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Sample records for lung gene expression

  1. Gene expression profiling analysis of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H.; Ma, J.; Wu, J.; Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Qu, C.; Zheng, D.; Xu, S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study screened potential genes related to lung adenocarcinoma, with the aim of further understanding disease pathogenesis. The GSE2514 dataset including 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 19 adjacent normal tissue samples from 10 patients with lung adenocarcinoma aged 45-73 years was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two groups were screened using the t-test. Potential gene functions were predicted using functional and pathway enrichment analysis, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks obtained from the STRING database were constructed with Cytoscape. Module analysis of PPI networks was performed through MCODE in Cytoscape. In total, 535 upregulated and 465 downregulated DEGs were identified. These included ATP5D, UQCRC2, UQCR11 and genes encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which are mainly associated with mitochondrial ATP synthesis coupled electron transport, and which were enriched in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. Other DEGs were associated with DNA replication (PRIM1, MCM3, and RNASEH2A), cell surface receptor-linked signal transduction and the enzyme-linked receptor protein signaling pathway (MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1), and regulation of the cytoskeleton and phosphatidylinositol signaling system (PIP5K1B, PIP5K1C, and PIP4K2B). Our findings suggest that DEGs encoding subunits of NADH, PRIM1, MCM3, MAPK1, STAT3, RAF1, and JAK1 might be associated with the development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26840709

  2. Identification of differentially expressed genes between lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chaojing; Chen, Hezhong; Shan, Zhengxiang; Yang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between lung adenocarcinoma and normal lung tissues, and between lung squamous cell carcinoma and normal lung tissues, with the purpose of identifying potential biomarkers for the treatment of lung cancer. The gene expression profile (GSE6044) was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included data from 10 lung adenocarcinoma samples, 10 lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, and five matched normal lung tissue samples. After data processing, DEGs were identified using the Student's t-test adjusted via the Benjamini-Hochberg method. Subsequently, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery, and a global network was constructed. A total of 95 upregulated and 241 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung adenocarcinoma samples, and 204 upregulated and 285 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, as compared with the normal lung tissue samples. The DEGs in the lung squamous cell carcinoma group were enriched in the following three pathways: Hsa04110, Cell cycle; hsa03030, DNA replication; and hsa03430, mismatch repair. However, the DEGs in the lung adenocarcinoma group were not significantly enriched in any specific pathway. Subsequently, a global network of lung cancer was constructed, which consisted of 341 genes and 1,569 edges, of which the top five genes were HSP90AA1, BCL2, CDK2, KIT and HDAC2. The expression trends of the above genes were different in lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma when compared with normal tissues. Therefore, these genes were suggested to be crucial genes for differentiating lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27356570

  3. Identification of differentially expressed genes between lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaojing; Chen, Hezhong; Shan, Zhengxiang; Yang, Lixin

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between lung adenocarcinoma and normal lung tissues, and between lung squamous cell carcinoma and normal lung tissues, with the purpose of identifying potential biomarkers for the treatment of lung cancer. The gene expression profile (GSE6044) was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included data from 10 lung adenocarcinoma samples, 10 lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, and five matched normal lung tissue samples. After data processing, DEGs were identified using the Student's t‑test adjusted via the Benjamini‑Hochberg method. Subsequently, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery, and a global network was constructed. A total of 95 upregulated and 241 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung adenocarcinoma samples, and 204 upregulated and 285 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, as compared with the normal lung tissue samples. The DEGs in the lung squamous cell carcinoma group were enriched in the following three pathways: Hsa04110, Cell cycle; hsa03030, DNA replication; and hsa03430, mismatch repair. However, the DEGs in the lung adenocarcinoma group were not significantly enriched in any specific pathway. Subsequently, a global network of lung cancer was constructed, which consisted of 341 genes and 1,569 edges, of which the top five genes were HSP90AA1, BCL2, CDK2, KIT and HDAC2. The expression trends of the above genes were different in lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma when compared with normal tissues. Therefore, these genes were suggested to be crucial genes for differentiating lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27356570

  4. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  5. Epigenetic Control of Gene Expression in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics is traditionally defined as the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. There are three main classes of epigenetic marks—DNA methylation, modifications of histone tails, and noncoding RNAs—each of which may be influenced by the environment, diet, diseases, and ageing. Importantly, epigenetic marks have been shown to influence immune cell maturation and are associated with the risk of developing various forms of cancer, including lung cancer. Moreover, there is emerging evidence that these epigenetic marks affect gene expression in the lung and are associated with benign lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and interstitial lung disease. Technological advances have made it feasible to study epigenetic marks in the lung, and it is anticipated that this knowledge will enhance our understanding of the dynamic biology in the lung and lead to the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for our patients with lung disease. PMID:21596832

  6. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  7. LungGENS’: a web-based tool for mapping single-cell gene expression in the developing lung

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yina; Guo, Minzhe; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We developed LungGENS (Lung Gene Expression iN Single-cell), a web-based bioinformatics resource for querying single-cell gene expression databases by entering a gene symbol or a list of genes or selecting a cell type of their interest. Gene query provides quantitative RNA expression of the gene of interest in each lung cell type. Cell type query returns associated selective gene signatures and genes encoding cell surface markers and transcription factors in interactive heatmap and tables. LungGENS will be broadly applicable in respiratory research, providing a cell-specific RNA expression resource at single-cell resolution. LungGENS is freely available for non-commercial use at https://research.cchmc.org/pbge/lunggens/default.html. PMID:26130332

  8. 'LungGENS': a web-based tool for mapping single-cell gene expression in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Du, Yina; Guo, Minzhe; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Xu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We developed LungGENS (Lung Gene Expression iN Single-cell), a web-based bioinformatics resource for querying single-cell gene expression databases by entering a gene symbol or a list of genes or selecting a cell type of their interest. Gene query provides quantitative RNA expression of the gene of interest in each lung cell type. Cell type query returns associated selective gene signatures and genes encoding cell surface markers and transcription factors in interactive heatmap and tables. LungGENS will be broadly applicable in respiratory research, providing a cell-specific RNA expression resource at single-cell resolution. LungGENS is freely available for non-commercial use at https://research.cchmc.org/pbge/lunggens/default.html. PMID:26130332

  9. Gene expression profile of androgen modulated genes in the murine fetal developing lung

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidences suggest that sex affects lung development. Indeed, a higher incidence of respiratory distress syndrome is observed in male compared to female preterm neonates at comparable developmental stage and experimental studies demonstrated an androgen-related delay in male lung maturation. However, the precise mechanisms underlying these deleterious effects of androgens in lung maturation are only partially understood. Methods To build up a better understanding of the effect of androgens on lung development, we analyzed by microarrays the expression of genes showing a sexual difference and those modulated by androgens. Lungs of murine fetuses resulting from a timely mating window of 1 hour were studied at gestational day 17 (GD17) and GD18, corresponding to the period of surge of surfactant production. Using injections of the antiandrogen flutamide to pregnant mice, we hunted for genes in fetal lungs which are transcriptionally modulated by androgens. Results Results revealed that 1844 genes were expressed with a sexual difference at GD17 and 833 at GD18. Many genes were significantly modulated by flutamide: 1597 at GD17 and 1775 at GD18. Datasets were analyzed by using in silico tools for reconstruction of cellular pathways. Between GD17 and GD18, male lungs showed an intensive transcriptional activity of proliferative pathways along with the onset of lung differentiation. Among the genes showing a sex difference or an antiandrogen modulation of their expression, we specifically identified androgen receptor interacting genes, surfactant related genes in particularly those involved in the pathway leading to phospholipid synthesis, and several genes of lung development regulator pathways. Among these latter, some genes related to Shh, FGF, TGF-beta, BMP, and Wnt signaling are modulated by sex and/or antiandrogen treatment. Conclusion Our results show clearly that there is a real delay in lung maturation between male and female in this period

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Neonatal Tracheal Aspirates Demonstrate a Pattern of Lung-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bozyk, Paul D.; Popova, Antonia P.; Bentley, John Kelley; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Linn, Marisa J.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously isolated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the tracheal aspirates of premature neonates with respiratory distress. Although isolation of MSCs correlates with the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, the physiologic role of these cells remains unclear. To address this, we further characterized the cells, focusing on the issues of gene expression, origin, and cytokine expression. Microarray comparison of early passage neonatal lung MSC gene expression to cord blood MSCs and human fetal and neonatal lung fibroblast lines demonstrated that the neonatal lung MSCs differentially expressed 971 gene probes compared with cord blood MSCs, including the transcription factors Tbx2, Tbx3, Wnt5a, FoxF1, and Gli2, each of which has been associated with lung development. Compared with lung fibroblasts, 710 gene probe transcripts were differentially expressed by the lung MSCs, including IL-6 and IL-8/CXCL8. Differential chemokine expression was confirmed by protein analysis. Further, neonatal lung MSCs exhibited a pattern of Hox gene expression distinct from cord blood MSCs but similar to human fetal lung fibroblasts, consistent with a lung origin. On the other hand, limiting dilution analysis showed that fetal lung fibroblasts form colonies at a significantly lower rate than MSCs, and fibroblasts failed to undergo differentiation along adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. In conclusion, MSCs isolated from neonatal tracheal aspirates demonstrate a pattern of lung-specific gene expression, are distinct from lung fibroblasts, and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:21341990

  11. Gene expression profiles of small-cell lung cancers: molecular signatures of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Taniwaki, Masaya; Daigo, Yataro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Takano, Atsushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Yasui, Wataru; Inai, Kouki; Kohno, Nobuoki; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2006-09-01

    To characterize the molecular mechanisms involved in the carcinogenesis and progression of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and identify molecules to be applied as novel diagnostic markers and/or for development of molecular-targeted drugs, we applied cDNA microarray profile analysis coupled with purification of cancer cells by laser-microbeam microdissection (LMM). Expression profiles of 32,256 genes in 15 SCLCs identified 252 genes that were commonly up-regulated and 851 transcripts that were down-regulated in SCLC cells compared with non-cancerous lung tissue cells. An unsupervised clustering algorithm applied to the expression data easily distinguished SCLC from the other major histological type of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and identified 475 genes that may represent distinct molecular features of each of the two histological types. In particular, SCLC was characterized by altered expression of genes related to neuroendocrine cell differentiation and/or growth such as ASCL1, NRCAM, and INSM1. We also identified 68 genes that were abundantly expressed both in advanced SCLCs and advanced adenocarcinomas (ADCs), both of which had been obtained from patients with extensive chemotherapy treatment. Some of them are known to be transcription factors and/or gene expression regulators such as TAF5L, TFCP2L4, PHF20, LMO4, TCF20, RFX2, and DKFZp547I048 as well as those encoding nucleotide-binding proteins such as C9orf76, EHD3, and GIMAP4. Our data provide valuable information for better understanding of lung carcinogenesis and chemoresistance. PMID:16865272

  12. A meta-analysis of lung cancer gene expression identifies PTK7 as a survival gene in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ron; Khatri, Purvesh; Mazur, Pawel K.; Polin, Melanie; Zheng, Yanyan; Vaka, Dedeepya; Hoang, Chuong D.; Shrager, Joseph; Xu, Yue; Vicent, Silvestre; Butte, Atul; Sweet-Cordero, E. Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and it continues to lack effective treatment. The increasingly large and diverse public databases of lung cancer gene expression constitute a rich source of candidate oncogenic drivers and therapeutic targets. To define novel targets for lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), we conducted a large scale meta-analysis of genes specifically overexpressed in ADC. We identified an eleven-gene signature that was overexpressed consistently in ADC specimens relative to normal lung tissue. Six genes in this signature were specifically overexpressed in ADC relative to other subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among these genes was the little studied protein tyrosine kinase PTK7. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that PTK7 is highly expressed in primary ADC patient samples. RNAi-mediated attenuation of PTK7 decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis in a subset of ADC cell lines. Further, loss of PTK7 activated the MKK7-JNK stress response pathway and impaired tumor growth in xenotransplantation assays. Our work defines PTK7 as a highly and specifically expressed gene in ADC and a potential therapeutic target in this subset of NSCLC. PMID:24654231

  13. Alterations in gene expression and DNA methylation during murine and human lung alveolar septation.

    PubMed

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2015-07-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  14. Alterations in Gene Expression and DNA Methylation during Murine and Human Lung Alveolar Septation

    PubMed Central

    Cuna, Alain; Halloran, Brian; Faye-Petersen, Ona; Kelly, David; Crossman, David K.; Cui, Xiangqin; Pandit, Kusum; Kaminski, Naftali; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Ahmad, Ausaf; Mariani, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation, a major epigenetic mechanism, may regulate coordinated expression of multiple genes at specific time points during alveolar septation in lung development. The objective of this study was to identify genes regulated by methylation during normal septation in mice and during disordered septation in bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In mice, newborn lungs (preseptation) and adult lungs (postseptation) were evaluated by microarray analysis of gene expression and immunoprecipitation of methylated DNA followed by sequencing (MeDIP-Seq). In humans, microarray gene expression data were integrated with genome-wide DNA methylation data from bronchopulmonary dysplasia versus preterm and term lung. Genes with reciprocal changes in expression and methylation, suggesting regulation by DNA methylation, were identified. In mice, 95 genes with inverse correlation between expression and methylation during normal septation were identified. In addition to genes known to be important in lung development (Wnt signaling, Angpt2, Sox9, etc.) and its extracellular matrix (Tnc, Eln, etc.), genes involved with immune and antioxidant defense (Stat4, Sod3, Prdx6, etc.) were also observed. In humans, 23 genes were differentially methylated with reciprocal changes in expression in bronchopulmonary dysplasia compared with preterm or term lung. Genes of interest included those involved with detoxifying enzymes (Gstm3) and transforming growth factor-β signaling (bone morphogenetic protein 7 [Bmp7]). In terms of overlap, 20 genes and three pathways methylated during mouse lung development also demonstrated changes in methylation between preterm and term human lung. Changes in methylation correspond to altered expression of a number of genes associated with lung development, suggesting that DNA methylation of these genes may regulate normal and abnormal alveolar septation. PMID:25387348

  15. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in the mouse lung: Association with lung pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Pacurari, M.; Qian, Y.; Porter, D.W.; Wolfarth, M.; Wan, Y.; Luo, D.; Ding, M.; Castranova, V.; Guo, N.L.

    2011-08-15

    Due to the fibrous shape and durability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), concerns regarding their potential for producing environmental and human health risks, including carcinogenesis, have been raised. This study sought to investigate how previously identified lung cancer prognostic biomarkers and the related cancer signaling pathways are affected in the mouse lung following pharyngeal aspiration of well-dispersed MWCNT. A total of 63 identified lung cancer prognostic biomarker genes and major signaling biomarker genes were analyzed in mouse lungs (n = 80) exposed to 0, 10, 20, 40, or 80 {mu}g of MWCNT by pharyngeal aspiration at 7 and 56 days post-exposure using quantitative PCR assays. At 7 and 56 days post-exposure, a set of 7 genes and a set of 11 genes, respectively, showed differential expression in the lungs of mice exposed to MWCNT vs. the control group. Additionally, these significant genes could separate the control group from the treated group over the time series in a hierarchical gene clustering analysis. Furthermore, 4 genes from these two sets of significant genes, coiled-coil domain containing-99 (Ccdc99), muscle segment homeobox gene-2 (Msx2), nitric oxide synthase-2 (Nos2), and wingless-type inhibitory factor-1 (Wif1), showed significant mRNA expression perturbations at both time points. It was also found that the expression changes of these 4 overlapping genes at 7 days post-exposure were attenuated at 56 days post-exposure. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) found that several carcinogenic-related signaling pathways and carcinogenesis itself were associated with both the 7 and 11 gene signatures. Taken together, this study identifies that MWCNT exposure affects a subset of lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. - Research Highlights: > Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes affect lung cancer biomarkers in mouse lungs. > The results suggest potentially harmful effects of MWCNT exposure on human lungs. > The results could potentially be used for

  16. Nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms, gene expression and lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the pleiotropic effects of nitric oxide (NO) within the lungs, it is likely that NO is a significant factor in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to test for association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three NO synthase (NOS) genes and lung function, as well as to examine gene expression and protein levels in relation to the genetic variation. Methods One SNP in each NOS gene (neuronal NOS (NOS1), inducible NOS (NOS2), and endothelial NOS (NOS3)) was genotyped in the Lung Health Study (LHS) and correlated with lung function. One SNP (rs1800779) was also analyzed for association with COPD and lung function in four COPD case–control populations. Lung tissue expression of NOS3 mRNA and protein was tested in individuals of known genotype for rs1800779. Immunohistochemistry of lung tissue was used to localize NOS3 expression. Results For the NOS3 rs1800779 SNP, the baseline forced expiratory volume in one second in the LHS was significantly higher in the combined AG + GG genotypic groups compared with the AA genotypic group. Gene expression and protein levels in lung tissue were significantly lower in subjects with the AG + GG genotypes than in AA subjects. NOS3 protein was expressed in the airway epithelium and subjects with the AA genotype demonstrated higher NOS3 expression compared with AG and GG individuals. However, we were not able to replicate the associations with COPD or lung function in the other COPD study groups. Conclusions Variants in the NOS genes were not associated with lung function or COPD status. However, the G allele of rs1800779 resulted in a decrease of NOS3 gene expression and protein levels and this has implications for the numerous disease states that have been associated with this polymorphism. PMID:24192154

  17. Proteasome dysfunction inhibits surfactant protein gene expression in lung epithelial cells: mechanism of inhibition of SP-B gene expression.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Boggaram, Vijayakumar

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins maintain lung function through their actions to reduce alveolar surface tension and control of innate immune responses in the lung. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for the degradation of majority of intracellular proteins in eukaryotic cells, and proteasome dysfunction has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative, cardiac, and other diseases. Proteasome function is impaired in interstitial lung diseases associated with surfactant protein C (SP-C) mutation mapping to the BRICHOS domain located in the proSP-C protein. In this study we determined the effects of proteasome inhibition on surfactant protein expression in H441 and MLE-12 lung epithelial cells to understand the relationship between proteasome dysfunction and surfactant protein gene expression. Proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and MG132 reduced the levels of SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner in H441 and MLE-12 cells. In H441 cells, lactacystin and MG132 inhibition of SP-B mRNA was associated with similar decreases in SP-B protein, and the inhibition was due to inhibition of gene transcription. Proteasome inhibitors decreased thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/Nkx2.1 DNA binding activity, and the reduced TTF-1 DNA binding activity was due to reduced expression levels of TTF-1 protein. These data indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is essential for the maintenance of surfactant protein gene expression and that disruption of this pathway inhibits surfactant protein gene expression via reduced expression of TTF-1 protein. PMID:16905641

  18. Gene expression profiling in mouse lung following polymeric hexamethylene diisocyanate exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-T.; Ylostalo, Joni; Friedman, Mitchell; Hoyle, Gary W. . E-mail: ghoyle@tulane.edu

    2005-05-15

    Isocyanates are a common cause of occupational lung disease. Hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), a component of polyurethane spray paints, can induce respiratory symptoms, inflammation, lung function impairment, and isocyanate asthma. The predominant form of HDI in polyurethane paints is a nonvolatile polyisocyanate known as HDI biuret trimer (HDI-BT). Exposure of mice to aerosolized HDI-BT results in pathological effects, including pulmonary edema, lung inflammation, cellular proliferation, and fibrotic lesions, which occur with distinct time courses following exposure. To identify genes that mediate lung pathology in the distinct temporal phases after exposure, gene expression profiles in HDI-BT-exposed C57BL/6J mouse lungs were analyzed. RNase protection assay (RPA) of genes involved in apoptosis, cell survival, and inflammation revealed increased expression of I{kappa}B{alpha}, Fas, Bcl-X{sub L}, TNF{alpha}, KC, MIP-2, IL-6, and GM-CSF following HDI-BT exposure. Microarray analysis of approximately 10 000 genes was performed on lung RNA collected from mice 6, 18, and 90 h after HDI-BT exposure and from unexposed mice. Classes of genes whose expression was increased 6 h after exposure included those involved in stress responses (particularly oxidative stress and thiol redox balance), growth arrest, apoptosis, signal transduction, and inflammation. Types of genes whose expression was increased at 18 h included proteinases, anti-proteinases, cytoskeletal molecules, and inflammatory mediators. Transcripts increased at 90 h included extracellular matrix components, transcription factors, inflammatory mediators, and cell cycle regulators. This characterization of the gene expression profile in lungs exposed to HDI-BT will provide a basis for investigating injury and repair pathways that are operative during isocyanate-induced lung disease.

  19. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the environment and genetics in lung cancer etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤ 0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR = 0.12). Sixty-three (∼ 28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, P-value < 0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, and WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, and UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, and MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study's results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  20. Heme-related gene expression signatures of meat intakes in lung cancer tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tram Kim; Rotunno, Melissa; Ryan, Brid M.; Pesatori, Angela C.; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Spitz, Margaret; Caporaso, Neil E.; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer causes more deaths worldwide than any other cancer. In addition to cigarette smoking, dietary factors may contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Epidemiologic studies, including the Environment and Genetics in Lung cancer Etiology (EAGLE), have reported increased consumption of red/processed meats to be associated with higher risk of lung cancer. Heme-iron toxicity may link meat intake with cancer. We investigated this hypothesis in meat-related lung carcinogenesis using whole genome expression. We measured genome-wide expression (HG-U133A) in 49 tumor and 42 non-involved fresh frozen lung tissues of 64 adenocarcinoma EAGLE patients. We studied gene expression profiles by high-versus-low meat consumption, with and without adjustment by sex, age, and smoking. Threshold for significance was a False Discovery Rate (FDR) ≤0.15. We studied whether the identified genes played a role in heme-iron related processes by means of manually curated literature search and gene ontology-based pathway analysis. We found that gene expression of 232 annotated genes in tumor tissue significantly distinguished lung adenocarcinoma cases who consumed above/below the median intake of fresh red meats (FDR=0.12). Sixty-three (~28%) of the 232 identified genes (12 expected by chance, p-value<0.001) were involved in heme binding, absorption, transport, and Wnt signaling pathway (e.g., CYPs, TPO, HPX, HFE, SLCs, WNTs). We also identified several genes involved in lipid metabolism (e.g., NCR1, TNF, UCP3) and oxidative stress (e.g., TPO, SGK2, MTHFR) that may be indirectly related to heme-toxicity. The study’s results provide preliminary evidence that heme-iron toxicity might be one underlying mechanism linking fresh red meat intake and lung cancer. PMID:23681825

  1. Prediction of Lung Cancer Histological Types by RT-qPCR Gene Expression in FFPE Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Schallheim, Jason M.; Hayes, D. Neil; Roberts, Patrick J.; Bastien, Roy R.L.; Mullins, Michael; Yin, Xiaoying; Miller, C. Ryan; Thorne, Leigh B.; Geiersbach, Katherine B.; Muldrew, Kenneth L.; Funkhouser, William K.; Fan, Cheng; Hayward, Michele C.; Bayer, Steven; Perou, Charles M.; Bernard, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer histologic diagnosis is clinically relevant because there are histology-specific treatment indications and contraindications. Histologic diagnosis can be challenging owing to tumor characteristics, and it has been shown to have less-than-ideal agreement among pathologists reviewing the same specimens. Microarray profiling studies using frozen specimens have shown that histologies exhibit different gene expression trends; however, frozen specimens are not amenable to routine clinical application. Herein, we developed a gene expression–based predictor of lung cancer histology for FFPE specimens, which are routinely available in clinical settings. Genes predictive of lung cancer histologies were derived from published cohorts that had been profiled by microarrays. Expression of these genes was measured by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) in a cohort of patients with FFPE lung cancer. A histology expression predictor (HEP) was developed using RT-qPCR expression data for adenocarcinoma, carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. In cross-validation, the HEP exhibited mean accuracy of 84% and κ = 0.77. In separate independent validation sets, the HEP was compared with pathologist diagnoses on the same tumor block specimens, and the HEP yielded similar accuracy and precision as the pathologists. The HEP also exhibited good performance in specimens with low tumor cellularity. Therefore, RT-qPCR gene expression from FFPE specimens can be effectively used to predict lung cancer histology. PMID:23701907

  2. Fibrotic gene expression coexists with alveolar proteinosis in early indium lung.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Kiyosawa, Hidenori; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-08-01

    Occupational inhalation of indium compounds can cause the so-called "indium lung disease". Most affected individuals show pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease. In animal experiments, inhalation of indium tin oxide or indium oxide has been shown to cause lung damage. However, the mechanisms by which indium compounds lead to indium lung disease remain unknown. In this study, we constructed a mouse model of indium lung disease and analyzed gene expression in response to indium exposure. Indium oxide (In2O3, 10 mg/kg, primary particle size <100 nm) was administered intratracheally to C57BL/6 mice (male, 8 weeks of age) twice a week for 8 weeks. Four weeks after the final instillation, histopathological analysis exhibited periodic acid-Schiff positive material in the alveoli, characteristic of PAP. Comprehensive gene expression analysis by RNA-Seq, however, revealed expression of fibrosis-related genes, such as surfactant associated protein D, surfactant associated protein A1, mucin 1, and collagen type I and III, was significantly increased, indicating that fibrotic gene expression progresses in early phase of indium lung. These data supported the latest hypothesis that PAP occurs as an acute phase response and is replaced by fibrosis after long-term latency. PMID:27308969

  3. Selection of Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies related to lung injury in a preterm lamb model

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Fantini, Prue M.; Rajapaksa, Anushi E.; Oakley, Regina; Tingay, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Preterm newborns often require invasive support, however even brief periods of supported ventilation applied inappropriately to the lung can cause injury. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR (qPCR) has been extensively employed in studies of ventilation-induced lung injury with the reference gene 18S ribosomal RNA (18S RNA) most commonly employed as the internal control reference gene. Whilst the results of these studies depend on the stability of the reference gene employed, the use of 18S RNA has not been validated. In this study the expression profile of five candidate reference genes (18S RNA, ACTB, GAPDH, TOP1 and RPS29) in two geographical locations, was evaluated by dedicated algorithms, including geNorm, Normfinder, Bestkeeper and ΔCt method and the overall stability of these candidate genes determined (RefFinder). Secondary studies examined the influence of reference gene choice on the relative expression of two well-validated lung injury markers; EGR1 and IL1B. In the setting of the preterm lamb model of lung injury, RPS29 reference gene expression was influenced by tissue location; however we determined that individual ventilation strategies influence reference gene stability. Whilst 18S RNA is the most commonly employed reference gene in preterm lamb lung studies, our results suggest that GAPDH is a more suitable candidate. PMID:27210246

  4. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  5. HTR4 gene structure and altered expression in the developing lung

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 4 (5-HT4R) gene (HTR4) associated with lung function. The aims of this study were to i) investigate the expression profile of HTR4 in adult and fetal lung tissue and cultured airway cells, ii) further define HTR4 gene structure and iii) explore the potential functional implications of key SNPs using a bioinformatic approach. Methods Following reverse transcription (RT)-PCR in human brain, 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE) was used to examine the exonic structure of HTR4 at the 5′ end. Quantitative (Q)-PCR was used to quantify HTR4 mRNA expression in total RNA from cultured airway cells and whole lung tissue. Publically available gene microarray data on fetal samples of estimated gestational age 7–22 weeks were mined for HTR4 expression. Immunohistochemistry (IHC; in adult and fetal lung tissue) and a radioligand binding assay (in cultured airway cells) were used to analyze 5­HT4R protein expression. Results IHC in adult lung, irrespective of the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), suggested low level expression of 5-HT4R protein, which was most prominent in alveolar pneumocytes. There was evidence of differential 5-HT4R protein levels during gestation in fetal lung, which was also evident in gene expression microarray data. HTR4 mRNA expression, assessed by Q-PCR, was <0.5% relative to brain in total adult lung tissue and in human airway smooth muscle (HASM) and bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) derived from adult donors. Radioligand binding experiments also indicated that HBEC and HASM cells did not express a significant 5-HT4R population. 5′ RACE in brain identified a novel N-terminal variant, containing an extended N-terminal sequence. The functional significance of key HTR4 SNPs was investigated using the encyclopedia of DNA elements consortium (ENCODE

  6. Identification and characterization of genes differentially expressed in lung and head and neck cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Shriver, S.P.; Bloch, L.M.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1994-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer for men and women in the U.S. Although lung tumors are classified into many different histopathological subtypes, the predominant risk factor for all tumor types is cigarette smoking. Tobacco use is also the major risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Because of this similarity in etiology, we hypothesize that early events in tumorigenesis may be represented by alterations in gene expression which are found in common among different types of lung tumors and which are also present in head and neck tumors. It has been difficult to use differential expression methods to study lung cancer because of the cellular and karyotypic heterogeneity found in individual tumors. In order to avoid these limitations, we have used differential display to compare normal bronchial epithelium to a variety of lung tumors and tumor cell lines. In addition to numerous individual differences which are probably due to cellular and karyotypic heterogeneity, we have identified sequences that are uniformly present in a number of unrelated lung tumor samples and absent from or reduced in a set of normal bronchial epithelium samples. The expression patterns of some of these sequences were found to be similar in parallel analysis of SCCHN and matched normal tissue. We have also identified sequences that are present in normal issue but absent from or reduced in tumors, and which may represent tumor suppresser genes. Further characterization of the expression patterns and structure of these sequences is in progress.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of host gene expression in chicken embryo lung cells infected with laryngotracheitis virus

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infection by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV; gallid herpesvirus 1) causes acute respiratory diseases in chickens often with high mortality. To better understand host-ILTV interactions at the host transcriptional level, a microarray analysis was performed using 4 × 44 K Agilent chicken custom oligo microarrays. Results Microarrays were hybridized using the two color hybridization method with total RNA extracted from ILTV infected chicken embryo lung cells at 0, 1, 3, 5, and 7 days post infection (dpi). Results showed that 789 genes were differentially expressed in response to ILTV infection that include genes involved in the immune system (cytokines, chemokines, MHC, and NF-κB), cell cycle regulation (cyclin B2, CDK1, and CKI3), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cellular metabolism. Differential expression for 20 out of 789 genes were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). A bioinformatics tool (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) used to analyze biological functions and pathways on the group of 789 differentially expressed genes revealed that 21 possible gene networks with intermolecular connections among 275 functionally identified genes. These 275 genes were classified into a number of functional groups that included cancer, genetic disorder, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. Conclusion The results of this study provide comprehensive knowledge on global gene expression, and biological functionalities of differentially expressed genes in chicken embryo lung cells in response to ILTV infections. PMID:20663125

  8. Integrating Murine Gene Expression Studies to Understand Obstructive Lung Disease Due to Chronic Inhaled Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Peggy S.; Hofmann, Oliver; Baron, Rebecca M.; Cernadas, Manuela; Meng, Quanxin Ryan; Bresler, Herbert S.; Brass, David M.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Christiani, David C.; Hide, Winston

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Endotoxin is a near ubiquitous environmental exposure that that has been associated with both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These obstructive lung diseases have a complex pathophysiology, making them difficult to study comprehensively in the context of endotoxin. Genome-wide gene expression studies have been used to identify a molecular snapshot of the response to environmental exposures. Identification of differentially expressed genes shared across all published murine models of chronic inhaled endotoxin will provide insight into the biology underlying endotoxin-associated lung disease. Methods We identified three published murine models with gene expression profiling after repeated low-dose inhaled endotoxin. All array data from these experiments were re-analyzed, annotated consistently, and tested for shared genes found to be differentially expressed. Additional functional comparison was conducted by testing for significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes in known pathways. The importance of this gene signature in smoking-related lung disease was assessed using hierarchical clustering in an independent experiment where mice were exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and endotoxin plus smoke. Results A 101-gene signature was detected in three murine models, more than expected by chance. The three model systems exhibit additional similarity beyond shared genes when compared at the pathway level, with increasing enrichment of inflammatory pathways associated with longer duration of endotoxin exposure. Genes and pathways important in both asthma and COPD were shared across all endotoxin models. Mice exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and smoke plus endotoxin were accurately classified with the endotoxin gene signature. Conclusions Despite the differences in laboratory, duration of exposure, and strain of mouse used in three experimental models of chronic inhaled endotoxin, surprising similarities in gene expression were observed

  9. Early changes in lung gene expression due to high tidal volume.

    PubMed

    Copland, Ian B; Kavanagh, Brian P; Engelberts, Doreen; McKerlie, Colin; Belik, Jaques; Post, Martin

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to use gene expression profiling to understand how adult rat lung responds to high tidal volume (HV) ventilation in vivo. HV ventilation for 30 minutes did not cause discernable lung injury (in terms of altered mechanics or histology) but caused obvious injury when continued for 90 minutes. However, at 30-minute ventilation, HV caused significant upregulation of 10 genes and suppression of 12 genes. Among the upregulated genes were transcription factors, stress proteins, and inflammatory mediators; the downregulated genes were exemplified by metabolic regulatory genes. On the basis of cluster analysis, we studied Egr-1, c-Jun, heat shock protein 70, and interleukin (IL)-1beta in further detail. Temporal studies demonstrated that Egr-1 and c-Jun were increased early and before heat shock protein 70 and IL-1beta. Spatial studies using in situ hybridization and laser capture microscopy revealed that all four genes were upregulated primarily in the bronchiolar airway epithelium. Furthermore, at 90 minutes of HV ventilation, a significant increase in intracellular IL-1beta protein was observed. Although there are limitations to gene array methodology, the current data suggest a global hypothesis that (1). the effects of HV are cumulative; (2). specific patterns of gene activation and suppression precede lung injury; and (3). alteration of gene expression after mechanical stretch is pathogenic. PMID:12816737

  10. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  11. cis-acting elements that confer lung epithelial cell expression of the CC10 gene.

    PubMed

    Stripp, B R; Sawaya, P L; Luse, D S; Wikenheiser, K A; Wert, S E; Huffman, J A; Lattier, D L; Singh, G; Katyal, S L; Whitsett, J A

    1992-07-25

    To define cis-acting genetic elements responsible for cell-specific transcriptional regulation of the CC10 gene, DNA sequences spanning nucleotides -2338 to +49 of the rat CC10 gene were linked to a reporter gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). In transient expression assays, CC10 sequences were capable of restricting CAT expression to a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line similar to pulmonary Clara cells. Transgenic mice harboring the hybrid RtCC10-CAT construct expressed high levels of CAT activity specifically within protein extracts of lung and trachea. Transcripts for the CAT reporter gene colocalized with those for the endogenous murine CC10 gene within the airways of transgenic mice. Functional analysis of deletion mutants identified stimulatory, inhibitory, and cell type-specific transcriptional regulatory elements. The results of gel retention and DNaseI protection assays suggest that a transcriptional stimulatory region located between -320 and -175, and a cell type-specific regulatory element located between -175 and +49, result from a series of protein-DNA interactions occurring at -220 to -205 and -128 to -86, respectively. Lung epithelial specific transcriptional regulatory elements described herein will be useful for expression of chimeric genes within epithelial cells lining the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles of mice. PMID:1634515

  12. Bronchial airway gene expression in smokers with lung or head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyck, Eric; Nazarov, Petr V; Muller, Arnaud; Nicot, Nathalie; Bosseler, Manon; Pierson, Sandrine; Van Moer, Kris; Palissot, Valérie; Mascaux, Céline; Knolle, Ulrich; Ninane, Vincent; Nati, Romain; Bremnes, Roy M; Vallar, Laurent; Berchem, Guy; Schlesser, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major cause of cancers of the respiratory tract, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and head and neck cancer (HNC). In order to better understand carcinogenesis of the lung and upper airways, we have compared the gene expression profiles of tumor-distant, histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens obtained from current smokers with NSCLC or HNC (SC, considered as a single group), as well as nonsmokers (NS) and smokers without cancer (SNC). RNA from a total of 97 biopsies was used for gene expression profiling (Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 array). Differentially expressed genes were used to compare NS, SNC, and SC, and functional analysis was carried out using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Smoking-related cancer of the respiratory tract was found to affect the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic biotransformation proteins, as well as proteins associated with crucial inflammation/immunity pathways and other processes that protect the airway from the chemicals in cigarette smoke or contribute to carcinogenesis. Finally, we used the prediction analysis for microarray (PAM) method to identify gene signatures of cigarette smoking and cancer, and uncovered a 15-gene signature that distinguished between SNC and SC with an accuracy of 83%. Thus, gene profiling of histologically normal bronchial biopsy specimens provided insight into cigarette-induced carcinogenesis of the respiratory tract and gene signatures of cancer in smokers. PMID:24497500

  13. Constitutive expression of human keratin 14 gene in mouse lung induces premalignant lesions and squamous differentiation.

