Schor, A

    2001-01-01

    Aims—High expression of the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in tumours has been found to be associated with poor prognosis in some studies, but not in others. The aims of this study were to determine the prognostic value of VEGF in operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its possible association with vascularity. Methods—Sections from 81 NSCLC archival specimens were stained with antibodies to von Willebrand factor (vWF) and VEGF. Vascularity was measured by the average density of vWF positive vessels. VEGF expression in tumour cells was assessed by consensus of two independent observers according to three indices, namely: (1) percentage of area stained, (2) intensity of staining, and (3) final score (product of area and intensity). Results—VEGF immunoreactivity was present in all tumours and adjacent normal lung tissue. None of the three VEGF indices was associated with vascularity or the clinical parameters examined. Mean survival times were shorter in patients with high VEGF expression, but the difference was not significant. This applied to the full cohort of patients, or when analysed separately according to tumour type or stage. However, high VEGF expression was associated with poor survival in patients with high vascularity (p = 0.02). VEGF had no discriminant value among patients with low vascularity. Vascularity had no prognostic value, except for late stage patients (UICC stages II and IIIa combined; n = 36), where high vascularity was associated with longer survival (p = 0.01). Conclusions—VEGF on its own has no prognostic value in NSCLC, but may become a useful indicator when combined with vascularity. VEGF may play a physiological role in the normal lung. Key Words: non-small cell lung cancer • vascular endothelial growth factor • vascularity • prognosis PMID:11215279

  15. XCR1 promotes cell growth and migration and is correlated with bone metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ting; Han, Shuai; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Zhitao; Yan, Wangjun; Liu, Tielong; Wei, Haifeng; Song, Dianwen; Zhou, Wang Yang, Xinghai Xiao, Jianru

    2015-08-21

    Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 30–40% patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the mechanism underlying this bone metastasis remains poorly understood. The chemokine super family is believed to play an important role in tumor metastasis in lung cancer. The chemokine receptor XCR1 has been identified to promote cell proliferation and migration in oral cancer and ovarian carcinoma, but the role of XCR1 in lung cancer has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that XCR1 was overexpressed in lung cancer bone metastasis as compared with that in patients with primary lung cancer. In addition, the XCR1 ligand XCL1 promoted the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells markedly, and knockdown of XCR1 by siRNA abolished the effect of XCL1 in cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, we identified JAK2/STAT3 as a novel downstream pathway of XCR1, while XCL1/XCR1 increased the mRNA level of the downstream of JAK2/STAT3 including PIM1, JunB, TTP, MMP2 and MMP9. These results indicate that XCR1 is a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer bone metastasis. - Highlights: • XCR1 is overexpressed in bone metastasis compared with primary NSCLC. • XCR1 activation by XCL1 promotes lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. • JAK2/STAT3 is a novel potential downstream pathway of XCR1.

  16. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  17. Identification of a long non-coding RNA gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor opposite strand, which stimulates cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Eliza J; Seim, Inge; Pauli, Jana P; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Thomas, Patrick B; Carter, Shea L; Walpole, Carina M; Fung, Jenny N T; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in non‑small cell lung cancer tumourigenesis are largely unknown; however, recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likely to play a role. In this study, we used public databases to identify an mRNA-like, candidate long non-coding RNA, GHSROS (GHSR opposite strand), transcribed from the antisense strand of the ghrelin receptor gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed higher expression of GHSROS in lung cancer tissue compared to adjacent, non-tumour lung tissue. In common with many long non-coding RNAs, GHSROS is 5' capped and 3' polyadenylated (mRNA-like), lacks an extensive open reading frame and harbours a transposable element. Engineered overexpression of GHSROS stimulated cell migration in the A549 and NCI-H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, but suppressed cell migration in the Beas-2B normal lung-derived bronchoepithelial cell line. This suggests that GHSROS function may be dependent on the oncogenic context. The identification of GHSROS, which is expressed in lung cancer and stimulates cell migration in lung cancer cell lines, contributes to the growing number of non-coding RNAs that play a role in the regulation of tumourigenesis and metastatic cancer progression. PMID:23722988

  18. Lung cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Keith, Robert L

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, and the majority of diagnoses are made in former smokers. Although avoidance of tobacco abuse and smoking cessation clearly will have the greatest impact on lung cancer development, effective chemoprevention could prove to be more effective than treatment of established, advanced-stage disease. Chemoprevention is the use of dietary or pharmaceutical agents to reverse or block the carcinogenic process and has been successfully applied to common malignancies other than lung (including recent reports on the prevention of breast cancer in high-risk individuals). Despite previous studies in lung cancer chemoprevention failing to identify effective agents, our ability to define the highest-risk populations and the understanding of lung tumor and premalignant biology continue to make advances. Squamous cell carcinogenesis in the bronchial epithelium starts with normal epithelium and progresses through hyperplasia, metaplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ to invasive cancer. Precursor lesions also have been identified for adenocarcinoma, and these premalignant lesions are targeted by chemopreventive agents in current and future trials. Chemopreventive agents can currently only be recommended as part of well-designed clinical trials, and multiple trials have recently been completed or are enrolling subjects. PMID:22550242

  19. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  20. Lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Pastorino, U

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary cause of cancer mortality in developed countries. First diagnosis only when disease has already reached the metastatic phase is the main reason for failure in treatment. To this regard, although low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) has proven to be effective in the early detection of lung cancer (providing both higher resectability and higher long-term survival rates), the capacity of annual CT screening to reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy smokers has yet to be demonstrated. Numerous ongoing large-scale randomised trials are under way in high-risk individuals with different study designs. The initial results should be available within the next 2 years. PMID:20424610

  1. Epigenetic regulation of Smad2 and Smad3 by profilin-2 promotes lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yun-Neng; Ding, Wei-Qiao; Guo, Xiao-Jie; Yuan, Xin-Wang; Wang, Dong-Mei; Song, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Altered transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signalling has been implicated in tumour development and progression. However, the molecular mechanism behind this alteration is poorly understood. Here we show that profilin-2 (Pfn2) increases Smad2 and Smad3 expression via an epigenetic mechanism, and that profilin-2 and Smad expression correlate with an unfavourable prognosis of lung cancer patients. Profilin-2 overexpression promotes, whereas profilin-2 knockdown drastically reduces, lung cancer growth and metastasis. We show that profilin-2 suppresses the recruitment of HDAC1 to Smad2 and Smad3 promoters by preventing nuclear translocation of HDAC1 through protein-protein interaction at the C terminus of both proteins, leading to the transcriptional activation of Smad2 and Smad3. Increased Smad2 and Smad3 expression enhances TGF-β1-induced EMT and production of the angiogenic factors VEGF and CTGF. These findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of TGF-β1/Smad signalling, and suggest a potential molecular target for the development of anticancer drugs. PMID:26354229

  2. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zirong; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T.; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A.; Carper, Miranda B.; Haura, Eric B.; Schabath, Matthew B.; Cress, W. Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J.

    2016-01-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP–responsive element–binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC. PMID:27140397

  3. cAMP/CREB-regulated LINC00473 marks LKB1-inactivated lung cancer and mediates tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zirong; Li, Jian-Liang; Lin, Shuibin; Cao, Chunxia; Gimbrone, Nicholas T; Yang, Rongqiang; Fu, Dongtao A; Carper, Miranda B; Haura, Eric B; Schabath, Matthew B; Lu, Jianrong; Amelio, Antonio L; Cress, W Douglas; Kaye, Frederic J; Wu, Lizi

    2016-06-01

    The LKB1 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated and inactivated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of LKB1 promotes cancer progression and influences therapeutic responses in preclinical studies; however, specific targeted therapies for lung cancer with LKB1 inactivation are currently unavailable. Here, we have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) signature that is associated with the loss of LKB1 function. We discovered that LINC00473 is consistently the most highly induced gene in LKB1-inactivated human primary NSCLC samples and derived cell lines. Elevated LINC00473 expression correlated with poor prognosis, and sustained LINC00473 expression was required for the growth and survival of LKB1-inactivated NSCLC cells. Mechanistically, LINC00473 was induced by LKB1 inactivation and subsequent cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-regulated transcription coactivator (CRTC) activation. We determined that LINC00473 is a nuclear lncRNA and interacts with NONO, a component of the cAMP signaling pathway, thereby facilitating CRTC/CREB-mediated transcription. Collectively, our study demonstrates that LINC00473 expression potentially serves as a robust biomarker for tumor LKB1 functional status that can be integrated into clinical trials for patient selection and treatment evaluation, and implicates LINC00473 as a therapeutic target for LKB1-inactivated NSCLC. PMID:27140397

  4. Reaction of plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Kimura, Tatsuo; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Mitsuoka, Shigeki; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Tomohiro; Tachibana, Keisei; Noguchi, Masayuki; Yano, Seiji; Hirata, Kazuto

    2011-09-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor induces resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It has been hypothesized that epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors administration may influence the levels of plasma hepatocyte growth factor. Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and relapsed after chemotherapies were eligible. Plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels were analyzed on pretreatment and post-treatment day 15 and 30. We also investigated the correlation between plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels and sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, tissue immunoreactivity for hepatocyte growth factor and MET gene status. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. Plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels on post-treatment day 15 (630.1 ± 366.9 pg/ml) were significantly higher (p = 0.029) than the pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels (485.9 ± 230.2 pg/ml). Plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels on the post-treatment day 30 (581.5 ± 298.1 pg/ml) tend to be higher than those before treatment (p = 0.057). Pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels in patients with progressive disease (724.1 ± 216.4 pg/ml) were significantly higher than those in patients with stable disease (396.5 ± 148.3 pg/ml; p = 0.0008) and partial response (381.7 ± 179.0 pg/ml; p = 0.0039). The optimal pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor cut-off value for diagnosis of responder was 553.5 pg/ml, and its sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 65%, respectively. Pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels had no correlation with tissue immunoreactivities for hepatocyte growth factor, MET gene status and active EGFR mutations. Administration of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors significantly increased plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels. High levels of pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor indicated intrinsic resistance to epidermal growth factor

  5. ZD6474, an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase, inhibits growth of experimental lung metastasis and production of malignant pleural effusions in a non-small cell lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Matsumori, Yuka; Yano, Seiji; Goto, Hisatsugu; Nakataki, Emiko; Wedge, Stephen R; Ryan, Anderson J; Sone, Saburo

    2006-01-01

    ZD6474 is a novel, orally active inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) tyrosine kinase, with some additional activity against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of ZD6474 in the control of established experimental lung metastasis and pleural effusions produced by human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. PC14PE6 (adenocarcinoma) and H226 (squamous cell carcinoma) cells express high levels of EGFR and only PC14PE6 cells overexpress VEGF. Neither ZD6474 nor the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib inhibit proliferation of PC14PE6 or H226 cells in vitro. Both PC14PE6 and H226 cells inoculated intravenously into nude mice induced multiple lung nodules after 5-7 weeks. In addition, PC14PE6 cells produced bloody pleural effusions. Daily oral treatment with ZD6474 did not reduce the number of lung nodules produced by PC14PE6 or H226 cells, but did reduce the lung weight and the size of lung nodules. ZD6474 also inhibited the production of pleural effusions by PC14PE6 cells. Histological analyses of lung lesions revealed that ZD6474 treatment inhibited activation of VEGFR-2 and reduced tumor vascularization and tumor cell proliferation. Therapeutic effects of ZD6474 were considered likely to be due to inhibition of VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase because gefitinib was inactive in this model. These results indicate that ZD6474, an inhibitor of VEGFR-2, may be useful in controlling the growth of established lung metastasis and pleural effusions by NSCLC. PMID:16783964

  6. Restoration of miR-7 expression suppresses the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells by modulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingrong; Zheng, Yijie; Sun, Gengyun; Xiong, Shudao

    2014-12-01

    microRNAs are an abundant class of short endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as important regulators of multiple target genes and participate in diverse biological roles in carcinogenesis. However, the role of miR-7 in lung cancer remains unclear and requires further elucidation. In the present study, we found a reduction of miR-7 expression in Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells originating from mice by real-time RT-PCR. Restoration of miR-7 inhibited 3LL cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis in vitro and reduced tumorigenicity in vivo. We further confirmed that miR-7 downregulated the expression of both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and murine leukemia viral oncogene homologue-1 (RAF-1) oncogenes by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. Furthermore, inhibition of EGFR showed similar effects to miR-7 enforcement in 3LL cells. Taken together, these findings revealed that miR-7 acts as an antitumor miRNA in 3LL by targeting and suppressing the expression of both EGFR and RAF-1 oncogenes. This study may provide a rationale for the use of miR-7 in lung cancer target therapy. PMID:25334070

