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Sample records for lung protein leak

  1. Air leak after lung resection: pathophysiology and patients' implications.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Cecilia; Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    Protocols for the management of air leaks are critical aspects in the postoperative course of patients following lung resections. Many investigations in the last decade are focusing on the chest tube modalities or preventative measures, however, little is known about the pathophysiology of air leak and the patient perception of this common complication. This review concentrates on understanding the reasons why a pulmonary parenchyma may start to leak or an air leak may be longer than others. Experimental works support the notion that lung overdistension may favor air leak. These studies may represent the basis of future investigations. Furthermore, the standardization of nomenclature in the field of pleural space management and the creation of novel air leak scoring systems have contributed to improve the knowledge among thoracic surgeons and facilitate the organization of trials on this matter. We tried to summarize available evidences about the patient perception of a prolonged air leak and about what would be useful for them in order to prevent worsening of their quality of life. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible of prolonged air leak in order to define tailored treatments and protocols. Improving the care at home with web-based telemonitoring or real time connected chest drainage may in a future improve the quality of life of the patients experience this complication and also enhance hospital finances. PMID:26941970

  2. Air leak after lung resection: pathophysiology and patients’ implications

    PubMed Central

    Miserocchi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Protocols for the management of air leaks are critical aspects in the postoperative course of patients following lung resections. Many investigations in the last decade are focusing on the chest tube modalities or preventative measures, however, little is known about the pathophysiology of air leak and the patient perception of this common complication. This review concentrates on understanding the reasons why a pulmonary parenchyma may start to leak or an air leak may be longer than others. Experimental works support the notion that lung overdistension may favor air leak. These studies may represent the basis of future investigations. Furthermore, the standardization of nomenclature in the field of pleural space management and the creation of novel air leak scoring systems have contributed to improve the knowledge among thoracic surgeons and facilitate the organization of trials on this matter. We tried to summarize available evidences about the patient perception of a prolonged air leak and about what would be useful for them in order to prevent worsening of their quality of life. Future investigations are warranted to better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible of prolonged air leak in order to define tailored treatments and protocols. Improving the care at home with web-based telemonitoring or real time connected chest drainage may in a future improve the quality of life of the patients experience this complication and also enhance hospital finances. PMID:26941970

  3. Adiponectin protects against hyperoxic lung injury and vascular leak

    PubMed Central

    Sliman, Sean M.; Patel, Rishi B.; Cruff, Jason P.; Kotha, Sainath R.; Newland, Christie A.; Schrader, Carrie A.; Sherwani, Shariq I.; Gurney, Travis O.; Magalang, Ulysses J.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin (Ad), an adipokine exclusively secreted by the adipose tissue, has emerged as a paracrine metabolic regulator as well as a protectant against oxidative stress. Pharmacological approaches of protecting against clinical hyperoxic lung injury during oxygen therapy/treatment are limited. Earlier, we have reported that Ad inhibits the NADPH oxidase-catalyzed formation of superoxide from molecular oxygen in human neutrophils. Having this as the premise, we conducted studies to determine whether (i) exogenous Ad would protect against the hyperoxia-induced barrier dysfunction in the lung endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro and (ii) endogenously synthesized Ad would protect against hyperoxic lung injury in wild type (WT) and Ad-overexpressing transgenic (AdTg) mice in vivo. The results demonstrated that exogenous Ad protected against the hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress, loss of glutathione (GSH), cytoskeletal reorganization, barrier dysfunction, and leak in the lung ECs in vitro. Furthermore, the hyperoxia-induced lung injury, vascular leak, and lipid peroxidation were significantly attenuated in AdTg mice in vivo. Also, AdTg mice exhibited elevated levels of total thiols and GSH in the lungs as compared to WT mice. For the first time, our studies demonstrated that Ad protected against the hyperoxia-induced lung damage apparently through attenuation of oxidative stress and modulation of thiol-redox status. PMID:22183615

  4. Influenza Infects Lung Microvascular Endothelium Leading to Microvascular Leak: Role of Apoptosis and Claudin-5

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan M.; Wang, Changsen; Tigdi, Jayesh; Si, Xiaoe; Dumpit, Carlo; Charles, Steffany; Gamage, Asela; Moraes, Theo J.; Lee, Warren L.

    2012-01-01

    Severe influenza infections are complicated by acute lung injury, a syndrome of pulmonary microvascular leak. The pathogenesis of this complication is unclear. We hypothesized that human influenza could directly infect the lung microvascular endothelium, leading to loss of endothelial barrier function. We infected human lung microvascular endothelium with both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza. Permeability of endothelial monolayers was assessed by spectrofluorimetry and by measurement of the transendothelial electrical resistance. We determined the molecular mechanisms of flu-induced endothelial permeability and developed a mouse model of severe influenza. We found that both clinical and laboratory strains of human influenza can infect and replicate in human pulmonary microvascular endothelium, leading to a marked increase in permeability. This was caused by apoptosis of the lung endothelium, since inhibition of caspases greatly attenuated influenza-induced endothelial leak. Remarkably, replication-deficient virus also caused a significant degree of endothelial permeability, despite displaying no cytotoxic effects to the endothelium. Instead, replication-deficient virus induced degradation of the tight junction protein claudin-5; the adherens junction protein VE-cadherin and the actin cytoskeleton were unaffected. Over-expression of claudin-5 was sufficient to prevent replication-deficient virus-induced permeability. The barrier-protective agent formoterol was able to markedly attenuate flu-induced leak in association with dose-dependent induction of claudin-5. Finally, mice infected with human influenza developed pulmonary edema that was abrogated by parenteral treatment with formoterol. Thus, we describe two distinct mechanisms by which human influenza can induce pulmonary microvascular leak. Our findings have implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of acute lung injury from severe influenza. PMID:23115643

  5. Imatinib attenuates inflammation and vascular leak in a clinically relevant two-hit model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Alicia N; Sammani, Saad; Esquinca, Adilene E; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Garcia, Joe G N; Letsiou, Eleftheria; Dudek, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS), an illness characterized by life-threatening vascular leak, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Recent preclinical studies and clinical observations have suggested a potential role for the chemotherapeutic agent imatinib in restoring vascular integrity. Our prior work demonstrates differential effects of imatinib in mouse models of ALI, namely attenuation of LPS-induced lung injury but exacerbation of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Because of the critical role of mechanical ventilation in the care of patients with ARDS, in the present study we pursued an assessment of the effectiveness of imatinib in a "two-hit" model of ALI caused by combined LPS and VILI. Imatinib significantly decreased bronchoalveolar lavage protein, total cells, neutrophils, and TNF-α levels in mice exposed to LPS plus VILI, indicating that it attenuates ALI in this clinically relevant model. In subsequent experiments focusing on its protective role in LPS-induced lung injury, imatinib attenuated ALI when given 4 h after LPS, suggesting potential therapeutic effectiveness when given after the onset of injury. Mechanistic studies in mouse lung tissue and human lung endothelial cells revealed that imatinib inhibits LPS-induced NF-κB expression and activation. Overall, these results further characterize the therapeutic potential of imatinib against inflammatory vascular leak. PMID:26432864

  6. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: an ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Maya; Tokunaga, Hisako; Kaneko, Kenji; Arai, Tsunenori

    2007-02-01

    In order to seal air leak from lung dissection plane in thoracotomy, we studied diode laser irradiation (wavelength: 810nm) with surface stain of indocyanine green (ICG, peak absorption wavelength: 805nm) ex vivo. In general, this air leak is sealed by suturing with weak tension and large margin of parenchyma. This suturing requires surgeon's skill and takes long time. Moreover, lung ventilatory performance is significantly impaired. Since laser tissue welding is novel method to adhere living tissue with thin thermally denatured attachment layer, we propose to seal the lung dissection plane with laser irradiation. Our aim of this study is to investigate the sealing mechanism as well as optimum condition to develop reliable laser sealing method for dissected lung plane in surgery, using practical laser-dye combination. Compartment of extracted porcine lung was prepared as a lung model, which volume was approximately 60cm^3. ICG solution (2.5mg/ml) was applied to the dissection plane of this lung model with 1minute. The diode laser (power density: 8-40W/cm^2) irradiated to the plane, moving the laser spot with constant speed (v=1mm/s). The heat degeneration depth and smoothness of the laser irradiated surface were observed by a microscope. When power density was over 24W/cm^2, heat degeneration depth was over 1.5E-4 m. There were no pin holes on the surface and the air leak seemed to be sealed completely. We also evaluated the air leak by endotracheal pressure. In the case of above condition, the heat degeneration depth was the same that of previous reported result with CO2 laser.

  7. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: monitoring heat-denature with auto-fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Maya; Arai, Tsunenori

    2008-02-01

    We studied the monitoring of heat-denature by autofluorescence spectrum from lung dissection plane during laser air leak sealing procedure. In order to seal the air leakage from lung in thoracotomy, we proposed novel laser sealing method with the combination of the diode laser (810nm wavelength) irradiation and indocyanine green staining (peak absorption wavelength: 805 nm). This sealing method is expected to preserve the postoperative ventilatory capacity and achieve minimally invasive surgery. We previously reported that this laser sealing only requires thin sealing margin (less than 300 μm in thickness) compared with that of the suturing or stapling. The most serious issue on the laser air leak sealing might be re-air-leakage due to rigid surface layer caused by excessive heat-denature, such as carbonization. We should achieve laser air leak sealing minimizing the degree of heat denature. Dissection planes of isolated porcine lung with /without the diode laser irradiation were prepared as samples. We measured the auto-fluorescence from these samples using a spectrometer. When the diode laser was irradiated with 400J/cm2, the surface of diode laser irradiated lung was fully carbonized. The ration of auto-fluorescence emission of 450nm / 500 nm, with 280 nm excitation wavelength was decreased less tha 50 % of initial value. That of 600 nm / 500 nm was increased over 700 % of initial value. The decreasing of the 450 nm auto-fluorescence intensity might be attributed to the heat-denaturing of the interstitial collagen in lung. However, increasing of the 600 nm didn't specify the origins, we suppose it might be originated from heat-denature substance, like carbonization. We could establish the useful monitoring for lung heat-denaturing with simple methodology. We think the auto-fluorescence measurement can be helpful not only for understanding the sealing mechanism, but also for controlling the degree of heat-denaturing during the procedure.

  8. Polynitroxyl-albumin (PNA) plus tempol attenuate lung capillary leak elicited by prolonged intestinal ischemia and reperfusion(1).

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Li, H; Ma, L; Trimble, C E; Kuppusamy, P; Hsia, C J; Carden, D L

    2000-07-01

    Stable nitroxyl radicals (nitroxides) are potential antioxidant drugs, and we have previously reported that linking nitroxide to biological macromolecules can improve therapeutic activity in at least two ways. First, polynitroxylated compounds such as polynitroxyl human serum albumin (PNA) are a novel class of high molecular weight, extracellular antioxidants. Second, compounds such as PNA can prolong the half-life of free (unbound, low molecular weight) nitroxides such as 4-hydroxy-2,2,6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (Tempol) in vivo. Unlike PNA, Tempol can readily access the intracellular compartment. Thus PNA can act alone in the extracellular compartment, or in concert with Tempol, to provide additional antioxidant protection within cells. In this study, we compared the abilities of PNA, Tempol, and the combination of PNA + Tempol to prevent lung microvascular injury secondary to prolonged gut ischemia (I, 120 min) and reperfusion (R, 20 min) in the rat. Pulmonary capillary filtration coefficient (K(f,c)) and lung neutrophil retention (tissue myeloperoxidase activity, MPO) were measured in normal, isolated rat lungs perfused with blood harvested from I/R rats. Blood donor rats were treated with drug during ischemia. Gut I/R resulted in a marked increase in pulmonary capillary coefficient and lung MPO. PNA + Tempol, but not PNA alone or Tempol alone, at the doses used, prevented the development of lung leak. None of the treatments had an effect on lung neutrophil retention. Anti-inflammatory therapeutic activity appeared to correlate with blood Tempol level: in the presence of PNA, blood Tempol levels were maintained in the 50-100 microM range vs. essentially undetectable levels shortly after Tempol was administered alone. In this model of lung injury secondary to prolonged gut I/R, lung capillary leak was prevented when the membrane-permeable compound Tempol was maintained in its active, free radical state by PNA. PMID:10962204

  9. Surfactant protein D in human lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hartl, D; Griese, M

    2006-06-01

    The lung is continuously exposed to inhaled pollutants, microbes and allergens. Therefore, the pulmonary immune system has to defend against harmful pathogens, while an inappropriate inflammatory response to harmless particles must be avoided. In the bronchoalveolar space this critical balance is maintained by innate immune proteins, termed surfactant proteins. Among these, surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a central role in the pulmonary host defence and the modulation of allergic responses. Several human lung diseases are characterized by decreased levels of bronchoalveolar SP-D. Thus, recombinant SP-D has been proposed as a therapeutical option for cystic fibrosis, neonatal lung disease and smoking-induced emphysema. Furthermore, SP-D serum levels can be used as disease activity markers for interstitial lung diseases. This review illustrates the emerging role of SP-D translated from in vitro studies to human lung diseases. PMID:16684127

  10. Determinants of diagnostic accuracy in pulmonary scintigraphy for pulmonary capillary protein leak associated with adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS): a technical note.

    PubMed

    Tatum, J; Sugerman, H; Perdikaris, N; Rehr, R; Burke, T; Fratkin, M

    1989-01-01

    Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary capillary protein leak using [99mTc] human serum albumin (99mTc-HSA) was first reported from our laboratory. In this study we investigated the impact of 1) sampling time post tracer injection, and 2) lung region assignment, on diagnostic accuracy between 2 groups (control n = 20 and ARDS n = 20). Each patient received 370 MBq 99mTc-HSA i.v. and was imaged for 45 min. The slope index (SI) [change in lung: heart activity ratio/min] was calculated from 11 computer assigned lung regions for intervals of 5-15 (early [E]) and 15-45 (late [L]) min. The diagnostic accuracy of E vs L SI calculations for the 11 regions was evaluated by stepwise logistic regression. E SI data and L SI data from the lower 1/3 of the lung did not achieve significance for inclusion in the discriminant model (P less than 0.05). In the nine remaining regions L SI was significant. Optimal discrimination was achieved from L SI data obtained from a region confined to the lateral half of the mid 3rd of the lung field (sensitivity 81%, specificity 85%, accuracy 83%). The results confirm that: 1) a late (15-45 min) sampling period and 2) proper region assignment are necessary to maximize accuracy of this technique. PMID:2920740

  11. Protein Signature of Lung Cancer Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mehan, Michael R.; Ayers, Deborah; Thirstrup, Derek; Xiong, Wei; Ostroff, Rachel M.; Brody, Edward N.; Walker, Jeffrey J.; Gold, Larry; Jarvis, Thale C.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Wilcox, Sheri K.

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related mortality. We applied a highly multiplexed proteomic technology (SOMAscan) to compare protein expression signatures of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues with healthy adjacent and distant tissues from surgical resections. In this first report of SOMAscan applied to tissues, we highlight 36 proteins that exhibit the largest expression differences between matched tumor and non-tumor tissues. The concentrations of twenty proteins increased and sixteen decreased in tumor tissue, thirteen of which are novel for NSCLC. NSCLC tissue biomarkers identified here overlap with a core set identified in a large serum-based NSCLC study with SOMAscan. We show that large-scale comparative analysis of protein expression can be used to develop novel histochemical probes. As expected, relative differences in protein expression are greater in tissues than in serum. The combined results from tissue and serum present the most extensive view to date of the complex changes in NSCLC protein expression and provide important implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22509397

  12. Chronic lung inflammation in victims of toxic gas leak at Bhopal.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K; Sankaran, K; Sharma, S K; Misra, N P

    1995-02-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) studies in 20 patients at Bhopal, 1.3 +/- 0.4 yr and 2.7 +/- 0.6 yr after toxic gas exposure had revealed that the lower respiratory tract inflammation had progressed from initial macrophage alveolitis to macrophage-neutrophilic alveolitis. The interval between the two lavages was 1.4 +/- 0.6 yr. BAL studies in a new group of 24 patients 5.1 +/- 1.0 yr after exposure had confirmed chronic inflammation of the lower respiratory tract as evidenced by macrophage-neutrophilic alveolitis in these subjects as well. Clinical, radiographic and pulmonary function abnormalities were persistent in a proportion of subjects in both groups. Fibronectin (FN) levels were estimated in BAL fluid in 41 patients. Elevated FN levels were seen in 12 (29.3%) subjects and nine of these 12 had radiographic abnormalities. Severely exposed subjects (n = 30) had significantly higher BAL fibronectin levels compared to normal subjects and mild/moderately exposed subjects. Repeat FN estimations in BAL samples from 10 patients had revealed that five had abnormally high FN including three who had high FN on both occasions. The number of patients showing abnormal decline in pulmonary function was higher in patients with elevated FN than in patients with normal FN. Thus, persisting clinical, roentgenographic and ventilatory abnormalities, as well as macrophage-neutrophilic alveolitis along with abnormally elevated FN levels in a proportion of subjects, suggest the possibility that lung fibrosis can occur in subjects exposed to toxic gas at Bhopal. PMID:7708994

  13. Correlation of Apical Fluid-Regulating Channel Proteins with Lung Function in Human COPD Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meimi; Liu, Shan-Lu; Huang, Yao; Idell, Steven; Li, Xiumin; Ji, Hong-Long

    2014-01-01

    Links between epithelial ion channels and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are emerging through animal model and in vitro studies. However, clinical correlations between fluid-regulating channel proteins and lung function in COPD remain to be elucidated. To quantitatively measure epithelial sodium channels (ENaC), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), and aquaporin 5 (AQP5) proteins in human COPD lungs and to analyze the correlation with declining lung function, quantitative western blots were used. Spearman tests were performed to identify correlations between channel proteins and lung function. The expression of α and β ENaC subunits was augmented and inversely associated with lung function. In contrast, both total and alveolar type I (ATI) and II (ATII)-specific CFTR proteins were reduced. The expression level of CFTR proteins was associated with FEV1 positively. Abundance of AQP5 proteins and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) was decreased and correlated with spirometry test results and gas exchange positively. Furthermore, these channel proteins were significantly associated with severity of disease. Our study demonstrates that expression of ENaC, AQP5, and CFTR proteins in human COPD lungs is quantitatively associated with lung function and severity of COPD. These apically located fluid-regulating channels may thereby serve as biomarkers and potent druggable targets of COPD. PMID:25329998

  14. Activated protein C attenuates acute lung injury and apoptosis in a hyperoxic animal model.

    PubMed

    Husari, Ahmad W; Khayat, Aline; Awdeh, Haitham; Hatoum, Hadi; Nasser, Michel; Mroueh, Salman M; Zaatari, Ghazi; El-Sabban, Marwan; Dbaibo, Ghassan S

    2010-05-01

    Evidence suggests that activated protein C (APC) attenuates acute lung injury (ALI) through antithrombotic and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of APC on ALI in adult rats exposed to hyperoxic environment. Rats were divided into control, hyperoxia, hyperoxia + APC, and APC. Hyperoxia and hyperoxia + APC were exposed to 1, 3, and 5 days of hyperoxia. Hyperoxia + APC and APC were injected with APC (5 mg/kg, i.p.) every 12 h. Control and hyperoxia received isotonic sodium chloride solution injection. Measurement of wet to dry ratio and albumin leak demonstrated significant improvement in hyperoxia + APC when compared with hyperoxia. Apoptosis, as measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling assay, was significantly reduced in hyperoxia + APC when compared with hyperoxia. Histological evaluation of lung sections showed significant reduction in inflammation, edema, and in the number of marginating neutrophils in hyperoxia + APC as compared with hyperoxia. Transcriptional expression of lung inflammatory mediators demonstrated a time-dependent surge in the levels TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 in response to hyperoxia that was attenuated with APC administration in the presence of hyperoxia. In this rat model, APC attenuates lung injury and the expression of inflammatory mediators in ALI secondary to hyperoxia. PMID:19851127

  15. Gelatin based on Power-gel.TM. as solders for Cr.sup.4+laser tissue welding and sealing of lung air leak and fistulas in organs

    DOEpatents

    Alfano, Robert R.; Tang, Jing; Evans, Jonathan M.; Ho, Peng Pei

    2006-04-25

    Laser tissue welding can be achieved using tunable Cr.sup.4+ lasers, semiconductor lasers and fiber lasers, where the weld strength follows the absorption spectrum of water. The use of gelatin and esterified gelatin as solders in conjunction with laser inducted tissue welding impart much stronger tensile and torque strengths than albumin solders. Selected NIR wavelength from the above lasers can improve welding and avoid thermal injury to tissue when used alone or with gelatin and esterified gelatin solders. These discoveries can be used to enhance laser tissue welding of tissues such as skin, mucous, bone, blood vessel, nerve, brain, liver, pancreas, spleen, kidney, lung, bronchus, respiratory track, urinary tract, gastrointestinal tract, or gynecologic tract and as a sealant for pulmonary air leaks and fistulas such as intestinal, rectal and urinary fistulas.

  16. Dynamic protein-protein interaction subnetworks of lung cancer in cases with smoking history

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wei; He, Li-Ran; Zhao, Yan-Chao; Chan, Man-Him; Zhang, Meng; He, Miao

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer and is linked to 85% of lung cancer cases. However, how lung cancer develops in patients with smoking history remains unclear. Systems approaches that combine human protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks and gene expression data are superior to traditional methods. We performed these systems to determine the role that smoking plays in lung cancer development and used the support vector machine (SVM) model to predict PPIs. By defining expression variance (EV), we found 520 dynamic proteins (EV>0.4) using data from the Human Protein Reference Database and Gene Expression Omnibus Database, and built 7 dynamic PPI subnetworks of lung cancer in patients with smoking history. We also determined the primary functions of each subnetwork: signal transduction, apoptosis, and cell migration and adhesion for subnetwork A; cell-sustained angiogenesis for subnetwork B; apoptosis for subnetwork C; and, finally, signal transduction and cell replication and proliferation for subnetworks D–G. The probability distribution of the degree of dynamic protein and static protein differed, clearly showing that the dynamic proteins were not the core proteins which widely connected with their neighbor proteins. There were high correlations among the dynamic proteins, suggesting that the dynamic proteins tend to form specific dynamic modules. We also found that the dynamic proteins were only correlated with the expression of selected proteins but not all neighbor proteins when cancer occurred. PMID:23149315

  17. Mitochondrial proton and electron leaks

    PubMed Central

    Jastroch, Martin; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Mookerjee, Shona; Treberg, Jason R.; Brand, Martin D.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial proton and electron leak have a major impact on mitochondrial coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species. In the first part of this chapter, we address the molecular nature of the basal and inducible proton leak pathways, and their physiological importance. The basal leak is unregulated, and a major proportion can be attributed to mitochondrial anion carriers, while the proton leak through the lipid bilayer appears to be minor. The basal proton leak is cell-type specific and correlates with metabolic rate. The inducible leak through the adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) and uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can be activated by fatty acids, superoxide, or peroxidation products. The physiological role of inducible leak through UCP1 in mammalian brown adipose tissue is heat production, whereas the roles of non-mammalian UCP1 and its paralogous proteins, in particular UCP2 and UCP3, are not yet resolved. The second part of the chapter focuses on the electron leak that occurs in the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Exit of electrons prior to the reduction of oxygen to water at cytochrome c oxidase causes the production of superoxide. As the mechanisms of electron leak are crucial to understanding their physiological relevance, we summarize the mechanisms and topology of electron leak from Complex I and III in studies using isolated mitochondria. We also highlight recent progress and challenges of assessing electron leak in the living cell. Finally, we emphasise the importance of proton and electron leak as therapeutic targets in body weight regulation and insulin secretion. PMID:20533900

  18. Size-dependent leak of soluble and membrane proteins through the yeast nuclear pore complex

    PubMed Central

    Popken, Petra; Ghavami, Ali; Onck, Patrick R.; Poolman, Bert; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) allow selective import and export while forming a barrier for untargeted proteins. Using fluorescence microscopy, we measured in vivo the permeability of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NPC for multidomain proteins of different sizes and found that soluble proteins of 150 kDa and membrane proteins with an extralumenal domain of 90 kDa were still partly localized in the nucleus on a time scale of hours. The NPCs thus form only a weak barrier for the majority of yeast proteins, given their monomeric size. Using FGΔ-mutant strains, we showed that specific combinations of Nups, especially with Nup100, but not the total mass of FG-nups per pore, were important for forming the barrier. Models of the disordered phase of wild-type and mutant NPCs were generated using a one bead per amino acid molecular dynamics model. The permeability measurements correlated with the density predictions from coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations in the center of the NPC. The combined in vivo and computational approach provides a framework for elucidating the structural and functional properties of the permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes. PMID:25631821

  19. PROTEIN ACCUMULATION IN LUNG LAVAGE FLUID FOLLOWING OZONE EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of protein in lung lavage fluid was used as an indicator of pulmonary damage following exposure of guinea pigs to 03. Exposure of animals to 510, 1000 or 1960 micrograms/cu. m. (O.26, 0.51 or 1.0 ppm) of O3 for 72 hours resulted in significantly elevated levels of la...

  20. Different Effects of Guanine Nucleotides (GDP and GTP) on Protein-Mediated Mitochondrial Proton Leak

    PubMed Central

    Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M.; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared the influence of GDP and GTP on isolated mitochondria respiring under conditions favoring oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and under conditions excluding this process, i.e., in the presence of carboxyatractyloside, an adenine nucleotide translocase inhibitor, and/or oligomycin, an FOF1-ATP synthase inhibitor. Using mitochondria isolated from rat kidney and human endothelial cells, we found that the action of GDP and GTP can differ diametrically depending on the conditions. Namely, under conditions favoring OXPHOS, both in the absence and presence of linoleic acid, an activator of uncoupling proteins (UCPs), the addition of 1 mM GDP resulted in the state 4 (non-phosphorylating respiration)-state 3 (phosphorylating respiration) transition, which is characteristic of ADP oxidative phosphorylation. In contrast, the addition of 1 mM GTP resulted in a decrease in the respiratory rate and an increase in the membrane potential, which is characteristic of UCP inhibition. The stimulatory effect of GDP, but not GTP, was also observed in inside-out submitochondrial particles prepared from rat kidney mitochondria. However, the effects of GDP and GTP were more similar in the presence of OXPHOS inhibitors. The importance of these observations in connection with the action of UCPs, adenine nucleotide translocase (or other carboxyatractyloside-sensitive carriers), carboxyatractyloside- and purine nucleotide-insensitive carriers, as well as nucleoside-diphosphate kinase (NDPK) are considered. Because the measurements favoring oxidative phosphorylation better reflect in vivo conditions, our study strongly supports the idea that GDP cannot be considered a significant physiological inhibitor of UCP. Moreover, it appears that, under native conditions, GTP functions as a more efficient UCP inhibitor than GDP and ATP. PMID:24904988

  1. Partitioning lung and plasma proteins: circulating surfactant proteins as biomarkers of alveolocapillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Doyle, I R; Nicholas, T E; Bersten, A D

    1999-03-01

    1. The alveolocapillary membrane faces an extraordinary task in partitioning the plasma and lung hypophase proteins, with a surface area approximately 50-fold that of the body and only 0.1-0.2 micron thick. 2. Lung permeability is compromised under a variety of circumstances and the delineation between physiological and pathological changes in permeability is not always clear. Although the tight junctions of the epithelium, rather than the endothelium, are regarded as the major barrier to fluid and protein flux, it is becoming apparent that the permeability of both are dynamically regulated. 3. Whereas increased permeability and the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolar compartment has dire consequences, fortuitously the flux of surfactant proteins from the airspaces into the circulation may provide a sensitive means of non-invasively monitoring the lung, with important implications for treatment modalities. 4. Surfactant proteins are unique in that they are present in the alveolar hypophase in high concentrations. They diffuse down their vast concentration gradients (approximately 1:1500-7000) into the circulation in a manner that reflects lung function and injury score. Surfactant proteins vary markedly in size (approximately 20-650 kDa) and changes in the relative amounts appear particularly diagnostic with regard to disease severity. Alveolar levels of surfactant proteins remain remarkably constant despite respiratory disease and, unlike the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolus, which may reach equilibrium in acute lung injury, the flux of surfactant proteins is unidirectional because of the concentration gradient and because they are rapidly cleared from the circulation. 5. Ultimately, the diagnostic usefulness of surfactant proteins as markers of alveolocapillary permeability will demand a sound understanding of their kinetics through the vascular compartment. PMID:10081613

  2. Surfactant Proteins in Smoking-Related Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Papiris, Spyridon; Papadaki, Georgia; Manali, Effrosyni D; Roussou, Aneza; Spathis, Aris; Karakitsos, Petros; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a highly surface-active mixture of proteins and lipids that is synthesized and secreted in the alveoli by type II epithelial cells and is found in the fluid lining the alveolar surface. The protein part of surfactant constitutes two hydrophilic proteins (SP-A and SP-D) that regulate surfactant metabolism and have immunologic functions, and two hydrophobic proteins (SP-B and SP-C), which play a direct role in the organization of the surfactant structure in the interphase and in the stabilization of the lipid layers during the respiratory cycle. Several studies have shown that cigarette smoke seems to affect, in several ways, both surfactant homeostasis and function. The alterations in surfactants' biophysical properties caused by cigarette smoking, contribute to the development of several smoking related lung diseases. In this review we provide information on biochemical and physiological aspects of the pulmonary surfactant and on its possible association with the development of two major chronic diseases of the lung known to be related to smoking, i.e. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Additional information on the possible role of surfactant protein alterations and/or dysfunction in the combination of these two conditions, recently described as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are also provided. PMID:26420367

  3. A Function of Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, M. L.; Bisagno, A. M.; Zasadzinski, J. A. N.; Bruni, R.; Waring, A. J.

    1993-07-01

    The primary function of lung surfactant is to form monolayers at the alveolar interface capable of lowering the normal surface tension to near zero. To accomplish this process, the surfactant must be capable of maintaining a coherent, tightly packed monolayer that avoids collapse during expiration. The positively charged amino-terminal peptide SP-B1-25 of lung surfactant-specific protein SP-B increases the collapse pressure of an important component of lung surfactant, palmitic acid (PA), to nearly 70 millinewtons per meter. This alteration of the PA isotherms removes the driving force for "squeeze-out" of the fatty acids from the primarily dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers of lung surfactant. An uncharged mutant of SP-B1-25 induced little change in the isotherms, suggesting that a specific charge interaction between the cationic peptide and the anionic lipid is responsible for the stabilization. The effect of SP-B1-25 on fatty acid isotherms is remarkably similar to that of simple poly-cations, suggesting that such polymers might be useful as components of replacement surfactants for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome.

  4. Protein signature for non-small cell lung cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Yong; Wang, Libo; Gao, Ling; Wang, Yingping; Liu, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Kai; Song, Jena; Wang, Hongxia; Bayer, Thomas A; Glaser, Laurel; Sun, Yezhou; Zhang, Weijia; Cutaia, Michael; Zhang, David Y; Ye, Fei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current histopathological classification and TNM staging have limited accuracy in predicting survival and stratifying patients for appropriate treatment. The goal of the study is to determine whether the expression pattern of functionally important regulatory proteins can add additional values for more accurate classification and prognostication of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The expression of 108 proteins and phosphoproteins in 30 paired NSCLC samples were assessed using Protein Pathway Array (PPA). The differentially expressed proteins were further confirmed using a tissue microarray (TMA) containing 94 NSCLC samples and were correlated with clinical data and survival. Results: Twelve of 108 proteins (p-CREB(Ser133), p-ERK1/2(Thr202/Tyr204), Cyclin B1, p-PDK1(Ser241), CDK4, CDK2, HSP90, CDC2p34, β-catenin, EGFR, XIAP and PCNA) were selected to build the predictor to classify normal and tumor samples with 97% accuracy. Five proteins (CDC2p34, HSP90, XIAP, CDK4 and CREB) were confirmed to be differentially expressed between NSCLC (n=94) and benign lung tumor (n=19). Over-expression of CDK4 and HSP90 in tumors correlated with a favorable overall survival in all NSCLC patients and the over-expression of p-CREB(Ser133) and CREB in NSCLC correlated with a favorable survival in smokers and those with squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. Finally, the four proteins (CDK4, HSP90, p-CREB and CREB) were used to calculate the risk score of each individual patient with NSCLC to predict survival. Conclusion: In summary, our data demonstrated a broad disturbance of functionally important regulatory proteins in NSCLC and some of these can be selected as clinically useful biomarkers for diagnosis, classification and prognosis. PMID:24959380

  5. Heat shock protein 27 promotes cell proliferation through activator protein-1 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, SAI; HU, YANGMIN; HUANG, YUWEN; XU, HUIMIN; WU, GONGXIONG; DAI, HAIBIN

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) is an important regulator involved in the development of lung cancer. However, limited evidence exists concerning the underlying molecular mechanisms of its action. The results of the present study revealed that HSP27 was highly expressed in the lung cancer tissues of mice. In an in vitro model, the overexpression of HSP27 promoted cell proliferation, while HSP27 knockdown inhibited cell proliferation. HSP27 promoted cell proliferation in vitro by directly upregulating the expression of HSP27 target genes, which required the activation of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) signaling pathway. This was evaluated by the phosphorylation status of an important pathway component, c-Jun in lung cancer tissue and cells. These results suggested that HSP27 has a promotional role in lung cancer, and therefore indicated a novel mechanism involving lung cancer cell proliferation, which may underlie poor responses to therapy. Therefore, HSP27 may be a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:26137108

  6. Protein Kinase Cα Mediates Erlotinib Resistance in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abera, Mahlet B.