    PubMed

    Dakir, E L Habib; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Linnoila, R Ilona

    2008-12-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 20% of all human lung cancers and is strongly linked to cigarette smoking. It develops through premalignant changes that are characterized by high levels of keratin 14 (K14) expression in the airway epithelium and evolve through basal cell hyperplasia, squamous metaplasia and dysplasia to carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma. In order to explore the impact of K14 in the pulmonary epithelium that normally lacks both squamous differentiation and K14 expression, human keratin 14 gene hK14 was constitutively expressed in mouse airway progenitor cells using a mouse Clara cell specific 10 kDa protein (CC10) promoter. While the lungs of CC10-hK14 transgenic mice developed normally, we detected increased expression of K14 and the molecular markers of squamous differentiation program such as involucrin, loricrin, small proline-rich protein 1A, transglutaminase 1 and cholesterol sulfotransferase 2B1. In contrast, wild-type lungs were negative. Aging CC10-hK14 mice revealed multifocal airway cell hyperplasia, occasional squamous metaplasia and their lung tumors displayed evidence for multidirectional differentiation. We conclude that constitutive expression of hK14 initiates squamous differentiation program in the mouse lung, but fails to promote squamous maturation. Our study provides a novel model for assessing the mechanisms of premalignant lesions in vivo by modifying differentiation and proliferation of airway progenitor cells. PMID:18701433

  14. Low-dose oral cadmium increases airway reactivity and lung neuronal gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Joshua D; Wongtrakool, Cherry; Banton, Sophia A; Li, Shuzhao; Orr, Michael L; Barr, Dana Boyd; Neujahr, David C; Sutliff, Roy L; Go, Young-Mi; Jones, Dean P

    2016-07-01

    Inhalation of cadmium (Cd) is associated with lung diseases, but less is known concerning pulmonary effects of Cd found in the diet. Cd has a decades-long half-life in humans and significant bioaccumulation occurs with chronic dietary intake. We exposed mice to low-dose CdCl2 (10 mg/L in drinking water) for 20 weeks, which increased lung Cd to a level similar to that of nonoccupationally exposed adult humans. Cd-treated mice had increased airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine challenge, and gene expression array showed that Cd altered the abundance of 443 mRNA transcripts in mouse lung. In contrast to higher doses, low-dose Cd did not elicit increased metallothionein transcripts in lung. To identify pathways most affected by Cd, gene set enrichment of transcripts was analyzed. Results showed that major inducible targets of low-dose Cd were neuronal receptors represented by enriched olfactory, glutamatergic, cholinergic, and serotonergic gene sets. Olfactory receptors regulate chemosensory function and airway hypersensitivity, and these gene sets were the most enriched. Targeted metabolomics analysis showed that Cd treatment also increased metabolites in pathways of glutamatergic (glutamate), serotonergic (tryptophan), cholinergic (choline), and catecholaminergic (tyrosine) receptors in the lung tissue. Protein abundance measurements showed that the glutamate receptor GRIN2A was increased in mouse lung tissue. Together, these results show that in mice, oral low-dose Cd increased lung Cd to levels comparable to humans, increased airway hyperresponsiveness and disrupted neuronal pathways regulating bronchial tone. Therefore, dietary Cd may promote or worsen airway hyperresponsiveness in multiple lung diseases including asthma. PMID:27401458

  15. Gene expression subtraction of non-cancerous lung from smokers and non-smokers with adenocarcinoma, as a predictor for smokers developing lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stav, David; Bar, Ilan; Sandbank, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer death in developed countries. Adenocarcinoma is becoming the most common form of lung cancer. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer. Long-term cigarettes smoking may be characterized by genetic alteration and diffuse injury of the airways surface, named field cancerization, while cancer in non-smokers is usually clonally derived. Detecting specific genes expression changes in non-cancerous lung in smokers with adenocarcinoma may give us instrument for predicting smokers who are going to develop this malignancy. Objectives We described the gene expression in non-cancerous lungs from 21 smoker patients with lung adenocarcinoma and compare it to gene expression in non-cancerous lung tissue from 10 non-smokers with primary lung adenocarcinoma. Methods Total RNA was isolated from peripheral non-cancerous lung tissue. The cDNA was hybridized to the U133A GeneChip array. Hierarchical clustering analysis on genes obtained from smokers and non-smokers, after subtracting were exported to the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software for further analysis. Results The genes subtraction resulted in disclosure of 36 genes with high score. They were subsequently mapped and sorted based on location, cellular components, and biochemical activity. The gene functional analysis disclosed 20 genes, which are involved in cancer process (P = 7.05E-5 to 2.92E-2). Conclusion Detected genes may serve as a predictor for smokers who may be at high risk of developing lung cancer. In addition, since these genes originating from non-cancerous lung, which is the major area of the lungs, a sample from an induced sputum may represent it. PMID:18811983

  16. DNA Methylation Profile and Expression of Surfactant Protein A2 gene in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grageda, Melissa; Silveyra, Patricia; Thomas, Neal J.; DiAngelo, Susan L.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the methylation profile of genes allow for the identification of biomarkers that may guide diagnosis and effective treatment of disease. Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in lung homeostasis and immunity, and is encoded by two genes (SFTPA1 and SFTPA2). The goal of this study was to identify differentially methylated CpG sites in the promoter region of the SFTPA2 gene in lung cancer tissue, and to determine the correlation between the promoter’s methylation profile and gene expression. For this, we collected 28 pairs of cancerous human lung tissue and adjacent non-cancerous (NC) lung tissue: 17 adenocarcinoma (AC), 9 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 2 AC with SCC features, and we evaluated DNA methylation of the SFTPA2 promoter region by bisulfite conversion. Our results identified a higher methylation ratio in one CpG site of the SFTPA2 gene in cancerous tissue vs. NC tissue (0.36 vs. 0.11, p=0.001). When assessing AC samples, we also found cancerous tissues associated with a higher methylation ratio (0.43 vs. 0.10, p=0.02). In the SCC group, although cancerous tissue showed a higher methylation ratio (0.22 vs. 0.11), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.35). Expression of SFTPA2 mRNA and total SP-A protein was significantly lower in cancer tissue when compared to adjacent NC tissue (p<0.001), and correlated with the hypermethylated status of a SFTPA2 CpG site in AC samples. The findings of this pilot study may hold promise for future use of SFTPA2 as a biomarker for the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25514367

  17. MiR-374a suppresses lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and invasion by targeting TGFA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haijian; Liu, Yan; Shu, Xiao Ou; Cai, Qiuyin

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant expression of miR-374a has been reported in several types of human cancers, including lung cancer. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanisms underlying the role of miR-374a in lung cancer remain largely unknown. We found that the expression of miR-374a was significantly downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma tissues compared to adjacent normal lung tissues in samples included in The Cancer Genome Atlas. Functional studies revealed that overexpression of miR-374a led to inhibition of lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation, migration and invasion and that miR-374a negatively regulated transforming growth factor-alpha (TGFA) gene expression by directly targeting the 3'-UTR of TGFA mRNA. Treating lung adenocarcinoma cells with TGF-α neutralizing antibody resulted in suppression of cell proliferation and invasion, which mimicked the action of miR-374a. Additionally, TGFA gene expression was significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to adjacent normal tissue and high TGFA gene expression strongly correlated with poor survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our studies suggest that miR-374a suppresses lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and invasion via targeting TGFA gene expression. Our findings may provide novel treatment strategies for lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:27207663

  18. RNA-seq analysis of lung adenocarcinomas reveals different gene expression profiles between smoking and nonsmoking patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafang; Xiao, Xiangjun; Ji, Xuemei; Liu, Bin; Amos, Christopher I

    2015-11-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is caused by the combination of genetic and environmental effects, and smoking plays an important role in the disease development. Exploring the gene expression profile and identifying genes that are shared or vary between smokers and nonsmokers with lung adenocarcinoma will provide insights into the etiology of this complex cancer. We obtained RNA-seq data from paired normal and tumor tissues from 34 nonsmoking and 34 smoking patients with lung adenocarcinoma (GEO: GSE40419). R Bioconductor, edgeR, was adopted to conduct differential gene expression analysis between paired normal and tumor tissues. A generalized linear model was applied to identify genes that were differentially expressed in nonsmoker and smoker patients as well as genes that varied between these two groups. We identified 2273 genes that showed differential expression with FDR < 0.05 and |logFC| >1 in nonsmoker tumor versus normal tissues; 3030 genes in the smoking group; and 1967 genes were common to both groups. Sixty-eight and 70% of the identified genes were downregulated in nonsmoking and smoking groups, respectively. The 20 genes such as SPP1, SPINK1, and FAM83A with largest fold changes in smokers also showed similar large and highly significant fold changes in nonsmokers and vice versa, showing commonalities in expression changes for adenocarcinomas in both smokers and nonsmokers for these genes. We also identified 175 genes that were significantly differently expressed between tumor samples from nonsmoker and smoker patients. Gene expression profile varied substantially between smoker and nonsmoker patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Smoking patients overall showed far more complicated disease mechanism and have more dysregulation in their gene expression profiles. Our study reveals pathogenetic differences in smoking and nonsmoking patients with lung adenocarcinoma from transcriptome analysis. We provided a list of candidate genes for further study for disease

  19. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  20. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (< 3 micron), that is respirable. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  1. Antioxidant gene expression in rat lung after exposure to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Gilks, C. B.; Price, K.; Wright, J. L.; Churg, A.

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the effects of cigarette smoke on the expression of genes encoding intracellular antioxidant species, we exposed rats to whole cigarette smoke or air (control) daily for 1, 2, 7, or 14 days. After sacrifice, RNA was extracted from one lung and expression of mRNA for catalase (CAT), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and metallothionein (MT) was determined by Northern blots and dot blots. The anatomical distribution of expression of these genes was determined by in situ hybridization studies on sections of the contralateral lung. We found that expression of both MnSOD and MT was significantly increased (to levels 70 to 400% greater than in controls) at days 1 and 2 and returned to control levels by day 7. GPX expression was slightly but significantly increased at days 7 and 14 in smoke-exposed animals. CuZnSOD and CAT expression did not change from control levels. In control lungs, MnSOD was expressed in all cell types, with the highest expression seen in bronchial epithelial cells; a notable finding was a mosaic pattern of expression in the bronchial epithelium, with contiguous areas of bronchial epithelium composed of cells expressing MnSOD at high levels (hot spots), compared with the adjacent epithelium. In smoke-exposed lungs, the hot spots became less prominent after 1 and 2 days of exposure to smoke, but after 7 and 14 days the distribution of MnSOD expression was similar in control and smoke-exposed animals. CAT, CuZnSOD, GPX, and MT also showed widespread expression in the lung by in situ hybridization; GPX, CuZnSOD and MT were all most highly expressed in bronchial epithelium, whereas CAT expression levels were similar in all cell types. In contrast to MnSOD, expression of CAT, CuZnSOD, GPX, and MT was uniform within the bronchial epithelium, and the distribution of expression was the same in control and smoke-exposed animals at all time points. We conclude that

  2. Gene expression profiling of cancer stem cell in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Cheol; Sung, Ji-Min; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Seo, Kun-Ho; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ku; Kim, Jin-Suk; El-Aty AM, Abd; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Background The studies on cancer-stem-cells (CSCs) have attracted so much attention in recent years as possible therapeutic implications. This study was carried out to investigate the gene expression profile of CSCs in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Results We isolated CSCs from A549 cell line of which side population (SP) phenotype revealed several stem cell properties. After staining the cell line with Hoechst 33342 dye, the SP and non-side population (non-SP) cells were sorted using flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA expression profiles were measured using an Affymetrix GeneChip® oligonucleotide array. Among the sixty one differentially expressed genes, the twelve genes inclusive three poor prognostic genes; Aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1/C2 (AKR1C1/C2), Transmembrane 4 L six family member 1 nuclear receptor (TM4SF1), and Nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) were significantly up-regulated in SP compared to non-SP cells. Conclusion This is the first report indicating the differences of gene expression pattern between SP and non-SP cells in A549 cells. We suggest that the up-regulations of the genes AKR1C1/C2, TM4SF1 and NR0B1 in SP of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells could be a target of poor prognosis in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18034892

  3. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs. PMID:27085470

  4. Lung tumor microenvironment induces specific gene expression signature in intratumoral NK cells.

    PubMed

    Gillard-Bocquet, Mélanie; Caer, Charles; Cagnard, Nicolas; Crozet, Lucile; Perez, Mikael; Fridman, Wolf Herman; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Cremer, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are able to recognize and kill tumor cells, however whether they contribute to tumor immunosurveillance is still debated. Our previous studies demonstrated the presence of NK cells in human lung tumors. Their comparison with NK cells from non-tumoral lung tissues and with blood NK cells from the same individuals revealed a decreased expression of some NK receptors and impaired ex vivo cytotoxic functions occurring specifically in NK cells isolated from the tumor microenvironment. The aim of the present study was to characterize the transcriptional profile of such intratumoral NK cells, by comparative microarray analysis of sorted NK cells isolated from non-tumoral (Non-Tum-NK) and tumoral (Tum-NK) lung tissues of 12 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer patients. Our results reveal a specific gene expression signature of Tum-NK cells particularly in activation processes and cytotoxicity, confirming that tumor environment induces modifications in NK cells biology. Indeed, intratumoral NK cells display higher expression levels of NKp44, NKG2A, Granzymes A and K, and Fas mRNA. A particular pattern of receptors involved in chemotaxis was also observed, with an overexpression of CXCR5 and CXCR6, and a lower expression of CX3CR1 and S1PR1 genes in Tum-NK as compared to Non-Tum-NK cells. The precise identification of the molecular pathways modulated in the tumor environment will help to decipher the role of NK cells in tumor immunosurveillance and will open future investigations to manipulate their antitumoral functions. PMID:23382731

  5. Gene expression profile of human lung epithelial cells chronically exposed to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongquan; Stueckle, Todd A.; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Rojanasakul, Yon; Lu, Yongju; Wang, Liying

    2015-01-01

    A rapid increase in utility of engineered nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), has raised a concern over their safety. Based on recent evidence from animal studies, pulmonary exposure of CNTs may lead to nanoparticle accumulation in the deep lung without effective clearance which could interact with local lung cells for a long period of time. Physicochemical similarities of CNTs to asbestos fibers may contribute to their asbestos-like carcinogenic potential after long-term exposure, which has not been well addressed. More studies are needed to identify and predict the carcinogenic potential and mechanisms for promoting their safe use. Our previous study reported a long-term in vitro exposure model for CNT carcinogenicity and showed that 6-month sub-chronic exposure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) causes malignant transformation of human lung epithelial cells. In addition, the transformed cells induced tumor formation in mice and exhibited an apoptosis resistant phenotype, a key characteristic of cancer cells. Although the potential role of p53 in the transformation process was identified, the underlying mechanisms of oncogenesis remain largely undefined. Here, we further examined the gene expression profile by using genome microarrays to profile molecular mechanisms of SWCNT oncogenesis. Based on differentially expressed genes, possible mechanisms of SWCNT-associated apoptosis resistance and oncogenesis were identified, which included activation of pAkt/p53/Bcl-2 signaling axis, increased gene expression of Ras family for cell cycle control, Dsh-mediated Notch 1, and downregulation of apoptotic genes BAX and Noxa. Activated immune responses were among the major changes of biological function. Our findings shed light on potential molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in SWCNT oncogenic potential.

  6. Gene Co-Expression Analysis Predicts Genetic Variants Associated with Drug Responsiveness in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Sanaya; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness to drugs is an important concern in designing personalized treatment for cancer patients. Currently genetic markers are often used to guide targeted therapy. However, deeper understanding of the molecular basis for drug responses and discovery of new predictive biomarkers for drug sensitivity are much needed. In this paper, we present a workflow for identifying condition-specific gene co-expression networks associated with responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Erlotinib, in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia by combining network mining and statistical analysis. Particularly, we have identified multiple gene modules specifically co-expressed in the drug responsive cell lines but not in the unresponsive group. Interestingly, most of these modules are enriched on specific cytobands, suggesting potential copy number variation events on these loci. Our results therefore imply that there are multiple genetic loci with copy number variations associated with the Erlotinib responses. The existence of CNVs in these loci is also confirmed in lung cancer tissue samples using the TCGA data. Since these structural variations are inferred from functional genomics data, these CNVs are functional variations. These results suggest the condition specific gene co- expression network mining approach is an effective approach in predicting candidate biomarkers for drug responses. PMID:27570645

  7. Gene Co-Expression Analysis Predicts Genetic Variants Associated with Drug Responsiveness in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Sanaya; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Responsiveness to drugs is an important concern in designing personalized treatment for cancer patients. Currently genetic markers are often used to guide targeted therapy. However, deeper understanding of the molecular basis for drug responses and discovery of new predictive biomarkers for drug sensitivity are much needed. In this paper, we present a workflow for identifying condition-specific gene co-expression networks associated with responses to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Erlotinib, in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using data from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia by combining network mining and statistical analysis. Particularly, we have identified multiple gene modules specifically co-expressed in the drug responsive cell lines but not in the unresponsive group. Interestingly, most of these modules are enriched on specific cytobands, suggesting potential copy number variation events on these loci. Our results therefore imply that there are multiple genetic loci with copy number variations associated with the Erlotinib responses. The existence of CNVs in these loci is also confirmed in lung cancer tissue samples using the TCGA data. Since these structural variations are inferred from functional genomics data, these CNVs are functional variations. These results suggest the condition specific gene co- expression network mining approach is an effective approach in predicting candidate biomarkers for drug responses. PMID:27570645

  8. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gandhale, Pradeep N.; Kumar, Himanshu; Kulkarni, Diwakar D.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011) and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010) viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG), cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B), chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1) and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK) in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens. PMID:27071061

  9. Validation of Tuba1a as appropriate internal control for normalization of gene expression analysis during mouse lung development.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Aditi; Dobersch, Stephanie; Dammann, Reinhard H; Bellusci, Saverio; Ilinskaya, Olga N; Braun, Thomas; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The expression ratio between the analysed gene and an internal control gene is the most widely used normalization method for quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) expression analysis. The ideal reference gene for a specific experiment is the one whose expression is not affected by the different experimental conditions tested. In this study, we validate the applicability of five commonly used reference genes during different stages of mouse lung development. The stability of expression of five different reference genes (Tuba1a, Actb Gapdh, Rn18S and Hist4h4) was calculated within five experimental groups using the statistical algorithm of geNorm software. Overall, Tuba1a showed the least variability in expression among the different stages of lung development, while Hist4h4 and Rn18S showed the maximum variability in their expression. Expression analysis of two lung specific markers, surfactant protein C (SftpC) and Clara cell-specific 10 kDA protein (Scgb1a1), normalized to each of the five reference genes tested here, confirmed our results and showed that incorrect reference gene choice can lead to artefacts. Moreover, a combination of two internal controls for normalization of expression analysis during lung development will increase the accuracy and reliability of results. PMID:25723738

  10. Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha-Mediated Genes Predicts Recurrence-Free Survival in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lianya; Zhang, Helin; Duan, Lin; He, Wenshu; Zhu, Yihua; Bai, Yunfei; Zhu, Miao

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis on high-throughput gene expression data to identify TNF-α-mediated genes implicated in lung cancer. We first investigated the gene expression profiles of two independent TNF-α/TNFR KO murine models. The EGF receptor signaling pathway was the top pathway associated with genes mediated by TNF-α. After matching the TNF-α-mediated mouse genes to their human orthologs, we compared the expression patterns of the TNF-α-mediated genes in normal and tumor lung tissues obtained from humans. Based on the TNF-α-mediated genes that were dysregulated in lung tumors, we developed a prognostic gene signature that effectively predicted recurrence-free survival in lung cancer in two validation cohorts. Resampling tests suggested that the prognostic power of the gene signature was not by chance, and multivariate analysis suggested that this gene signature was independent of the traditional clinical factors and enhanced the identification of lung cancer patients at greater risk for recurrence. PMID:25548907

  11. Gene expression signature for angiogenic and nonangiogenic non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiangting; Bianchi, Fabrizio; Ferguson, Mary; Cesario, Alfredo; Margaritora, Stefano; Granone, Pierluigi; Goldstraw, Peter; Tetlow, Michelle; Ratcliffe, Cathy; Nicholson, Andrew G; Harris, Adrian; Gatter, Kevin; Pezzella, Francesco

    2005-02-10

    Angiogenesis is regarded as essential for tumour growth. However, we have demonstrated that some other aggressive non-small-cell lung carcinomas (n-SCLC) do not have angiogenesis. In this study, using cDNA microarray analysis, we demonstrate that angiogenic and nonangiogenic tumour types can be distinguished by their gene expression profiles. Tissue samples from 42 n-SCLC patients were obtained with consent. In all, 12 tumours were nonangiogenic and 30 angiogenic. The two groups were matched by age, sex, smoking and tumour stage. Total RNAs were extracted followed by microarray hybridization and image scan procedure. Data were analysed using GeneSpring 5.1 software. A total of 62 genes were found to be able to separate angiogenic from nonangiogenic tumours. Nonangiogenic tumours have higher levels of genes concerned with mitochondrial metabolism, mRNA transcription, protein synthesis and the cell cycle. Angiogenic tumours have higher levels of genes coding for membrane vesicles, integrins, remodelling, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These results further support our first finding that nonangiogenic lung tumours are fast-growing tumours filling the alveoli in the absence of vascular remodelling. We raise the hypothesis that in nonangiogenic tumours, hypoxia leads to a higher activation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which allows tumour growth without triggering angiogenesis. PMID:15592519

  12. Temporal expression of hypoxia-regulated genes is associated with early changes in redox status in irradiated lung

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Isabel L.; Zhang, Xiuwu; Hadley, Caroline; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Zhang, Yu; Marks, Sam; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2013-01-01

    The development of normal lung tissue toxicity after radiation exposure results from multiple changes in cell signaling and communication initiated at the time of the ionizing event. The onset of gross pulmonary injury is preceded by tissue hypoxia and chronic oxidative stress. We have previously shown development of debilitating lung injury can be mitigated or prevented by administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic antioxidant, 24 hours after radiation. This suggests that hypoxia-mediated signaling pathways may play a role in late radiation injury, but the exact mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the temporal expression of hypoxia-associated genes in irradiated mouse lung and determine whether AEOL10150 alters expression of these genes. A focused oligo array was used to establish a hypoxia-associated gene expression signature for lung tissue from sham-irradiated or irradiated mice treated with or without AEOL10150. Results were further verified by RT-PCR. 44 genes associated with metabolism, cell growth, apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress and extracellular matrix synthesis were upregulated after radiation. Elevated expression of 31 of these genes was attenuated in animals treated with AEOL10150, suggesting that expression of a number of hypoxia-associated genes are regulated by early development of oxidative stress after radiation. Genes identified herein could provide insight into the role of hypoxic signaling in radiation lung injury, suggesting novel therapeutic targets, as well as clues to the mechanism by which AEOL10150 confers pulmonary radioprotection. PMID:22588005

  13. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Malard, Veronique; Berenguer, Frederic; Prat, Odette; Ruat, Sylvie; Steinmetz, Gerard; Quemeneur, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to 59 Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxicogenomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and biomarker research. Results A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BNIP3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for biomarker research. Of those, TIMP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative biomarker of cobalt toxicity was identified. PMID:17553155

  14. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  15. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  16. Combination of protein coding and noncoding gene expression as a robust prognostic classifier in stage I lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ichiro; Okayama, Hirokazu; Schetter, Aaron J; Robles, Ana I; Kohno, Takashi; Bowman, Elise D; Kazandjian, Dickran; Welsh, Judith A; Oue, Naohide; Saito, Motonobu; Miyashita, Masao; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Skaug, Vidar; Mollerup, Steen; Haugen, Aage; Yokota, Jun; Harris, Curtis C

    2013-07-01

    Prognostic tests for patients with early-stage lung cancer may provide needed guidance on postoperative surveillance and therapeutic decisions. We used a novel strategy to develop and validate a prognostic classifier for early-stage lung cancer. Specifically, we focused on 42 genes with roles in lung cancer or cancer prognosis. Expression of these biologically relevant genes and their association with relapse-free survival (RFS) were evaluated using microarray data from 148 patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma. Seven genes associated with RFS were further examined by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in 291 lung adenocarcinoma tissues from Japan, the United States, and Norway. Only BRCA1, HIF1A, DLC1, and XPO1 were each significantly associated with prognosis in the Japan and US/Norway cohorts. A Cox regression-based classifier was developed using these four genes on the Japan cohort and validated in stage I lung adenocarcinoma from the US/Norway cohort and three publicly available lung adenocarcinoma expression profiling datasets. The results suggest that the classifier is robust across ethnically and geographically diverse populations regardless of the technology used to measure gene expression. We evaluated the combination of the four-gene classifier with miRNA miR-21 (MIR21) expression and found that the combination improved associations with prognosis, which were significant in stratified analyses on stage IA and stage IB patients. Thus, the four coding gene classifier, alone or with miR-21 expression, may provide a clinically useful tool to identify high-risk patients and guide recommendations regarding adjuvant therapy and postoperative surveillance of patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23639940

  17. A Highly Efficient Gene Expression Programming (GEP) Model for Auxiliary Diagnosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Si, Hongzong; Liu, Shihai; Li, Xianchao; Gao, Caihong; Cui, Lianhua; Li, Chuan; Yang, Xue; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is an important and common cancer that constitutes a major public health problem, but early detection of small cell lung cancer can significantly improve the survival rate of cancer patients. A number of serum biomarkers have been used in the diagnosis of lung cancers; however, they exhibit low sensitivity and specificity. Methods We used biochemical methods to measure blood levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), Na+, Cl-, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 145 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients and 155 non-small cell lung cancer and 155 normal controls. A gene expression programming (GEP) model and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves incorporating these biomarkers was developed for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. Results After appropriate modification of the parameters, the GEP model was initially set up based on a training set of 115 SCLC patients and 125 normal controls for GEP model generation. Then the GEP was applied to the remaining 60 subjects (the test set) for model validation. GEP successfully discriminated 281 out of 300 cases, showing a correct classification rate for lung cancer patients of 93.75% (225/240) and 93.33% (56/60) for the training and test sets, respectively. Another GEP model incorporating four biomarkers, including CEA, NSE, LDH, and CRP, exhibited slightly lower detection sensitivity than the GEP model, including six biomarkers. We repeat the models on artificial neural network (ANN), and our results showed that the accuracy of GEP models were higher than that in ANN. GEP model incorporating six serum biomarkers performed by NSCLC patients and normal controls showed low accuracy than SCLC patients and was enough to prove that the GEP model is suitable for the SCLC patients. Conclusion We have developed a GEP model with high sensitivity and specificity for the auxiliary diagnosis of SCLC. This GEP model has the potential for the wide use

  18. Validation of the Lung Subtyping Panel in Multiple Fresh-Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tumor Gene Expression Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Faruki, Hawazin; Mayhew, Gregory M; Fan, Cheng; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Parker, Scott; Kam-Morgan, Lauren; Eisenberg, Marcia; Horten, Bruce; Hayes, D Neil; Perou, Charles M; Lai-Goldman, Myla

    2016-06-01

    Context .- A histologic classification of lung cancer subtypes is essential in guiding therapeutic management. Objective .- To complement morphology-based classification of lung tumors, a previously developed lung subtyping panel (LSP) of 57 genes was tested using multiple public fresh-frozen gene-expression data sets and a prospectively collected set of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tumor samples. Design .- The LSP gene-expression signature was evaluated in multiple lung cancer gene-expression data sets totaling 2177 patients collected from 4 platforms: Illumina RNAseq (San Diego, California), Agilent (Santa Clara, California) and Affymetrix (Santa Clara) microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Gene centroids were calculated for each of 3 genomic-defined subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and neuroendocrine, the latter of which encompassed both small cell carcinoma and carcinoid. Classification by LSP into 3 subtypes was evaluated in both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples, and agreement with the original morphology-based diagnosis was determined. Results .- The LSP-based classifications demonstrated overall agreement with the original clinical diagnosis ranging from 78% (251 of 322) to 91% (492 of 538 and 869 of 951) in the fresh-frozen public data sets and 84% (65 of 77) in the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded data set. The LSP performance was independent of tissue-preservation method and gene-expression platform. Secondary, blinded pathology review of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples demonstrated concordance of 82% (63 of 77) with the original morphology diagnosis. Conclusions .- The LSP gene-expression signature is a reproducible and objective method for classifying lung tumors and demonstrates good concordance with morphology-based classification across multiple data sets. The LSP panel can supplement morphologic assessment of lung cancers, particularly

  19. Prediction of lung cancer based on serum biomarkers by gene expression programming methods.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhuang; Chen, Xiao-Zheng; Cui, Lian-Hua; Si, Hong-Zong; Lu, Hai-Jiao; Liu, Shi-Hai

    2014-01-01

    In diagnosis of lung cancer, rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors is very important. Serum markers, including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), C-reactive protein (CRP), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA), neurone specific enolase (NSE) and Cyfra21-1, are reported to reflect lung cancer characteristics. In this study classification of lung tumors was made based on biomarkers (measured in 120 NSCLC and 60 SCLC patients) by setting up optimal biomarker joint models with a powerful computerized tool - gene expression programming (GEP). GEP is a learning algorithm that combines the advantages of genetic programming (GP) and genetic algorithms (GA). It specifically focuses on relationships between variables in sets of data and then builds models to explain these relationships, and has been successfully used in formula finding and function mining. As a basis for defining a GEP environment for SCLC and NSCLC prediction, three explicit predictive models were constructed. CEA and NSE are frequently- used lung cancer markers in clinical trials, CRP, LDH and Cyfra21-1 have significant meaning in lung cancer, basis on CEA and NSE we set up three GEP models-GEP 1(CEA, NSE, Cyfra21-1), GEP2 (CEA, NSE, LDH), GEP3 (CEA, NSE, CRP). The best classification result of GEP gained when CEA, NSE and Cyfra21-1 were combined: 128 of 135 subjects in the training set and 40 of 45 subjects in the test set were classified correctly, the accuracy rate is 94.8% in training set; on collection of samples for testing, the accuracy rate is 88.9%. With GEP2, the accuracy was significantly decreased by 1.5% and 6.6% in training set and test set, in GEP3 was 0.82% and 4.45% respectively. Serum Cyfra21-1 is a useful and sensitive serum biomarker in discriminating between NSCLC and SCLC. GEP modeling is a promising and excellent tool in diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25422226

  20. Pattern of antioxidant and DNA repair gene expression in normal airway epithelium associated with lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Blomquist, Thomas; Crawford, Erin L; Mullins, D'Anna; Yoon, Youngsook; Hernandez, Dawn-Alita; Khuder, Sadik; Ruppel, Patricia L; Peters, Elizabeth; Oldfield, David J; Austermiller, Brad; Anders, John C; Willey, James C

    2009-11-15

    In previous studies, we reported that key antioxidant and DNA repair genes are regulated differently in normal bronchial epithelial cells of lung cancer cases compared with non-lung cancer controls. In an effort to develop a biomarker for lung cancer risk, we evaluated the transcript expressions of 14 antioxidant, DNA repair, and transcription factor genes in normal bronchial epithelial cells (HUGO names CAT, CEBPG, E2F1, ERCC4, ERCC5, GPX1, GPX3, GSTM3, GSTP1, GSTT1, GSTZ1, MGST1, SOD1, and XRCC1). A test comprising these 14 genes accurately identified the lung cancer cases in two case-control studies. The receiver operating characteristic-area under the curve was 0.82 (95% confidence intervals, 0.68-0.91) for the first case-control set (25 lung cancer cases and 24 controls), and 0.87 (95% confidence intervals, 0.73-0.96) for the second set (18 cases and 22 controls). For each gene included in the test, the key difference between cases and controls was altered distribution of transcript expression among cancer cases compared with controls, with more lung cancer cases expressing at both extremes among all genes (Kolmorogov-Smirnov test, D = 0.0795; P = 0.041). A novel statistical approach was used to identify the lower and upper boundaries of transcript expression that optimally classifies cases and controls for each gene. Based on the data presented here, there is an increased prevalence of lung cancer diagnosis among individuals that express a threshold number of key antioxidant, DNA repair, and transcription factor genes at either very high or very low levels in the normal airway epithelium. PMID:19887610

  1. Altered expression of the IQGAP1 gene in human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, C.E.; Palmisano, W.A.; Lechner, J.F.

    1995-12-01

    IQGAP1 is a GTPase activation protein that accelerates GTP hydrolysis by normal p21 ras proteins. Therefore, IQGAP1 could act as an upstream affector of p21 ras activity by convert in excess amounts of active GTP-21 ras to inactive GDP-21 ras. IQGAP1 displays extensive sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of all previously reported ras GAPs, including the tumor suppressor gene protein neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). It has been shown that abnormal NF1 protein cannot negatively regulate the activity of ras proteins in neuroblast cells. This observation supports the hypothesis that NF1 is a tumor suppressor gene whose product acts upstream of ras. IQGAP1 is primarily expressed in lung, where it may play a role similar to NF1 in regulating the activity of H-ras or K-ras proteins. IQGAP1 functions as other GAPs by controlling the activity of ras.

  2. Clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 protein expression in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Changjun; Sun, Dawei; Bai, Xue; Li, Yingbin; Xu, Hai; Xu, Shidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 (beta-IGH3) protein expression in lung cancer remain unclear. This study investigated beta-IGH3 protein expression levels and biological function, as well as lung cancer prognosis. Methods Beta-IGH3 protein expression levels were measured in 236 lung cancers and were matched with adjacent noncancerous tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Subsequently, the relationship between beta-IGH3 protein expression, clinical–pathological parameters, and lung cancer prognosis was evaluated. Results Beta-IGH3 protein expression was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (61.86% vs 22.88%; P=0.01). Of the 236 enrolled cases, 146 (61.86%) showed high beta-IGH3 levels. Tumor size, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis were significantly related to beta-IGH3 protein expression in univariate analysis (P=0.001, 0.044, and 0.029, respectively), whereas age, sex, and histological type were not (P=0.038, 0.756, and 0.889, respectively). Finally, a Cox regression model also identified beta-IGH3 as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.01). Conclusion Beta-IGH3 is highly expressed in lung cancers and may be a potential target for lung cancer treatments. PMID:27563252

  3. A gene expression signature of emphysema-related lung destruction and its reversal by the tripeptide GHK

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease consisting of emphysema, small airway obstruction, and/or chronic bronchitis that results in significant loss of lung function over time. Methods In order to gain insights into the molecular pathways underlying progression of emphysema and explore computational strategies for identifying COPD therapeutics, we profiled gene expression in lung tissue samples obtained from regions within the same lung with varying amounts of emphysematous destruction from smokers with COPD (8 regions × 8 lungs = 64 samples). Regional emphysema severity was quantified in each tissue sample using the mean linear intercept (Lm) between alveolar walls from micro-CT scans. Results We identified 127 genes whose expression levels were significantly associated with regional emphysema severity while controlling for gene expression differences between individuals. Genes increasing in expression with increasing emphysematous destruction included those involved in inflammation, such as the B-cell receptor signaling pathway, while genes decreasing in expression were enriched in tissue repair processes, including the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) pathway, actin organization, and integrin signaling. We found concordant differential expression of these emphysema severity-associated genes in four cross-sectional studies of COPD. Using the Connectivity Map, we identified GHK as a compound that can reverse the gene-expression signature associated with emphysematous destruction and induce expression patterns consistent with TGFβ pathway activation. Treatment of human fibroblasts with GHK recapitulated TGFβ-induced gene-expression patterns, led to the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and elevated the expression of integrin β1. Furthermore, addition of GHK or TGFβ restored collagen I contraction and remodeling by fibroblasts derived from COPD lungs compared to fibroblasts from former smokers without

  4. Resection of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers Reverses Tumor-Induced Gene Expression Changes in the Peripheral Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Vachani, Anil; Chang, Celia; Nichols, Calen; Billouin, Shere; Horng, Wenhwai; Rom, William N.; Albelda, Steven M.; Showe, Michael K.; Showe, Louise C.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To characterize the interactions of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) tumors with the immune system at the level of mRNA and microRNA (miRNA) expression and to define expression signatures that characterize the presence of a malignant tumor vs. a non-malignant nodule. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We have examined the changes of both mRNA and miRNA expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) between paired samples collected from NSCLC patients before and after tumor removal using Illumina gene expression arrays. RESULTS We found that malignant tumor removal significantly changes expression of more than 3,000 protein-coding genes, especially genes in pathways associated with suppression of the innate immune response, including NK cell signaling and apoptosis-associated ceramide signaling. Binding sites for the ETS-domain transcription factors ELK1, ELK4 and SPI1 were enriched in promoter regions of genes upregulated in the presence of a tumor. Additional important regulators included five miRNAs expressed at significantly higher levels before tumor removal. Repressed protein-coding targets of those miRNAs included many transcription factors, several involved in immunologically important pathways. While there was a significant overlap in the effects of malignant tumors and benign lung nodules on PBMC gene expression, we identified one gene panel which indicates a tumor or nodule presence and a second panel that can distinguish malignant from non-malignant nodules. CONCLUSIONS A tumor presence in the lung influences mRNA and miRNA expression in PBMC and this influence is reversed by tumor removal. These results suggest that PBMC gene expression signatures could be used for lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:21807633

  5. Airway gene transfer in a non-human primate: lentiviral gene expression in marmoset lungs.

    PubMed

    Farrow, N; Miller, D; Cmielewski, P; Donnelley, M; Bright, R; Parsons, D W

    2013-01-01

    Genetic therapies for cystic fibrosis (CF) must be assessed for safety and efficacy, so testing in a non-human primate (NHP) model is invaluable. In this pilot study we determined if the conducting airways of marmosets (n = 2) could be transduced using an airway pre-treatment followed by an intratracheal bolus dose of a VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 based lentiviral (LV) vector (LacZ reporter). LacZ gene expression (X-gal) was assessed after 7 days and found primarily in conducting airway epithelia as well as in alveolar regions. The LacZ gene was not detected in liver or spleen via qPCR. Vector p24 protein bio-distribution into blood was transient. Dosing was well tolerated. This preliminary study confirmed the transducibility of CF-relevant airway cell types. The marmoset is a promising NHP model for testing and translating genetic treatments for CF airway disease towards clinical trials. PMID:23412644

  6. Amplification of FGFR1 gene and expression of FGFR1 protein is found in different histological types of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vitor; Reis, Diana; Silva, Maria; Alarcão, Ana Maria; Ladeirinha, Ana Filipa; d'Aguiar, Maria João; Ferreira, Teresa; Caramujo-Balseiro, Sandra; Carvalho, Lina

    2016-08-01

    Although lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer-related death, accurate diagnosis followed by personalized treatment is expected to raise the 5-year survival rate. Targeted therapies are now in routine clinical use, in particular for lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) has recently emerged as a molecular target, especially in squamous cell/epidermoid carcinoma (SQC) of the lung. This paper evaluates FGFR1 expression and gene copy number in adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, pleomorphic carcinomas (PLEOMC) and adenosquamous carcinomas (ADSQC) of the lung and also explores the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. We studied 76 lung carcinomas: 34 ADC, 24 SQC, 10 PLEOMC and 8 ADSQC. FGFR1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Higher FGFR1 protein expression was observed in all tumour types compared to non-tumour tissue. FGFR1 expression was higher in ADC and PLEOMC than in SQC. We found a tendency to higher expression in ADC than in SQC and significantly higher expression in PLEOMC than in other histological subtypes. FISH-based amplification of FGFR1 was identified in 15 (20 %) lung carcinomas: 5 (15 %) ADC, 5 (21 %) SQC, 3 (30 %) PLEOMC and 2 (25 %) ADSQC. Amplification was more frequent in SQC without significant differences. FGFR1 protein is expressed in the majority of lung carcinomas, though it is higher in ADC and PLEOMC (the latter may reflect the importance of FGFR1 control of the EMT pathway). FGFR1 amplification was identified in all types of lung carcinoma. Although FGFR1 is most frequently amplified in SQC, other histological types merit assessment of FGFR1 amplification, in order to select patients that might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:27194548

  7. Gene identification for risk of relapse in stage I lung adenocarcinoma patients: a combined methodology of gene expression profiling and computational gene network analysis.