  7. Effective growth-suppressive activity of maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK) inhibitor against small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Kato, Taigo; Olugbile, Sope; Tamura, Kenji; Chung, Suyoun; Miyamoto, Takashi; Matsuo, Yo; Salgia, Ravi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Park, Jae-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK), that plays a critical role in maintenance of cancer stem cells (CSCs), is predominantly expressed in various types of human cancer including small cell lung cancer (SCLC). SCLC usually acquires resistance to anti-cancer drugs and portends dismal prognosis. We have delineated roles of MELK in development/progression of SCLC and examined anti-tumor efficacy of OTS167, a highly potent MELK inhibitor, against SCLC. MELK expression was highly upregulated in both SCLC cell lines and primary tumors. siRNA-mediated MELK knockdown induced significant growth inhibition in SCLC cell lines. Concordantly, treatment with OTS167 exhibited strong cytotoxicity against eleven SCLC cell lines with IC50 of < 10 nM. As similar to siRNA knockdown, OTS167 treatment induced cytokinetic defects with intercellular bridges, and in some cell lines we observed formation of neuronal protrusions accompanied with increase of a neuronal differentiation marker (CD56), indicating that the compound induced differentiation of cancer cells to neuron-like cells. Furthermore, the MELK inhibition decreased its downstream FOXM1 activity and Akt expression in SCLC cells, and led to apoptotic cell death. OTS167 appeared to be more effective to CSCs as measured by the sphere formation assay, thus MELK inhibition might become a promising treatment modality for SCLC. PMID:26871945

  8. Mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-chul; Berns, Anton

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease and a major therapeutic burden with poor survival rates. It is responsible for 30% of all cancer deaths. Lung cancer is strongly associated with smoking, although some subtypes are also seen in non-smokers. Tumors in the latter group are mostly adenocarcinomas with many carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Survival statistics of lung cancer are grim because of its late detection and frequent local and distal metastases. Although DNA sequence information from tumors has revealed a number of frequently occurring mutations, affecting well-known tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes, many of the driver mutations remain ill defined. This is likely due to the involvement of numerous rather infrequently occurring driver mutations that are difficult to distinguish from the very large number of passenger mutations detected in smoking-related lung cancers. Therefore, experimental model systems are indispensable to validate putative driver lesions and to gain insight into their mechanisms of action. Whereas a large fraction of these analyzes can be performed in cell cultures in vitro, in many cases the consequences of the mutations have to be assessed in the context of an intact organism, as this is the context in which the Mendelian selection process of the tumorigenic process took place and the advantages of particular mutations become apparent. Current mouse models for cancer are very suitable for this as they permit mimicking many of the salient features of human tumors. The capacity to swiftly re-engineer complex sets of lesions found in human tumors in mice enables us to assess the contribution of defined combinations of lesions to distinct tumor characteristics such as metastatic behavior and response to therapy. In this review we will describe mouse models of lung cancer and how they are used to better understand the disease and how they are exploited to develop better intervention strategies

  9. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trial that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  10. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The survival from bronchogenic carcinoma is highly dependent upon stage at the time of treatment. This is particularly true for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma, but holds true for small cell carcinoma as well. The problem presented to the medical profession has been to find a practical means of detecting lung cancer while it is still at an early stage. Three studies in progress have indicated that a larger proportion of the patients may be found to have early stage lung cancer when screened with a combination of chest X-rays and sputum cytology. However, the detection of these early stage cases has not yet been translated into an improvement in the overall mortality rate from lung cancer. PMID:6278787

  11. [Smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Postmus, P E

    1999-11-01

    Since fifty years it is clear now that smoking of tobacco products is responsible for the lung cancer epidemic that is currently in progress worldwide. Although in the Western world a small decrease of lung cancer in males is found, the number of female patients is steadily increasing. Changes in tobacco production have resulted in exposition of smokers to other carcinogens. This is probably the cause of the change in the histological pattern with an increase of adenocarcinoma and stabilisation of squamous cell lung cancer. Despite the bad prognosis there is some hope that with improvement of early detection methods more patients can be cured. However, for a real change it is necessary to discourage smoking by all means. PMID:11930407

  12. MIIP accelerates epidermal growth factor receptor protein turnover and attenuates proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Fu, Jianhua; Ling, Yihong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The migration and invasion inhibitory protein (MIIP) has been discovered recently to have inhibitory functions in cell proliferation and migration. Overexpression of MIIP reduced the intracellular steady-state level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein in lung cancer cells with no effect on EGFR mRNA expression compared to that in the control cells. This MIIP-promoted EGFR protein degradation was reversed by proteasome and lysosome inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of both proteasomal and lysosomal pathways in this degradation. This finding was further validated by pulse-chase experiments using 35S-methionine metabolic labeling. We found that MIIP accelerates EGFR protein turnover via proteasomal degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum and then via the lysosomal pathway after its entry into endocytic trafficking. MIIP-stimulated downregulation of EGFR inhibits downstream activation of Ras and blocks the MEK signal transduction pathway, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The negative correlation between MIIP and EGFR protein expression was validated in lung adenocarcinoma samples. Furthermore, the higher MIIP protein expression predicts a better overall survival of Stage IA-IIIA lung adenocarcinoma patients who underwent radical surgery. These findings reveal a new mechanism by which MIIP inhibits cell proliferation. PMID:26824318

  13. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  14. Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Akerley, Wallace; Bogner, Paul; Borghaei, Hossein; Chow, Laura QM; Downey, Robert J.; Gandhi, Leena; Ganti, Apar Kishor P.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Grecula, John C.; Hayman, James; Heist, Rebecca Suk; Horn, Leora; Jahan, Thierry; Koczywas, Marianna; Loo, Billy W.; Merritt, Robert E.; Moran, Cesar A.; Niell, Harvey B.; O’Malley, Janis; Patel, Jyoti D.; Ready, Neal; Rudin, Charles M.; Williams, Charles C.; Gregory, Kristina; Hughes, Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors account for approximately 20% of lung cancers; most (≈15%) are small cell lung cancer (SCLC). These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for SCLC focus on extensive-stage SCLC because it occurs more frequently than limited-stage disease. SCLC is highly sensitive to initial therapy; however, most patients eventually die of recurrent disease. In patients with extensive-stage disease, chemotherapy alone can palliate symptoms and prolong survival in most patients; however, long-term survival is rare. Most cases of SCLC are attributable to cigarette smoking; therefore, smoking cessation should be strongly promoted. PMID:23307984

  15. A stochastic Markov chain model to describe lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Newton, Paul K; Mason, Jeremy; Bethel, Kelly; Bazhenova, Lyudmila A; Nieva, Jorge; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A stochastic Markov chain model for metastatic progression is developed for primary lung cancer based on a network construction of metastatic sites with dynamics modeled as an ensemble of random walkers on the network. We calculate a transition matrix, with entries (transition probabilities) interpreted as random variables, and use it to construct a circular bi-directional network of primary and metastatic locations based on postmortem tissue analysis of 3827 autopsies on untreated patients documenting all primary tumor locations and metastatic sites from this population. The resulting 50 potential metastatic sites are connected by directed edges with distributed weightings, where the site connections and weightings are obtained by calculating the entries of an ensemble of transition matrices so that the steady-state distribution obtained from the long-time limit of the Markov chain dynamical system corresponds to the ensemble metastatic distribution obtained from the autopsy data set. We condition our search for a transition matrix on an initial distribution of metastatic tumors obtained from the data set. Through an iterative numerical search procedure, we adjust the entries of a sequence of approximations until a transition matrix with the correct steady-state is found (up to a numerical threshold). Since this constrained linear optimization problem is underdetermined, we characterize the statistical variance of the ensemble of transition matrices calculated using the means and variances of their singular value distributions as a diagnostic tool. We interpret the ensemble averaged transition probabilities as (approximately) normally distributed random variables. The model allows us to simulate and quantify disease progression pathways and timescales of progression from the lung position to other sites and we highlight several key findings based on the model. PMID:22558094

  16. [Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Akinobu; Kudoh, Syoji

    2003-02-01

    It is widely known that patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are frequently associated with lung cancer. Although a complication with lung cancer is an important prognostic factor for IPF, standard treatments for lung cancer cannot be given because of IPF. Especially, the administration of many anticancer agents is limited by a complication with IPF, which is recognized as a risk factor for the development of fatal lung injury in cancer chemotherapy. Epidemiological studies reveal that cigarette smoking and occupational and environmental exposure to toxic substances are common risk factors for both IPF and lung cancer. It has been assumed that metaplasia in fibrous lesions is pathologically a precancerous lesion, but it is necessary to prove several genetic abnormalities in the process of carcinogenesis in order to clarify that. Currently, several genetic abnormalities in IPF, including in p53, K-ras, FHIT and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 type II receptor, have been reported. PMID:12610869

  17. Stromal platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) provides a therapeutic target independent of tumor cell PDGFRα expression in lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, David E.; Gupta, Puja; Dellinger, Michael T.; Toombs, Jason E.; Peyton, Michael; Duignan, Inga; Malaby, Jennifer; Bailey, Timothy; Burns, Colleen; Brekken, Rolf A.; Loizos, Nick

    2012-01-01

    In lung cancer, platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) is expressed frequently by tumor-associated stromal cells and by cancer cells in a subset of tumors. We sought to determine the effect of targeting stromal PDGFRα in preclinical lung tumor xenograft models (human tumor, mouse stroma). Effects of anti-human (IMC-3G3) and anti-mouse (1E10) PDGFRα mAbs on proliferation and PDGFRα signaling were evaluated in lung cancer cell lines and mouse fibroblasts. Therapy studies were performed using established PDGFRα-positive H1703 cells and PDGFRα-negative Calu-6, H1993, and A549 subcutaneous tumors in immunocompromised mice treated with vehicle, anti-PDGFRα mAbs, chemotherapy, or combination therapy. Tumors were analyzed for growth and levels of growth factors. IMC-3G3 inhibited PDGFRα activation and the growth of H1703 cells in vitro and tumor growth in vivo, but had no effect on PDGFRα-negative cell lines or mouse fibroblasts. 1E10 inhibited growth and PDGFRα activation of mouse fibroblasts, but had no effect on human cancer cell lines in vitro. In vivo, 1E10-targeted inhibition of murine PDGFRα reduced tumor growth as single-agent therapy in Calu-6 cells and enhanced the effect of chemotherapy in xenografts derived from A549 cells. We also identified that low expression cancer cell expression of VEGF-A and elevated expression of PDGF-AA were associated with response to stromal PDGFRα targeting. We conclude that stromal PDGFRα inhibition represents a means for enhancing control of lung cancer growth in some cases, independent of tumor cell PDGFRα expression. PMID:22933705

  18. DNA methylation transcriptionally regulates the putative tumor cell growth suppressor ZNF677 in non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Gerwin; Altenberger, Corinna; Schmid, Bianca; Marhold, Maximilian; Tomasich, Erwin; Ziegler, Barbara; Müllauer, Leonhard; Minichsdorfer, Christoph; Lang, György; End-Pfützenreuter, Adelheid; Döme, Balazs; Arns, Britt-Madeleine; Fong, Kwun M.; Wright, Casey M.; Yang, Ian A.; Klepetko, Walter; Zielinski, Christoph C.; Zöchbauer-Müller, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    In our study, we investigated the role of ZNF677 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). By comparing ZNF677 expression in primary tumor (TU) and in the majority of cases also of corresponding non-malignant lung tissue (NL) samples from > 1,000 NSCLC patients, we found tumor-specific downregulation of ZNF677 expression (adjusted p-values < 0.001). We identified methylation as main mechanism for ZNF677 downregulation in NSCLC cells and we observed tumor-specific ZNF677 methylation in NSCLC patients (p < 0.0001). In the majority of TUs, ZNF677 methylation was associated with loss of ZNF677 expression. Moreover, ZNF677 overexpression in NSCLC cells was associated with reduced cell proliferation and cell migration. ZNF677 was identified to regulate expression of many genes mainly involved in growth hormone regulation and interferon signalling. Finally, patients with ZNF677 methylated TUs had a shorter overall survival compared to patients with ZNF677 not methylated TUs (p = 0.013). Overall, our results demonstrate that ZNF677 is trancriptionally regulated by methylation in NSCLCs, suggest that ZNF677 has tumor cell growth suppressing properties in NSCLCs and that ZNF677 methylation might serve as prognostic parameter in these patients. PMID:25504438