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression and mutational activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are given as a primary therapy for advanced patients with EGFR-activating mutations; however, the majority of these tumors relapse and patients eventually develop resistance to TKIs. To address a potential role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in the resistance to TKIs, we used the isogenic NSCLC H1650 cell line and its erlotinib-resistant derivative H1650-M3, a cell line that displays a mesenchymal-like morphology driven by transforming growth factor-β signaling. We found that H1650-M3 cells display remarkable PKCα upregulation and PKCδ downregulation. Notably, silencing PKCα from H1650-M3 cells using RNA interference caused a significant reduction in the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers vimentin, Zeb2, Snail, and Twist. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition or PKCα RNA interference depletion and PKCδ restoring sensitized H1650-M3 cells to erlotinib. Whereas ectopic overexpression of PKCα in parental H1650 cells was not sufficient to alter the expression of EMT genes or to confer resistance to erlotinib, it caused downregulation of PKCδ expression, suggesting a unidirectional crosstalk. Finally, mechanistic studies revealed that PKCα upregulation in H1650-M3 cells is driven by transforming growth factor-β. Our results identified important roles for specific PKC isozymes in erlotinib resistance and EMT in lung cancer cells, and highlight PKCα as a potential target for lung cancer treatment. PMID:25724832

  7. Protein kinase Cα mediates erlotinib resistance in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abera, Mahlet B; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2015-05-01

    Overexpression and mutational activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are given as a primary therapy for advanced patients with EGFR-activating mutations; however, the majority of these tumors relapse and patients eventually develop resistance to TKIs. To address a potential role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in the resistance to TKIs, we used the isogenic NSCLC H1650 cell line and its erlotinib-resistant derivative H1650-M3, a cell line that displays a mesenchymal-like morphology driven by transforming growth factor-β signaling. We found that H1650-M3 cells display remarkable PKCα upregulation and PKCδ downregulation. Notably, silencing PKCα from H1650-M3 cells using RNA interference caused a significant reduction in the expression of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers vimentin, Zeb2, Snail, and Twist. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition or PKCα RNA interference depletion and PKCδ restoring sensitized H1650-M3 cells to erlotinib. Whereas ectopic overexpression of PKCα in parental H1650 cells was not sufficient to alter the expression of EMT genes or to confer resistance to erlotinib, it caused downregulation of PKCδ expression, suggesting a unidirectional crosstalk. Finally, mechanistic studies revealed that PKCα upregulation in H1650-M3 cells is driven by transforming growth factor-β. Our results identified important roles for specific PKC isozymes in erlotinib resistance and EMT in lung cancer cells, and highlight PKCα as a potential target for lung cancer treatment. PMID:25724832

  8. Long term effects of maternal protein restriction on postnatal lung alveoli development of rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Farid, S A; Mahmoud, O M; Salem, N A; Abdel-Alrahman, G; Hafez, G A

    2015-01-01

    Poor nutrition of women during pregnancy causes reduction in foetal growth and can adversely affect the development of the foetal lungs. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of maternal protein restriction on the postnatal lung development in neonatal period, and on lung structure in adult rat offspring. Female virgin Sprague-Dawley albino rats (more than 200 g) were used. One male rat was introduced into a cage with one female for matting. Once the pregnancy was confirmed, pregnant rats were divided into two main groups; each consists of 6 female as follow: 1 - normally nourished group; 2 - protein deficient group. After delivery, offspring were subdivided into three groups: 1 day after delivery, 2 weeks and 2 months postnatal. Rat body and lung weight were recorded and ratio of lung weight to body weight was assessed. Total plasma protein and serum albumin were assessed for all groups. Lung tissue stained with H&E for histological and morphometric analysis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate the number of cells positive for pulmonary surfactant protein A. Our results showed that protein restriction interfere with neonatal and postnatal lung development resulting in morphological and morphometric changes of normal lung development. We concluded that protein deficiency lead to developmental retardation of lung. PMID:26620509

  9. A novel nanobody specific for respiratory surfactant protein A has potential for lung targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Mei; He, Xian; Li, Nan; Yu, Feng; Hu, Yang; Wang, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Du, Yu-Kui; Du, Shan-Shan; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Wei, Ya-Ru; Mulet, Xavier; Coia, Greg; Weng, Dong; He, Jian-Hua; Wu, Min; Li, Hui-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lung-targeting drugs are thought to be potential therapies of refractory lung diseases by maximizing local drug concentrations in the lung to avoid systemic circulation. However, a major limitation in developing lung-targeted drugs is the acquirement of lung-specific ligands. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SPA) is predominantly synthesized by type II alveolar epithelial cells, and may serve as a potential lung-targeting ligand. Here, we generated recombinant rat pulmonary SPA (rSPA) as an antigen and immunized an alpaca to produce two nanobodies (the smallest naturally occurring antibodies) specific for rSPA, designated Nb6 and Nb17. To assess these nanobodies’ potential for lung targeting, we evaluated their specificity to lung tissue and toxicity in mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that these anti-rSPA nanobodies selectively bound to rat lungs with high affinity. Furthermore, we intravenously injected fluorescein isothiocyanate-Nb17 in nude mice and observed its preferential accumulation in the lung to other tissues, suggesting high affinity of the nanobody for the lung. Studying acute and chronic toxicity of Nb17 revealed its safety in rats without causing apparent histological alterations. Collectively, we have generated and characterized lung-specific nanobodies, which may be applicable for lung drug delivery. PMID:25926731

  10. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  11. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2), tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ), the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in lung cancer. Methods The expression patterns of GPER in various lung cancer lines and lung tumors were investigated using standard quantitative real time PCR (at mRNA levels), Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods (at protein levels). The expression of GPER was scored and the pairwise comparisons (cancer vs adjacent tissues as well as cancer vs normal lung tissues) were performed. Results Analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed a significantly higher expression of GPER at both mRNA and protein levels in human non small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC) lines relative to immortalized normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). The virally immortalized human small airway epithelial cell line HPL1D showed higher expression than HBECs and similar expression to NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections of murine lung adenomas as well as human lung adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung carcinomas showed consistently higher expression of GPER in the tumor relative to the surrounding non-tumor tissue. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrate increased GPER expression in lung cancer cells and tumors compared to normal lung. Further evaluation of the function and regulation of GPER will be necessary to determine if GPER is a marker of lung cancer progression. PMID:23273253

  12. Sealing Nitrogen Tetroxide Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, George G.; Houston, Donald W.; Scott, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    Use of Furmanite FSC-N-6B sealant in clam-shell sealing device makes it possible to stop leaks of nitrogen tetroxide through defective or improperly-seated plumbing fittings. Devised to stop leaks in vent line of small rocket motor on Space Shuttle. Also used on plumbing containing hydrazine and other hazardous fluids, and repair withstands severe temperature, vibration, and shock. Leaks stopped in place, without draining or replacement of leaking parts.

  13. Leak detector uses ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Keir, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Probe located on outer wall of vacuum-jacketed fluid lines detects leaks on inner wall. Probe picks up and amplifies vibrations that occur when gas rushes through leak and converts them to audible signal or CRT display. System is considerably simpler to use than helium leak detectors and allows rapid checks to be made as part of routine maintenance.

  14. Expression of a human surfactant protein C mutation associated with interstitial lung disease disrupts lung development in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bridges, James P; Wert, Susan E; Nogee, Lawrence M; Weaver, Timothy E

    2003-12-26

    Surfactant Protein C (SP-C) is a secreted transmembrane protein that is exclusively expressed by alveolar type II epithelial cells of the lung. SP-C associates with surfactant lipids to reduce surface tension within the alveolus, maintaining lung volume at end expiration. Mutations in the gene encoding SP-C (SFTPC) have recently been linked to chronic lung disease in children and adults. The goal of this study was to determine whether a disease-linked mutation in SFTPC causes lung disease in transgenic mice. The SFTPC mutation, designated g.1728 G --> A, results in the deletion of exon4, generating a truncated form of SP-C (SP-C(Deltaexon4)). cDNA encoding SP-C(Deltaexon4) was constitutively expressed in type II epithelial cells of transgenic mice. Viable F0 transgene-positive mice were not generated after two separate rounds of pronuclear injections. Histological analysis of lung tissue harvested from embryonic day 17.5 F0 transgene-positive fetuses revealed that SP-C(Deltaexon4) caused a dose-dependent disruption in branching morphogenesis of the lung associated with epithelial cell cytotoxicity. Transient expression of SP-C(Deltaexon4) in isolated type II epithelial cells or HEK293 cells resulted in incomplete processing of the mutant proprotein, a dose-dependent increase in BiP transcription, trapping of the proprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum, and rapid degradation via a proteasome-dependent pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that the g.1728 G --> A mutation causes misfolding of the SP-C proprotein with subsequent induction of the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathways ultimately resulting in disrupted lung morphogenesis. PMID:14525980

  15. Role of hyaluronan and hyaluronan-binding proteins in lung pathobiology.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Frances E; Singleton, Patrick A

    2011-08-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has diverse functions in normal lung homeostasis and pulmonary disease. HA constitutes the major glycosaminoglycan in lung tissue, with HA degradation products, produced by hyaluronidase enzymes and reactive oxygen species, being implicated in several lung diseases, including acute lung injury, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary hypertension. The differential activities of HA and its degradation products are due, in part, to regulation of multiple HA-binding proteins, including cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44), Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), HA-binding protein 2 (HABP2), and receptor for HA-mediated motility (RHAMM). Recent research indicates that exogenous administration of high-molecular-weight HA can serve as a novel therapeutic intervention for lung diseases, including lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury, sepsis/ventilator-induced lung injury, and airway hyperreactivity. This review focuses on the regulatory role of HA and HA-binding proteins in lung pathology and discusses the capacity of HA to augment and inhibit various lung diseases. PMID:21571904

  16. Activation of the Canonical Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Pathway during Lung Morphogenesis and Adult Lung Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sountoulidis, Alexandros; Stavropoulos, Athanasios; Giaglis, Stavros; Apostolou, Eirini; Monteiro, Rui; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.; Chen, Huaiyong; Stripp, Barry R.; Mummery, Christine; Andreakos, Evangelos; Sideras, Paschalis

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) has been implicated in early lung development, adult lung homeostasis and tissue-injury repair. However, the precise mechanism of action and the spatio-temporal pattern of BMP-signaling during these processes remains inadequately described. To address this, we have utilized a transgenic line harboring a BMP-responsive eGFP-reporter allele (BRE-eGFP) to construct the first detailed spatiotemporal map of canonical BMP-pathway activation during lung development, homeostasis and adult-lung injury repair. We demonstrate that during the pseudoglandular stage, when branching morphogenesis progresses in the developing lung, canonical BMP-pathway is active mainly in the vascular network and the sub-epithelial smooth muscle layer of the proximal airways. Activation of the BMP-pathway becomes evident in epithelial compartments only after embryonic day (E) 14.5 primarily in cells negative for epithelial-lineage markers, located in the proximal portion of the airway-tree, clusters adjacent to neuro-epithelial-bodies (NEBs) and in a substantial portion of alveolar epithelial cells. The pathway becomes activated in isolated E12.5 mesenchyme-free distal epithelial buds cultured in Matrigel suggesting that absence of reporter activity in these regions stems from a dynamic cross-talk between endoderm and mesenchyme. Epithelial cells with activated BMP-pathway are enriched in progenitors capable of forming colonies in three-dimensional Matrigel cultures. As lung morphogenesis approaches completion, eGFP-expression declines and in adult lung its expression is barely detectable. However, upon tissue-injury, either with naphthalene or bleomycin, the canonical BMP-pathways is re-activated, in bronchial or alveolar epithelial cells respectively, in a manner reminiscent to early lung development and in tissue areas where reparatory progenitor cells reside. Our studies illustrate the dynamic activation of canonical BMP-pathway during lung

  17. Permeability characteristics of complement-damaged membranes: evaluation of the membrane leak generated by the complement proteins C5b-9.

    PubMed

    Sims, P J

    1981-03-01

    Permeability characteristics of the membrane lesion generated by the terminal complement proteins are considered in light of recent observations that the measured diffusion of solute across complement-damaged membranes does not conform to the "doughnut hole" model of a discrete transmembrane pore formed by the inserted C5b-9 complex. By using the measured kinetics of steady-state tracer isotope diffusion of nonelectrolytes across resealed erythrocyte ghost membranes treated with C5b-9, a new transport model is developed. This model considers the apparent membrane lesion strictly in terms of the operational criteria of a functional conducting pathway for the observed diffusing solute, independent of a priori assumptions about the geometry or molecular properties of the membrane lesion. With this definition of the unit membrane lesion and the assumption that the exclusion size of the conducting pathway varies directly with the multiplicity of bound C5b-9 (as suggested by previous measurements under conditions of varying input of C5b-9), numerical estimates of te apparent permeability of the complement-damaged membrane to four diffusing nonelectrolytes are derived. These results suggest that the pathway for a particle diffusing across the complement lesion cannot be a pore and is functionally equivalent to an aqueous leak pathway, free of pore constraints. Implications of these results are discussed in terms of current molecular models for the mechanism of membrane damage by the complement proteins. PMID:6940192

  18. Leak detection/verification

    SciTech Connect

    Krhounek, V.; Zdarek, J.; Pecinka, L.

    1997-04-01

    Loss of coolant accident (LOCA) experiments performed as part of a Leak Before Break (LBB) analysis are very briefly summarized. The aim of these experiments was to postulate the leak rates of the coolant. Through-wall cracks were introduced into pipes by fatigue cycling and hydraulically loaded in a test device. Measurements included coolant pressure and temperature, quantity of leaked coolant, displacement of a specimen, and acoustic emission. Small cracks were plugged with particles in the coolant during testing. It is believed that plugging will have no effect in cracks with leak rates above 35 liters per minute. The leak rate safety margin of 10 is sufficient for cracks in which the leak rate is more than 5 liters per minute.

  19. Detecting Methane Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.; Hinkley, E. D.

    1984-01-01

    Remote sensor uses laser radiation backscattered from natural targets. He/Ne Laser System for remote scanning of Methane leaks employs topographic target to scatter light to receiver near laser transmitter. Apparatus powered by 1.5kW generator transported to field sites and pointed at suspected methane leaks. Used for remote detection of natural-gas leaks and locating methane emissions in landfill sites.

  20. Expression and clinical significance of A‐kinase anchor protein 4 in lung adenocarcinoma tissue

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Kang; Yu, Xiao‐Yun; Yu, Zhuang; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The A‐kinase anchor proteins (AKAP) are a growing family of scaffolding proteins involved in the occurrence, proliferation, and metastasis of tumors by controlling intracellular signals. In this study, the expression and significance of AKAP4 were analyzed in patients with lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent non‐cancerous tissues. Methods Using reverse transcriptase‐polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, AKAP4 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) and protein expression levels were measured in 108 cases of lung adenocarcinoma and adjacent non‐cancerous tissues. Results AKAP4 mRNA and protein were expressed in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, but not in adjacent non‐cancerous tissues. The expression of AKAP4 mRNA and protein was closely associated with lymphatic metastasis (P < 0.05), but had no relationship with stage, differentiation degree, gender, age or smoking (P > 0.05). AKAP4 expression had an adverse effect on the overall survival rate (P < 0.05). Conclusion The expression of AKAP4 was high in lung adenocarcinoma tissue, which may be closely related to the lymphatic metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma. AKAP4 may be a novel lung adenocarcinoma molecule marker and a predictor of poor prognosis. PMID:27148411

  1. Significance of Trask protein interactions in brain metastatic cohorts of lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hua; Shang, Li-Qun; Chen, Rui-Lin; Yang, Shu-Mei; Wang, Shui-Li; Wang, Jun; Sun, Gang

    2015-06-01

    A class of adhesion protein that occurs in the membrane with both extracellular and intracellular domain and play vital role in maintaining multicellularity is TRASK, also called CUB-domain containing protein1, CD318 (CDCP1). Specifically, in the current study, documented aggressive grades of lung cancers and distant metastatic tissues were examined for protein interactions of Trask and compared with lung cancer variants in situ. The intracellular domain of Trask has the ability to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation and thereafter undergo increased genomic expression, as well as interact with cytoskeletal proteins in the cell periphery and other local signal transduction machinery to induce invadopodia formation and distant metastasis. We incorporated proximity ligation assay to examine protein interactions of Trask in metastatic lung cancer tissues and compare with advanced and low-grade lung cancers restricted to the primary site of origins. Here, we provide direct evidence that activated Trask, which is a phosphorylated form, binds with cytoskeletal proteins actin and spectrin. These interactions were not seen in locally growing lung cancer and cancer in situ. These interactions may be responsible for invadopodia formation and breaking free from a multicellular environment. Functional studies demonstrated interaction between Trask and the STOCs Orai1 and Stim1. Calcium release from internal stores was highest in metastatic lung cancers, suggesting this mechanism as an initial stimulus for the cells to respond chaotically to external growth factor stimulation, especially in aggressive metastatic variants of lung cancers. Recently, inhibitors of STOCs have been identified, and preclinical evidence may be obtained whether these drugs may be of benefit in preventing the deadly consequences of lung cancer. PMID:25775948

  2. CREB-binding protein regulates lung cancer growth by targeting MAPK and CPSF4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhipeng; Yu, Wendan; Zhang, Changlin; Zhao, Shilei; Yu, Zhenlong; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Tang, Ranran; Xuan, Yang; Yang, Wenjing; Hao, Jiaojiao; Xu, Tingting; Zhang, Qianyi; Huang, Wenlin; Deng, Wuguo; Guo, Wei

    2016-02-01

    CBP (CREB-binding protein) is a transcriptional co-activator which possesses HAT (histone acetyltransferases) activity and participates in many biological processes, including embryonic development, growth control and homeostasis. However, its roles and the underlying mechanisms in the regulation of carcinogenesis and tumor development remain largely unknown. Here we investigated the molecular mechanisms and potential targets of CBP involved in tumor growth and survival in lung cancer cells. Elevated expression of CBP was detected in lung cancer cells and tumor tissues compared to the normal lung cells and tissues. Knockdown of CBP by siRNA or inhibition of its HAT activity using specific chemical inhibitor effectively suppressed cell proliferation, migration and colony formation and induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells by inhibiting MAPK and activating cytochrome C/caspase-dependent signaling pathways. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analyses revealed the co-localization and interaction between CBP and CPSF4 (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 4) proteins in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CPSF4 inhibited hTERT transcription and cell growth induced by CBP, and vice versa, demonstrating the synergetic effect of CBP and CPSF4 in the regulation of lung cancer cell growth and survival. Moreover, we found that high expression of both CBP and CPSF4 predicted a poor prognosis in the patients with lung adenocarcinomas. Collectively, our results indicate that CBP regulates lung cancer growth by targeting MAPK and CPSF4 signaling pathways. PMID:26628108

  3. Classification of lung cancer tumors based on structural and physicochemical properties of proteins by bioinformatics models.

    PubMed

    Hosseinzadeh, Faezeh; Ebrahimi, Mansour; Goliaei, Bahram; Shamabadi, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Rapid distinction between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors is very important in diagnosis of this disease. Furthermore sequence-derived structural and physicochemical descriptors are very useful for machine learning prediction of protein structural and functional classes, classifying proteins and the prediction performance. Herein, in this study is the classification of lung tumors based on 1497 attributes derived from structural and physicochemical properties of protein sequences (based on genes defined by microarray analysis) investigated through a combination of attribute weighting, supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms. Eighty percent of the weighting methods selected features such as autocorrelation, dipeptide composition and distribution of hydrophobicity as the most important protein attributes in classification of SCLC, NSCLC and COMMON classes of lung tumors. The same results were observed by most tree induction algorithms while descriptors of hydrophobicity distribution were high in protein sequences COMMON in both groups and distribution of charge in these proteins was very low; showing COMMON proteins were very hydrophobic. Furthermore, compositions of polar dipeptide in SCLC proteins were higher than NSCLC proteins. Some clustering models (alone or in combination with attribute weighting algorithms) were able to nearly classify SCLC and NSCLC proteins. Random Forest tree induction algorithm, calculated on leaves one-out and 10-fold cross validation) shows more than 86% accuracy in clustering and predicting three different lung cancer tumors. Here for the first time the application of data mining tools to effectively classify three classes of lung cancer tumors regarding the importance of dipeptide composition, autocorrelation and distribution descriptor has been reported. PMID:22829872

  4. Expression of lung resistance-related protein, LRP, and multidrug resistance-related protein, MRP1, in normal human lung cells in long-term cultures.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Thomas; Torky, Abdel-Rahman Wageeh; Stehfest, Ekkehard; Hofmann, Stefan; Foth, Heidi

    2005-10-01

    Transport processes form part of the body's defense mechanism, and they determine the intracellular levels of many endogenous and exogenous compounds. The multidrug resistance-related protein MRP1 and the lung resistance-related protein LRP are associated with drug resistance against chemotherapeutics; they protect cells against toxic compounds. There is much experimental evidence to suggest that both of these transporter proteins serve important physiological functions. The expression of LRP and MRP1 was studied in normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBEC) and peripheral lung cells (PLC) obtained from explant cultures from morphologically-normal human lung tissue taken from patients with lung cancer. LRP (mRNA and protein) was detected in the cells of the bronchi as well as the peripheral lung with low (a factor of 2.6) inter-individual variation in the first generation. No significant alterations were noted for LRP within three-to-four generations in the same patient. LRP expression was not substantially different between cultures from different topographic regions of the human lung. MRP1 protein and MRP1 mRNA could also be detected in all of the NHBEC and PLC cultures studied, but with substantially higher (a factor of 7.7) intra-individual variation in the first generation than for LRP. MRP expression was the same for bronchial cells and PLC when the material was obtained from both sites. The level of mRNA for MRP1 was, in general, less stable than that for LRP. In multigeneration explant cultures, the levels of LRP mRNA and protein and MRP1 protein did not fluctuate greatly, but the level of MRP1 mRNA dropped to about 25% of the reference value within four generations (after about 8-10 weeks of culture). In one case, NHBEC subpassages were followed over a period of 20 weeks. In this system MRP mRNA levels increased by more than threefold, while levels of MRP1 protein and LRP mRNA and protein were expressed at almost constant rates. PMID:15986202

  5. Ascorbate attenuates pulmonary emphysema by inhibiting tobacco smoke and Rtp801-triggered lung protein modification and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Indranil; Ganguly, Souradipta; Rozanas, Christine R; Stuehr, Dennis J; Panda, Koustubh

    2016-07-19

    Cigarette smoking causes emphysema, a fatal disease involving extensive structural and functional damage of the lung. Using a guinea pig model and human lung cells, we show that oxidant(s) present in tobacco smoke not only cause direct oxidative damage of lung proteins, contributing to the major share of lung injury, but also activate Rtp801, a key proinflammatory cellular factor involved in tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. Rtp801 triggers nuclear factor κB and consequent inducible NOS (iNOS)-mediated overproduction of NO, which in combination with excess superoxide produced during Rtp801 activation, contribute to increased oxido-nitrosative stress and lung protein nitration. However, lung-specific inhibition of iNOS with a iNOS-specific inhibitor, N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine, dihydrochloride (L-NIL) solely restricts lung protein nitration but fails to prevent or reverse the major tobacco smoke-induced oxidative lung injury. In comparison, the dietary antioxidant, ascorbate or vitamin C, can substantially prevent such damage by inhibiting both tobacco smoke-induced lung protein oxidation as well as activation of pulmonary Rtp801 and consequent iNOS/NO-induced nitration of lung proteins, that otherwise lead to increased proteolysis of such oxidized or nitrated proteins by endogenous lung proteases, resulting in emphysematous lung damage. Vitamin C also restricts the up-regulation of matrix-metalloproteinase-9, the major lung protease involved in the proteolysis of such modified lung proteins during tobacco smoke-induced emphysema. Overall, our findings implicate tobacco-smoke oxidant(s) as the primary etiopathogenic factor behind both the noncellular and cellular damage mechanisms governing emphysematous lung injury and demonstrate the potential of vitamin C to accomplish holistic prevention of such damage. PMID:27382160

  6. Role of surfactant protein A in non-infectious lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hisatsugu; Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a large multimeric protein found in the airways and alveoli of the lungs. SP-A is a member of the collectin family of proteins, characterized by NH2-terminal collagen-like regions and COOH-terminal lectin domains. Although other surfactant proteins such as SP-B function to reduce surface tension in the lungs, SP-A as well as SP-D regulates the pulmonary immune response. To date, a number of studies have shown the immunoregulatory function of SP-A, mainly in the field of infectious diseases. By binding to a wide variety of pathogens, SP-A opsonizes and enhances pathogen uptake by phagocytes. In addition to the effect on pathogens, recent studies have shown that SP-A also modulates lung immune system in the area of non-infectious lung diseases. In this review, the potential role of SP-A in the multiple aspects of pulmonary host defense will be discussed, focusing mainly on non-infectious lung diseases such as acute and chronic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. J. Med. Invest. 61: 1-6, February, 2014. PMID:24705741

  7. Apparatus for detecting leaks

    DOEpatents

    Booth, Eugene T.

    1976-02-24

    A method and apparatus for determining the position of and estimating the size of leaks in an evacuating apparatus comprising the use of a testing gas such as helium or hydrogen flowing around said apparatus whereby the testing gas will be drawn in at the site of any leaks.

  8. C-reactive protein and procalcitonin predict anastomotic leaks following colorectal cancer resections – a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecki, Roman; Rzaca, Marek; Obuszko, Zbigniew; Velchuru, Vamsi Ramana; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Early safe discharge is paramount for the success of ERAS following colorectal cancer resections. Anastomotic leakage (AL) has high morbidity, particularly if the patient has been discharged to the community. Aim To evaluate whether C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) can predict AL before early discharge. Material and methods Fifty-five consecutive patients undergoing open and robotic colorectal cancer resections were included. C-reactive protein and PCT were measured pre-operatively, 8 h after incision, and on the first and third postoperative day. Thirty-day readmissions, re-operations and mortality were recorded. Results Twenty-nine patients underwent robotic and the remainder open (n = 26) resections. Five patients had AL. The mean CRP and PCT increased on postoperative day 1 (POD 1) and POD 3 in all patients. On POD 3, mean CRP was 114 mg/l in non-AL patients and 321 mg/l in AL patients (p = 0.0001). Mean PCT on POD 3 was 0.56 ng/ml in the non-AL group and 10.4 ng/ml in AL patients (p = 0.017). On analysis of ROC and AUC curves, the cut-off for CRP on POD 3 was 245.64 mg/l, with 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity for AL. The cut-off for PCT on POD 3 was 3.83 ng/ml, with 75% sensitivity and 100% specificity for AL. Conclusions C-reactive protein and PCT measurement on POD 3 following colorectal cancer resection can positively identify patients at low risk of anastomotic leakage. PMID:26865894

  9. Overexpression of FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6 in cardiomyocytes reduces ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca(2+) leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and increases contractility.

    PubMed

    Prestle, J; Janssen, P M; Janssen, A P; Zeitz, O; Lehnart, S E; Bruce, L; Smith, G L; Hasenfuss, G

    2001-02-01

    The FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6 is tightly associated with the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-release channel (ryanodine receptor type 2 [RyR2]), but the physiological function of FKBP12.6 is unclear. We used adenovirus (Ad)-mediated gene transfer to overexpress FKBP12.6 in adult rabbit cardiomyocytes. Western immunoblot and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed specific overexpression of FKBP12.6, with unchanged expression of endogenous FKBP12. FKBP12.6-transfected myocytes displayed a significantly higher (21%) fractional shortening (FS) at 48 hours after transfection compared with Ad-GFP-infected control cells (4.8+/-0.2% FS versus 4+/-0.2% FS, respectively; n=79 each; P:=0.001). SR-Ca(2+) uptake rates were monitored in beta-escin-permeabilized myocytes using Fura-2. Ad-FKBP12.6-infected cells showed a statistically significant higher rate of Ca(2+) uptake of 0.8+/-0.09 nmol/s(-)(1)/10(6) cells (n=8, P:<0.05) compared with 0.52+/-0.1 nmol/s(-)(1)/10(6) cells in sham-infected cells (n=8) at a [Ca(2+)] of 1 micromol/L. In the presence of 5 micromol/L ruthenium red to block Ca(2+) efflux via RyR2, SR-Ca(2+) uptake rates were not significantly different between groups. From these measurements, we calculate that SR-Ca(2+) leak through RyR2 is reduced by 53% in FKBP12.6-overexpressing cells. Caffeine-induced contractures were significantly larger in Ad-FKBP12.6-infected myocytes compared with Ad-GFP-infected control cells, indicating a higher SR-Ca(2+) load. Taken together, these data suggest that FKBP12.6 stabilizes the closed conformation state of RyR2. This may reduce diastolic SR-Ca(2+) leak and consequently increase SR-Ca(2+) release and myocyte shortening. PMID:11157671

  10. Circulating pro-surfactant protein B as a risk biomarker for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Hanash, Samir; Rundle, Andrew; McKeague, Ian; Tang, Deliang; Darakjy, Salima; Gaziano, J. Michael; Sesso, Howard D.; Perera, Frederica

    2013-01-01

    Background Our prior studies of lung cancer suggested that a novel biomarker (pro-surfactant protein B or pro-SFTPB) might serve as a predictive marker for this disease. We aimed to determine the potential utility of pro-SFTPB for distinguishing lung cancer cases from matched controls as a risk marker. Methods Study subjects were drawn from the longitudinal Physicians’ Health Study (PHS). Cases (n = 188) included individuals who were cancer-free at study enrollment but developed lung cancer during follow-up. Controls (n = 337) were subjects who did not develop lung cancer. Cases and controls were matched on date of study enrollment, age at enrollment, and smoking status and amount. Baseline plasma samples drawn at enrollment were analyzed for pro-SFTPB using ELISA to detect differences in protein expression levels for cases and controls. Results Pro-SFTPB-non-detectable status was significantly associated with lung cancer risk (OR = 5.88, 95% CI 1.24, 27.48). Among subjects with detectable levels of the protein, increasing plasma concentration of pro-SFTPB was associated with higher lung cancer risk (OR = 1.41 per unit increase in log pro-SFTPB, 95% CI 1.08, 1.84). Conclusion These results suggest a non-linear, J-shaped association between plasma pro-SFTPB levels and lung cancer risk, with both non-detectable and higher levels of the marker being associated with lung cancer. Impact These results show promise of a risk marker that could contribute to predicting risk for lung cancer development and to narrowing the high risk population for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening. PMID:23897585

  11. Fibroblast Activation Protein (FAP) Accelerates Collagen Degradation and Clearance from Lungs in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ming-Hui; Zhu, Qiang; Li, Hui-Hua; Ra, Hyun-Jeong; Majumdar, Sonali; Gulick, Dexter L; Jerome, Jacob A; Madsen, Daniel H; Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Speicher, David W; Bachovchin, William W; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Puré, Ellen

    2016-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a disease characterized by progressive, unrelenting lung scarring, with death from respiratory failure within 2-4 years unless lung transplantation is performed. New effective therapies are clearly needed. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a cell surface-associated serine protease up-regulated in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in wound healing and cancer. We postulate that FAP is not only a marker of disease but influences the development of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. In two different models of pulmonary fibrosis, intratracheal bleomycin instillation and thoracic irradiation, we find increased mortality and increased lung fibrosis in FAP-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Lung extracellular matrix analysis reveals accumulation of intermediate-sized collagen fragments in FAP-deficient mouse lungs, consistent within vitrostudies showing that FAP mediates ordered proteolytic processing of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-derived collagen cleavage products. FAP-mediated collagen processing leads to increased collagen internalization without altering expression of the endocytic collagen receptor, Endo180. Pharmacologic FAP inhibition decreases collagen internalization as expected. Conversely, restoration of FAP expression in the lungs of FAP-deficient mice decreases lung hydroxyproline content after intratracheal bleomycin to levels comparable with that of wild-type controls. Our findings indicate that FAP participates directly, in concert with MMPs, in collagen catabolism and clearance and is an important factor in resolving scar after injury and restoring lung homeostasis. Our study identifies FAP as a novel endogenous regulator of fibrosis and is the first to show FAP's protective effects in the lung. PMID:26663085

  12. Osteoactivin (GPNMB) ectodomain protein promotes growth and invasive behavior of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oyewumi, Moses O.; Manickavasagam, Dharani; Novak, Kimberly; Wehrung, Daniel; Paulic, Nikola; Moussa, Fouad M.; Sondag, Gregory R.; Safadi, Fayez F.

    2016-01-01

    The potential application of GPNMB/OA as a therapeutic target for lung cancer will require a greater understanding of the impact of GPNMB/OA ectodomain (ECD) protein shedding into tumor tissues. Thus, in this work we characterized GPNMB/OA expression and extent of shedding of its ECD protein while evaluating the impact on lung cancer progression using three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: A549, SK-MES-1 and calu-6. We observed a direct correlation (R2 = 0.89) between GPNMB/OA expression on NSCLC cells and the extent of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding. Meanwhile, siRNA-mediated knockdown of GPNMB/OA in cancer cells significantly reduced GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding, migration, invasion and adhesion to extracellular matrix materials. Also, exogenous treatment of cancer cells (expressing low GPNMB/OA) with recombinant GPNMB/OA protein (rOA) significantly facilitated cell invasion and migration, but the effects of rOA was negated by inclusion of a selective RGD peptide. Further studies in athymic (nu/nu) mice-bearing calu-6 showed that intratumoral supplementation with rOA effectively facilitated in vivo tumor growth as characterized by a high number of proliferating cells (Ki67 staining) coupled with a low number of apoptotic cells. Taken together, our results accentuate the relevance of GPNMB/OA ECD protein shedding to progression of lung cancer. Thus, strategies that suppress GPNMB/OA expression on lung cancer cells as well as negate shedding of GPNMB/OA ECD protein are worthy of consideration in lung cancer therapeutics. PMID:26883195

  13. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  14. Leak detection aid

    DOEpatents

    Steeper, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  15. Overcoming inactivation of the lung surfactant by serum proteins: a potential role for fluorocarbons?