    PubMed

    Ludovini, Vienna; Bianconi, Fortunato; Siggillino, Annamaria; Piobbico, Danilo; Vannucci, Jacopo; Metro, Giulio; Chiari, Rita; Bellezza, Guido; Puma, Francesco; Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Servillo, Giuseppe; Crinò, Lucio

    2016-05-24

    Risk assessment and treatment choice remains a challenge in early non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to identify novel genes involved in the risk of early relapse (ER) compared to no relapse (NR) in resected lung adenocarcinoma (AD) patients using a combination of high throughput technology and computational analysis. We identified 18 patients (n.13 NR and n.5 ER) with stage I AD. Frozen samples of patients in ER, NR and corresponding normal lung (NL) were subjected to Microarray technology and quantitative-PCR (Q-PCR). A gene network computational analysis was performed to select predictive genes. An independent set of 79 ADs stage I samples was used to validate selected genes by Q-PCR.From microarray analysis we selected 50 genes, using the fold change ratio of ER versus NR. They were validated both in pool and individually in patient samples (ER and NR) by Q-PCR. Fourteen increased and 25 decreased genes showed a concordance between two methods. They were used to perform a computational gene network analysis that identified 4 increased (HOXA10, CLCA2, AKR1B10, FABP3) and 6 decreased (SCGB1A1, PGC, TFF1, PSCA, SPRR1B and PRSS1) genes. Moreover, in an independent dataset of ADs samples, we showed that both high FABP3 expression and low SCGB1A1 expression was associated with a worse disease-free survival (DFS).Our results indicate that it is possible to define, through gene expression and computational analysis, a characteristic gene profiling of patients with an increased risk of relapse that may become a tool for patient selection for adjuvant therapy. PMID:27081700

  8. Early Changes in Gene Expression Induced by Tobacco Smoke: Evidence for the Importance of Estrogen within Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Meireles, Sibele I.; Esteves, Gustavo H.; Hirata, Roberto; Peri, Suraj; Devarajan, Karthik; Slifker, Michael; Mosier, Stacy L.; Peng, Jing; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Hurst, Harrell E.; Neves, E. Jordao; Reis, Luiz F.; Gairola, C. Gary; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Clapper, Margie L.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., surpassing breast cancer as the primary cause of cancer-related mortality in women. The goal of the present study was to identify early molecular changes in the lung induced by exposure to tobacco smoke and thus identify potential targets for chemoprevention. Female A/J mice were exposed to either tobacco smoke or HEPA-filtered air via a whole-body exposure chamber (6 h/day; 5 days/wk for 3, 8 and 20 wk). Gene expression profiles of lung tissue from control and smoke-exposed animals were established using a 15 K cDNA microarray. Cytochrome P450 1b1 (Cyp1b1), a Phase I enzyme involved in both the metabolism of xenobiotics and the 4-hydroxylation of 17β-estradiol, was modulated to the greatest extent following smoke exposure. A panel of 10 genes was found to be differentially expressed in control and smoke-exposed lung tissue at 3, 8 and 20 wk (P < 0.001). The interaction network of these differentially expressed genes revealed new pathways modulated by short-term smoke exposure including estrogen metabolism. In addition, 17β-estradiol was detected within murine lung tissue by gas chromatography coupled mass spectrometry and immunohistochemistry. Identification of the early molecular events that contribute to lung tumor formation is anticipated to lead to the development of promising targeted chemopreventive therapies. In conclusion, the presence of 17β-estradiol within lung tissue when combined with the modulation of Cyp1b1 and other estrogen metabolism genes by tobacco smoke provides novel insight into a possible role for estrogens in lung cancer. PMID:20515954

  9. Altered expression of gamma-synuclein and detoxification-related genes in lungs of rats exposed to JP-8.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis A; Valikhani, Mohammad; Cossio, María J; Carr, Theresa; Jung, Mira; Hyde, Juanita; Witten, Mark L; Smulson, Mark E

    2005-03-01

    Many military personnel are at risk of lung damage or systemic toxicity as a result of exposure to the jet fuel JP-8. We have now used microarray analysis to characterize changes in the gene expression profile of lung tissue induced by exposure of rats to JP-8 at a concentration of 171 or 352 mg/m(3) for 1 h/d for 7 d, with the higher dose estimated to mimic the level of occupational exposure in humans. The expression of 56 genes was significantly affected by a factor of /= 1.5 by JP-8 at the low dose. Eighty-six percent of these genes were downregulated by JP-8. The expression of 66 genes was similarly affected by JP-8 at the higher dose, with the expression of 42% of these genes being upregulated. Prominent among the latter genes was that for the centrosome-associated protein gamma-synuclein, whose expression was consistently increased. The expression of various genes related to antioxidant responses and detoxification, including those for glutathione S-transferases and cytochrome P450 proteins, were also upregulated. The microarray data were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Our extensive data set may thus provide important insight into the pulmonary response to occupational exposure to JP-8 in humans. PMID:15618438

  10. Genome wide analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression changes in the mouse lung following subchronic arsenate exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alterations in DNA methylation have been proposed as a mechanism for the complex toxicological effects of arsenic. In this study, whole genome DNA methylation and gene expression changes were evaluated in lungs from female mice exposed for 90 days to 50 ppm arsenate (As) in drink...

  11. Aberrant large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) gene expression correlates with EGFR mutation and survival in lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Susan Y.; Sit, Ko-Yung; Sihoe, Alan D.L.; Suen, Wai-Sing; Au, Wing-Kuk; Tang, Ximing; Ma, Edmond S.K.; Chan, Wai-Kong; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Minna, John D.; Tsao, George S.W.; Lam, David C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) gene is a putative tumor suppressor gene with potential roles in regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis in lung cancer. The aim of this study is to explore the association of aberrant LATS2 expression with EGFR mutation and survival in lung adenocarcinoma (AD), and the effects of LATS2 silencing in both lung AD cell lines. Methods LATS2 mRNA and protein expression in resected lung AD were correlated with demographic characteristics, EGFR mutation and survival. LATS2-specific siRNA was transfected into four EGFR wild-type (WT) and three EGFR mutant AD cell lines and the changes in LATS2 expression and relevant signaling molecules before and after LATS2 knockdown were assayed. Results Fifty resected lung AD were included (M:F = 23:27, smokers:non-smokers = 19:31, EGFR mutant:wild-type = 21:29) with LATS2 mRNA levels showed no significant difference between gender, age, smoking and pathological stages while LATS2 immunohistochemical staining on an independent set of 79 lung AD showed similar trend. LATS2 mRNA level was found to be a significant independent predictor for survival status (disease-free survival RR = 0.217; p = 0.003; Overall survival RR = 0.238; p = 0.036). siRNA-mediated suppression of LATS2 expression resulted in augmentation of ERK phosphorylation in EGFR wild-type AD cell lines with high basal LATS2 expression, discriminatory modulation of Akt signaling between EGFR wild-type and mutant cells, and induction of p53 accumulation in AD cell lines with low baseline p53 levels. Conclusions LATS2 expression level is predictive of survival in patients with resected lung AD. LATS2 may modulate and contribute to tumor growth via different signaling pathways in EGFR mutant and wild-type tumors. PMID:24976335

  12. Similarities in Gene Expression Profiles during In Vitro Aging of Primary Human Embryonic Lung and Foreskin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Marthandan, Shiva; Priebe, Steffen; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Cellerino, Alessandro; Guthke, Reinhard; Hemmerich, Peter; Diekmann, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative senescence is of fundamental importance for the process of cellular aging, since it is a property of most of our somatic cells. Here, we elucidated this process by comparing gene expression changes, measured by RNA-seq, in fibroblasts originating from two different tissues, embryonic lung (MRC-5) and foreskin (HFF), at five different time points during their transition into senescence. Although the expression patterns of both fibroblast cell lines can be clearly distinguished, the similar differential expression of an ensemble of genes was found to correlate well with their transition into senescence, with only a minority of genes being cell line specific. Clustering-based approaches further revealed common signatures between the cell lines. Investigation of the mRNA expression levels at various time points during the lifespan of either of the fibroblasts resulted in a number of monotonically up- and downregulated genes which clearly showed a novel strong link to aging and senescence related processes which might be functional. In terms of expression profiles of differentially expressed genes with age, common genes identified here have the potential to rule the transition into senescence of embryonic lung and foreskin fibroblasts irrespective of their different cellular origin. PMID:26339636

  13. Similarities in Gene Expression Profiles during In Vitro Aging of Primary Human Embryonic Lung and Foreskin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Marthandan, Shiva; Priebe, Steffen; Baumgart, Mario; Groth, Marco; Cellerino, Alessandro; Guthke, Reinhard; Hemmerich, Peter; Diekmann, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative senescence is of fundamental importance for the process of cellular aging, since it is a property of most of our somatic cells. Here, we elucidated this process by comparing gene expression changes, measured by RNA-seq, in fibroblasts originating from two different tissues, embryonic lung (MRC-5) and foreskin (HFF), at five different time points during their transition into senescence. Although the expression patterns of both fibroblast cell lines can be clearly distinguished, the similar differential expression of an ensemble of genes was found to correlate well with their transition into senescence, with only a minority of genes being cell line specific. Clustering-based approaches further revealed common signatures between the cell lines. Investigation of the mRNA expression levels at various time points during the lifespan of either of the fibroblasts resulted in a number of monotonically up- and downregulated genes which clearly showed a novel strong link to aging and senescence related processes which might be functional. In terms of expression profiles of differentially expressed genes with age, common genes identified here have the potential to rule the transition into senescence of embryonic lung and foreskin fibroblasts irrespective of their different cellular origin. PMID:26339636

  14. Current smoking-specific gene expression signature in normal bronchial epithelium is enhanced in squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Boelens, Mirjam C; van den Berg, Anke; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Geerlings, Marie; de Jong, Wouter K; te Meerman, Gerard J; Sietsma, Hannie; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S; Groen, Harry J M

    2009-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for the development of squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC). However, the smoking-related molecular changes in SCC have not been studied. Gene expression studies in both histologically normal bronchial epithelium and SCC epithelial samples identified genes differentially expressed between current and ex-smokers. Subsequently, expression levels of the smoking-related genes in normal bronchial epithelium were compared with those in SCC cells, since we hypothesized that the smoking-induced changes would be also deregulated in SCC. Gene expression profiles were generated using Agilent whole human genome microarrays on laser-microdissected normal bronchial epithelium and SCC samples. Expression levels of 246 genes, mainly related to oxidative stress response, were significantly different between normal bronchial epithelium of current and ex-smokers. Such a differential gene expression profile did not exist in SCC cells of smokers and ex-smokers. Interestingly, when comparing SCC and normal bronchial epithelium from ex-smokers, the vast majority of these 246 genes were also deregulated in SCC. When comparing SCC with normal epithelium from smokers, 22% of the up-regulated genes showed a similar high expression in SCC whereas 79% of the down-regulated genes were even further reduced in SCC as compared to current smokers. The down-regulated genes included several tumour suppressor genes, such as C9orf9, INHBB, LRIG1, SCGB3A1, SERPINI2, STEAP3 and ZMYND10. Thus, our study shows that the majority of genes up-regulated in normal bronchial epithelium of current smokers show similar high expression levels in SCC, while down-regulated genes are even further repressed in SCC. Our data indicate that smoking-related changes in normal bronchial epithelial cells persist in malignant transformed squamous cells. PMID:19334046

  15. Highly specific expression of luciferase gene in lungs of naive nude mice directed by prostate-specific antigen promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hongwei; Li Jinzhong; Helm, Gregory A.; Pan Dongfeng . E-mail: Dongfeng_pan@yahoo.com

    2005-09-09

    PSA promoter has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy in prostate cancer models. Characterization of foreign gene overexpression in normal animals elicited by PSA promoter should help evaluate therapy safety. Here we constructed an adenovirus vector (AdPSA-Luc), containing firefly luciferase gene under the control of the 5837 bp long prostate-specific antigen promoter. A charge coupled device video camera was used to non-invasively image expression of firefly luciferase in nude mice on days 3, 7, 11 after injection of 2 x 10{sup 9} PFU of AdPSA-Luc virus via tail vein. The result showed highly specific expression of the luciferase gene in lungs of mice from day 7. The finding indicates the potential limitations of the suicide gene therapy of prostate cancer based on selectivity of PSA promoter. By contrary, it has encouraging implications for further development of vectors via PSA promoter to enable gene therapy for pulmonary diseases.

  16. Gene expression analysis of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lung of healthy and COPD subjects

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Tove; Hegelund Myrbäck, Tove; Olsson, Marita; Seidegård, Janeric; Werkström, Viktoria; Zhou, Xiao-Hong; Grunewald, Johan; Gustavsson, Lena; Nord, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    This study describes for the first time the expression levels of genes encoding membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes in the lungs of ex-smoking patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes are key determinants of drug uptake, metabolism, and elimination for systemically administered as well as inhaled drugs, with consequent influence on clinical efficacy and patient safety. In this study, while no difference in gene expression was found between healthy and COPD subjects, we identified a significant regional difference in mRNA expression of both membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes between central and peripheral tissue in both healthy and COPD subjects. The majority of the differentially expressed genes were higher expressed in the central airways such as the transporters SLC2A1 (GLUT1), SLC28A3 (CNT3), and SLC22A4 (OCTN1) and the drug-metabolizing enzymes GSTZ1, GSTO2, and CYP2F1. Together, this increased knowledge of local pharmacokinetics in diseased and normal lung may improve modeling of clinical outcomes of new chemical entities intended for inhalation therapy delivered to COPD patients. In addition, based on the similarities between COPD and healthy subjects regarding gene expression of membrane transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes, our results suggest that clinical pharmacological studies in healthy volunteers could be a valid model of COPD patients regarding drug disposition of inhaled drugs in terms of drug metabolism and drug transporters. PMID:25505599

  17. Gene expression analysis in rat lungs after intratracheal exposure to nanoparticles doped with cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccini, Teresa; Fabbri, Marco; Roda, Elisa; Grazia Sacco, Maria; Manzo, Luigi; Gribaldo, Laura

    2011-07-01

    Silica nanoparticles (NPs) incorporating cadmium (Cd) have been developed for a range of potential application including drug delivery devices. Occupational Cd inhalation has been associated with emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis and lung tumours. Mechanistically, Cd can induce oxidative stress and mediate cell-signalling pathways that are involved in inflammation.This in vivo study aimed at investigating pulmonary molecular effects of NPs doped with Cd (NP-Cd, 1 mg/animal) compared to soluble CdCl2 (400 μg/animal), in Sprague Dawley rats treated intra-tracheally, 7 and 30 days after administration. NPs of silica containing Cd salt were prepared starting from commercial nano-size silica powder (HiSil™ T700 Degussa) with average pore size of 20 nm and surface area of 240 m2/g. Toxicogenomic analysis was performed by the DNA microarray technology (using Agilent Whole Rat Genome Microarray 4×44K) to evaluate changes in gene expression of the entire genome. These findings indicate that the whole genome analysis may represent a valuable approach to assess the whole spectrum of biological responses to cadmium containing nanomaterials.

  18. A gene in the chromosomal region 3p21 with greatly reduced expression in lung cancer is similar to the gene for ubiquitin-activating enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Kok, K; Hofstra, R; Pilz, A; van den Berg, A; Terpstra, P; Buys, C H; Carritt, B

    1993-01-01

    The chromosomal region 3p21 is thought to be the site of a lung tumor suppressor gene. We recently cloned a gene from this region that has greatly reduced expression in almost all lung tumor cell lines examined, in spite of being widely expressed in a variety of other tumor and nontumor cell types. We report here the sequence of this gene and show that it has significant homology to the genes encoding the ubiquitin-activating enzymes of three species, including humans. This suggests it is a second, autosomal member of this gene family in humans and may play a role in the ubiquitin conjugation pathway, which is of central importance in all eukaryotes. PMID:8327486

  19. Gene expression profiling of the effects of organic dust in lung epithelial and THP-1 cells reveals inductive effects on inflammatory and immune response genes.

    PubMed

    Boggaram, Vijay; Loose, David S; Gottipati, Koteswara R; Natarajan, Kartiga; Mitchell, Courtney T

    2016-04-01

    The intensification and concentration of animal production operations expose workers to high levels of organic dusts in the work environment. Exposure to organic dusts is a risk factor for the development of acute and chronic respiratory symptoms and diseases. Lung epithelium plays important roles in the control of immune and inflammatory responses to environmental agents to maintain lung health. To better understand the effects of organic dust on lung inflammatory responses, we characterized the gene expression profiles of A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells influenced by exposure to poultry dust extract by DNA microarray analysis using Illumina Human HT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip. We found that A549 alveolar and Beas2B bronchial epithelial and THP-1 cells responded with unique changes in the gene expression profiles with regulation of genes encoding inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other inflammatory proteins being common to all the three cells. Significantly induced genes included IL-8, IL-6, IL-1β, ICAM-1, CCL2, CCL5, TLR4, and PTGS2. Validation by real-time qRT-PCR, ELISA, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemical staining of lung sections from mice exposed to dust extract validated DNA microarray results. Pathway analysis indicated that dust extract induced changes in gene expression influenced functions related to cellular growth and proliferation, cell death and survival, and cellular development. These data show that a broad range of inflammatory mediators produced in response to poultry dust exposure can modulate lung immune and inflammatory responses. This is the first report on organic dust induced changes in expression profiles in lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells. PMID:26884459

  20. Expression and clinical significance of genes frequently mutated in small cell lung cancers defined by whole exome/RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Iwakawa, Reika; Kohno, Takashi; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Tsuta, Koji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Nishikawa, Ryo; Noguchi, Masayuki; Harris, Curtis C.; Robles, Ana I.; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive type of lung cancer. Only 15% of SCLC patients survive beyond 2 years after diagnosis. Therefore, for the improvement of patients’ outcome in this disease, it is necessary to identify genetic alterations applicable as therapeutic targets in SCLC cells. The purpose of this study is the identification of genes frequently mutated and expressed in SCLCs that will be targetable for therapy of SCLC patients. Exome sequencing was performed in 28 primary tumors and 16 metastatic tumors from 38 patients with SCLCs. Expression of mutant alleles was verified in 19 cases by RNA sequencing. TP53, RB1 and PTEN were identified as being significantly mutated genes. Additional 36 genes were identified as being frequently (≥10%) mutated in SCLCs by combining the results of this study and two recent studies. Mutated alleles were expressed in 8 of the 36 genes, TMEM132D, SPTA1, VPS13B, CSMD2, ANK2, ASTN1, ASPM and FBN3. In particular, the TMEM132D, SPTA1 and VPS13B genes were commonly mutated in both early and late stage tumors, primary tumors and metastases, and tumors before and after chemotherapy, as in the case of the TP53 and RB1 genes. Therefore, in addition to TP53, RB1 and PTEN, TMEM132D, SPTA1 and VPS13B could be also involved in SCLC development, with the products from their mutated alleles being potential therapeutic targets in SCLC patients. PMID:25863124

  1. Expression and clinical significance of genes frequently mutated in small cell lung cancers defined by whole exome/RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Iwakawa, Reika; Kohno, Takashi; Totoki, Yasushi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Mimaki, Sachiyo; Tsuta, Koji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Nishikawa, Ryo; Noguchi, Masayuki; Harris, Curtis C; Robles, Ana I; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru; Totsuka, Hirohiko; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Yokota, Jun

    2015-06-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is the most aggressive type of lung cancer. Only 15% of SCLC patients survive beyond 2 years after diagnosis. Therefore, for the improvement of patients' outcome in this disease, it is necessary to identify genetic alterations applicable as therapeutic targets in SCLC cells. The purpose of this study is the identification of genes frequently mutated and expressed in SCLCs that will be targetable for therapy of SCLC patients. Exome sequencing was performed in 28 primary tumors and 16 metastatic tumors from 38 patients with SCLCs. Expression of mutant alleles was verified in 19 cases by RNA sequencing. TP53, RB1 and PTEN were identified as being significantly mutated genes. Additional 36 genes were identified as being frequently (≥10%) mutated in SCLCs by combining the results of this study and two recent studies. Mutated alleles were expressed in 8 of the 36 genes, TMEM132D, SPTA1, VPS13B, CSMD2, ANK2, ASTN1, ASPM and FBN3. In particular, the TMEM132D, SPTA1 and VPS13B genes were commonly mutated in both early and late stage tumors, primary tumors and metastases, and tumors before and after chemotherapy, as in the case of the TP53 and RB1 genes. Therefore, in addition to TP53, RB1 and PTEN, TMEM132D, SPTA1 and VPS13B could be also involved in SCLC development, with the products from their mutated alleles being potential therapeutic targets in SCLC patients. PMID:25863124

  2. The Effect of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Expression of FHIT in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S.; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1Met/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1Met/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth inhibition was achieved. PMID:22085272

  3. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiang; Liu, Xingang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  4. Integrated Analysis of DNA Methylation and mRNA Expression Profiles Data to Identify Key Genes in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiang; Li, Xiaodan; Guan, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lung adenocarcinoma (LAC) is the most frequent type of lung cancer and has a high metastatic rate at an early stage. This study is aimed at identifying LAC-associated genes. Materials and Methods. GSE62950 downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus included a DNA methylation dataset and an mRNA expression profiles dataset, both of which included 28 LAC tissue samples and 28 adjacent normal tissue samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by Limma package in R, and their functions were predicted by enrichment analysis using TargetMine online tool. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using STRING and Cytoscape. Finally, LAC-associated methylation sites were identified by CpGassoc package in R and mapped to the DEGs to obtain LAC-associated DEGs. Results. Total 913 DEGs were identified in LAC tissues. In the PPI networks, MAD2L1, AURKB, CCNB2, CDC20, and WNT3A had higher degrees, and the first four genes might be involved in LAC through interaction. Total 8856 LAC-associated methylation sites were identified and mapped to the DEGs. And there were 29 LAC-associated methylation sites located in 27 DEGs (e.g., SH3GL2, BAI3, CDH13, JAM2, MT1A, LHX6, and IGFBP3). Conclusions. These key genes might play a role in pathogenesis of LAC. PMID:27610375

  5. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression of Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma-Derived A549 Clones

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Keiko; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Noma, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy appears to be promising for restoring damaged or irreparable lung tissue. However, establishing a simple and reproducible protocol for preparing lung progenitor populations is difficult because the molecular basis for alveolar epithelial cell differentiation is not fully understood. We investigated an in vitro system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of alveolus-specific gene expression using a human alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell line, A549. After cloning A549 subpopulations, each clone was classified into five groups according to cell morphology and marker gene expression. Two clones (B7 and H12) were further analyzed. Under serum-free culture conditions, surfactant protein C (SPC), an ATII marker, was upregulated in both H12 and B7. Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), an ATI marker, was upregulated in H12 and significantly induced in B7. When the RAS/MAPK pathway was inhibited, SPC and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) expression levels were enhanced. After treatment with dexamethasone (DEX), 8-bromoadenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), surfactant protein B and TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. We found that A549-derived clones have plasticity in gene expression of alveolar epithelial differentiation markers and could be useful in studying ATII maintenance and differentiation. PMID:26167183

  6. Indications for distinct pathogenic mechanisms of asbestos and silica through gene expression profiling of the response of lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Timothy N.; Peeters, Paul M.; Shukla, Arti; Arijs, Ingrid; Dragon, Julie; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Reynaert, Niki L.; Mossman, Brooke T.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational and environmental exposures to airborne asbestos and silica are associated with the development of lung fibrosis in the forms of asbestosis and silicosis, respectively. However, both diseases display distinct pathologic presentations, likely associated with differences in gene expression induced by different mineral structures, composition and bio-persistent properties. We hypothesized that effects of mineral exposure in the airway epithelium may dictate deviating molecular events that may explain the different pathologies of asbestosis versus silicosis. Using robust gene expression-profiling in conjunction with in-depth pathway analysis, we assessed early (24 h) alterations in gene expression associated with crocidolite asbestos or cristobalite silica exposures in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEs). Observations were confirmed in an immortalized line (BEAS-2B) by QRT-PCR and protein assays. Utilization of overall gene expression, unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis and integrated pathway analysis revealed gene alterations that were common to both minerals or unique to either mineral. Our findings reveal that both minerals had potent effects on genes governing cell adhesion/migration, inflammation, and cellular stress, key features of fibrosis. Asbestos exposure was most specifically associated with aberrant cell proliferation and carcinogenesis, whereas silica exposure was highly associated with additional inflammatory responses, as well as pattern recognition, and fibrogenesis. These findings illustrate the use of gene-profiling as a means to determine early molecular events that may dictate pathological processes induced by exogenous cellular insults. In addition, it is a useful approach for predicting the pathogenicity of potentially harmful materials. PMID:25351596

  7. ACUTE OZONE-INDUCED INFLAMMATORY GENE EXPRESSION IN THE RAT LUNG IS NOT RELATED TO LEVELS OF ANTIOXIDANTS IN THE LAVAGE FLUID

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Ozone causes oxidative stress and lung inflammation. We hypothesized that rat strains with or without genetic susceptibility to cardiovascular disease will have different antioxidant levels in alveolar lining, and that ozone induced inflammatory gene expression wil...

  8. Subchronic inhalation of soluble manganese induces expression of hypoxia-associated angiogenic genes in adult mouse lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Bredow, Sebastian . E-mail: sbredow@LRRI.org; Falgout, Melanie M.; March, Thomas H.; Yingling, Christin M.; Malkoski, Stephen P.; Aden, James; Bedrick, Edward J.; Lewis, Johnnye L.; Divine, Kevin K.

    2007-06-01

    Although the lung constitutes the major exposure route for airborne manganese (Mn), little is known about the potential pulmonary effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Transition metals can mimic a hypoxia-like response, activating the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) transcription factor family. Through binding to the hypoxia-response element (HRE), these factors regulate expression of many genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Increases in VEGF, an important biomarker of angiogenesis, have been linked to respiratory diseases, including pulmonary hypertension. The objective of this study was to evaluate pulmonary hypoxia-associated angiogenic gene expression in response to exposure of soluble Mn(II) and to assess the genes' role as intermediaries of potential pulmonary Mn toxicity. In vitro, 0.25 mM Mn(II) altered morphology and slowed the growth of human pulmonary epithelial cell lines. Acute doses between 0.05 and 1 mM stimulated VEGF promoter activity up to 3.7-fold in transient transfection assays. Deletion of the HRE within the promoter had no effect on Mn(II)-induced VEGF expression but decreased cobalt [Co(II)]-induced activity 2-fold, suggesting that HIF-1 may not be involved in Mn(II)-induced VEGF gene transcription. Nose-only inhalation to 2 mg Mn(II)/m{sup 3} for 5 days at 6 h/day produced no significant pulmonary inflammation but induced a 2-fold increase in pulmonary VEGF mRNA levels in adult mice and significantly altered expression of genes associated with murine angiogenesis. These findings suggest that even short-term exposures to soluble, occupationally relevant Mn(II) concentrations may alter pulmonary gene expression in pathways that ultimately could affect the lungs' susceptibility to respiratory disease.

  9. Identification of Gene Expression Differences between Lymphangiogenic and Non-Lymphangiogenic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Erin; Sibley, Robert C.; Cenik, Bercin Kutluk; Silva, Asitha; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Dellinger, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that lung tumors induce the formation of lymphatic vessels. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling tumor lymphangiogenesis in lung cancer have not been fully delineated. In the present study, we identify a panel of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines that induce lymphangiogenesis and use genome-wide mRNA expression to characterize the molecular mechanisms regulating tumor lymphangiogenesis. We show that Calu-1, H1993, HCC461, HCC827, and H2122 NSCLC cell lines form tumors that induce lymphangiogenesis whereas Calu-3, H1155, H1975, and H2073 NSCLC cell lines form tumors that do not induce lymphangiogenesis. By analyzing genome-wide mRNA expression data, we identify a 17-gene expression signature that distinguishes lymphangiogenic from non-lymphangiogenic NSCLC cell lines. Importantly, VEGF-C is the only lymphatic growth factor in this expression signature and is approximately 50-fold higher in the lymphangiogenic group than in the non-lymphangiogenic group. We show that forced expression of VEGF-C by H1975 cells induces lymphangiogenesis and that knockdown of VEGF-C in H1993 cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the triple angiokinase inhibitor, nintedanib (small molecule that blocks all FGFRs, PDGFRs, and VEGFRs), suppresses tumor lymphangiogenesis in H1993 tumors. Together, these data suggest that VEGF-C is the dominant driver of tumor lymphangiogenesis in NSCLC and reveal a specific therapy that could potentially block tumor lymphangiogenesis in NSCLC patients. PMID:26950548

  10. Identification of miRNAs and differentially expressed genes in early phase non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wen; Liu, Jie; Pei, Baojing; Wang, Xiaobo; Guo, Yu; Yuan, Lin

    2016-04-01

    To explore the potential therapeutic targets of early‑stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), gene microarray analysis was conducted. The microarray data of NSCLC in stage IA, IB, IIA, and IIB (GSE50081), were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in IB vs. IA, IIA vs. IB, IIB vs. IIA were screened out via R. ToppGene Suite was used to get the enriched Gene Ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways of the DEGs. The GeneCoDis3 database and Cytoscape software were used to construct the transcriptional regulatory network. In total, 25, 17 and 14 DEGs were identified in IB vs. IA, IIA vs. IB, IIB vs. IIA of NSCLC, respectively. Some GO terms and pathways (e.g., extracellular space, alveolar lamellar body, bioactivation via cytochrome P450 pathway) were found significantly enriched in DEGs. Genes S100P, ALOX15B, CCL11, NLRP2, SERPINA3, FoxO4 and hsa-miR-491 may play important roles in the development of early-stage NSCLC. Thus, by bioinformatics analysis the key genes and biological processes involving in the development of early-stage NSCLC could be established, providing more potential references for the therapeutic targets. PMID:26781349

  11. Heterogeneity of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 gene expression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    SMIRNOV, SERHEY; PASHKEVICH, ANASTASIYA; LIUNDYSHEVA, VALERIYA; BABENKO, ANDREY; SMOLYAKOVA, RAISA

    2015-01-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) gene expression analysis is currently used widely in the molecular diagnosis of cancer. According to numerous studies, ERCC1 gene expression correlates with overall survival and effectiveness of chemotherapy with platinum agents. However, the degree of this correlation differs among various studies, with certain authors reporting a complete lack of such a correlation. These contradictions may be attributed to a number of factors, including the heterogeneity of the tumor tissue. In this study, we attempted to assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity exhibited by tissue samples obtained from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) through the expression of the ERCC1 gene. This study included 25 samples of tumor tissue from patients with a morphologically confirmed NSCLC diagnosis. A total of three randomized sections of each specimen were used. The ERCC1 gene expression was assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in the TaqMan format. When planning the experiment and analysis of qPCR data, the MIQE guidelines were taken into consideration. We established that the coefficient of variation of the relative level of ERCC1 gene expression in the majority of the samples exceeded 33% (P<0.05), indicating the significant heterogeneity of the sample. We also demonstrated that the degree of heterogeneity of the tumor tissue is largely dependent on disease stage. PMID:25469300

  12. Gene Expression and Pathway Analysis of Effects of the CMAH Deactivation on Mouse Lung, Kidney and Heart

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Chang, Byung-Soo; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-01-01

    Background N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is generated by hydroxylation of CMP-Neu5Ac to CMP-Neu5Gc, catalyzed by CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (CMAH). However, humans lack this common mammalian cell surface molecule, Neu5Gc, due to inactivation of the CMAH gene during evolution. CMAH is one of several human-specific genes whose function has been lost by disruption or deletion of the coding frame. It has been suggested that CMAH inactivation has resulted in biochemical or physiological characteristics that have resulted in human-specific diseases. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify differential gene expression profiles associated with the loss of Neu5Gc expression, we performed microarray analysis using Illumina MouseRef-8 v2 Expression BeadChip, using the main tissues (lung, kidney, and heart) from control mice and CMP-Neu5Ac hydroxylase (Cmah) gene knock-out mice, respectively. Out of a total of 25,697 genes, 204, 162, and 147 genes were found to be significantly modulated in the lung, kidney, and heart tissues of the Cmah null mouse, respectively. In this study, we examined the gene expression profiles, using three commercial pathway analysis software packages: Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis, and Pathway Studio. The gene ontology analysis revealed that the top 6 biological processes of these genes included protein metabolism and modification, signal transduction, lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism, nucleoside, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, immunity and defense, and carbohydrate metabolism. Gene interaction network analysis showed a common network that was common to the different tissues of the Cmah null mouse. However, the expression of most sialytransferase mRNAs of Hanganutziu-Deicher antigen, sialy-Tn antigen, Forssman antigen, and Tn antigen was significantly down-regulated in the liver tissue of Cmah null mice. Conclusions/Significance Mice bearing a human-like deletion of the Cmah gene

  13. In situ detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcripts in human lung granulomas reveals differential gene expression in necrotic lesions.

    PubMed

    Fenhalls, Gael; Stevens, Liesel; Moses, Lorraine; Bezuidenhout, Juanita; Betts, Joanna C; Helden Pv, Paul van; Lukey, Pauline T; Duncan, Ken

    2002-11-01

    We have used RNA-RNA in situ hybridization to detect the expression of several Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes in tuberculous granulomas in lung tissue sections from tuberculosis patients. The M. tuberculosis genes chosen fall into two classes. Four genes (icl, narX, and Rv2557 and Rv2558) have been implicated in the persistence of the bacterium in the host, and two genes (iniB and kasA) are upregulated in response to isoniazid exposure. Both necrotic and nonnecrotic granulomas were identified in all of the patients. Necrotic granulomas were divided into three zones: an outer lymphocyte cuff containing lymphocytes and macrophages, a transition zone consisting of necrotic material interspersed with macrophages, and a central acellular necrotic region. Transcripts of all of the genes studied were found in nonnecrotic granulomas and in the lymphocyte cuff of necrotic granulomas. Mycobacterial gene expression was associated with CD68-positive myeloid cells. Rv2557 and/or its homologue Rv2558, kasA, and iniB were expressed within the transition zone of necrotic granulomas, whereas icl and narX transcripts were absent from this area. There was no evidence of transcription of any of the genes examined in the central necrotic region, although mycobacterial DNA was present. The differential expression of genes within granulomas demonstrates that M. tuberculosis exists in a variety of metabolic states and may be indicative of the response to different microenvironments. These observations confirm that genes identified in models of persistence or in response to drug treatment in vitro are expressed in the human host. PMID:12379712

  14. Decreased Expression of Surfactant Protein Genes Is Associated with an Increased Expression of Forkhead Box M1 Gene in the Fetal Lung Tissues of Premature Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Won-Ho; Chang, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyung Suk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recently, Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) was reported to be correlated with lung maturation and expression of surfactant proteins (SPs) in mice models. However, no study has been conducted in rabbit lungs despite their high homology with human lungs. Thus, we attempted to investigate serial changes in the expressions of FoxM1 and SP-A/B throughout lung maturation in rabbit fetuses. Materials and Methods Pregnant New Zealand White rabbits were grouped according to gestational age from 5 days before to 2 days after the day of expected full term delivery (F5, F4, F3, F2, F1, F0, P1, and P2). A total of 64 fetuses were enrolled after Cesarean sections. The expressions of mRNA and proteins of FoxM1 and SP-A/B in fetal lung tissue were tested by quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, their correlations were analyzed. Results The mRNA expression of SP-A/B showed an increasing tendency positively correlated with gestational age, while the expression of FoxM1 mRNA and protein decreased from F5 to F0. A significant negative correlation was found between the expression levels of FoxM1 and SP-A/B (SP-A: R=-0.517, p=0.001; SP-B: R=-0.615, p<0.001). Conclusion Preterm rabbits demonstrated high expression of FoxM1 mRNA and protein in the lungs compared to full term rabbits. Also, the expression of SP-A/B was inversely related with serial changes in FoxM1 expression. This is the first report to suggest an association between FoxM1 and expression of SP-A/B and lung maturation in preterm rabbits. PMID:24142647

  15. A polymorphic minisatellite region of BORIS regulates gene expression and its rare variants correlate with lung cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Roh, Yun-Gil; Chu, In-Sun; Heo, Jeonghoon; Kim, Seung Il; Chang, Heekyung; Kang, Tae-Hong; Chung, Jin Woong; Koh, Sang Seok; Larionov, Vladimir; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of BORIS/CTCFL (Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites/CTCF-like protein) is reported in different malignancies. In this study, we characterized the entire promoter region of BORIS/CTCFL, including the CpG islands, to assess the relationship between BORIS expression and lung cancer. To simplify the construction of luciferase reporter cassettes with various-sized portions of the upstream region, genomic copies of BORIS were isolated using TAR cloning technology. We analyzed three promoter blocks: the GATA/CCAAT box, the CpG islands and the minisatellite region BORIS-MS2. Polymorphic minisatellite sequences were isolated from genomic DNA prepared from the blood of controls and cases. Of the three promoter blocks, the GATA/CCAAT box was determined to be a critical element of the core promoter, while the CpG islands and the BORIS-MS2 minisatellite region were found to act as regulators. Interestingly, the polymorphic minisatellite region BORIS-MS2 was identified as a negative regulator that repressed the expression levels of luciferase reporter cassettes less effectively in cancer cells compared with normal cells. We also examined the association between the size of BORIS-MS2 and lung cancer in a case–control study with 590 controls and 206 lung cancer cases. Rare alleles of BORIS-MS2 were associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–4.08; and P=0.039). To conclude, our data provide information on the organization of the BORIS promoter region and gene regulation in normal and cancer cells. In addition, we propose that specific alleles of the BORIS-MS2 region could be used to identify the risk for lung cancer. PMID:27416782

  16. A polymorphic minisatellite region of BORIS regulates gene expression and its rare variants correlate with lung cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Se-Lyun; Roh, Yun-Gil; Chu, In-Sun; Heo, Jeonghoon; Kim, Seung Il; Chang, Heekyung; Kang, Tae-Hong; Chung, Jin Woong; Koh, Sang Seok; Larionov, Vladimir; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of BORIS/CTCFL (Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites/CTCF-like protein) is reported in different malignancies. In this study, we characterized the entire promoter region of BORIS/CTCFL, including the CpG islands, to assess the relationship between BORIS expression and lung cancer. To simplify the construction of luciferase reporter cassettes with various-sized portions of the upstream region, genomic copies of BORIS were isolated using TAR cloning technology. We analyzed three promoter blocks: the GATA/CCAAT box, the CpG islands and the minisatellite region BORIS-MS2. Polymorphic minisatellite sequences were isolated from genomic DNA prepared from the blood of controls and cases. Of the three promoter blocks, the GATA/CCAAT box was determined to be a critical element of the core promoter, while the CpG islands and the BORIS-MS2 minisatellite region were found to act as regulators. Interestingly, the polymorphic minisatellite region BORIS-MS2 was identified as a negative regulator that repressed the expression levels of luciferase reporter cassettes less effectively in cancer cells compared with normal cells. We also examined the association between the size of BORIS-MS2 and lung cancer in a case-control study with 590 controls and 206 lung cancer cases. Rare alleles of BORIS-MS2 were associated with a statistically significantly increased risk of lung cancer (odds ratio, 2.04; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-4.08; and P=0.039). To conclude, our data provide information on the organization of the BORIS promoter region and gene regulation in normal and cancer cells. In addition, we propose that specific alleles of the BORIS-MS2 region could be used to identify the risk for lung cancer. PMID:27416782

  17. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  18. The effects of differential polyadenylation on expression of the dihydrofolate reductase-encoding gene in Chinese hamster lung cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Hussain, A; Melera, P W

    1995-10-01

    Three differently sized mRNAs are expressed from each of two DHFR (encoding dihydrofolate reductase) alleles present in the Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line, DC-3F. The relative abundancy of the transcripts produced from each allele differs dramatically as a result of differential utilization of the multiple poly(A) sites present in the DHFR DHFR gene and a genetic polymorphism located within the third poly(A) signal of one allele. We sought to determine whether such differences in polyadenylation affect the steady-state levels of DHFR and mRNAs expressed from either allele and, in a more general sense, to ask whether differences in 3' end RNA processing in a gene containing multiple poly(A) sites affects the final level of gene expression. An SV40 promoter-based transient expression system producing chimeric cat::DHFR transcripts was developed to regenerate the in vivo mRNA polyadenylation patterns associated with each of the two DHFR alleles. The results demonstrate that the total amount of polyadenylated RNA expressed from each of these constructs in vitro is the same regardless of the differential utilization of the poly(A) signals that occurs between them. Moreover, measurement of the individual turnover rates of the DHFR mRNAs expressed in vivo from each allele, as determined by pulse-chase labeling and actinomycin D inhibition studies, revealed no significant allele-specific differences in transcript half-lives. Finally, measuring the steady-state levels of DHFR poly(A)+ mRNA in parental DC-3F cells demonstrated that both alleles are expressed to the same extent during normal growth. Thus, even though dramatic allele-specific differences in 3' end processing of DHFR transcripts occur in vivo, such differences do not appear to influence the steady-state levels of DHFR gene expression. PMID:7590264

  19. Lentiviral Delivery of RNAi for In Vivo Lineage-Specific Modulation of Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew A; Kwok, Letty W; Porter, Emily L; Payne, Julie G; McElroy, Gregory S; Ohle, Sarah J; Greenhill, Sara R; Blahna, Matthew T; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Jean, Jyh C; Mizgerd, Joseph P; Kotton, Darrell N

    2013-01-01

    Although RNA interference (RNAi) has become a ubiquitous laboratory tool since its discovery 12 years ago, in vivo delivery to selected cell types remains a major technical challenge. Here, we report the use of lentiviral vectors for long-term in vivo delivery of RNAi selectively to resident alveolar macrophages (AMs), key immune effector cells in the lung. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of this approach by RNAi-based downregulation of p65 (RelA), a component of the pro-inflammatory transcriptional regulator, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and a key participant in lung disease pathogenesis. In vivo RNAi delivery results in decreased induction of NF-κB and downstream neutrophilic chemokines in transduced AMs as well as attenuated lung neutrophilia following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Through concurrent delivery of a novel lentiviral reporter vector (lenti-NF-κB-luc-GFP) we track in vivo expression of NF-κB target genes in real time, a critical step towards extending RNAi-based therapy to longstanding lung diseases. Application of this system reveals that resident AMs persist in the airspaces of mice following the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation, thus allowing these localized cells to be used as effective vehicles for prolonged RNAi delivery in disease settings. PMID:23403494

  20. Gene expression analysis of microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Erin A.; Ng, Kevin W.; Anderson, Christine; Hubaux, Roland; Thu, Kelsie L.; Lam, Wan L.; Martinez, Victor D.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and has a five-year survival rate of 18% [1]. MARK2 is a serine/threonine-protein kinase, and is a key component in the phosphorylation of microtubule-associated proteins [2], [3]. A recent study published by Hubaux et al. found that microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 (MARK2) showed highly frequent DNA and RNA level disruption in lung cancer cell lines and independent non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cohorts [4]. These alterations result in the acquisition of oncogenic properties in cell lines, such as increased viability and anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, a microarray-based transcriptome analysis of three short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated MARK2 knockdown lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (GEO#: GSE57966) revealed an association between MARK2 gene expression and cell cycle activation and DNA damage response. Here, we present a detailed description of transcriptome analysis to support the described role of MARK2 in promoting a malignant phenotype. PMID:26697357

  1. Profiling Analysis of Histone Modifications and Gene Expression in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Murine Cells Resistant to Anti-VEGF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yanhua; Chen, Kaiming; Liu, Zhenping; Li, Bing; Li, Jie; Tao, Fei; Gu, Hua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells become resistant after long-term use of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents. Our previous study shows that treatment with a VEGF inhibitor (VEGF-Trap) facilitates to develop tumor resistance through regulating angiogenesis-related genes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Histone modifications as a key epigenetic factor play a critical role in regulation of gene expression. Here, we explore the potential epigenetic gene regulatory functions of key histone modifications during tumor resistance in a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line. We generated high resolution genome-wide maps of key histone modifications in sensitive tumor sample (LLC-NR) and resistant tumor sample (LLC-R) after VEGF-Trap treatment. Profiling analysis of histone modifications shows that histone modification levels are effectively predictive for gene expression. Composition of promoters classified by histone modification state is different between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines regardless of CpG content. Histone modification state change between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines shows different patterns in CpG-rich and CpG-poor promoters. As a consequence, genes with different level of CpG content whose gene expression level are altered are enriched in distinct functions. Notably, histone modification state change in promoters of angiogenesis-related genes consists with their expression alteration. Taken together, our findings suggest that treatment with anti-VEGF therapy results in extensive histone modification state change in promoters with multiple functions, particularly, biological processes related to angiogenesis, likely contributing to tumor resistance development. PMID:27362259

  2. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis-Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Wu, Honglu; Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine respirable dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans. One of the particular interests in the study is to evaluate dust-induced changes of the expression of fibrosis-related genes, and to identify specific signaling pathways involved in lunar dustinduced toxicity. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 milligrams per cubic meters of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected by lavaging with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A zymosan-induced luminolbased chemiluminescence assay was used to assess the activity of BAL cells. The lavaged lung tissue was snap frozen in LN2 and total RNA was isolated using the Qigen RNeasy kit. The expression of 84 fibrosisrelated genes were analyzed using the RT2 Profiler PCR Array technique. The expression of 18 genes of interest were further measured using real-time PCR technique in all the samples. 10 out of 18 genes of interest showed persistently significant expression changes in the local lung tissue exposed to lunar dust, indicating a prolonged proinflammatory response. The expressions of several of these genes were dose- and time-dependent and were significantly correlated with other pathological parameters. The potential signaling pathways and upstream regulators were further analyzed using IPA pathway analysis tool based on the gene expression data. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explore the

  3. Effects of the Demethylating Agent, 5-Azacytidine, on Expression of the Kallikrein-Kinin Genes in Carcinoma Cells of the Lung and Pleura

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Joshua; Sia, Yee Yen; Misso, Neil L.; Aggarwal, Shashi; Ng, Angeline; Bhoola, Kanti D.