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor C complements the ability of positron emission tomography to predict nodal disease in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Madtes, David K.; Wood, Douglas E.; Flum, David R.; Zadworny, Megan E.; Waworuntu, Rachel; Hwang, Billanna; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) C and D are biologically rational markers of nodal disease that could improve the accuracy of lung cancer staging. We hypothesized that these biomarkers would improve the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A cross-sectional study (2010–2013) was performed of patients prospectively enrolled in a lung nodule biorepository, staged by computed tomography (CT) and PET, and who underwent pathologic nodal evaluation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure biomarker levels in plasma from blood drawn before anesthesia. Likelihood ratio testing was used to compare the following logistic regression prediction models: ModelPET, ModelPET/VEGF-C, ModelPET/VEGF-D, and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D. To account for 5 planned pairwise comparisons, P values<.01 were considered significant. Results Among 62 patients (median age, 67 years; 48% men; 87% white; and 84% NSCLC), 58% had fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in hilar and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed lymph node metastases was 40%. Comparisons of prediction models revealed the following: ModelPET/VEGF-C versus ModelPET (P = .0069), ModelPET/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .1886), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .0146), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-C (P = .2818), and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-D (P = .0095). In ModelPET/VEGF-C, higher VEGF-C levels were associated with an increased risk of nodal disease (odds ratio, 2.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.26–6.90). Conclusions Plasma levels of VEGF-C complemented the ability of PET to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed NSCLC. VEGF-D did not improve prediction. PMID:26320776

  20. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients. PMID:26483336

  1. Nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this review is to report the Clinical Year in Review proceedings in the field of nonsmall cell lung cancer that were presented at the 2012 European Respiratory Society Congress in Vienna, Austria. Various topics were reviewed, including epidemiology, screening, diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and palliative and end of life care. PMID:23457162

  2. Surfactant protein D suppresses lung cancer progression by downregulation of epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Takahashi, M; Ariki, S; Asakawa, D; Tajiri, M; Wada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Nishitani, C; Takamiya, R; Saito, A; Uehara, Y; Hashimoto, J; Kurimura, Y; Takahashi, H; Kuroki, Y

    2015-02-12

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a member of the collectin family that has an important role in maintaining pulmonary homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrated that SP-D inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that SP-D suppressed epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in A549 cells, H441 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and human EGF receptor (EGFR) stable expression CHO-K1 cells. A binding study using (125)I-EGF demonstrated that SP-D downregulated the binding of EGF to EGFR. A ligand blot indicated that SP-D bound to EGFR, and a lectin blot suggested that EGFR in A549 cells had both high-mannose type and complex type N-glycans. We purified the recombinant extracellular domain of EGFR (soluble EGFR=soluble EGFR (sEGFR)), and demonstrated that SP-D directly bound to sEGFR in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The binding of SP-D to sEGFR was suppressed by EDTA, mannose or N-glycopeptidase F treatment. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that N-glycans in domain III of EGFR were of a high-mannose type. These data suggest that SP-D reduces EGF binding to EGFR through the interaction between the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D and N-glycans of EGFR, and downregulates EGF signaling. Our finding suggests the novel type of regulation system of EGF signaling involving lectin-to-carbohydrate interaction and downregulation of ligand binding. PMID:24608429

  3. Update in Lung Cancer 2014.

    PubMed

    Spira, Avrum; Halmos, Balazs; Powell, Charles A

    2015-08-01

    In the past 2 years, lung cancer research and clinical care have advanced significantly. Advancements in the field have improved outcomes and promise to lead to further reductions in deaths from lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. These advances include identification of new molecular targets for personalized targeted therapy, validation of molecular signatures of lung cancer risk in smokers, progress in lung tumor immunotherapy, and implementation of population-based lung cancer screening with chest computed tomography in the United States. In this review, we highlight recent research in these areas and challenges for the future. PMID:26230235

  4. Therapeutic inhibition of TRF1 impairs the growth of p53-deficient K-RasG12V-induced lung cancer by induction of telomeric DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    García-Beccaria, María; Martínez, Paula; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Martínez, Sonia; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Cañamero, Marta; Mulero, Francisca; Ambrogio, Chiara; Flores, Juana M; Megias, Diego; Barbacid, Mariano; Pastor, Joaquín; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are considered anti-cancer targets, as telomere maintenance above a minimum length is necessary for cancer growth. Telomerase abrogation in cancer-prone mouse models, however, only decreased tumor growth after several mouse generations when telomeres reach a critically short length, and this effect was lost upon p53 mutation. Here, we address whether induction of telomere uncapping by inhibition of the TRF1 shelterin protein can effectively block cancer growth independently of telomere length. We show that genetic Trf1 ablation impairs the growth of p53-null K-RasG12V-induced lung carcinomas and increases mouse survival independently of telomere length. This is accompanied by induction of telomeric DNA damage, apoptosis, decreased proliferation, and G2 arrest. Long-term whole-body Trf1 deletion in adult mice did not impact on mouse survival and viability, although some mice showed a moderately decreased cellularity in bone marrow and blood. Importantly, inhibition of TRF1 binding to telomeres by small molecules blocks the growth of already established lung carcinomas without affecting mouse survival or tissue function. Thus, induction of acute telomere uncapping emerges as a potential new therapeutic target for lung cancer. PMID:25971796

  5. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase Knockdown Inhibits Growth of Lung Cancer Cells Through G0/G1 Phase Arrest.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhifeng; Xiong, Liwen; Zhou, Jianhua; Wang, Jin; Li, Zhao; Hu, Haiyang; Lin, Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer as an aggressive type tumor is rapidly growing and has become the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. γ-Glutamylcyclotransferase (GGCT) has been shown as a diagnostic marker in various cancers. To reveal whether there is a correlation between GGCT and lung cancer, GGCT expression in human lung cancer cell lines was first determined by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot. GGCT is expressed in all tested lung cancer cell lines, A549, H1299, and H460. Then, a lentivirus-based system was applied to knock down GGCT in A549 cells, which were thus divided into Lv-shGGCT, Lv-shCon, and Con (noninfected) groups. Methylthiazol tetrazolium assay showed that the cell proliferation was decreased by over 50% in the Lv-shGGCT group compared with controls. The size and number of colonies were dramatically reduced in the GGCT knockdown group, as measured by colony formation assay. Moreover, A549 cells infected with Lv-shGGCT were arrested in the G0/G1 phase as assayed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin D1 were decreased and the cleaved level of PARP was increased in GGCT knockdown cells. In conclusion, GGCT plays a critical role in lung cancer cell proliferation and may be a potential cancer therapeutic target. PMID:25941902

  6. Japonicone A inhibits the growth of non-small cell lung cancer cells via mitochondria-mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Du, Yan; Gong, Jiannan; Tian, Xinrui; Yan, Xiaomei; Guo, Tao; Huang, Min; Zhang, Bingtai; Hu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yinping; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Maolan

    2015-09-01

    Japonicone A, which is a natural product isolated from the aerial part of Inula japonica Thunb., has a wide range of clinical applications, including anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation. This study investigated the effects of japonicone A on the growth of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. The results showed that japonicone A significantly inhibited the growth of NSCLC cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This product also blocked cell cycle progression at S phase and induced mitochondrial-related apoptosis by upregulating Bax, cleaved caspase-9, cleaved caspase-3, and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein levels and by downregulating Bcl-2, cyclin D1, CDC25A, and CDK2 protein levels. In vivo, japonicone A suppressed tumor growth via the same mechanism as that observed in vitro. In conclusion, our study is the first to report that japonicone A has an inhibitory effect on the growth of NSCLC cells, indicating that japonicone A administration is a potential therapeutic approach for future NSCLC treatments. PMID:25908173

  7. Interleukin-17 potently increases non-small cell lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lei; Wang, Hui; Yang, Fen; Ding, Qi; Zhao, Jianhua

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of interleukin (IL)-17 on the growth and metastasis of tumors that were subcutaneously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells were subcutaneously injected into C57BL/6 mice followed by intraperitoneal injection of mouse recombinant IL-17 protein (IL-17 groups) or phosphate‑buffered saline (control groups). Tumor growth and metastasis were assessed by measuring the size and weight of tumors and cervical lymph nodes, respectively. Cytokine expression in tumor masses was quantified by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, respectively. CCR2‑positive macrophage infiltration in tumor masses was detected by flow cytometric analysis. The proliferation and migration of LLC cells, stimulated by the IL-17 protein were detected by Cell Counting kit (CCK)‑8 and wound scratch assays in vitro. Tumors were grafted into the C57BL/6 mice. The mice that were intraperitoneally injected with IL-17 exhibited significantly larger tumors compared with the control mice. After day 7 of injection and beyond, the weight of cervical lymph nodes in IL-17 groups was higher than that in the control mice. It was also demonstrated that the number of CCR2-positive macrophages that infiltrated the tumor masses in the IL-17 groups was higher than that of the control mice. CD34 expression in vascular endothelial cells was also higher in tumors grafted in IL-17 mice than those grafted in control mice. Furthermore, the tumor tissue mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and tumor necrosis factor-α were greater in mice from the IL-17 group than the control mice, while levels of migration inhibitory factor and thrombospondin‑1 were lower in mice from the IL-17 group than in the control. IL-17 also increased the migration of LLC cells in vitro. In conclusion, IL-17 exhibited the ability to promote

  8. World conference on lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Felip, Enriqueta; Rosell, Rafael

    2003-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer death. Improving this dismal outcome requires cooperation among several specialists. The 10th World Conference on Lung Cancer was held in Vancouver, Canada last month. The meeting was organised on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) and the British Columbia Cancer Agency. This Conference was chaired by Nevin Murray and the scientific sessions took place 10 - 14 August, with > 3000 participating lung cancer experts. The Vancouver programme included > 140 invited speakers throughout the 'meet the professor', plenary and interactive sessions, as well as 300 oral and 500 poster presentations. PMID:14640956

  9. Lung cancer susceptibility among atomic bomb survivors in relation to CA repeat number polymorphism of epidermal growth factor receptor gene and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kengo; Nakachi, Kei; Imai, Kazue; Cologne, John B; Niwa, Yasuharu; Kusunoki, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Prevention could be improved by identifying susceptible individuals as well as improving understanding of interactions between genes and etiological environmental agents, including radiation exposure. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-signaling pathway, regulating cellular radiation sensitivity, is an oncogenic cascade involved in lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma. The cytosine adenine (CA) repeat number polymorphism in the first intron of EGFR has been shown to be inversely correlated with EGFR production. It is hypothesized that CA repeat number may modulate individual susceptibility to lung cancer. Thus, we carried out a case-cohort study within the Japanese atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivor cohort to evaluate a possible association of CA repeat polymorphism with lung cancer risk in radiation-exposed or negligibly exposed (<5 mGy) A-bomb survivors. First, by dividing study subjects into Short and Long genotypes, defined as the summed CA repeat number of two alleles < or = 37 and > or = 38, respectively, we found that the Short genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, among negligibly exposed subjects. Next, we found that prior radiation exposure significantly enhanced lung cancer risk of survivors with the Long genotype, whereas the risk for the Short genotype did not show any significant increase with radiation dose, resulting in indistinguishable risks between these genotypes at a high radiation dose. Our findings imply that the EGFR pathway plays a crucial role in assessing individual susceptibility to lung adenocarcinoma in relation to radiation exposure. PMID:19843645

  10. Immune checkpoint blockade in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Aswin; Socinski, Mark A; Villaruz, Liza C

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the therapeutic landscape of advanced lung cancer. The adaptive immune system has developed a sophisticated method of tumor growth control, but T-cell activation is regulated by various checkpoints. Blockade of the immune checkpoints with therapies targeting the PD-1 pathway, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has been validated as a therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer. Newer therapies and novel combinations are also being evaluated, and the use of biomarkers in conjunction with these drugs is an area of active investigation. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of the above approaches in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27585231

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  12. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  13. The relationship of quantitative epidermal growth factor receptor expression in non-small cell lung cancer to long term survival.