    PubMed

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2015-08-14

    In many pulmonary conditions serum proteins interfere with the normal adsorption of components of the lung surfactant to the surface of the alveoli, resulting in lung surfactant inactivation, with potentially serious untoward consequences. Here, we review the strategies that have recently been designed in order to counteract the biophysical mechanisms of inactivation of the surfactant. One approach includes protein analogues or peptides that mimic the native proteins responsible for innate resistance to inactivation. Another perspective uses water-soluble additives, such as electrolytes and hydrophilic polymers that are prone to enhance adsorption of phospholipids. An alternative, more recent approach consists of using fluorocarbons, that is, highly hydrophobic inert compounds that were investigated for partial liquid ventilation, that modify interfacial properties and can act as carriers of exogenous lung surfactant. The latter approach that allows fluidisation of phospholipid monolayers while maintaining capacity to reach near-zero surface tension definitely warrants further investigation. PMID:26110877

  16. Improved gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, F.E. Jr.

    1983-10-06

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the nonlinear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  17. Gaseous leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Juravic, Jr., Frank E.

    1988-01-01

    In a short path length mass-spectrometer type of helium leak detector wherein the helium trace gas is ionized, accelerated and deflected onto a particle counter, an arrangement is provided for converting the detector to neon leak detection. The magnetic field of the deflection system is lowered so as to bring the non linear fringe area of the magnetic field across the ion path, thereby increasing the amount of deflection of the heavier neon ions.

  18. Computerized leak training

    SciTech Connect

    Parella, C.; Monroe, A.

    1985-11-01

    Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation's computerized leak detection training system is discussed. The system is able to simulate gas leak situations by means of a computer. The training setup includes actual visual display via slides of houses represented on a plotting board; computer with plotter board in front that simulates an area and various leakage situations; a typical handheld CGI; and a control pad for the computer. The training system has filled a valuable need in the area of emergency training.

  19. Low Level Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA has transferred the improved portable leak detector technology to UE Systems, Inc.. This instrument was developed to detect leaks in fluid systems of critical launch and ground support equipment. This system incorporates innovative electronic circuitry, improved transducers, collecting horns, and contact sensors that provide a much higher degree of reliability, sensitivity and versatility over previously used systems. Potential commercial uses are pipelines, underground utilities, air-conditioning systems, petrochemical systems, aerospace, power transmission lines and medical devices.

  20. WRSS jumper leak assessment

    SciTech Connect

    BAILEY, J.W.

    1999-06-23

    The purpose of this assessment is: (1) to assemble and document the facts associated with three recently installed jumpers which have leaked either during actual process operation or during post installation testing; (2) to describe the corrective actions taken and to identify any process improvements which need to be implemented in the Hanford jumper design and installation activities; and (3) to document WRSS jumper leak lessons learned for use by future projects and other jumper design, fabrication, and installation activities.

  1. Leaking chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-04-01

    There are numerous physical situations in which a hole or leak is introduced in an otherwise closed chaotic system. The leak can have a natural origin, it can mimic measurement devices, and it can also be used to reveal dynamical properties of the closed system. A unified treatment of leaking systems is provided and applications to different physical problems, in both the classical and quantum pictures, are reviewed. The treatment is based on the transient chaos theory of open systems, which is essential because real leaks have finite size and therefore estimations based on the closed system differ essentially from observations. The field of applications reviewed is very broad, ranging from planetary astronomy and hydrodynamical flows to plasma physics and quantum fidelity. The theory is expanded and adapted to the case of partial leaks (partial absorption and/or transmission) with applications to room acoustics and optical microcavities in mind. Simulations in the limaçon family of billiards illustrate the main text. Regarding billiard dynamics, it is emphasized that a correct discrete-time representation can be given only in terms of the so-called true-time maps, while traditional Poincaré maps lead to erroneous results. Perron-Frobenius-type operators are generalized so that they describe true-time maps with partial leaks.

  2. Leaks in pipe networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pudar, Ranko S.; Liggett, James A.

    1992-01-01

    Leak detection in water-distribution systems can be accomplished by solving an inverse problem using measurements of pressure and/or flow. The problem is formulated with equivalent orifice areas of possible leaks as the unknowns. Minimization of the difference between measured and calculated heads produces a solution for the areas. The quality of the result depends on number and location of the measurements. A sensitivity matrix is key to deciding where to make measurements. Both location and magnitude of leaks are sensitive to the quantity and quality of pressure measurements and to how well the pipe friction parameters are known. The overdetermined problem (more measurements than suspected leaks) gives the best results, but some information can be derived from the underdetermined problem. The variance of leak areas, based on the quality of system characteristics and pressure data, indicates the likely accuracy of the results. The method will not substitute for more traditional leak surveys but can serve as a guide and supplement.

  3. Developmental regulation of chicken surfactant protein A and its localization in lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Skjødt, Karsten; Hansen, Søren; Haagsman, Henk P; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2016-08-01

    Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) is a collagenous C-type lectin (collectin) that plays an important role in the early stage of the host immune response. In chicken, SP-A (cSP-A) is expressed as a 26 kDa glycosylated protein in the lung. Using immunohistochemistry, cSP-A protein was detected mainly in the lung lining fluid covering the parabronchial epithelia. Specific cSP-A producing epithelial cells, resembling mammalian type II cells, were identified in the parabronchi. Gene expression of cSP-A markedly increased from embryonic day 14 onwards until the time of hatch, comparable to the SP-A homologue chicken lung lectin, while mannan binding lectin and collectins CL-L1 and CL-K1 only showed slightly changed expression during development. cSP-A protein could be detected as early as ED 18 in lung tissue using Western blotting, and expression increased steadily until day 28 post-hatch. Our observations are a first step towards understanding the role of this protein in vivo. PMID:26976230

  4. Using the theory of coevolution to predict protein-protein interactions in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Chan, Man-Him; Tu, Wen-Jian; He, Li-Ran; Lee, Chak-Man; He, Miao

    2013-02-01

    Systems biology has become an effective approach for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of lung cancer. In this study, sequences of 100 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)-related proteins were downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases. The Theory of Coevolution was then used to build a protein-protein interaction (PPI) network of NSCLC. Adopting the reverse thinking approach, we analyzed the NSCLC proteins one at a time. Fifteen key proteins were identified and categorized into a special protein family F(K), which included Cyclin D1 (CCND1), E-cadherin (CDH1), Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12 (CXCL12), epidermal growth factor (EGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), TNF receptor superfamily, member 6(FAS), FK506 binding protein 12-rapamycin associated protein 1 (FRAP1), O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), parkinson protein 2, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase (PARK2), phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), calcium channel voltage-dependent alpha 2/delta subunit 2 (CACNA2D2), tubulin beta class I (TUBB), SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 2 (SMARCA2), and wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 7A (WNT7A). Seven key nodes of the sub-network were identified, which included PARK2, WNT7A, SMARCA2, FRAP1, CDKN2A, CCND1, and EGFR. The PPI predictions of EGFR-EGF, PARK2-FAS, PTEN-FAS, and CACNA2D2-CDH1 were confirmed experimentally by retrieving the Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) and PubMed databases. We proposed that the 7 proteins could serve as potential diagnostic molecular markers for NSCLC. In accordance with the developmental mode of lung cancer established by Sekine et al., we assumed that the occurrence and development of lung cancer were linked not only to gene loss in the 3p region (WNT7A, 3p25) and genetic mutations in the 9p

  5. Serum clara cell protein: a sensitive biomarker of increased lung epithelium permeability caused by ambient ozone.

    PubMed

    Broeckaert, F; Arsalane, K; Hermans, C; Bergamaschi, E; Brustolin, A; Mutti, A; Bernard, A

    2000-06-01

    Ozone in ambient air may cause various effects on human health, including decreased lung function, asthma exacerbation, and even premature mortality. These effects have been evidenced using various clinical indicators that, although sensitive, do not specifically evaluate the O(3)-increased lung epithelium permeability. In the present study, we assessed the acute effects of ambient O(3) on the pulmonary epithelium by a new approach relying on the assay in serum of the lung-specific Clara cell protein (CC16 or CC10). We applied this test to cyclists who exercised for 2 hr during episodes of photochemical smog and found that O(3) induces an early leakage of lung Clara cell protein. The protein levels increased significantly into the serum from exposure levels as low as 0.060-0.084 ppm. Our findings, confirmed in mice exposed to the current U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for O(3) (0.08 ppm for 8 hr) indicate that above the present natural background levels, there is almost no safety margin for the effects of ambient O(3) on airway permeability. The assay of CC16 in the serum represents a new sensitive noninvasive test allowing the detection of early effects of ambient O(3) on the lung epithelial barrier. PMID:10856027

  6. Purification, characterization and substrate specificity of rabbit lung phospholipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Tsao, F H; Tian, Q; Strickland, M S

    1992-05-01

    Three phospholipid transfer proteins, namely proteins I, II and III, were purified from the rabbit lung cytosolic fraction. The molecular masses of phospholipid transfer proteins I, II and III are 32 kilodaltons (kDa), 22 kDa and 32 kDa, respectively; their isoelectric point values are 6.5, 7.0 and 6.8, respectively. Phospholipid transfer proteins I and III transferred phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) from donor unilamellar liposomes to acceptor multilamellar liposomes; protein II transferred PC but not PI. All the three phospholipid transfer proteins transferred phosphatidylethanolamine poorly and showed no tendency to transfer triolein. The transfer of [14C]PC from unilamellar liposomes to multilamellar liposomes facilitated by each protein was affected differently by the presence of acidic phospholipids in the PC unilamellar liposomes. In an equal molar ratio of acidic phospholipid and PC, phosphatidylglycerol (PG) reduced the activities of proteins I and III by 70% (P = 0.0004 and 0.0032, respectively) whereas PI and phosphatidylserine (PS) had an insignificant effect. In contrast, the protein II activity was stimulated 2-3-times more by either PG (P = 0.0024), PI (P = 0.0006) or PS (P = 0.0038). In addition, protein II transferred dioleoylPC (DOPC) about 2-times more effectively than dipalmitoylPC (DPPC) (P = 0.0002), whereas proteins I and III transferred DPPC 20-40% more effectively than DOPC but this was statistically insignificant. The markedly different substrate specificities of the three lung phospholipid transfer proteins suggest that these proteins may play an important role in sorting intracellular membrane phospholipids, possibly including lung surfactant phospholipids. PMID:1596521

  7. Overexpression of gelsolin-like actin-capping protein is associated with progression of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fangchun; Zhang, Ruifeng; Don, Liangliang; Ying, Kejing

    2011-01-01

    Gelsolin-like actin-capping protein (CapG), a ubiquitous actin-binding protein, has been shown to play a critical role in regulating the migration ability of cells. In this study, we investigated CapG expression in lung cancer cell lines under hypoxia and evaluated the effect of CapG on the migration ability of these cells. We also analyzed the expression of CapG in a total of 75 patients with lung adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that hypoxia increased the expression of CapG in the human lung cancer cell lines, A549 and H358. Knockdown of CapG expression with small interfering RNA led to a decrease in the migration ability of these cell lines. These results indicate that CapG expression is upregulated in lung cancer cell lines under hypoxia and that CapG may contribute to the migration ability of lung cancer cells. Moreover, the excised lung adenocarcinoma tissues showed significantly increased immunoreactivity for CapG, compared to the adjacent tumor-free tissues. Importantly, overexpression of CapG is significantly associated with male sex (χ(2) = 5.195, p = 0.033) and lymph node metastasis (χ(2) = 5.58, p = 0.021). Likewise, CapG overexpression was observed with advanced tumor stages (III and IV, 16/31), compared with early tumor stages (I and II, 14/44), but the difference was not statistically significant. These results suggest that overexpression of CapG may be associated with progression of lung adenocarcinoma. In conclusion, CapG may be a promising target for therapy and a potential biomarker for predicting the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:21908955

  8. Effects of oleic acid on pulmonary capillary leak and thromboxanes

    SciTech Connect

    Olanoff, L.S.; Reines, H.D.; Spicer, K.M.; Halushka, P.V.

    1984-06-01

    The role of arachidonic acid metabolites in oleic acid-induced lung injury in anesthetized dogs was investigated. Oleic acid was administered as a bolus injection into the pulmonary artery after either indomethacin (10 mg/kg iv) or vehicle. Measurements of hemodynamic parameters, mean systemic (MAP), pulmonary capillary wedge, and pulmonary artery pressures (PAP), cardiac output, arterial blood gases, extravascular lung waters (EVLW) by thermaldye double indicator dilution techniques and plasma immunoreactive thromboxane B2 (iTxB2), by radioimmunoassay were obtained at zero time (baseline) and 20 min following each oleic acid injection. A new noninvasive technique was employed to measure pulmonary capillary protein leak by the scintigraphic analysis of intravenously administered technetium-/sup 99/m radiolabeled human serum albumin (99mTc -HSA) in the cardiac and lung regions. Oleic acid injection caused a significant dose related fall in MAP, arterial pO/sup 2/, and cardiac output, and increases in EVLW and plasma iTxB2 in the vehicle pretreated animals, while mean PAP remained unchanged. In contrast, in the indomethacin pretreated dogs, MAP, EVLW, cardiac output, and plasma iTxB2 levels did not change from baseline values and there was an increase in mean PAP. Pulmonary vascular resistance was significantly elevated in both groups.

  9. Ammonia Leak Locator Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, Franklin T.; Wuest, Martin P.; Deffenbaugh, Danny M.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal control system of International Space Station Alpha will use liquid ammonia as the heat exchange fluid. It is expected that small leaks (of the order perhaps of one pound of ammonia per day) may develop in the lines transporting the ammonia to the various facilities as well as in the heat exchange equipment. Such leaks must be detected and located before the supply of ammonia becomes critically low. For that reason, NASA-JSC has a program underway to evaluate instruments that can detect and locate ultra-small concentrations of ammonia in a high vacuum environment. To be useful, the instrument must be portable and small enough that an astronaut can easily handle it during extravehicular activity. An additional complication in the design of the instrument is that the environment immediately surrounding ISSA will contain small concentrations of many other gases from venting of onboard experiments as well as from other kinds of leaks. These other vapors include water, cabin air, CO2, CO, argon, N2, and ethylene glycol. Altogether, this local environment might have a pressure of the order of 10(exp -7) to 10(exp -6) torr. Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) was contracted by NASA-JSC to provide support to NASA-JSC and its prime contractors in evaluating ammonia-location instruments and to make a preliminary trade study of the advantages and limitations of potential instruments. The present effort builds upon an earlier SwRI study to evaluate ammonia leak detection instruments [Jolly and Deffenbaugh]. The objectives of the present effort include: (1) Estimate the characteristics of representative ammonia leaks; (2) Evaluate the baseline instrument in the light of the estimated ammonia leak characteristics; (3) Propose alternative instrument concepts; and (4) Conduct a trade study of the proposed alternative concepts and recommend promising instruments. The baseline leak-location instrument selected by NASA-JSC was an ion gauge.

  10. Hydroxysafflor yellow A suppress oleic acid-induced acute lung injury via protein kinase A

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chaoyun; Huang, Qingxian; Wang, Chunhua; Zhu, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yunfeng; Yuan, Shuai; Bai, Xianyong

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation response and oxidative stress play important roles in acute lung injury (ALI). Activation of the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway may attenuate ALI by suppressing immune responses and inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a natural flavonoid compound that reduces oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine-mediated damage. In this study, we examined whether HSYA could protect the lungs from oleic acid (OA)-induced injury, which was used to mimic ALI, and determined the role of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in this process. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO{sub 2}), carbon dioxide tension, pH, and the PaO{sub 2}/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. We measured wet/dry lung weight ratio and evaluated tissue morphology. The protein and inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunoassay. The activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, PKA, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, and the concentrations of cAMP and malondialdehyde in the lung tissue were detected using assay kits. Bcl-2, Bax, caspase 3, and p22{sup phox} levels in the lung tissue were analyzed using Western blotting. OA increased the inflammatory cytokine and ROS levels and caused lung dysfunction by decreasing cAMP synthesis, inhibiting PKA activity, stimulating caspase 3, and reducing the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. H-89 increased these effects. HSYA significantly increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, inhibited the inflammatory response via cAMP/PKA pathway activation, and attenuated OA-induced lung injury. Our results show that the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway is required for the protective effect of HSYA against ALI. - Highlights: • Oleic acid (OA) cause acute lung injury (ALI) via inhibiting cAMP/PKA signal pathway. • Blocking protein kinase A (PKA) activation may

  11. Host DNA repair proteins in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in lung epitehlial cells and in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host DNA damage and DNA repair response to bacterial infections and its significance are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that infection by Gram-negative bacterium P. aeruginosa significantly altered the expression and enzymatic activity of base excision DNA repair protein OGG1 in lung epi...

  12. The LIM-Only Protein FHL2 Attenuates Lung Inflammation during Bleomycin-Induced Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schied, Tanja; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Loser, Karin; Vogl, Thomas; Ludwig, Stephan; Wixler, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Fibrogenesis is usually initiated when regenerative processes have failed and/or chronic inflammation occurs. It is characterised by the activation of tissue fibroblasts and dysregulated synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins. FHL2 (four-and-a-half LIM domain protein 2) is a scaffolding protein that interacts with numerous cellular proteins, regulating signalling cascades and gene transcription. It is involved in tissue remodelling and tumour progression. Recent data suggest that FHL2 might support fibrogenesis by maintaining the transcriptional expression of alpha smooth muscle actin and the excessive synthesis and assembly of matrix proteins in activated fibroblasts. Here, we present evidence that FHL2 does not promote bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, but rather suppresses this process by attenuating lung inflammation. Loss of FHL2 results in increased expression of the pro-inflammatory matrix protein tenascin C and downregulation of the macrophage activating C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN. Consequently, FHL2 knockout mice developed a severe and long-lasting lung pathology following bleomycin administration due to enhanced expression of tenascin C and impaired activation of inflammation-resolving macrophages. PMID:24260575

  13. The effect of ribosomal protein S15a in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Guangxin; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: RPS15A (Ribosomal Protein S15A) promotes mRNA/ribosome interactions in translation. It is critical for the process of eukaryotic protein biosynthesis. Recently, aberrantly expressed RPS15A was found in the hepatitis virus and in malignant tumors. However, the role of RPS15A has not been fully revealed on the development of lung cancer. Method: In this study, a Tissue Microarray (TMA) of primary lung adenocarcinoma tissue specimens was carried out. Furthermore, to further investigate the function of RPS15A in lung cancer, RPS15A-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expressing lentivirus (Lv-shRPS15A) was constructed and used to infect H1299 and A549 cells. Result: Our data showed that RPS15A expression was increased in tumor tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of RSP15A inhibited cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis in the cancer cells. Gene expression profile microarray also revealed that the P53 signaling pathway was activated in Lv-shRPS15A-infected cancer cells. Conclusion: Taken together, our results demonstrate that RPS15A is a novel oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:26989627

  14. Aortic Carboxypeptidase-Like Protein Is Expressed in Fibrotic Human Lung and its Absence Protects against Bleomycin-Induced Lung Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schissel, Scott L.; Dunsmore, Sarah E.; Liu, Xiaoli; Shine, Robert W.; Perrella, Mark A.; Layne, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis include proliferating fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, as well as excessive collagen matrix deposition. In addition, both myofibroblast contraction and remodeling of the collagen-rich matrix contribute to the abnormal structure and function of the fibrotic lung. Little is known, however, about collagen-associated proteins that promote fibroblast and myofibroblast retention, as well as the proliferation of these cells on the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP), a collagen-associated protein with a discoidin-like domain, is expressed at high levels in human fibrotic lung tissue and human fibroblasts, and that its expression increases markedly in the lungs of bleomycin-injured mice. Importantly, ACLP-deficient mice accumulated significantly fewer myofibroblasts and less collagen in the lung after bleomycin injury, as compared with wild-type controls, despite equivalent levels of bleomycin-induced inflammation. ACLP that is secreted by lung fibroblasts was retained on fibrillar collagen, and ACLP-deficient lung fibroblasts that were cultured on collagen exhibited changes in cell spreading, proliferation, and contraction of the collagen matrix. Finally, the addition of recombinant discoidin-like domain of ACLP to cultured ACLP-deficient lung fibroblasts restored cell spreading and increased the contraction of collagen gels. Therefore, both ACLP and its discoidin-like domain may be novel targets for anti-myofibroblast-based therapies for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19179605

  15. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the breakdown of uranium in rocks and soil. It seeps up through the ground, and leaks ... substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. These ...

  16. CDK2 Inhibition Causes Anaphase Catastrophe in Lung Cancer through the Centrosomal Protein CP110

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shanhu; Danilov, Alexey V.; Godek, Kristina; Orr, Bernardo; Tafe, Laura J.; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Behrens, Carmen; Mino, Barbara; Moran, Cesar A.; Memoli, Vincent A.; Mustachio, Lisa Maria; Galimberti, Fabrizio; Ravi, Saranya; DeCastro, Andrew; Lu, Yun; Sekula, David; Andrew, Angeline S; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Freemantle, Sarah; Compton, Duane A.; Dmitrovsky, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy is frequently detected in human cancers and is implicated in carcinogenesis. Pharmacological targeting of aneuploidy is an attractive therapeutic strategy as this would preferentially eliminate malignant over normal cells. We previously discovered that CDK2 inhibition causes lung cancer cells with more than two centrosomes to undergo multipolar cell division leading to apoptosis, defined as anaphase catastrophe. Cells with activating KRAS mutations were especially sensitive to CDK2 inhibition. Mechanisms of CDK2-mediated anaphase catastrophe and how activated KRAS enhances this effect were investigated. Live-cell imaging provided direct evidence that following CDK2 inhibition, lung cancer cells develop multipolar anaphase and undergo multipolar cell division with the resulting progeny apoptotic. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated repression of the CDK2 target and centrosome protein CP110 induced anaphase catastrophe of lung cancer cells. In contrast, CP110 overexpression antagonized CDK2 inhibitor-mediated anaphase catastrophe. Furthermore, activated KRAS mutations sensitized lung cancer cells to CDK2 inhibition by deregulating CP110 expression. Thus, CP110 is a critical mediator of CDK2-inhibition-driven anaphase catastrophe. Independent examination of murine and human paired normal-malignant lung tissues revealed marked upregulation of CP110 in malignant versus normal lung. Human lung cancers with KRAS mutations had significantly lower CP110 expression as compared to KRAS wild-type cancers. Thus, a direct link was found between CP110 and CDK2 inhibitor antineoplastic response. CP110 plays a mechanistic role in response of lung cancer cells to CDK2 inhibition, especially in the presence of activated KRAS mutations. PMID:25808870

  17. Exploring a Structural Protein-Drug Interactome for New Therapeutics in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaodong; Wang, Fang; Li, Liwei; Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Xu, David; Wang, Bo; Sinn, Tony; Pollok, Karen; Sandusky, George; Li, Lang; Turchi, John; Jalal, Shadia I.; Meroueh, Samy

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacology of drugs is often defined by more than one protein target. This property can be exploited to use approved drugs to uncover new targets and signaling pathways in cancer. Towards enabling a rational approach to uncover new targets, we expand a structural protein-ligand interactome (http://www.biodrugscreen.org) by scoring the interaction among 1,000 FDA-approved drugs docked to 2,500 pockets on protein structures of the human genome. This afforded a drug-target network whose properties compared favorably with previous networks constructed with experimental data. Among drugs with highest degree and betweenness two are cancer drugs and one is currently used for treatment of lung cancer. Comparison of predicted cancer and non-cancer targets reveals that the most cancer-specific compounds were also the most selective compounds. Analysis of compound flexibility, hydrophobicity, and size showed that the most selective compounds were low molecular weight fragment-like heterocycles. We use a previously-developed screening approach using the cancer drug erlotinib as a template to screen other approved drugs that mimic its properties. Among the top 12 ranking candidates, four are cancer drugs, two of them kinase inhibitors (like erlotinib). Cellular studies using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells revealed that several drugs inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation. We mined patient records at the Regenstrief Medical Record System to explore possible association of exposure to three of these drugs with occurrence of lung cancer. Preliminary in vivo studies using non-small cell lung cancer (NCLSC) xenograft model showed that losartan- and astemizole-treated mice had tumors that weighed 50 (p < 0.01) and 15 (p < 0.01) percent less than vehicle. These results set the stage for further exploration of these drugs and to uncover new drugs for lung cancer. PMID:24402119

  18. Different techniques for urinary protein analysis of normal and lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Tantipaiboonwong, Payungsak; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Sriyam, Supawadee; Phutrakul, Suree; Chen, Shui-Tein

    2005-03-01

    Many components in urine are useful in clinical diagnosis and urinary proteins are known as important components to define many diseases such as proteinuria, kidney, bladder and urinary tract diseases. In this study, we focused on the comparison of different sample preparation methods for isolating urinary proteins prior to protein analysis of pooled healthy and lung cancer patient samples. Selective method was used for preliminary investigation of some putative urinary protein markers. Urine samples were passed first through a gel filtration column (PD-10 desalting column) to remove high salts and subsequently concentrated. Remaining interferences were removed by ultrafiltration or four precipitation methods. The analysis of urinary proteins by high-performance liquid chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed many similarities in profiles among preparation methods and a few profiles were different between normal and lung cancer patients. In contrast, the results of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) showed more distinctly different protein patterns. Our finding showed that the sequential preparation of urinary proteins by gel filtration and ultrafiltration could retain most urinary proteins which demonstrated the highest protein spots on 2-D gels and able to identify preliminary urinary protein markers related to cancer. Although sequential preparation of urine samples by gel filtration and protein precipitation resulted in low amounts of proteins on 2-D gels, high Mr proteins were easily detected. Therefore, there are alternative choices for urine sample preparation for studying the urinary proteome and identifying urinary protein markers important for further preclinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:15693063

  19. Antimicrobial proteins and peptides in human lung diseases: A friend and foe partnership with host proteases.

    PubMed

    Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Andrault, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Lung antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are major sentinels of innate immunity by preventing microbial colonization and infection. Nevertheless bactericidal activity of AMPs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is compromised in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF) and asthma. Evidence is accumulating that expression of harmful human serine proteases, matrix metalloproteases and cysteine cathepsins is markedely increased in these chronic lung diseases. The local imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors compromises lung tissue integrity and function, by not only degrading extracellular matrix components, but also non-matrix proteins. Despite the fact that AMPs are somewhat resistant to proteolytic degradation, some human proteases cleave them efficiently and impair their antimicrobial potency. By contrast, certain AMPs may be effective as antiproteases. Host proteases participate in concert with bacterial proteases in the degradation of key innate immunity peptides/proteins and thus may play immunomodulatory activities during chronic lung diseases. In this context, the present review highlights the current knowledge and recent discoveries on the ability of host enzymes to interact with AMPs, providing a better understanding of the role of human proteases in innate host defense. PMID:26341472

  20. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  1. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  2. Identification and characterization of proteins isolated from microvesicles derived from human lung cancer pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Ok; Choi, Do-Young; Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Hee Joung; Kang, Jeong Won; Jung, Jae Hun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R; Lee, Kye Young; Gho, Yong Song; Kim, Kwang Pyo

    2013-07-01

    Microvesicles (MVs, also known as exosomes, ectosomes, microparticles) are released by various cancer cells, including lung, colorectal, and prostate carcinoma cells. MVs released from tumor cells and other sources accumulate in the circulation and in pleural effusion. Although recent studies have shown that MVs play multiple roles in tumor progression, the potential pathological roles of MV in pleural effusion, and their protein composition, are still unknown. In this study, we report the first global proteomic analysis of highly purified MVs derived from human nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) pleural effusion. Using nano-LC-MS/MS following 1D SDS-PAGE separation, we identified a total of 912 MV proteins with high confidence. Three independent experiments on three patients showed that MV proteins from PE were distinct from MV obtained from other malignancies. Bioinformatics analyses of the MS data identified pathologically relevant proteins and potential diagnostic makers for NSCLC, including lung-enriched surface antigens and proteins related to epidermal growth factor receptor signaling. These findings provide new insight into the diverse functions of MVs in cancer progression and will aid in the development of novel diagnostic tools for NSCLC. PMID:23585444

  3. S100A8/A9 Proteins Mediate Neutrophilic Inflammation and Lung Pathology during Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Torres, Diana; Slight, Samantha; Mehra, Smriti; McKenna, Kyle C.; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kolls, Jay; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Tessier, Phillipe; Roth, Johannes; Selman, Moisés; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Cumming, Bridgette; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Steyn, Adrie J. C.; Babu, Subash; Kaushal, Deepak; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Vogl, Thomas; Rangel-Moreno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas. However, the immune factors that drive the formation of a protective granuloma during latent TB, and the factors that drive the formation of inflammatory granulomas during active TB, are not well defined. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the underlying immune mechanisms involved in formation of inflammatory granulomas seen during active TB. Methods: The immune mediators involved in inflammatory granuloma formation during TB were assessed using human samples and experimental models of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, using molecular and immunologic techniques. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that in human patients with active TB and in nonhuman primate models of M. tuberculosis infection, neutrophils producing S100 proteins are dominant within the inflammatory lung granulomas seen during active TB. Using the mouse model of TB, we demonstrate that the exacerbated lung inflammation seen as a result of neutrophilic accumulation is dependent on S100A8/A9 proteins. S100A8/A9 proteins promote neutrophil accumulation by inducing production of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and influencing leukocyte trafficking. Importantly, serum levels of S100A8/A9 proteins along with neutrophil-associated chemokines, such as keratinocyte chemoattractant, can be used as potential surrogate biomarkers to assess lung inflammation and disease severity in human TB. Conclusions: Our results thus show a major pathologic role for S100A8/A9 proteins in mediating neutrophil accumulation and inflammation associated with TB. Thus, targeting specific molecules, such as S100A8/A9 proteins, has the potential to decrease lung tissue damage without impacting protective immunity against TB. PMID:24047412

  4. The Motor Protein KIF14 Inhibits Tumor Growth and Cancer Metastasis in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Pei-Fang; Hong, Tse-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chang, Yih-Leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Chang, Gee-Chen; Jou, Yuh-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively), and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001). The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:23626713

  5. The motor protein KIF14 inhibits tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hung, Pei-Fang; Hong, Tse-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Chiung; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chang, Yih-Leong; Wu, Chen-Tu; Chang, Gee-Chen; Jou, Yuh-Shan; Pan, Szu-Hua; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2013-01-01

    The motor protein kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) are involved in cancer progression. The depletion of one of the KIFs, KIF14, might delay the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, resulting in a binucleated status, which enhances tumor progression; however, the exact correlation between KIF14 and cancer progression remains ambiguous. In this study, using loss of heterozygosity and array comparative genomic hybridization analyses, we observed a 30% loss in the regions surrounding KIF14 on chromosome 1q in lung adenocarcinomas. In addition, the protein expression levels of KIF14 in 122 lung adenocarcinomas also indicated that approximately 30% of adenocarcinomas showed KIF14 down-regulation compared with the expression in the bronchial epithelial cells of adjacent normal counterparts. In addition, the reduced expression of KIF14 mRNA or proteins was correlated with poor overall survival (P = 0.0158 and <0.0001, respectively), and the protein levels were also inversely correlated with metastasis (P<0.0001). The overexpression of KIF14 in lung adenocarcinoma cells inhibited anchorage-independent growth in vitro and xenograft tumor growth in vivo. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 also inhibited or enhanced cancer cell migration, invasion and adhesion to the extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen IV. Furthermore, we detected the adhesion molecules cadherin 11 (CDH11) and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) as cargo on KIF14. The overexpression and silencing of KIF14 enhanced or reduced the recruitment of CDH11 in the membrane fraction, suggesting that KIF14 might act through recruiting adhesion molecules to the cell membrane and modulating cell adhesive, migratory and invasive properties. Thus, KIF14 might inhibit tumor growth and cancer metastasis in lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:23626713

  6. Ras regulates alveolar macrophage formation of CXC chemokines and neutrophil activation in streptococcal M1 protein-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songen; Hwaiz, Rundk; Rahman, Milladur; Herwald, Heiko; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-06-15

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is associated with a high mortality rate. The M1 serotype of Streptococcus pyogenes is most frequently associated with STSS. Herein, we examined the role of Ras signaling in M1 protein-induced lung injury. Male C57BL/6 mice received the Ras inhibitor (farnesylthiosalicylic acid, FTS) prior to M1 protein challenge. Bronchoalveolar fluid and lung tissue were harvested for quantification of neutrophil recruitment, edema and CXC chemokine formation. Neutrophil expression of Mac-1 was quantified by use of flow cytometry. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Administration of FTS reduced M1 protein-induced neutrophil recruitment, edema formation and tissue damage in the lung. M1 protein challenge increased Mac-1 expression on neutrophils and CXC chemokine levels in the lung. Inhibition of Ras activity decreased M1 protein-induced expression of Mac-1 on neutrophils and secretion of CXC chemokines in the lung. Moreover, FTS abolished M1 protein-provoked gene expression of CXC chemokines in alveolar macrophages. Ras inhibition decreased chemokine-mediated neutrophil migration in vitro. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that Ras signaling is a potent regulator of CXC chemokine formation and neutrophil infiltration in the lung. Thus, inhibition of Ras activity might be a useful way to antagonize streptococcal M1 protein-triggered acute lung injury. PMID:24704370

  7. Lipase member H is a novel secreted protein selectively upregulated in human lung adenocarcinomas and bronchioloalveolar carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Yukihiro; Ishimine, Hisako; Shinozaki-Ushiku, Aya; Ito, Yoshimasa; Sumitomo, Kenya; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi; Michiue, Tatsuo; Asashima, Makoto; Kurisaki, Akira

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Most of the adenocarcinomas and bronchioloalveolar carcinomas were LIPH-positive. • LIPH is necessary for the proliferation of lung cancer cells in vitro. • A high level of LIPH in serum is correlated with better survival in early phase lung-cancer patients after surgery. - Abstract: Lung cancer is one of the most frequent causes of cancer-related death worldwide. However, molecular markers for lung cancer have not been well established. To identify novel genes related to lung cancer development, we surveyed publicly available DNA microarray data on lung cancer tissues. We identified lipase member H (LIPH, also known as mPA-PLA1) as one of the significantly upregulated genes in lung adenocarcinoma. LIPH was expressed in several adenocarcinoma cell lines when they were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), western blotting, and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Immunohistochemical analysis detected LIPH expression in most of the adenocarcinomas and bronchioloalveolar carcinomas tissue sections obtained from lung cancer patients. LIPH expression was also observed less frequently in the squamous lung cancer tissue samples. Furthermore, LIPH protein was upregulated in the serum of early- and late-phase lung cancer patients when they were analyzed by ELISA. Interestingly, high serum level of LIPH was correlated with better survival in early phase lung cancer patients after surgery. Thus, LIPH may be a novel molecular biomarker for lung cancer, especially for adenocarcinoma and bronchioloalveolar carcinoma.