    2011-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) and plasma kallikrein (KLKB1) may regulate the growth and proliferation of tumours of the lung and pleura, through the generation of kinin peptides that signal through the kinin B1 (BDKRB1) and B2 (BDKRB2) receptors. The development and progression of cancer results from genetic mutations, as well as epigenetic changes that include methylation of DNA at CpG islands. The aim of this study was to assess whether expression of the kallikrein-kinin genes in lung cancer and mesothelioma cells is regulated by DNA methylation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed differences in the basal expression of the kallikrein-kinin genes and proteins in lung carcinoma and mesothelioma cells, compared with non-malignant lung epithelial and mesothelial cells, respectively. Following treatment with the demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA), KLKB1 mRNA expression was consistently increased in both lung carcinoma and mesothelioma cells, whereas KLK1, BDKRB1 and BDKRB2 mRNA expression was decreased or unchanged. Increased expression of KLKB1 after 5-AZA treatment suggests it may function as a tumour suppressor gene in cancers of the lung and pleura. Studies on DNA methylation of the kallikrein-kinin genes will enhance understanding of their role in carcinogenesis and provide insights into the importance of kallikreins as tumour biomarkers. PMID:21904690

  4. Transcriptional regulation of SP-B gene expression by nitric oxide in H441 lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Boggaram, Vijay; Chandru, Hemakumar; Gottipati, Koteswara Rao; Thakur, Vijayander; Das, Aparajita; Berhane, Kiflu

    2010-08-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) is essential for the surface tension-lowering function of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant dysfunction and reduced SP-B levels are associated with elevated nitric oxide (NO) in inflammatory lung diseases, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. We previously found that NO donors decreased SP-B expression in H441 and MLE-12 lung epithelial cells by reducing SP-B promoter activity. In this study, we determined the roles of DNA elements and interacting transcription factors necessary for NO inhibition of SP-B promoter activity in H441 cells. We found that the NO donor diethylenetriamine-nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO) decreased SP-B promoter thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), hepatocyte nuclear factor 3 (HNF-3), and Sp1 binding activities but increased activator protein 1 (AP-1) binding activity. DETA-NO decreased TTF-1, but not Sp1, levels, suggesting that reduced TTF-1 expression contributes to reduced TTF-1 binding activity. Lack of effect on Sp1 levels suggested that DETA-NO inhibits Sp1 binding activity per se. Overexpression of Sp1, but not TTF-1, blocked DETA-NO inhibition of SP-B promoter activity. DETA-NO inhibited SP-B promoter induction by exogenous TTF-1 without altering TTF-1 levels. DETA-NO decreased TTF-1 mRNA levels and gene transcription rate, indicating that DETA-NO inhibits TTF-1 expression at the transcriptional level. We conclude that NO inhibits SP-B promoter by decreasing TTF-1, Sp1, and HNF-3 binding activities and increasing AP-1 binding activity. NO inhibits TTF-1 levels and activity to decrease SP-B expression. NO inhibition of SP-B expression could be a mechanism by which surfactant dysfunction occurs in inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:20418387

  5. Hoxb-5 down regulation alters Tenascin-C, FGF10 and Hoxb gene expression patterns in pseudoglandular period fetal mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Volpe, MaryAnn V; Ramadurai, Sujatha M; Pham, Lucia D; Nielsen, Heber C

    2007-01-01

    Organ-specific patterning is partly determined by Hox gene regulatory interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), cell adhesion and fibroblast growth factor (FGFs) signaling pathways but coordination of these mechanisms in lung development is unknown. We have previously shown that Hoxb-5 affects airway patterning during lung morphogenesis. Hoxb-5 regulation in fetal lung affects ECM expression of tenascin-C and alters FGF10 spatial and cellular expression. To test this hypothesis, gestational day 13.5 (Gd13.5) fetal mouse lung fibroblasts and whole lungs were cultured with Hoxb-5-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). Western blots showed that siRNA-down regulation of Hoxb-5 led to decreased tenascin-C and FGF10 and was associated with increased Hoxb-4 and decreased Hoxb-6 protein levels. Hoxa-5 protein levels were not affected. Hoxb-5 siRNA-treated whole lung cultures had a significant decrease in total lung and peripheral branching region surface area. Immunostaining showed negligible levels of Hoxb-5 protein and tenascin-C, and loss of FGF10 spatial restriction. We conclude that Hoxb-5 helps regulate lung airway development through modulation of ECM expression of tenascin-C. ECM changes induced by Hoxb-5 may affect mesenchymal-epithelial cell signaling to alter spatial and cellular restriction of FGF10. Hoxb-5 may also affect lung airway branching indirectly by cross regulation of other Hoxb genes. PMID:17127343

  6. Increased gene expression for VEGF and the VEGF receptors KDR/Flk and Flt in lungs exposed to acute or to chronic hypoxia. Modulation of gene expression by nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Tuder, R M; Flook, B E; Voelkel, N F

    1995-01-01

    Endothelial cells constitute an essential integrator of factors that effect blood vessel remodeling induced by chronic hypoxia. We hypothesized that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may participate in the lung response to acute and to chronic hypoxia. We found that ex vivo perfusion of isolated lungs under hypoxic conditions (when compared with normoxia) caused an increase in lung tissue mRNA of VEGF and of the VEGF receptors KDR/Flk and Flt. Chronic hypobaric hypoxia also increased lung tissue mRNA levels of VEGF, KDR/Flk, and Flt and the amount of VEGF protein. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated increased VEGF and KDR/flk hybridization signals in lungs from chronically hypoxic rats. Since endotoxin treatment of rats decreased lung VEGF mRNA, we postulated that nitric oxide (NO) or an NO-related metabolite might be involved in lung VEGF gene expression. Indeed, sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, decreased and L-NAME (N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester), an inhibitor of NO-synthesis, increased both VEGF and VEGF receptor transcripts. We conclude that VEGF in the isolated perfused lung acts as an early gene in response to hypoxia and that lung VEGF and VEGF receptor mRNA levels are influenced by hypoxia and NO-dependent mechanisms. Images PMID:7706486

  7. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Theriot, Corey; Zalesak, Selina; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of reactive dust, containing 1-2% of respirable fine dust (< 3 microns). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents through inhalation to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans and to identify the mechanisms and potential pathways involved in lunar dust-induced toxicity. Ccl3, Ccl12, Cxcl2, Cxcl5, Itgb8, Tnf, Ldhc, Clec4e, Bmp7, and Smad6, showed persistently significant expression changes in the lung tissue. The expression of several of these genes were dose- and time- dependent, and were significantly correlated with other pathological. Our previous data showed that no pathological changes were detected in low dose groups. However, several genes, primarily produced by lung epithelial, were significantly altered persistently in response to low-dose dust exposure. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity, contributing not only the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also understandings of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  8. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis: Identification of Intelectin-1 and -2 as Stat6-dependent genes expressed in lung and intestine during infection

    PubMed Central

    Voehringer, David; Stanley, Sarah A.; Cox, Jeffery S.; Completo, Gladys C.; Lowary, Todd L.; Locksley, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Elimination of the helminth parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis from infected mice is mediated by IL-4 or IL-13 and dependent on the IL-4Rα chain and the transcription factor Stat6 in non-hematopoietic cells. However, it is not clear which Stat6-dependent effector molecules mediate worm expulsion. We identified intelectin-1 and -2 as Stat6-dependent genes that are induced during infection. Intelectins can bind galactofuranose, a sugar present only in microorganisms and might therefore serve as microbial pattern element. To analyze whether constitutive expression of intelectin-1 or -2 leads to accelerated pathogen clearance, transgenic mice were generated which express high levels of these genes selectively in the lung. Infection with N. brasiliensis or Mycobacterium tuberculosis did not result in accelerated pathogen clearance in transgenic as compared to wild-type mice. Further, no significant modulation of the immune response in lung or lymph nodes was observed. Thus, under these conditions, intelectins did not enhance pathogen clearance. PMID:17420014

  9. Global gene expression profiling reveals a suppressed immune response pathway associated with 3q amplification in squamous carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jun; Zou, Yong; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Bing; Massion, Pierre P.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 3q26–28 is a critical region of genomic amplification in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), particularly lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). No molecular therapeutic target has shown clinical utility for SCC, in contrast with adenocarcinomas of the lung. To identify novel candidate drivers in this region, we performed both Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH, Agilent Human Genome CGH 244A oligo-microarrays) and Gene Expression Microarray (Agilent Human Gene Expression 4 × 44 K microarray) on 24 untreated lung SCC specimens. Using our previously published integrative genomics approach, we identified 12 top amplified driver genes within this region that are highly correlated and overexpressed in lung SCC. We further demonstrated one of the 12 top amplified driver Fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1) as a novel cancer gene in NSCLC and FXR1 executes its regulatory function by forming a novel complex with two other oncogenes, protein kinase C, iota ( PRKCI) and epithelial cell transforming 2 (ECT2) within the same amplicon in lung cancer cell. Here we report that immune response pathways are significantly suppressed in lung SCC and negatively associated with 3q driver gene expression, implying a potential role of 3q drivers in cancer immune-surveillance. In light of the attractive immunotherapy strategy using blockade of negative regulators of T cell function for multiple human cancer including lung SCC, our findings may provide a rationale for targeting 3q drivers in combination of immunotherapies for human tumors harboring the 3q amplicon. The data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE40089. PMID:26484266

  10. DNA Repair Genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jingyan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Liu, Qi; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery combined with chemotherapy is an important therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, chemotherapy drug resistance seriously hinders the curative effect. Studies show that DNA repair genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 are associated with NSCLC chemotherapy, but their expression and mechanism in NSCLC chemotherapy drug-resistant cells has not been elucidated. MATERIAL AND METHODS NSCLC cell line A549 and drug resistance cell line A549/DDP were cultured. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to detect ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression. A549/DDP cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group; the siRNA-negative control group (scramble group); and the siRNA ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection group. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression. MTT was used to detect cell proliferation activity. Caspase 3 activity was tested by use of a kit. Western blot analysis was performed to detect PI3K, AKT, phosphorylated PI3K, and phosphorylated AKT protein expression. RESULTS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in A549/DDP compared with A549 (P<0.05). ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection can significantly reduce ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 expression obviously inhibited cell proliferation and increased caspase 3 activity (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 significantly decreased PI3K and AKT phosphorylation levels (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in NSCLC drug-resistant cells, and they regulated lung cancer occurrence and development through the phosphorylating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27289442

  11. DNA Repair Genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Chemotherapy Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuai; Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jingyan; Chen, Peng; Liu, Hongxing; Liu, Qi; Han, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgery combined with chemotherapy is an important therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, chemotherapy drug resistance seriously hinders the curative effect. Studies show that DNA repair genes ERCC1 and BRCA1 are associated with NSCLC chemotherapy, but their expression and mechanism in NSCLC chemotherapy drug-resistant cells has not been elucidated. Material/Methods NSCLC cell line A549 and drug resistance cell line A549/DDP were cultured. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to detect ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA expression. A549/DDP cells were randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group; the siRNA-negative control group (scramble group); and the siRNA ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection group. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to determine ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression. MTT was used to detect cell proliferation activity. Caspase 3 activity was tested by use of a kit. Western blot analysis was performed to detect PI3K, AKT, phosphorylated PI3K, and phosphorylated AKT protein expression. Results ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in A549/DDP compared with A549 (P<0.05). ERCC1 and BRCA1siRNA transfection can significantly reduce ERCC1 and BRCA1 mRNA and protein expression (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 expression obviously inhibited cell proliferation and increased caspase 3 activity (P<0.05). Downregulating ERCC1 and BRCA1 significantly decreased PI3K and AKT phosphorylation levels (P<0.05). Conclusions ERCC1 and BRCA1 were overexpressed in NSCLC drug-resistant cells, and they regulated lung cancer occurrence and development through the phosphorylating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PMID:27289442

  12. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene over expression correlates with poor prognosis in non small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycolysis in presence of oxygen with high glucose consumption is known to be the metabolism of choice in many tumors. In lung cancer this phenomenon is routinely exploited in diagnostic PET imaging of fluorodeoxyglucose uptake, but not much is known about the prognostic capabilities of glycolysis level assessment in resected lung tumor samples. Methods In this retrospective study, we used real time polymerase chain reaction(RQ-PCR) to assess the expression level of the gene for Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase(GAPDH), key enzyme for glucose breakdown, in tumor samples from 82 consecutive early stages resected non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) patients. We then compared our results in six large publicly available NSCLC microarray datasets collecting data from over 1250 total patients. Results In our study GAPDH gene over expression was found to be an adverse prognostic factor in early stages NSCLC (n = 82 HR = 1.30 p = 0.050). This result was confirmed in 5 of 6 public datasets analyzed: Shedden et al. 2008: n = 442 HR = 1.54 p < 0.0001; Lee et al. 2008: n = 138 HR = 1.31 p = 0.043; Tomida et al. 2009: n = 117 HR = 1.59 p = 0.004; Roepman et al. 2009: n = 172 (TPI1 gene) HR = 1.51 p = 0.009; Okayama et al. 2012: n = 226 HR = 3.19 p < 0.0001; Botling et al. 2013: n = 196 HR = 1.00 p = 0.97). Furthermore, in the large and clinically well annotated Shedden et al. microarray dataset, GAPDH hazard ratio did not change whether calculated for the whole dataset or for the subgroup of adjuvant naive patients only (n = 330 HR = 1.49 p < 0.0001). Conclusion GAPDH gene over expression in resected tumor samples is an adverse prognostic factor in NSCLC. Our results confirm the prognostic value of glucose metabolism assessment in NSCLC. PMID:23988223

  13. Gene expression profiles of lung adenocarcinoma linked to histopathological grading and survival but not to EGF-R status: a microarray study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several different gene expression signatures have been proposed to predict response to therapy and clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma. Herein, we investigate if elements of published gene sets can be reproduced in a small dataset, and how gene expression profiles based on limited sample size relate to clinical parameters including histopathological grade and EGFR protein expression. Methods Affymetrix Human Genome U133A platform was used to obtain gene expression profiles of 28 pathologically and clinically annotated adenocarcinomas of the lung. EGFR status was determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results Using unsupervised clustering algorithms, the predominant gene expression signatures correlated with the histopathological grade but not with EGFR protein expression as detected by immunohistochemistry. In a supervised analysis, the signature of high grade tumors but not of EGFR overexpressing cases showed significant enrichment of gene sets reflecting MAPK activation and other potential signaling cascades downstream of EGFR. Out of four different previously published gene sets that had been linked to prognosis, three showed enrichment in the gene expression signature associated with favorable prognosis. Conclusions In this dataset, histopathological tumor grades but not EGFR status were associated with dominant gene expression signatures and gene set enrichment reflecting oncogenic pathway activation, suggesting that high immunohistochemistry EGFR scores may not necessarily be linked to downstream effects that cause major changes in gene expression patterns. Published gene sets showed association with patient survival; however, the small sample size of this study limited the options for a comprehensive validation of previously reported prognostic gene expression signatures. PMID:20196851

  14. Fenugreek extract diosgenin and pure diosgenin inhibit the hTERT gene expression in A549 lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Ghareghomi, Somayyeh; Haddadchi, Gholamreza; Milani, Morteza; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Daroushnejad, Hasan

    2014-09-01

    Trigonella foenum-graecum generally known as fenugreek, has been normally cultivated in Asia and Africa for the edible and medicinal values of its seeds. Fenugreek leaves and seeds have been used widely for therapeutic purposes. Fenugreek seed is recognized to show anti-diabetic and anti-nociceptive properties and other things such as hypocholesterolaemic, and anti-cancer. Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin from therapeutic herbs, fenugreek (T. foenum-graceum L.), has been well-known to have anticancer properties. Telomerase activity is not identified in usual healthy cells, while in carcinogenic cell telomerase expression is reactivated. Therefore telomerase illustrates a promising cancer therapeutic target. We deliberate the inhibitory effect of pure diosgenin and fenugreek extract diosgenin on human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT) expression which is critical for telomerase activity. MTT-assay and qRT-PCR analysis were achieved to discover cytotoxicity effects and hTERT gene expression inhibition properties, separately. MTT results exhibited that IC50 for pure diosgenin were 47, 44 and 43 µM and for fenugreek extract diosgenin were 49, 48 and 47 µM for 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment. Culturing cells with pure diosgenin and fenugreek extract diosgenin treatment caused in down regulation of hTERT expression. These results indication that pure and impure diosgenin prevents telomerase activity by down regulation of the hTERT gene expression in A549 lung cancer cell line, with the difference that pure compound is more effective than another. PMID:24973886

  15. Chemokine gene expression in lung CD8 T cells correlates with protective immunity in mice immunized intra-nasally with Adenovirus-85A

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Immunization of BALB/c mice with a recombinant adenovirus expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) antigen 85A (Ad85A) protects against aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis only when it is administered intra-nasally (i.n.). Immunization with Ad85A induces a lung-resident population of activated CD8 T cells that is antigen dependent, highly activated and mediates protection by early inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth. In order to determine why the i.n. route is so effective compared to parenteral immunization, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression profiles of pulmonary and splenic CD8 T cells after i.n. or intra-dermal (i.d.) immunization. Method Total RNA from CD8 T cells was isolated from lungs or spleens of mice immunized with Ad85A by the i.n. or i.d. route. The gene profiles generated from each condition were compared. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differentially expressed genes were analyzed to determine if they mapped to particular molecular functions, biological processes or pathways using Gene Ontology and Panther DB mapping tools. Results CD8 T cells from lungs of i.n. immunized mice expressed a large number of chemokines chemotactic for resting and activated T cells as well as activation and survival genes. Lung lymphocytes from i.n. immunized mice also express the chemokine receptor gene Cxcr6, which is thought to aid long-term retention of antigen-responding T cells in the lungs. Expression of CXCR6 on CD8 T cells was confirmed by flow cytometry. Conclusions Our microarray analysis represents the first ex vivo study comparing gene expression profiles of CD8 T cells isolated from distinct sites after immunization with an adenoviral vector by different routes. It confirms earlier phenotypic data indicating that lung i.n. cells are more activated than lung i.d. CD8 T cells. The sustained expression of chemokines and activation genes enables CD8 T cells to remain in the lungs for extended periods after

  16. Demethoxycurcumin alters gene expression associated with DNA damage, cell cycle and apoptosis in human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ko, Yang-Ching; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Hsiao, Yung-Ting; Hsia, Te-Chun; Yang, Su-Tso; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths and new lung cancer cases are continuously emerging around the globe; however, treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Demethoxycurcumin (DMC) has been shown to exert cytotoxic effects in human cancer cells via induction of apoptosis. However, the effects of DMC on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions have not been yet elucidated. Human lung cancer NCI-H460 cells were incubated with or without 35 μM of DMC for 24 h and total RNA was extracted for cDNA synthesis labeling and microarray hybridization, followed by fluor-labeled cDNA hybridization on chip. Expression Console software with default Robust Multichip Analysis (RMA) parameters were used for detecting and quantitating the localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules. The GeneGo software was used for investigating key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. Genes associated with DNA damage and repair, cell-cycle check point and apoptosis could be altered by DMC; in particular, 144 genes were found up-regulated and 179 genes down-regulated in NCI-H460 cells after exposure to DMC. In general, DMC-altered genes may offer information to understand the cytotoxic mechanism of this agent at the genetic level since gene alterations can be useful biomarkers or targets for the diagnosis and treatment of human lung cancer in the future. PMID:25600535

  17. FGFR1 mRNA and Protein Expression, not Gene Copy Number, Predict FGFR TKI Sensitivity Across All Lung Cancer Histologies

    PubMed Central

    Wynes, Murry W.; Hinz, Trista K.; Gao, Dexiang; Martini, Michael; Marek, Lindsay A.; Ware, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Böhm, Diana; Perner, Sven; Helfrich, Barbara A.; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek; Wojtylak, Szymon; Sejda, Aleksandra; Gozgit, Joseph M.; Bunn, Paul A.; Camidge, D. Ross; Tan, Aik-Choon; Hirsch, Fred R.; Heasley, Lynn E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose FGFR1 gene copy number (GCN) is being evaluated as a biomarker for FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) response in squamous-cell lung cancers (SCC). The exclusive use of FGFR1 GCN for predicting FGFR TKI sensitivity assumes increased GCN is the only mechanism for biologically-relevant increases in FGFR1 signaling. Herein, we tested whether FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression may serve as better biomarkers of FGFR TKI sensitivity in lung cancer. Experimental Design Histologically diverse lung cancer cell lines were submitted to assays for ponatinib sensitivity, a potent FGFR TKI. A tissue microarray comprised of resected lung tumors was submitted to FGFR1 GCN and mRNA analyses and the results were validated with TCGA lung cancer data. Results 14/58 cell lines exhibited ponatinib sensitivity (IC50 values ≤ 50 nM) that correlated with FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression, but not with FGFR1 GCN or histology. Moreover, ponatinib sensitivity associated with mRNA expression of the ligands, FGF2 and FGF9. In resected tumors, 22% of adenocarcinomas and 28% of SCCs expressed high FGFR1 mRNA. Importantly, only 46% of SCCs with increased FGFR1 GCN expressed high mRNA. Lung cancer TCGA data validated these findings and unveiled overlap of FGFR1 mRNA positivity with KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Conclusions FGFR1 dependency is frequent across various lung cancer histologies and FGFR1 mRNA may serve as a better biomarker of FGFR TKI response in lung cancer than FGFR1 GCN. The study provides important and timely insight into clinical testing of FGFR TKIs in lung cancer and other solid tumor types. PMID:24771645

  18. Wnt signaling induces gene expression of factors associated with bone destruction in lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachelle W; Merkel, Alyssa R; Page, Jonathan M; Ruppender, Nazanin S; Guelcher, Scott A; Sterling, Julie A

    2014-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is an important regulator of bone destruction in bone metastatic tumors. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates PTHrP production in part through the transcription factor Gli2, which is regulated independent of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in osteolytic cancer cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β in vivo does not fully inhibit tumor growth in bone or tumor-induced bone destruction, suggesting other pathways are involved. While Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 in development, the role of Wnt signaling in bone metastasis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 expression in tumor cells that induce bone destruction. We report here that Wnt activation by β-catenin/T cell factor 4 (TCF4) over-expression or lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment increased Gli2 and PTHrP expression in osteolytic cancer cells. This was mediated through the TCF and Smad binding sites within the Gli2 promoter as determined by promoter mutation studies, suggesting cross-talk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Culture of tumor cells on substrates with bone-like rigidity increased Gli2 and PTHrP production, enhanced autocrine Wnt activity and led to an increase in the TCF/Wnt signaling reporter (TOPFlash), enriched β-catenin nuclear accumulation, and elevated Wnt-related genes by PCR-array. Stromal cells serve as an additional paracrine source of Wnt ligands and enhanced Gli2 and PTHrP mRNA levels in MDA-MB-231 and RWGT2 cells in vitro and promoted tumor-induced bone destruction in vivo in a β-catenin/Wnt3a-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that a combination of matrix rigidity and stromal-secreted factors stimulate Gli2 and PTHrP through Wnt signaling in osteolytic breast cancer cells, and there is significant cross-talk between the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. This suggests that the Wnt signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor cell response to the bone

  19. Wnt signaling induces gene expression of factors associated with bone destruction in lung and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rachelle W.; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Page, Jonathan M.; Ruppender, Nazanin S.; Guelcher, Scott A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is an important regulator of bone destruction in bone metastatic tumors. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) stimulates PTHrP production in part through the transcription factor Gli2, which is regulated independent of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in osteolytic cancer cells. However, inhibition of TGF-β in vivo does not fully inhibit tumor growth in bone or tumor-induced bone destruction, suggesting other pathways are involved. While Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 in development, the role of Wnt signaling in bone metastasis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether Wnt signaling regulates Gli2 expression in tumor cells that induce bone destruction. We report here that Wnt activation by β-catenin/T-cell factor 4 (TCF4) over-expression or lithium chloride (LiCl) treatment increased Gli2 and PTHrP expression in osteolytic cancer cells. This was mediated through the TCF and Smad binding sites within the Gli2 promoter as determined by promoter mutation studies, suggesting cross-talk between TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Culture of tumor cells on substrates with bone-like rigidity increased Gli2 and PTHrP production, enhanced autocrine Wnt activity and led to an increase in the TCF/Wnt signaling reporter (TOPFlash), enriched β-catenin nuclear accumulation, and elevated Wnt-related genes by PCR-array. Stromal cells serve as an additional paracrine source of Wnt ligands and enhanced Gli2 and PTHrP mRNA levels in MDA-MB-231 and RWGT2 cells in vitro and promoted tumor-induced bone destruction in vivo in a β-catenin/Wnt3a-dependent mechanism. These data indicate that a combination of matrix rigidity and stromal-secreted factors stimulate Gli2 and PTHrP through Wnt signaling in osteolytic breast cancer cells, and there is significant cross-talk between the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways. This suggests that the Wnt signaling pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor cell response to the bone

  20. Global gene expression changes in human embryonic lung fibroblasts induced by organic extracts from respirable air particles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently, we used cell-free assays to demonstrate the toxic effects of complex mixtures of organic extracts from urban air particles (PM2.5) collected in four localities of the Czech Republic (Ostrava-Bartovice, Ostrava-Poruba, Karvina and Trebon) which differed in the extent and sources of air pollution. To obtain further insight into the biological mechanisms of action of the extractable organic matter (EOM) from ambient air particles, human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL12469) were treated with the same four EOMs to assess changes in the genome-wide expression profiles compared to DMSO treated controls. Method For this purpose, HEL cells were incubated with subtoxic EOM concentrations of 10, 30, and 60 μg EOM/ml for 24 hours and global gene expression changes were analyzed using human whole genome microarrays (Illumina). The expression of selected genes was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Results Dose-dependent increases in the number of significantly deregulated transcripts as well as dose-response relationships in the levels of individual transcripts were observed. The transcriptomic data did not differ substantially between the localities, suggesting that the air pollution originating mainly from various sources may have similar biological effects. This was further confirmed by the analysis of deregulated pathways and by identification of the most contributing gene modulations. The number of significantly deregulated KEGG pathways, as identified by Goeman's global test, varied, depending on the locality, between 12 to 29. The Metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450 exhibited the strongest upregulation in all 4 localities and CYP1B1 had a major contribution to the upregulation of this pathway. Other important deregulated pathways in all 4 localities were ABC transporters (involved in the translocation of exogenous and endogenous metabolites across membranes and DNA repair), the Wnt and TGF-β signaling pathways (associated

  1. Sensitivity of Small Cell Lung Cancer to BET Inhibition Is Mediated by Regulation of ASCL1 Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Lenhart, Ryan; Kirov, Stefan; Desilva, Heshani; Cao, Jian; Lei, Ming; Johnston, Kathy; Peterson, Russell; Schweizer, Liang; Purandare, Ashok; Ross-Macdonald, Petra; Fairchild, Craig; Wong, Tai; Wee, Susan

    2015-10-01

    The BET (bromodomain and extra-terminal) proteins bind acetylated histones and recruit protein complexes to promote transcription elongation. In hematologic cancers, BET proteins have been shown to regulate expression of MYC and other genes that are important to disease pathology. Pharmacologic inhibition of BET protein binding has been shown to inhibit tumor growth in MYC-dependent cancers, such as multiple myeloma. In this study, we demonstrate that small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth inhibition by the BET inhibitor JQ1. JQ1 treatment has no impact on MYC protein expression, but results in downregulation of the lineage-specific transcription factor ASCL1. SCLC cells that are sensitive to JQ1 are also sensitive to ASCL1 depletion by RNAi. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies confirmed the binding of the BET protein BRD4 to the ASCL1 enhancer, and the ability of JQ1 to disrupt the interaction. The importance of ASCL1 as a potential driver oncogene in SCLC is further underscored by the observation that ASCL1 is overexpressed in >50% of SCLC specimens, an extent greater than that observed for other putative oncogenes (MYC, MYCN, and SOX2) previously implicated in SCLC. Our studies have provided a mechanistic basis for the sensitivity of SCLC to BET inhibition and a rationale for the clinical development of BET inhibitors in this disease with high unmet medical need. PMID:26253517

  2. Hidden Treasures in “Ancient” Microarrays: Gene-Expression Portrays Biology and Potential Resistance Pathways of Major Lung Cancer Subtypes and Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kerkentzes, Konstantinos; Lagani, Vincenzo; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Vyberg, Mogens; Røe, Oluf Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Novel statistical methods and increasingly more accurate gene annotations can transform “old” biological data into a renewed source of knowledge with potential clinical relevance. Here, we provide an in silico proof-of-concept by extracting novel information from a high-quality mRNA expression dataset, originally published in 2001, using state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches. Methods: The dataset consists of histologically defined cases of lung adenocarcinoma (AD), squamous (SQ) cell carcinoma, small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid, metastasis (breast and colon AD), and normal lung specimens (203 samples in total). A battery of statistical tests was used for identifying differential gene expressions, diagnostic and prognostic genes, enriched gene ontologies, and signaling pathways. Results: Our results showed that gene expressions faithfully recapitulate immunohistochemical subtype markers, as chromogranin A in carcinoids, cytokeratin 5, p63 in SQ, and TTF1 in non-squamous types. Moreover, biological information with putative clinical relevance was revealed as potentially novel diagnostic genes for each subtype with specificity 93–100% (AUC = 0.93–1.00). Cancer subtypes were characterized by (a) differential expression of treatment target genes as TYMS, HER2, and HER3 and (b) overrepresentation of treatment-related pathways like cell cycle, DNA repair, and ERBB pathways. The vascular smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, and actin cytoskeleton pathways were overexpressed in normal tissue. Conclusion: Reanalysis of this public dataset displayed the known biological features of lung cancer subtypes and revealed novel pathways of potentially clinical importance. The findings also support our hypothesis that even old omics data of high quality can be a source of significant biological information when appropriate bioinformatics methods are used. PMID:25325012

  3. Novel functional germline variants in the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 gene and their effect on gene expression and microvessel density in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Glubb, Dylan M; Cerri, Elisa; Giese, Alexandra; Zhang, Wei; Mirza, Osman; Thompson, Emma E.; Chen, Peixian; Das, Soma; Jassem, Jacek; Rzyman, Witold; Lingen, Mark W.; Salgia, Ravi; Hirsch, Fred R.; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Innocenti, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Purpose VEGFR-2 plays a crucial role in mediating angiogenic endothelial cell responses via the VEGF pathway and angiogenesis inhibitors targeting VEGFR-2 are in clinical use. As angiogenesis is a host-driven process, functional heritable variation in KDR, the gene encoding VEGFR-2, may affect VEGFR-2 function, and ultimately, the extent of tumor angiogenesis. Experimental Design We resequenced KDR using 24 DNAs each from healthy Caucasian, African American and Asian groups. Non-synonymous genetic variants were assessed for function using phosphorylation assays. Luciferase reporter gene assays were used to examine effects of variants on gene expression. KDR mRNA and protein expression, and microvessel density (MVD) were measured in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor samples and matching patient DNA samples were genotyped to test for associations with variants of interest. Results KDR resequencing led to the discovery of 120 genetic variants, of which 25 had not been previously reported. Q472H had increased VEGFR-2 protein phosphorylation and associated with increased MVD in NSCLC tumor samples. −2854C and −2455A increased luciferase expression and associated with higher KDR mRNA levels in NSCLC samples. −271A reduced luciferase expression and associated with lower VEGFR-2 levels in NSCLC samples. −906C and 23408G, associated with higher KDR mRNA levels in NSCLC samples. Conclusions This study has defined KDR genetic variation in three populations and identified common variants that impact on tumoral KDR expression and vascularization. These findings may have important implications for understanding the molecular basis of genetic associations between KDR variation and clinical phenotypes related to VEGFR-2 function. PMID:21712447

  4. Curcumin alters gene expression-associated DNA damage, cell cycle, cell survival and cell migration and invasion in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Tsang; Wang, Wei-Shu; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Su-Tso; Tang, Nou-Ying; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality and new cases are on the increase worldwide. However, the treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Curcumin has been shown to induce cell death in many human cancer cells, including human lung cancer cells. However, the effects of curcumin on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions remain unclear. Curcumin (2 µM) was added to NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells and the cells were incubated for 24 h. Total RNA was extracted from isolated cells for cDNA synthesis, labeling, microarray hybridization and flour‑labeled cDNA hybridized on chip. Localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules were detected and quantified using Expression Console software (Affymetrix) with default RMA parameters. GeneGo software was used for the key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. The results showed that ~170 genes were significantly upregulated and 577 genes were significantly downregulated in curcumin‑treated cells. Specifically, the up‑ and downregulated genes included CCNE2, associated with DNA damage; ID3, associated with cell survival and 146 genes with a >2- to 3-fold change including the TP53INP1 gene, associated with DNA damage; CDC6, CDCA5, TAKMIP2, CDK14, CDK5, CDCA76, CDC25A, CDC5L and SKP2, associated with cell cycle; the CARD6, ID1 and ID2 genes, associated with cell survival and the BRMS1L, associated with cell migration and invasion. Additionally, 59 downregulated genes exhibited a >4-fold change, including the DDIT3 gene, associated with DNA damage; while 97 genes had a >3- to 4-fold change including the DDIT4 gene, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle and 321 genes with a >2- to 3-fold including the GADD45A and CGREF1 genes, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle, the TNFRSF10B, GAS5, TSSC1 and TNFRSF11B gene, associated with cell survival and the ARHAP29 and CADM2 genes, associated with cell migration

  5. Effect of ambient PM(2.5) on lung mitochondrial damage and fusion/fission gene expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruijin; Kou, Xiaojing; Geng, Hong; Xie, Jingfang; Yang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Yuexia; Cai, Zongwei; Dong, Chuan

    2015-03-16

    Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of respiratory disease. Although previous mitochondrial research has provided new information about PM toxicity in the lung, the exact mechanism of PM2.5-mediated structural and functional damage of lung mitochondria remains unclear. In this study, changes in lung mitochondrial morphology, expression of mitochondrial fission/fusion markers, lipid peroxidation, and transport ATPase activity in SD rats exposed to ambient PM2.5 at different dosages were investigated. Also, the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the respiratory burst in rat alveolar macrophages (AMs) exposed to PM2.5 was examined by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). The results showed that (1) PM2.5 deposited in the lung and induced pathological damage, particularly causing abnormal alterations of mitochondrial structure, including mitochondrial swelling and cristae disorder or even fragmentation in the presence of higher doses of PM2.5; (2) PM2.5 significantly affected the expression of specific mitochondrial fission/fusion markers (OPA1, Mfn1, Mfn2, Fis1, and Drp1) in rat lung; (3) PM2.5 inhibited Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities and elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) content in rat lung mitochondria; and (4) PM2.5 induced rat AMs to produce ROS, which was inhibited by about 84.1% by diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI), an important ROS generation inhibitor. It is suggested that the pathological injury observed in rat lung exposed to PM2.5 is associated with mitochondrial fusion-fission dysfunction, ROS generation, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, and cellular homeostasis imbalance. Damage to lung mitochondria may be one of the important mechanisms by which PM2.5 induces lung injury, contributing to respiratory diseases. PMID:25560372

  6. DIFFERENTIAL LUNG GENE EXPRESSION IN IMMUNOLOGICALLY-CHALLENGED RATS EXPOSED TO CONCENTRATED AIRBORNE PARTICULATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Children residing in urbanized areas suffer disproportionately higher asthma-related morbidity and mortality. One explanation is that inner city children are exposured to higher levels of environmental asthma triggers such as airborne particulate matter. To elucidate gene-environ...