    PubMed Central

    Veale, D.; Kerr, N.; Gibson, G. J.; Kelly, P. J.; Harris, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) has been reported in non small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) when compared to normal lung. We have examined post-operative survival in 19 surgically treated patients with NSCLC who had full characterisation of EGFr on primary tumour membrane preparations from resection specimens. There were ten squamous, seven adeno and two large cell carcinomas. The median concentration of high affinity sites was 31 fmol per mg of protein (4-1532) and the median dissociation constant (Kd) of these high affinity sites was 2.3 x 10(-10) per mol (1.2-30 x 10(-10)). Seven patients survived over 5 years. Twelve patients died between 8.5 and 55 months from the time of surgery. When > 5 year survivors were compared to non-survivors there was no difference as regards tumour size or stage, or as regards age or sex. The survivors had a median concentration of high affinity EGFr sites of 16.1 fmol mg-1 protein compared to a median concentration of 68.6 fmol mg-1 protein in the non-survivors (P = 0.01 Wilcoxon test). No long term survivor had > 35 fmol mg-1 protein of receptor. Thus EGFr quantitation may give independent prognostic information in NSCLC and help to select patients for adjuvant therapy after surgery. These results need confirmation in a larger prospective study. PMID:8391303

  14. The HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 potently inhibits non-small cell lung cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Garon, Edward B.; Finn, Richard S.; Hamidi, Habib; Dering, Judy; Pitts, Sharon; Kamranpour, Naeimeh; Desai, Amrita J.; Hosmer, Wylie; Ide, Susan; Avsar, Emin; Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Quadt, Cornelia; Liu, Manway; Dubinett, Steven M.; Slamon, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is involved in protein folding and functions as a chaperone for numerous client proteins, many of which are important in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pathogenesis. We sought to define preclinical effects of the HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY922 and identify predictors of response. We assessed in vitro effects of NVP-AUY922 on proliferation and protein expression in NSCLC cell lines. We evaluated gene expression changes induced by NVP-AUY922 exposure. Xenograft models were evaluated for tumor control and biological effects. NVP-AUY922 potently inhibited in vitro growth in all 41 NSCLC cell lines evaluated with IC50 < 100 nM. IC100 (complete inhibition of proliferation) < 40 nM was seen in 36 of 41 lines. Consistent gene expression changes after NVP-AUY922 exposure involved a wide range of cellular functions, including consistently decreased dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) after exposure. NVP-AUY922 slowed growth of A549 (KRAS mutant) xenografts, and achieved tumor stability and decreased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression in H1975 xenografts, a model harboring a sensitizing and a resistance mutation for EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the EGFR gene. This data will help inform the evaluation of correlative data from a recently completed phase II NSCLC trial and a planned phase IB trial of NVP-AUY922 in combination with pemetrexed in NSCLC. PMID:23493311

  15. Randomized clinical trial of adenosine 5'-triphosphate on tumor growth and survival in advanced lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Agteresch, Hendrik J; Burgers, Sjaak A; van der Gaast, Ate; Wilson, J H Paul; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2003-09-01

    We recently reported that regular infusions of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) inhibited loss of body weight and quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present paper we investigated whether ATP affects tumor growth and survival in the same group of patients. Fifty-eight NSCLC patients (stage IIIB or IV) were randomly assigned to receive either 10 i.v. 30-h ATP infusions every 2-4 weeks over a 24-week period (n = 28) or no ATP (control patients, n = 30). ATP was given for a median of 6.5 infusions. Differences in time to progression and survival between patients in both groups were tested by means of the log-rank test and Cox regression analysis. Forty-nine patients were evaluable for tumor response. None of the evaluable patients showed a complete or partial response. Median time to progression was 3.9 months [95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.3-5.5] in the ATP group compared to 3.0 months (95% CI = 2.4-3.7) in the control group (p = 0.71). Median survival was 5.6 months (95% CI = 1.1-10.1) for the ATP group and 4.7 months (95% CI = 2.6-6.8) for the control group (p = 0.68). ATP treatment was associated with a significant increase in survival in the subgroup of weight-losing patients with stage IIIB NSCLC: in this subgroup, median survival was 9.3 months (95% CI = 2.1-16.5) for ATP-treated patients versus 3.5 months (95% CI = 2.3-4.7) for control patients (between-group difference: p = 0.009). No significant effect of ATP was observed for weight-losing patients with stage IV NSCLC or for weight-stable NSCLC patients. Although ATP as a single therapy does not lead to tumor regression or increased survival in patients with advanced lung cancer, it may prolong survival in weight-losing patients with stage IIIB lung cancer. The latter finding is intriguing, but requires confirmation in larger clinical trials. PMID:14501386

  16. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel Alberto; Wakelee, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is predominantly associated with cigarette smoking; however, a substantial minority of patients with the disease have never smoked. In the US it is estimated there are 17,000-26,000 annual deaths from lung cancer in never smokers, which as a separate entity would be the seventh leading cause of cancer mortality. Controversy surrounds the question of whether or not the incidence of lung cancer in never-smokers is increasing, with more data to support this observation in Asia. There are several factors associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in never smokers including second hand smoke, indoor air pollution, occupational exposures, and genetic susceptibility among others. Adenocarcinoma is the most common histology of lung cancer in never smokers and in comparison to lung cancer in smokers appears less complex with a higher likelihood to have targetable driver mutations. PMID:26667338

  17. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth by concomitant treatment of human lung cancer cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and arsenic trioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chia-Wen; Yao, Ju-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Yu; Lee, Pei-Chih; Lee, Te-Chang

    2011-11-15

    The efficacy of arsenic trioxide (ATO) against acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and relapsed APL has been well documented. ATO may cause DNA damage by generating reactive oxygen intermediates. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, modulates gene and protein expression via histone-dependent or -independent pathways that may result in chromatin decondensation, cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATO and SAHA act synergistically to enhance the death of cancer cells. Our current findings showed that combined treatment with ATO and SAHA resulted in enhanced suppression of non-small-cell lung carcinoma in vitro in H1299 cells and in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. Flow cytometric analysis of annexin V+ cells showed that apoptotic cell death was significantly enhanced after combined treatment with ATO and SAHA. At the doses used, ATO did not interfere with cell cycle progression, but SAHA induced p21 expression and led to G1 arrest. A Comet assay demonstrated that ATO, but not SAHA, induced DNA strand breaks in H1299 cells; however, co-treatment with SAHA significantly increased ATO-induced DNA damage. Moreover, SAHA enhanced acetylation of histone H3 and sensitized genomic DNA to DNase I digestion. Our results suggest that SAHA may cause chromatin relaxation and increase cellular susceptibility to ATO-induced DNA damage. Combined administration of SAHA and ATO may be an effective approach to the treatment of lung cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO and SAHA are therapeutic agents with different action modes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of ATO and SAHA synergistically inhibits tumor cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SAHA loosens chromatin structure resulting in increased sensitivity to DNase I. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATO-induced DNA damage and apoptosis are enhanced by co-treatment with SAHA.

  18. Inhibition of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Zhao, Ying-Nan; Yu, Chang-Hai; Zhao, Yun-Long; Liu, Yang

    2016-07-15

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1 receptor) is expressed in many cancer cell types as compared to normal counterparts underscoring its potential role in tumor behavior. The aim of present study was to test the role of mGlu1 receptor in experimental non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). First, protein expression of mGlu1 receptor was higher in human NSCLC cell lines, including both adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma subtypes, when compared to normal bronchial epithelial cells. Inhibition of mGlu1 receptor by BAY36-7620 (an mGlu1 receptor-specific inhibitor) inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice with tumors of A549 or H1299. Treatment with BAY36-7620 suppressed AKT phosphorylation in A549 tumors and pre-treatment with BAY36-7620 blocked the L-quisqualate (a potent mGlu1 receptor agonist)-induced AKT phosphorylation in A549 cells. Treatment with BAY36-7620 reduced cellular proliferation of A549 cells. Treatment with BAY36-7620 enhanced cleaved PARP levels and reduced protein expression of bcl-2, HIF-1α, and VEGF. In contrast, treatment with L-quisqualate reduced cleaved PARP levels and enhanced protein expression of bcl-2, HIF-1α, VEGF, and IL-8, which was reversed by co-incubation with MK2206 (an AKT inhibitor). Pre-treatment with BAY36-7620 blocked the VEGF-induced AKT phosphorylation in HUVECs. Treatment of HUVECs with L-quisqualate resulted in enhancement of capillary tube formation, which was reversed by co-incubation with MK2206. Furthermore, mGlu1 receptor knockdown suppressed tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice with tumors of A549 or H1299. Collectively, inhibition of mGlu1 receptor suppressed tumor growth and angiogenesis in experimental NSCLC. PMID:27132814

  19. The Evolving Role of Maintenance Therapy Using Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) in the Management of Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao H.; Powers, Benjamin C.

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the development of many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) are a class of novel biologically-targeted agents widely used in the management of recurrent non-small cell lung cancer. Erlotinib, one of the EGFR TKIs, is currently FDA approved in second and third line therapy. However, recent studies showed that erlotinib is also effective as maintenance therapy after initial chemotherapy, improving disease free survival and possibly overall survival. Our current understanding of erlotinib’s mechanism of action, with the discovery that EGFR mutation confers higher response rate, has propelled this agent into the first line setting. Advances in molecular testing and clinical research of this agent and other agents in this class will eventually change the way we utilize EGFR TKIs in the near future. PMID:22550402

  20. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, O S

    2000-05-01

    Screening for lung cancer serves to prevent deaths from this disease insofar as earlier resections are associated with higher rates of cure. There is good reason to believe that this is the case: in stage I, the 5-year survival rate with resection is 70%, whereas without resection the corresponding rate is only 10%. Before this evidence emerged, various authoritative organizations and agencies in North America advised against screening for lung cancer on the grounds of the results of several RCTs. As for CXR, I argue that the study results are consistent with up to 40% reduction in the fatality rate. Moreover, modern helical CT screening provides for detecting much smaller tumors than were detected in those studies. It is time to revoke the conclusion that screening for lung cancer does not serve to prevent deaths from this disease, and to quantify the usefulness of CT screening in particular. As for the requisite research, the prevailing orthodoxy has it that RCTs are to be used, but I argue that more meaningful results are obtainable, more rapidly and much less expensively, by the use of noncomparative (and hence unrandomized) studies. PMID:10855255

  1. Tankyrase Inhibitor Sensitizes Lung Cancer Cells to Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Inhibition via Stabilizing Angiomotins and Inhibiting YAP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Lu, Bo; Castillo, Johnny; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Zinger; McAllister, Gregory; Lindeman, Alicia; Reece-Hoyes, John; Tallarico, John; Russ, Carsten; Hoffman, Greg; Xu, Wenqing; Schirle, Markus; Cong, Feng

    2016-07-15

    YAP signaling pathway plays critical roles in tissue homeostasis, and aberrant activation of YAP signaling has been implicated in cancers. To identify tractable targets of YAP pathway, we have performed a pathway-based pooled CRISPR screen and identified tankyrase and its associated E3 ligase RNF146 as positive regulators of YAP signaling. Genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of tankyrase prominently suppresses YAP activity and YAP target gene expression. Using a proteomic approach, we have identified angiomotin family proteins, which are known negative regulators of YAP signaling, as novel tankyrase substrates. Inhibition of tankyrase or depletion of RNF146 stabilizes angiomotins. Angiomotins physically interact with tankyrase through a highly conserved motif at their N terminus, and mutation of this motif leads to their stabilization. Tankyrase inhibitor-induced stabilization of angiomotins reduces YAP nuclear translocation and decreases downstream YAP signaling. We have further shown that knock-out of YAP sensitizes non-small cell lung cancer to EGFR inhibitor Erlotinib. Tankyrase inhibitor, but not porcupine inhibitor, which blocks Wnt secretion, enhances growth inhibitory activity of Erlotinib. This activity is mediated by YAP inhibition and not Wnt/β-catenin inhibition. Our data suggest that tankyrase inhibition could serve as a novel strategy to suppress YAP signaling for combinatorial targeted therapy. PMID:27231341

  2. Activation of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Edward S; Liu, Diane; Lee, J Jack; Behrens, Carmen; Lippman, Scott M; Hong, Waun Ki; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Lee, Euni; Lee, Ho-Young

    2015-06-30

    According to previous reports demonstrating the implication of insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) signaling in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in this study, the potential prognostic values of IGF-1R expression/activation were analyzed. The expression and activation of IGF-1R were evaluated in two tissue microarray (TMA) sets from NSCLC patients (N = 352 for TMA I, and N = 353 for TMA II). Alterations in IGF-1R protein or mRNA expression in NSCLC patients were evaluated using publicly available data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We found that membranous and cytoplasmic IGF-1R expressions were significantly associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in both of the TMAs. Analysis of the TCGA data revealed increased mRNA levels in NSCLC patients, which was significantly associated with reductions in overall survival (OS) (median survival 26.51 vs. 47.77 months, P = 0.017) and disease-free survival (median survival 17.44 vs. 37.65 months, P = 0.045) only in NSCLC patients with adenocarcinoma (ADC). These data suggest that IGF-1R is activated in patients with NSCLC, particularly those with SCC. IGF-1R mRNA expression is a potential prognostic factor in patients with NSCLC, especially those with ADC. Further studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of IGF-1R in NSCLC patients. PMID:25944691

  3. Oncoprotein ZNF322A transcriptionally deregulates alpha-adducin, cyclin D1 and p53 to promote tumor growth and metastasis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jen, J; Lin, L-L; Chen, H-T; Liao, S-Y; Lo, F-Y; Tang, Y-A; Su, W-C; Salgia, R; Hsu, C-L; Huang, H-C; Juan, H-F; Wang, Y-C