  8. E3 ubiquitin ligase RFWD2 controls lung branching through protein-level regulation of ETV transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Yokoyama, Shigetoshi; Herriges, John C; Zhang, Zhen; Young, Randee E; Verheyden, Jamie M; Sun, Xin

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian lung is an elaborate branching organ, and it forms following a highly stereotypical morphogenesis program. It is well established that precise control at the transcript level is a key genetic underpinning of lung branching. In comparison, little is known about how regulation at the protein level may play a role. Ring finger and WD domain 2 (RFWD2, also termed COP1) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that modifies specific target proteins, priming their degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system. RFWD2 is known to function in the adult in pathogenic processes such as tumorigenesis. Here, we show that prenatal inactivation of Rfwd2 gene in the lung epithelium led to a striking halt in branching morphogenesis shortly after secondary branch formation. This defect is accompanied by distalization of the lung epithelium while growth and cellular differentiation still occurred. In the mutant lung, two E26 transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factors essential for normal lung branching, ETS translocation variant 4 (ETV4) and ETV5, were up-regulated at the protein level, but not at the transcript level. Introduction of Etv loss-of-function alleles into the Rfwd2 mutant background attenuated the branching phenotype, suggesting that RFWD2 functions, at least in part, through degrading ETV proteins. Because a number of E3 ligases are known to target factors important for lung development, our findings provide a preview of protein-level regulatory network essential for lung branching morphogenesis. PMID:27335464

  9. Surfactant protein B gene variations enhance susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung in German patients

    PubMed Central

    Seifart, C; Seifart, U; Plagens, A; Wolf, M; von Wichert, P

    2002-01-01

    Genetic factors are thought to influence the risk for lung cancer. Since pulmonary surfactant mediates the response to inhaled carcinogenic substances, candidate genes may be among those coding for pulmonary surfactant proteins. In the present matched case–control study a polymorphism within intron 4 of the gene coding for surfactant specific protein B was analysed in 357 individuals. They were divided into 117 patients with lung cancer (40 patients with small cell lung cancer, 77 patients with non small cell lung cancer), matched controls and 123 healthy individuals. Surfactant protein B gene variants were analysed using specific PCR and cloned surfactant protein B sequences as controls. The frequency of the intron 4 variation was similar in both control groups (13.0% and 9.4%), whereas it was increased in the small cell lung cancer group (17.5%) and the non small cell lung cancer group (16.9%). The gene variation was found significantly more frequently in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (25.0%, P=0.016, odds ratio=3.2, 95%CI=1.24–8.28) than in the controls. These results indicate an association of the surfactant protein B intron 4 variants and/or its flanking loci with mechanisms that may enhance lung cancer susceptibility, especially to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 37, 212–217. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600353 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12107845

  10. Proteomic Study of Differential Protein Expression in Mouse Lung Tissues after Aerosolized Ricin Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhendong; Han, Chao; Du, Jiajun; Zhao, Siyan; Fu, Yingying; Zheng, Guanyu; Sun, Yucheng; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu; Qian, Jun; Liu, Linna

    2014-01-01

    Ricin is one of the most poisonous natural toxins from plants and is classified as a Class B biological threat pathogen by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of U.S.A. Ricin exposure can occur through oral or aerosol routes. Ricin poisoning has a rapid onset and a short incubation period. There is no effective treatment for ricin poisoning. In this study, an aerosolized ricin-exposed mouse model was developed and the pathology was investigated. The protein expression profile in the ricin-poisoned mouse lung tissue was analyzed using proteomic techniques to determine the proteins that were closely related to the toxicity of ricin. 2D gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and subsequent biological functional analysis revealed that six proteins including Apoa1 apolipoprotein, Ywhaz 14-3-3 protein, Prdx6 Uncharacterized Protein, Selenium-binding protein 1, HMGB1, and DPYL-2, were highly related to ricin poisoning. PMID:24786090

  11. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  12. Refrigerant leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrne, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative leak detector visually demonstrates refrigerant loss from precision volume of large refrigeration system over established period of time from single test point. Mechanical unit is less costly than electronic "sniffers" and is more reliable due to absence of electronic circuits that are susceptible to drift.

  13. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  14. High expression of cellular retinol binding protein-1 in lung adenocarcinoma is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Doldo, Elena; Costanza, Gaetana; Ferlosio, Amedeo; Pompeo, Eugenio; Agostinelli, Sara; Bellezza, Guido; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Giunta, Alessandro; Sidoni, Angelo; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adenocarcinoma, the most common non-small cell lung cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, with a low overall survival (OS) despite increasing attempts to achieve an early diagnosis and accomplish surgical and multimodality treatment strategies. Cellular retinol binding protein-1 (CRBP-1) regulates retinol bioavailability and cell differentiation, but its role in lung cancerogenesis remains uncertain. Experimental design CRBP-1 expression, clinical outcome and other prognostic factors were investigated in 167 lung adenocarcinoma patients. CRBP-1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry of tissue microarray sections, gene copy number analysis and tumor methylation specific PCR. Effects of CRBP-1 expression on proliferation/apoptosis gene array, protein and transcripts were investigated in transfected A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells. Results CRBP-1High expression was observed in 62.3% of adenocarcinomas and correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS as an independent prognostic factor. CRBP-1 gene copy gain also associated with tumor CRBP-1High status and dedifferentiation. CRBP-1-transfected (CRBP-1+) A549 grew more than CRBP-1− A549 cells. At >1μM concentrations, all trans-retinoic acid and retinol reduced viability more in CRBP-1+ than in CRBP-1− A549 cells. CRBP-1+ A549 cells showed up-regulated RARα/ RXRα and proliferative and transcriptional genes including pAkt, pEGFR, pErk1/2, creb1 and c-jun, whereas RARβ and p53 were strongly down-regulated; pAkt/pErk/ pEGFR inhibitors counteracted proliferative advantage and increased RARα/RXRα, c-jun and CD44 expression in CRBP-1+ A549 cells. Conclusion CRBP-1High expression in lung adenocarcinoma correlated with increased tumor grade and reduced OS, likely through increased Akt/Erk/EGFR-mediated cell proliferation and differentiation. CRBP-1High expression can be considered an additional marker of poor prognosis in lung adenocarcinoma patients. PMID:26807202

  15. Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-Expressing Glia in the Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Mier, Gabriela B.

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic nerves regulate important functions in visceral organs, including the lung. The postganglionic portion of these nerves is ensheathed by glial cells known as non-myelinating Schwann cells. In the brain, glia play important functional roles in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, and maintenance of the blood brain barrier. Similarly, enteric glia are now known to have analogous roles in gastrointestinal neurotransmission, inflammatory response, and barrier formation. In contrast to this, very little is known about the function of glia in other visceral organs. Like the gut, the lung forms a barrier between airborne pathogens and the bloodstream, and autonomic lung innervation is known to affect pulmonary inflammation and lung function. Lung glia are described as non-myelinating Schwann cells but their function is not known, and indeed no transgenic tools have been validated to study them in vivo. The primary goal of this research was, therefore, to investigate the relationship between non-myelinating Schwann cells and pulmonary nerves in the airways and vasculature and to validate existing transgenic mouse tools that would be useful for studying their function. We focused on the glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter, which is a cognate marker of astrocytes that is expressed by enteric glia and non-myelinating Schwann cells. We describe the morphology of non-myelinating Schwann cells in the lung and verify that they express glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100, a classic glial marker. Furthermore, we characterize the relationship of non-myelinating Schwann cells to pulmonary nerves. Finally, we report tools for studying their function, including a commercially available transgenic mouse line. PMID:26442852

  16. Tumor suppressor death-associated protein kinase attenuates inflammatory responses in the lung.

    PubMed

    Nakav, Sigal; Cohen, Shmuel; Feigelson, Sara W; Bialik, Shani; Shoseyov, David; Kimchi, Adi; Alon, Ronen

    2012-03-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk) is a tumor suppressor thought to inhibit cancer by promoting apoptosis and autophagy. Because cancer progression is linked to inflammation, we investigated the in vivo functions of DAPk in lung responses to various acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli. Lungs of DAPk knockout (KO) mice secreted higher concentrations of IL-6 and keratinocyte chemoattractant (or chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 1) in response to transient intranasal administrations of the Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) agonist LPS. In addition, DAPk-null macrophages and neutrophils were hyperresponsive to ex vivo stimulation with LPS. DAPk-null neutrophils were also hyperresponsive to activation via Fc receptor and Toll-like receptor-3, indicating that the suppressive functions of this kinase are not restricted to TLR4 pathways. Even after the reconstitution of DAPk-null lungs with DAPk-expressing leukocytes by transplanting wild-type (WT) bone marrow into lethally irradiated DAPk KO mice, the chimeric mice remained hypersensitive to both acute and chronic LPS challenges, as well as to tobacco smoke exposure. DAPk-null lungs reconstituted with WT leukocytes exhibited elevated neutrophil content and augmented cytokine secretion in the bronchoalveolar space, as well as enhanced epithelial cell injury in response to both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. These results suggest that DAPk attenuates a variety of inflammatory responses, both in lung leukocytes and in lung epithelial cells. The DAPk-mediated suppression of lung inflammation and airway injury may contribute to the tumor-suppressor functions of this kinase in epithelial carcinogenesis. PMID:21997486

  17. Pro–Surfactant Protein B As a Biomarker for Lung Cancer Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Don D.; Tammemagi, C. Martin; Lam, Stephen; Barnett, Matt J.; Duan, Xiaobo; Tam, Anthony; Auman, Heidi; Feng, Ziding; Goodman, Gary E.; Hanash, Samir; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Preliminary studies have identified pro–surfactant protein B (pro-SFTPB) to be a promising blood biomarker for non–small-cell lung cancer. We conducted a study to determine the independent predictive potential of pro-SFTPB in identifying individuals who are subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer. Patients and Methods Pro-SFTPB levels were measured in 2,485 individuals, who enrolled onto the Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer Study by using plasma sample collected at the baseline visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the predictive ability of pro-SFTPB in addition to known lung cancer risk factors. Calibration and discrimination were evaluated, the latter by an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). External validation was performed with samples collected in the Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) participants using a case-control study design. Results Adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, personal history of cancer, family history of lung cancer, forced expiratory volume in one second percent predicted, average number of cigarettes smoked per day, and smoking duration, pro-SFTPB (log transformed) had an odds ratio of 2.220 (95% CI, 1.727 to 2.853; P < .001). The AUCs of the full model with and without pro-SFTPB were 0.741 (95% CI, 0.696 to 0.783) and 0.669 (95% CI, 0.620 to 0.717; difference in AUC P < .001). In the CARET Study, the use of pro-SFPTB yielded an AUC of 0.683 (95% CI, 0.604 to 0.761). Conclusion Pro-SFTPB in plasma is an independent predictor of lung cancer and may be a valuable addition to existing lung cancer risk prediction models. PMID:24248694

  18. Exhaled breath condensate for lung cancer protein analysis: a review of methods and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Sarah A; Haefliger, Simon; Harris, Benjamin; Pavlakis, Nick; Clarke, Stephen J; Molloy, Mark P; Howell, Viive M

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is considered one of the most aggressive human cancers, with a 5 year overall survival of 10-15%. Early diagnosis of lung cancer is ideal; however, it is still uncertain as to what technique will prove successful in the systematic screening of high-risk populations, with the strongest evidence currently supporting low dose computed tomography (LDCT). Analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has recently been proposed as an alternative low risk and non-invasive screening method to investigate early-stage neoplastic processes in the airways. However, there still remains a relative paucity of lung cancer research involving EBC, particularly in the measurement of lung proteins that are centrally linked to pathogenesis. Considering the ease and safety associated with EBC collection, and advances in the area of mass spectrometry based profiling, this technology has potential for use in screening for the early diagnosis of lung cancer. This review will examine proteomics as a method of detecting markers of neoplasia in patient EBC with a particular emphasis on LC, as well as discussing methodological challenges involving in proteomic analysis of EBC specimens. PMID:27380020

  19. Lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity via protein disulfide isomerase-dependent tissue factor decryption.

    PubMed

    Lysov, Zakhar; Swystun, Laura L; Kuruvilla, Sara; Arnold, Andrew; Liaw, Patricia C

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy have an elevated risk for thrombosis. However, the mechanisms by which chemotherapy agents increase the risk for thrombosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism(s) by which lung cancer chemotherapy agents cisplatin, carboplatin, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel elicit increased tissue factor activity on endothelial cells, A549 cells, and monocytes. Tissue factor activity, tissue factor antigen, and phosphatidylserine exposure were measured on chemotherapy-treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), A549 cells, and monocytes. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and cell surface free thiol levels were measured on HUVEC and A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. Treatment of HUVECs, A549 cells, and monocytes with lung cancer chemotherapy significantly increased cell surface tissue factor activity. However, elevated tissue factor antigen levels were observed only on cisplatin-treated and gemcitabine-treated monocytes. Cell surface levels of phosphatidylserine were increased on HUVEC and monocytes treated with cisplatin/gemcitabine combination therapy. Chemotherapy also resulted in increased cell surface levels of PDI and reduced cell surface free thiol levels. Glutathione treatment and PDI inhibition, but not phosphatidylserine inhibition, attenuated tissue factor activity. Furthermore, increased tissue factor activity was reversed by reducing cysteines with dithiothreitol. These studies are the first to demonstrate that lung cancer chemotherapy agents increase procoagulant activity on endothelial cells and A549 cells by tissue factor decryption through a disulfide bond formation in a PDI-dependent mechanism. PMID:24911456

  20. Clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 protein expression in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    He, Changjun; Sun, Dawei; Bai, Xue; Li, Yingbin; Xu, Hai; Xu, Shidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The clinical implications of transforming growth factor-beta–induced gene-h3 (beta-IGH3) protein expression in lung cancer remain unclear. This study investigated beta-IGH3 protein expression levels and biological function, as well as lung cancer prognosis. Methods Beta-IGH3 protein expression levels were measured in 236 lung cancers and were matched with adjacent noncancerous tissues by immunohistochemical staining. Subsequently, the relationship between beta-IGH3 protein expression, clinical–pathological parameters, and lung cancer prognosis was evaluated. Results Beta-IGH3 protein expression was significantly higher in lung cancer tissues compared with adjacent noncancerous tissues (61.86% vs 22.88%; P=0.01). Of the 236 enrolled cases, 146 (61.86%) showed high beta-IGH3 levels. Tumor size, clinical stage, and lymph node metastasis were significantly related to beta-IGH3 protein expression in univariate analysis (P=0.001, 0.044, and 0.029, respectively), whereas age, sex, and histological type were not (P=0.038, 0.756, and 0.889, respectively). Finally, a Cox regression model also identified beta-IGH3 as an independent prognostic factor (P=0.01). Conclusion Beta-IGH3 is highly expressed in lung cancers and may be a potential target for lung cancer treatments. PMID:27563252

  1. Protein profiling of human lung telocytes and microvascular endothelial cells using iTRAQ quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yonghua; Cretoiu, Dragos; Yan, Guoquan; Cretoiu, Sanda Maria; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Fang, Hao; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are described as a particular type of cells of the interstitial space (www.telocytes.com). Their main characteristics are the very long telopodes with alternating podoms and podomers. Recently, we performed a comparative proteomic analysis of human lung TCs with fibroblasts, demonstrating that TCs are clearly a distinct cell type. Therefore, the present study aims to reinforce this idea by comparing lung TCs with endothelial cells (ECs), since TCs and ECs share immunopositivity for CD34. We applied isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) combined with automated 2-D nano-ESI LC-MS/MS to analyse proteins extracted from TCs and ECs in primary cell cultures. In total, 1609 proteins were identified in cell cultures. 98 proteins (the 5th day), and 82 proteins (10th day) were confidently quantified (screened by two-sample t-test, P < 0.05) as up- or down-regulated (fold change >2). We found that in TCs there are 38 up-regulated proteins at the 5th day and 26 up-regulated proteins at the 10th day. Bioinformatics analysis using Panther revealed that the 38 proteins associated with TCs represented cellular functions such as intercellular communication (via vesicle mediated transport) and structure morphogenesis, being mainly cytoskeletal proteins and oxidoreductases. In addition, we found 60 up-regulated proteins in ECs e.g.: cell surface glycoprotein MUC18 (15.54-fold) and von Willebrand factor (5.74-fold). The 26 up-regulated proteins in TCs at 10th day, were also analysed and confirmed the same major cellular functions, while the 56 down-regulated proteins confirmed again their specificity for ECs. In conclusion, we report here the first extensive comparison of proteins from TCs and ECs using a quantitative proteomics approach. Our data show that TCs are completely different from ECs. Protein expression profile showed that TCs play specific roles in intercellular communication and intercellular signalling. Moreover, they might

  2. Uncoupling Protein 2 Increases Susceptibility to Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Jianchun; Hu, Mingdong; Yang, Yu; Guo, Liang; Xu, Jing; Lei, Chuanjiang; Jiao, Yan; Xu, JianCheng

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is upregulated in patients with systemic inflammation and infection, but its functional role is unclear. We up- or downregulated UCP2 expression using UCP2 recombinant adenovirus or the UCP2 inhibitor, genipin, in lungs of mice, and investigated the mechanisms of UCP2 in ALI. UCP2 overexpression in mouse lungs increased LPS-induced pathological changes, lung permeability, lung inflammation, and lowered survival rates. Furthermore, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential were decreased, while reactive oxygen species production was increased. Additionally, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activity was elevated, which increased the sensitivity to LPS-induced apoptosis and inflammation. LPS-induced apoptosis and release of inflammatory factors were alleviated by pretreatment of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 or the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059 in UCP2-overexpressing mice. On the other hand, LPS-induced alveolar epithelial cell death and inflammation were attenuated by genipin. In conclusion, UCP2 increased susceptibility to LPS-induced cell death and pulmonary inflammation, most likely via ATP depletion and activation of MAPK signaling following ALI in mice. PMID:27057102

  3. Blueberry anthocyanins ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury through the protein kinase RNA-activated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunen; Tan, Dehong; Tong, Changci; Zhang, Yubiao; Xu, Ying; Liu, Xinwei; Gao, Yan; Hou, Mingxiao

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of blueberry anthocyanins (BA) on radiation-induced lung injury and investigate the mechanism of action. Seven days after BA(20 and 80 mg/kg/d)administration, 6 weeks old male Sprague-Dawley rats rats were irradiated by LEKTA precise linear accelerator at a single dose of 20 Gy only once. and the rats were continuously treated with BA for 4 weeks. Moreover, human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiC) were transfected with either control-siRNA or siRNA targeting protein kinase R (PKR). Cells were then irradiated and treated with 75 μg/mL BA for 72 h. The results showed that BA significantly ameliorated radiation-induced lung inflammation, lung collagen deposition, apoptosis and PKR expression and activation. In vitro, BA significantly protected cells from radiation-induced cell death through modulating expression of Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase-3. Suppression of PKR by siRNA resulted in ablation of BA protection on radiation-induced cell death and modulation of anti-apoptotic and pro-apoptotic proteins, as well as Caspase-3 expression. These findings suggest that BA is effective in ameliorating radiation-induced lung injury, likely through the PKR signaling pathway. PMID:26551926

  4. Matrix-Gla protein promotes osteosarcoma lung metastasis and associates with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zandueta, Carolina; Ormazábal, Cristina; Perurena, Naiara; Martínez-Canarias, Susana; Zalacaín, Marta; Julián, Mikel San; Grigoriadis, Agamemnon E; Valencia, Karmele; Campos-Laborie, Francisco J; Rivas, Javier De Las; Vicent, Silvestre; Patiño-García, Ana; Lecanda, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most prevalent osseous tumour in children and adolescents and, within this, lung metastases remain one of the factors associated with a dismal prognosis. At present, the genetic determinants driving pulmonary metastasis are poorly understood. We adopted a novel strategy using robust filtering analysis of transcriptomic profiling in tumour osteoblastic cell populations derived from human chemo-naive primary tumours displaying extreme phenotypes (indolent versus metastatic) to uncover predictors associated with metastasis and poor survival. We identified MGP, encoding matrix-Gla protein (MGP), a non-collagenous matrix protein previously associated with the inhibition of arterial calcification. Using different orthotopic models, we found that ectopic expression of Mgp in murine and human OS cells led to a marked increase in lung metastasis. This effect was independent of the carboxylation of glutamic acid residues required for its physiological role. Abrogation of Mgp prevented lung metastatic activity, an effect that was rescued by forced expression. Mgp levels dramatically altered endothelial adhesion, trans-endothelial migration in vitro and tumour cell extravasation ability in vivo. Furthermore, Mgp modulated metalloproteinase activities and TGFβ-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation. In the clinical setting, OS patients who developed lung metastases had high serum levels of MGP at diagnosis. Thus, MGP represents a novel adverse prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in OS. Microarray datasets may be found at: http://bioinfow.dep.usal.es/osteosarcoma/ Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27172275

  5. An alternatively spliced surfactant protein B mRNA in normal human lung: disease implication.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Wang, G; Demello, D E; Floros, J

    1999-01-01

    We identified an alternatively-spliced surfactant protein B (SP-B) mRNA from normal human lung with a 12 nt deletion at the beginning of exon 8. This deletion causes a loss of four amino acids in the SP-B precursor protein. Sequence comparison of the 3' splice sites reveals only one difference in the frequency of U/C in the 11 predominantly-pyrimidine nucleotide tract, 73% for the normal and 45% for the alternatively-spliced SP-B mRNA (77-99% for the consensus sequence). Analysis of SP-B mRNA in lung indicates that the abundance of the alternatively-spliced form is very low and varies among individuals. Although the relative abundance of the deletion form of SP-B mRNA remains constant among normal lungs, it is found with relatively higher abundance in the lungs of some individuals with diseases such as congenital alveolar proteinosis, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, alveolar capillary dysplasia and hypophosphatasia. This observation points to the possibility that the alternative splicing is a potential regulatory mechanism of SP-B and may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease under certain circumstances. PMID:10493923

  6. Calcitriol inhibits tumor necrosis factor alpha and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhu-Xia; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xu, Shen; Qin, Hou-Ying; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang; Zhao, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Acute lung injury is a common complication of sepsis in intensive care unit patients with an extremely high mortality. The present study investigated the effects of calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.0mg/kg) to establish the animal model of sepsis-induced acute lung injury. Some mice were i.p. injected with calcitriol (1.0μg/kg) before LPS injection. An obvious infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs was observed beginning at 1h after LPS injection. Correspondingly, TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates were markedly elevated in LPS-treated mice. Interestingly, calcitriol obviously alleviated LPS-induced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lungs. Moreover, calcitriol markedly attenuated LPS-induced elevation of TNF-α and MIP-2 in sera and lung homogenates. Further analysis showed that calcitriol repressed LPS-induced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. In addition, calcitriol blocked LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 and p50 subunit in the lungs. Taken together, these results suggest that calcitriol inhibits inflammatory cytokines production in LPS-induced acute lung injury. PMID:27216047

  7. VEGF-D promotes pulmonary oedema in hyperoxic acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sato, Teruhiko; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Harris, Nicole C; Roufail, Sally; Turner, Debra J; Yuan, Yinan; Zhang, You-Fang; Fox, Stephen B; Hibbs, Margaret L; Wilkinson-Berka, Jennifer L; Williams, Richard A; Stacker, Steven A; Sly, Peter D; Achen, Marc G

    2016-06-01

    Leakage of fluid from blood vessels, leading to oedema, is a key feature of many diseases including hyperoxic acute lung injury (HALI), which can occur when patients are ventilated with high concentrations of oxygen (hyperoxia). The molecular mechanisms driving vascular leak and oedema in HALI are poorly understood. VEGF-D is a protein that promotes blood vessel leak and oedema when overexpressed in tissues, but the role of endogenous VEGF-D in pathological oedema was unknown. To address these issues, we exposed Vegfd-deficient mice to hyperoxia. The resulting pulmonary oedema in Vegfd-deficient mice was substantially reduced compared to wild-type, as was the protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, consistent with reduced vascular leak. Vegf-d and its receptor Vegfr-3 were more highly expressed in lungs of hyperoxic, versus normoxic, wild-type mice, indicating that components of the Vegf-d signalling pathway are up-regulated in hyperoxia. Importantly, VEGF-D and its receptors were co-localized on blood vessels in clinical samples of human lungs exposed to hyperoxia; hence, VEGF-D may act directly on blood vessels to promote fluid leak. Our studies show that Vegf-d promotes oedema in response to hyperoxia in mice and support the hypothesis that VEGF-D signalling promotes vascular leak in human HALI. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:26924464

  8. PRODUCTION OF LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT CADMIUM-BINDING PROTEINS IN RABBIT LUNG FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO CADMIUM CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low molecular weight cadmium-binding proteins were studied in lung tissue from rabbits exposed to aerosols of CdCl2. Lungs obtained from animals exposed by inhalation to aerosols of 800 or 1600 micrograms/cu.m. CdCl2 for 2-hr periods/day, every other day for a 5-day period, were ...

  9. Lung fibrotic tenascin-C upregulation is associated with other extracellular matrix proteins and induced by TGFβ1

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive parenchymal lung disease of unknown aetiology and poor prognosis, characterized by altered tissue repair and fibrosis. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical component in regulating cellular homeostasis and appropriate wound healing. The aim of our study was to determine the expression profile of highlighted ECM proteins in IPF lungs. Methods ECM gene and protein expression was analyzed by cDNA microarrays, rt-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western-blot in lungs from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), categorized as chronic (cHP) and subacute (saHP), and healthy lung tissue. Primary fibroblast cultures from normal subjects and fibrotic patients were studied to evaluate tenascin-C (TNC) synthesis. Results A total of 20 ECM proteins were upregulated and 6 proteins downregulated in IPF. TNC was almost undetected in normal lungs and significantly upregulated in fibrotic lungs (IPF and cHP) compared to saHP. Furthermore, it was located specifically in the fibroblastic foci areas of the fibrotic lung with a subepithelial gradient pattern. TNC levels were correlated with fibroblastic foci content in cHP lungs. Versican and fibronectin glycoproteins were associated with TNC, mainly in fibroblastic foci of fibrotic lungs. Fibroblasts from IPF patients constitutively synthesized higher levels of TNC than normal fibroblasts. TNC and α-sma was induced by TGF-β1 in both fibrotic and normal fibroblasts. TNC treatment of normal and fibrotic fibroblasts induced a non-significant increased α-sma mRNA. Conclusions The difference in ECM glycoprotein content in interstitial lung diseases could contribute to the development of lung fibrosis. The increase of TNC in interstitial areas of fibrotic activity could play a key role in the altered wound healing. PMID:25064447

  10. Improved Portable Ultrasonic Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Moerk, John S.; Haskell, William D.; Cox, Robert B.; Polk, Jimmy D.; Strobel, James P.; Luaces, Frank

    1995-01-01

    Improved portable ultrasonic leak detector features three interchangeable ultrasonic-transducer modules, each suited for operation in unique noncontact or contact mode. One module equipped with ultrasound-collecting horn for use in scanning to detect leaks from distance; horn provides directional sensitivity pattern with sensitivity multiplied by factor of about 6 in forward direction. Another module similar, does not include horn; this module used for scanning close to suspected leak, where proximity of leak more than offsets loss of sensitivity occasioned by lack of horn. Third module designed to be pressed against leaking vessel; includes rugged stainless-steel shell. Improved detectors perform significantly better, smaller, more rugged, and greater sensitivity.

  11. Wnt5a Is Associated with Cigarette Smoke-Related Lung Carcinogenesis via Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jae Sook; Ju, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Park, Kyong Hwa; Lee, Jong Won; Koh, In Song; Kim, Yeul Hong

    2013-01-01

    Wnt5a is overexpressed during the progression of human non-small cell lung cancer. However, the roles of Wnt5a during smoking-related lung carcinogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. We investigated the associations between Wnt5a and the early development of cigarette smoke related lung cancer using human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells (NHBE, BEAS-2B, 1799, 1198 and 1170I) at different malignant stages established by exposure to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). Abnormal up-regulation of Wnt5a mRNA and proteins was detected in CSC-exposed transformed 1198 and tumorigenic 1170I cells as compared with other non-CSC exposed HBE cells. Tumor tissues obtained from smokers showed higher Wnt5a expressions than matched normal tissues. In non-CSC exposed 1799 cells, treatment of recombinant Wnt5a caused the activations of PKC and Akt, and the blockage of Wnt5a and PKC significantly decreased the viabilities of CSC-transformed 1198 cells expressing high levels of Wnt5a. This reduced cell survival rate was associated with increased apoptosis via the down-regulation of Bcl2 and the induction of cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase. Moreover, CSC-treated 1799 cells showed induction of Wnt5a expression and enhanced colony-forming capacity. The CSC-induced colony forming efficiency was suppressed by the co-incubation with a PKC inhibitor. In conclusion, these results suggest that cigarette smoke induces Wnt5a-coupled PKC activity during lung carcinogenesis, which causes Akt activity and anti-apoptosis in lung cancer. Therefore, current study provides novel clues for the crucial role of Wnt5a in the smoking-related lung carcinogenesis. PMID:23349696

  12. Arachidonic acid pathway activates multidrug resistance related protein in cultured human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Torky, Abdelrahman; Raemisch, Anja; Glahn, Felix; Foth, Heidi

    2008-05-01

    Primary cultures of human lung cells can serve as a model system to study the mechanisms underlying the effects of irritants in air and to get a deeper insight into the (patho)physiological roles of the xenobiotic detoxification systems. For 99 human lung cancer cases the culture duration for bronchial epithelium and peripheral lung cells (PLC) are given in term of generations and weeks. Using this system, we investigated whether and how prostaglandins (PG) modify multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) function in normal human lung cells. PGF2alpha had no effect on MRP function, whereas PGE2 induced MRP activity in cultured NHBECs. The transport activity study of MRP in NHBEC, PLC, and A549 under the effect of exogenously supplied PGF2alpha (10 microM, 1 day) using single cell fluorimetry revealed no alteration in transport activity of MRP. PG concentrations were within the physiological range. COX I and II inhibitors indomethacin (5, 10 microM) and celecoxib (5, 10 microM) could substantially decrease the transport activity of MRP in NHBEC, PLC, and A549 in 1- and 4-day trials. Prostaglandin E2 did not change cadmium-induced caspase 3/7 activation in NHBECs and had no own effect on caspase 3/7 activity. Cadmium chloride (5, 10 microM) was an effective inducer of caspase 3/7 activation in NHBECs with a fivefold and ninefold rise of activity. In primary human lung cells arachidonic acid activates MRP transport function only in primary epithelial lung cells by prostaglandin E2 but not by F2alpha mediated pathways and this effect needs some time to develop. PMID:17943274

  13. Serum vitamin D, vitamin D binding protein, and lung cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Mondul, Alison M.; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Vitamin D may prolong cancer survival by inhibiting tumor progression and metastasis, however, there are limited epidemiologic studies regarding the association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and lung cancer survival. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and lung cancer specific survival and to evaluate whether vitamin D binding protein (DBP) concentration modified this association. Materials and Methods 25(OH)D and DBP were measured in fasting serum samples from 500 male lung cancer cases in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer related death according to quartiles of season-specific 25(OH)D, DBP, and the molar ratio of 25(OH)D:DBP, a proxy for free circulating 25(OH)D. Results Comparing highest to lowest quartiles, serum 25(OH)D (HR=1.18; 95% CI: 0.89–1.56) and DBP (HR=0.95; 95% CI: 0.71–1.26) were not associated with lung cancer survival and DBP concentration did not modify the association with 25(OH)D (p for interaction=0.56). There was suggestion of an association between higher serum 25(OH)D and better survival from adenocarcinoma (HR=0.64; 95% CI: 0.17–2.45) and small cell carcinoma (HR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.21–1.45), but these estimates were based on a relatively small number of cases. Conclusion Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with overall lung cancer survival regardless of DBP concentration, however, these findings should be examined in other studies that include women and subjects with higher 25(OH)D levels. PMID:25456734

  14. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Dowd, R.M.

    1984-10-01

    The problems associated with leaking underground storage tanks are discussed. An estimated 10-30% of the 3.5 million or more underground tanks now used to store petroleum products and other liquids may be leaking their contents to the surrounding environment. The EPA is initiating a national field survey of tanks used for the storing of engine fuels. The first phase of the survey will cover a representative sample of 1050 facilities and approximately 2800 tanks. EPA will analyze the questionnaires and then select a sub-sample of about 500 tanks to examine leakage problems in more detail. In the absence of specific groundwater protection legislation or regulation, EPA is planning to use the Toxic Substances Control Act to regulate underground tanks.