  7. Localization of type I procollagen gene expression in silica-induced granulomatous lung disease and implication of transforming growth factor-beta as a mediator of fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, T. J.; Roby, J. D.; Mecham, R. P.; Parks, W. C.; Crouch, E.; Pierce, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    We have used the silica-induced model of pulmonary injury in the rat to study the pattern of collagen expression in granulomatous lung inflammation. A single intratracheal instillation of silica into adult rats resulted in granulomatous inflammation leading to fibrosis and alveolar proteinosis. The development of disease in these animals was characterized over a 27-day period after treatment by means of histological, biochemical, and molecular analyses. Biochemical analyses indicated that significant increases in the weights of silicotic lungs were due to elevated amounts of DNA and total protein. Analysis of hydroxyproline content showed a 15-fold increase in this amino acid in silicotic lungs, confirming the development of a fibrotic reaction. In situ hybridization for type I procollagen mRNA displayed increased gene expression in the parenchyma, conducting airways, and vasculature of silicotic rats. Within the parenchyma, type I procollagen was expressed uniquely within granulomatous lesions. Immunohistochemistry indicated type I procollagen was being expressed by an alpha-smooth muscle actin-negative population of cells. Immunolocalization of extra-cellular transforming growth factor-beta showed coincident temporal and spatial overlap with type I procollagen expression, implicating this cytokine as a mediator of collagen gene expression in this model. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8546202

  8. Retinoid Homeostatic Gene Expression in Liver, Lung and Kidney: Ontogeny and Response to Vitamin A-Retinoic Acid (VARA) Supplementation from Birth to Adult Age.

    PubMed

    Owusu, Sarah A; Ross, A Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA, retinol) metabolism is homeostatically controlled, but little is known of its regulation in the postnatal period. Here, we determined the postnatal trajectory of VA storage and metabolism in major compartments of VA metabolism-plasma, liver, lung, and kidney from postnatal (P) day 1 to adulthood. We also investigated the response to supplementation with VARA, a combination of VA and 10% all-trans-retinoic acid that previously was shown to synergistically increase retinol uptake and storage in lung. Nursling pups of dams fed a VA-marginal diet received an oral dose of oil (placebo) or VARA on each of four neonatal days: P1, P4, P7, and P10; and again as adults. Tissues were collected 6 h after the final dosing on P1, P4, P10, and at adult age. Gene transcripts for Lrat and Rbp4 in liver and Raldh-1 and Raldh-3 in lung, did not differ in the neonatal period but were higher, P<0.05, in adults, while Cyp26B1, Stra6, megalin, and Raldh-2 in lung did not differ from perinatal to adult ages. VARA supplementation increased total retinol in plasma, liver and lung, with a dose-by-dose accumulation in neonatal liver and lung, while transcripts for Lrat in liver, megalin in kidney, Cyp26A1/B1 in liver and lung, respectively, and Stra6 in lung, were all increased, suggesting pathways of VA uptake, storage and RA oxidation were each augmented after VARA. VARA decreased hepatic expression of Rbp4, responsible for VA trafficking from liver to plasma, and, in lung, of Raldh-1 and Raldh-2, which function in RA production. Our results define retinoid homeostatic gene expression from neonatal and adult age and show that while supplementation with VARA acutely alters retinol content and retinoid homeostatic gene expression in neonatal and adult lung, liver and kidney, VARA supplementation of neonates increased adult-age VA content only in the liver. PMID:26731668

  9. Retinoid Homeostatic Gene Expression in Liver, Lung and Kidney: Ontogeny and Response to Vitamin A-Retinoic Acid (VARA) Supplementation from Birth to Adult Age

    PubMed Central

    Owusu, Sarah A.; Ross, A. Catharine

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin A (VA, retinol) metabolism is homeostatically controlled, but little is known of its regulation in the postnatal period. Here, we determined the postnatal trajectory of VA storage and metabolism in major compartments of VA metabolism–plasma, liver, lung, and kidney from postnatal (P) day 1 to adulthood. We also investigated the response to supplementation with VARA, a combination of VA and 10% all-trans-retinoic acid that previously was shown to synergistically increase retinol uptake and storage in lung. Nursling pups of dams fed a VA-marginal diet received an oral dose of oil (placebo) or VARA on each of four neonatal days: P1, P4, P7, and P10; and again as adults. Tissues were collected 6 h after the final dosing on P1, P4, P10, and at adult age. Gene transcripts for Lrat and Rbp4 in liver and Raldh-1 and Raldh-3 in lung, did not differ in the neonatal period but were higher, P<0.05, in adults, while Cyp26B1, Stra6, megalin, and Raldh-2 in lung did not differ from perinatal to adult ages. VARA supplementation increased total retinol in plasma, liver and lung, with a dose-by-dose accumulation in neonatal liver and lung, while transcripts for Lrat in liver, megalin in kidney, Cyp26A1/B1 in liver and lung, respectively, and Stra6 in lung, were all increased, suggesting pathways of VA uptake, storage and RA oxidation were each augmented after VARA. VARA decreased hepatic expression of Rbp4, responsible for VA trafficking from liver to plasma, and, in lung, of Raldh-1 and Raldh-2, which function in RA production. Our results define retinoid homeostatic gene expression from neonatal and adult age and show that while supplementation with VARA acutely alters retinol content and retinoid homeostatic gene expression in neonatal and adult lung, liver and kidney, VARA supplementation of neonates increased adult-age VA content only in the liver. PMID:26731668

  10. Association and Virulence Gene Expression Vary among Serotype III Group B Streptococcus Isolates following Exposure to Decidual and Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korir, Michelle L.; Knupp, David; LeMerise, Kathryn; Boldenow, Erica; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Aronoff, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) causes severe disease in neonates, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. GBS species are highly diverse and can be classified by serotype and multilocus sequence typing. Sequence type 17 (ST-17) strains cause invasive neonatal disease more frequently than strains of other STs. Attachment and invasion of host cells are key steps in GBS pathogenesis. We investigated whether four serotype III strains representing ST-17 (two strains), ST-19, and ST-23 differ in their abilities to attach to and invade both decidual cells and lung epithelial cells. Virulence gene expression following host cell association and exposure to amnion cells was also tested. The ST-17 strains differed in their abilities to attach to and invade decidual cells, whereas there were no differences with lung epithelial cells. The ST-19 and ST-23 strains, however, attached to and invaded decidual cells less than both ST-17 strains. Although the ST-23 strain attached to lung epithelial cells better than ST-17 and -19 strains, none of the strains effectively invaded the lung epithelial cells. Notably, the association with host cells resulted in the differential expression of several virulence genes relative to basal expression levels. Similar expression patterns of some genes were observed regardless of cell type used. Collectively, these results show that GBS strains differ in their abilities to attach to distinct host cell types and express key virulence genes that are relevant to the disease process. Enhancing our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms could aid in the identification of novel therapeutic targets or vaccine candidates that could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality associated with neonatal infections. PMID:25135682

  11. Promoter methylation status of tumor suppressor genes and inhibition of expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bangqing; Song, Jianfei; Luan, Jiaqiang; Sun, Xiaolin; Bai, Jian; Wang, Haiyong; Li, Angui; Zhang, Lifei; Feng, Xiaoyan; Du, Zhenzong

    2016-08-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic DNA modification catalyzed by DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). The purpose of this study was to investigate DNMT1 gene and protein expression and the effects of methylation status on tumor suppressor genes in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines grown in vitro and in vivo Human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, A549 and H838, were grown in vitro and inoculated subcutaneously into nude mice to form tumors and were then treated with the DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, with and without treatment with the benzamide histone deacetylase inhibitor, entinostat (MS-275). DNMT1 protein expression was quantified by Western blot. Promoter methylation status of tumor suppressor genes (RASSF1A, ASC, APC, MGMT, CDH13, DAPK, ECAD, P16, and GATA4) was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Methylation status of the tumor suppressor genes was regulated by the DNMT1 gene, with the decrease of DNMT1 expression following DNA methylation treatment. Demethylation of tumor suppressor genes (APC, ASC, and RASSF1A) restored tumor growth in nude mice. The results of this study support a role for methylation of DNA as a potential epigenetic clinical biomarker of prognosis or response to therapy and for DNMT1 as a potential therapeutic target in NSCLC. PMID:27190263

  12. Altered expression of the CCN genes in the lungs of mice in response to cigarette smoke exposure and viral and bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Gueugnon, Fabien; Thibault, Virginie C; Kearley, Jennifer; Petit-Courty, Agnès; Vallet, Amandine; Guillon, Antoine; Si-Tahar, Mustapha; Humbles, Alison A; Courty, Yves

    2016-07-15

    The CCN proteins are key signaling and regulatory molecules involved in many biological functions and contribute to malignant and non-malignant lung diseases. Despite the high morbidity and mortality of the lung respiratory infectious diseases, there is very little data related to the expression of the CCNs during infection. We investigated in mice the pulmonary mRNA expression levels of five CCNs (1 to 5) in response to influenza A virus (IAV) and bacterial agents (Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA)). IAV, NTHi, LPS or LTA were instilled intranasally into mice. Mice were also exposed for 4days or 8weeks to cigarette smoke alone or prior infection to IAV in order to determine if CS modifies the CCN response to a viral infection. All challenges induced a robust inflammation. The mRNA expression of CCN1, CCN2 and CCN3 was decreased after short exposure to CS whereas prolonged exposure altered the expression of CCN1, CCN3 and CCN4. Influenza A virus infection increased CCN1, 2, 4 and 5 mRNA levels but expression of CCN3 was significantly decreased. Acute CS exposure prior infection had little effect on the expression of CCN genes but prolonged exposure abolished the IAV-dependent induction. Treatment with LPS or LTA and infection with NTHi revealed that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria rapidly modulate the expression of the CCN genes. Our findings reveal that several triggers of lung inflammation influence differently the CCN genes. CCN3 deserves special attention since its mRNA expression is decreased by all the triggers studied. PMID:27080955

  13. Expression level and methylation status of three tumor suppressor genes, DLEC1, ITGA9 and MLH1, in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastuszak-Lewandoska, Dorota; Kordiak, Jacek; Antczak, Adam; Migdalska-Sęk, Monika; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Górski, Paweł; Nawrot, Ewa; Kiszałkiewicz, Justyna M; Domańska-Senderowska, Daria; Brzeziańska-Lasota, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    Despite therapeutic advances, lung cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer-related death in the world. There is a need to develop biomarkers of diagnostic and/or prognostic value and to translate findings in basic science research to clinical application. Tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) represent potential useful markers for disease detection, progression and treatment target. We tried to elucidate the role of three 3p21.3 TSGs: DLEC1, ITGA9 and MLH1, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We assessed their expression pattern by qPCR in 59 NSCLC tissues and in the matched macroscopically unchanged lung tissues. Additionally, we analyzed gene promoter methylation status by methylation-specific PCR in NSCLC samples. We did not find significant correlations between gene expression and methylation. In case of DLEC1 and ITGA9, expression levels were decreased in 71-78 % of tumor samples and significantly different between tumor and normal tissues (P = 0.0001). It could point to their diagnostic value. ITGA9 could also be regarded as a diagnostic marker differentiating NSCLC subtypes, as its expression level was significantly lower in squamous cell carcinoma (P = 0.001). The simultaneous down-regulation of DLEC1 and ITGA9 was observed in 52.5 % of NSCLCs. MSPs revealed high frequencies of gene promoter methylation in NSCLCs: 84 % for DLEC1 and MLH1 and 57 % for ITGA9. Methylation indexes reflected moderate gene methylation levels: 34 % for ITGA9, 27 % for MLH1 and 26 % for DLEC1. However, frequent simultaneous methylation of the studied genes in more than 50 % of NSCLCs suggests the possibility of consider them as a panel of epigenetic markers. PMID:27287342

  14. Health Risk Assessment for Air Pollutants: Alterations in Lung and Cardiac Gene Expression in Mice Exposed to Milano Winter Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5)

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Cristina; Cifola, Ingrid; Mangano, Eleonora; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, atherosclerosis and cardiac autonomic dysfunction have been linked to urban particulate matter exposure. The chemical composition of airborne pollutants in Milano is similar to those of other European cities though with a higher PM2.5 fraction. Milano winter fine particles (PM2.5win) are characterized by the presence of nitrate, organic carbon fraction, with high amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and elements such as Pb, Al, Zn, V, Fe, Cr and others, with a negligible endotoxin presence. In BALB/c mice, we examined, at biochemical and transcriptomic levels, the adverse effects of repeated Milano PM2.5win exposure in lung and heart. We found that ET-1, Hsp70, Cyp1A1, Cyp1B1 and Hsp-70, HO-1, MPO respectively increased within lung and heart of PM2.5win-treated mice. The PM2.5win exposure had a strong impact on global gene expression of heart tissue (181 up-regulated and 178 down-regulated genes) but a lesser impact on lung tissue (14 up-regulated genes and 43 down-regulated genes). Focusing on modulated genes, in lung we found two- to three-fold changes of those genes related to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exposure and calcium signalling. Within heart the most striking aspect is the twofold to threefold increase in collagen and laminin related genes as well as in genes involved in calcium signaling. The current study extends our previous findings, showing that repeated instillations of PM2.5win trigger systemic adverse effects. PM2.5win thus likely poses an acute threat primarily to susceptible people, such as the elderly and those with unrecognized coronary artery or structural heart disease. The study of genomic responses will improve understanding of disease mechanisms and enable future clinical testing of interventions against the toxic effects of air pollutant. PMID:25296036

  15. Differences in the expression of chromosome 1 genes between lung telocytes and other cells: mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, alveolar type II cells, airway epithelial cells and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoru; Zheng, Minghuan; Zhang, Miaomiao; Qian, Mengjia; Zheng, Yonghua; Li, Meiyi; Cretoiu, Dragos; Chen, Chengshui; Chen, Luonan; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a unique type of interstitial cells with specific, extremely long prolongations named telopodes (Tps). Our previous study showed that TCs are distinct from fibroblasts (Fbs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as concerns gene expression and proteomics. The present study explores patterns of mouse TC-specific gene profiles on chromosome 1. We investigated the network of main genes and the potential functional correlations. We compared gene expression profiles of mouse pulmonary TCs, MSCs, Fbs, alveolar type II cells (ATII), airway basal cells (ABCs), proximal airway cells (PACs), CD8+ T cells from bronchial lymph nodes (T-BL) and CD8+ T cells from lungs (T-LL). The functional and feature networks were identified and compared by bioinformatics tools. Our data showed that on TC chromosome 1, there are about 25% up-regulated and 70% down-regulated genes (more than onefold) as compared with the other cells respectively. Capn2, Fhl2 and Qsox1 were over-expressed in TCs compared to the other cells, indicating that biological functions of TCs are mainly associated with morphogenesis and local tissue homoeostasis. TCs seem to have important roles in the prevention of tissue inflammation and fibrogenesis development in lung inflammatory diseases and as modulators of immune cell response. In conclusion, TCs are distinct from the other cell types. PMID:24826900

  16. Response of the mouse lung transcriptome to welding fume: effects of stainless and mild steel fumes on lung gene expression in A/J and C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Debate exists as to whether welding fume is carcinogenic, but epidemiological evidence suggests that welders are an at risk population for the development of lung cancer. Recently, we found that exposure to welding fume caused an acutely greater and prolonged lung inflammatory response in lung tumor susceptible A/J versus resistant C57BL/6J (B6) mice and a trend for increased tumor incidence after stainless steel (SS) fume exposure. Here, our objective was to examine potential strain-dependent differences in the regulation and resolution of the lung inflammatory response induced by carcinogenic (Cr and Ni abundant) or non-carcinogenic (iron abundant) metal-containing welding fumes at the transcriptome level. Methods Mice were exposed four times by pharyngeal aspiration to 5 mg/kg iron abundant gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS), Cr and Ni abundant GMA-SS fume or vehicle and were euthanized 4 and 16 weeks after the last exposure. Whole lung microarray using Illumina Mouse Ref-8 expression beadchips was done. Results Overall, we found that tumor susceptibility was associated with a more marked transcriptional response to both GMA-MS and -SS welding fumes. Also, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that gene regulation and expression in the top molecular networks differed between the strains at both time points post-exposure. Interestingly, a common finding between the strains was that GMA-MS fume exposure altered behavioral gene networks. In contrast, GMA-SS fume exposure chronically upregulated chemotactic and immunomodulatory genes such as CCL3, CCL4, CXCL2, and MMP12 in the A/J strain. In the GMA-SS-exposed B6 mouse, genes that initially downregulated cellular movement, hematological system development/function and immune response were involved at both time points post-exposure. However, at 16 weeks, a transcriptional switch to an upregulation for neutrophil chemotactic genes was found and included genes such as S100A8, S100A9 and MMP9. Conclusions

  17. Enhancement of tumor initiation and expression of KCNMA1, MORF4L2 and ASPM genes in the adenocarcinoma of lung xenograft after vorinostat treatment.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wei-Ying; Wu, Chun-Yi; Hwu, Luen; Lee, Jhih-Shian; Tsai, Cheng-Han; Lin, Kang-Ping; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Chou, Teh-Ying; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Gelovani, Juri; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2015-04-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are usually tolerant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and associated with tumor relapse. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), is currently being used in clinical trials of lung cancer. However, SAHA facilitates the formation of induced pluripotent stem cells from somatic cells. We hypothesized that SAHA would mediate the CSCs properties and subsequently confer a more malignant phenotype in lung cancer. Transfected H1299 lung cancer cells, which stably expresses a triple fused reporter gene (DsRedm-Fluc-tTKsr39) under the control of CMV promoter was used to establish a xenograft mouse model. After the treatment of SAHA, H1299 cell line and tumor xenografts were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) based on aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. We found that SAHA could suppress the growth of xenografted H1299 tumors with decreased proportion of ALDHbr lung cancer cells indicating that SAHA may target CSCs. However, SAHA significantly enhanced the tumor initiating capacity and the expression of malignant genes such as KCNMA1, MORF4L2 and ASPM in the remaining living ALDHbr cells. These findings suggested that SAHA treatment created a more drug-resistant state in residual ALDHbr cells. The in vivo imaging technique may facilitate searching and characterization of CSCs. PMID:25796627

  18. Using gene expression profiling to evaluate cellular responses in mouse lungs exposed to V2O5 and a group of other mouse lung tumorigens and non-tumorigens.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael B; Dodd, Darol E; McMullen, Patrick D; Pendse, Salil; MacGregor, Judith A; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Andersen, Melvin E

    2015-10-01

    Many compounds test positive for lung tumors in two-year NTP carcinogenicity bioassays in B6C3F1 mice. V2O5 was identified as a lung carcinogen in this assay, leading to its IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) classification as group 2b or a "possible" human carcinogen. To assess potential tumorigenic mode of action of V2O5, we compared gene expression and gene ontology enrichment in lung tissue of female B6C3F1 mice exposed for 13 weeks to a V2O5 particulate aerosol at a tumorigenic level (2.0 mg/m(3)). Relative to 12 other compounds also tested for carcinogenicity in 2-year bioassays in mice, there were 1026 differentially expressed genes with V2O5, of which 483 were unique to V2O5. Ontology analysis of the 1026 V2O5 differentially expressed genes showed enrichment for hyaluronan and sphingolipid metabolism, adenylate cyclase functions, c-AMP signaling and PKA activation/signaling. Enrichment of lipids/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory pathways were consistent with previously reported clinical findings. Enrichment of c-AMP and PKA signaling pathways may arise due to inhibition of phosphatases, a known biological action of vanadate. We saw no enrichment for DNA-damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle, or apoptosis pathway signaling in mouse lungs exposed to V2O5 which is in contrast with past studies evaluating in vivo gene expression in target tissues of other carcinogens (arsenic, formaldehyde, naphthalene and chloroprene). PMID:26210822

  19. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Cell Proliferation and Inflammation as the Predominant Pathways Regulated by Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Primary Human Fetal Lung Cells Exposed to Hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Binoy; Maity, Suman; Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Welty, Stephen E; Belmont, John; Coarfa, Cristian; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to hyperoxia contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. We observed that aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling protects newborn mice and primary fetal human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs) against hyperoxic injury. Additionally, a recent genome-wide transcriptome study in a newborn mouse model of BPD identified AhR as a key regulator of hyperoxia-induced gene dysregulation. Whether the AhR similarly deregulates genes in HPMEC is unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize transcriptome level gene expression profile in AhR-sufficient and -deficient HPMEC exposed to normoxic and hyperoxic conditions. Global gene expression profiling was performed using Illumina microarray platform and selected genes were validated by real-time RT-PCR. AhR gene expression and hyperoxia independently affected the expression of 540 and 593 genes, respectively. Two-way ANOVA further identified 85 genes that were affected by an interaction between AhR expression and exposure to hyperoxia. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG), Gene Ontology, and Reactome pathway analysis identified cell proliferation, immune function, cytokine signaling, and organ development as the major pathways affected in AhR-deficient cells. The biological processes that were significantly enriched by hyperoxia included metabolic process, stress response, signal transduction, cell cycle, and immune regulation. Cell cycle was the predominant pathway affected by the combined effect of AhR knockdown and hyperoxia. Functional analysis of cell cycle showed that AhR-deficient cells had decreased proliferation compared with AhR-sufficient cells. These findings suggest that AhR modulates hyperoxic lung injury by regulating the genes that are necessary for cell proliferation and inflammation. PMID:27103661

  20. Cancer-testis gene expression is associated with the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase 677 C>T polymorphism in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor-specific, coordinate expression of cancer-testis (CT) genes, mapping to the X chromosome, is observed in more than 60% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Although CT gene expression has been unequivocally related to DNA demethylation of promoter regions, the underlying mechanism leading to loss of promoter methylation remains elusive. Polymorphisms of enzymes within the 1-carbon pathway have been shown to affect S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) production, which is the sole methyl donor in the cell. Allelic variants of several enzymes within this pathway have been associated with altered SAM levels either directly, or indirectly as reflected by altered levels of SAH and Homocysteine levels, and altered levels of DNA methylation. We, therefore, asked whether the five most commonly occurring polymorphisms in four of the enzymes in the 1-carbon pathway associated with CT gene expression status in patients with NSCLC. Methods Fifty patients among a cohort of 763 with NSCLC were selected based on CT gene expression status and typed for five polymorphisms in four genes known to affect SAM generation by allele specific q-PCR and RFLP. Results We identified a significant association between CT gene expression and the MTHFR 677 CC genotype, as well as the C allele of the SNP, in this cohort of patients. Multivariate analysis revealed that the genotype and allele strongly associate with CT gene expression, independent of potential confounders. Conclusions Although CT gene expression is associated with DNA demethylation, in NSCLC, our data suggests this is unlikely to be the result of decreased MTHFR function. PMID:24063603

  1. TCDD and a Putative Endogenous AhR Ligand, ITE, Elicit the Same Immediate Changes in Gene Expression in Mouse Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Ellen C.; Welle, Stephen L.; Gasiewicz, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates toxicity of several classes of xenobiotics and also has important physiological roles in differentiation, reproduction, and immunity, although the endogenous ligand(s) mediating these functions is/are as yet unidentified. One candidate endogenous ligand, 2-(1′H-indolo-3′-carbonyl)-thiazole-4-carboxylic acid methyl ester (ITE), is a potent AhR agonist in vitro, activates the murine AhR in vivo, but does not induce toxicity. We hypothesized that ITE and the toxic ligand, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), may modify transcription of different sets of genes to account for their different toxicity. To test this hypothesis, primary mouse lung fibroblasts were exposed to 0.5μM ITE, 0.2nM TCDD, or vehicle for 4 h, and total gene expression was evaluated using microarrays. After this short-term and low-dose treatment, several hundred genes were changed significantly, and the response to ITE and TCDD was remarkably similar, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Induced gene sets included the expected battery of AhR-dependent xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes, as well as several sets that reflect the inflammatory role of lung fibroblasts. Real time quantitative RT-qPCR assay of several selected genes confirmed these microarray data and further suggested that there may be kinetic differences in expression between ligands. These data suggest that ITE and TCDD elicit an analogous change in AhR conformation such that the initial transcription response is the same. Furthermore, if the difference in toxicity between TCDD and ITE is mediated by differences in gene expression, then it is likely that secondary changes enabled by the persistent TCDD, but not by the shorter lived ITE, are responsible. PMID:19933214

  2. Identification of Novel Gene Expression Targets for the Ras Association Domain Family 1 (RASSF1A) Tumor Suppressor Gene in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Neuroblastoma1

    PubMed Central

    Agathanggelou, Angelo; Bièche, Ivan; Ahmed-Choudhury, Jalal; Nicke, Barbara; Dammann, Reinhard; Baksh, Shairaz; Gao, Boning; Minna, John D.; Downward, Julian; Maher, Eamonn R.; Latif, Farida

    2012-01-01

    RASSF1A is a recently identified 3p21.3 tumor suppressor gene. The high frequency of epigenetic inactivation of this gene in a wide range of human sporadic cancers including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and neuroblastoma suggests that RASSF1A inactivation is important for tumor development. Although little is known about the function of RASSF1A, preliminary data suggests that it may have multiple functions. To gain insight into RASSF1A functions in an unbiased manner, we have characterized the expression profile of a lung cancer cell line (A549) transfected with RASSF1A. Initially we demonstrated that transient expression of RASSF1A into the NSCLC cell line A549 induced G1 cell cycle arrest, as measured by propidium iodide staining. Furthermore, an-nexin-V staining showed that RASSF1A-expressing cells had an increased sensitivity to staurosporine-induced apoptosis. We then screened a cDNA microarray containing more than 6000 probes to identify genes differentially regulated by RASSF1A. Sixty-six genes showed at least a 2-fold change in expression. Among these were many genes with relevance to tumorigenesis involved in transcription, cytoskeleton, signaling, cell cycle, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For 22 genes we confirmed the microarray results by real-time RT-PCR and/or Northern blotting. In silico, we were able to confirm the majority of these genes in other NSCLC cell lines using published data on gene expression profiles. Furthermore, we confirmed 10 genes at the RNA level in two neuroblastoma cell lines, indicating that these RASSF1A target genes have relevance in non-lung cell backgrounds. Protein analysis of six genes (ETS2, Cyclin D3, CDH2, DAPK1, TXN, and CTSL) showed that the changes induced by RASSF1A at the RNA level correlated with changes in protein expression in both non-small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma cell lines. Finally, we have used a transient assay to demonstrate the induction of CDH2 and TGM2 by RASSF1A in NSCLC cell lines. We

  3. Investigation by microarray analysis of effects of cigarette design characteristics on gene expression in human lung mucoepidermoid cancer cells NCI-H292 exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Chikako; Fukano, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    The effects of tobacco leaf types and the presence or absence of charcoal in the cigarette filters on gene expression were investigated using cigarette prototypes made of either flue-cured (FC) leaf or burley (BLY) leaf and Kentucky Reference 2R4F as a representative blend cigarette with cellulose acetate filters or charcoal filters. NCI-H292, human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line, was exposed to the total particulate matter (TPM) and gas/vapor phase (GVP) from each prototype for 8h and then the changes in gene expression from microarray data were analyzed. A number of genes associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage and xenobiotic response were modified by the two fractions, TPM and GVP, from the three prototypes with cellulose acetate filters. Both TPM and GVP fractions strongly enhanced the gene expression of HMOX1, which is encoding the limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of oxidative stress and inflammatory process. Comparing the effects of TPM and GVP fraction, TPM strongly activated Nrf2 pathway-mediated anti-oxidative stress reaction, whereas GVP caused notable DNA damage response. In comparison of FC and BLY, TPM from FC more strongly induced the expression of histone family proteins than that from BLY. GVP from FC markedly induced gene expression associated with HSP70-mediated inflammation relative to that from BLY. Charcoal included in the filter strongly reduced the effects of GVP from each cigarette on gene expression. However, charcoal did not modified the effects of TPM. As a whole, charcoal is a useful material for reducing the biological effects of GVP. PMID:25497788

  4. Acute high-level exposure to WTC particles alters expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and immune function in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Ward, William O.; Peltier, Richard E.; Zelikoff, Judith; Chen, Lung-chi

    2015-01-01

    First responders (FR) present at Ground Zero in the first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapsed have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injuries. The few toxicology studies performed to date evaluated effects from just fine (<2.5 µm) WTC dusts; none examined health effects/toxicities from atmospheres bearing larger particle sizes, despite the fact the majority (496%) of dusts were >10µm and most FR likely entrained dusts by mouth breathing. Using a system that generated/delivered supercoarse (10–53 µm) WTC dusts to F344 rats (in a manner that mimicked FR exposures), this study sought to examine potential toxicities in the lungs. In this exploratory study, rats were exposed for 2 h to 100 mg WTC dust/m3 (while under isoflurane [ISO] anesthesia) or an air/ISO mixture; this dose conservatively modeled likely exposures by mouth-breathing FR facing ≈750–1000 mg WTC dust/m3. Lungs were harvested 2 h post-exposure and total RNA extracted for subsequent global gene expression analysis. Among the > 1000 genes affected by WTC dust (under ISO) or ISO alone, 166 were unique to the dust exposure. In many instances, genes maximally-induced by the WTC dust exposure (relative to in naïve rats) were unchanged/inhibited by ISO only; similarly, several genes maximally inhibited in WTC dust rats were largely induced/unchanged in rats that received ISO only. These outcomes reflect likely contrasting effects of ISO and the WTC dust on lung gene expression. Overall, the data show that lungs of rats exposed to WTC dust (under ISO) – after accounting for any impact from ISO alone – displayed increased expression of genes related to lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle control, while several involved in anti-oxidant function were inhibited. These changes suggested acute inflammogenic effects and oxidative stress in the lungs of WTC dust-exposed rats. This study, thus, concludes that a single very high exposure to WTC dusts could

  5. Acute high-level exposure to WTC particles alters expression of genes associated with oxidative stress and immune function in the lung.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ward, William O; Peltier, Richard E; Zelikoff, Judith; Chen, Lung-chi

    2015-01-01

    First responders (FR) present at Ground Zero in the first 72 h after the World Trade Center (WTC) collapsed have progressively exhibited significant respiratory injuries. The few toxicology studies performed to date evaluated effects from just fine (< 2.5 µm) WTC dusts; none examined health effects/toxicities from atmospheres bearing larger particle sizes, despite the fact the majority (> 96%) of dusts were > 10 µm and most FR likely entrained dusts by mouth breathing. Using a system that generated/delivered supercoarse (10-53 µm) WTC dusts to F344 rats (in a manner that mimicked FR exposures), this study sought to examine potential toxicities in the lungs. In this exploratory study, rats were exposed for 2 h to 100 mg WTC dust/m(3) (while under isoflurane [ISO] anesthesia) or an air/ISO mixture; this dose conservatively modeled likely exposures by mouth-breathing FR facing ≈750-1000 mg WTC dust/m(3). Lungs were harvested 2 h post-exposure and total RNA extracted for subsequent global gene expression analysis. Among the >  1000 genes affected by WTC dust (under ISO) or ISO alone, 166 were unique to the dust exposure. In many instances, genes maximally-induced by the WTC dust exposure (relative to in naïve rats) were unchanged/inhibited by ISO only; similarly, several genes maximally inhibited in WTC dust rats were largely induced/unchanged in rats that received ISO only. These outcomes reflect likely contrasting effects of ISO and the WTC dust on lung gene expression. Overall, the data show that lungs of rats exposed to WTC dust (under ISO) - after accounting for any impact from ISO alone - displayed increased expression of genes related to lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle control, while several involved in anti-oxidant function were inhibited. These changes suggested acute inflammogenic effects and oxidative stress in the lungs of WTC dust-exposed rats. This study, thus, concludes that a single very high exposure

  6. Cancer-Prone Mice Expressing the Ki-rasG12C Gene Show Increased Lung Carcinogenesis after CT Screening Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Munley, Michael T.; Moore, Joseph E.; Walb, Matthew C.; Isom, Scott P.; Olson, John D.; Zora, J. Gregory; Kock, Nancy D.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2011-01-01

    A >20-fold increase in X-ray computed tomography (CT) use during the last 30 years has caused considerable concern because of the potential carcinogenic risk from these CT exposures. Estimating the carcinogenic risk from high-energy, single high-dose exposures obtained from atomic bomb survivors and extrapolating these data to multiple low-energy, low-dose CT exposures using the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model may not give an accurate assessment of actual cancer risk. Recently, the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST) reported that annual CT scans of current and former heavy smokers reduced lung cancer mortality by 20%, highlighting the need to better define the carcinogenic risk associated with these annual CT screening exposures. In this study, we used the bitransgenic CCSP-rtTA/Ki-ras mouse model that conditionally expresses the human mutant Ki-rasG12C gene in a doxycycline-inducible and lung-specific manner to measure the carcinogenic risk of exposure to multiple whole-body CT doses that approximate the annual NLST screening protocol. Irradiated mice expressing the Ki-rasG12C gene in their lungs had a significant (P = 0.01) 43% increase in the number of tumors/mouse (24.1 ± 1.9) compared to unirradiated mice (16.8 ± 1.3). Irradiated females had significantly (P < 0.005) more excess tumors than irradiated males. No tumor size difference or dose response was observed over the total dose range of 80–160 mGy for either sex. Irradiated bitransgenic mice that did not express the Ki-rasG12C gene had a low tumor incidence (≤0.1/mouse) that was not affected by exposure to CT radiation. These results suggest that (i) estimating the carcinogenic risk of multiple CT exposures from high-dose carcinogenesis data using the LNT model may be inappropriate for current and former smokers and (ii) any increased carcinogenic risk after exposure to fractionated low-dose CT-radiation may be restricted to only those individuals expressing cancer susceptibility genes in

  7. Gene Expression Profile of the A549 Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Cell Line following Treatment with the Seeds of Descurainia sophia, a Potential Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Joon; Bang, Ok-Sun

    2013-01-01

    Descurainia sophia has been traditionally used in Korean medicine for treatment of diverse diseases and their symptoms, such as cough, asthma, and edema. Our previous results showed that ethanol extract of the seeds of D. sophia (EEDS) has a potent cytotoxic effect on human cancer cells. In this study, we reveal the molecular events that are induced by EEDS treatment in A549 human lung cancer cells. The dose-dependent effect of EEDS on gene expression was measured via a microarray analysis. Gene ontology and pathway analyses were performed to identify functional involvement of genes regulated by EEDS. From gene expression analyses, two major dose-dependent patterns were observed after EEDS treatment. One pattern consisted of 1,680 downregulated genes primarily involved in metabolic processes (FDR < 0.01). The second pattern consisted of 1,673 upregulated genes primarily involved in signaling processes (FDR < 0.01). Pathway activity analyses revealed that the metabolism-related pathways and signaling-related pathways were regulated by the EEDS in dose-dependent and reciprocal manners. In conclusion, the identified biphasic regulatory mechanism involving activation of signaling pathways may provide molecular evidence to explain the inhibitory effect of EEDS on A549 cell growth. PMID:23935669

  8. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein. PMID:27481008

  9. High-resolution detection of recurrent aberrations in lung adenocarcinomas by array comparative genomic hybridization and expression analysis of selective genes by quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hong; Wong, Maria Pik; Tin, Vicky

    2014-06-01

    Genomic abnormalities are the hallmark of cancers and may harbor potential candidate genes important for cancer development and progression. We performed array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) on 36 cases of primary lung adenocarcinoma (AD) using an array containing 2621 BAC or PAC clones spanning the genome at an average interval of 1 Mb. Array CGH identified the commonest aberrations consisting of DNA gains within 1p, 1q, 5p, 5q, 7p, 7q, 8q, 11q, 12p, 13q, 16p, 17q, 20q, and losses with 6q, 9p, 10q and 18q. High-level copy gains involved mainly 7p21-p15 and 20q13.3. Dual color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed on a selective locus for validation of array CGH results. Genomic aberrations were compared with different clinicopathological features and a trend of higher number of aberrations in tumors with aggressive phenotypes and current tobacco exposure was identified. According to array CGH data, 23 candidate genes were selected for quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis. The concordance observed between the genomic and expression changes in most of the genes suggested that they could be candidate cancer-related genes that contributed to the development of lung AD. PMID:24728343

  10. Early alterations in extracellular matrix and transforming growth factor [beta] gene expression in mouse lung indicative of late radiation fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.N.; Johnston, C.J.; Baggs, R.; Rubin, P. )

    1994-02-01

    Fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of collagen, is a late result of thoracic irradiation. The expression of late radiation injury can be found immediately after irradiation by measuring messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance. To determine if extracellular matrix mRNA and transforming growth factor beta abundance was affected acutely after irradiation, the authors measured mRNA levels of collagen I (CI), collagen III (CIII), collagen IV (CIV), fibronectin (FN), and transforming growth factor [beta] (TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3]) in mouse lungs on day 1 and day 14 after graded doses of radiation. C57BL/6 female mice were irradiated with a single dose to the thorax of 5 or 12.5 Gy. Total lung RNA was prepared and immobilized by Northern and slot blotting and hybridized with radiolabelled cDNA probes for CI, CIII, CIV, FN, TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3] and a control probe encoding for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Autoradiographic data were quantified by video densitometry and results normalized to GAPDH. Changes in the expression of CI, CIII, CIV, FN and TGF[beta][sub 1,2 3] were observed as early as 1 day after exposure. Through 14 days, changes in mRNA up to 5-fold were seen for any one dose. Dose related changes as high as 10-fold were also evident. The CI:CIII ratio increased gradually for the 5 Gy dose at 14 days postirradiation while the CI:CII ratio for the 12.5 Gy dose decreased by approximately 4-fold as compared to the control. These studies suggest that alterations in expression of extracellular matrix and TGF[beta] mRNA occur very early after radiation injury even at low doses and may play a role in the development of chronic fibrosis. 37 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Differential association of STK11 and TP53 with KRAS mutation-associated gene expression, proliferation and immune surveillance in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schabath, M B; Welsh, E A; Fulp, W J; Chen, L; Teer, J K; Thompson, Z J; Engel, B E; Xie, M; Berglund, A E; Creelan, B C; Antonia, S J; Gray, J E; Eschrich, S A; Chen, D-T; Cress, W D; Haura, E B; Beg, A A

    2016-06-16

    While mutations in the KRAS oncogene are among the most prevalent in human cancer, there are few successful treatments to target these tumors. It is also likely that heterogeneity in KRAS-mutant tumor biology significantly contributes to the response to therapy. We hypothesized that the presence of commonly co-occurring mutations in STK11 and TP53 tumor suppressors may represent a significant source of heterogeneity in KRAS-mutant tumors. To address this, we utilized a large cohort of resected tumors from 442 lung adenocarcinoma patients with data including annotation of prevalent driver mutations (KRAS and EGFR) and tumor suppressor mutations (STK11 and TP53), microarray-based gene expression and clinical covariates, including overall survival (OS). Specifically, we determined impact of STK11 and TP53 mutations on a new KRAS mutation-associated gene expression signature as well as previously defined signatures of tumor cell proliferation and immune surveillance responses. Interestingly, STK11, but not TP53 mutations, were associated with highly elevated expression of KRAS mutation-associated genes. Mutations in TP53 and STK11 also impacted tumor biology regardless of KRAS status, with TP53 strongly associated with enhanced proliferation and STK11 with suppression of immune surveillance. These findings illustrate the remarkably distinct ways through which tumor suppressor mutations may contribute to heterogeneity in KRAS-mutant tumor biology. In addition, these studies point to novel associations between gene mutations and immune surveillance that could impact the response to immunotherapy. PMID:26477306

  12. Genome-Wide Gene Expression Profiles in Lung Tissues of Pig Breeds Differing in Resistance to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenhua; Zhang, Yujie; Wang, Nan; Li, Yanping; Yang, Lijuan; Jiang, Chenglan; Zhang, Chaoyang; Wen, Changhong; Jiang, Yunliang

    2014-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) caused by PRRS virus (PRRSV) is an infectious disease characterized by severe reproductive deficiency in pregnant sows, typical respiratory symptoms in piglets, and high mortality rate of piglets. In this study, we employed an Affymetrix microarray chip to compare the gene expression profiles of lung tissue samples from Dapulian (DPL) pigs (a Chinese indigenous pig breed) and Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire (DLY) pigs after infection with PRRSV. During infection with PRRSV, the DLY pigs exhibited a range of clinical features that typify the disease, whereas the DPL pigs showed only mild signs of the disease. Overall, the DPL group had a lower percentage of CD4+ cells and lower CD4+/CD8+ratios than the DLY group (p<0.05). For both IL-10 and TNF-α, the DLY pigs had significantly higher levels than the DPL pigs (p<0.01). The DLY pigs have lower serum IFN-γ levels than the DPL pigs (p<0.01). The serum IgG levels increased slightly from 0 dpi to 7 dpi, and peaked at 14 dpi (p<0.0001). Microarray data analysis revealed 16 differentially expressed (DE) genes in the lung tissue samples from the DLY and DPL pigs (q≤5%), of which LOC100516029 and LOC100523005 were up-regulated in the PRRSV-infected DPL pigs, while the other 14 genes were down-regulated in the PRRSV-infected DPL pigs compared with the PRRSV-infected DLY pigs. The mRNA expression levels of 10 out of the 16 DE genes were validated by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and their fold change was consistent with the result of microarray data analysis. We further analyzed the mRNA expression level of 8 differentially expressed genes between the DPL and DLY pigs for both uninfected and infected groups, and found that TF and USP18 genes were important in underlying porcine resistance or susceptibility to PRRSV. PMID:24465897

  13. p53 gene product expression in resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, with studies of concurrent cytological preparations and microwave antigen retrieval.