    2016-01-01

    ZNF322A encoding a classical Cys2His2 zinc finger transcription factor was previously revealed as a potential oncogene in lung cancer patients. However, the oncogenic role of ZNF322A and its underlying mechanism in lung tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here we show ZNF322A protein overexpression in 123 Asian and 74 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that ZNF322A was an independent risk factor for a poor outcome in lung cancer, corroborating the Kaplan–Meier results that patients with ZNF322A protein overexpression had significantly poorer overall survival than other patients. Overexpression of ZNF322A promoted cell proliferation and soft agar growth by prolonging cell cycle in S phase in multiple lung cell lines, including the immortalized lung cell BEAS-2B. In addition, ZNF322A overexpression enhanced cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of ZNF322A reduced cell growth, invasion and metastasis abilities in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed potential ZNF322A-regulated downstream targets, including alpha-adducin (ADD1), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and p53. Using luciferase promoter activity assay combined with site-directed mutagenesis and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assay, we found that ZNF322A could form a complex with c-Jun and cooperatively activate ADD1 and CCND1 but repress p53 gene transcription by recruiting differential chromatin modifiers, such as histone deacetylase 3, in an AP-1 element dependent manner. Reconstitution experiments indicated that CCND1 and p53 were important to ZNF322A-mediated promotion of cell proliferation, whereas ADD1 was necessary for ZNF322A-mediated cell migration and invasion. Our results provide compelling evidence that ZNF322A overexpression transcriptionally dysregulates genes involved in cell growth and motility therefore contributes to lung tumorigenesis and poor prognosis. PMID:26279304

  4. Oncoprotein ZNF322A transcriptionally deregulates alpha-adducin, cyclin D1 and p53 to promote tumor growth and metastasis in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jen, J; Lin, L-L; Chen, H-T; Liao, S-Y; Lo, F-Y; Tang, Y-A; Su, W-C; Salgia, R; Hsu, C-L; Huang, H-C; Juan, H-F; Wang, Y-C

    2016-05-01

    ZNF322A encoding a classical Cys2His2 zinc finger transcription factor was previously revealed as a potential oncogene in lung cancer patients. However, the oncogenic role of ZNF322A and its underlying mechanism in lung tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here we show ZNF322A protein overexpression in 123 Asian and 74 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that ZNF322A was an independent risk factor for a poor outcome in lung cancer, corroborating the Kaplan-Meier results that patients with ZNF322A protein overexpression had significantly poorer overall survival than other patients. Overexpression of ZNF322A promoted cell proliferation and soft agar growth by prolonging cell cycle in S phase in multiple lung cell lines, including the immortalized lung cell BEAS-2B. In addition, ZNF322A overexpression enhanced cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of ZNF322A reduced cell growth, invasion and metastasis abilities in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed potential ZNF322A-regulated downstream targets, including alpha-adducin (ADD1), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and p53. Using luciferase promoter activity assay combined with site-directed mutagenesis and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assay, we found that ZNF322A could form a complex with c-Jun and cooperatively activate ADD1 and CCND1 but repress p53 gene transcription by recruiting differential chromatin modifiers, such as histone deacetylase 3, in an AP-1 element dependent manner. Reconstitution experiments indicated that CCND1 and p53 were important to ZNF322A-mediated promotion of cell proliferation, whereas ADD1 was necessary for ZNF322A-mediated cell migration and invasion. Our results provide compelling evidence that ZNF322A overexpression transcriptionally dysregulates genes involved in cell growth and motility therefore contributes to lung tumorigenesis and poor prognosis. PMID:26279304

  5. Blocking M2 muscarinic receptor signaling inhibits tumor growth and reverses epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qingnan; Gu, Xiajing; Zhang, Chun; Lu, Qin; Chen, Hongzhuan; Xu, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancers express non-neuronal, cholinergic autoparacrine loop, which facilitates tumor growth. Interruption of M3 muscarinic cholinergic signaling has been reported to inhibit small cell lung cancer (SCLC) growth. The purpose of this study is to investigate if blocking autoparacrine muscarinic cholinergic signaling could inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that PC9 and A549 cells expressed all 5 subtypes of muscarinic receptor (mAChR) and blocking M2 mAChR (M2R) signaling using selective antagonist methoctramine or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibited tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Consistent with AChR agonists stimulating p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) and Akt phosphorylation, blocking M2R signaling decreased MAPK and Akt phosphorylation, indicating that non-neuronal ACh functions as an autoparacrine growth factor signaling in part through activation of M2R and downstream MAPK and Akt pathways. Importantly, further studies revealed that blocking M2R signaling also reversed epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in vitro and in vivo, indicating that non-neuronal ACh promotes EMT partially through activation of M2R. These findings demonstrate that M2R plays a role in the growth and progression of NSCLC and suggest M2R antagonists may be an efficacious adjuvant therapy for NSCLC. PMID:25778781

  6. NBM-T-BBX-OS01, Semisynthesized from Osthole, Induced G1 Growth Arrest through HDAC6 Inhibition in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Pai, Jih-Tung; Hsu, Chia-Yun; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Yu, Sheng-Yung; Huang, Chung-Yang; Chen, Chia-Nan; Liao, Chiung-Ho; Weng, Meng-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Disrupting lung tumor growth via histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibition is a strategy for cancer therapy or prevention. Targeting HDAC6 may disturb the maturation of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) mediated cell cycle regulation. In this study, we demonstrated the effects of semisynthesized NBM-T-BBX-OS01 (TBBX) from osthole on HDAC6-mediated growth arrest in lung cancer cells. The results exhibited that the anti-proliferative activity of TBBX in numerous lung cancer cells was more potent than suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a clinically approved pan-HDAC inhibitor, and the growth inhibitory effect has been mediated through G1 growth arrest. Furthermore, the protein levels of cyclin D1, CDK2 and CDK4 were reduced while cyclin E and CDK inhibitor, p21Waf1/Cip1, were up-regulated in TBBX-treated H1299 cells. The results also displayed that TBBX inhibited HDAC6 activity via down-regulation HDAC6 protein expression. TBBX induced Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and led to the disruption of cyclin D1/Hsp90 and CDK4/Hsp90 association following the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 proteins through proteasome. Ectopic expression of HDAC6 rescued TBBX-induced G1 arrest in H1299 cells. Conclusively, the data suggested that TBBX induced G1 growth arrest may mediate HDAC6-caused Hsp90 hyper-acetylation and consequently increased the degradation of cyclin D1 and CDK4. PMID:25946558

  7. Fibroblast growth factor signaling and inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer and their role in squamous cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salgia, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    With the introduction of targeted agents primarily applicable to non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) of adenocarcinoma histology, there is a heightened unmet need in the squamous cell carcinoma population. Targeting the angiogenic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling pathway is among the strategies being explored in squamous NSCLC; these efforts are supported by growth-promoting effects of FGF signaling in preclinical studies (including interactions with other pathways) and observations suggesting that FGF/FGFR-related aberrations may be more common in squamous versus adenocarcinoma and other histologies. A number of different anti-FGF/FGFR approaches have shown promise in preclinical studies. Clinical trials of two multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors are restricting enrollment to patients with squamous NSCLC: a phase I/II trial of nintedanib added to first-line gemcitabine/cisplatin and a phase II trial of ponatinib for previously treated advanced disease, with the latter requiring not only squamous disease but also a confirmed FGFR kinase amplification or mutation. There are several ongoing clinical trials of multitargeted agents in general NSCLC populations, including but not limited to patients with squamous disease. Other FGF/FGFR-targeted agents are in earlier clinical development. While results are awaited from these clinical investigations in squamous NSCLC and other disease settings, additional research is needed to elucidate the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in the biology of NSCLC of different histologies. PMID:24711160

  8. Neferine, an alkaloid from lotus seed embryo, inhibits human lung cancer cell growth by MAPK activation and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Poornima, Paramasivan; Weng, Ching Feng; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya

    2014-01-01

    Neferine is the major bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the seed embryo of a traditional medicinal plant Nelumbo nucifera (Lotus). Epidemiological studies have revealed the therapeutic potential of lotus seed embryo. Although several mechanisms have been proposed, a clear anticancer action mechanism of neferine on lung cancer cells is still not known. Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in the world, and the patients with advanced stage of nonsmall lung cancer require adjunct chemotherapy after surgical resection for the eradication of cancer cells. In this study, the effects of neferine were evaluated and characterized in A549 cells. Neferine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner with the hypergeneration of reactive oxygen species, activation of MAPKs, lipid peroxidation, depletion of cellular antioxidant pool, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular calcium accumulation. Furthermore, neferine treatment leads to the inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB and Bcl2, upregulation of Bax and Bad, release of cytochrome C, activation of caspase cascade, and DNA fragmentation. In addition, neferine could induce p53 and its effector protein p21 and downregulation of cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 thereby inducing G1 cell cycle arrest. These results suggest a novel function of neferine as an apoptosis inducer in lung cancer cells. PMID:23983146

  9. Combining onartuzumab with erlotinib inhibits growth of non-small cell lung cancer with activating EGFR mutations and HGF overexpression.

    PubMed

    Sano, Yuji; Hashimoto, Eri; Nakatani, Noriaki; Abe, Masaichi; Satoh, Yasuko; Sakata, Kiyoaki; Fujii, Toshihiko; Fujimoto-Ouchi, Kaori; Sugimoto, Masamichi; Nagahashi, Shigehisa; Aoki, Masahiro; Motegi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Eiichi; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2015-02-01

    Erlotinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-TKI), benefits survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who harbor activating EGFR mutations. However, elevated expression of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a ligand of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase, causes erlotinib resistance. Because onartuzumab, a monovalent antibody to MET, blocks HGF-induced MET activation, the addition of onartuzumab to erlotinib may improve therapeutic efficacy. We engineered the human NSCLC cell line PC-9 (MET-positive cells harboring an exon 19 deletion of EGFR) to overexpress hHGF and evaluated the effects of an onartuzumab and erlotinib combination in vitro and in vivo in xenograft models. A stable clone of PC-9/hHGF was less sensitive to erlotinib than the parental PC-9, and the addition of onartuzumab to erlotinib suppressed the proliferation of these cells in vitro. In PC-9/hHGF xenograft tumors, onartuzumab or erlotinib alone minimally inhibited tumor growth; however, combining onartuzumab and erlotinib markedly suppressed tumor growth. The total MET protein level was decreased in PC-9/hHGF cells, because MET is constitutively phosphorylated by autocrine HGF, leading to its ubiquitination and degradation. Onartuzumab reduced phospho-MET levels, inhibited MET ubiquitination, and consequently restored MET protein levels. Moreover, in NSCLC clinical specimens harboring activating EGFR mutations, more than 30% of patients expressed high levels of HGF. Our findings raised the possibility that patients with NSCLC with EGFR mutations who express high levels of HGF may benefit from onartuzumab and erlotinib combination therapy, and that HGF can be a novel biomarker for selecting such patients. PMID:25522765

  10. Mucins in lung cancer: diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Imayavaramban; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P; Macha, Muzafar A; Haridas, Dhanya; Majhi, Prabin Dhangada; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Batra, Surinder K; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of mucins is associated with cancer development and metastasis. An overexpression of few mucins contributes to oncogenesis by enhancing cancer cell growth and providing constitutive survival signals. This review focuses on the importance of mucins both in the normal bronchial epithelial cells and the malignant tumors of the lung and their contribution in the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer patients. During lung cancer progression, mucins either alone or through their interaction with many receptor tyrosine kinases mediate cell signals for growth and survival of cancer cells. Also, stage-specific expression of certain mucins, like MUC1, is associated with poor prognosis from lung cancer. Thus, mucins are emerging as attractive targets for developing novel therapeutic approaches for lung cancer. Several strategies targeting mucin expression and function are currently being investigated to control lung cancer progression. PMID:25319180

  11. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder. PMID:22736441

  12. Sporoderm-Broken Spores of Ganoderma lucidum Inhibit the Growth of Lung Cancer: Involvement of the Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yali; Lv, Jing; Li, Kun; Xu, Jing; Li, Mingyan; Zhang, Wen; Pang, Xiufeng

    2016-10-01

    The sporoderm-broken spores of Ganoderma lucidum (SBGS) and their extracts exhibited a wide range of biological activities. In the present study, we prepare ethanol/ethanol extract (E/E-SBGS) and ethanol/aqueous extract (E/A-SBGS) from SBGS and examine their antitumor activities against human lung cancer. Our results showed that E/E-SBGS, not E/A-SBGS, inhibited the survival and migration of lung cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. E/E-SBGS arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase and triggered apoptosis by decreasing the expression and activity of cell cycle regulators, cyclin B1 and cdc2, as well as anti-apoptotic proteins, Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl. Consequently, colony formation of lung cancer cells was markedly blocked by E/E-SBGS at subtoxic concentrations. Oral administration of both E/E-SBGS and SBGS significantly suppressed tumor volume and tumor weight without gross toxicity in mice. Mechanism study showed that E/E-SBGS dose-dependently suppressed the activation of Akt, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and their downstream molecules S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in treated tumor cells. Taken together, these results indicate that the ethanol extract of sporoderm-broken spores of G. lucidum suppresses the growth of human lung cancer, at least in part, through inhibition of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, suggesting its potential role in cancer treatments. PMID:27618151