  15. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2008-05-20

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  16. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Harold E.; McLaurin, Felder M.; Ortiz, Monico; Huth, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  17. Immune-Signatures for Lung Cancer Diagnostics: Evaluation of Protein Microarray Data Normalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Stefanie; Soldo, Regina; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hofer, Philipp; Gsur, Andrea; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    New minimal invasive diagnostic methods for early detection of lung cancer are urgently needed. It is known that the immune system responds to tumors with production of tumor-autoantibodies. Protein microarrays are a suitable highly multiplexed platform for identification of autoantibody signatures against tumor-associated antigens (TAA). These microarrays can be probed using 0.1 mg immunoglobulin G (IgG), purified from 10 µL of plasma. We used a microarray comprising recombinant proteins derived from 15,417 cDNA clones for the screening of 100 lung cancer samples, including 25 samples of each main histological entity of lung cancer, and 100 controls. Since this number of samples cannot be processed at once, the resulting data showed non-biological variances due to “batch effects”. Our aim was to evaluate quantile normalization, “distance-weighted discrimination” (DWD), and “ComBat” for their effectiveness in data pre-processing for elucidating diagnostic immune-signatures. “ComBat” data adjustment outperformed the other methods and allowed us to identify classifiers for all lung cancer cases versus controls and small-cell, squamous cell, large-cell, and adenocarcinoma of the lung with an accuracy of 85%, 94%, 96%, 92%, and 83% (sensitivity of 0.85, 0.92, 0.96, 0.88, 0.83; specificity of 0.85, 0.96, 0.96, 0.96, 0.83), respectively. These promising data would be the basis for further validation using targeted autoantibody tests.

  18. Role of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 in acute inflammation after lung contusion.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Madathilparambil V; Yu, Bi; Machado-Aranda, David; Bender, Matthew D; Ochoa-Frongia, Laura; Helinski, Jadwiga D; Davidson, Bruce A; Knight, Paul R; Hogaboam, Cory M; Moore, Bethany B; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2012-06-01

    Lung contusion (LC), commonly observed in patients with thoracic trauma is a leading risk factor for development of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Previously, we have shown that CC chemokine ligand (CCL)-2, a monotactic chemokine abundant in the lungs, is significantly elevated in LC. This study investigated the nature of protection afforded by CCL-2 in acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome during LC, using rats and CC chemokine receptor (CCR) 2 knockout (CCR2(-/-)) mice. Rats injected with a polyclonal antibody to CCL-2 showed higher levels of albumin and IL-6 in the bronchoalveolar lavage and myeloperoxidase in the lung tissue after LC. Closed-chest bilateral LC demonstrated CCL-2 localization in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and epithelial cells. Subsequent experiments performed using a murine model of LC showed that the extent of injury, assessed by pulmonary compliance and albumin levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage, was higher in the CCR2(-/-) mice when compared with the wild-type (WT) mice. We also found increased release of IL-1β, IL-6, macrophage inflammatory protein-1, and keratinocyte chemoattractant, lower recruitment of AMs, and higher neutrophil infiltration and phagocytic activity in CCR2(-/-) mice at 24 hours. However, impaired phagocytic activity was observed at 48 hours compared with the WT. Production of CCL-2 and macrophage chemoattractant protein-5 was increased in the absence of CCR2, thus suggesting a negative feedback mechanism of regulation. Isolated AMs in the CCR2(-/-) mice showed a predominant M1 phenotype compared with the predominant M2 phenotype in WT mice. Taken together, the above results show that CCL-2 is functionally important in the down-modulation of injury and inflammation in LC. PMID:22281985

  19. Modulation of lung inflammation by the Epstein-Barr virus protein Zta

    PubMed Central

    Guenther, James F.; Cameron, Jennifer E.; Nguyen, Hong T.; Wang, Yu; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Shan, Bin; Lasky, Joseph A.; Flemington, Erik K.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have implicated gamma-herpesviruses, particularly Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), in the progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The data presented here examine the possible role that EBV plays in the potentiation of this disease by evaluating the pulmonary response to expression of the EBV lytic transactivator protein Zta. Expression of Zta in the lungs of mice via adenovirus-mediated delivery (Adv-Zta) produced profibrogenic inflammation that appeared most pronounced by day 7 postexposure. Relative to mice exposed to control GFP-expressing adenovirus (Adv-GFP), mice exposed to Adv-Zta displayed evidence of lung injury and a large increase in inflammatory cells, predominantly neutrophils, recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Cytokine and mRNA profiling of the BAL fluid and cells recovered from Adv-Zta-treated mice revealed a Th2 and Th17 bias. mRNA profiles from Adv-Zta-infected lung epithelial cells revealed consistent induction of mRNAs encoding Th2 cytokines. Coexpression in transient assays of wild-type Zta, but not a DNA-binding-defective mutant Zta, activated expression of the IL-13 promoter in lung epithelial cells, and detection of IL-13 in Adv-Zta-treated mice correlated with expression of Zta. Induction of Th2 cytokines in Zta-expressing mice corresponded with alternative activation of macrophages. In cell culture and in mice, Zta repressed lung epithelial cell markers. Despite the profibrogenic character at day 7, the inflammation resolves by 28 days postexposure to Adv-Zta without evidence of fibrosis. These observations indicate that the EBV lytic transactivator protein Zta displays activity consistent with a pathogenic role in pulmonary fibrosis associated with herpesvirus infection. PMID:20817778

  20. DNA Methylation Profile and Expression of Surfactant Protein A2 gene in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grageda, Melissa; Silveyra, Patricia; Thomas, Neal J.; DiAngelo, Susan L.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the methylation profile of genes allow for the identification of biomarkers that may guide diagnosis and effective treatment of disease. Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in lung homeostasis and immunity, and is encoded by two genes (SFTPA1 and SFTPA2). The goal of this study was to identify differentially methylated CpG sites in the promoter region of the SFTPA2 gene in lung cancer tissue, and to determine the correlation between the promoter’s methylation profile and gene expression. For this, we collected 28 pairs of cancerous human lung tissue and adjacent non-cancerous (NC) lung tissue: 17 adenocarcinoma (AC), 9 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 2 AC with SCC features, and we evaluated DNA methylation of the SFTPA2 promoter region by bisulfite conversion. Our results identified a higher methylation ratio in one CpG site of the SFTPA2 gene in cancerous tissue vs. NC tissue (0.36 vs. 0.11, p=0.001). When assessing AC samples, we also found cancerous tissues associated with a higher methylation ratio (0.43 vs. 0.10, p=0.02). In the SCC group, although cancerous tissue showed a higher methylation ratio (0.22 vs. 0.11), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.35). Expression of SFTPA2 mRNA and total SP-A protein was significantly lower in cancer tissue when compared to adjacent NC tissue (p<0.001), and correlated with the hypermethylated status of a SFTPA2 CpG site in AC samples. The findings of this pilot study may hold promise for future use of SFTPA2 as a biomarker for the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25514367

  1. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates TGF-β1-mediated lung vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Brant M; Hu, Meng; Zheng, Anni; Zhao, Xueke; Che, Pulin; Brandon, Angela; Anjum, Naseem; Snapper, Scott; Creighton, Judy; Guan, Jun-Lin; Han, Qimei; Cai, Guo-Qiang; Han, Xiaosi; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Ding, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    TGF-β1 induces an increase in paracellular permeability and actin stress fiber formation in lung microvascular endothelial and alveolar epithelial cells via small Rho GTPase. The molecular mechanism involved is not fully understood. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP) has an essential role in actin structure dynamics. We hypothesized that N-WASP plays a critical role in these TGF-β1-induced responses. In these cell monolayers, we demonstrated that N-WASP down-regulation by short hairpin RNA prevented TGF-β1-mediated disruption of the cortical actin structure, actin stress filament formation, and increased permeability. Furthermore, N-WASP down-regulation blocked TGF-β1 activation mediated by IL-1β in alveolar epithelial cells, which requires actin stress fiber formation. Control short hairpin RNA had no effect on these TGF-β1-induced responses. TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Y256 of N-WASP via activation of small Rho GTPase and focal adhesion kinase mediates TGF-β1-induced paracellular permeability and actin cytoskeleton dynamics. In vivo, compared with controls, N-WASP down-regulation increases survival and prevents lung edema in mice induced by bleomycin exposure-a lung injury model in which TGF-β1 plays a critical role. Our data indicate that N-WASP plays a crucial role in the development of TGF-β1-mediated acute lung injury by promoting pulmonary edema via regulation of actin cytoskeleton dynamics.-Wagener, B. M., Hu, M., Zheng, A., Zhao, X., Che, P., Brandon, A., Anjum, N., Snapper, S., Creighton, J., Guan, J.-L., Han, Q., Cai, G.-Q., Han, X., Pittet, J.-F., Ding, Q. Neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein regulates TGF-β1-mediated lung vascular permeability. PMID:27025963

  2. Aspects of leak detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chivers, T.C.

    1997-04-01

    A requirement of a Leak before Break safety case is that the leakage from the through wall crack be detected prior to any growth leading to unacceptable failure. This paper sets out to review some recent developments in this field. It does not set out to be a comprehensive guide to all of the methods available. The discussion concentrates on acoustic emission and how the techniques can be qualified and deployed on operational plant.

  3. Vacuum leak detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazokas, G. P. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A leak detector for use with high vacuum seals as used in feedthroughs and hatch covers for manned spacecraft and vacuum systems is described. Two thermistors are used, one exposed directly to vacuum and the other exposed to a secondary chamber formed by the seal being monitored and a second auxiliary seal. Leakage into the secondary chamber causes an unbalance of an electrical bridge circuit in which the thermistors are connected.

  4. NOTCH1, HIF1A and Other Cancer-Related Proteins in Lung Tissue from Uranium Miners—Variation by Occupational Exposure and Subtype of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pesch, Beate; Casjens, Swaantje; Stricker, Ingo; Westerwick, Daniela; Taeger, Dirk; Rabstein, Sylvia; Wiethege, Thorsten; Tannapfel, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Johnen, Georg

    2012-01-01

    Background Radon and arsenic are established pulmonary carcinogens. We investigated the association of cumulative exposure to these carcinogens with NOTCH1, HIF1A and other cancer-specific proteins in lung tissue from uranium miners. Methodology/Principal Findings Paraffin-embedded tissue of 147 miners was randomly selected from an autopsy repository by type of lung tissue, comprising adenocarcinoma (AdCa), squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and cancer-free tissue. Within each stratum, we additionally stratified by low or high level of exposure to radon or arsenic. Lifetime exposure to radon and arsenic was estimated using a quantitative job-exposure matrix developed for uranium mining. For 22 cancer-related proteins, immunohistochemical scores were calculated from the intensity and percentage of stained cells. We explored the associations of these scores with cumulative exposure to radon and arsenic with Spearman rank correlation coefficients (rs). Occupational exposure was associated with an up-regulation of NOTCH1 (radon rs = 0.18, 95% CI 0.02–0.33; arsenic: rs = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.38). Moreover, we investigated whether these cancer-related proteins can classify lung cancer using supervised and unsupervised classification. MUC1 classified lung cancer from cancer-free tissue with a failure rate of 2.1%. A two-protein signature discriminated SCLC (HIF1A low), AdCa (NKX2-1 high), and SqCC (NKX2-1 low) with a failure rate of 8.4%. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that the radiation-sensitive protein NOTCH1 can be up-regulated in lung tissue from uranium miners by level of exposure to pulmonary carcinogens. We evaluated a three-protein signature consisting of a physiological protein (MUC1), a cancer-specific protein (HIF1A), and a lineage-specific protein (NKX2-1) that could discriminate lung cancer and its major subtypes with a low failure rate. PMID:23028920

  5. A case of anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 antibody positive myopathy associated with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Shin; Unoda, Ki-Ichi; Nakajima, Hideto; Ikeda, Soichiro; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Kimura, Fumiharu

    2016-08-31

    Myositis-specific autoantibodies (MSAs) are associated with myositis. Anti-nuclear matrix protein 2 (NXP-2) antibody was recently identified as a major MSA and was observed mostly in juvenile dermatomyositis. We report the case of a 44-year-old man who presented with myopathy with anti-NXP-2 antibody and large cell carcinoma of the lung. He was hospitalized because of myalgia and edema of limbs. Neurological examination revealed mild proximal-dominant weakness in all four extremities, and laboratory studies showed elevated creatine kinase level (6,432 IU/l). Needle electromyography showed myogenic patterns. MRI of the lower limbs demonstrated inflammatory lesions in the thighs. Biopsied specimen from the left quadriceps femoris muscle showed mild mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate surrounding muscle fibres but no fiber necrosis. He was diagnosed with myopathy based on neurological examinations and clinical symptoms. His chest X-ray and CT showed tumor shadow on the right upper lung field, but CT didn't indicate the findings of interstitial lung disease. This was surgically removed, and a histological diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer was suspected. He was also treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy before and after operation. His symptoms of myopathy promptly remitted with the preoperative chemotherapy. His serum analysis was positive for the anti-NXP-2. Further investigation and experience of MSAs are necessary to evaluate the therapeutic strategy against cancer-associated myopathy/myositis. PMID:27477574

  6. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor modulates surfactant protein B and C expression in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiangsong; Zheng, Liduan; Dodd-o, Jeffrey; Langer, John; Wang, Danming; Li, Dechun

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a robust pulmonary expression of hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) during the perinatal period, when surfactant protein (SP) synthesis begins. We hypothesized that HIMF modulates SP expression and participates in lung development and maturation. The temporal-spatial expression of HIMF, SP-B, and SP-C in developing mouse lungs was examined by immunohistochemical staining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. The expression and localization of SP-B and SP-C were investigated in mouse lungs after intratracheal instillation of HIMF in adult mice. The effects of HIMF on SP-B and SP-C transcription activity, and on mRNA degradation, were investigated in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 and C10 cells using the promoter-luciferase reporter assay and actinomycin D incubation. The activation of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was explored by Western blot. Intratracheal instillation of HIMF resulted in significant increases of SP-B and SP-C production, predominantly localized to alveolar type II cells. In MLE-12 and C10 cells, HIMF enhanced SP-B and SP-C mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, HIMF increased transcription activity and prevented actinomycin D-facilitated SP-B and SP-C mRNA degradation in MLE-12 cells. Incubation of cells with LY294002, PD098059, or U0126 abolished HIMF-induced Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and suppressed HIMF-induced SP-B and SP-C production, whereas SB203580 had no effect. These results indicate that HIMF induces SP-B and SP-C production in mouse lungs and alveolar type II-like cell lines via activations of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that HIMF plays critical roles in lung development and maturation. PMID:16166744

  7. Thyroid transcription factor-1, hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β and surfactant protein A and B in the developing chick lung

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, XIN; YUTZEY, KATHERINE E.; WHITSETT, JEFFREY A.

    1998-01-01

    Expression of surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B and the transcription factors TTF-1 and HNF-3β was identified by immunohistochemistry in the developing chicken. SP-B, a small hydrophobic peptide critical for lung function and surfactant homeostasis in mammals, was detected in the epithelial cells of parabronchi in embryonic chicken lung from the 15th day of incubation, prior to the onset of the breathing movements and was expressed at high levels in the posthatching chicken lung. SP-A, an abundant surfactant protein involved in innate defence of the mammalian lung, was detected in the chick embryo in subsets of epithelial cells in the mesobronchus, starting from d 15 and was detected in the posthatching chicken lung. The transcription factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β (HNF-3β) and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), both regulators epithelial cell differentiation and gene expression in mammalian species, were detected at the onset of lung bud formation (d 4 of incubation) and throughout lung development. Abundant nuclear expression was detected in nuclei of respiratory epithelial cells of developing bronchial tubules for both transcription factors. In contrast to the surfactant proteins, expression of both TTF-1 and HNF-3β decreased markedly in posthatching chicken lung. The expression of SP-A and SP-B in chick lung demonstrates the conservation of surfactant proteins in vertebrates. The temporospatial pattern of TTF-1 and HNF-3β overlaps with that of SP-A and SP-B, supporting their potential roles in chick lung development and demonstrating the conservation of regulatory mechanisms contributing to gene expression in respiratory epithelial cells in vertebrates. PMID:9877295

  8. Lewis lung carcinoma regulation of mechanical stretch-induced protein synthesis in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Carson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stretch can activate muscle and myotube protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. While it has been established that tumor-derived cachectic factors can induce myotube wasting, the effect of this catabolic environment on myotube mechanical signaling has not been determined. We investigated whether media containing cachectic factors derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) can regulate the stretch induction of myotube protein synthesis. C2C12 myotubes preincubated in control or LLC-derived media were chronically stretched. Protein synthesis regulation by anabolic and catabolic signaling was then examined. In the control condition, stretch increased mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis. The LLC treatment decreased basal mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis and attenuated the stretch induction of protein synthesis. LLC media increased STAT3 and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in myotubes, independent of stretch. Both stretch and LLC independently increased ERK1/2, p38, and NF-κB phosphorylation. In LLC-treated myotubes, the inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 rescued the stretch induction of protein synthesis. Interestingly, either leukemia inhibitory factor or glycoprotein 130 antibody administration caused further inhibition of mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis in stretched myotubes. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition increased basal mTORC1 signaling activity and protein synthesis in LLC-treated myotubes, but did not restore the stretch induction of protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that LLC-derived cachectic factors can dissociate stretch-induced signaling from protein synthesis through ERK1/2 and p38 signaling, and that glycoprotein 130 signaling is associated with the basal stretch response in myotubes. PMID:26491045

  9. Yes associated protein is a poor prognostic factor in well-differentiated lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Hyun; Kim, Young Keum; Shin, Dong Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Shin, Nari; Kim, Arong; Lee, Jung Hee; Choi, Kyung Un; Kim, Jee Yeon; Lee, Chang Hun; Sol, Mee Young

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is a highly conserved potent regulator of cell growth and apoptosis including large tumor suppressor (LATS) and Yes-associated protein (YAP). LATS has been regarded as a tumor suppressor gene and YAP as either of a tumor suppressor gene or an oncogene. We investigated their expression in lung adenocarcinoma. YAP and LATS protein expression was assessed in 167 surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and compared with clinicopathologic factors. Disease free survival and overall survival were also evaluated. YAP expression was noted in cytoplasm (48 cases; 28.7%), nuclear (34; 20.4%) and both locations (4; 2.4%). The nuclear expression was typically observed in well differentiated adenocarcinoma. LATS was expressed in cytoplasm when its signal is weak. Perinuclear expression of LATS was observed when it is strongly expressed. While cytoplasmic and nuclear YAP expressions were inversely related. In well differentiated adenocarcinoma patients, YAP nuclear expression was related with more frequent relapse. Both of nuclear YAP and LATS expression were more frequently observed in well differentiated adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, YAP expression exhibited more frequent relapse in well differentiated adenocarcinoma group. We suggest that YAP may act as an oncogene and predict poorer prognosis in well differentiated lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26884866

  10. Analysis of the expression protein profiles of lung squamous carcinoma cell using shot-gun proteomics strategy.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yandong; Yang, Shuanying; Tian, Yingxuan; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bin; Bu, Lina; Huo, Shufen

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to globally screen and identify the expression protein profiles of lung squamous carcinoma cell (SqCC) using shot-gun proteomics strategy and to further analyze function of individual proteins by bioinformatics, which may likely result in the identification of new biomarkers and provide helpful clues for pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and progression of lung SqCC. The specific tumor cells were isolated and collected from the tissues of six patients with lung SqCC by laser capture microdissection (LCM). Total proteins from the LCM cells were extracted, digested with trypsin. The sequence information of resulting peptides was acquired by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and tandem mass spectrometry (TMS). The global protein profiles of lung SqCC cell were identified with BioworksTM software in IPI human protein database. Cellular component, molecular function, and biological process of the all proteins were analyzed using gene ontology (GO). About 720,000 tumor cells were satisfactorily collected from tissues of six patients with lung SqCC by LCM and the homogeneities of cell population were estimated to be over 95% as determined by microscopic visualization. The high resolution profiles including HPLC, full mass spectrum, and tandem mass spectrum were successfully obtained. Database searching of the resulting bimolecular sequence information identified 1982 proteins in all samples. The bioinformatics of these proteins, including amino acids sequence, fraction of coverage, molecular weight, isoelectric point, etc., were analyzed in detail. Among them, the function of most proteins was recognized by using GO. Five candidate proteins, Prohibitin (PHB), Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Heat shock protein27 (HSP27), Annexin A1(ANXA1), and High mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), might play an important role in SqCC genesis, progression, recurrence, and metastasis according to relative literatures. We have successfully isolated

  11. Keeping lung surfactant where it belongs: protein regulation of two-dimensional viscosity.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zasadzinski, Joseph A

    2005-07-01

    Lung surfactant causes the surface tension, gamma, in the alveoli to drop to nearly zero on exhalation; in the upper airways gamma is approximately 30 mN/m and constant. Hence, a surface tension gradient exists between alveoli and airways that should lead to surfactant flow out of the alveoli and elimination of the surface tension gradient. However, the lung surfactant specific protein SP-C enhances the resistance to surfactant flow by regulating the ratio of solid to fluid phase in the monolayer, leading to a jamming transition at which the monolayer transforms from fluidlike to solidlike. The accompanying three orders of magnitude increase in surface viscosity helps minimize surfactant flow to the airways and likely stabilizes the alveoli against collapse. PMID:15833995

  12. Atypical Protein Kinase Cι Expression and Aurothiomalate Sensitivity in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Regala, Roderick P.; Thompson, E. Aubrey; Fields, Alan P.

    2008-01-01

    The anti-rheumatoid agent aurothiomalate (ATM) is a potent inhibitor of oncogenic PKCι ATM inhibits non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) growth by binding PKCι and blocking activation of a PKCι-Par6-Rac1-Pak-Mek 1,2-Erk 1,2 signaling pathway. Here, we assessed the growth inhibitory activity of ATM in a panel of human cell lines representing major lung cancer subtypes. ATM inhibited anchorage-independent growth in all lines tested with IC50s ranging from ~300 nM – >100 µM. ATM sensitivity correlates positively with expression of PKCι and Par6, but not with the PKCι binding protein p62, or the proposed targets of ATM in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), thioredoxin reductase 1 or 2 (TrxR1 and TrxR2). PKCι expression profiling revealed that a significant subset of primary NSCLC tumors express PKCι at or above the level associated with ATM sensitivity. ATM sensitivity is not associated with general sensitivity to the cytotoxic agents cis-platin, placitaxel and gemcitabine. ATM inhibits tumorigenicity of both sensitive and insensitive lung cell tumors in vivo at plasma drug concentrations achieved in RA patients undergoing ATM therapy. ATM inhibits Mek/Erk signaling and decreases proliferative index without effecting tumor apoptosis or vascularization in vivo. We conclude that ATM exhibits potent anti-tumor activity against major lung cancer subtypes, particularly tumor cells that express high levels of the ATM target PKCι and Par6. Our results indicate that PKCι expression profiling will be useful in identifying lung cancer patients most likely to respond to ATM therapy in an ongoing clinical trial. PMID:18632643

  13. Functional importance of the NH2-terminal insertion sequence of lung surfactant protein B

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Shelli L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Waring, Alan J.; Walther, Frans J.; Hernandez-Juviel, Jose M.; Ruchala, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is required for proper surface activity of pulmonary surfactant. In model lung surfactant lipid systems composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids, the unsaturated lipids are removed from the film at high compression. It is thought that SP-B helps anchor these lipids closely to the monolayer in three-dimensional cylindrical structures termed “nanosilos” seen by atomic force microscopy imaging of deposited monolayers at high surface pressures. Here we explore the role of the SP-B NH2 terminus in the formation and stability of these cylindrical structures, specifically the distribution of lipid stack height, width, and density with four SP-B truncation peptides: SP-B 1–25, SP-B 9–25, SP-B 11–25, and SP-B 1–25Nflex (prolines 2 and 4 substituted with alanine). The first nine amino acids, termed the insertion sequence and the interface seeking tryptophan residue 9, are shown to stabilize the formation of nanosilos while an increase in the insertion sequence flexibility (SP-B 1–25Nflex) may improve peptide functionality. This provides a functional understanding of the insertion sequence beyond anchoring the protein to the two-dimensional membrane lining the lung, as it also stabilizes formation of nanosilos, creating reversible repositories for fluid lipids at high compression. In lavaged, surfactant-deficient rats, instillation of a mixture of SP-B 1–25 (as a monomer or dimer) and synthetic lung lavage lipids quickly improved oxygenation and dynamic compliance, whereas SP-B 11–25 surfactants showed oxygenation and dynamic compliance values similar to that of lipids alone, demonstrating a positive correlation between formation of stable, but reversible, nanosilos and in vivo efficacy. PMID:20023175

  14. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, P.T.

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  15. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, Patrick T.

    1981-01-01

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  16. Variable leak gas source

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A variable leak gas source and a method for obtaining the same which includes filling a quantity of hollow glass micro-spheres with a gas, storing said quantity in a confined chamber having a controllable outlet, heating said chamber above room temperature, and controlling the temperature of said chamber to control the quantity of gas passing out of said controllable outlet. Individual gas filled spheres may be utilized for calibration purposes by breaking a sphere having a known quantity of a known gas to calibrate a gas detection apparatus.

  17. Superfluid helium leak sealant study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorreiter, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty-one leak specimens were fabricated in the ends of stainless steel and aluminum tubes. Eighteen of these tubes were coated with a copolymer material to seal the leak. The other three specimens were left uncoated and served as control specimens. All 21 tubes were cold shocked in liquid helium 50 times and then the leak rate was measured while the tubes were submerged in superfluid helium at 1.7 K. During the cold shocks two of the coated specimens were mechanically damaged and eliminated from the test program. Of the remaining 16 coated specimens one suffered a total coating failure and resulting high leak rate. Another three of the coated specimens suffered partial coating failures. The leak rates of the uncoated specimens were also measured and reported. The significance of various leak rates is discussed in view of the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Dewar performance.

  18. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 and its function in lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Wujak, L; Markart, P; Wygrecka, M

    2016-07-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 is a ubiquitously expressed, versatile cell surface transmembrane receptor involved in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. LRP1 binds and endocytoses a broad spectrum of over 40 ligands identified thus far, including lipoproteins, extracellular matrix proteins, proteases and protease/inhibitor complexes and growth factors. Interactions with other membrane receptors and intracellular adaptors/scaffolding proteins allow LRP1 to modulate cell migration, survival, proliferation and (trans) differentiation. Because LRP1 displays a wide-range of interactions and activities, its expression and function is temporally and spatially tightly controlled. It is not, therefore, surprising that deregulation of LRP1 production and/or activity is observed in several diseases. In this review, we will systematically examine the evidence for the role of LRP1 in human pathologies placing special emphasis on LRP1-mediated pathogenesis of the lung. PMID:26926950

  19. Heat shock protein 90-β over-expression is associated with poor survival in stage I lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yongkai; Huang, Bo; Liu, Qian; Liu, Yongyu

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90-beta (Hsp90-β) is associated with cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis and has been investigated as a prognostic factor in many cancers. However, Hsp90-β protein expression in lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) has not been thoroughly elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between Hsp90-β expression, clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in lung adenocarcinomas. Seventy-five surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and matched normal lung tissue samples were obtained to construct a tissue microarray (TMA), including 44 stage IA-IB cases. Then, Hsp90-β protein expression level in lung tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis with a Log-rank significance test was used to estimate the survival differences among subgroups according to Hsp90-β expression in lung ADC tissues using SigmaPlot/SigmaStat v10 and 3.5, respectively. Hsp90-β protein expression was significantly upregulated in lung ADC tissues compared to that in the matched normal alveoli (P<0.001) and was associated with tumor differentiation (P<0.001). Furthermore, Hsp90-β over-expression was correlated with poor survival in stage I patients (P=0.026). Increased Hsp90-β expression was associated with reduced overall survival (HR, 2.440; 95% confidence interval, 1.076-5.530; P=0.033). To conclude, our data demonstrated that Hsp90-β protein was over-expressed in lung ADC tumor tissues and was associated with poor outcomes in early stage ADC patients and low pathological grade tumors. These data suggest that Hsp90-β could be a clinically useful biomarker for the prognosis of ADC and an effective anticancer target. PMID:26339394

  20. Keratin proteins in human lung carcinomas. Combined use of morphology, keratin immunocytochemistry, and keratin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed Central

    Banks-Schlegel, S. P.; McDowell, E. M.; Wilson, T. S.; Trump, B. F.; Harris, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Light-microscopic immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy demonstrated that adenocarcinomas (AC) and squamous cell (epidermoid) carcinomas (SCCs) of human lung contained keratin proteins in the form of tonofilament bundles. However, moderately differentiated (md) SCCs contained abundant keratin, whereas poorly differentiated (pd) SCCs and all ACs contained lesser amounts. Lung tumors with the diagnosis of AC or SCC, as defined by WHO criteria, were also analyzed by immunoprecipitation techniques for the presence of keratin proteins. Regardless of the degree of tumor differentiation, SCCs contained a 44 kd keratin which was lacking in ACs. Interestingly, normal bronchial epithelium also contained the same 44 kd keratin. In addition, as SCCs became more differentiated, they exhibited even greater differences in the profile of synthesized keratins. Specifically, the relative abundance of the intermediate-sized keratins (57 and 59 kd) was increased in the md SCCs. Although keratin protein patterns appear to be a valuable adjunct in distinguishing AC from SCC, their usefulness as a diagnostic tool will require survey of a larger number of poorly differentiated tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:6198920

  1. Protein kinase C-ζ mediates lung injury induced by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Caraballo, Juan C; Borcherding, Jennifer; Thorne, Peter S; Comellas, Alejandro P

    2013-03-01

    Recently, we reported that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) disrupt tight junctions (TJs) in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) via an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we investigated the role of protein kinase C (PKC)-ζ activation in DEP-induced lung injury. C57/bl6 mice were instilled intratracheally with 50 μl of saline containing 100 μg of DEPs or titanium dioxide (TiO2). Twenty-four hours later, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed to assess neutrophil counts and protein concentrations. In addition, in vitro experiments were performed in primary rat and human AECs exposed to DEPs (50 μg/cm(2)) for 3 hours. Transepithelial electrical conductance was measured, and TJ protein association was analyzed by immunoprecipitation. To determine whether the overexpression of antioxidants prevented DEP-induced lung injury, AECs and mice were infected with adenoviruses containing catalase and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plasmids. In vivo, the overexpression of catalase and MnSOD prevented DEP-induced neutrophil recruitment. The inhibition of PKC-ζ activation also prevented DEP-induced neutrophil recruitment in vivo. In vitro, DEPs activated PKC-ζ in AECs, but not in alveolar macrophages. Using a specific myristolated PKC-ζ pseudosubstrate pepetide (PKC-ζ ps), we showed that PKC-ζ mediated the DEP-induced dissociation of occludin and zonula occludin-1 (ZO1) in rat and human AECs. In addition, the overexpression of constitutively active PKC-ζ induced the dissociation of occludin and ZO1 in AECs. DEP-induced TJ disruption occurs via PKC-ζ. TJ disruption seems to be in part responsible for DEP-induced lung injury. PMID:23221045

  2. Adenoviral gene transfer of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 in rat lung.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, R.; Driscoll, K.; Wan, Y.; Braciak, T.; Howard, B.; Xing, Z.; Graham, F.; Gauldie, J.

    1996-01-01

    Replication-defective adenoviral vectors are capable of localized transfer and expression of incorporated gene product in lung tissue. We have constructed an adenoviral vector that expresses rat macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, a C-X-C chemokine specifically chemotactic for neutrophils, Supernatants from 293 cells, infected with the adenoviral MIP-2 (ADMIP-2) construct, showed potent chemotactic activity and the ability of the ADMIP-2 vector to transcribe and make functional protein was confirmed. In vivo analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from rats after intratracheal instillation of ADMIP-2 (10(9) plaque-forming units) showed a 10-fold increase in the absolute number of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as opposed to rats treated with an equal titer of an E1-disabled control virus expressing firefly luciferase (ADCA-18). Neutrophils constituted 65% of total BAL cells with alveolar macrophages being the other major cell type recovered. Rat MIP-2 protein was increased (nanograms per milliliter) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid over a period of 7 days in ADMIP-2-treated animals. MIP-2 mRNA was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis in lung tissue, and histological analysis confirmed the presence of massive localized tissue neutrophilia. Evidence of chronic tissue injury and repair (ie, fibrosis) was not detected up to 2 weeks after the neutrophil infiltrate had resolved, subsequent to decreased chemokine presence. Adenoviral gene transfer proved an effective tool for the assessment of lung tissue expression of this chemokine in vivo and is useful in developing rodent models of tissue neutrophilia. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:8863686

  3. The effects of drugs, other foreign compounds, and cigarette smoke on the synthesis of protein by lung slices

    SciTech Connect

    Hellstern, K.; Curtis, C.G.; Powell, G.M. ); Upshall, D.G. )

    1990-04-01

    The incorporation of {sup 14}C-leucine into rabbit lung slices was monitored in the absence and presence of selected drugs and chemicals relevant to the perturbation of lung function and the development of lung disease. Known inhibitors of protein synthesis (cycloheximide and ricin) inhibited the incorporation of {sup 14}C-leucine. Marked inhibition was also recorded with the lung toxins paraquat and 4-ipomeanol. By contrast, orciprenaline, salbutamol, and terbutaline were without effect although some response was recorded with isoprenaline. The filtered gas phase of cigarette smoke and acrolein, one of its components, were inhibitory but protection was afforded by N-acetylcysteine. It is suggested that the inhibitory effects of cigarette smoke may be due to its acrolein content. It is further suggested that the use of lung slices and measurements of {sup 14}C-leucine incorporation provide valuable means for monitoring potential pulmonary toxins.

  4. Expression of p53 protein, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus matrix protein, and surfactant protein in the lungs of sheep with pulmonary adenomatosis.