    PubMed Central

    Binks, S; Clelland, C A; Ronan, J; Bell, J

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To document the frequency and extent of p53 gene product expression in paraffin sections of resected non-small cell carcinoma of the lung and in cytological preparations of the same tumours; to determine the effect of microwave antigen retrieval on antigen detection. METHODS: Representative paraffin sections of 50 non-small cell carcinomas were stained with an antibody to p53 gene product (DO-7) both with and without prior microwave antigen retrieval. Cytoblocks and cell smears obtained from 19 cases were similarly stained. RESULTS: Using a histochemical scoring system (0-300) which takes into account staining intensity and extent, 78% (n = 39) of microwave pretreated paraffin sections and 52% (n = 26) of non-pretreated sections scored between 5 and 300; p = 0.001; 56% (n = 28) of microwave pretreated sections and only 2% (n = 1) of non-pretreated sections scored between 100 and 300 (p = 0.0001); 75% of direct smears of tumours and 80% of cytoblocks stained similarly to the paraffin sections of the resected specimens. No smears or cytoblocks stained positively when the sections of the resected specimen were negative. CONCLUSIONS: As up to 78% of non-small cell lung carcinomas overexpress p53 gene product, this may prove to be a valuable diagnostic method in biopsy or cytological material when the morphological diagnosis is uncertain. Microwave antigen retrieval is effective on formalin fixed tissue. Images PMID:9215149

  14. Targeting Chromatin-Mediated Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Therapy: Preclinical Rationale and Clinical Results.

    PubMed

    Pasini, Alice; Delmonte, Angelo; Tesei, Anna; Calistri, Daniele; Giordano, Emanuele

    2015-10-01

    Targeting chromatin-mediated transcriptional control of gene expression is nowadays considered a promising new strategy, transcending conventional anticancer therapy. As a result, molecules acting as DNA demethylating agents or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have entered the clinical arena in the last decade. Given the evidence suggesting that epigenetic regulation is significantly involved in lung cancer development and progression, the potential of epigenetically active compounds to modulate gene expression and reprogram cancer cells to a less aggressive phenotype is, at present, a promising strategy. Accordingly, a large number of compounds that interact with the epigenetic machinery of gene expression regulation are now being developed and tested as potential antitumor agents, either alone or in combination with standard therapy. The preclinical rationale and clinical data concerning the pharmacological modulation of chromatin organization in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is described in this review. Although preclinical data suggest that a pharmacological treatment targeting the epigenetic machinery has relevant activity over the neoplastic phenotype of NSCLC cells, clinical results are disappointing, leading only to short periods of disease stabilization in NSCLC patients. This evidence calls for a significant rethinking of strategies for an effective epigenetic therapy of NSCLC. The synergistic effect of concurrent epigenetic therapies, use at low doses, the priming of current treatments with previous epigenetic drugs, and the selection of clinical trial populations based on epigenetic biomarkers/signatures appear to be the cornerstones of a mature therapeutic strategy aiming to establish new regimens for reprogramming malignant cells and improving the clinical history of affected patients. PMID:26347133

  15. Surfactant metabolism and anti-oxidative capacity in hyperoxic neonatal rat lungs: effects of keratinocyte growth factor on gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koslowski, Roland; Kasper, Michael; Schaal, Katharina; Knels, Lilla; Lange, Marco; Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Development of preterm infant lungs is frequently impaired resulting in bronchopulmoary dysplasia (BPD). BPD results from interruption of physiologic anabolic intrauterine conditions, the inflammatory basis and therapeutic consequences of premature delivery, including increased oxygen supply for air breathing. The latter requires surfactant, produced by alveolar type II (AT II) cells to lower surface tension at the pulmonary air:liquid interface. Its main components are specific phosphatidylcholine (PC) species including dipalmitoyl-PC, anionic phospholipids and surfactant proteins. Local antioxidative enzymes are essential to cope with the pro-inflammatory side effects of normal alveolar oxygen pressures. However, respiratory insufficiency frequently requires increased oxygen supply. To cope with the injurious effects of hyperoxia to epithelia, recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rhKGF) was proposed as a surfactant stimulating, non-catabolic and epithelial-protective therapeutic. The aim of the present study was to examine the qualification of rhKGF to improve expression parameters of lung maturity in newborn rats under hyperoxic conditions (85% O(2) for 7 days). In response to rhKGF proliferating cell nuclear antigen mRNA, as a feature of stimulated proliferation, was elevated. Similarly, the expressions of ATP-binding cassette protein A3 gene, a differentiation marker of AT II cells and of peroxiredoxin 6, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, three genes involved in oxygen radical protection were increased. Furthermore, mRNA levels of acyl-coA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1, catalyzing dipalmitoyl-PC synthesis by acyl remodeling, and adipose triglyceride lipase, considered as responsible for fatty acid supply for surfactant PC synthesis, were elevated. These results, together with a considerable body of other confirmative evidence, suggest that rhKGF should be developed into a therapeutic option to treat preterm infants at risk for

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor protein expression and gene copy number alterations in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Tsuta, Koji; Mimae, Takahiro; Nitta, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Akihiko; Maeshima, Akiko M; Asamura, Hisao; Grogan, Thomas M; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies and is potentially an attractive target for anticancer treatment. In this study, we included 379 patients who underwent surgical resection (179 diagnosed as having adenocarcinoma [ADC]; 150, squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]; 41, sarcomatoid carcinoma and 9, large cell carcinoma). IGF-1R expression and gene copy number were assessed by immunohistochemistry and bright-field in situ hybridization (BISH), respectively. IGF-1R expression in non-small cell lung carcinoma was observed in 41.4% of samples and was more prevalent in SCC (69.3%) than in ADC (25.1%), large cell carcinoma (33.3%), and sarcomatoid carcinoma (12.2%) (P < .001). Among ADCs, most mucinous ADCs (75%) showed strong membranous staining with the IGF-1R antibody. Compared with protein expression, IGF-1R gene alteration was rare (8.4%). A statistically significant correlation between IGF-1R expression and positive IGF-1R BISH was observed (γ = 0.762, P < .001). IGF-1R-positive tumors were more common in smokers (P = .004), and these tumors were larger (P = .006) than the IGF-1R-negative tumors. IGF-1R BISH positivity was not correlated with any clinicopathologic factor. IGF-1R expression and IGF-1R BISH positivity were not correlated with overall survival. IGF-1R is highly expressed in SCC and mucinous ADC, although copy number alterations in the IGF-1R gene were rare. These findings may have important implications for future anti-IGF-1R therapeutic approaches. PMID:23266446

  17. Optimal Route for Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation to Protect Against Neonatal Hyperoxic Lung Injury: Gene Expression Profiles and Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Sung, Dong Kyung; Chang, Yun Sil; Ahn, So Yoon; Sung, Se In; Yoo, Hye Soo; Choi, Soo Jin; Kim, Soo Yoon; Park, Won Soon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal route of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation. To this end, gene expression profiling was performed to compare the effects of intratracheal (i.t.) versus intravenous (i.v.) MSC administration. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of each route to protect against neonatal hyperoxic lung injury was also determined. Newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to hyperoxia (90% oxygen) from birth for 14 days. Human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs labeling with PKH26 were transplanted through either the i.t. (5×10(5)) or i.v. (2×10(6)) route at postnatal day (P) 5. At P14, lungs were harvested for histological, biochemical and microarray analyses. Hyperoxic conditions induced an increase in the mean linear intercept and mean alveolar volume (MAV), indicative of impaired alveolarization. The number of ED-1 positive cells was significantly decreased by both i.t. and i.v. transplantations. However, i.t. administration of MSCs resulted in a greater decrease in MAV and ED-1 positive cells compared to i.v. administration. Moreover, the number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly decreased in the i.t. group, but not in the i.v. group. Although the i.t. group received only one fourth of the number of MSCs that the i.v. group did, a significantly higher number of donor cell-derived red PKH 26 positivity were recovered in the i.t. group. Hyperoxic conditions induced the up regulation of genes associated with the inflammatory response, such as macrophage inflammatory protein-1 α, tumor necrosis factor-α and inter leukin-6; genes associated with cell death, such as p53 and caspases; and genes associated with fibrosis, such as connective tissue growth factor. In contrast, hyperoxic conditions induced the dwon-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. These hyperoxia-induced changes in gene expression were decreased in the i.t. group, but not in the i.v. group. Thus, local i.t. MSC

  18. Optimal Route for Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation to Protect Against Neonatal Hyperoxic Lung Injury: Gene Expression Profiles and Histopathology

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, So Yoon; Sung, Se In; Yoo, Hye Soo; Choi, Soo Jin; Kim, Soo Yoon; Park, Won Soon

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the optimal route of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation. To this end, gene expression profiling was performed to compare the effects of intratracheal (IT) versus intravenous (IV) MSC administration. Furthermore, the therapeutic efficacy of each route to protect against neonatal hyperoxic lung injury was also determined. Newborn Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to hyperoxia (90% oxygen) from birth for 14 days. Human umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs labeling with PKH26 were transplanted through either the IT (5×105) or IV (2×106) route at postnatal day (P) 5. At P14, lungs were harvested for histological, biochemical and microarray analyses. Hyperoxic conditions induced an increase in the mean linear intercept and mean alveolar volume (MAV), indicative of impaired alveolarization. The number of ED-1 positive cells was significantly decreased by both IT and IV transplantations. However, IT administration of MSCs resulted in a greater decrease in MAV and ED-1 positive cells compared to IV administration. Moreover, the number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly decreased in the IT group, but not in the IV group. Although the IT group received only one fourth of the number of MSCs that the IV group did, a significantly higher number of donor cell-derived red PKH 26 positivity were recovered in the IT group. Hyperoxic conditions induced the up regulation of genes associated with the inflammatory response, such as macrophage inflammatory protein-1 α, tumor necrosis factor-α and inter leukin-6; genes associated with cell death, such as p53 and caspases; and genes associated with fibrosis, such as connective tissue growth factor. In contrast, hyperoxic conditions induced the dwon-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. These hyperoxia-induced changes in gene expression were decreased in the IT group, but not in the IV group. Thus, local IT MSC transplantation was more effective

  19. The effects of HIF-1alpha on gene expression profiles of NCI-H446 human small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Gene targeted therapy refers to any therapy focused on one of the many biological features of the tumor. Such features are mediated by specific genes that are involved in tumor metastasis, recurrence, poor response to chemotherapy and others. Hypoxia is an important pathognomonic feature of many malignant tumors including SCLC (small cell lung cancer). HIF-1alpha, which is induced by hypoxia, is the most important regulatory factor of many specific genes that can influence the biological features of tumors. Methods In this study, we tried to elucidate the changes in gene expression profiles of SCLC NCI-H446 cells mediated by HIF-1alpha. According to different treatments of cells, three experimental pairwise comparisons were designed: hypoxia group vs. control group, Ad5-HIF-1alpha group vs. Ad5 group, and Ad5-siHIF-1 alpha group Vs Ad5 group. Results Results from the analysis of gene expression profiles indicated that there were 65 genes upregulated and 28 genes downregulated more than two-fold in all three experimental pairwise comparisons. These genes were involved in transport, signal-transduction, cell adhesion/motility, growth factor/cytokines, transcription, inflammatory response, metabolic process, in addition to others. SOCS1, IGFBP5, IL-6 and STAT3 were also upregulated at protein level. SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells but HIF-1alpha could induce growth and suppress apoptosis. Conclusions Through this research, we are trying to find novel functional genes that are mediated by HIF-1alpha and provide the theoretical basis for new therapeutic targets. HIF-1 alpha maybe upregulate the expression of SOCS1 through mediation of STAT3 and IL-6. In addition, SOCS1 could significantly induce apoptosis and suppress growth of NCI-H446 cells. This was contrary to HIF-1alpha and it indicated that there might be an antagonism effect between HIF-1alpha and SOCS1 on regulating growth and apoptosis of NCI-H446

  20. Alterations in cathepsin L expression in lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Okudela, Koji; Mitsui, Hideaki; Woo, Tetsukan; Arai, Hiromasa; Suzuki, Takehisa; Matsumura, Mai; Kojima, Yoko; Umeda, Shigeaki; Tateishi, Yoko; Masuda, Munetaka; Ohashi, Kenichi

    2016-07-01

    We herein investigated the potential role of cathepsin L in lung carcinogenesis. Lung cancer cell lines and surgically resected tumors were examined for the expression of the cathepsin L protein and copy number alterations in its gene locus. Cathepsin L was stably expressed in bronchiolar epithelial cells. Neoplastic cells expressed cathepsin L at various levels, whereas its expression was completely lost in most of the lung cancer cell lines (63.6%, 7/11) examined. Furthermore, expression levels were lower in a large fraction of lung tumors (69.5%, 139/200) than in bronchiolar epithelia. The expression of cathepsin L was lost in some tumors (16.0%, 32/200). In adenocarcinomas, expression levels were significantly lower in high-grade tumors than in low-grade tumors (one-way ANOVA, P < 0.0500). Copy number alterations were found in 18.0% (36 [32 gain + 4 loss] /200) of lung tumors. No relationship existed between cathepsin L protein expression levels and the copy number of its gene locus (Spearman's rank-order correlation, P = 0.3096). Collectively, these results suggest that the down-regulated expression of cathepsin L, which is caused by an undefined mechanism other than copy number alterations, is involved in the progression of lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:27327955

  1. Prognostic Value of MET Gene Copy Number and Protein Expression in Patients with Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Published Literatures

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baoping; Cen, Hong; Tan, Xiaohong; Liu, Wenjian; Ke, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognostic value of the copy number (GCN) and protein expression of the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) gene for survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial. This study aims to comprehensively and quantitatively asses the suitability of MET GCN and protein expression to predict patients' survival. Methods PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched for articles comparing overall survival in patients with high MET GCN or protein expression with those with low level. Pooled hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the random and the fixed-effects models. Subgroup and sensitivity analyses were also performed. Results Eighteen eligible studies enrolling 5,516 patients were identified. Pooled analyses revealed that high MET GCN or protein expression was associated with poor overall survival (OS) (GCN: HR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.35–2.68, p<0.001; protein expression: HR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.017). In Asian populations (GCN: HR = 2.22, 95% CI 1.46–3.38, p<0.001; protein expression: HR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.34–2.68, p<0.001), but not in the non-Asian subset. For adenocarcinoma, high MET GCN or protein expression indicated decreased OS (GCN: HR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.05–2.10, p = 0.025; protein expression: HR = 1.69, 95% CI 1.31–2.19, p<0.001). Results were similar for multivariate analysis (GCN: HR = 1.61, 95% CI 1.15–2.25, p = 0.005; protein expression: HR = 2.18, 95% CI 1.60–2.97, p<0.001). The results of the sensitivity analysis were not materially altered and did not draw different conclusions. Conclusions Increased MET GCN or protein expression was significantly associated with poorer survival in patients with surgically resected NSCLC; this information could potentially further stratify patients in clinical treatment. PMID:24922520

  2. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma Prevents Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhengwang; Li, Lei; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Cao, Wenjiao; Xu, Yunfei; Song, Dianwen; Yang, Xinghai; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The poor survival rate is largely due to the extensive local invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells remain largely elusive. In this study, we examined the role of preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) in lung cancer metastasis. Our results show that PRAME is downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma and lung bone metastasis compared with normal human lung. Knockdown of PRAME decreases the expression of E-Cadherin and promotes the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of lung cancer cells by regulating multiple critical genes, most of which are related to cell migration, including MMP1, CCL2, CTGF, and PLAU. Clinical data analysis reveals that the expression of MMP1 correlates with the clinical features and outcome of lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PRAME plays a role in preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies can be developed by targeting PRAME. PMID:27391090

  3. Expression of DNA repair and replication genes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a role for thymidylate synthetase (TYMS)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background BRCA1 (B), ERCC1 (E), RRM1 (R) and TYMS (T) mRNA expression has been extensively studied with respect to NSCLC patient outcome upon various chemotherapy agents. However, these markers have not been introduced into clinical practice yet. One of the reasons seems to be lack of a standard approach for the classification of the reported high/low mRNA expression. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic/predictive impact of B, E, R, T in routinely-treated NSCLC patients by taking into account the expression of these genes in the normal lung parenchyma. Methods B, E, R, T mRNA expression was examined in 276 NSCLC samples (real-time PCR). The normal range of B, E, R, T transcript levels was first determined in matched tumor – normal pairs and then applied to the entire tumor series. Four main chemotherapy categories were examined: taxanes-without-platinum (Tax); platinum-without-taxanes (Plat); taxanes/platinum doublets (Tax/Plat); and, all-other combinations. Results In comparison to remotely located normal lung parenchyma, B, E, R, T mRNA expression was generally increased in matched tumors, as well as in the entire tumor series. Therefore, tumors were classified as expressing normal or aberrant B, E, R, T mRNA. In general, no marker was associated with overall and progression free survival (OS, PFS). Upon multivariate analysis, aberrant intratumoral TYMS predicted for shorter PFS than normal TYMS in 1st line chemo-naïve treated patients (p = 0.012). In the same setting, specific interactions were observed for aberrant TYMS with Plat and Tax/Plat (p = 0.003 and p = 0.006, respectively). Corresponding patients had longer PFS in comparison to those treated with Tax (Plat: HR = 0.234, 95% CI:0.108-0.506, Wald’s p < 0.0001; Tax/Plat: HR = 0.242, 95% CI:0.131-0.447, Wald’s p < 0.0001). Similar results were obtained for PFS in 1st line chemo-naïve and (neo)adjuvant pre-treated patients. Adenocarcinoma, early disease

  4. Gene therapy for lung inflammatory diseases: not so far away?

    PubMed Central

    Sallenave, J. M.; Porteous, D. J.; Haslett, C.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is a readily accessible target organ for gene therapy. To date, therapeutic gene delivery has largely focused on introducing functional, corrective genes in lung diseases arising from single gene defects such as cystic fibrosis. More recently interest has centred on gene therapy as a potential therapeutic tool in modulating complex pathological processes such as pulmonary inflammation. Genetic modification of critical components of the inflammatory process may be beneficial-for example, overexpressing anti-elastase genes may circumvent elastase mediated lung damage in emphysema. With the development of improved viral and liposome vectors and the evolution of effective adjuvant immunosuppression to obviate host immune responses-- for example, using selective cytokines and blockers of T cell surface activation--the potential exists to target therapeutic doses of transgene to deficient or dysregulated cells. Furthermore, increased understanding of tissue-specific promoter regions and of mechanisms controlling regulation of gene expression offer the potential for close control of therapeutic gene expression within the lung. Continuing refinements in these technologies will provide new therapeutic strategies in inflammatory lung disease. 


 PMID:9337837

  5. Gene therapy for lung inflammatory diseases: not so far away?

    PubMed

    Sallenave, J M; Porteous, D J; Haslett, C

    1997-08-01

    The lung is a readily accessible target organ for gene therapy. To date, therapeutic gene delivery has largely focused on introducing functional, corrective genes in lung diseases arising from single gene defects such as cystic fibrosis. More recently interest has centred on gene therapy as a potential therapeutic tool in modulating complex pathological processes such as pulmonary inflammation. Genetic modification of critical components of the inflammatory process may be beneficial-for example, overexpressing anti-elastase genes may circumvent elastase mediated lung damage in emphysema. With the development of improved viral and liposome vectors and the evolution of effective adjuvant immunosuppression to obviate host immune responses--for example, using selective cytokines and blockers of T cell surface activation--the potential exists to target therapeutic doses of transgene to deficient or dysregulated cells. Furthermore, increased understanding of tissue-specific promoter regions and of mechanisms controlling regulation of gene expression offer the potential for close control of therapeutic gene expression within the lung. Continuing refinements in these technologies will provide new therapeutic strategies in inflammatory lung disease. PMID:9337837

  6. GENE EXPRESSION NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Gene expression network" is the term used to describe the interplay, simple or complex, between two or more gene products in performing a specific cellular function. Although the delineation of such networks is complicated by the existence of multiple and subtle types of intera...

  7. Suppressive effects of a proton beam on tumor growth and lung metastasis through the inhibition of metastatic gene expression in 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yun-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Shik; Chun, So-Young; Jang, Tae Jung; Nam, Kyung-Soo

    2016-07-01

    A proton beam is a next generation tool to treat intractable cancer. Although the therapeutic effects of a proton beam are well known, the effect on tumor metastasis is not fully described. Here, we investigated the effects of a proton beam on metastasis in highly invasive 4T1 murine breast cancer cells and their orthotopic breast cancer model. Cells were irradiated with 2, 4, 8 or 16 Gy proton beam, and changes in cell proliferation, survival, and migration were observed by MTT, colony forming and wound healing assays. 4T1 breast cancer cell-implanted BALB/c mice were established and the animals were randomly divided into 4 groups when tumor size reached 200 mm3. Breast tumors were selectively irradiated with 10, 20 or 30 Gy proton beam. Breast tumor sizes were measured twice a week, and breast tumor and lung tissues were pathologically observed. Metastasis-regulating gene expression was assessed with quantitative RT-PCR. A proton beam dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, survival and migration in 4T1 murine breast cancer cells. Also, growth of breast tumors in the 4T1 orthotopic breast cancer model was significantly suppressed by proton beam irradiation without significant change of body weight. Furthermore, fewer tumor nodules metastasized from breast tumor into lung in mice irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam, but not with 10 and 20 Gy, than in control. We observed correspondingly lower expression levels of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which are important factors in cancer metastasis, in breast tumor irradiated with 30 Gy proton beam. Proton beam irradiation did not affect expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and MMP-2. Taken together, the data suggest that, although proton beam therapy is an effective tool for breast cancer treatment, a suitable dose is necessary to prevent metastasis-linked relapse and poor prognosis. PMID:27176787

  8. Gene expression technology

    SciTech Connect

    Goeddel, D.V. )

    1990-01-01

    The articles in this volume were assemble to enable the reader to design effective strategies for the expression of cloned genes and cDNAs. More than a compilation of papers describing the multitude of techniques now available for expressing cloned genes, this volume provides a manual that should prove useful for solving the majority of expression problems one likely to encounter. The four major expression systems commonly available to most investigators are stressed: Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, yeast, and mammalian cells. Each of these system has its advantages and disadvantages, details of which are found in Chapter 1 and the strategic overviews for the four major sections of the volume. The papers in each of these sections provide many suggestions on how to proceed if initial expression levels are not sufficient.

  9. Electroporation-mediated Delivery of Genes in Rodent Models of Lung Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Aranda, David; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Several of the biological processes involved in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome after lung contusion are regulated at a genetic and epigenetic level. Thus, strategies to manipulate gene expression in this context are highly desirable not only to elucidate the mechanisms involved but also to look for potential therapies. In the present chapter, we describe mouse and rat models of inducing blunt thoracic injury followed by electroporation-mediated gene delivery to the lung. Electroporation is a highly efficient and easily reproducible technique that allows circumvention of several of lung gene delivery challenges and safety issues present with other forms of lung gene therapy. PMID:24510825

  10. Vitamin D-responsive SGPP2 variants associated with lung cell expression and lung function

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vitamin D is associated with lung health in epidemiologic studies, but mechanisms mediating observed associations are poorly understood. This study explores mechanisms for an effect of vitamin D in lung through an in vivo gene expression study, an expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in lung tissue, and a population-based cohort study of sequence variants. Methods Microarray analysis investigated the association of gene expression in small airway epithelial cells with serum 25(OH)D in adult non-smokers. Sequence variants in candidate genes identified by the microarray were investigated in a lung tissue eQTL database, and also in relation to cross-sectional pulmonary function in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition (Health ABC) study, stratified by race, with replication in the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). Results 13 candidate genes had significant differences in expression by serum 25(OH)D (nominal p < 0.05), and a genome-wide significant eQTL association was detected for SGPP2. In Health ABC, SGPP2 SNPs were associated with FEV1 in both European- and African-Americans, and the gene-level association was replicated in European-American FHS participants. SNPs in 5 additional candidate genes (DAPK1, FSTL1, KAL1, KCNS3, and RSAD2) were associated with FEV1 in Health ABC participants. Conclusions SGPP2, a sphingosine-1-phosphate phosphatase, is a novel vitamin D-responsive gene associated with lung function. The identified associations will need to be followed up in further studies. PMID:24274704

  11. Differential gene expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines in lungs of ascites-resistant and -susceptible broiler chickens following intravenous cellulose microparticle injection.

    PubMed

    Hamal, Krishna R; Wideman, Robert F; Anthony, Nicholas B; Erf, Gisela F

    2010-02-15

    Intravenous injection of microparticles (MPs) is a tool to reveal susceptibility to pulmonary hypertension (PH) syndrome (PHS, ascites) in broilers. After injection MPs get lodged in pulmonary arterioles and cause localized inflammation. To examine the expression of chemokines/cytokines during the MP-induced pulmonary inflammatory response, lungs were collected from 4-week-old broilers (6/line/time point) from the PHS-resistant (RES) and -susceptible (SUS) broilers before (0h) and after (2, 6, 12, 24, and 48h) MP injection and analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. In both lines, expression of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, and K60 increased from 0 to 6h, reached peak levels at 6 and 12h, and decreased thereafter, whereas IL-4 and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) expression remained elevated past 12h. Lungs from the RES line broilers had higher expression (P<0.05) of IL-1beta and IL-6 at 2, 6, and 12h; higher IL-8 at 6 and 12h; higher K60 at 6, 12, and 24h; higher IL-4 at 12, 24, and 48h and higher IFN-gamma expression at 6 and 48h post-MP injection than SUS line broilers. Higher expression of chemokines/cytokines in RES compared to SUS line lungs may explain the ability of RES line broilers to effectively counteract the MP-induced PH and resolve the vascular occlusion. PMID:19698998

  12. Gene expression networks.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Reuben; Portier, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of microarrays and next-generation biotechnologies, the use of gene expression data has become ubiquitous in biological research. One potential drawback of these data is that they are very rich in features or genes though cost considerations allow for the use of only relatively small sample sizes. A useful way of getting at biologically meaningful interpretations of the environmental or toxicological condition of interest would be to make inferences at the level of a priori defined biochemical pathways or networks of interacting genes or proteins that are known to perform certain biological functions. This chapter describes approaches taken in the literature to make such inferences at the biochemical pathway level. In addition this chapter describes approaches to create hypotheses on genes playing important roles in response to a treatment, using organism level gene coexpression or protein-protein interaction networks. Also, approaches to reverse engineer gene networks or methods that seek to identify novel interactions between genes are described. Given the relatively small sample numbers typically available, these reverse engineering approaches are generally useful in inferring interactions only among a relatively small or an order 10 number of genes. Finally, given the vast amounts of publicly available gene expression data from different sources, this chapter summarizes the important sources of these data and characteristics of these sources or databases. In line with the overall aims of this book of providing practical knowledge to a researcher interested in analyzing gene expression data from a network perspective, the chapter provides convenient publicly accessible tools for performing analyses described, and in addition describe three motivating examples taken from the published literature that illustrate some of the relevant analyses. PMID:23086841

  13. Diet-derived 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 activates vitamin D receptor target gene expression and suppresses EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Verone-Boyle, Alissa R.; Shoemaker, Suzanne; Attwood, Kristopher; Morrison, Carl D.; Makowski, Andrew J.; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Hershberger, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies implicate vitamin D status as a factor that influences growth of EGFR mutant lung cancers. However, laboratory based evidence of the biological effect of vitamin D in this disease is lacking. To fill this knowledge gap, we determined vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression in human lung tumors using a tissue microarray constructed of lung cancer cases from never-smokers (where EGFR gene mutations are prevalent). Nuclear VDR was detected in 19/19 EGFR mutant tumors. Expression tended to be higher in tumors with EGFR exon 19 deletions than those with EGFR L858R mutations. To study anti-proliferative activity and signaling, EGFR mutant lung cancer cells were treated with the circulating metabolite of vitamin D, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25D3). 25D3 inhibited clonogenic growth in a dose-dependent manner. CYP27B1 encodes the 1α-hydroxylase (1αOHase) that converts 25D3 to the active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3). Studies employing VDR siRNA, CYP27B1 zinc finger nucleases, and pharmacologic inhibitors of the vitamin D pathway indicate that 25D3 regulates gene expression in a VDR-dependent manner but does not strictly require 1αOHase-mediated conversion of 25D3 to 1,25D3. To determine the effects of modulating serum 25D3 levels on growth of EGFR mutant lung tumor xenografts, mice were fed diets containing 100 or 10,000 IU vitamin D3/kg. High dietary vitamin D3 intake resulted in elevated serum 25D3 and significant inhibition of tumor growth. No toxic effects of supplementation were observed. These results identify EGFR mutant lung cancer as a vitamin D-responsive disease and diet-derived 25D3 as a direct VDR agonist and therapeutic agent. PMID:26654942

  14. Selective Toll-Like Receptor Expression in Human Fetal Lung

    PubMed Central

    Petrikin, Joshua E; Gaedigk, Roger; Leeder, J Steven; Truog, William E

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are critical components of the innate immune system, acting as pattern recognition molecules and triggering an inflammatory response. TLR associated gene products are of interest in modulating inflammatory related pulmonary diseases of the neonate. The ontogeny of TLR related genes in human fetal lung has not been previously described and could elucidate additional functions and identify strategies for attenuating the effects of fetal inflammation. We examined the expression of 84 TLR related genes on 23 human fetal lung samples from three groups with estimated ages of 60 (57-59d), 90 (89-91d), and 130 (117-154d) days. Using a false detection rate algorithm, we identified 32 genes displaying developmental regulation with TLR2 having the greatest up-regulation of TLR genes (9.2 fold increase) and TLR4 unchanged. We confirmed the TLR2 up-regulation by examining an additional 133 fetal lung tissue samples with a fluorogenic polymerase chain reaction assay (TaqMan®) and found an exponential best-fit curve over the time studied. The best-fit curve predicts a 6.1 fold increase from 60d to 130d. We conclude that TLR2 is developmentally expressed from the early pseudoglandular stage of lung development to the canalicular stage. PMID:20581745

  15. Combined Use of Gene Expression Modeling and siRNA Screening Identifies Genes and Pathways Which Enhance the Activity of Cisplatin When Added at No Effect Levels to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Ada W. Y.; Hung, Stacy S.; Backstrom, Ian; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Poon, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Segovia, Romulo; Rawji, Jenna; Qadir, Mohammed A.; Aparicio, Samuel; Stirling, Peter C.; Steidl, Christian; Bally, Marcel B.

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based combination chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While cisplatin is effective, its use is not curative and resistance often emerges. As a consequence of microenvironmental heterogeneity, many tumour cells are exposed to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. Further, genomic heterogeneity and unique tumor cell sub-populations with reduced sensitivities to cisplatin play a role in its effectiveness within a site of tumor growth. Being exposed to sub-lethal doses will induce changes in gene expression that contribute to the tumour cell’s ability to survive and eventually contribute to the selective pressures leading to cisplatin resistance. Such changes in gene expression, therefore, may contribute to cytoprotective mechanisms. Here, we report on studies designed to uncover how tumour cells respond to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. A microarray study revealed changes in gene expressions that occurred when A549 cells were exposed to a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of cisplatin (e.g. the IC10). These data were integrated with results from a genome-wide siRNA screen looking for novel therapeutic targets that when inhibited transformed a NOEL of cisplatin into one that induced significant increases in lethality. Pathway analyses were performed to identify pathways that could be targeted to enhance cisplatin activity. We found that over 100 genes were differentially expressed when A549 cells were exposed to a NOEL of cisplatin. Pathways associated with apoptosis and DNA repair were activated. The siRNA screen revealed the importance of the hedgehog, cell cycle regulation, and insulin action pathways in A549 cell survival and response to cisplatin treatment. Results from both datasets suggest that RRM2B, CABYR, ALDH3A1, and FHL2 could be further explored as cisplatin-enhancing gene targets. Finally, pathways involved in repairing double-strand DNA breaks and INO80 chromatin remodeling were enriched in both

  16. Combined Use of Gene Expression Modeling and siRNA Screening Identifies Genes and Pathways Which Enhance the Activity of Cisplatin When Added at No Effect Levels to Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ada W Y; Hung, Stacy S; Backstrom, Ian; Ricaurte, Daniel; Kwok, Brian; Poon, Steven; McKinney, Steven; Segovia, Romulo; Rawji, Jenna; Qadir, Mohammed A; Aparicio, Samuel; Stirling, Peter C; Steidl, Christian; Bally, Marcel B

    2016-01-01

    Platinum-based combination chemotherapy is the standard treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While cisplatin is effective, its use is not curative and resistance often emerges. As a consequence of microenvironmental heterogeneity, many tumour cells are exposed to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. Further, genomic heterogeneity and unique tumor cell sub-populations with reduced sensitivities to cisplatin play a role in its effectiveness within a site of tumor growth. Being exposed to sub-lethal doses will induce changes in gene expression that contribute to the tumour cell's ability to survive and eventually contribute to the selective pressures leading to cisplatin resistance. Such changes in gene expression, therefore, may contribute to cytoprotective mechanisms. Here, we report on studies designed to uncover how tumour cells respond to sub-lethal doses of cisplatin. A microarray study revealed changes in gene expressions that occurred when A549 cells were exposed to a no-observed-effect level (NOEL) of cisplatin (e.g. the IC10). These data were integrated with results from a genome-wide siRNA screen looking for novel therapeutic targets that when inhibited transformed a NOEL of cisplatin into one that induced significant increases in lethality. Pathway analyses were performed to identify pathways that could be targeted to enhance cisplatin activity. We found that over 100 genes were differentially expressed when A549 cells were exposed to a NOEL of cisplatin. Pathways associated with apoptosis and DNA repair were activated. The siRNA screen revealed the importance of the hedgehog, cell cycle regulation, and insulin action pathways in A549 cell survival and response to cisplatin treatment. Results from both datasets suggest that RRM2B, CABYR, ALDH3A1, and FHL2 could be further explored as cisplatin-enhancing gene targets. Finally, pathways involved in repairing double-strand DNA breaks and INO80 chromatin remodeling were enriched in both

  17. Antioxidant enzyme expression in rat lungs during hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Ho, Y S; Dey, M S; Crapo, J D

    1996-05-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that upregulate the activities of pulmonary antioxidant enzymes in adult rats during exposure to 85% oxygen, the relative contents of corresponding mRNA in normal and hyperoxic lungs were determined. Hyperoxic exposure drastically induced the expression of lung manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA. Maximal induction of MnSOD mRNA occurred at days 3 and 5 of exposure to hyperoxia, reaching a 600 and a 340% increase over the levels of air-exposed rats, respectively. In addition, hyperoxia induced lung mRNA for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, alpha-tubulin, and gamma-actin to different extends at various days of exposure. Hyperoxia had little or no effect on the levels of mRNA for copper/zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), catalase, heat shock protein (HSP70), and creatine kinase. Nuclear run-on experiments showed that the transcriptional rate of the MnSOD gene is enhanced in hyperoxic rat lungs by approximately 400% at day 3 of exposure compared with that of controls. The specific activities of CuZnSOD and MnSOD in these lung samples per unit of lung protein or DNA were also determined. The activity of CuZnSOD in hyperoxic lungs was found to be unchanged compared with controls, except a 20% decrease at day 7 of exposure when standardized against protein content of lung homogenate. Changes of CuZnSOD activity were more dramatic in hyperoxic lungs (a 40% increase at days 3, 5, 7, and 14 of exposure) when enzyme activity was normalized using lung DNA content. Surprisingly, no proportional increase of lung MnSOD enzyme activity was observed at days 3 and 5 of oxygen exposure. The increase of MnSOD activity per unit of lung protein also did not parallel the increase in MnSOD protein content at days 5, 7, and 14 of exposure. These data suggest that, in addition to transcriptional activation, translational and/or posttranslational

  18. mRNA expression levels and genetic status of genes involved in the EGFR and NF-κB pathways in metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has a dismal prognosis. EGFR is overexpressed or mutated in a large proportion of cases. Downstream components of the EGFR pathway and crosstalk with the NF-κB pathway have not been examined at the clinical level. We explored the prognostic significance of the mRNA expression of nine genes in the EGFR and NF-κB pathways and of BRCA1 and RAP80 in patients in whom EGFR and K-ras gene status had previously been determined. In addition, NFKBIA and DUSP22 gene status was also determined. Methods mRNA expression of the eleven genes was determined by QPCR in 60 metastatic NSCLC patients and in nine lung cancer cell lines. Exon 3 of NFKBIA and exon 6 of DUSP22 were analyzed by direct sequencing. Results were correlated with outcome to platinum-based chemotherapy in patients with wild-type EGFR and to erlotinib in those with EGFR mutations. Results BRCA1 mRNA expression was correlated with EZH2, AEG-1, Musashi-2, CYLD and TRAF6 expression. In patients with low levels of both BRCA1 and AEG-1, PFS was 13.02 months, compared to 5.4 months in those with high levels of both genes and 7.7 months for those with other combinations (P = 0.025). The multivariate analysis for PFS confirmed the prognostic role of high BRCA1/AEG-1 expression (HR, 3.1; P = 0.01). Neither NFKBIA nor DUSP22 mutations were found in any of the tumour samples or cell lines. Conclusions The present study provides a better understanding of the behaviour of metastatic NSCLC and identifies the combination of BRCA1 and AEG-1 expression as a potential prognostic model. PMID:21951562

  19. VARIATION OF THE EXPRESSION OF ENDOGENOUS "HOUSEKEEPING" GENES IN B[A]P TREATED MOUSE LUNGS MEASURED BY qRT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative RT-PCR is frequently used to analyze gene expression in different experimental systems. In this assay, housekeeping genes are frequently used to normalize for the variability between samples (relative quantification). We have examined the utility of using qRT-PCR and...