  13. Dexamethasone suppresses the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer via inducing estrogen sulfotransferase and inactivating estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-jie; Li, Jian; Hao, Fang-ran; Yuan, Yin; Li, Jing-yun; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Tian-yan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Dexamethasone (DEX) is a widely used synthetic glucocorticoid, which has shown anti-cancer efficacy and anti-estrogenic activity. In this study we explored the possibility that DEX might be used as an endocrine therapeutic agent to treat human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The viability and proliferation of human NSCLC cell lines A549 and H1299 were assessed in vitro. Anti-tumor action was also evaluated in A549 xenograft nude mice treated with DEX (2 or 4 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) or the positive control tamoxifen (50 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 32 d. The expression of estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) in tumor cells and tissues was examined. The intratumoral estrogen levels and uterine estrogen responses were measured. Results: DEX displayed mild cytotoxicity to the NSCLC cells (IC50 >500 μmol/L) compared to tamoxifen (IC50 <50 μmol/L), but it was able to inhibit the cell proliferation at low micromolar ranges. Furthermore, DEX (0.1–10 μmol/L) dose-dependently up-regulated EST expression in the cells, and inhibited the cell migration in vitro. Triclosan, a sulfation inhibitor, was able to diminish DEX-caused inhibition on the cell viability. In A549 xenograft nude mice, DEX or tamoxifen administration remarkably suppressed the tumor growth. Moreover, DEX administration dose-dependently increased EST expression in tumor tissues, and reduced intratumoral estrogen levels as well as the volumes and weights of uterine. Conclusion: DEX suppresses the growth of A549 xenograft tumors via inducing EST and decreasing estradiol levels in tumor tissues, suggesting that DEX may be used as anti-estrogenic agent for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27133297

  14. MiR-92b regulates the cell growth, cisplatin chemosensitivity of A549 non small cell lung cancer cell line and target PTEN.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Li; Guan, Yan; Liu, Xiuju; Meng, Qingyong; Guo, Qisen

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged to play important roles in tumorigenesis and drug resistance of human cancer. Fewer studies were explored the roles of miR-92b on human lung cancer cell growth and resistance to cisplatin (CDDP). In this paper, we utilized real-time PCR to verify miR-92b was significantly up-regulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues compared to matched adjacent normal tissues. In vitro assay demonstrated that knock-down of miR-92b inhabits cell growth and sensitized the A549/CDDP cells to CDDP. Furthermore, we found miR-92b could directly target PTEN, a unique tumor suppressor gene, which was downregulated in lung cancer tissues compared to the matched adjacent normal tissues. These data indicate that the miR-92b play an oncogene roles by regulates cell growth, cisplatin chemosensitivity phenotype, and could serve as a novel potential maker for NSCLC therapy. PMID:24099768

  15. MKP1/CL100 controls tumor growth and sensitivity to cisplatin in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S; Machado-Pinilla, R; Manguan-García, C; Belda-Iniesta, C; Moratilla, C; Cejas, P; Fresno-Vara, J A; de Castro-Carpeño, J; Casado, E; Nistal, M; Gonzalez-Barón, M; Perona, R

    2006-06-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents the most frequent and therapy-refractive sub-class of lung cancer. Improving apoptosis induction in NSCLC represents a logical way forward in treating this tumor. Cisplatin, a commonly used therapeutic agent in NSCLC, induces activation of N-terminal-c-Jun kinase (JNK) that, in turn, mediates induction of apoptosis. In analysing surgical tissue samples of NSCLC, we found that expression of MKP1/CL100, a negative regulator of JNK, showed a strong nuclear staining for tumor cells, whereas, in normal bronchial epithelia, MKP1 was localized in the cytoplasm as well as in nuclei. In the NSCLC-derived cell lines H-460 and H-23, we found that MKP1 was constitutively expressed. Expressing a small-interfering RNA (siRNA) vector for MKP1 in H-460 cells resulted in a more efficient activation by cisplatin of JNK and p38 than in the parental cells, and this correlated with a 10-fold increase in sensitivity to cisplatin. A similar response was also observed in H-460 and H-23 cells when treated with the MKP1 expression inhibitor RO-31-8220. Moreover, expression of a siRNA-MKP2, an MKP1-related phosphatase, had no effect on H-460 cell viability response to cisplatin. Tumors induced by H-460 cells expressing MKP1 siRNA grew slower in nu(-)/nu(-) mice and showed more susceptibility to cisplatin than parental cells, and resulted in an impaired growth of the tumor in mice. On the other hand, overexpression of MKP1 in the H-1299 NSCLC-derived cell line resulted in further resistance to cisplatin. Overall, the results showed that inhibition of MKP1 expression contributes to a slow down in cell growth in mice and an increase of cisplatin-induced cell death in NSCLC. As such, MKP1 can be an attractive target in sensitizing cells to cisplatin to increase the effectiveness of the drug in treating NSCLC. PMID:16462770

  16. Controversies in Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Gill, Ritu R; Jaklitsch, Michael T; Jacobson, Francine L

    2016-02-01

    There remains an extensive debate over lung cancer screening, with lobbying for and against screening for very compelling reasons. The National Lung Screening Trial, International Early Lung Cancer Program, and other major screening studies favor screening with low-dose CT scans and have shown a reduction in lung cancer-specific mortality. The increasing incidence of lung cancer and the dismal survival rate for advanced disease despite improved multimodality therapy have sparked an interest in the implementation of national lung cancer screening. Concerns over imaging workflow, radiation dose, management of small nodules, overdiagnosis bias, lead-time and length-time bias, emerging new technologies, and cost-effectiveness continue to be debated. The authors address each of these issues as they relate to radiologic practice. PMID:26846531

  17. Targeting Lung Cancer Stem Cells with Antipsychological Drug Thioridazine

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Haiying; Huang, Dongning; Qin, Li; Zheng, Zhiyong; Hua, Li; Wang, Guodong; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells critical for lung cancer progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Thioridazine, a classical neurological drug, has been reported with anticancer ability. However, whether thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells has never been studied. In our current work, we used different dosage of thioridazine to test its effect on lung cancer stem cells sphere formation. The response of lung cancer stem cells to chemotherapy drug with thioridazine treatment was measured. The cell cycle distribution of lung cancer stem cells after thioridazine treatment was detected. The in vivo inhibitory effect of thioridazine was also measured. We found that thioridazine could dramatically inhibit sphere formation of lung cancer stem cells. It sensitized the LCSCs to chemotherapeutic drugs 5-FU and cisplatin. Thioridazine altered the cell cycle distribution of LCSCs and decreased the proportion of G0 phase cells in lung cancer stem cells. Thioridazine inhibited lung cancer stem cells initiated tumors growth in vivo. This study showed that thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. It provides a potential drug for lung cancer therapy through targeting lung cancer stem cells. PMID:27556038

  18. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Targeted delivery of let-7a microRNA encapsulated ephrin-A1 conjugated liposomal nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Kaye, Fredric; Sharma, Parvesh; Moudgil, Brij M; Clapp, William L; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small noncoding RNA sequences that negatively regulate the expression of target genes by posttranscriptional repression. miRs are dysregulated in various diseases, including cancer. let-7a miR, an antioncogenic miR, is downregulated in lung cancers. Our earlier studies demonstrated that let-7a miR inhibits tumor growth in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) and could be a potential therapeutic against lung cancer. EphA2 (ephrin type-A receptor 2) tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in most cancer cells, including MPM and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Ephrin-A1, a specific ligand of the EphA2 receptor, inhibits cell proliferation and migration. In this study, to enhance the delivery of miR, the miRs were encapsulated in the DOTAP (N-[1-(2.3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium)/Cholesterol/DSPE (1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[cyanur(polyethylene glycol)-2000])-PEG (polyethylene glycol)-cyanur liposomal nanoparticles (LNP) and ephrin-A1 was conjugated on the surface of LNP to target receptor EphA2 on lung cancer cells. The LNP with an average diameter of 100 nm showed high stability, low cytotoxicity, and high loading efficiency of precursor let-7a miR and ephrin-A1. The ephrin-A1 conjugated LNP (ephrin-A1–LNP) and let-7a miR encapsulated LNP (miR–LNP) showed improved transfection efficiency against MPM and NSCLC. The effectiveness of targeted delivery of let-7a miR encapsulated ephrin-A1 conjugated LNP (miR–ephrin-A1–LNP) was determined on MPM and NSCLC tumor growth in vitro. miR–ephrin-A1–LNP significantly increased the delivery of let-7a miR in lung cancer cells when compared with free let-7a miR. In addition, the expression of target gene Ras was significantly repressed following miR–ephrin-A1–LNP treatment. Furthermore, the miR–ephrin-A1–LNP complex significantly inhibited MPM and NSCLC proliferation, migration, and tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that the engineered mi

  20. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  1. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  2. Translation initiation factor eIF3b expression in human cancer and its role in tumor growth and lung colonization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Ru, Yuanbin; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Wang, Xuejiao; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Theodorescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Discovery transcriptomic analyses suggest eukaryotic initiation factor 3b (eIF3b) is elevated in human bladder and prostate cancer, yet its role as a prognostic factor or its requirement in the maintenance or progression of human cancer is not established. Here we determine the therapeutic potential of eIF3b by examining the clinical relevance of its expression in human cancer tissues and its role in experimental tumor models. Experimental Design We examined mRNA expression of eIF3b in bladder (N=317) and prostate (N=566) tissue samples and protein expression by immunohistochemistry in 143 bladder tumor samples as a function of clinicopathologic features. The impact of eIF3b depletion by siRNA in human cancer lines was evaluated in regards to in vitro cell growth, cell cycle, migration, in vivo subcutaneous tumor growth and lung colonization. Results eIF3b mRNA expression correlated to tumor grade, stage and survival in human bladder and prostate cancer. eIF3b protein expression stratified survival in human bladder cancer. eIF3b depletion reduced in vitro cancer cell growth; inhibited G1/S cell cycle transition by changing protein but not RNA expression of Cyclin A, E, Rb and p27Kip1; inhibited migration and disrupted actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions. These changes were associated with decreased protein expression of integrin α5. Integrin α5 depletion phenocopied effects observed with eIF3b. eIF3b depleted bladder cancer cells formed fewer subcutaneous tumors that grew more slowly and had reduced lung colonization. Conclusion eIF3b expression relates to human bladder and prostate cancer prognosis, is required for tumor growth and thus a candidate therapeutic target. PMID:23575475

  3. Lower gefitinib dose led to earlier resistance acquisition before emergence of T790M mutation in epidermal growth factor receptor-mutated lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Hiromi; Ichihara, Eiki; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yasugi, Masayuki; Takata, Saburo; Sakai, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Kunio; Takigawa, Nagio; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2013-11-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancers with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs); however, unlike cytotoxic agents, it is generally accepted that minimal doses of drugs inhibiting target molecules are sufficient when molecular-targeted agents, including EGFR-TKIs, are used. Thus, any utility of higher doses remains unclear. We compared low-dose (15 mg/kg) gefitinib therapy with high-dose (50 mg/kg) therapy using an EGFR-mutated lung cancer xenograft model. Both gefitinib doses induced tumor shrinkage, but tumors regrew in the low-dose group within 1 month, whereas tumors in the high-dose group did not. Neither the T790M mutation nor MET amplification was apparent in regrown tumors. We also compared outcomes after two doses of gefitinib (5 and 25 mg/kg) in a transgenic EGFR-mutated lung cancer mouse model. In line with the results obtained using the xenograft model, both gefitinib doses completely inhibited tumor growth, but tumors treated with the lower dose of gefitinib developed earlier drug resistance. In conclusion, a low gefitinib dose caused tumors to become drug-resistant prior to acquisition of the T790M mutation or MET amplification in EGFR-mutated models of lung cancer. This suggests that it is important to optimize the EGFR-TKI dose for treatment of EGFR mutation-associated lung cancer. Gefitinib may need to be given at a dose greater than the minimum required for inhibition of target molecules. PMID:24033722