    PubMed

    İlhan, Fatma; Vural, Sevil A; Yıldırım, Serkan; Sözdutmaz, İbrahim; Alcigir, Mehmet E

    2016-05-01

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a naturally occurring cancer in sheep that is caused by the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). Because the pathologic and epidemiologic features of OPA are similar to those of bronchoalveolar carcinoma in humans, OPA is considered a useful animal model for pulmonary carcinogenesis. In this study, 3,512 lungs from various breeds of sheep were collected and macroscopically examined. OPA was identified in 30 sheep, and samples of these animals were further examined by histologic, immunohistochemical (p53 protein, surfactant protein A [SP-A], proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA], JSRV matrix protein [MA]), and PCR methods. Papillary or acinar adenocarcinomas were detected microscopically in the affected areas. Immunoreactivity for p53 PAb240 was detected in 13 sheep, whereas p53 DO-1 was not detected in any of the OPA animals. PCNA immunoreactivity was recorded in 27 animals. SP-A and JSRV MA protein was immunopositive in all 30. JSRV proviral DNA was detected by PCR analysis in all of the lung samples collected from OPA animals. In addition, the pulmonary SP-A levels were increased in tumor cells. The results of this study suggest that PCNA and p53 protein expression may be useful indicators in monitoring malignancy of pulmonary tumors. PMID:27016721

  5. Immunogenic proteins specific to different bird species in bird fancier's lung.

    PubMed

    Rouzet, Adeline; Reboux, Gabriel; Rognon, Bénédicte; Barrera, Coralie; De Vuyst, Paul; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Millon, Laurence; Roussel, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Bird fancier's lung (BFL) is a disease produced by exposure to avian proteins present in droppings, blooms, and serum of a variety of birds. Although serological test results are currently used to confirm clinical diagnosis of the disease, bird species specificity is poorly understood. This study aimed to contribute to a better understanding of the specificity of immunogenic proteins revealed from the droppings of three bird species. Sera from four patients with BFL and two controls without exposure were analyzed by Western blotting with antigens from droppings of two pigeon and budgerigar strains and two hen species. When the antigens from the droppings of the three bird species were compared, the profile of immunogenic proteins was different and there were similarities between strains of the same species. Only one 68-kD protein was common to pigeon and budgerigar droppings, while proteins of 200, 175, 140, 100, and 35 kD were detected as specific in one bird species. These results provide insight to further characterize these proteins, and to design new serological tests specific to different bird species. These tests may help to refine strategies of antigenic exclusion and also to allow a patient compensation in case of BFL of occupational origin. PMID:24786679

  6. The histone demethylase PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuzhou; Pan, Xufeng; Zhao, Heng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PHF8 overexpresses in human NSCLC and predicts poor survival. • PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell growth and transformation. • PHF8 regulates apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. • PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer. • MiR-21 is critically essential for PHF8 function in human lung cancer cells. - Abstract: PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing protein and erases repressive histone marks including H4K20me1 and H3K9me1/2. It binds to H3K4me3, an active histone mark usually located at transcription start sites (TSSs), through its plant homeo-domain, and is thus recruited and enriched in gene promoters. PHF8 is involved in the development of several types of cancer, including leukemia, prostate cancer, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Herein we report that PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PHF8 is up-regulated in human NSCLC tissues, and high PHF8 expression predicts poor survival. Our in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrate that PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation and cellular transformation. We found that PHF8 knockdown induces DNA damage and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer, and miR-21 knockdown blocks the effects of PHF8 on proliferation and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. In summary, PHF8 promotes lung cancer cell growth and survival by regulating miR-21.

  7. Systems Biology Approaches for the Prediction of Possible Role of Chlamydia pneumoniae Proteins in the Etiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahanavaj; Imran, Ahamad; Khan, Abdul Arif; Abul Kalam, Mohd; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has recently supported the association of bacterial infection with the growth and development of cancers, particularly in organs that are constantly exposed to bacteria such as the lungs, colon, cervical cancer etc. Our in silico study on the proteome of Chlamydia pneumoniae suggests an unprecedented idea of the etiology of lung cancer and have revealed that the infection of C. pneumoniae is associated with lung cancer development and growth. It is reasonable to assume that C. pneumoniae transports its proteins within host-intracellular organelles during infection, where they may work with host-cell proteome. The current study was performed for the prediction of nuclear targeting protein of C. pneumoniae in the host cell using bioinformatics predictors including ExPASy pI/Mw tool, nuclear localization signal (NLS) mapper, balanced sub cellular localization predictor (BaCeILo), and Hum-mPLoc 2.0. We predicted 47/1112 nuclear-targeting proteins of C. pneumoniae connected with several possible alterations in host replication and transcription during intracellular infection. These nuclear-targeting proteins may direct to competitive interactions of host and C. pneumoniae proteins with the availability of same substrate and may be involved as etiological agents in the growth and development of lung cancer. These novel findings are expected to access in better understanding of lung cancer etiology and identifying molecular targets for therapy. PMID:26871581

  8. Effect of IL-2-Bax, a novel interleukin-2-receptor-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin lung injury1

    PubMed Central

    Segel, Michael J; Aqeilan, Rami; Zilka, Keren; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya; Wallach-Dayan, Shulamit B; Conner, Michael W; Christensen, Thomas G; Breuer, Raphael

    2005-01-01

    The role of lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis is not clear, but the weight of the evidence supports a pro-fibrotic effect for lymphocytes. The high-affinity interleukin-2 receptor (haIL-2R) is expressed on activated, but not quiescent, T lymphocytes. This selective expression of haIL-2R provides the basis for therapeutic strategies that target IL-2R-expressing cells. We hypothesized that elimination of activated lymphocytes by IL-2R-targeted chimeric proteins might ameliorate lung fibrosis. We investigated the effects of IL-2-Bax, a novel apoptosis-inducing IL-2R-targeted chimeric protein, on bleomycin-induced lung injury in mice. Treatment groups included (i) a single intratracheal instillation of bleomycin and twice-daily intraperitoneal injections of IL-2-Bax; (ii) intratracheal bleomycin and intraperitoneal IL-2-PE664Glu, an older-generation chimeric protein; (iii) intratracheal bleomycin/intraperitoneal PBS; (iv) intratracheal saline/intraperitoneal PBS. Lung injury was evaluated 14 days after intratracheal instillation by cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, semi-quantitative and quantitative histomorphological measurements and by biochemical analysis of lung hydroxyproline. Bleomycin induced a BAL lymphocytosis that was significantly attenuated by IL-2-Bax and IL-2-PE664Glu. However, morphometric parameters and lung hydroxyproline were unaffected by the chimeric proteins. These results show that IL-2-Bax reduces the lymphocytic infiltration of the lungs in response to bleomycin, but this effect is not accompanied by a decrease in lung fibrosis. PMID:16191100

  9. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha; Smith, Trent; Tate, LaNetra; Raissi, Ali; Mohajeri, Nahid; Muradov, Nazim; Bokerman, Gary

    2009-01-01

    At NASA, hydrogen safety is a key concern for space shuttle processing. Leaks of any level must be quickly recognized and addressed due to hydrogen s lower explosion limit. Chemo - chromic devices have been developed to detect hydrogen gas in several embodiments. Because hydrogen is odorless and colorless and poses an explosion hazard, there is an emerging need for sensors to quickly and accurately detect low levels of leaking hydrogen in fuel cells and other advanced energy- generating systems in which hydrogen is used as fuel. The device incorporates a chemo - chromic pigment into a base polymer. The article can reversibly or irreversibly change color upon exposure to hydrogen. The irreversible pigment changes color from a light beige to a dark gray. The sensitivity of the pigment can be tailored to its application by altering its exposure to gas through the incorporation of one or more additives or polymer matrix. Furthermore, through the incorporation of insulating additives, the chemochromic sensor can operate at cryogenic temperatures as low as 78 K. A chemochromic detector of this type can be manufactured into any feasible polymer part including injection molded plastic parts, fiber-spun textiles, or extruded tapes. The detectors are simple, inexpensive, portable, and do not require an external power source. The chemochromic detectors were installed and removed easily at the KSC launch pad without need for special expertise. These detectors may require an external monitor such as the human eye, camera, or electronic detector; however, they could be left in place, unmonitored, and examined later for color change to determine whether there had been exposure to hydrogen. In one type of envisioned application, chemochromic detectors would be fabricated as outer layers (e.g., casings or coatings) on high-pressure hydrogen storage tanks and other components of hydrogen-handling systems to provide visible indications of hydrogen leaks caused by fatigue failures or

  10. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein production and regulation in fetal rat lung cells.

    PubMed

    Price, W A; Moats-Staats, B M; D'Ercole, A J; Stiles, A D

    1993-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are expressed in lung from early in gestation and may modulate IGF-stimulated fetal lung cell proliferation and/or differentiation. To begin to define IGFBP production and regulation in lung cells during development, we prepared primary cultures of 19 day gestation fetal rat lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells and identified IGFBPs secreted into medium. Ligand blot analysis of conditioned media (CM) from both cell types demonstrated IGFBP bands of approximately 39,000-45,000, 32,000, 24,000, and 22,000 M(r). These migration characteristics allowed the identification of the 39,000-45,000 M(r) bands as IGFBP-3 and the 24,000 M(r) band as IGFBP-4, while Western immunoblot analyses localized IGFBP-2 to the 32,000 M(r) band and IGFBP-5 to the 22,000 M(r) band. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNAs generated by reverse transcription of fibroblast and epithelial cell RNA using specific oligodeoxynucleotide primers for IGFBPs 1 through 6, demonstrated the presence of amplified products for IGFBP-2, -3, -4, -5, and -6. In both cell types, IGFBP-2 and -3 production was sustained during 48 h of incubation in serum-free medium, whereas IGFBP-4 abundance increased only during the first 6 to 12 h of incubation. CM from fibroblasts and epithelial cells plated at low densities contained a high abundance of IGFBP-2 per microgram cellular DNA compared with cells at higher densities. In contrast, IGFBP-3 and -4 abundance normalized to cell DNA did not change with differing cell densities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682822

  11. Relationship of Vitamin D Binding Protein Polymorphisms and Lung Function in Korean Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Ye; Choi, Dong Pil; Won, Sungho; Lee, Young; Shin, Ju Hye; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Oh, Yeon Mok

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Multiple genetic factors are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The association of gene encoding vitamin D binding protein (VDBP, GC) with COPD has been controversial. We sought to investigate the types of GC variants in the Korean population and determine the association of GC variants with COPD and lung function in the Korean population. Materials and Methods The study cohort consisted of 203 COPD patients and 157 control subjects. GC variants were genotyped by the restriction fragment-length polymorphism method. Repeated measures of lung function data were analyzed using a linear mixed model including sex, age, height, and pack-years of smoking to investigate the association of GC genetic factors and lung function. Results GC1F variant was most frequently observed in COPD (46.1%) and controls (42.0%). GC1S variant (29.0% vs. 21.4%; p=0.020) and genotype 1S-1S (8.3% vs. 3.4%; p=0.047) were more commonly detected in control than COPD. According to linear mixed model analysis including controls and COPD, subjects with genotype 1S-1S had 0.427 L higher forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) than those with other genotypes (p=0.029). However, interaction between the genotype and smoking pack-year was found to be particularly significant among subjects with genotype 1S-1S; FEV1 decreased by 0.014 L per smoking pack-year (p=0.001). Conclusion This study suggested that GC polymorphism might be associated with lung function and risk of COPD in Korean population. GC1S variant and genotype 1S-1S were more frequently observed in control than in COPD. Moreover, GC1S variant was more common in non-decliners than in rapid decliners among COPD. PMID:25048491

  12. CALIFORNIA LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of California. This database was developed and is maintained by the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB). Point locations represent tanks where leak events have occurred. Tank latitude-long...

  13. HAWAII LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Point coverage of leaking underground storage tanks(LUST) for the state of Hawaii. The original database was developed and is maintained by the State of Hawaii, Dept. of Health. The point locations represent facilities where one or more leaking underground storage tank exists. ...

  14. Leaking underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    McLearn, M.E.; Miller, M.J.; Kostecki, P.T.; Calabrese, E.J.; Presio, L.M.; Suyama, W.; Kucharski, W.A.

    1988-04-01

    Remedial options for leaking underground storage tanks were investigated in a joint project of the Electric Power Research Institute and the Underground Storage Tank Committee of the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group. Both existing and emerging technologies were examined. Thirteen remedial techniques were identified and initially characterized as in situ or non-in situ. In situ methods include volatilization, biodegradation, leaching and chemical reaction, vitrification, passive remediation, and isolation or containment. Non-in situ techniques include land treatment, thermal treatment, asphalt incorporation, solidification and stabilization, groundwater extraction and treatment, chemical extraction, and excavation. Soil and groundwater remediation problems have many site-specific consideration which must be considered in choosing an appropriate remedial option; these include cleanup goals, site and contaminant characteristics, cost, exposures pathways, and others. Appropriate remedial techniques are chosen by assessing technical, implementational, environmental and economic consideration of each available option to achieve the desired cleanup goal at the specified site.

  15. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  16. Immune Defense Protein Expression in Highly Purified Mouse Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Meenal; Lowell, Clifford A

    2016-06-01

    Lung epithelial cells play critical roles in initiating and modulating immune responses during pulmonary infection or injury. To better understand the spectrum of immune response-related proteins present in lung epithelial cells, we developed an improved method of isolating highly pure primary murine alveolar type (AT) II cells and murine tracheal epithelial cells (mTECs) using negative selection for a variety of lineage markers and positive selection for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), a pan-epithelial cell marker. This method yielded 2-3 × 10(6) ATII cells/mouse lung and 1-2 × 10(4) mTECs/trachea that were highly pure (>98%) and viable (>98%). Using these preparations, we found that both ATII cells and mTECs expressed the Lyn tyrosine kinase, which is best studied as an inhibitory kinase in hematopoietic cells. However, we found little or no expression of Syk in either ATII cells or mTECs, which is in contrast to earlier published reports. Both cell types expressed C-type lectin receptors, anaphylatoxin receptors, and various Toll-like receptors (TLRs). In addition, stimulation of ATII cells with TLR ligands led to secretion of various cytokines and chemokines. Interestingly, lyn(-/-) ATII cells were hyperresponsive to TLR3 stimulation, suggesting that, as in hematopoietic cells, Lyn might be playing an inhibitory role in ATII cells. In conclusion, the improved isolation method reported here, along with expression profiles of various immune defense proteins, will help refocus investigations of immune-related signaling events in pulmonary epithelium. PMID:26574781

  17. Curcumin Triggers DNA Damage and Inhibits Expression of DNA Repair Proteins in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ting, Chien-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Liu, Yu-Chang; Chiang, I-Tsang

    2015-07-01

    The study goal was to evaluate the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and expression of DNA-repair proteins in human lung cancer. Thus, NCI-H460 cells were used to study the effects of curcumin on DNA damage and repair in vitro. We investigated curcumin induces DNA damage by comet the assay and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. The DNA damage/repair-related protein levels were examined and monitored by western blotting and confocal microscopy. Curcumin significantly increased the length of comet tails and DNA condensation in NCI-H460 cells. Curcumin reduced expression of DNA-repair proteins such as 14-3-3 protein sigma (14-3-3σ), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1), and mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (MDC1). Curcumin also increased phosphorylation of p53 and Histone H2A.X (S140) in the nuclei of NCI-H460 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated that curcumin triggered DNA damage and inhibited expression of DNA-repair-associated proteins in NCI-H460 cells. PMID:26124332

  18. Determination of Lipid-Protein Interactions in Lung Surfactants Using Computer Simulations and Structural Bioinformatics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaznessis, Yiannis

    2001-06-01

    Proteins are the primary components of the networks that conduct the flows of mass, energy and information in living organisms. The discovery of the principles of protein structure and function allows the development of design rules for biological activities. The microscopic nature of the operating mechanisms of protein activity, and the vast complexity of the networks of interaction call for the employment of powerful computational methodologies that can decipher the physicochemical and evolutionary principles underlying protein structure and function. An example will be presented that reflects the strength of computational approaches. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and structural bioinformatics tools are employed to investigate the interactions between the first 25 N-terminal residues of surfactant protein B (SP-B 1-25) and the lipid components of the lung surfactant (LS). An understanding of the molecular level interactions between the LS components is essential for the establishment of design rules for the development of synthetic LS and the treatment of the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, which results from deficiency or inactivation of LS.

  19. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  20. Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Borelli, Violetta; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Birarda, Giovanni; Bedolla, Diana E; Salomé, Murielle; Vaccari, Lisa; Calligaro, Carla; Cotte, Marine; Hesse, Bernhard; Luisi, Fernando; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects. PMID:26159651

  1. Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Borelli, Violetta; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Birarda, Giovanni; Bedolla, Diana E.; Salomé, Murielle; Vaccari, Lisa; Calligaro, Carla; Cotte, Marine; Hesse, Bernhard; Luisi, Fernando; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects. PMID:26159651

  2. The adaptor protein insulin receptor substrate 2 inhibits alternative macrophage activation and allergic lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Preeta; Dorsey, Nicolas J; Li, Jiaqi; Qi, Xiulan; Smith, Elizabeth P; Yamaji-Kegan, Kazuyo; Keegan, Achsah D

    2016-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) is an adaptor protein that becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in response to the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-13, which results in activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt pathway. IL-4 and IL-13 contribute to allergic lung inflammation. To examine the role of IRS2 in allergic disease, we evaluated the responses of IRS2-deficient (IRS2(-/-)) mice. Unexpectedly, loss of IRS2 resulted in a substantial increase in the expression of a subset of genes associated with the generation of alternatively activated macrophages (AAMs) in response to IL-4 or IL-13 in vitro. AAMs secrete factors that enhance allergic responses and promote airway remodeling. Moreover, compared to IRS2(+/+) mice, IRS2(+/-) and IRS2(-/-) mice developed enhanced pulmonary inflammation, accumulated eosinophils and AAMs, and exhibited airway and vascular remodeling upon allergen stimulation, responses that partially depended on macrophage-intrinsic IRS2 signaling. Both in unstimulated and IL-4-stimulated macrophages, lack of IRS2 enhanced phosphorylation of Akt and ribosomal S6 protein. Thus, we identified a critical inhibitory loop downstream of IRS2, demonstrating an unanticipated and previously unrecognized role for IRS2 in suppressing allergic lung inflammation and remodeling. PMID:27330190

  3. A Promoter Polymorphism in the CD59 Complement Regulatory Protein Gene in Donor Lungs Correlates With a Higher Risk for Chronic Rejection After Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Budding, K; van de Graaf, E A; Kardol-Hoefnagel, T; Broen, J C A; Kwakkel-van Erp, J M; Oudijk, E-J D; van Kessel, D A; Hack, C E; Otten, H G

    2016-03-01

    Complement activation leads primarily to membrane attack complex formation and subsequent target cell lysis. Protection against self-damage is regulated by complement regulatory proteins, including CD46, CD55, and CD59. Within their promoter regions, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present that could influence transcription. We analyzed these SNPs and investigated their influence on protein expression levels. A single SNP configuration in the promoter region of CD59 was found correlating with lower CD59 expression on lung endothelial cells (p = 0.016) and monocytes (p = 0.013). Lung endothelial cells with this SNP configuration secreted more profibrotic cytokine IL-6 (p = 0.047) and fibroblast growth factor β (p = 0.036) on exposure to sublytic complement activation than cells with the opposing configuration, whereas monocytes were more susceptible to antibody-mediated complement lysis (p < 0.0001). Analysis of 137 lung transplant donors indicated that this CD59 SNP configuration correlates with impaired long-term survival (p = 0.094) and a significantly higher incidence of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (p = 0.046) in the recipient. These findings support a role for complement in the pathogenesis of this posttransplant complication and are the first to show a deleterious association of a donor CD59 promoter polymorphism in lung transplantation. PMID:26517734

  4. Nanoparticles in the lung and their protein corona: the few proteins that count.

    PubMed

    Whitwell, Harry; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Elgy, Christine; Morgan, Cliff; Griffiths, Mark; Clark, Howard; Skipp, Paul; Madsen, Jens

    2016-11-01

    The formation of protein coronae on nanoparticles (NPs) has been investigated almost exclusively in serum, despite the prevailing route of exposure being inhalation of airborne particles. In addition, an increasing number of nanomedicines, that exploit the airways as the site of delivery, are undergoing medical trials. An understanding of the effects of NPs on the airways is therefore required. To further this field, we have described the corona formed on polystyrene (PS) particles with different surface modifications and on titanium dioxide particles when incubated in human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). We show, using high-resolution quantitative mass spectrometry (MS(E)), that a large number of proteins bind with low copy numbers but that a few "core" proteins bind to all particles tested with high fidelity, averaging the surface properties of the different particles independent of the surface properties of the specific particle. The averaging effect at the particle surface means that differing cellular effects may not be due to the protein corona but due to the surface properties of the nanoparticle once inside the cell. Finally, the adherence of surfactant associated proteins (SP-A, B and D) suggests that there may be interactions with lipids and pulmonary surfactant (PSf), which could have potential in vivo health effects for people with chronic airway diseases such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or those who have increased susceptibility toward other respiratory diseases. PMID:27465202

  5. Proteasome dysfunction inhibits surfactant protein gene expression in lung epithelial cells: mechanism of inhibition of SP-B gene expression.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Boggaram, Vijayakumar

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins maintain lung function through their actions to reduce alveolar surface tension and control of innate immune responses in the lung. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for the degradation of majority of intracellular proteins in eukaryotic cells, and proteasome dysfunction has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative, cardiac, and other diseases. Proteasome function is impaired in interstitial lung diseases associated with surfactant protein C (SP-C) mutation mapping to the BRICHOS domain located in the proSP-C protein. In this study we determined the effects of proteasome inhibition on surfactant protein expression in H441 and MLE-12 lung epithelial cells to understand the relationship between proteasome dysfunction and surfactant protein gene expression. Proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and MG132 reduced the levels of SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner in H441 and MLE-12 cells. In H441 cells, lactacystin and MG132 inhibition of SP-B mRNA was associated with similar decreases in SP-B protein, and the inhibition was due to inhibition of gene transcription. Proteasome inhibitors decreased thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/Nkx2.1 DNA binding activity, and the reduced TTF-1 DNA binding activity was due to reduced expression levels of TTF-1 protein. These data indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is essential for the maintenance of surfactant protein gene expression and that disruption of this pathway inhibits surfactant protein gene expression via reduced expression of TTF-1 protein. PMID:16905641

  6. Dialysate leaks in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, M; Ouimet, D; Pichette, V

    2001-01-01

    Dialysate leakage represents a major noninfectious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). An exit-site leak refers to the appearance of any moisture around the PD catheter identified as dialysate; however, the spectrum of dialysate leaks also includes any dialysate loss from the peritoneal cavity other than via the lumen of the catheter. The incidence of dialysate leakage is somewhat more than 5% in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, but this percentage probably underestimates the number of early leaks. The incidence of hydrothorax or pleural leak as a complication of PD remains unclear. Factors identified as potentially related to dialysate leakage are those related to the technique of PD catheter insertion, the way PD is initiated, and weakness of the abdominal wall. The pediatric literature tends to favor Tenckhoff catheters over other catheters as being superior with respect to dialysate leakage, but no consensus on catheter choice exists for adults in this regard. An association has been found between early leaks (< or =30 days) and immediate CAPD initiation and perhaps median catheter insertion. Risk factors contributing to abdominal weakness appear to predispose mostly to late leaks; one or more of them can generally be identified in the majority of patients. Early leakage most often manifests as a pericatheter leak. Late leaks may present more subtly with subcutaneous swelling and edema, weight gain, peripheral or genital edema, and apparent ultrafiltration failure. Dyspnea is the first clinical clue to the diagnosis of a pleural leak. Late leaks tend to develop during the first year of CAPD. The most widely used approach to determine the exact site of the leakage is with computed tomography after infusion of 2 L of dialysis fluid containing radiocontrast material. Treatments for dialysate leaks include surgical repair, temporary transfer to hemodialysis, lower dialysate volumes, and PD with a cycler. Recent recommendation propose

  7. Mutant surfactant A2 proteins associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer induce TGF-β1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Cano, Christopher A.; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the lung surfactant proteins are found in patients with interstitial lung disease and lung cancer, but their pathologic mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans heterozygous for a missense mutation in the gene encoding surfactant protein (SP)-A2 (SFTPA2) contains more TGF-β1 than control samples. Expression of mutant SP-A2 in lung epithelial cells leads to secretion of latent TGF-β1, which is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling. TGF-β1 secretion is not observed in lung epithelial cells expressing the common SP-A2 variants or other misfolded proteins capable of increasing cellular endoplasmic reticulum stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response is necessary for maximal TGF-β1 secretion because gene silencing of the unfolded protein response transducers leads to an ∼50% decrease in mutant SP-A2–mediated TGF-β1 secretion. Expression of the mutant SP-A2 proteins leads to the coordinated increase in gene expression of TGF-β1 and two TGF-β1–binding proteins, LTBP-1 and LTBP-4; expression of the latter is necessary for secretion of this cytokine. Inhibition of the TGF-β autocrine positive feedback loop by a pan–TGF-β–neutralizing antibody, a TGF-β receptor antagonist, or LTBP gene silencing results in the reversal of TGF-β–mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell death. Because secretion of latent TGF-β1 is induced specifically by mutant SP-A2 proteins, therapeutics targeted to block this pathway may be especially beneficial for this molecularly defined subgroup of patients. PMID:23223528

  8. Xuebijing exerts protective effects on lung permeability leakage and lung injury by upregulating Toll-interacting protein expression in rats with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Wei; Wang, Yun-Hui; Qian, Chuan-Yun; Li, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Xuebijing (XBJ) is a type of traditional Tibetan medicine, and previous pharmacological studies have shown that the ethanol extract is derived from Chuanxiong, Chishao, Danshen and Honghua. Chuanxiong, Chishao, Danshen and Honghua possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, and has been used in the treatment of inflammatory infectious diseases. In the present study, we investigated the effects of XBJ on pulmonary permeability and lung injury in cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in rats. A CLP sepsis model was established for the control and treatment groups, respectively. Approximately 2 h prior to surgery, an amount of 100 mg/kg XBJ injection was administered to the treatment group. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PT-PCR) and western blot analysis were used to examine the expression of Toll-interacting protein (Tollip), interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), nuclear factor-κB65 (NF-κB65) and TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in lung tissue. ELISA was applied to detect changes of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and von wille-brand factor (vWF) in serum. The number of neutrophils, albumin and total cells in the BAL fluid were measured. For histological analysis, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains were evaluated. Lung permeability, the wet/dry weight ratio (W/D) and the lung pathology score were determined following the induction of ALI by CLP for 24 h. The results demonstrated that XBJ upregulated Tollip expression and blocked the activity of IRAK1, TLR4, NF-κβ65 and TRAF6. Additionally, the number of neutrophils and total cells were significantly decreased in the XBJ group compared to that in the control group. Lung permeability, the wet/dry weight ratio (W/D) and the lung pathology score were

  9. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  10. Identification of Antigenic Proteins from Lichtheimia corymbifera for Farmer’s Lung Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Rognon, Bénédicte; Barrera, Coralie; Monod, Michel; Valot, Benoit; Roussel, Sandrine; Quadroni, Manfredo; Jouneau, Stephane; Court-Fortune, Isabelle; Caillaud, Denis; Fellrath, Jean-Marc; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Reboux, Gabriel; Millon, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The use of recombinant antigens has been shown to improve both the sensitivity and the standardization of the serological diagnosis of Farmer’s lung disease (FLD). The aim of this study was to complete the panel of recombinant antigens available for FLD serodiagnosis with antigens of Lichtheimia corymbifera, known to be involved in FLD. L. corymbifera proteins were thus separated by 2D electrophoresis and subjected to western blotting with sera from 7 patients with FLD and 9 healthy exposed controls (HEC). FLD-associated immunoreactive proteins were identified by mass spectrometry based on a protein database specifically created for this study and subsequently produced as recombinant antigens. The ability of recombinant antigens to discriminate patients with FLD from controls was assessed by ELISA performed with sera from FLD patients (n = 41) and controls (n = 43) recruited from five university hospital pneumology departments of France and Switzerland. Forty-one FLD-associated immunoreactive proteins from L. corymbifera were identified. Six of them were produced as recombinant antigens. With a sensitivity and specificity of 81.4 and 77.3% respectively, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase was the most effective antigen for discriminating FLD patients from HEC. ELISA performed with the putative proteasome subunit alpha type as an antigen was especially specific (88.6%) and could thus be used for FLD confirmation. The production of recombinant antigens from L. corymbifera represents an additional step towards the development of a standardized ELISA kit for FLD diagnosis. PMID:27490813

  11. Underground tank leak detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Niaki, Shahzad; Broscious, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, the increase in leaks from underground gasoline storage tanks has had a significant adverse environmental impact on the US. Current estimates from government and industry sources are that between 1.5 to 3.5 million underground storage tanks exist in the nation. Estimates of the number of leaking tanks range from 75,000 to 100,000; and 350,000 others may develop leaks within the next five years. The 1983 National Petroleum News Factbook Issue forecasts the existence of approximately 140,000 gasoline service stations in the US at the end of 1983. New York State estimates that 19% of its 83,000 active underground gasoline tanks are now leaking. Maine estimates that 25% of its 1,600 retail gasoline underground tanks are leaking approximately 11 million gallons yearly. In Michigan 39% of ground water contamination incidents are attributed to storage tanks. One of the primary causes of tank leakage is corrosion of the storage tanks. Product loss from leaking tanks may cause an adverse effect on the environment, endanger lives, reduce income, and require the expenditure of millions of dollars for cleanup. To prevent or reduce the adverse effects of gasoline leakage, an accurate method must be used to determine whether or not an underground tank is leaking.

  12. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B).

    PubMed

    Hemming, Joanna M; Hughes, Brian R; Rennie, Adrian R; Tomas, Salvador; Campbell, Richard A; Hughes, Arwel V; Arnold, Thomas; Botchway, Stanley W; Thompson, Katherine C

    2015-08-25

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air-water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1-25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1-25,63-78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (~2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air-water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air-water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  13. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air–water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1–25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1–25,63–78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (∼2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air–water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air–water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  14. Role of leak potassium channels in pain signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yao; Toyoda, Hiroki

    2015-10-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are membrane proteins that allow rapid and selective flow of K(+) ions across the cell membrane, generating electrical signals in neurons. Thus, K(+) channels play a critical role in determining the neuronal excitability. Two-pore domain (K2P) "leak" K(+) channels give rise to leak K(+) currents that are responsible for the resting membrane potential and input resistance. The wide expression of leak K(+) channels in the central and peripheral nervous system suggests that these channels are critically involved in pain signaling and behavior. Indeed, it has become apparent in the past decade that the leak K(+) channels play essential roles in the development of pain. In this review, we describe evidence for the roles of TASK1, TASK3, TREK1, TREK2, TRAAK and TRESK channels in pain signaling and behavior. Furthermore, we describe the possible involvement of TASK2 and TWIK1 channels in pain. PMID:26321392

  15. Aerosol delivery of programmed cell death protein 4 using polysorbitol-based gene delivery system for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Kyoung; Xing, Lei; Chen, Bao-An; Xu, Fengguo; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Zhang, Can

    2014-11-01

    The development of a safe and effective gene delivery system is the most challenging obstacle to the broad application of gene therapy in the clinic. In this study, we report the development of a polysorbitol-based gene delivery system as an alternative gene carrier for lung cancer therapy. The copolymer was prepared by a Michael addition reaction between sorbitol diacrylate (SD) and spermine (SPE); the SD-SPE copolymer effectively condenses with DNA on the nanoscale and protects it from nucleases. SD-SPE/DNA complexes showed excellent transfection with low toxicity both in vitro and in vivo, and aerosol delivery of SD-SPE complexes with programmed cell death protein 4 DNA significantly suppressed lung tumorigenesis in K-ras(LA1) lung cancer model mice. These results demonstrate that SD-SPE has great potential as a gene delivery system based on its excellent biocompatibility and high gene delivery efficiency for lung cancer gene therapy. PMID:24983766

  16. Buffer optimization for high resolution of human lung cancer tissue proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kibeom; Pi, Kyungbae; Lee, Keeman

    2009-01-01

    A problem in proteomic analysis of lung cancer tissue is the presence of complex components of different histological backgrounds (squamous cell carcinoma, small cell lung carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma). The efficient solubilization of protein components before two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) is a very critical. Poor solubilization has been associated with a failure to detect proteins and diffuse, streaked and/or trailing protein spots. Here, we have optimized the solubilization of human lung cancer tissue to increase protein resolution. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) rehydration buffer containing a thiourea-urea mixture provided superior resolution, whereas a buffer without thiourea yielded consistently poor results. In addition, IEF rehydration buffers containing CHAPS and DTT gave superior resolution, whereas buffers containing Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) and/or Triton X-100 did not. A tributylphosphine-containing buffer gave consistently poor results. Using optimized conditions, we used 2-D gel analysis of human lung cancer tissue to identify 11 differentially-expressed protein spots by MALDI-mass spectrometry. This study provides a methodological tool to study the complex mammalian proteomes. PMID:18800191

  17. Identification of Oxidative Stress Related Proteins as Biomarkers for Lung Cancer and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Bronchoalveolar Lavage

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Maria Dolores; Nogal, Ana; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Meléndez, Ricardo; Romero-Romero, Beatriz; Mediano, Maria Dolores; López-Campos, Jose L.; García-Carbonero, Rocío; Sanchez-Gastaldo, Amparo; Carnero, Amancio; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) commonly coexist in smokers, and the presence of COPD increases the risk of developing LC. Cigarette smoke causes oxidative stress and an inflammatory response in lung cells, which in turn may be involved in COPD and lung cancer development. The aim of this study was to identify differential proteomic profiles related to oxidative stress response that were potentially involved in these two pathological entities. Protein content was assessed in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of 60 patients classified in four groups: COPD, COPD and LC, LC, and control (neither COPD nor LC). Proteins were separated into spots by two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and examined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). A total of 16 oxidative stress regulatory proteins were differentially expressed in BAL samples from LC and/or COPD patients as compared with the control group. A distinct proteomic reactive oxygen species (ROS) protein signature emerged that characterized lung cancer and COPD. In conclusion, our findings highlight the role of the oxidative stress response proteins in the pathogenic pathways of both diseases, and provide new candidate biomarkers and predictive tools for LC and COPD diagnosis. PMID:23389041

  18. A Leak Monitor for Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    GenCorp Aerojet Industrial Products, Lewis Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Case Western Reserve University developed a gas leak detection system, originally for use with the Space Shuttle propulsion system and reusable launch vehicles. The Model HG200 Automated Gas Leak Detection System has miniaturized sensors that can identify extremely low concentrations of hydrogen without requiring oxygen. A microprocessor-based hardware/software system monitors the sensors and displays the source and magnitude of hydrogen leaks in real time. The system detects trace hydrogen around pipes, connectors, flanges and pressure tanks, and has been used by Ford Motor Company in the production of a natural gas-powered car.