  20. Synergistic effects of co-administration of suicide gene expressing mesenchymal stem cells and prodrug-encapsulated liposome on aggressive lung melanoma metastases in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Huang, Bing; Wu, Hai-Bin; Wu, Jia-He; Li, Li-Ming; Li, Yan-Xin; Hu, Yu-Lan; Han, Min; Shen, You-Qing; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Gao, Jian-Qing

    2015-07-10

    The success of conventional suicide gene therapy for cancer treatment is still limited because of lack of efficient delivery methods, as well as poor penetration into tumor tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently emerged as potential vehicles in improving delivery issues. However, these stem cells are usually genetically modified using viral gene vectors for suicide gene overexpression to induce sufficient therapeutic efficacy. This approach may result in safety risks for clinical translation. Therefore, we designed a novel strategy that uses non-viral gene vector in modifying MSCs with suicide genes to reduce risks. In addition, these cells were co-administrated with prodrug-encapsulated liposomes for synergistic anti-tumor effects. Results demonstrate that this strategy is effective for gene and prodrug delivery, which co-target tumor tissues, to achieve a significant decrease in tumor colonization and a subsequent increase in survival in a murine melanoma lung metastasis model. Moreover, for the first time, we demonstrated the permeability of MSCs within tumor nests by using an in vitro 3D tumor spheroid model. Thus, the present study provides a new strategy to improve the delivery problem in conventional suicide gene therapy and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. Furthermore, this study also presents new findings to improve our understanding of MSCs in tumor-targeted gene delivery. PMID:25966361

  1. Identification of rat lung – prominent genes by a parallel DNA microarray hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongming; Chen, Jiwang; Weng, Tingting; Jin, Nili; Liu, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Background The comparison of organ transcriptomes is an important strategy for understanding gene functions. In the present study, we attempted to identify lung-prominent genes by comparing the normal transcriptomes of rat lung, heart, kidney, liver, spleen, and brain. To increase the efficiency and reproducibility, we first developed a novel parallel hybridization system, in which 6 samples could be hybridized onto a single slide at the same time. Results We identified the genes prominently expressed in the lung (147) or co-expressed in lung-heart (23), lung-liver (37), lung-spleen (203), and lung-kidney (98). The known functions of the lung-prominent genes mainly fell into 5 categories: ligand binding, signal transducer, cell communication, development, and metabolism. Real-time PCR confirmed 13 lung-prominent genes, including 5 genes that have not been investigated in the lung, vitamin D-dependent calcium binding protein (Calb3), mitogen activated protein kinase 13 (Mapk13), solute carrier family 29 transporters, member 1 (Slc29a1), corticotropin releasing hormone receptor (Crhr1), and lipocalin 2 (Lcn2). Conclusion The lung-prominent genes identified in this study may provide an important clue for further investigation of pulmonary functions. PMID:16533406

  2. Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Demonstrate Distinctive Pulmonary Gene Expressions for Vascular Response Genes: Impact of Ozone Exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparative gene expression profiling of multiple tissues from rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can help decode the transcriptional program that governs organ-specific functions. We examined expressions of CVD genes in the lungs of ...

  3. Assessment of expressions of Bcl-XL, b-FGF, Bmp-2, Caspase-3, PDGFR-α, Smad1 and TGF-β1 genes in a rat model of lung ischemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Şimşek, Hasan; Demiryürek, Şeniz; Demir, Tuncer; Atabay, Hüsne Didem; Çeribasi, Ali Osman; Bayraktar, Recep; Kaplan, Davut Sinan; Öztuzcu, Serdar; Cengiz, Beyhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Ischemia is described as organs and tissues are destitute of oxygen due to decreased arterial or venous blood flow. Many mechanisms play role in cell death happened as a consequence of a new blood flow is needed for both cell regeneration and to clean toxic metabolites during ischemia and later. Lung damage induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a frequent problem in lung transplantation. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) is known as cell suicide, and plays a key role in embryonic developmental and in maintain adult tissue’s life. Materials and Methods: It is investigated expressions of Smad1, Bmp-2, Bcl-XL, b-FGF, Caspase-3, TGF-β1, PDGFR-α genes for molecular changes in lung tissues, after I/R is formed, in this study. For this, we included 40 Wistar albino rats to this study and divided 4 groups (n=10). The Groups were determined as Control (C), Group 1= 1 hr ischemia (I), Group 2= 1 hr ischemia+2 hr reperfusion (I+2R), Group 3= 1 hr ischemia+4 hr reperfusion (I+4R). Besides, molecular analysis and histopathologic examinations of tissues were performed, and the results were evaluated by normalization and statistics analysis. Results: We have found a significant increase in expression of Bcl-XL (P=0.046) and Caspase-3 (P=0.026) genes of group 1, and it was not monitored any significant difference in Group 2 and Group 3. In all groups, the changes in b-FGF (P=0.087), Bmp-2 (P=0.457), TGF-β1 (P=0.201) and PDGFR-α (P=0.116) were not significant compared to control group. We did not see any mRNA expression of Smad1 gene in all groups include control. Conclusion: These findings suggest that I/R injury may trigger apoptotic mechanism in lung. PMID:27081467

  4. Characterization of the mid-foregut transcriptome identifies genes regulated during lung bud induction

    PubMed Central

    Millien, Guetchyn; Beane, Jennifer; Lenburg, Marc; Tsao, Po-Nien; Lu, Jining; Spira, Avrum; Ramirez., Maria I.

    2008-01-01

    To identify genes expressed during initiation of lung organogenesis, we generated transcriptional profiles of the prospective lung region of the mouse foregut (mid-foregut) microdissected from embryos at three developmental stages between embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) and E9.5. This period spans from lung specification of foregut cells to the emergence of the primary lung buds. We identified a number of known and novel genes that are temporally regulated as the lung bud forms. Genes that regulate transcription, including DNA binding factors, co-factors, and chromatin remodeling genes, are the main functional groups that change during lung bud formation. Members of key developmental transcription and growth factor families, not previously described to participate in lung organogenesis, are expressed in the mid-foregut during lung bud induction. These studies also show early expression in the mid-foregut of genes that participate in later stages of lung development. This characterization of the mid-foregut transcriptome provides new insights into molecular events leading to lung organogenesis. PMID:18023262

  5. Identification of Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma as a Potential Tumor Suppressor in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Quan; Li, Lin; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Zhao, Chenglong; Li, Lei; Cao, Wenjiao; Yang, Xinghai; Wei, Haifeng; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Background Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) is known as a tumor-associated antigen that is altered in a variety of malignancies, including lung cancer. However, the role of PRAME in lung cancer remains unclear. Material/Methods We analyzed the expression of PRAME in human lung adenocarcinomas and studied the function of PRAME using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced gene knockdown in lung cancer cell lines PC9 and A549. Results We found that PRAME expression is down-regulated in lung adenocarcinomas. Knockdown of PRAME promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of PC9 and A549 cells. Conclusions In line with its roles in controlling cell growth, RPAME regulates multiple critical cell-growth related genes, including IGF1R oncogene. IGF1R up-regulation contributes to increase of cell growth upon the knockdown of PRAME. Taken together, our results suggest that PRAME has inhibitory roles in lung cancer. PMID:27241212

  6. Expansion of CD4+CD25+ and CD25- T-Bet, GATA-3, Foxp3 and RORγt Cells in Allergic Inflammation, Local Lung Distribution and Chemokine Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, You; Malmhäll, Carina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Rådinger, Madeleine; O'Neil, Serena E.; Lötvall, Jan; Bossios, Apostolos

    2011-01-01

    Allergic asthma is associated with airway eosinophilia, which is regulated by different T-effector cells. T cells express transcription factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt and Foxp3, representing Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells respectively. No study has directly determined the relative presence of each of these T cell subsets concomitantly in a model of allergic airway inflammation. In this study we determined the degree of expansion of these T cell subsets, in the lungs of allergen challenged mice. Cell proliferation was determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) together with 7-aminoactnomycin (7-AAD). The immunohistochemical localisation of T cells in the lung microenvironments was also quantified. Local expression of cytokines, chemokines and receptor genes was measured using real-time RT-PCR array analysis in tissue sections isolated by laser microdissection and pressure catapulting technology. Allergen exposure increased the numbers of T-bet+, GATA-3+, RORγt+ and Foxp3+ cells in CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25- T cells, with the greatest expansion of GATA-3+ cells. The majority of CD4+CD25+ T-bet+, GATA-3+, RORγt+ and Foxp3+ cells had incorporated BrdU and underwent proliferation during allergen exposure. Allergen exposure led to the accumulation of T-bet+, GATA-3+ and Foxp3+ cells in peribronchial and alveolar tissue, GATA-3+ and Foxp3+ cells in perivascular tissue, and RORγt+ cells in alveolar tissue. A total of 28 cytokines, chemokines and receptor genes were altered more than 3 fold upon allergen exposure, with expression of half of the genes claimed in all three microenvironments. Our study shows that allergen exposure affects all T effector cells in lung, with a dominant of Th2 cells, but with different local cell distribution, probably due to a distinguished local inflammatory milieu. PMID:21625544

  7. Role of the ABCE1 gene in human lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    REN, YI; LI, YINGHUI; TIAN, DALI

    2012-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter E1 (ABCE1), also known as RLI (RNase L inhibitor), is a new type of endoribonuclease inhibitor, which can specifically bind to RNase L and abolish its effect. ABCE1 binds to eIF2α and eIF5 to form a pre-translation initiation complex, suggesting its crucial role in cell growth, development and certain pathological processes. To probe the role of ABCE1 in the development and progress of human lung adenocarcinoma, we first detected the changes of its mRNA and protein expression in tissues, and found a high expression level of ABCE1 in human lung adenocarcinoma tissues and metastatic lymph nodes, which was also correlated with clinical stages. Moreover, human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells were infected with lentiviral vectors containing ABCE1-specific shRNA, and resulted in significant inhibition of cell growth. Using microarray assay, a number of differentially expressed genes were found after ABCE1 suppression. Our results demonstrated the potential role of ABCE1 in human lung adenocarcinoma, which may provide some molecular basis for the mechanisms of development and progress of human lung adenocarcinoma, and help to find new pharmacological targets. PMID:22267055

  8. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  9. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  10. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  11. Whole-Genome Analysis of Temporal Gene Expression during Early Transdifferentiation of Human Lung Alveolar Epithelial Type 2 Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Helena Morales; Newman, Donna R.; Sannes, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the surfactant-producing pulmonary alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell acts as the progenitor of the type I (AT1) cell, but the regulatory mechanisms involved in this relationship remain the subject of active investigation. While previous studies have established a number of specific markers that are expressed during transdifferentiation from AT2 to AT1 cells, we hypothesized that additional, previously unrecognized, signaling pathways and relevant cellular functions are transcriptionally regulated at early stages of AT2 transition. In this study, a discovery-based gene expression profile analysis was undertaken of freshly isolated human AT2 (hAT2) cells grown on extracellular matrix (ECM) substrata known to either support (type I collagen) or retard (Matrigel) the early transdifferentiation process into hAT1-like cells over the first three days. Cell type-specific expression patterns analyzed by Illumina Human HT-12 BeadChip yielded over 300 genes that were up- or down-regulated. Candidate genes significantly induced or down-regulated during hAT2 transition to hAT1-like cells compared to non-transitioning hAT2 cells were identified. Major functional groups were also recognized, including those of signaling and cytoskeletal proteins as well as genes of unknown function. Expression of established signatures of hAT2 and hAT1 cells, such as surfactant proteins, caveolin-1, and channels and transporters, was confirmed. Selected novel genes further validated by qRT-PCR, protein expression analysis, and/or cellular localization included SPOCK2, PLEKHO1, SPRED1, RAB11FIP1, PTRF/CAVIN-1 and RAP1GAP. These results further demonstrate the utility of genome-wide analysis to identify relevant, novel cell type-specific signatures of early ECM-regulated alveolar epithelial transdifferentiation processes in vitro. PMID:24690998

  12. Gene Express Inc.

    PubMed

    Saccomanno, Colette F

    2006-07-01

    Gene Express, Inc. is a technology-licensing company and provider of Standardized Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (StaRT-PCR) services. Designed by and for clinical researchers involved in pharmaceutical, biomarker and molecular diagnostic product development, StaRT-PCR is a unique quantitative and standardized multigene expression measurement platform. StaRT-PCR meets all of the performance characteristics defined by the US FDA as required to support regulatory submissions [101,102] , and by the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act of 1988 (CLIA) as necessary to support diagnostic testing [1] . A standardized mixture of internal standards (SMIS), manufactured in bulk, provides integrated quality control wherein each native template target gene is measured relative to a competitive template internal standard. Bulk production enables the compilation of a comprehensive standardized database from across multiple experiments, across collaborating laboratories and across the entire clinical development lifecycle of a given compound or diagnostic product. For the first time, all these data are able to be directly compared. Access to such a database can dramatically shorten the time from investigational new drug (IND) to new drug application (NDA), or save time and money by hastening a substantiated 'no-go' decision. High-throughput StaRT-PCR is conducted at the company's automated Standardized Expression Measurement (SEM) Center. Currently optimized for detection on a microcapillary electrophoretic platform, StaRT-PCR products also may be analyzed on microarray, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), or matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) platforms. SEM Center services deliver standardized genomic data--data that will accelerate the application of pharmacogenomic technology to new drug and diagnostic test development and facilitate personalized medicine. PMID:16886903

  13. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  14. Evolution of Gene Expression after Gene Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat–maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. PMID:25912045

  15. Transcriptome network analysis reveals potential candidate genes for squamous lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jing; Hu, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Squamous lung cancer is a common type of lung cancer; however, its mechanism of oncogenesis is still unknown. The aim of this study was to screen candidate genes of squamous lung cancer using a bioinformatics strategy and elucidate the mechanism of squamous lung cancer. Published microarray data of the GSE3268 series was obtained from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO). Significance analysis of microarrays was performed using the software R, and differentially expressed genes by R analysis were harvested. The relationship between transcription factors and target genes in cancer were collected from the Transcriptional regulatory element database. A transcriptome network analysis method was used to construct gene regulation networks and select the candidate genes for squamous lung cancer. SPI1, FLI1, FOS, ETS2, EGR1 and PPARG were defined as candidate genes for squamous lung cancer by the transcriptome network analysis method. Among them, 5 genes had been reported to be involved in lung cancer, except SPI1 and FLI1. Effective recall on previous knowledge conferred strong confidence in these methods. It is demonstrated that transcriptome network analysis is useful in the identification of candidate genes in disease. PMID:21922129

  16. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  17. Serial analysis of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Velculescu, V E; Zhang, L; Vogelstein, B; Kinzler, K W

    1995-10-20

    The characteristics of an organism are determined by the genes expressed within it. A method was developed, called serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), that allows the quantitative and simultaneous analysis of a large number of transcripts. To demonstrate this strategy, short diagnostic sequence tags were isolated from pancreas, concatenated, and cloned. Manual sequencing of 1000 tags revealed a gene expression pattern characteristic of pancreatic function. New pancreatic transcripts corresponding to novel tags were identified. SAGE should provide a broadly applicable means for the quantitative cataloging and comparison of expressed genes in a variety of normal, developmental, and disease states. PMID:7570003

  18. Expression of hPNAS-4 Radiosensitizes Lewis Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Hui; Yuan Zhu; Zhu Hong; Li Lei; Shi Huashan; Wang Zi; Fan Yu; Deng Qian; Zeng Jianshuang; He Yinbo; Xiao Jianghong; Li Zhiping

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to transfer the hPNAS-4 gene, a novel apoptosis-related human gene, into Lewis lung cancer (LL2) and observe its radiosensitive effect on radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: The hPNAS-4 gene was transfected into LL2 cells, and its expression was detected via western blot. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry were used to detect the growth and apoptosis of cells treated with irradiation/PNAS-4 in vitro. The hPNAS-4 gene was transferred into LL2-bearing mice through tail vein injection of the liposome/gene complex. The tumor volumes were recorded after radiation therapy. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay were performed to detect the tumor cell growth and apoptosis in vivo. Results: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue, and its overexpressions were confirmed via western blot analysis. Compared with the control, empty plasmid, hPNAS-4, radiation, and empty plasmid plus radiation groups, the hPNAS-4 plus radiation group more significantly inhibited growth and enhanced apoptosis of LL2 cells in vitro and in vivo (P<.05). Conclusions: The hPNAS-4 gene was successfully transferred into LL2 cells and tumor tissue and was expressed in both LL2 cell and tumor tissue. The hPNAS-4 gene therapy significantly enhanced growth inhibition and apoptosis of LL2 tumor cells by radiation therapy in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, it may be a potential radiosensitive treatment of radiation therapy for lung cancer.

  19. Aberrant Gene Expression in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ence; Ji, Guoli; Brinkmeyer-Langford, Candice L.; Cai, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression as an intermediate molecular phenotype has been a focus of research interest. In particular, studies of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) have offered promise for understanding gene regulation through the discovery of genetic variants that explain variation in gene expression levels. Existing eQTL methods are designed for assessing the effects of common variants, but not rare variants. Here, we address the problem by establishing a novel analytical framework for evaluating the effects of rare or private variants on gene expression. Our method starts from the identification of outlier individuals that show markedly different gene expression from the majority of a population, and then reveals the contributions of private SNPs to the aberrant gene expression in these outliers. Using population-scale mRNA sequencing data, we identify outlier individuals using a multivariate approach. We find that outlier individuals are more readily detected with respect to gene sets that include genes involved in cellular regulation and signal transduction, and less likely to be detected with respect to the gene sets with genes involved in metabolic pathways and other fundamental molecular functions. Analysis of polymorphic data suggests that private SNPs of outlier individuals are enriched in the enhancer and promoter regions of corresponding aberrantly-expressed genes, suggesting a specific regulatory role of private SNPs, while the commonly-occurring regulatory genetic variants (i.e., eQTL SNPs) show little evidence of involvement. Additional data suggest that non-genetic factors may also underlie aberrant gene expression. Taken together, our findings advance a novel viewpoint relevant to situations wherein common eQTLs fail to predict gene expression when heritable, rare inter-individual variation exists. The analytical framework we describe, taking into consideration the reality of differential phenotypic robustness, may be valuable for investigating

  20. Regulation of Airway Mucin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Philip; Loukoianov, Artem; Wachi, Shinichiro; Wu, Reen

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are important components that exert a variety of functions in cell-cell interaction, epidermal growth factor receptor signaling, and airways protection. In the conducting airways of the lungs, mucins are the major contributor to the viscoelastic property of mucous secretion, which is the major barrier to trapping inhaled microbial organism, particulates, and oxidative pollutants. The homeostasis of mucin production is an important feature in conducting airways for the maintenance of mucociliary function. Aberrant mucin secretion and accumulation in airway lumen are clinical hallmarks associated with various lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, emphysema, and lung cancer. Among 20 known mucin genes identified, 11 of them have been verified at either the mRNA and/or protein level in airways. The regulation of mucin genes is complicated, as are the mediators and signaling pathways. This review summarizes the current view on the mediators, the signaling pathways, and the transcriptional units that are involved in the regulation of airway mucin gene expression. In addition, we also point out essential features of epigenetic mechanisms for the regulation of these genes. PMID:17961085

  1. Science review: Searching for gene candidates in acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Finigan, James H; Hassoun, Paul; Garcia, Joe GN

    2004-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a complex and devastating illness, often occurring within the setting of sepsis, and carries an annual mortality rate of 30–50%. Although the genetic basis of ALI has not been fully established, an increasing body of evidence suggests that genetic predisposition contributes to disease susceptibility and severity. Significant difficulty exists, however, in defining the exact nature of these genetic factors, including large phenotypic variance, incomplete penetrance, complex gene–environment interactions, and strong potential for locus heterogeneity. We utilized the candidate gene approach and an ortholog gene database to provide relevant gene ontologies and insights into the genetic basis of ALI. We employed a Medline search of selected basic and clinical studies in the English literature and studies sponsored by the HopGene National Institutes of Health sponsored Program in Genomic Applications. Extensive gene expression profiling studies in animal models of ALI (rat, murine, canine), as well as in humans, were performed to identify potential candidate genes . We identified a number of candidate genes for ALI, with blood coagulation and inflammation gene ontologies being the most highly represented. The candidate gene approach coupled with extensive gene profiling and novel bioinformatics approaches is a valuable way to identify genes that are involved in ALI. PMID:15566614

  2. Sp3 regulates fas expression in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, H; Miranda, K; Fine, A

    1998-01-01

    By transducing an apoptotic signal in immune effector cells, Fas has been directly implicated in the control of immunological activity. Expression and functional results, however, have also suggested a role for Fas in regulating cell turnover in specific epithelial populations. To characterize factors responsible for Fas expression in epithelial cells, approximately 3 kb of the 5' flanking region of the mouse Fas gene was isolated. By rapid amplification of cDNA ends and primer extension, transcriptional start sites were identified within 50 bp upstream of the translation start site. Transient transfection of promoter-luciferase constructs in a mouse lung epithelial cell line, MLE-15, localized promoter activity to the first 77 bp of upstream sequence. By using a 60 bp DNA probe (-18 to -77) in electrophoretic mobility-shift assays, three shifted complexes were found. Incubation with excess cold Sp1 oligonucleotide or an anti-Sp3 antibody inhibited complex formation. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Sp1 site resulted in 60-70% loss of promoter activity. In Drosophila SL-2 cells, promoter activity was markedly increased by co-transfection of an Sp3 expression construct. These results show that the Sp3 protein is involved in regulating Fas gene expression in lung epithelial cells. PMID:9639581

  3. IGFBP7 is a p53 target gene inactivated in human lung cancer by DNA hypermethylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Cui, Tiantian; Knösel, Thomas; Yang, Linlin; Zöller, Kristin; Petersen, Iver

    2011-07-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) was considered a tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. However, the mechanism responsible for the downregulation of this gene has not yet been fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the epigenetic inactivation of IGFBP7 expression in human lung cancer. We found that 14 out of 16 lung cancer cell lines showed decreased expression of IGFBP7 compared to control cells by real-time RT-PCR, and 42 out of 90 patients (46.7%) with primary lung tumor exhibited negative staining of IGFBP7 by immunohistochemistry analysis. The IGFBP7 expression could be restored by demethylation agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) in 7 cancer cell lines. Methylation status of IGFBP7 was further evaluated by bisulfite sequencing (BS) and methylation-specific-PCR (MSP). It turned out that low expression of IGFBP7 was associated with DNA methylation in lung cancer cell lines and in primary lung tumors (P=0.019). To explore the regulatory role of p53 on IGFBP7, we transfected a wild type p53 expression vector into lung cancer cell lines H1299, H2228, and H82. Forced expression of p53 increased IGFBP7 expression only in H82 harboring no IGFBP7 methylation, while transfection in combination with DAC induced the expression of IGFBP7 in H1299 and H2228, in which IGFBP7 was methylated. Additionally, treatment with p53 inducer adriamycin (ADR) alone or in combination with DAC increased the expression of IGFBP7 in the 3 cell lines. Our data suggest that IGFBP7 is inactivated in lung cancer by DNA hypermethylation in both lung cancer cell lines and primary lung tumors, and IGFBP7 might be regulated by p53 in lung cancer cells. PMID:21095038

  4. Method of controlling gene expression

    DOEpatents

    Peters, Norman K.; Frost, John W.; Long, Sharon R.

    1991-12-03

    A method of controlling expression of a DNA segment under the control of a nod gene promoter which comprises administering to a host containing a nod gene promoter an amount sufficient to control expression of the DNA segment of a compound of the formula: ##STR1## in which each R is independently H or OH, is described.

  5. New genes linked to lung cancer susceptibility in Asian women

    Cancer.gov

    An international group of scientists has identified three genes that predispose Asian women who have never smoked to lung cancer. The discovery of specific genetic variations, which have not previously been associated with lung cancer risk in other popul

  6. Gene Expression in Oligodendroglial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Elisabeth J.; Haylock, Brian; Husband, David; du Plessis, Daniel; Sibson, D. Ross; Warnke, Peter C.; Walker, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Background: Oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss are more likely to be chemosensitive and have longer survival than those with intact 1p/19q, but not all respond to chemotherapy, warranting investigation of the biological basis of chemosensitivity. Methods: Gene expression profiling was performed using amplified antisense RNA from 28 oligodendroglial tumors treated with chemotherapy (26 serial stereotactic biopsy, 2 resection). Expression of differentially expressed genes was validated by real-time PCR. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clustering of multiple samples from the same case in 14/17 cases and identified subgroups associated with tumor grade and 1p/19q status. 176 genes were differentially expressed, 164 being associated with 1p/19q loss (86% not on 1p or 19q). 94 genes differed between responders and non-responders to chemotherapy; 12 were not associated with 1p/19q loss. Significant differential expression was confirmed in 11/13 selected genes. Novel genes associated with response to therapy included SSBP2, GFRA1, FAP and RASD1. IQGAP1, INA, TGIF1, NR2F2 and MYCBP were differentially expressed in oligodendroglial tumors with 1p/19q loss. Conclusion: Gene expression profiling using serial stereotactic biopsies indicated greater homogeneity within tumors than between tumors. Genes associated with 1p/19q status or response were identified warranting further elucidation of their role in oligodendroglial tumors. PMID:20966545

  7. Expression of a phosphorylated form of ATF4 in lung and non-small cell lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Chui-Feng; Miao, Yuan; Lin, Xu-Yong; Zhang, Di; Wang, En-Hua

    2014-01-01

    ATF4 is a member of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein family of basic zipper-containing proteins, a family of transcription factors phosphorylated at serines residues by protein kinase A. The family has been proved to be able to stimulate the transcription of the genes containing CRE elements. Elevated ATF4 expression was detected in some tumors including breast carcinoma compared to their corresponding nontumor tissues. p-ATF4 (ser 245), a phosphorylated form of ATF4 protein at serine 245 site, was believed to be an active type of this protein. However, its expression and clinical significance in malignant tumors including non-small cell lung cancer were not reported up to date. In the current study, we investigate the expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in non-small cell lung cancer using tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry. p-ATF4 (ser 245) immunostaining was detected in nucleus and cytoplasm in cancer cells and normal lung epithelial cells. Compared to bronchial epithelium and submucosal glands (total positive rate, 14.6% (12/82)), there was increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in non-small cell lung cancer cells (total positive rate, 42.7% (35/82)) (p < 0.05). In addition, increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) was associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced TNM stages (III and IV) in non-small cell lung cancer (p < 0.05). Immunofluorescent staining confirmed nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) in lung and cancer tissues, and also in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines including NCI-H157 and LTE cells. These results indicate that increased expression of p-ATF4 (ser 245) may contribute to cancer development of non-small cell lung cancer and may be a potential cancer marker. PMID:23975372

  8. Deletion and differential expression of p16{sup INK4a} in mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Belinsky, S.A.; Swafford, D.S.; Middleton, S.K.; Kennedy, C.H.; Tesfaigzi, J.

    1997-12-31

    Recent allelotyping of chemical-induced lung tumors in hybrid mice has detected loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 4 in a region involving the interferon-{alpha} (IFN-{alpha}) gene cluster that is syntenic to human chromosome 9p21-22, the location of the p16{sup INK4a}(p16) and (p15) tumor suppressor genes. The purpose of the current investigation was to characterize the expression of p16 and p15 in lung tumors and tumor-derived cell lines induced in Ad mice by exposure to the tobacco-specific nitrosamine, 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK). Expression of p16 and p15 was detected in all primary lung tumors; however, levels of expression of p16 differed by up to 15-fold between tumors. This is the first study to note a marked difference in the expression of the p16 gene in primary lung tumors. The apparent low levels of expression seen in approximately half of the tumors was not attributed to deletion, mutation or methylation of the p16 gene. Conversely, the high levels of p16 expression were not the result of effects on the retinoblastoma gene (Rb) or cyclin D1 proteins but most likely in response to a dysfunction elsewhere within this pathway. In contrast to the detection of p16 expression in primary tumors, this gene was deleted in all four cell lines. Three of four cell lines also showed loss of the p15 gene. Mapping of these homozygous deletions on chromosome 4 revealed that the p16 gene resides near the D4MIT77 marker, which is located approximately 12 cM proximal to the IFN-{alpha} gene cluster, thereby implicating the p16 gene as one of the targets within the allelic deletions detected previously in primary lung tumors from hybrid mice.

  9. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Lindsay M.; Sandri, Brian J.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Meyer, Carolyn M.; Price, Andrew P.; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases. PMID:26954258

  10. Analysis of Genome-scale Expression Network in Four Major Bacterial Residents of Cystic Fibrosis Lung

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinkhan, Nazanin; Zarrineh, Peyman; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    In polymicrobial communities where several species co-exist in a certain niche and consequently the possibility of interactions among species is very high, gene expression data sources can give better insights in to underlying adaptation mechanisms assumed by bacteria. Furthermore, several possible synergistic or antagonistic interactions among species can be investigated through gene expression comparisons. Lung is one of the habitats harboring several distinct pathogens during severe pulmonary disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cystic fibrosis (CF). Expression data analysis of these lung residents can help to gain a better understanding on how these species interact with each other within the host cells. The first part of this paper deals with introducing available data sources for the major bacteria responsible for causing lung diseases and their genomic relations. In the second part, the main focus is on the studies concerning gene expression analyses of these species. PMID:25435803

  11. A Catalog of Genes Homozygously Deleted in Human Lung Cancer and the Candidacy of PTPRD as a Tumor Suppressor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Takashi; Otsuka, Ayaka; Girard, Luc; Sato, Masanori; Iwakawa, Reika; Ogiwara, Hideaki; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse; Minna, John D.; Yokota, Jun

    2010-01-01

    A total of 176 genes homozygously deleted in human lung cancer were identified by DNA array-based whole genome scanning of 52 lung cancer cell lines and subsequent genomic PCR in 74 cell lines, including the 52 cell lines scanned. One or more exons of these genes were homozygously deleted in one (1%) to 20 (27%) cell lines. These genes included known tumor suppressor genes, e.g., CDKN2A/p16, RB1, and SMAD4, and candidate tumor suppressor genes whose hemizygous or homozygous deletions were reported in several types of human cancers, such as FHIT, KEAP1, and LRP1B/LRP-DIP. CDKN2A/p16 and p14ARF located in 9p21 were most frequently deleted (20/74, 27%). The PTPRD gene was most frequently deleted (8/74, 11%) among genes mapping to regions other than 9p21. Somatic mutations, including a nonsense mutation, of the PTPRD gene were detected in 8/74 (11%) of cell lines and 4/95 (4%) of surgical specimens of lung cancer. Reduced PTPRD expression was observed in the majority (>80%) of cell lines and surgical specimens of lung cancer. Therefore, PTPRD is a candidate tumor suppressor gene in lung cancer. Microarray-based expression profiling of 19 lung cancer cell lines also indicated that some of the 176 genes, such as KANK and ADAMTS1, are preferentially inactivated by epigenetic alterations. Genetic/epigenetic as well as functional studies of these 176 genes will increase our understanding of molecular mechanisms behind lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20073072

  12. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Lin, Mien-Chun; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter-driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter's tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP's gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter-driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk-carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27322500

  13. Gene Therapy for Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Suicide Gene Driven by a Lung-Specific Promoter Delivered by JC Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chiung-Yao; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Meilin

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed type of lung cancer, has a poor prognosis even with combined surgery, chemotherapy, or molecular targeted therapies. Most patients are diagnosed with an in-operable advanced or metastatic disease, both pointing to the necessity of developing effective therapies for lung adenocarcinoma. Surfactant protein B (SP-B) has been found to be overexpressed in lung adenocarcinoma. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that human lung adenocarcinoma cells are susceptible to the JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infection. Therefore, we designed that the JCPyV virus-like particle (VLP) packaged with an SP-B promoter–driven thymidine kinase suicide gene (pSPB-tk) for possible gene therapy of human lung adenocarcinoma. Plasmids expressing the GFP (pSPB-gfp) or thymidine kinase gene (pSPB-tk) under the control of the human SP-B promoter were constructed. The promoter’s tissue specificity was tested by transfection of pSPB-gfp into A549, CH27, and H460 human lung carcinoma cells and non-lung cells. The JCPyV VLP’s gene transfer efficiency and the selective cytotoxicity of pSPB-tk combined with ganciclovir (GCV) were tested in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. In the current study, we found that SP-B promoter–driven GFP was specifically expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and large cell carcinoma (H460) cells. JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver a GFP reporter gene into A549 cells for expression. Selective cytotoxicity was observed in A549 but not non-lung cells that were transfected with pSPB-tk or infected with pSPB-tk–carrying JCPyV VLPs. In mice injected with pSPB-tk–carrying JCPyV VLPs through the tail vein and treated with ganciclovir (GCV), a potent 80% inhibition of growth of human lung adenocarcinoma nodules resulted. The JCPyV VLPs combined with the use of SP-B promoter demonstrates effectiveness as a potential gene therapy against human lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27322500

  14. Selective expression of transthyretin in subtypes of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuai; Sun, Suozhu; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng; Liu, Liyun

    2016-06-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is expressed primarily in liver, choroid plexus of brain and pancreatic islet A and B cells. It is also synthesized in some endocrine tumors. In the present study, the protein expression of TTR in lung cancer tissues and cell lines was investigated by western blot. The mRNA expression of TTR in 24 pairs of frozen lung cancer tissues was examined by RT-PCR. The specific expression and cellular distribution of TTR were also evaluated in 104 paraffin-embedded lung cancer samples and 3 normal lung tissues by immunohistochemistry. Similarly, the subcellular localization and expression of TTR were further analyzed in lung cancer cell lines. With the exception of mucinous adenocarcinoma, the expression of TTR protein was observed in all tested subtypes of lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma displayed the highest positive expression rate of TTR, accounting for 84.4 %, and the positive expression rate of TTR was up to 85.7 % at stages III and IV. The secretory bubbles with strong TTR staining were observed in luminal cells of lung cancer. Furthermore, the localization of TTR in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells and the secretion of TTR into extracellular milieu were also confirmed. Taken together, TTR is selectively synthesized in lung cancer cells and can be secreted extracellularly. PMID:26943652

  15. Regulation of proto-oncogene expression in adult and developing lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Molinar-Rode, R; Smeyne, R J; Curran, T; Morgan, J I

    1993-01-01

    Activation of immediate-early gene expression has been associated with mitogenesis, differentiation, nerve cell depolarization, and recently, terminal differentiation processes and programmed cell death. Previous evidence also suggested that immediate-early genes play a role in the physiology of the lungs (J. I. Morgan, D. R. Cohen, J. L. Hempstead, and T. Curran, Science 237:192-197, 1987). Therefore, we analyzed c-fos expression in adult and developing lung tissues. Seizures elicited by chemoconvulsants induced expression of mRNA for c-fos, c-jun, and junB and Fos-like immunoreactivity in lung tissue. The use of pharmacological antagonists and adrenalectomy indicated that this increased expression was neurogenic. Interestingly, by using a fos-lacZ transgenic mouse, it was shown that Fos-LacZ expression in response to seizure occurred preferentially in clusters of epithelial cells at the poles of the bronchioles. This was the same location of Fos-LacZ expression detected during early lung development. These data imply that pharmacological induction of immediate-early gene expression in adult mice recapitulates an embryological program of gene expression. Images PMID:8497249

  16. Conditional Gene Expression in Mycobacterium abscessus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Mélanie; Singh, Anil Kumar; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Nassif, Xavier; Herrmann, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging human pathogen responsible for lung infections, skin and soft-tissue infections and disseminated infections in immunocompromised patients. It may exist either as a smooth (S) or rough (R) morphotype, the latter being associated with increased pathogenicity in various models. Genetic tools for homologous recombination and conditional gene expression are desperately needed to allow the study of M. abscessus virulence. However, descriptions of knock-out (KO) mutants in M. abscessus are rare, with only one KO mutant from an S strain described so far. Moreover, of the three major tools developed for homologous recombination in mycobacteria, only the one based on expression of phage recombinases is working. Several conditional gene expression tools have recently been engineered for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, but none have been tested yet in M. abscessus. Based on previous experience with genetic tools allowing homologous recombination and their failure in M. abscessus, we evaluated the potential interest of a conditional gene expression approach using a system derived from the two repressors system, TetR/PipOFF. After several steps necessary to adapt TetR/PipOFF for M. abscessus, we have shown the efficiency of this system for conditional expression of an essential mycobacterial gene, fadD32. Inhibition of fadD32 was demonstrated for both the S and R isotypes, with marginally better efficiency for the R isotype. Conditional gene expression using the dedicated TetR/PipOFF system vectors developed here is effective in S and R M. abscessus, and may constitute an interesting approach for future genetic studies in this pathogen. PMID:22195042

  17. Expression quantitative trait analysis reveals fine germline transcript regulation in mouse lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Cotroneo, Chiara E; Dassano, Alice; Colombo, Francesca; Pettinicchio, Angela; Lecis, Daniele; Dugo, Matteo; De Cecco, Loris; Dragani, Tommaso A; Manenti, Giacomo

    2016-06-01

    Gene expression modulates cellular functions in both physiologic and pathologic conditions. Herein, we carried out a genetic linkage study on the transcriptome of lung tumors induced by urethane in an (A/J x C57BL/6)F4 intercross population, whose individual lung tumor multiplicity (Nlung) is linked to the genotype at the Pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1 (Pas1) locus. We found that expression levels of 1179 and 1579 genes are modulated by an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in cis and in trans, respectively (LOD score > 5). Of note, the genomic area surrounding and including the Pas1 locus regulated 14 genes in cis and 857 genes in trans. In lung tumors of the same (A/J x C57BL/6)F4 mice, we found 1124 genes whose transcript levels associated with Nlung (FDR < 0.001). The expression levels of about a third of these genes (n = 401) were regulated by the genotype at the Pas1 locus. Pathway analysis of the sets of genes associated with Nlung and regulated by Pas1 revealed a set of 14 recurrently represented genes that are components or targets of the Ras-Erk and Pi3k-Akt signaling pathways. Altogether our results illustrate the architecture of germline control of gene expression in mouse lung cancer: they highlight the importance of Pas1 as a tumor-modifier locus, attribute to it a novel role as a major regulator of transcription in lung tumor nodules and strengthen the candidacy of the Kras gene as the effector of this locus. PMID:26966001

  18. Expression and genomic imprinting of the porcine Rasgrf1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue-Yun; Liu, Li-Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Long; Zhang, Shu-Jing; Yin, Zong-Jun

    2014-02-25

    Imprinted genes play important roles in mammalian growth, development and behavior. The Rasgrf1 (Ras protein-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor 1) gene has been identified as an imprinted gene in mouse and rat. In the present study, we detected its sequence, imprinting status and expression pattern in the domestic pigs. A 228 bp partial sequence located in exon 14 and a 193 bp partial sequence located in exon 1 of the Rasgrf1 gene in domestic pigs were obtained. A G/A transition, was identified in Rasgrf1 exon 14, and then, the reciprocal Berkshire × Wannan black F1 hybrid model and the RT-PCR-RFLP method were used to detect the imprinting status of porcine Rasgrf1 gene at the developmental stage of 1-day-old. The expression profile results indicated that the porcine Rasgrf1 mRNA was highly expressed in brain, pituitary and pancreas, followed by kidney, stomach, lung, testis, small intestine, ovary, spleen and liver, and at low levels of expression in longissimus dorsi, heart, and backfat. The expression levels of Rasgrf1 gene in brain, pituitary and pancreas tissues were significantly different between the two reciprocal F1 hybrids. Imprinting analysis showed that porcine Rasgrf1 gene was maternally expressed in the liver, small intestine, paternally expressed in the lung, but biallelically expressed in brain, heart, spleen, kidney, stomach, pancreas, backfat, testis, ovary, longissimus dorsi and pituitary tissues. PMID:24342659

  19. ARVCF expression is significantly correlated with the malignant phenotype of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Di; Tang, Na; Liu, Yang; Wang, En-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Armadillo repeat gene deleted in velo-cardio-facial syndrome (ARVCF) is a member of the p120 catenin (p120ctn) family; it contains nine central Armadillo repeats and binds to the juxtamembrane domain of E-cadherin. We used immunohistochemistry to measure ARVCF expression in 121 patients with NSCLC and western blotting to examine differences in ARVCF expression between lung cancer and adjacent normal lung tissues. We interfered with ARVCF expression in two lung cancer cell lines and measured its effects on invasion and proliferation. ARVCF expression correlated with the malignant phenotype and poor prognosis. We also observed ARVCF-dependent changes in small GTPase (mainly RhoA) activity in lung cancer cells. We confirmed that ARVCF plays an important role in the malignant phenotype. PMID:25683624

  20. Transgenic control of perforin gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenheld, M.G.; Podack, E.R.; Levy, R.B.