  4. Betulinic acid decreases specificity protein 1 (Sp1) level via increasing the sumoylation of sp1 to inhibit lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Wang, Mei-Chun; Chen, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shih-Ting; Yeh, Yu-Min; Su, Wu-Chou; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the inhibitory effect of betulinic acid (BA) on specificity protein 1 (Sp1) expression is involved in the prevention of cancer progression, but the mechanism of this effect remains to be delineated. In this study, we determined that BA treatment in HeLa cells increased the sumoylation of Sp1 by inhibiting sentrin-specific protease 1 expression. The subsequent recruitment of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RING finger protein 4 resulted in ubiquitin-mediated degradation in a 26S-proteosome-dependent pathway. In addition, both BA treatment and mithramycin A (MMA) treatment inhibited lung tumor growth and down-regulated Sp1 protein expression in Kras(G12D)-induced lung cancers of bitransgenic mice. In gene expression profiles of Kras(G12D)-induced lung cancers in bitransgenic mice with and without Sp1 inhibition, 542 genes were affected by MMA treatment. One of the gene products, cyclin A2, which was involved in the S and G(2)/M phase transition during cell cycle progression, was investigated in detail because its expression was regulated by Sp1. The down-regulation of cyclin A2 by BA treatment resulted in decreased retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and cell cycle G(2)/M arrest. The BA-mediated cellular Sp1 degradation and antitumor effect were also confirmed in a xenograft mouse model by using H1299 cells. The knockdown of Sp1 in lung cancer cells attenuated the tumor-suppressive effect of BA. Taken together, the results of this study clarify the mechanism of BA-mediated Sp1 degradation and identify a pivotal role for Sp1 in the BA-induced repression of lung cancer growth. PMID:22956772

  5. A novel muscarinic antagonist R2HBJJ inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cell growth and arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nan; Wei, Xiaoli; Liu, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaoyun; He, Xinhua; Zhuo, Rengong; Zhao, Zhe; Wang, Liyun; Yan, Haitao; Zhong, Bohua; Zheng, Jianquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancers express the cholinergic autocrine loop, which facilitates the progression of cancer cells. The antagonists of mAChRs have been demonstrated to depress the growth of small cell lung cancers (SCLCs). In this study we intended to investigate the growth inhibitory effect of R2HBJJ, a novel muscarinic antagonist, on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and the possible mechanisms. The competitive binding assay revealed that R2HBJJ had a high affinity to M3 and M1 AChRs. R2HBJJ presented a strong anticholinergic activity on carbachol-induced contraction of guinea-pig trachea. R2HBJJ markedly suppressed the growth of NSCLC cells, such as H1299, H460 and H157. In H1299 cells, both R2HBJJ and its leading compound R2-PHC displayed significant anti-proliferative activity as M3 receptor antagonist darifenacin. Exogenous replenish of ACh could attenuate R2HBJJ-induced growth inhibition. Silencing M3 receptor or ChAT by specific-siRNAs resulted in a growth inhibition of 55.5% and 37.9% on H1299 cells 96 h post transfection, respectively. Further studies revealed that treatment with R2HBJJ arrested the cell cycle in G0/G1 by down-regulation of cyclin D1-CDK4/6-Rb. Therefore, the current study reveals that NSCLC cells express an autocrine and paracrine cholinergic system which stimulates the growth of NSCLC cells. R2HBJJ, as a novel mAChRs antagonist, can block the local cholinergic loop by antagonizing predominantly M3 receptors and inhibit NSCLC cell growth, which suggest that M3 receptor antagonist might be a potential chemotherapeutic regimen for NSCLC. PMID:23285263

  6. Screening for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Stiles, Brendon M; Pua, Bradley; Altorki, Nasser K

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is a global health burden and is among the most common and deadliest of all malignancies worldwide. The goal of screening programs is to detect tumors in earlier, curable stages, consequently reducing disease-specific mortality. The issue of screening has great relevance to thoracic surgeons, who should play a leading role in the debate over screening and its consequences. The burden is on thoracic surgeons to work in a multidisciplinary setting to guide and treat these patients safely and responsibly, ensuring low morbidity and mortality of potential diagnostic or therapeutic interventions. PMID:27261909

  7. Epidermal growth factor receptor and K-Ras in non-small cell lung cancer-molecular pathways involved and targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ramon Andrade; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Medeiros, Rui; Araújo, António MF

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently the leading cause of cancer death in Western nations. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents 80% of all lung cancers, and adenocarcinoma is the predominant histological type. Despite the intensive research carried out on this field and therapeutic advances, the overall prognosis of these patients remains unsatisfactory, with a 5-year overall survival rate of less than 15%. Nowadays, pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics represent the key to successful treatment. Recent studies suggest the existence of two distinct molecular pathways in the carcinogenesis of lung adenocarcinoma: one associated with smoking and activation of the K-Ras oncogene and the other not associated with smoking and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The K-ras mutation is mainly responsible for primary resistance to new molecules which inhibit tyrosine kinase EGFR (erlotinib and gefitinib) and most of the EGFR mutations are responsible for increased tumor sensitivity to these drugs. This article aims to conduct a systematic review of the literature regarding the molecular pathways involving the EGFR, K-Ras and EGFR targeted therapies in NSCLC tumor behavior. PMID:22087435

  8. CCL21/CCR7 up-regulate vascular endothelial growth factor-D expression via ERK pathway in human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Limei; Zhang, Qingfu; Li, Yang; Tang, Na; Qiu, Xueshan

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangiogenesis has received considerable attention and become a new research hotspot of tumor metastasis. Recently, C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is known to promote metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells into lymph nodes. In this study, we investigated the relationship between CCL21/CCR7 and the lymphangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-D in human lung cancer cells and its impact on patients’ prognosis. We found that CCL21/CCR7 increase the expression of VEGF-D in NSCLC Cell Lines through induced ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation. In addition, our study found that the expression levels of CCR7 and CCL21 were correlated with VEGF-D, lymphatic vessels density (LVD), clinical stages, lymph node metastasis, and patient Survival in 90 human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. Taken together, our results provide evidence that CCL21/CCR7 induce VEGF-D up-regulation and promote lymphangiogenesis via ERK/Akt pathway in lung cancer. PMID:26884842

  9. The next generation of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Conor E; Khuri, Fadlo R; Ramalingam, Suresh S

    2015-04-15

    The discovery of "driver" genomic alterations in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has dramatically changed the field of thoracic oncology in recent years. The best understood of these molecular drivers are those involving the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which when aberrantly activated are integral to the development of a subset of NSCLC tumors. First-generation and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) specific to the activated EGFR have shown significant efficacy and have brought about the era of targeted therapy for NSCLC. The most common resistance mechanism is a threonine-to-methionine substitution (T790M) in exon 20 of the EGFR gene. Although the previous standard of care in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC that progressed on initial TKI therapy was chemotherapy, third-generation EGFR TKIs have now been developed and have yielded promising results for this population of patients with NSCLC. This article reviews the emerging data regarding third-generation agents in the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:25521095

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Status in the Treatment of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae Ho; Srimuninnimit, Vichien; Cheng, Rebecca; Wang, Xin; Orlando, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Advances in oncology research have led to identification of tumor-specific biomarkers, some of which are important predictive indicators and ideal targets for novel therapeutics. One such biomarker in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Patients with NSCLC who harbor an activating EGFR mutation show a more favorable response to treatment with an EGFR inhibitor, such as gefitinib, erlotinib, or afatinib, than to chemotherapy. The prevalence of EGFR mutations in East Asian patients is higher than that in other populations, and in some clinical settings, patients have been treated with EGFR inhibitors based on clinicopathologic characteristics with no information on EGFR status. However, based on results from a series of studies in which East Asian patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC were treated with EGFR inhibitors alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy, this may not be the best practice because EGFR mutation status was found to be a key predictor of outcome. Data from these studies highlight the necessity of EGFR testing in determining the most suitable treatment for patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC. PMID:25943319

  11. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  12. UK partnership targets lung cancer.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Cancer Research UK has joined with two major pharmaceutical companies to launch a large multiarm clinical trial, dubbed the National Lung Matrix trial, to test the effectiveness of promising experimental therapies in treating rare forms of advanced lung cancer. PMID:25002593

  13. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  14. ML-18 is a non-peptide bombesin receptor subtype-3 antagonist which inhibits lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Mantey, Samuel A; Moreno, Paola; Nakamura, Taichi; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-02-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype (BRS)-3 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) for the bombesin (BB)-family of peptides. BRS-3 is an orphan GPCR and little is known of its physiological role due to the lack of specific agonists and antagonists. PD168368 is a nonpeptide antagonist for the neuromedin B (NMB) receptor (R) whereas PD176252 is a nonpeptide antagonist for the gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) R and NMBR but not BRS-3. Here nonpeptide analogs of PD176252 e.g. the S-enantiomer ML-18, and the R-enantiomer, EMY-98, were investigated as BRS-3 antagonists using lung cancer cells. ML-18 and EMY-98 inhibited specific (125)I-BA1 (DTyr-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-βAla-His-Phe-Nle-NH2)BB(6-14) binding to NCI-H1299 lung cancer cells stably transfected with BRS-3 with IC50 values of 4.8 and >100μM, respectively. In contrast, ML-18 bound with lower affinity to the GRPR and NMBR with IC50 values of 16 and >100μM, respectively. ML-18 (16μM), but not its enantiomer EMY-98, inhibited the ability of 10nM BA1 to elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) in a reversible manner using lung cancer cells loaded with FURA2-AM. ML-18 (16μM), but not EMY-98, inhibited the ability of 100nM BA1 to cause tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR and ERK in lung cancer cells. ML-18 but not EMY-98 inhibited the proliferation of lung cancer cells. The results indicate that ML-18 is a nonpeptide BRS-3 antagonist that should serve as a template to improve potency and selectivity. PMID:25554218

  15. [Grading of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Bohle, R M; Schnabel, P A

    2016-07-01

    In comparison with other tumor entities there is no common generally accepted grading system for lung cancer with clearly defined criteria and clinical relevance. In the recent fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification from 2015 of tumors of the lungs, pleura, thymus and heart, there is no generally applicable grading for pulmonary adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas or rarer forms of carcinoma. Since the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of adenocarcinomas published in 2011, 5 different subtypes with significantly different prognosis are proposed. This results in an architectural (histologic) grading, which is usually applied to resection specimens. For squamous cell carcinoma the number of different histological subtypes in the new WHO classification was reduced compared to earlier versions but without a common grading system. In recent publications nesting and budding were proposed as the main (histologic) criteria for a grading of squamous cell carcinomas. The grading of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lungs in comparison with NET in other organs is presented in a separate article in this issue. Certain rare tumor types are high grade per definition: small cell, large cell and pleomorphic carcinomas, carcinosarcomas and pulmonary blastomas. In the future it is to be expected that these developments will be further refined, e. g. by adding further subtypes for adenocarcinomas and cytologic and/or nuclear criteria for adenocarcinoma and/or squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27356985

  16. [The epidemiology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in males and the fifth most frequent cancer in females. In developed countries only breast cancer is diagnosed more often in women. Worldwide, lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in males and females. In the Europe lung cancer accounts for 21% of all cancer cases in males and 29% of all cancer deaths. The rapid increase in lung cancer incidence was observed the since beginning of the XX century till 1990-1994. The incidence in males decreased recently, but still increases in females, especially in young women. The changes in frequency of various histological subtypes of lung cancer are observed too. Despite many clinical trials, modern diagnostic techniques and improved supportive care, the prognosis remains unfavourable and long-term survival almost did not change. In Poland the incidence of lung cancer in 2002 was 81.9/100 000 in males and 22.2/100 000 in females. In both genders 1-year and 5-year survivals time are one of the shortest in Europe. PMID:17541915

  17. MET inhibition in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giaj Levra, Matteo; Novello, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Targeted agents have completely changed cancer treatment strategy, leading it from a “one size fits all” approach to a customized therapy. In this scenario Met, a heterodimere receptor tyrosine kinase deeply involved into embryogenesis and organogenesis, has been introduced many years ago as a potential target for biological agents, becoming “druggable” only in this last period of time. Met can be altered through receptor overexpression, genomic amplification, mutations or alternative splicing, autocrine or paracrine secretion of hepatic growth factor (HGF): these dysregulations stimulate tumorigenesis (in terms of cell-cell detachment, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and survival) and metastatization. Met is overexpressed in lung cancer and Met gene amplification can drive the dependency of cell survival and proliferation upon the Met signaling. Both Met overexpression and amplification seem to correlate with poor prognosis. Met amplification is also described to be linked to EGFR acquired resistance. Several Met inhibitors have been tested both in preclinical and human trials, demonstrating activity in lung cancer treatment. This paper aims to summarize data on Met biological function, on its interaction with cell signaling and other pathways and to present data on those Met inhibitors currently under evaluation. PMID:25806202