  19. Aerospace Payloads Leak Test Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovsky, Oleg; Grayson, Cynthia M.

    2010-01-01

    Pressurized and sealed aerospace payloads can leak on orbit. When dealing with toxic or hazardous materials, requirements for fluid and gas leakage rates have to be properly established, and most importantly, reliably verified using the best Nondestructive Test (NDT) method available. Such verification can be implemented through application of various leak test methods that will be the subject of this paper, with a purpose to show what approach to payload leakage rate requirement verification is taken by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The scope of this paper will be mostly a detailed description of 14 leak test methods recommended.

  20. Cigarette smoke induces the expression of Notch3, not Notch1, protein in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, ZHENSHUN; TAN, QIUYUE; TAN, WEIJUN; ZHANG, LI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of cigarette smoke on the expression of Notch proteins in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). Protein expression levels of Notch1 and Notch3 were analyzed using immunohistochemistry in 102 human LAC specimens. Of these, 52 were obtained from smokers and 50 from non-smokers. In addition, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) at varying concentrations (1, 2.5 and 5%) was administered to A549 cells. The expression of Notch1 and Notch3 protein was then detected by western blot analysis at different time points (0, 8, 24 and 48 h). Of the 102 LAC specimens, 42 (41.2%) were positive for Notch1 and 63 (61.8%) were positive for Notch3. There was no significant difference in the level of Notch1 expression between smokers and non-smokers with LAC (P>0.05). The positive rate and staining intensity of Notch3 expression were increased in the smokers compared with the non-smokers (P<0.05). The expression of Notch3 protein in A549 cells increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner following treatment with CSE, whilst the expression of Notch1 protein appeared stable. The results suggested that cigarette smoke was able to induce the expression of Notch3, not Notch1, protein in LAC. The data revealed an upregulation of Notch3 in LAC following cigarette smoke exposure. Such findings may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of LAC. PMID:26622547

  1. Parathyroid hormone-related protein (pthrp) is a gravisensor for lung and bone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torday, J.

    Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein (PTHrP) and its receptor represent a stretch- sensitive paracrine signaling mechanism (Torday, 1999) that may sense gravity. PTHrP has been shown to be essential for the development and homeostatic regulation of lung (Rubin et al, 2000) and bone (Kronenberg et al, 1994). Since both lung and bone structure and function are affected by microgravity, we hypothesized that microgravity down-regulates PTHrP signaling. To test this hypothesis, we suspended lung and bone cells in the microgravity environment of a rotating wall vessel apparatus, which simulates microgravity, for up to 72 hours. During the first 6-8 hours, PTHrP expression fell precipitously, decreasing by 80-90%; during the subsequent 64-66 hours, PTHrP expression remained at this newly established level. PTHrP production decreased from 5 pmol/ml/3hours to undetectable levels in culture medium from microgravity-exposed cells. The cells were then put back in culture at unit gravity for 24hours, and PTHrP expression and production returned to normal levels. Based on these findings, we have obtained bones from rats flown in space for 2 weeks (mission SLS-2, provided courtesy of the Biospecimen Facility, Ames Research Center, NASA, as a result of a peer-reviewed proposal). Analysis of PTHrP expression by femurs and tibias from these animals (n=5) revealed that PTHrP expression was 60% lower than in bones from ground-based rats. Interestingly, there were no differences in PTHrP exp ression by parietal bones, indicating that the effect of weightlessness on PTHrP expression is due to the unweighting of weight-bearing bones. This finding is consistent with other studies of microgravity-induced osteoporosis. The loss of the PTHrP signaling mechanism may be corrected using chemical agents that up-regulate this pathway.

  2. TNF-Alpha Represses Transcription of Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-4 in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nian-Ling; Li, Changgong; Huang, Hao Hao; Sebald, Matthew; Londhe, Vedang A.; Heisterkamp, Nora; Warburton, David; Bellusci, Saverio; Minoo, Parviz

    2007-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Proteins are key signaling molecules in vertebrate development. Little is known about Bmp gene regulation in any organ. In Drosophila, the Bmp gene, dpp is regulated by Dorsal, the invertebrate homologue of Rel-NFkB. In this study we examined whether TNF-alpha, which activates NF-kB, can regulate Bmp4 gene expression. TNF-alpha reduced Bmp4 mRNA in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and repressed transcriptional activity of the human Bmp4 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Similar repression was observed when the Bmp4 promoter was co-transfected with a p65 (RelA) expression vector in the absence of TNF-alpha treatment, suggesting that RelA mediates the effect of TNF-alpha. In support of this finding, the repressor effect of TNF-alpha on Bmp4 was abrogated by a co-transfected dominant negative mutant of IkB (S32A/S36A). The human Bmp4 promoter contains 3 putative consensus binding sites for NF-kB. Surprisingly, only one of the latter binding sites was capable of binding NFkB. Repressor effect of NFkB was not dependent on any of the three binding sites, but localized to a 122 bp fragment which bound both RelA and SP1. SP1stimulated transcription, whereas increasing doses of RelA opposed this effect. In vivo, TNF-alpha inhibited branching morphogenesis and LacZ gene expression in Bmp4-lacz transgenic lungs. These data support a model in which TNF-alpha-induced RelA interacts with SP1 to bring about transcriptional repression of Bmp4 gene. These findings provide a mechanistic paradigm for interactions between mediators of inflammation and morphogenesis with relevant implications for normal lung development and pathogenesis of disease. PMID:17350185

  3. Factors predicting the occurrence of a gastrojejunal anastomosis leak following gastric bypass

    PubMed Central

    Sufi, Pratik; Heath, Dugal

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Occurrence of anastomotic leaks following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), arising principally from the gastro-jejunal anastomosis, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Their early detection and treatment is essential. However, a significant number of postoperative oral contrast studies fail to identify leaks, and a negative study providing false reassurance can lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Physiological features including tachycardia, increased respiratory rate and pyrexia or elevations in C-reactive protein and white cell count are seen in patients with leaks. In this study we examine physiological and laboratory parameters in patients with and without anastomotic leaks following RYGB to try and improve the detection of leaks. Aim To evaluate clinical signs and laboratory tests in determination of the development of gastrojejunal leaks after gastric bypass surgery. Material and methods The study examined 116 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic RYGB. Clinical signs and laboratory results were reviewed retrospectively. Results Four gastrojejunostomy leaks in our series were identified after RYGB surgery. All these patients were treated successfully. Leak patients’ in-hospital stay was longer. Tachycardia among leak patients occurs from day 1 with 100% sensitivity and 87% specificity at a cut-off point of 90 bpm. A temperature difference appears on day 2 in leak patients. The CRP was higher on day 2 and 3 in leak patients. Higher intravenous fluid requirements were observed in patients with leaks. Conclusions Gastrojejunal anastomosis leak is associated with longer in-hospital treatment. The earliest significant indicators of a leak are tachycardia and positive fluid balance. A temperature spike and CRP rise occur on day 2. Leak patients matched SIRS WBC count criteria on day 3. PMID:25337170

  4. Integrative Proteomics and Tissue Microarray Profiling Indicate the Association between Overexpressed Serum Proteins and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haichuan; Wang, Rui; Sun, Yihua; Zeng, Rong; Chen, Haiquan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Clinically, the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by the early detection and risk screening among population. To meet this need, here we describe the application of extensive peptide level fractionation coupled with label free quantitative proteomics for the discovery of potential serum biomarkers for lung cancer, and the usage of Tissue microarray analysis (TMA) and Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assays for the following up validations in the verification phase. Using these state-of-art, currently available clinical proteomic approaches, in the discovery phase we confidently identified 647 serum proteins, and 101 proteins showed a statistically significant association with NSCLC in our 18 discovery samples. This serum proteomic dataset allowed us to discern the differential patterns and abnormal biological processes in the lung cancer blood. Of these proteins, Alpha-1B-glycoprotein (A1BG) and Leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), two plasma glycoproteins with previously unknown function were selected as examples for which TMA and MRM verification were performed in a large sample set consisting about 100 patients. We revealed that A1BG and LRG1 were overexpressed in both the blood level and tumor sections, which can be referred to separate lung cancer patients from healthy cases. PMID:23284758

  5. Activation of the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the bombesin receptor complex in small cell lung carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudino, G.; Cirillo, D.; Naldini, L.; Rossino, P.; Comoglio, P.M. )

    1988-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that bombesin-like peptides produced by small cell lung carcinomas may sustain deregulated proliferation through an autocrine mechanism. The authors have shown that the neuropeptide bombesin leads to the activation of a protein-tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates a 115-kDa protein (p115) associated with the bombesin receptor complex in mouse Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. They now report that phosphotyrosine antibodies recognize a 115-kDa protein, phosphorylated on tyrosine, in four human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines producing bombesin but not in a nonproducer variant line. p115 from detergent-treated small cell lung carcinoma cells binds to bombesin-Sepharose and can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in the presence of radiolabeled ATP and Mn{sup 2+}. As for the p115 immunoprecipitated from mouse fibroblast, the small cell lung carcinoma p115 can be phosphorylated in an immunocomplex kinase assay. However, the latter does not require the presence of exogenous bombesin for activity. Binding data, obtained by using radiolabeled ligand, suggest receptor occupancy in the cell lines producing bombesin. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that proliferation in some human small cell lung carcinoma lines is under autocrine control, regulated through activation of bombesin receptors.

  6. Amplification of FGFR1 gene and expression of FGFR1 protein is found in different histological types of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vitor; Reis, Diana; Silva, Maria; Alarcão, Ana Maria; Ladeirinha, Ana Filipa; d'Aguiar, Maria João; Ferreira, Teresa; Caramujo-Balseiro, Sandra; Carvalho, Lina

    2016-08-01

    Although lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer-related death, accurate diagnosis followed by personalized treatment is expected to raise the 5-year survival rate. Targeted therapies are now in routine clinical use, in particular for lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) has recently emerged as a molecular target, especially in squamous cell/epidermoid carcinoma (SQC) of the lung. This paper evaluates FGFR1 expression and gene copy number in adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, pleomorphic carcinomas (PLEOMC) and adenosquamous carcinomas (ADSQC) of the lung and also explores the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathway. We studied 76 lung carcinomas: 34 ADC, 24 SQC, 10 PLEOMC and 8 ADSQC. FGFR1 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Higher FGFR1 protein expression was observed in all tumour types compared to non-tumour tissue. FGFR1 expression was higher in ADC and PLEOMC than in SQC. We found a tendency to higher expression in ADC than in SQC and significantly higher expression in PLEOMC than in other histological subtypes. FISH-based amplification of FGFR1 was identified in 15 (20 %) lung carcinomas: 5 (15 %) ADC, 5 (21 %) SQC, 3 (30 %) PLEOMC and 2 (25 %) ADSQC. Amplification was more frequent in SQC without significant differences. FGFR1 protein is expressed in the majority of lung carcinomas, though it is higher in ADC and PLEOMC (the latter may reflect the importance of FGFR1 control of the EMT pathway). FGFR1 amplification was identified in all types of lung carcinoma. Although FGFR1 is most frequently amplified in SQC, other histological types merit assessment of FGFR1 amplification, in order to select patients that might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:27194548

  7. Lung cancer induced in mice by the envelope protein of jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) closely resembles lung cancer in sheep infected with JSRV

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Sarah K; Metzger, Michael J; Hudkins, Kelly L; Alpers, Charles E; York, Denis; DeMartini, James C; Miller, A Dusty

    2006-01-01

    Background Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) causes a lethal lung cancer in sheep and goats. Expression of the JSRV envelope (Env) protein in mouse lung, by using a replication-defective adeno-associated virus type 6 (AAV6) vector, induces tumors resembling those seen in sheep. However, the mouse and sheep tumors have not been carefully compared to determine if Env expression alone in mice can account for the disease features observed in sheep, or whether additional aspects of virus replication in sheep are important, such as oncogene activation following retrovirus integration into the host cell genome. Results We have generated mouse monoclonal antibodies (Mab) against JSRV Env and have used these to study mouse and sheep lung tumor histology. These Mab detect Env expression in tumors in sheep infected with JSRV from around the world with high sensitivity and specificity. Mouse and sheep tumors consisted mainly of well-differentiated adenomatous foci with little histological evidence of anaplasia, but at long times after vector exposure some mouse tumors did have a more malignant appearance typical of adenocarcinoma. In addition to epithelial cell tumors, lungs of three of 29 sheep examined contained fibroblastic cell masses that expressed Env and appeared to be separate neoplasms. The Mab also stained nasal adenocarcinoma tissue from one United States sheep, which we show was due to expression of Env from ovine enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV), a virus closely related to JSRV. Systemic administration of the AAV6 vector encoding JSRV Env to mice produced numerous hepatocellular tumors, and some hemangiomas and hemangiosarcomas, showing that the Env protein can induce tumors in multiple cell types. Conclusion Lung cancers induced by JSRV infection in sheep and by JSRV Env expression in mice have similar histologic features and are primarily characterized by adenomatous proliferation of peripheral lung epithelial cells. Thus it is unnecessary to invoke a role for

  8. Akt kinase-interacting protein1, a novel therapeutic target for lung cancer with EGFR-activating and gatekeeper mutations.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Takeuchi, S; Fujita, N; Nakamura, A; Wang, W; Li, Q; Oda, M; Mitsudomi, T; Yatabe, Y; Sekido, Y; Yoshida, J; Higashiyama, M; Noguchi, M; Uehara, H; Nishioka, Y; Sone, S; Yano, S

    2013-09-12

    Despite initial dramatic response, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant lung cancer patients always acquire resistance to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Gatekeeper T790M mutation in EGFR is the most prevalent genetic alteration underlying acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI, and EGFR mutant lung cancer cells are reported to be addictive to EGFR/Akt signaling even after acquired T790M mutation. Here, we focused on Akt kinase-interacting protein1 (Aki1), a scaffold protein of PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/PDK1 (3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase)/Akt that determines receptor signal selectivity for non-mutated EGFR, and assessed its role in EGFR mutant lung cancer with or without gatekeeper T790M mutation. Cell line-based assays showed that Aki1 constitutively associates with mutant EGFR in lung cancer cells with (H1975) or without (PC-9 and HCC827) T790M gatekeeper mutation. Silencing of Aki1 induced apoptosis of EGFR mutant lung cancer cells. Treatment with Aki1 siRNA dramatically inhibited growth of H1975 cells in a xenograft model. Moreover, silencing of Aki1 further potentiated growth inhibitory effect of new generation EGFR-TKIs against H1975 cells in vitro. Aki1 was frequently expressed in tumor cells of EGFR mutant lung cancer patients (53/56 cases), including those with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKI treatment (7/7 cases). Our data suggest that Aki1 may be a critical mediator of survival signaling from mutant EGFR to Akt, and may therefore be an ideal target for EGFR mutant lung cancer patients, especially those with acquired EGFR-TKI resistance due to EGFR T790M gatekeeper mutation. PMID:23045273

  9. Human Genetic Relevance and Potent Antitumor Activity of Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibition in Canine Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Clemente-Vicario, Francisco; Alvarez, Carlos E.; Rowell, Jennie L.; Roy, Satavisha; London, Cheryl A.; Kisseberth, William C.; Lorch, Gwendolen

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been an open question how similar human and canine lung cancers are. This has major implications in availability of human treatments for dogs and in establishing translational models to test new therapies in pet dogs. The prognosis for canine advanced lung cancer is poor and new treatments are needed. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is an ATPase-dependent molecular chaperone ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotic cells. HSP90 is essential for posttranslational conformational maturation and stability of client proteins including protein kinases and transcription factors, many of which are important for the proliferation and survival of cancer cells. We investigated the activity of STA-1474, a HSP90 inhibitor, in two canine lung cancer cell lines, BACA and CLAC. Results Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of both cell lines revealed genetic relevance to human non-small cell lung cancer. STA-1474 inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of both cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The ICs50 after 72 h treatment with STA-1474 were 0.08 and 0.11 μM for BACA and CLAC, respectively. When grown as spheroids, the IC50 of STA-1474 for BACA cells was approximately two-fold higher than when grown as a monolayer (0.348 μM vs. 0.168 μM), whereas CLAC spheroids were relatively drug resistant. Treatment of tumor-stromal fibroblasts with STA-1474 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in their relative cell viability with a low IC50 of 0.28 μM. Conclusions Here we first established that lung adenocarcinoma in people and dogs are genetically and biochemically similar. STA1474 demonstrated biological activity in both canine lung cancer cell lines and tumor-stromal fibroblasts. As significant decreases in relative cell viability can be achieved with nanomolar concentrations of STA-1474, investigation into the clinical efficacy of this drug in canine lung cancer patients is warranted. PMID:26560147

  10. Regulation of Thrombin-Induced Lung Endothelial Cell Barrier Disruption by Protein Kinase C Delta

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Lishi; Chiang, Eddie T.; Kelly, Gabriel T.; Kanteti, Prasad; Singleton, Patrick A.; Camp, Sara M.; Zhou, Tingting; Dudek, Steven M.; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Wang, Ting; Black, Steven M.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Protein Kinase C (PKC) plays a significant role in thrombin-induced loss of endothelial cell (EC) barrier integrity; however, the existence of more than 10 isozymes of PKC and tissue–specific isoform expression has limited our understanding of this important second messenger in vascular homeostasis. In this study, we show that PKCδ isoform promotes thrombin-induced loss of human pulmonary artery EC barrier integrity, findings substantiated by PKCδ inhibitory studies (rottlerin), dominant negative PKCδ construct and PKCδ silencing (siRNA). In addition, we identified PKCδ as a signaling mediator upstream of both thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation and Rho GTPase activation affecting stress fiber formation, cell contraction and loss of EC barrier integrity. Our inhibitor-based studies indicate that thrombin-induced PKCδ activation exerts a positive feedback on Rho GTPase activation and contributes to Rac1 GTPase inhibition. Moreover, PKD (or PKCμ) and CPI-17, two known PKCδ targets, were found to be activated by PKCδ in EC and served as modulators of cytoskeleton rearrangement. These studies clarify the role of PKCδ in EC cytoskeleton regulation, and highlight PKCδ as a therapeutic target in inflammatory lung disorders, characterized by the loss of barrier integrity, such as acute lung injury and sepsis. PMID:27442243

  11. Effects of protein deficiency and food restriction on lung ascorbic acid and glutathione in rats exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Dubick, M.A.; Heng, H.; Rucker, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    Weanling (52 +/- 4 g) or adult (259 +/- 16 g) male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum casein-based diets containing 4 or 16% protein. A third group (food restricted) was fed daily the 16% protein diet, but at the food intake level of the 4% protein group. After 3 wk (weanling) or 5 wk (adults), half of the rats in each group were continuously exposed to 0.64 ppm ozone for 7 d. Ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione levels were then measured. In the heart and liver from weanling rats, ascorbic acid concentrations were lower in the protein-deficient group than in either control group. In the liver from weanling rats glutathione concentrations were also reduced in response to protein deficiency. Exposure to ozone produced no additional response. For adult rats the response for liver glutathione was similar to that of the weanlings. The liver ascorbate concentration, however, was consistently lower in adult rats compared to weanlings exposed to ozone. In lungs from adult rats, the ascorbic acid concentration was lower in the protein-deficient group than in either control group. On a whole-organ basis, both ascorbic acid and glutathione were usually higher in lungs from rats exposed to ozone than from those exposed to air. Interestingly, protein deficiency did not appear to compromise the lung's ability to maintain, in relative terms, the ascorbic acid or glutathione concentration in response to ozone.

  12. Zinc modulates cytokine-induced lung epithelial cell barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shenying; Knoell, Daren L

    2006-12-01

    Apoptosis plays a causative role in acute lung injury in part due to epithelial cell loss. We recently reported that zinc protects the lung epithelium during inflammatory stress whereas depletion of intracellular zinc enhances extrinsic apoptosis. In this investigation, we evaluated the relationship between zinc, caspase-3, and cell-to-cell contact via proteins that form the adherens junction complex. Cell adhesion proteins are directly responsible for formation of the mechanical barrier of the lung epithelium. We hypothesized that exposure to inflammatory cytokines, in conjunction with zinc deprivation, would induce caspase-3, leading to degradation of junction proteins, loss of cell-to-cell contact, and compromised barrier function. Primary human upper airway and type I/II alveolar epithelial cultures were obtained from multiple donors and exposed to inflammatory stimuli that provoke extrinsic apoptosis in addition to depletion of intracellular zinc. We observed that zinc deprivation combined with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, and Fas receptor ligation accelerates caspase-3 activation, proteolysis of E-cadherin and beta-catenin, and cellular apoptosis, leading to increased paracellular leak across monolayers of both upper airway and alveolar lung epithelial cultures. Zinc supplementation inhibited apoptosis and paracellular leak, whereas caspase inhibition was less effective. We conclude that zinc is a vital factor in the lung epithelium that protects against death receptor-mediated apoptosis and barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, our findings suggest that although caspase-3 inhibition reduces lung epithelial apoptosis it does not prevent mechanical dysfunction. These findings facilitate future studies aimed at developing therapeutic strategies to prevent acute lung injury. PMID:16844947

  13. Modern halogen leak detectors /Review/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evlampiev, A. I.; Karpov, V. I.; Levina, L. E.

    1981-04-01

    The halogen method is one of the basic techniques of leak detection for monitoring airtightness in such objects as refrigeration equipment and aerosol containers. Sensitivity has been improved by heated platinum emitters which stabilize background currents. Methods for protecting the region in which the gas is selected include placing the sensitive element in a new flow gauge and keeping the chamber at a certain distance from the tested surface. Chromatograph separating columns both increase sensitivity and distinguish test materials on a background of extraneous halogen-containing materials. Solid-state platinum diodes have been used as the sensitive elements of halogen leak detectors. Leak detectors based on electron-capture practically eliminate the effect of contamination of the surrounding atmosphere on leak detector sensitivity. A technique of vacuum testing is based on the high affinity of halogen-containing materials for electrons.

  14. Modern halogen leak detectors /Review/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evlampiev, A. I.; Karpov, V. I.; Levina, L. E.

    1980-09-01

    The halogen method is one of the basic techniques of leak detection for monitoring airtightness in such objects as refrigeration equipment and aerosol containers. Sensitivity has been improved by heated platinum emitters which stabilize background currents. Methods for protecting the region in which the gas is selected include placing the sensitive element in a new flow gauge and keeping the chamber at a certain distance from the tested surface. Chromatograph separating columns both increase sensitivity and distinguish test materials on a background of extraneous halogen-containing materials. Solid-state platinum diodes have been used as the sensitive elements of halogen leak detectors. Leak detectors based on electron-capture practically eliminate the effect of contamination of the surrounding atmosphere on leak detector sensitivity. A technique of vacuum testing is based on the high affinity of halogen-containing materials for electrons.

  15. Lung diffusion testing

    MedlinePlus

    Lung diffusion testing measures how well the lungs exchange gases. This is an important part of lung testing , because ... Gender Height Hemoglobin (the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen) level

  16. Eosinophil-Associated Lung Diseases. A Cry for Surfactant Proteins A and D Help?

    PubMed Central

    Ledford, Julie G.; Addison, Kenneth J.; Foster, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D (SP-A/-D) play important roles in numerous eosinophil-dominated diseases, including asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and allergic rhinitis. In these settings, SP-A/-D have been shown to modulate eosinophil chemotaxis, inhibit eosinophil mediator release, and mediate macrophage clearance of apoptotic eosinophils. Dysregulation of SP-A/-D function in eosinophil-dominated diseases is also not uncommon. Alterations in serum SP-A/-D levels are associated with disease severity in allergic rhinitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, oligimerization of SP-A/-D, necessary for their proper function, can be perturbed by reactive nitrogen species, which are increased in eosinophilic disease. In this review, we highlight the associations of eosinophilic lung diseases with SP-A and SP-D levels and functions. PMID:24960334

  17. CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Is Dispensable for Development of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Sohei; VanderLaan, Paul A.; Levantini, Elena; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Hirai, Hideyo; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Costa, Daniel B.; Watanabe, Hideo; Kobayashi, Susumu S.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Although disruption of normal proliferation and differentiation is a vital component of tumorigenesis, the mechanisms of this process in lung cancer are still unclear. A transcription factor, C/EBPβ is a critical regulator of proliferation and/or differentiation in multiple tissues. In lung, C/EBPβ is expressed in alveolar pneumocytes and bronchial epithelial cells; however, its roles on normal lung homeostasis and lung cancer development have not been well described. Here we investigated whether C/EBPβ is required for normal lung development and whether its aberrant expression and/or activity contribute to lung tumorigenesis. We showed that C/EBPβ was expressed in both human normal pneumocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. We found that overall lung architecture was maintained in Cebpb knockout mice. Neither overexpression of nuclear C/EBPβ nor suppression of CEBPB expression had significant effects on cell proliferation. C/EBPβ expression and activity remained unchanged upon EGF stimulation. Furthermore, deletion of Cebpb had no impact on lung tumor burden in a lung specific, conditional mutant EGFR lung cancer mouse model. Analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) revealed that expression, promoter methylation, or copy number of CEBPB was not significantly altered in human lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data suggest that C/EBPβ is dispensable for development of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:25767874

  18. Leak test adapter for containers

    DOEpatents

    Hallett, Brian H.; Hartley, Michael S.

    1996-01-01

    An adapter is provided for facilitating the charging of containers and leak testing penetration areas. The adapter comprises an adapter body and stem which are secured to the container's penetration areas. The container is then pressurized with a tracer gas. Manipulating the adapter stem installs a penetration plug allowing the adapter to be removed and the penetration to be leak tested with a mass spectrometer. Additionally, a method is provided for using the adapter.

  19. RAD51 variant proteins from human lung and kidney tumors exhibit DNA strand exchange defects.

    PubMed

    Silva, Michelle C; Morrical, Milagros D; Bryan, Katie E; Averill, April M; Dragon, Julie; Bond, Jeffrey P; Morrical, Scott W

    2016-06-01

    In human cells, error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks requires the DNA pairing and strand exchange activities of RAD51 recombinase. Activation of RAD51 recombination activities requires the assembly of RAD51 presynaptic filaments on the single-stranded DNA that forms at resected DSB ends. Mutations in proteins that control presynaptic filament assembly, such as BRCA2, and in RAD51 itself, are associated with human breast cancer. Here we describe the properties of two mutations in RAD51 protein that derive from human lung and kidney tumors, respectively. Sequence variants Q268P and Q272L both map to the DNA binding loop 2 (L2) region of RAD51, a motif that is involved in DNA binding and in the allosteric activation of ATP hydrolysis and DNA strand exchange activities. Both mutations alter the thermal stability, DNA binding, and ATPase properties of RAD51, however both variants retain intrinsic DNA strand exchange activity towards oligonucleotide substrates under optimized conditions. In contrast, both Q268P and Q272L variants exhibit drastically reduced DNA strand exchange activity in reaction mixtures containing long homologous ssDNA and dsDNA substrates and human RPA protein. Mixtures of wild-type and variant proteins also exhibit reduced DNA strand exchange activity, suggesting that heterozygous mutations could negatively affect DNA recombination and repair processes in vivo. Together, the findings of this study suggest that hypomorphic missense mutations in RAD51 protein could be drivers of genomic instability in cancer cells, and thereby contribute to the etiology of metastatic disease. PMID:27153211

  20. The Effect of Cigarette Smoke on the Translocator Protein (TSPO) in Cultured Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nagler, Rafael; Cohen, Shiri; Gavish, Moshe

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer is prevalent in cigarette smokers. The mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (TSPO), is thought to protect cells from free radical damage. We examined the effect of cigarette smoke (CS) (containing free radicals) alone and in the presence of saliva (containing redox active free iron), on survival of H1299 lung cancer cells and on their mitochondrial characteristics, and whether TSPO binding was influenced by CS and by saliva. We exposed H1299 cells to CS in the presence/absence of saliva and also characterized TSPO binding in the cells using [3H]PK 11195 as a radioligand. CS induced a significant drop in mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm), while addition of saliva did not lead to further loss of ΔΨm (42.5% vs. 39.85%). Scatchard analysis of the saturation curve of [3H]PK 11195 binding (0.2-6 nM final concentration) yielded a straight-line plot (R =  0.9). Average Bmax value was 3274 ± 787 fmol/mg of protein, and average Kd value was 9.2 ± 1.3 nM. Benzodiazepine diazepam partially prevented decrease in cell survival following exposure to CS and redox active iron containing media (saliva) while benzodiazepine clonazepam did not, indicating that this effect is TSPO-specific. Exposure of cells to CS resulted in alternation of biomolecules expressed by CLs peroxidation, reduction of TSPO binding, and depletion of the mitochondrial potential. This irreversible damage was enhanced in the presence of saliva. All these modulations may result in cellular death increase following CS exposure, enhanced in the presence of saliva. PMID:25968977

  1. DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title: DO ACUTE PHASE PROTEINS REFLECT THE SEVERITY OF INFLAMMATION IN RAT MODELS OF POLLUTANT-INDUCED LUNG INJURY?

    M. C. Schladweiler, BS 1, P. S. Gilmour, PhD 2, D. L. Andrews, BS 1, D. L. Costa, ScD 1, A. D. Ledbetter, BS 1, K. E. Pinkerton, PhD 3 and U. P. Kodavanti, ...

  2. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice fed a high-fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. Adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines that contribute obesity-related malignant progression. This study investigated the effects of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) deficiency on pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in male C57...