    1995-03-01

    Perforin is a pore-forming effector molecule of CTL and NK cells. To characterize perforin gene expression and its transcriptional control mechanisms in vivo, expression of a cell surface tag, i.e., human CD4, was driven by 5.1 kb of the murin perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region in transgenic mice. Six out of seven transgenic lines expressed the perforin-tag hybrid gene at low to intermediate levels, depending on the integration site. Transgene expression occurred in all cells that physiologically are able to express perforin. At the whole organ level, significant amounts of transgenic mRNA and endogenous perforin mRNA were co-expressed in the lymphoid organs, as well as in the lung, the ileum, the oviduct/uterus, and the bone marrow. At the single cell level, the perforin tag was present on NK cells and on CD8{sup +}, as well as on CD4{sup +} cells. Also targeted were Thy-1.2{sup +} {gamma}{delta} T cells, but not Thy-1.2{sup -} {gamma}{delta} T cells, B cells, nor monocytes. During thymic T cell development, transgene expression occurred in double negative (CD4{sup -}CD8{sup -}) thymocytes and was detected at all subsequent stages, but exceeded the expression levels of the endogenous gene in the thymus. In conclusion, the analyzed perforin 5{prime} flanking and promoter region contains important cis-acting sequences that restrict perforin expression to T cells and NK cells, and therefore provides a unique tool for manipulating T cell and/or Nk cell-mediated immune responses in transgenic mice. On the other hand, the normal control of perforin gene expression involves at least one additional negative control mechanism that was not mediated by the transgenic promoter and upstream region. This control restricts perforin gene expression in thymically developing T cells and in most resting peripheral T cells, but can be released upon T cell activation. 43 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Complex Sources of Variation in Tissue Expression Data: Analysis of the GTEx Lung Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    McCall, Matthew N; Illei, Peter B; Halushka, Marc K

    2016-09-01

    The sources of gene expression variability in human tissues are thought to be a complex interplay of technical, compositional, and disease-related factors. To better understand these contributions, we investigated expression variability in a relatively homogeneous tissue expression dataset from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) resource. In addition to identifying technical sources, such as sequencing date and post-mortem interval, we also identified several biological sources of variation. An in-depth analysis of the 175 genes with the greatest variation among 133 lung tissue samples identified five distinct clusters of highly correlated genes. One large cluster included surfactant genes (SFTPA1, SFTPA2, and SFTPC), which are expressed exclusively in type II pneumocytes, cells that proliferate in ventilator associated lung injury. High surfactant expression was strongly associated with death on a ventilator and type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. A second large cluster included dynein (DNAH9 and DNAH12) and mucin (MUC5B and MUC16) genes, which are exclusive to the respiratory epithelium and goblet cells of bronchial structures. This indicates heterogeneous bronchiole sampling due to the harvesting location in the lung. A small cluster included acute-phase reactant genes (SAA1, SAA2, and SAA2-SAA4). The final two small clusters were technical and gender related. To summarize, in a collection of normal lung samples, we found that tissue heterogeneity caused by harvesting location (medial or lateral lung) and late therapeutic intervention (mechanical ventilation) were major contributors to expression variation. These unexpected sources of variation were the result of altered cell ratios in the tissue samples, an underappreciated source of expression variation. PMID:27588449

  2. Re-expression of CXCL14, a common target for epigenetic silencing in lung cancer, induces tumor necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Mathewos; Klinge, Donna M.; Yingling, Christin M.; Do, Kieu; Van Neste, Leander; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are important regulators of directional cell migration and tumor metastasis. A genome-wide transcriptome array designed to uncover novel genes silenced by methylation in lung cancer identified the CXC-subfamily of chemokines. Expression of eleven of the sixteen known human CXC-chemokines was increased in lung adenocarcinoma cell lines after treatment with 5-aza-2deoxycytidine (DAC). Tumor-specific methylation leading to silencing of CXCL5, 12 and 14 was found in over 75% of primary lung adenocarcinomas and DAC treatment restored expression of each silenced gene. Forced expression of CXCL14 in H23 cells where this gene is silenced by methylation increased cell death in vitro and dramatically reduced in vivo growth of lung tumor xenografts through necrosis of up to 90% of the tumor mass. CXCL14 re-expression had a profound effect on the genome altering the transcription of over 1,000 genes, including increased expression of 30 cell cycle inhibitor and pro-apoptosis genes. In addition, CXCL14 methylation in sputum from asymptomatic early stage lung cancer cases was associated with a 2.9-fold elevated risk for this disease compared to controls, substantiating its potential as a biomarker for early detection of lung cancer. Together these findings identify CXCL14 as an important tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced during lung carcinogenesis. PMID:20562917

  3. Nuclear Neighborhoods and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Rui; Bodnar, Megan S.; Spector, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The eukaryotic nucleus is a highly compartmentalized and dynamic environment. Chromosome territories are arranged non-randomly within the nucleus and numerous studies have indicated that a gene’s position in the nucleus can impact its transcriptional activity. Here, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of the influence of specific nuclear neighborhoods on gene expression or repression. Nuclear neighborhoods associated with transcriptional repression include the inner nuclear membrane/nuclear lamina and peri-nucleolar chromatin, whereas neighborhoods surrounding the nuclear pore complex, PML nuclear bodies, and nuclear speckles seem to be transcriptionally permissive. While nuclear position appears to play an important role in gene expression, it is likely to be only one piece of a flexible puzzle that incorporates numerous parameters. We are still at a very early, yet exciting stage in our journey toward deciphering the mechanism(s) that govern the permissiveness of gene expression/repression within different nuclear neighborhoods. PMID:19339170

  4. Differential Gene Expression in Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Jakobs, Tatjana C.

    2014-01-01

    In glaucoma, regardless of its etiology, retinal ganglion cells degenerate and eventually die. Although age and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) are the main risk factors, there are still many mysteries in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The advent of genome-wide microarray expression screening together with the availability of animal models of the disease has allowed analysis of differential gene expression in all parts of the eye in glaucoma. This review will outline the findings of recent genome-wide expression studies and discuss their commonalities and differences. A common finding was the differential regulation of genes involved in inflammation and immunity, including the complement system and the cytokines transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). Other genes of interest have roles in the extracellular matrix, cell–matrix interactions and adhesion, the cell cycle, and the endothelin system. PMID:24985133

  5. Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferl, Robert; Paul, Anna-Lisa

    2009-01-01

    The Transgenic Arabidopsis Gene Expression System (TAGES) investigation is one in a pair of investigations that use the Advanced Biological Research System (ABRS) facility. TAGES uses Arabidopsis thaliana, thale cress, with sensor promoter-reporter gene constructs that render the plants as biomonitors (an organism used to determine the quality of the surrounding environment) of their environment using real-time nondestructive Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) imagery and traditional postflight analyses.

  6. High expression of cellular retinol binding protein-1 in lung adenocarcinoma is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Pompeo, Eugenio; Agostinelli, Sara; Bellezza, Guido; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Giunta, Alessandro; Sidoni, Angelo; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenocarcinoma, the most common non-small cell lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with a low overall survival (OS) despite increasing attempts to achieve an early diagnosis and accomplish surgical and multimodality treatment strategies. Cellular retinol binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) regulates retinol bioavailability and cell differentiation, but its role in lung cancerogenesis remains uncertain. Experimental design CRBP-1 expression, clinical outcome and other prognostic factors were investigated in 167 lung adenocarcinoma patients. CRBP-1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarray sections, gene copy number analysis and tumor methylation specific PCR. Effects of CRBP-1 expression on proliferation/apoptosis gene array, protein and transcripts were investigated in transfected A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Results CRBP-1High expression was observed in 62.3% of adenocarcinomas and correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS as an independent prognostic factor. CRBP-1 gene copy gain also associated with tumor CRBP-1High status and dedifferentiation. CRBP-1-transfected (CRBP-1+) A549 grew more than CRBP-1− A549 cells. At >1μM concentrations, all trans-retinoic acid and retinol reduced viability more in CRBP-1+ than in CRBP-1− A549 cells. CRBP-1+ A549 cells showed up-regulated RARα/ RXRα and proliferative and transcriptional genes including pAkt, pEGFR, pErk1/2, creb1 and c-jun, whereas RARβ and p53 were strongly down-regulated; pAkt/pErk/ pEGFR inhibitors counteracted proliferative advantage and increased RARα/RXRα, c-jun and CD44 expression in CRBP-1+ A549 cells. Conclusion CRBP-1High expression in lung adenocarcinoma correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS, likely through increased Akt/Erk/EGFR-mediated cell proliferation and differentiation. CRBP-1High expression can be considered an additional marker of poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:26807202

  7. Beryllium-induced lung disease exhibits expression profiles similar to sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Silveira, Lori J; Hamzeh, Nabeel; Gillespie, May; Mroz, Peggy M; Mayer, Annyce S; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Maier, Lisa A

    2016-06-01

    A subset of beryllium-exposed workers develop beryllium sensitisation (BeS) which precedes chronic beryllium disease (CBD). We conducted an in-depth analysis of differentially expressed candidate genes in CBD.We performed Affymetrix GeneChip 1.0 ST array analysis on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 10 CBD, 10 BeS and 10 beryllium-exposed, nondiseased controls stimulated with BeSO4 or medium. The differentially expressed genes were validated by high-throughput real-time PCR in this group and in an additional group of cases and nonexposed controls. The functional roles of the top candidate genes in CBD were assessed using a pharmacological inhibitor. CBD gene expression data were compared with whole blood and lung tissue in sarcoidosis from the Gene Expression Omnibus.We confirmed almost 450 genes that were significantly differentially expressed between CBD and controls. The top enrichment of genes was for JAK (Janus kinase)-STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) signalling. A JAK2 inhibitor significantly decreased tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ production. Furthermore, we found 287 differentially expressed genes overlapped in CBD/sarcoidosis. The top shared pathways included cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, and Toll-like receptor, chemokine and JAK-STAT signalling pathways.We show that PBMCs demonstrate differentially expressed gene profiles relevant to the immunnopathogenesis of CBD. CBD and sarcoidosis share similar differential expression of pathogenic genes and pathways. PMID:27103383

  8. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  9. Frequent alterations in cytoskeleton remodelling genes in primary and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Zhang, Xin; Li, Fuqiang; Xiao, Dakai; Hou, Yong; Zhu, Shida; Liu, Dongbing; Ye, Xiaofei; Ye, Mingzhi; Yang, Jie; Shao, Libin; Pan, Hui; Lu, Na; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Liping; Li, Jin; Huang, Liyan; Tang, Hailing; Deng, Qiuhua; Zheng, Yue; Peng, Lihua; Liu, Geng; Gu, Xia; He, Ping; Gu, Yingying; Lin, Weixuan; He, Huiming; Xie, Guoyun; Liang, Han; An, Na; Wang, Hui; Teixeira, Manuel; Vieira, Joana; Liang, Wenhua; Zhao, Xin; Peng, Zhiyu; Mu, Feng; Zhang, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Yang, Huanming; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wang, Jian; Zhong, Nanshan; Wang, Jun; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; He, Jianxing

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of genetic alterations in lung adenocarcinoma derived from Asian patients is largely uncharacterized. Here we present an integrated genomic and transcriptomic analysis of 335 primary lung adenocarcinomas and 35 corresponding lymph node metastases from Chinese patients. Altogether 13 significantly mutated genes are identified, including the most commonly mutated gene TP53 and novel mutation targets such as RHPN2, GLI3 and MRC2. TP53 mutations are furthermore significantly enriched in tumours from patients harbouring metastases. Genes regulating cytoskeleton remodelling processes are also frequently altered, especially in metastatic samples, of which the high expression level of IQGAP3 is identified as a marker for poor prognosis. Our study represents the first large-scale sequencing effort on lung adenocarcinoma in Asian patients and provides a comprehensive mutational landscape for both primary and metastatic tumours. This may thus form a basis for personalized medical care and shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26647728

  10. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (<100 kb) but extends much further. Sex-specific expression change is also genomically clustered. As genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  11. Differential Epigenetic Regulation of TOX Subfamily High Mobility Group Box Genes in Lung and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tessema, Mathewos; Yingling, Christin M.; Grimes, Marcie J.; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Liu, Yushi; Leng, Shuguang; Joste, Nancy; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine methylation affects regulation of hundreds of genes during cancer development. In this study, a novel aberrantly hypermethylated CpG island in cancer was discovered within the TOX2 promoter. TOX2 was unmethylated in normal cells but 28% lung (n = 190) and 23% breast (n = 80) tumors were methylated. Expression of two novel TOX2 transcripts identified was significantly reduced in primary lung tumors than distant normal lung (p<0.05). These transcripts were silenced in methylated lung and breast cancer cells and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment re-expressed both. Extension of these assays to TOX, TOX3, and TOX4 genes that share similar genomic structure and protein homology with TOX2 revealed distinct methylation profiles by smoking status, histology, and cancer type. TOX was almost exclusively methylated in breast (43%) than lung (5%) cancer, whereas TOX3 was frequently methylated in lung (58%) than breast (30%) tumors. TOX4 was unmethylated in all samples and showed the highest expression in normal lung. Compared to TOX4, expression of TOX, TOX2 and TOX3 in normal lung was 25, 44, and 88% lower, respectively, supporting the premise that reduced promoter activity confers increased susceptibility to methylation during lung carcinogenesis. Genome-wide assays revealed that siRNA-mediated TOX2 knockdown modulated multiple pathways while TOX3 inactivation targeted neuronal development and function. Although these knockdowns did not result in further phenotypic changes of lung cancer cells in vitro, the impact on tissue remodeling, inflammatory response, and cell differentiation pathways suggest a potential role for TOX2 in modulating tumor microenvironment. PMID:22496870

  12. Expression of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP), but not human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT), genes correlates with exposure of human lung cancers to platinum drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, T.; Fujiwara, Y.; Isobe, T.; Katoh, O.; Watanabe, H.; Yamakido, M.

    1998-01-01

    We examined the steady-state levels of mRNA for gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gamma-GCS), multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) and human canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter (cMOAT) in human lung cancer specimens to elucidate their roles in relation to platinum drug resistance in vivo. Seventy-six autopsy samples (38 primary tumours and their corresponding normal lung tissues) obtained from 38 patients were analysed using the quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method. Both subunits (heavy and light subunits) of gamma-GCS expression levels of normal lung and tumour tissues exposed to platinum drugs during life were significantly higher than those of non-exposed tissues, whereas only the MRP expression levels of tumours were elevated in association with ante-mortem platinum drug exposure. The gamma-GCS and MRP expression levels correlated significantly. The cMOAT expression levels did not correlate with ante-mortem platinum drug exposure. Next, we monitored gamma-GCS heavy subunit expression levels in peripheral mononuclear cells of eight previously untreated lung cancer patients after platinum drug administration, which revealed that these drugs induced gamma-GCS expression in vivo. These results suggest that gamma-GCS expression is induced by platinum drugs in vivo and/or the physiological stress response to xenobiotics. PMID:9569044

  13. Loss of expression of BAP1 is very rare in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andrici, Juliana; Parkhill, Thomas R; Jung, Jason; Wardell, Kathryn L; Verdonk, Brandon; Singh, Arjun; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Sheen, Amy; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W; Gill, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Germline mutations of the BAP1 gene have been implicated in a cancer predisposition syndrome which includes mesothelioma, uveal melanoma, cutaneous melanocytic lesions, renal cell carcinoma, and possibly other malignancies. Double hit inactivation of BAP1 with subsequent loss of expression of the BAP1 protein also occurs in approximately 50% of mesotheliomas. The link between BAP1 mutation and lung cancer is yet to be fully explored. We sought to assess BAP1 expression in a large cohort of lung cancers undergoing surgery with curative intent. We searched the Anatomical Pathology database of our institution for lung cancer patients undergoing surgery with curative intent between 2000 and 2010. Immunohistochemistry for BAP1 was then performed in tissue microarray format. Our cohort included 257 lung cancer patients, of which 155 (60%) were adenocarcinomas and 72 (28%) were squamous cell carcinomas, with no other subtype comprising more than 3%. BAP1 loss of expression was found in only one lung cancer. We conclude that BAP1 mutation occurs very infrequently (0.4%) in non-small cell lung cancer. Given that the pathological differential diagnosis between lung carcinoma and mesothelioma may sometimes be difficult, this finding increases the specificity of loss of expression for BAP1 for the diagnosis of mesothelioma. PMID:27114369

  14. Predicting Diagnostic Gene Biomarkers for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Shao, Yang; Long, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary reason for death due to cancer worldwide, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common subtype of lung cancer. Most patients die from complications of NSCLC due to poor diagnosis. In this paper, we aimed to predict gene biomarkers that may be of use for diagnosis of NSCLC by integrating differential gene expression analysis with functional association network analysis. We first constructed an NSCLC-specific functional association network by combining gene expression correlation with functional association. Then, we applied a network partition algorithm to divide the network into gene modules and identify the most NSCLC-specific gene modules based on their differential expression pattern in between normal and NSCLC samples. Finally, from these modules, we identified genes that exhibited the most impact on the expression of their functionally associated genes in between normal and NSCLC samples and predicted them as NSCLC biomarkers. Literature review of the top predicted gene biomarkers suggested that most of them were already considered critical for development of NSCLC.

  15. Predicting Diagnostic Gene Biomarkers for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bin; Shao, Yang; Long, Fei; Jiang, Shu-Juan

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary reason for death due to cancer worldwide, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common subtype of lung cancer. Most patients die from complications of NSCLC due to poor diagnosis. In this paper, we aimed to predict gene biomarkers that may be of use for diagnosis of NSCLC by integrating differential gene expression analysis with functional association network analysis. We first constructed an NSCLC-specific functional association network by combining gene expression correlation with functional association. Then, we applied a network partition algorithm to divide the network into gene modules and identify the most NSCLC-specific gene modules based on their differential expression pattern in between normal and NSCLC samples. Finally, from these modules, we identified genes that exhibited the most impact on the expression of their functionally associated genes in between normal and NSCLC samples and predicted them as NSCLC biomarkers. Literature review of the top predicted gene biomarkers suggested that most of them were already considered critical for development of NSCLC. PMID:27579312

  16. The significance of PIWI family expression in human lung embryogenesis and non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alfons; Tejero, Rut; Viñolas, Nuria; Cordeiro, Anna; Marrades, Ramon M.; Fuster, Dolors; Caritg, Oriol; Moises, Jorge; Muñoz, Carmen; Molins, Laureano; Ramirez, Josep; Monzo, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    The expression of Piwi-interacting RNAs, small RNAs that bind to PIWI proteins, was until recently believed to be limited to germinal stem cells. We have studied the expression of PIWI genes during human lung embryogenesis and in paired tumor and normal tissue prospectively collected from 71 resected non-small-cell lung cancer patients. The mRNA expression analysis showed that PIWIL1 was highly expressed in 7-week embryos and downregulated during the subsequent weeks of development. PIWIL1 was expressed in 11 of the tumor samples but in none of the normal tissue samples. These results were validated by immunohistochemistry, showing faint cytoplasmic reactivity in the PIWIL1-positive samples. Interestingly, the patients expressing PIWIL1 had a shorter time to relapse (TTR) (p = 0.006) and overall survival (OS) (p = 0.0076) than those without PIWIL1 expression. PIWIL2 and 4 were downregulated in tumor tissue in comparison to the normal tissue (p < 0.001) and the patients with lower levels of PIWIL4 had shorter TTR (p = 0.048) and OS (p = 0.033). In the multivariate analysis, PIWIL1 expression emerged as an independent prognostic marker. Using 5-Aza-dC treatment and bisulfite sequencing, we observed that PIWIL1 expression could be regulated in part by methylation. Finally, an in silico study identified a stem-cell expression signature associated with PIWIL1 expression. PMID:25742785

  17. Expression of β-Defensin Genes in Bovine Alveolar Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lisa K.; Rhodes, Janice; Bhat, Meenakshi; Diamond, Gill

    1998-01-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages (BAM) were examined for the expression of β-defensins and to determine whether their expression could be upregulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), as observed with β-defensins expressed in bovine tracheal epithelial cells. Four β-defensins were expressed constitutively in BAM, with bovine neutrophil β-defensin (BNBD)-4 and BNBD-5 being the most predominant. This is the first evidence of β-defensin gene expression in a mature myeloid cell. LPS had no effect on β-defensin expression in BAM, even though tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production was induced. Nonbacterial inflammatory particles had little effect on β-defensin gene expression or TNF-α production in BAM. We hypothesize that constitutively expressed β-defensins of alveolar macrophages may have a role in lung host defense. PMID:9453661

  18. Gene expression during memory formation.

    PubMed

    Igaz, Lionel Muller; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Vianna, Monica M R; Izquierdo, Ivan; Medina, Jorge H

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, neuroscientists have provided many clues that point out the involvement of de novo gene expression during the formation of long-lasting forms of memory. However, information regarding the transcriptional response networks involved in memory formation has been scarce and fragmented. With the advent of genome-based technologies, combined with more classical approaches (i.e., pharmacology and biochemistry), it is now feasible to address those relevant questions--which gene products are modulated, and when that processes are necessary for the proper storage of memories--with unprecedented resolution and scale. Using one-trial inhibitory (passive) avoidance training of rats, one of the most studied tasks so far, we found two time windows of sensitivity to transcriptional and translational inhibitors infused into the hippocampus: around the time of training and 3-6 h after training. Remarkably, these periods perfectly overlap with the involvement of hippocampal cAMP/PKA (protein kinase A) signaling pathways in memory consolidation. Given the complexity of transcriptional responses in the brain, particularly those related to processing of behavioral information, it was clearly necessary to address this issue with a multi-variable, parallel-oriented approach. We used cDNA arrays to screen for candidate inhibitory avoidance learning-related genes and analyze the dynamic pattern of gene expression that emerges during memory consolidation. These include genes involved in intracellular kinase networks, synaptic function, DNA-binding and chromatin modification, transcriptional activation and repression, translation, membrane receptors, and oncogenes, among others. Our findings suggest that differential and orchestrated hippocampal gene expression is necessary in both early and late periods of long-term memory consolidation. Additionally, this kind of studies may lead to the identification and characterization of genes that are relevant for the pathogenesis

  19. Evaluation of tetrafunctional block copolymers as synthetic vectors for lung gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Richard-Fiardo, Peggy; Hervouet, Catherine; Marsault, Robert; Franken, Philippe R; Cambien, Béatrice; Guglielmi, Julien; Warnez-Soulie, Julie; Darcourt, Jacques; Pourcher, Thierry; Colombani, Thibault; Haudebourg, Thomas; Peuziat, Pauline; Pitard, Bruno; Vassaux, Georges

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we evaluated, in mice, the efficacy of the tetrafunctional block copolymer 704 as a nonviral gene delivery vector to the lungs. SPECT/CT molecular imaging of gene expression, biochemical assays, and immunohistochemistry were used. Our dataset shows that the formulation 704 resulted in higher levels of reporter gene expression than the GL67A formulation currently being used in a clinical trial in cystic fibrosis patients. The inflammatory response associated with this gene transfer was lower than that induced by the GL67A formulation, and the 704 formulation was amenable to repeated administrations. The cell types transfected by the 704 formulation were type I and type II pneumocytes, and transgene expression could not be detected in macrophages. These results emphasize the relevance of the 704 formulation as a nonviral gene delivery vector for lung gene therapy. Further studies will be required to validate this vector in larger animals, in which the lungs are more similar to human lungs. PMID:25662490

  20. Expression of Chemokine XCL2 and CX3CL1 in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bing; Xu, Heyun; Ni, Kewei; Ni, Xuming; Shen, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemokines are a family of small proteins secreted by cells with chemotactic activity, and they play important roles in cell adhesion. However, the expression of chemokine XCL2 and CX3CL1 in lung cancers in different pathological stages remains unclear. Material/Methods XCL2 and CX3CL1 expression in lung cancers and adjacent non-cancerous tissues was detected by quantitative PCR and ELISA. The relative expression of both chemokines in lung cancers in different pathological stages was compared by immunohistochemical assay. Results The relative expression level of XCL2 and CX3CL1 in lung cancer was significantly higher compared with adjacent normal tissues (P<0.001). The expression level of both chemokines was significantly increased with higher pathological stages, as indicated by immunohistochemical assay (P<0.05 or P <0.001). Their expression level in cancers with higher numbers of metastatic lymph nodes was also significantly increased compared with cancers with lower numbers of metastatic lymph nodes (P<0.05 or P<0.001). Conclusions The expression of XCL2 and CX3CL1 increases with increasing degree of malignancy, indicating that both chemokines might be important targets in gene therapy for lung cancer. PMID:27156946

  1. Network-based approach identified cell cycle genes as predictor of overall survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Yafei; Tang, Hui; Sun, Zhifu; Bungum, Aaron O; Edell, Eric S; Lingle, Wilma L; Stoddard, Shawn M; Zhang, Mingrui; Jen, Jin; Yang, Ping; Wang, Liang

    2013-04-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is the most common type of primary lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to delineate gene expression patterns for survival prediction in lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression profiles of 82 (discovery set) and 442 (validation set 1) lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues were analyzed using a systems biology-based network approach. We also examined the expression profiles of 78 adjacent normal lung tissues from 82 patients. We found a significant correlation of an expression module with overall survival (adjusted hazard ratio or HR=1.71; 95% CI=1.06-2.74 in discovery set; adjusted HR=1.26; 95% CI=1.08-1.49 in validation set 1). This expression module contained genes enriched in the biological process of the cell cycle. Interestingly, the cell cycle gene module and overall survival association were also significant in normal lung tissues (adjusted HR=1.91; 95% CI, 1.32-2.75). From these survival-related modules, we further defined three hub genes (UBE2C, TPX2, and MELK) whose expression-based risk indices were more strongly associated with poor 5-year survival (HR=3.85, 95% CI=1.34-11.05 in discovery set; HR=1.72, 95% CI=1.21-2.46 in validation set 1; and HR=3.35, 95% CI=1.08-10.04 in normal lung set). The 3-gene prognostic result was further validated using 92 adenocarcinoma tumor samples (validation set 2); patients with a high-risk gene signature have a 1.52-fold increased risk (95% CI, 1.02-2.24) of death than patients with a low-risk gene signature. These results suggest that a network-based approach may facilitate discovery of key genes that are closely linked to survival in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23357462

  2. Expression of a human surfactant protein C mutation associated with interstitial lung disease disrupts lung development in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bridges, James P; Wert, Susan E; Nogee, Lawrence M; Weaver, Timothy E

    2003-12-26

    Surfactant Protein C (SP-C) is a secreted transmembrane protein that is exclusively expressed by alveolar type II epithelial cells of the lung. SP-C associates with surfactant lipids to reduce surface tension within the alveolus, maintaining lung volume at end expiration. Mutations in the gene encoding SP-C (SFTPC) have recently been linked to chronic lung disease in children and adults. The goal of this study was to determine whether a disease-linked mutation in SFTPC causes lung disease in transgenic mice. The SFTPC mutation, designated g.1728 G --> A, results in the deletion of exon4, generating a truncated form of SP-C (SP-C(Deltaexon4)). cDNA encoding SP-C(Deltaexon4) was constitutively expressed in type II epithelial cells of transgenic mice. Viable F0 transgene-positive mice were not generated after two separate rounds of pronuclear injections. Histological analysis of lung tissue harvested from embryonic day 17.5 F0 transgene-positive fetuses revealed that SP-C(Deltaexon4) caused a dose-dependent disruption in branching morphogenesis of the lung associated with epithelial cell cytotoxicity. Transient expression of SP-C(Deltaexon4) in isolated type II epithelial cells or HEK293 cells resulted in incomplete processing of the mutant proprotein, a dose-dependent increase in BiP transcription, trapping of the proprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum, and rapid degradation via a proteasome-dependent pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that the g.1728 G --> A mutation causes misfolding of the SP-C proprotein with subsequent induction of the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathways ultimately resulting in disrupted lung morphogenesis. PMID:14525980

  3. Gene expression profile of pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Galicia, J C; Henson, B R; Parker, J S; Khan, A A

    2016-06-01

    The cost, prevalence and pain associated with endodontic disease necessitate an understanding of the fundamental molecular aspects of its pathogenesis. This study was aimed to identify the genetic contributors to pulpal pain and inflammation. Inflamed pulps were collected from patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis (n=20). Normal pulps from teeth extracted for various reasons served as controls (n=20). Pain level was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using Affymetrix GeneTitan Multichannel Instrument. The difference in gene expression levels were determined by the significance analysis of microarray program using a false discovery rate (q-value) of 5%. Genes involved in immune response, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and signaling, integrin cell surface interactions, and others were expressed at relatively higher levels in the pulpitis group. Moreover, several genes known to modulate pain and inflammation showed differential expression in asymptomatic and mild pain patients (⩾30 mm on VAS) compared with those with moderate to severe pain. This exploratory study provides a molecular basis for the clinical diagnosis of pulpitis. With an enhanced understanding of pulpal inflammation, future studies on treatment and management of pulpitis and on pain associated with it can have a biological reference to bridge treatment strategies with pulpal biology. PMID:27052691

  4. Lentivirus IL-10 gene therapy down-regulates IL-17 and attenuates mouse orthotopic lung allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, S; Sato, M; Loisel-Meyer, S; Matsuda, Y; Oishi, H; Guan, Z; Saito, T; Yeung, J; Cypel, M; Hwang, D M; Medin, J A; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy to target lung allograft rejection in a mouse orthotopic left lung transplantation model. IL-10 may regulate posttransplant immunity mediated by IL-17. Lentivirus-mediated trans-airway luciferase gene transfer to the donor lung resulted in persistent luciferase activity up to 6 months posttransplant in the isograft (B6 to B6); luciferase activity decreased in minor-mismatched allograft lungs (B10 to B6) in association with moderate rejection. Fully MHC-mismatched allograft transplantation (BALB/c to B6) resulted in severe rejection and complete loss of luciferase activity. In minor-mismatched allografts, IL-10-encoding lentivirus gene therapy reduced the acute rejection score compared with the lentivirus-luciferase control at posttransplant day 28 (3.0 ± 0.6 vs. 2.0 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD); p = 0.025; n = 6/group). IL-10 gene therapy also significantly reduced gene expression of IL-17, IL-23, and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt without affecting levels of IL-12 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). Cells expressing IL-17 were dramatically reduced in the allograft lung. In conclusion, lentivirus-mediated IL-10 gene therapy significantly reduced expression of IL-17 and other associated genes in the transplanted allograft lung and attenuated posttransplant immune responses after orthotopic lung transplantation. PMID:23601206

  5. Systems Biophysics of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Jose M.G.; Saiz, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is a process central to any form of life. It involves multiple temporal and functional scales that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the coordinated regulation of multiple genes in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. This diversity in scales poses fundamental challenges to the use of traditional approaches to fully understand even the simplest gene expression systems. Recent advances in computational systems biophysics have provided promising avenues to reliably integrate the molecular detail of biophysical process into the system behavior. Here, we review recent advances in the description of gene regulation as a system of biophysical processes that extend from specific protein-DNA interactions to the combinatorial assembly of nucleoprotein complexes. There is now basic mechanistic understanding on how promoters controlled by multiple, local and distal, DNA binding sites for transcription factors can actively control transcriptional noise, cell-to-cell variability, and other properties of gene regulation, including precision and flexibility of the transcriptional responses. PMID:23790365

  6. Control of Renin Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Sean T.; Jones, Craig A.; Gross, Kenneth W.; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Renin, as part of the renin-angiotensin system, plays a critical role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, mammalian renal development and progression of fibrotic/hypertrophic diseases. Renin gene transcription is subject to complex developmental and tissue-specific regulation. Initial studies using the mouse As4.1 cell line, which has many characteristics of the renin-expressing juxtaglomerular cells of the kidney, have identified a proximal promoter region (−197 to −50 bp) and an enhancer (−2866 to −2625 bp) upstream of the Ren-1c gene, which are critical for renin gene expression. The proximal promoter region contains several transcription factor-binding sites including a binding site for the products of the developmental control genes Hox. The enhancer consists of at least 11 transcription factor-binding sites and is responsive to various signal transduction pathways including cAMP, retinoic acid, endothelin-1, and cytokines, all of which are known to alter renin mRNA levels. Furthermore, in vivo models have validated several of these key components found within the proximal promoter region and the enhancer as well as other key sites necessary for renin gene transcription. PMID:22576577

  7. RASSF1C modulates the expression of a stem cell renewal gene, PIWIL1

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background RASSF1A and RASSF1C are two major isoforms encoded by the Ras association domain family 1 (RASSF1) gene through alternative promoter selection and mRNA splicing. RASSF1A is a well established tumor suppressor gene. Unlike RASSF1A, RASSF1C appears to have growth promoting actions in lung cancer. In this article, we report on the identification of novel RASSF1C target genes in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Over-expression and siRNA techniques were used to alter RASSF1C expression in human lung cancer cells, and Affymetrix-microarray study was conducted using NCI-H1299 cells over-expressing RASSF1C to identify RASSF1C target genes. Results The microarray study intriguingly shows that RASSF1C modulates the expression of a number of genes that are involved in cancer development, cell growth and proliferation, cell death, and cell cycle. We have validated the expression of some target genes using qRT-PCR. We demonstrate that RASSF1C over-expression increases, and silencing of RASSF1C decreases, the expression of PIWIL1 gene in NSCLC cells using qRT-PCR, immunostaining, and Western blot analysis. We also show that RASSF1C over-expression induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in lung cancer cells, and inhibition of the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway suppresses the expression of PIWIL1 gene expression, suggesting that RASSF1C may exert its activities on some target genes such as PIWIL1 through the activation of the MEK-ERK1/2 pathway. Also, PIWIL1 expression is elevated in lung cancer cell lines compared to normal lung epithelial cells. Conclusions Taken together, our findings provide significant data to propose a model for investigating the role of RASSF1C/PIWIL1 proteins in initiation and progression of lung cancer. PMID:22591718

  8. Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won-Min; Zhang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gene co-expression network analysis has been shown effective in identifying functional co-expressed gene modules associated with complex human diseases. However, existing techniques to construct co-expression networks require some critical prior information such as predefined number of clusters, numerical thresholds for defining co-expression/interaction, or do not naturally reproduce the hallmarks of complex systems such as the scale-free degree distribution of small-worldness. Previously, a graph filtering technique called Planar Maximally Filtered Graph (PMFG) has been applied to many real-world data sets such as financial stock prices and gene expression to extract meaningful and relevant interactions. However, PMFG is not suitable for large-scale genomic data due to several drawbacks, such as the high computation complexity O(|V|3), the presence of false-positives due to the maximal planarity constraint, and the inadequacy of the clustering framework. Here, we developed a new co-expression network analysis framework called Multiscale Embedded Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (MEGENA) by: i) introducing quality control of co-expression similarities, ii) parallelizing embedded network construction, and iii) developing a novel clustering technique to identify multi-scale clustering structures in Planar Filtered Networks (PFNs). We applied MEGENA to a series of simulated data and the gene expression data in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). MEGENA showed improved performance over well-established clustering methods and co-expression network construction approaches. MEGENA revealed not only meaningful multi-scale organizations of co-expressed gene clusters but also novel targets in breast carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26618778

  9. Attenuated mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators in neonatal rat lung following lipopolysaccharide treatment

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, Valerie; Wiedinger, Kari; Zhou, Heping

    2012-01-01

    Neonates are known to exhibit increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and increasing evidence demonstrates that the increased susceptibility is related to their attenuated immune response to infections. The lung is equipped with an innate defense system involving both cellular and humoral mediators. The present study was performed to characterize the expression of inflammatory mediators in the lung of neonatal rats in comparison with older animals. Rats at postnatal day 1 (P1), P21, and P70 were treated with saline or 0.25 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via intraperitoneal injection. Two hours later, animals were sacrificed and the transcriptional response of key inflammatory mediators and enzyme activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the lung of these animals were examined. LPS-induced messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, namely interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, antiinflammatory cytokines, namely IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), and chemokines, namely macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, MIP-2, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, in P1 lung was much reduced compared to that in P21 and P70 animals at 2 hours postinjection. These data suggest that LPS-induced transcriptional response of cytokines and chemokines was much reduced in P1 lung even though the protein levels of these genes were not ascertained and mRNA levels of these genes may not reflect their final protein levels. MPO activity in LPS-treated P1 lung was also significantly attenuated compared to that in LPS-treated P70 lung, suggesting impaired neutrophil infiltration in P1 lung at 2 hours following LPS treatment. In parallel, the baseline mRNA expression of LPS-binding protein (LBP) in P1 lung was much lower than that in P21 and P70 lungs. While the protein level of LBP was not examined and the mRNA level of LBP may not reflect its final protein level, the reduced transcriptional response of cytokines and chemokines in

  10. Gene expression throughout a vertebrate's embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Describing the patterns of gene expression during embryonic development has broadened our understanding of the processes and patterns that define morphogenesis. Yet gene expression patterns have not been described throughout vertebrate embryogenesis. This study presents statistical analyses of gene expression during all 40 developmental stages in the teleost Fundulus heteroclitus using four biological replicates per stage. Results Patterns of gene expression for 7,000 genes appear to be important as they recapitulate developmental timing. Among the 45% of genes with significant expression differences between pairs of temporally adjacent stages, significant differences in gene expression vary from as few as five to more than 660. Five adjacent stages have disproportionately more significant changes in gene expression (> 200 genes) relative to other stages: four to eight and eight to sixteen cell stages, onset of circulation, pre and post-hatch, and during complete yolk absorption. The fewest differences among adjacent stages occur during gastrulation. Yet, at stage 16, (pre-mid-gastrulation) the largest number of genes has peak expression. This stage has an over representation of genes in oxidative respiration and protein expression (ribosomes, translational genes and proteases). Unexpectedly, among all ribosomal genes, both strong positive and negative correlations occur. Similar correlated patterns of expression occur among all significant genes. Conclusions These data provide statistical support for the temporal dynamics of developmental gene expression during all stages of vertebrate development. PMID:21356103