  18. Bronchoscopy of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Emslander, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cancer site in men and women with a high incidence and mortality rate. Most patients are diagnosed when the disease has already spread. An early, detection and immediate and accurate histological or cytological diagnosis are essential for a hopeful outcome. In most patients, bronchoscopy is the method of choice in establishing a suspected lung neoplasm. With the rigid and flexible method, two complementary techniques are available. The methods bear a very low mortality rate if sufficient monitoring and resuscitative instrumentation is available. Rigid bronchoscopy offers the possibility of obtaining large biopsy specimens from the tumorous tissue and provides an effective tool in the control of major haemorrhage. However, it cannot be used for the inspection of further peripherally located parts of the bronchial system and needs general anaesthesia. In contrast, the flexible method can be quickly and readily performed at practically any location using portable equipment. Bronchi can be inspected up to the 8th order and with bronchial washing, forceps biopsy, brush biopsy and fluorescence bronchoscopy techniques with a high diagnostic yield are available. This holds true, especially if these sampling techniques are used as complementary methods. PMID:18493335

  19. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  20. Effects of autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Huang, Lu; Yang, Yunmei; Xu, Liqian; Yang, Ji; Wu, Yue

    2013-04-01

    It is reported that the autocrine loop of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is crucial for the survival and proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. In this study we aimed to systematically investigate the role of autocrine vascular VEGF in NSCLC cell line A549 through inhibition of endogenous VEGF. A549 cells were transfected with florescence-labeled VEGF oligodeoxynucleotide with lipofectamine. For the experimental group, cells were transfected with VEGF anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN), sense oligodeoxynucleotide (SODN) and mutant oligodeoxynuleotide (MODN) respectively. For the control group cells were mock transfected with lipofectamine or culture medium. At indicated time point after transfection, the expression levels of VEGF mRNA and protein in A549 cells were analyzed by RT-PCR and ELISA respectively. Cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution was detected by flow cytometry. As revealed by RT-PCR assay, the mRNA level of VEGF in cells transfected with ASDON was significantly lower than the other four groups (P < 0.05) at 24 and 48 h after transfection. ELISA assay yielded similar result with significantly decreased level of VEGF protein expression (P < 0.05). The survival fraction of A549 cells transfected with ASDON was significantly lower than the other four groups (P < 0.05) at 24 h after transfection. Also the percentage of G2 phase cells of ASODN group was significantly lower than other four groups. Our data indicate that VEGF expression is efficiently inhibited in A549 cells by ASODN transfection and this inhibition leads to inhibited cell growth and impaired cell cycle distribution. PMID:23459872

  1. Antiestrogen fulvestrant enhances the antiproliferative effects of epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garon, Edward B.; Pietras, Richard J.; Finn, Richard S.; Kamranpour, Naeimeh; Pitts, Sharon; Márquez-Garbán, Diana C.; Desai, Amrita J.; Dering, Judy; Hosmer, Wylie; von Euw, Erika M.; Dubinett, Steven M.; Slamon, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor (ER) signaling and its interaction with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a potential therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To explore cross-communication between ER and EGFR, we have correlated ER pathway gene and protein expression profiles and examined effects of antiestrogens with or without EGFR inhibitors in preclinical models of human NSCLC. Methods We evaluated 54 NSCLC cell lines for growth inhibition with EGFR inhibitors, antiestrogen treatment or the combination. Each line was evaluated for baseline ER pathway protein expression. The majority were also evaluated for baseline ER pathway gene expression. Human NSCLC xenografts were evaluated for effects of inhibition of each pathway either individually or in combination. Results The specific antiestrogen fulvestrant has modest single agent activity in vitro, but in many lines fulvestrant adds to effects of EGFR inhibitors, including synergy in the EGFR mutant, erlotinib-resistant H1975 line. ERα, ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR)-A, PR-B and aromatase proteins are expressed in all lines to varying degrees, with trends towards lower aromatase in more sensitive cell lines. Sensitivity to fulvestrant correlates with greater baseline ERα gene expression. Tumor stability is achieved in human tumor xenografts with either fulvestrant or EGFR inhibitors, but tumors regress significantly when both pathways are inhibited. Conclusions These data provide a rationale for further investigation of the antitumor activity of combined therapy with antiestrogen and anti-EGFR agents in the clinic. Future work should also evaluate dual ER and EGFR inhibition in the setting of secondary resistance to EGFR inhibition. PMID:23399957

  2. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk ... day and for how long you have smoked. Being around the smoke ...

  3. Oncolytic vaccine virus harbouring the IL-24 gene suppresses the growth of lung cancer by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chunwei; Su, Qunshu; Liang, Yupei; Hu, Jinqing; Yuan, Sujing

    2016-07-15

    Lung cancer has an especially high incidence rate worldwide, and its resistance to cell death and chemotherapeutic drugs increases its intractability. The vaccinia virus has been shown to destroy neoplasm within a short time and disseminate rapidly and extensively as an enveloped virion throughout the circulatory system, and this virus has also demonstrated a strong ability to overexpress exogenous genes. Interleukin-24 (IL-24/mda-7) is an important cytokine that belongs to the activating caspase family and facilitates the inhibition of STAT3 when a cell enters the apoptosis pathway. In this study, we constructed a cancer-targeted vaccinia virus carrying the IL-24 gene knocked in the region of the viral thymidine kinase (TK) gene (VV-IL-24). Our results showed that VV-IL-24 efficiently infected and destroyed lung cancer cells via caspase-dependent apoptosis and decreased the expression of STAT3. In vivo, VV-IL-24 expressed IL-24 at a high level in the transplanted tumour, reduced STAT3 activity, and eventually led to apoptosis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that vv-IL-24 has the potential for use as a new human lung cancer treatment. PMID:27208781

  4. Lentiviral vector-mediated shRNA against AIMP2-DX2 suppresses lung cancer cell growth through blocking glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seung-Hee; Chung, Youn-Sun; Hwang, Soon-Kyung; Kwon, Jung-Taek; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Kim, Sunghoon; Park, Seung Bum; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2012-06-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases [ARS]-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2) has been implicated in the control of cell fate and lung cell differentiation. A variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2) is expressed in different cancer cells. We previously studied the expression level of AIMP2-DX2 in several lung cell lines and reported elevated expression levels of AIMP2-DX2 in NCI-H460 and NCI-H520. Here, we report that the suppression of AIMP2-DX2 by lentivirus mediated short hairpin (sh)RNA (sh-DX2) decreased the rate of glucose uptake and glucose transporters (Gluts) in NCI-H460 cells. Down-regulation of AIMP2-DX2 reduced glycosyltransferase (GnT)-V in the Golgi apparatus, while inducing the GnT-V antagonist GnT-III. Down-regulation of AIMP2-DX2 also suppressed the epidermal growth factor receptor/mitogen activated protein kinase (EGFR/MAPK) signaling pathway, leading to the decrease of the proliferation marker Ki-67 expression in nuclei. Furthermore, dual luciferase activity reduced capdependent protein translation in cells infected with sh-DX2. These results suggest that AIMP2-DX2 may be a relevant therapeutic target for lung cancer, and that the sh-DX2 lentiviral system can be an appropriate method for lung cancer therapy. PMID:22562359

  5. Growth and Metastases of Human Lung Cancer Are Inhibited in Mouse Xenografts by a Transition State Analogue of 5′-Methylthioadenosine Phosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Indranil; Locker, Joseph; Cassera, Maria B.; Belbin, Thomas J.; Merino, Emilio F.; Dong, Xinyuan; Hemeon, Ivan; Evans, Gary B.; Guha, Chandan; Schramm, Vern L.

    2011-01-01

    The S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) salvage enzyme 5′-methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) has been implicated as both a cancer target and a tumor suppressor. We tested these hypotheses in mouse xenografts of human lung cancers. AdoMet recycling from 5′-methylthioadenosine (MTA) was blocked by inhibition of MTAP with methylthio-DADMe-Immucillin-A (MTDIA), an orally available, nontoxic, picomolar transition state analogue. Blood, urine, and tumor levels of MTA increased in response to MTDIA treatment. MTDIA treatment inhibited A549 (human non-small cell lung carcinoma) and H358 (human bronchioloalveolar non-small cell lung carcinoma cells) xenograft tumor growth in immunodeficient Rag2−/−γC−/− and NCr-nu mice. Systemic MTA accumulation is implicated as the tumor-suppressive metabolite because MTDIA is effective for in vivo treatment of A549 MTAP−/− and H358 MTAP+/+ tumors. Tumors from treated mice showed increased MTA and decreased polyamines but little alteration in AdoMet, methionine, or adenine levels. Gene expression profiles of A549 tumors from treated and untreated mice revealed only modest alterations with 62 up-regulated and 63 down-regulated mRNAs (≥3-fold). MTDIA antitumor activity in xenografts supports MTAP as a target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:21135097

  6. LUNG CANCER IN NEVER SMOKERS: MOLECULAR PROFILES AND THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Charles M.; Avila-Tang, Erika; Harris, Curtis C.; Herman, James G.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Pao, William; Schwartz, Ann G.; Vahakangas, Kirsi H.; Samet, Jonathan M.

    2010-01-01

    The majority of lung cancers are caused by long term exposure to the several classes of carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. While a significant fraction of lung cancers in never smokers may also be attributable to tobacco, many such cancers arise in the absence of detectable tobacco exposure, and may follow a very different cellular and molecular pathway of malignant transformation. Recent studies summarized here suggest that lung cancers arising in never smokers have a distinct natural history, profile of oncogenic mutations, and response to targeted therapy. The majority of molecular analyses of lung cancer have focused on genetic profiling of pathways responsible for metabolism of primary tobacco carcinogens. Limited research has been conducted evaluating familial aggregation and genetic linkage of lung cancer, particularly among never smokers in whom such associations might be expected to be strongest. Data emerging over the past several years demonstrates that lung cancers in never smokers are much more likely to carry activating mutations of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR), a key oncogenic factor and direct therapeutic target of several newer anti-cancer drugs. EGFR mutant lung cancers may represent a distinct class of lung cancers, enriched in the never smoking population, and less clearly linked to direct tobacco carcinogenesis. These insights followed initial testing and demonstration of efficacy of EGFR-targeted drugs. Focused analysis of molecular carcinogenesis in lung cancers in never smokers is needed, and may provide additional biologic insight with therapeutic implications for lung cancers in both ever smokers and never smokers. PMID:19755392

  7. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  8. Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158689.html Lung Cancer Surgery Worthwhile for Older Patients Study found those ... 2016 THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Older lung cancer patients are surviving longer when they have lung ...

  9. HEDGEHOG-GLI signaling inhibition suppresses tumor growth in squamous lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lingling; Walter, Vonn; Hayes, D. Neil; Onaitis, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) currently lacks effective targeted therapies. Previous studies reported overexpression of HEDGEHOG (HH)-GLI signaling components in LSCC. However, they addressed neither the tumor heterogeneity nor the requirement for HH-GLI signaling. Here, we investigated the role of HH-GLI signaling in LSCC, and studied the therapeutic potential of HH-GLI suppression. Experimental Design Gene expression datasets of two independent LSCC patient cohorts were analyzed to study the activation of HH-GLI signaling. Four human LSCC cell lines were examined for HH-GLI signaling components. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed in these cells after blocking the HH-GLI pathway by lentiviral-shRNA knockdown or small molecule inhibitors. Xenografts in immunodeficient mice were used to determine the in vivo efficacy of GLI inhibitor GANT61. Results In both cohorts, activation of HH-GLI signaling was significantly associated with the classical subtype of LSCC. In cell lines, genetic knockdown of SMO produced minor effects on cell survival, while GLI2 knockdown significantly reduced proliferation and induced extensive apoptosis. Consistently, the SMO inhibitor GDC-0449 resulted in limited cytotoxicity in LSCC cells, whereas the GLI inhibitor GANT61 was very effective. Importantly, GANT61 demonstrated specific in vivo anti-tumor activity in xenograft models of GLI-positive cell lines. Conclusion Our studies demonstrate an important role for GLI2 in LSCC, and suggest GLI inhibition as a novel and potent strategy to treat a subset of LSCC patients. PMID:24423612

  10. Occupational exposure and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Li, Chen; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for male and the second most usual cancer for women after breast cancer. Currently there are available several non-specific cytotoxic agents and several targeted agents for lung cancer therapy. However; early stage diagnosis is still unavailable and several efforts are being made towards this direction. Novel biomarkers are being investigated along with new biopsy techniques. The occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogenic agents is an everyday phenomenon. Therefore until efficient early diagnosis is available, avoidance of exposure to carcinogenic agents is necessary. In the current mini-review occupational and environmental carcinogenic agents will be presented. PMID:24102018