  3. MIIP accelerates epidermal growth factor receptor protein turnover and attenuates proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Fu, Jianhua; Ling, Yihong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The migration and invasion inhibitory protein (MIIP) has been discovered recently to have inhibitory functions in cell proliferation and migration. Overexpression of MIIP reduced the intracellular steady-state level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein in lung cancer cells with no effect on EGFR mRNA expression compared to that in the control cells. This MIIP-promoted EGFR protein degradation was reversed by proteasome and lysosome inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of both proteasomal and lysosomal pathways in this degradation. This finding was further validated by pulse-chase experiments using 35S-methionine metabolic labeling. We found that MIIP accelerates EGFR protein turnover via proteasomal degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum and then via the lysosomal pathway after its entry into endocytic trafficking. MIIP-stimulated downregulation of EGFR inhibits downstream activation of Ras and blocks the MEK signal transduction pathway, resulting in inhibition of cell proliferation. The negative correlation between MIIP and EGFR protein expression was validated in lung adenocarcinoma samples. Furthermore, the higher MIIP protein expression predicts a better overall survival of Stage IA-IIIA lung adenocarcinoma patients who underwent radical surgery. These findings reveal a new mechanism by which MIIP inhibits cell proliferation. PMID:26824318

  4. Protein Kinase D Is Increased and Activated in Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Huachen; McKenzie, Raymond; Hao, Qin; Idell, Steven; Tang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a relentlessly progressive and usually fatal lung disease of unknown etiology for which no effective treatments currently exist. Hence, there is a profound need for the identification of novel drugable targets to develop more specific and efficacious therapeutic intervention in IPF. In this study, we performed immunohistochemical analyses to assess the cell type-specific expression and activation of protein kinase D (PKD) family kinases in normal and IPF lung tissue sections. We also analyzed PKD activation and function in human lung epithelial cells. We found that PKD family kinases (PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3) were increased and activated in the hyperplastic and regenerative alveolar epithelial cells lining remodeled fibrotic alveolar septa and/or fibroblast foci in IPF lungs compared with normal controls. We also found that PKD family kinases were increased and activated in alveolar macrophages, bronchiolar epithelium, and honeycomb cysts in IPF lungs. Interestingly, PKD1 was highly expressed and activated in the cilia of IPF bronchiolar epithelial cells, while PKD2 and PKD3 were expressed in the cell cytoplasm and nuclei. In contrast, PKD family kinases were not apparently increased and activated in IPF fibroblasts or myofibroblasts. We lastly found that PKD was predominantly activated by poly-L-arginine, lysophosphatidic acid and thrombin in human lung epithelial cells and that PKD promoted epithelial barrier dysfunction. These findings suggest that PKD may participate in the pathogenesis of IPF and may be a novel target for therapeutic intervention in this disease. PMID:25000413

  5. Prognostic significance of RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) on non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pataer, Abujiang; Raso, Maria Gabriela; Correa, Arlene M; Behrens, Carmen; Tsuta, Koji; Solis, Luisa; Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Swisher, Stephen G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The role of RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) in antiviral defence mechanisms and in cellular differentiation, growth, and apoptosis is well known, but the role of PKR in human lung cancer remains poorly understood. To explore the role of PKR in human lung cancer, we evaluated PKR’s expression in tissue microarray specimens from both non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and normal human bronchial epithelium tissue. Experimental Design Tissue microarray samples (TMA-1) from 231 lung cancers were stained with PKR antibody and validated on TMA-2 from 224 lung cancers. Immunohistochemical expression score was quantified by three pathologists independently. Survival probability was computed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results The NSCLC cells showed lower levels of PKR expression than normal bronchial epithelium cells did. We also found a significant association between lower levels of PKR expression and lymph node metastasis. We found that loss of PKR expression is correlated with a more aggressive behavior, and that a high PKR expression predicts a subgroup of patients with a favorable outcome. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models showed that a lower level of PKR expression was significantly associated with shorter survival in NSCLC patients. We further validated and confirmed that PKR to be a powerful prognostic factor in TMA-2 lung cancer (HR=0.22, P<0.0001). Conclusions Our findings first indicate that PKR expression is an independent prognostic variable in NSCLC patients. PMID:20930042

  6. ADAM9 enhances CDCP1 protein expression by suppressing miR-218 for lung tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Kuo-Liang; Kuo, Ting-Ting; Kuok, Qian-Yu; Lin, Yu-Sen; Hua, Chung-Hung; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Su, Pei-Yuan; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Sher, Yuh-Pyng

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in cancer patients due to the difficulty of controlling this complex process. MicroRNAs (miRNA), endogenous noncoding short RNAs with important biological and pathological functions, may play a regulatory role during cancer metastasis, but this role has yet to be fully defined. We previously demonstrated that ADAM9 enhanced the expression of the pro-migratory protein CDCP1 to promote lung metastasis; however, the regulatory process remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that endogenous miR-218, which is abundant in normal lung tissue but suppressed in lung tumors, is regulated during the process of ADAM9-mediated CDCP1 expression. Suppression of miR-218 was associated with high migration ability in lung cancer cells. Direct interaction between miR-218 and the 3'-UTR of CDCP1 mRNAs was detected in luciferase-based transcription reporter assays. CDCP1 protein levels decreased as expression levels of miR-218 increased, and increased in cells treated with miR-218 antagomirs. Induction of miR-218 inhibited tumor cell mobility, anchorage-free survival, and tumor-initiating cell formation in vitro and delayed tumor metastases in mice. Our findings revealed an integrative tumor suppressor function of miR-218 in lung carcinogenesis and metastasis. PMID:26553452

  7. ADAM9 enhances CDCP1 protein expression by suppressing miR-218 for lung tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Kuo-Liang; Kuo, Ting-Ting; Kuok, Qian-Yu; Lin, Yu-Sen; Hua, Chung-Hung; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Su, Pei-Yuan; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Sher, Yuh-Pyng

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in cancer patients due to the difficulty of controlling this complex process. MicroRNAs (miRNA), endogenous noncoding short RNAs with important biological and pathological functions, may play a regulatory role during cancer metastasis, but this role has yet to be fully defined. We previously demonstrated that ADAM9 enhanced the expression of the pro-migratory protein CDCP1 to promote lung metastasis; however, the regulatory process remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that endogenous miR-218, which is abundant in normal lung tissue but suppressed in lung tumors, is regulated during the process of ADAM9-mediated CDCP1 expression. Suppression of miR-218 was associated with high migration ability in lung cancer cells. Direct interaction between miR-218 and the 3′-UTR of CDCP1 mRNAs was detected in luciferase-based transcription reporter assays. CDCP1 protein levels decreased as expression levels of miR-218 increased, and increased in cells treated with miR-218 antagomirs. Induction of miR-218 inhibited tumor cell mobility, anchorage-free survival, and tumor-initiating cell formation in vitro and delayed tumor metastases in mice. Our findings revealed an integrative tumor suppressor function of miR-218 in lung carcinogenesis and metastasis. PMID:26553452

  8. Protein kinase C zeta mediates cigarette smoke/aldehyde- and lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation and histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Hwang, Jae-woong; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria T; Leitges, Michael; Kishore, Nandini; Li, Xiong; Rahman, Irfan

    2010-02-19

    Atypical protein kinase C (PKC) zeta is an important regulator of inflammation through activation of the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway. Chromatin remodeling on pro-inflammatory genes plays a pivotal role in cigarette smoke (CS)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced abnormal lung inflammation. However, the signaling mechanism whereby chromatin remodeling occurs in CS- and LPS-induced lung inflammation is not known. We hypothesized that PKCzeta is an important regulator of chromatin remodeling, and down-regulation of PKCzeta ameliorates lung inflammation by CS and LPS exposures. We determined the role and molecular mechanism of PKCzeta in abnormal lung inflammatory response to CS and LPS exposures in PKCzeta-deficient (PKCzeta(-/-)) and wild-type mice. Lung inflammatory response was decreased in PKCzeta(-/-) mice compared with WT mice exposed to CS and LPS. Moreover, inhibition of PKCzeta by a specific pharmacological PKCzeta inhibitor attenuated CS extract-, reactive aldehydes (present in CS)-, and LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory mediator release from macrophages. The mechanism underlying these findings is associated with decreased RelA/p65 phosphorylation (Ser(311)) and translocation of the RelA/p65 subunit of NF-kappaB into the nucleus. Furthermore, CS/reactive aldehydes and LPS exposures led to activation and translocation of PKCzeta into the nucleus where it forms a complex with CREB-binding protein (CBP) and acetylated RelA/p65 causing histone phosphorylation and acetylation on promoters of pro-inflammatory genes. Taken together, these data suggest that PKCzeta plays an important role in CS/aldehyde- and LPS-induced lung inflammation through acetylation of RelA/p65 and histone modifications via CBP. These data provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:20007975

  9. Circulating Complexes of the Vitamin D Binding Protein with G-Actin Induce Lung Inflammation by Targeting Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lingyin; Trujillo, Glenda; Miller, Edmund J.; Kew, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the actin scavenger function of the vitamin D binding protein (DBP) in vivo using DBP null (−/−) mice. Intravenous injection of G-actin into wild-type (DBP+/+) and DBP−/− mice showed that contrary to expectations, DBP+/+ mice developed more severe acute lung inflammation. Inflammation was restricted to the lung and pathological changes were clearly evident at 1.5 and 4 hours post-injection but were largely resolved by 24 hours. Histology of DBP+/+ lungs revealed noticeably more vascular leakage, hemorrhage and thickening of the alveolar wall. Flow cytometry analysis of whole lung homogenates showed significantly increased neutrophil infiltration into DBP+/+ mouse lungs at 1.5 and 4 hours. Increased amounts of protein and leukocytes were also noted in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from DBP+/+ mice 4 hours after actin injection. In vitro, purified DBP-actin complexes did not activate complement or neutrophils but induced injury and death of cultured human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Cells treated with DBP-actin showed a significant reduction in viability at 4 hours, this effect was reversible if cells were cultured in fresh media for another 24 hours. However, a 24-hour treatment with DBP-actin complexes showed a significant increase in cell death (95% for HLMVEC, 45% for HUVEC). The mechanism of endothelial cell death was via both caspase-3 dependent (HUVEC) and independent (HLMVEC) pathways. These results demonstrate that elevated levels and/or prolonged exposure to DBP-actin complexes may induce endothelial cell injury and death, particularly in the lung microvasculature. PMID:24268110

  10. Analysis of the relationship between PM2.5 and lung cancer based on protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Shu, Yang; Zhu, Liucun; Yuan, Fei; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung, is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality worldwide. Many etiologic factors for lung cancer tumorigenesis have been identified to date, such as smoking and exposure to radon, cooking fumes and asbestos. Atmospheric pollution has become increasingly heavy in China in recent years. Accordingly, greater numbers of people are paying attention to the air quality around them. PM2.5 (particulate matter with a diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less), which is one of the most important indicators for measuring air quality, can penetrate and be retained in lung tissue. It is believed that PM2.5 may represent a new type of etiological factor for lung cancer. This study constitutes the analysis of the association between PM2.5 and lung cancer. Genes related to small/nonsmall cell lung cancer were evaluated by assigning scores to measure the impact caused by PM2.5. Analyses of small/nonsmall cell lung cancer genes with high scores revealed that it is theoretically possible that PM2.5 is an etiologic factor for lung cancer. Our results provided new insights of the relationship between lung cancers and air pollution. PMID:26552437

  11. RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) depletes nutrients, inducing phosphorylation of AMP-activated kinase in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chengcheng; Hao, Chuncheng; Shao, RuPing; Fang, Bingliang; Correa, Arlene M; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Roth, Jack A; Behrens, Carmen; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Swisher, Stephen G; Pataer, Apar

    2015-05-10

    We have demonstrated that RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) and its downstream protein p-eIF2α are independent prognostic markers for overall survival in lung cancer. In the current study, we further investigate the interaction between PKR and AMPK in lung tumor tissue and cancer cell lines. We examined PKR protein expression in 55 frozen primary lung tumor tissues by Western blotting and analyzed the association between PKR expression and expression of 139 proteins on tissue samples examined previously by Reverse Phase Protein Array (RPPA) from the same 55 patients. We observed that biomarkers were either positively (phosphorylated AMP-activated kinase(T172) [p-AMPK]) or negatively (insulin receptor substrate 1, meiotic recombination 11, ATR interacting protein, telomerase, checkpoint kinase 1, and cyclin E1) correlated with PKR. We further confirmed that induction of PKR with expression vectors in lung cancer cells causes activation of the AMPK protein independent of the LKB1, TAK1, and CaMKKβ pathway. We found that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which increases AMP levels and decreases ATP levels, causing AMPK phosphorylation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting AMPK expression with compound C or siRNA enhanced PKR-mediated cell death. We next explored the combination of PKR and p-AMPK expression in NSCLC patients and observed that expression of p-AMPK predicted a poor outcome for adenocarcinoma patients with high PKR expression and a better prognosis for those with low PKR expression. These findings were consistent with our in vitro results. AMPK might rescue cells facing metabolic stresses, such as ATP depletion caused by PKR. Our data indicate that PKR causes nutrient depletion, which induces the phosphorylation of AMPK. AMPK might act as a protective response to metabolic stresses, such as nutrient deprivation. PMID:25798539

  12. Immunohistochemical characteristics of surfactant proteins a, B, C and d in inflammatory and tumorigenic lung lesions of f344 rats.

    PubMed

    Yokohira, Masanao; Yamakawa, Keiko; Nakano, Yuko; Numano, Takamasa; Furukawa, Fumio; Kishi, Sosuke; Ninomiya, Fumiko; Kanie, Shohei; Hitotsumachi, Hiroko; Saoo, Kousuke; Imaida, Katsumi

    2014-10-01

    Surfactant proteins (SPs), originally known as human lung surfactants, are essential to respiratory structure and function. There are 4 subtypes, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D, with SP-A and SP-D having immunological functions, and SP-B and SP-C having physicochemical properties that reduce the surface tension at biological interfaces. In this experiment, the expressions of SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D in lung neoplastic lesions induced by N-bis (2-hydroxypropyl) nitrosamine (DHPN) and inflammatory lesions due to quartz instillation were examined and compared immunohistochemically. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) lung samples featuring inflammation were obtained with a rat quartz instillation model, and neoplastic lesions, hyperplasias and adenomas, were obtained with the rat DHPN-induced lung carcinogenesis model. In the rat quartz instillation model, male 10-week old F344 rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation (IT) to quartz at a dose of 2 mg/rat suspended in saline (0.2 ml) on day 0, and sacrificed on day 28. Lung tumorigenesis in F344 male rats was initiated by DHPN in drinking water for 2 weeks, and the animals were then sacrificed in week 30. Lung proliferative lesions, hyperplasias and adenomas, were observed with DHPN, and inflammation was observed with quartz. The expressions of SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D were examined immunohistochemically. SP-B and SP-C showed strong expression in lung hyperplasias and adenomas, while SP-A and SP-D were observed in mucus or exudates in inflammatory alveoli. These results suggest the possibility that SP-B and SP-C are related to lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25378802

  13. Intelligent Leak Detection System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-10-27

    apability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a very long time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak in order to implement proper remediation activity. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or nearmore » surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2. This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. The presence of the PDGs were considered in the reservoir model at the injection well and an observation well. High frequency pressure data from sensors were collected based on different synthetic CO2 leakage scenarios in the model. Due to complexity of the pressure signal behaviors, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced to build an Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The ILDS was able to detect leakage characteristics in a short period of time (less than a day) demonstrating the capability of the system in quantifying leakage characteristics subject to complex rate behaviors. The performance of ILDS was examined under different conditions such as multiple well leakages, cap rock leakage, availability of an additional monitoring well, presence of pressure drift

  14. Intelligent Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohaghegh, Shahab D.

    2014-10-27

    apability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a very long time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak in order to implement proper remediation activity. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or near surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2. This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. The presence of the PDGs were considered in the reservoir model at the injection well and an observation well. High frequency pressure data from sensors were collected based on different synthetic CO2 leakage scenarios in the model. Due to complexity of the pressure signal behaviors, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced to build an Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The ILDS was able to detect leakage characteristics in a short period of time (less than a day) demonstrating the capability of the system in quantifying leakage characteristics subject to complex rate behaviors. The performance of ILDS was examined under different conditions such as multiple well leakages, cap rock leakage, availability of an additional monitoring well, presence of pressure drift and noise

  15. Lung Fibrosis-associated Surfactant Protein A1 and C Variants Induce Latent Transforming Growth Factor β1 Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Dey, Moushumi; Yuan, Wen-Cheng; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations of surfactant proteins are recognized as important causes of inherited lung fibrosis. Here, we study rare and common surfactant protein (SP)-A1 and SP-C variants, either discovered in our familial pulmonary fibrosis cohort or described by others. We show that expression of two SP-A1 (R219W and R242*) and three SP-C (I73T, M71V, and L188Q) variant proteins lead to the secretion of the profibrotic latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung epithelial cell lines. The secreted TGF-β1 is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling and is dependent upon expression of the latent TGF-β1 binding proteins. The dependence upon unfolded protein response (UPR) mediators for TGF-β1 induction differs for each variant. TGF-β1 secretion induced by the expression of the common SP-A1 R219W variant is nearly completely blocked by silencing the UPR transducers IRE-1α and ATF6. In contrast, the secretion of TGF-β1 induced by two rare SP-C mutant proteins (I73T and M71V), is largely unaffected by UPR silencing or by the addition of the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, implicating a UPR-independent mechanism for these variants. Blocking TGF-β1 secretion reverses cell death of RLE-6TN cells expressing these SP-A1 and SP-C variants suggesting that anti-TGF-β therapeutics may be beneficial to this molecularly defined subgroup of pulmonary fibrosis patients. PMID:23926107

  16. Lung fibrosis-associated surfactant protein A1 and C variants induce latent transforming growth factor β1 secretion in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Dey, Moushumi; Yuan, Wen-Cheng; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2013-09-20

    Missense mutations of surfactant proteins are recognized as important causes of inherited lung fibrosis. Here, we study rare and common surfactant protein (SP)-A1 and SP-C variants, either discovered in our familial pulmonary fibrosis cohort or described by others. We show that expression of two SP-A1 (R219W and R242*) and three SP-C (I73T, M71V, and L188Q) variant proteins lead to the secretion of the profibrotic latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung epithelial cell lines. The secreted TGF-β1 is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling and is dependent upon expression of the latent TGF-β1 binding proteins. The dependence upon unfolded protein response (UPR) mediators for TGF-β1 induction differs for each variant. TGF-β1 secretion induced by the expression of the common SP-A1 R219W variant is nearly completely blocked by silencing the UPR transducers IRE-1α and ATF6. In contrast, the secretion of TGF-β1 induced by two rare SP-C mutant proteins (I73T and M71V), is largely unaffected by UPR silencing or by the addition of the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, implicating a UPR-independent mechanism for these variants. Blocking TGF-β1 secretion reverses cell death of RLE-6TN cells expressing these SP-A1 and SP-C variants suggesting that anti-TGF-β therapeutics may be beneficial to this molecularly defined subgroup of pulmonary fibrosis patients. PMID:23926107

  17. TGF-β1 protein expression in non-small cell lung cancers is correlated with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ai-Li; Liu, Shu-Guang; Qi, Wen-Juan; Zhao, Yun-Fei; Li, Yu-Mei; Lei, Bin; Sheng, Wen-Jie; Shen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the expression intensity and prognostic significance of TGF-β1 protein in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), immunohistochemistry was carried out in 194 cases of NSCLC and 24 cases of normal lung tissues by SP methods. The PU (positive unit) value was used to assess the TGF-β1 protein expression in systematically selected fields under the microscope with Leica Q500MC image analysis. We found that the TGF-β1 PU value was nearly two-fold higher in NSCLC than in normal lung tissues (p=0.000), being associated with TNM stages (p=0.000) and lymph node metastases (p=0.000), but not to patient age, gender, smoking history, tumor differentiation, histological subtype and tumor location (P>0.05). Univariate analysis indicated that patients with high TGF-β1 protein expression and lymph node metastases demonstrated a poor prognosis (both p=0.000, ). Multivariate analysis showed that TGF-β1 protein expression (RR = 2.565, p=0.002) and lymph node metastases (RR=1.874, p= 0.030) were also independent prognostic factors. Thus, TGF-β1 protein expression may be correlated to oncogenesis and serve as an independent prognostic biomarker for NSCLC. PMID:25338997

  18. A Novel Technique to Treat Air Leak Following Lobectomy: Intrapleural Infusion of Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinou, Froso; Potaris, Konstantinos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.; Tsipas, Panteleimon; Karagkiouzis, Grigorios; Konstantinou, Marios

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent air leak following pulmonary lobectomy can be very difficult to treat and results in prolonged hospitalization. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a new method of postoperative air leak management using intrapleurally infused fresh frozen plasma via the chest tube. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively reviewed 98 consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer and postoperatively developed persistent air leak treated with intrapleural instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Results The study identified 89 men and 9 women, with a median age of 65.5 years (range 48–77 years), with persistent postoperative air leak. Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma was successful in stopping air leaks in 90 patients (92%) within 24 hours, and in 96 patients (98%) within 48 hours, following resumption of the procedure. In the remaining 2, air leak ceased at 14 and 19 days. Conclusions Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma is a safe, inexpensive, and remarkably effective method for treatment of persistent air leak following lobectomy for lung cancer. PMID:27079644

  19. Proteomic analysis of media from lung cancer cells reveals role of 14-3-3 proteins in cachexia

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Julie B.; Moylan, Jennifer S.; Horrell, Erin M. W.; Andrade, Francisco H.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: At the time of diagnosis, 60% of lung cancer patients present with cachexia, a severe wasting syndrome that increases morbidity and mortality. Tumors secrete multiple factors that contribute to cachectic muscle wasting, and not all of these factors have been identified. We used Orbitrap electrospray ionization mass spectrometry to identify novel cachexia-inducing candidates in media conditioned with Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LCM). Results: One-hundred and 58 proteins were confirmed in three biological replicates. Thirty-three were identified as secreted proteins, including 14-3-3 proteins, which are highly conserved adaptor proteins known to have over 200 binding partners. We confirmed the presence of extracellular 14-3-3 proteins in LCM via western blot and discovered that LCM contained less 14-3-3 content than media conditioned with C2C12 myotubes. Using a neutralizing antibody, we depleted extracellular 14-3-3 proteins in myotube culture medium, which resulted in diminished myosin content. We identified the proposed receptor for 14-3-3 proteins, CD13, in differentiated C2C12 myotubes and found that inhibiting CD13 via Bestatin also resulted in diminished myosin content. Conclusions: Our novel findings show that extracellular 14-3-3 proteins may act as previously unidentified myokines and may signal via CD13 to help maintain muscle mass. PMID:25972815

  20. Surfactant protein D suppresses lung cancer progression by downregulation of epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Takahashi, M; Ariki, S; Asakawa, D; Tajiri, M; Wada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Nishitani, C; Takamiya, R; Saito, A; Uehara, Y; Hashimoto, J; Kurimura, Y; Takahashi, H; Kuroki, Y

    2015-02-12

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a member of the collectin family that has an important role in maintaining pulmonary homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrated that SP-D inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that SP-D suppressed epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in A549 cells, H441 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and human EGF receptor (EGFR) stable expression CHO-K1 cells. A binding study using (125)I-EGF demonstrated that SP-D downregulated the binding of EGF to EGFR. A ligand blot indicated that SP-D bound to EGFR, and a lectin blot suggested that EGFR in A549 cells had both high-mannose type and complex type N-glycans. We purified the recombinant extracellular domain of EGFR (soluble EGFR=soluble EGFR (sEGFR)), and demonstrated that SP-D directly bound to sEGFR in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The binding of SP-D to sEGFR was suppressed by EDTA, mannose or N-glycopeptidase F treatment. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that N-glycans in domain III of EGFR were of a high-mannose type. These data suggest that SP-D reduces EGF binding to EGFR through the interaction between the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D and N-glycans of EGFR, and downregulates EGF signaling. Our finding suggests the novel type of regulation system of EGF signaling involving lectin-to-carbohydrate interaction and downregulation of ligand binding. PMID:24608429

  1. Patterns of neutrophil serine protease-dependent cleavage of surfactant protein D in inflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Jessica; McDonald, Barbara; Accurso, Frank J; Crouch, Erika C; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2008-04-01

    The manuscript presents definitive studies of surfactant protein D (SP-D) in the context of inflammatory lung fluids. The extent of SP-D depletion in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of children affected with cystic fibrosis (CF) is demonstrated to correlate best with the presence of the active neutrophil serine protease (NSP) elastase. Novel C-terminal SP-D fragments of 27 kDa and 11 kDa were identified in patient lavage fluid in addition to the previously described N-terminal, 35-kDa fragment by the use of isoelectrofocusing, modified blotting conditions, and region-specific antibodies. SP-D cleavage sites were identified. In vitro treatment of recombinant human SP-D dodecamers with NSPs replicated the fragmentation, but unexpectedly, the pattern of SP-D fragments generated by NSPs was dependent on calcium concentration. Whereas the 35- and 11-kDa fragments were generated when incubations were performed in low calcium (200 microM CaCl(2)), incubations in physiological calcium (2 mM) with higher amounts of elastase or proteinase-3 generated C-terminal 27, 21, and 14 kDa fragments, representing cleavage within the collagen and neck regions. Studies in which recombinant SP-D cleavage by individual NSPs was quantitatively evaluated under low and high calcium conditions showed that the most potent NSP for cleaving SP-D is elastase, followed by proteinase-3, followed by cathepsin G. These relative potency findings were considered in the context of other studies that showed that active NSPs in CF BALF are in the order: elastase, followed by cathepsin G, followed by proteinase-3. The findings support a pre-eminent role for neutrophil elastase as the critical protease responsible for SP-D depletion in inflammatory lung disease. PMID:18211966

  2. Persistence of LPS-induced lung inflammation in surfactant protein-C-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Maxfield, Melissa D; Ruetschilling, Teah L; Akinbi, Henry T; Baatz, John E; Kitzmiller, Joseph A; Page, Kristen; Xu, Yan; Bao, Erik L; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein-C (SP-C) gene-targeted mice (Sftpc(-/-)) develop progressive lung inflammation and remodeling. We hypothesized that SP-C deficiency reduces the ability to suppress repetitive inflammatory injury. Sftpc(+/+) and Sftpc(-/-) mice given three doses of bacterial LPS developed airway and airspace inflammation, which was more intense in the Sftpc(-/-) mice at 3 and 5 days after the final dose. Compared with Sftpc(+/+)mice, inflammatory injury persisted in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice 30 days after the final LPS challenge. Sftpc(-/-) mice showed LPS-induced airway goblet cell hyperplasia with increased detection of Sam pointed Ets domain and FoxA3 transcription factors. Sftpc(-/-) type II alveolar epithelial cells had increased cytokine expression after LPS exposure relative to Sftpc(+/+) cells, indicating that type II cell dysfunction contributes to inflammatory sensitivity. Microarray analyses of isolated type II cells identified a pattern of enhanced expression of inflammatory genes consistent with an intrinsic low-level inflammation resulting from SP-C deficiency. SP-C-containing clinical surfactant extract (Survanta) or SP-C/phospholipid vesicles blocked LPS signaling through the LPS receptor (Toll-like receptor [TLR] 4/CD14/MD2) in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, indicating that SP-C blocks LPS-induced cytokine production by a TLR4-dependent mechanism. Phospholipid vesicles alone did not modify the TLR4 response. In vivo deficiency of SP-C leads to inflammation, increased cytokine production by type II cells, and persistent inflammation after repetitive LPS stimulation. PMID:23795648

  3. Mitigated Transfer Line Leaks that Result in Surface Pools and Spray Leaks into Pits

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    1999-12-07

    This analysis provides radiological and toxicological consequence calculations for postulated mitigated leaks during transfers of six waste compositions. Leaks in Cleanout Boxes equipped with supplemental covers and leaks in pits are analyzed.

  4. Construction of protein interaction network involved in lung adenocarcinomas using a novel algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Li, Zhu; Xu, Ning; Yu, Bo; Xu, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Pei-Ge; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiu-Juan; Lin, Dian-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Studies that only assess differentially-expressed (DE) genes do not contain the information required to investigate the mechanisms of diseases. A complete knowledge of all the direct and indirect interactions between proteins may act as a significant benchmark in the process of forming a comprehensive description of cellular mechanisms and functions. The results of protein interaction network studies are often inconsistent and are based on various methods. In the present study, a combined network was constructed using selected gene pairs, following the conversion and combination of the scores of gene pairs that were obtained across multiple approaches by a novel algorithm. Samples from patients with and without lung adenocarcinoma were compared, and the RankProd package was used to identify DE genes. The empirical Bayesian (EB) meta-analysis approach, the search tool for the retrieval of interacting genes/proteins database (STRING), the weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) package and the differentially-coexpressed genes and links package (DCGL) were used for network construction. A combined network was also constructed with a novel rank-based algorithm using a combined score. The topological features of the 5 networks were analyzed and compared. A total of 941 DE genes were screened. The topological analysis indicated that the gene interaction network constructed using the WGCNA method was more likely to produce a small-world property, which has a small average shortest path length and a large clustering coefficient, whereas the combined network was confirmed to be a scale-free network. Gene pairs that were identified using the novel combined method were mostly enriched in the cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. The present study provided a novel perspective to the network-based analysis. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. Compared with single methods, the combined algorithm used in the present study may provide a novel method to

  5. Localized Expression of Tenascin in Systemic Sclerosis-Associated Lung Fibrosis and its Regulation by IGF Binding Protein (IGFBP)-3

    PubMed Central

    Brissett, Monique; Veraldi, Kristen L.; Pilewski, Joseph M.; Medsger, Thomas A.; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Tenascin (TN)-C is an extracellular matrix protein associated with injury and remodeling. Since Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β induces both TN-C and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein (IGFBP)-3, we sought to determine the role of IGFBP-3 in mediating TGF-β’s effects on TN-C production and to assess the levels of TN-C in vivo in SSc-associated pulmonary fibrosis (PF). Methods Primary human lung fibroblasts were stimulated with TGF-β or IGFBP-3 in the presence or absence of specific siRNAs and chemical signaling cascade inhibitors. TN-C levels were examined in lung tissues of patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)-associated pulmonary fibrosis using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and compared to those of normal donors. TN-C levels were quantified in serum from normal donors and patients with SSc with or without PF using ELISA. Results IGFBP-3 mediated TGF-β induction of TN-C. Direct induction of TN-C by IGFBP-3 occurred in a p38K-dependent manner. TN-C levels were abundant in SSc lung tissues and localized to subepithelial layers of the distal airways. No TN-C was detectable around proximal airways. Patients with SSc-associated pulmonary fibrosis had significantly greater levels of circulating TN-C compared to patients without this complication. Longitudinal samples obtained from patients with SSc before and after the onset of PF showed increased levels post-PF. Conclusion IGFBP-3, which is overexpressed in fibrotic lungs, induces production of TN-C by subepithelial fibroblasts. The increased lung tissue levels of TN-C parallel levels detected in sera of patients with SSc and lung fibrosis, suggesting that TN-C may be a useful biomarker for SSc-PF. PMID:21898349

  6. Humoral immune response against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-specific proteins after HCMV infection in lung transplantation as detected with recombinant and naturally occurring proteins.

    PubMed Central

    van Zanten, J; Harmsen, M C; van der Giessen, M; van der Bij, W; Prop, J; de Leij, L; The, T H

    1995-01-01

    The humoral immune response to four intracellularly located cytomegalovirus (CMV) proteins was studied in 15 lung transplant recipients experiencing active CMV infections. Five patients had primary infections, and 10 had secondary infections. Antibodies of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG classes were measured in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system in which procaryotically expressed recombinant proteins were used as a substrate and also in a monoclonal antibody-based capture ELISA which uses naturally occurring proteins as a substrate. The proteins investigated were the lower matrix protein pp65 (ppUL83), the major DNA-binding protein p52 (ppUL44), and the two immediate early proteins IE1 and IE2 (different splicing products of UL123). Higher levels of antibodies were found to pp65 and especially to p52 than to the immediate early antigens. Antibody levels detected in the recombinant protein-based ELISAs were generally lower than antibody responses detected with the matching antigen capture ELISA. Moreover, some patients appeared to have antibodies mainly to epitopes present on naturally occurring proteins. The antibody responses detected in both assays were related to the viral load during infection as assessed by the CMV antigenemia test, which is a quantitative marker for CMV load. It was found that although epitopes on naturally occurring proteins induce higher antibody responses and responses in more patients, antibodies directed to epitopes present on the recombinant proteins were inversely related to the viral load during a CMV infection. Therefore, antibodies to epitopes on the recombinant proteins might be more clinically relevant in this group of lung transplant recipients. PMID:7535179

  7. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B negatively regulates S100A9-mediated lung damage during respiratory syncytial virus exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Foronjy, R F; Ochieng, P O; Salathe, M A; Dabo, A J; Eden, E; Baumlin, N; Cummins, N; Barik, S; Campos, M; Thorp, E B; Geraghty, P

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has anti-inflammatory potential but PTP1B responses are desensitized in the lung by prolonged cigarette smoke exposure. Here we investigate whether PTP1B expression affects lung disease severity during respiratory syncytial viral (RSV) exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Ptp1b(-/-) mice infected with RSV exhibit exaggerated immune cell infiltration, damaged epithelial cell barriers, cytokine production, and increased apoptosis. Elevated expression of S100A9, a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, was observed in the lungs of Ptp1b(-/-) mice during RSV infection. Utilizing a neutralizing anti-S100A9 IgG antibody, it was determined that extracellular S100A9 signaling significantly affects lung damage during RSV infection. Preexposure to cigarette smoke desensitized PTP1B activity that coincided with enhanced S100A9 secretion and inflammation in wild-type animals during RSV infection. S100A9 levels in human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid had an inverse relationship with lung function in healthy subjects, smokers, and COPD subjects. Fully differentiated human bronchial epithelial cells isolated from COPD donors cultured at the air liquid interface secreted more S100A9 than cells from healthy donors or smokers following RSV infection. Together, these findings show that reduced PTP1B responses contribute to disease symptoms in part by enhancing S100A9 expression during viral-associated COPD exacerbations. PMID:26813343

  8. GPRC5A suppresses protein synthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum to prevent radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Farris, Alton B.; Xu, Kaiming; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Xiangming; Duong, Duc M.; Yi, Hong; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Sun, Shi-Yong; Wang, Ya

    2016-01-01

    GPRC5A functions as a lung tumour suppressor to prevent spontaneous and environmentally induced lung carcinogenesis; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we reveal that GPRC5A at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane suppresses synthesis of the secreted or membrane-bound proteins including a number of oncogenes, the most important one being Egfr. The ER-located GPRC5A disturbs the assembly of the eIF4F-mediated translation initiation complex on the mRNA cap through directly binding to the eIF4F complex with its two middle extracellular loops. Particularly, suppression of EGFR by GPRC5A contributes significantly to preventing ionizing radiation (IR)-induced lung tumorigenesis. Thus, GPRC5A deletion enhances IR-promoted EGFR expression through an increased translation rate, thereby significantly increasing lung tumour incidence in Gprc5a−/− mice. Our findings indicate that under-expressed GPRC5A during lung tumorigenesis enhances any transcriptional stimulation through an active translational status, which can be used to control oncogene expression and potentially the resulting related disease. PMID:27273304

  9. A Low-Protein Diet Enhances Angiotensin II Production in the Lung of Pregnant Rats but Not Nonpregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Haijun; Tanchico, Daren Tubianosa; Yallampalli, Uma; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary angiotensin II production is enhanced in pregnant rats fed a low-protein (LP) diet. Here we assessed if LP diet induces elevations in angiotensin II production in nonpregnant rats and whether Ace expression and ACE activity in lungs are increased. Nonpregnant rats were fed a normal (CT) or LP diet for 8, 12, or 17 days and timed pregnant rats fed for 17 days from Day 3 of pregnancy. Plasma angiotensin II, expressions of Ace and Ace2, and activities of these proteins in lungs, kidneys, and plasma were measured. These parameters were compared among nonpregnant rats or between nonpregnant and pregnant rats fed different diets. Major findings are as follows: (1) plasma angiotensin II levels were slightly higher in the LP than CT group on Days 8 and 12 in nonpregnant rats; (2) expression of Ace and Ace2 and abundance and activities of ACE and ACE2 in lungs, kidneys, and plasma of nonpregnant rats were unchanged by LP diet except for minor changes; (3) the abundance and activities of ACE in lungs of pregnant rats fed LP diet were greater than nonpregnant rats, while those of ACE2 were decreased. These results indicate that LP diet-induced increase in pulmonary angiotensin II production depends on pregnancy. PMID:27195150

  10. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4 signaling antagonist in controlling mouse lung development.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Dong, Yingying; Yu, Mingyan; Zhang, Long; Yan, Xiaohua; Sun, Jingxia; Qiao, Long; Geng, Huixia; Nakajima, Masahiro; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Ye-Guang; Jiang, Dianhua; Ning, Wen

    2011-04-26

    Lung morphogenesis is a well orchestrated, tightly regulated process through several molecular pathways, including TGF-β/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. Alteration of these signaling pathways leads to lung malformation. We investigated the role of Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1), a secreted follistatin-module-containing glycoprotein, in lung development. Deletion of Fstl1 in mice led to postnatal lethality as a result of respiratory failure. Analysis of the mutant phenotype showed that Fstl1 is essential for tracheal cartilage formation and alveolar maturation. Deletion of the Fstl1 gene resulted in malformed tracheal rings manifested as discontinued rings and reduced ring number. Fstl1-deficient mice displayed septal hypercellularity and end-expiratory atelectasis, which were associated with impaired differentiation of distal alveolar epithelial cells and insufficient production of mature surfactant proteins. Mechanistically, Fstl1 interacted directly with BMP4, negatively regulated BMP4/Smad1/5/8 signaling, and inhibited BMP4-induced surfactant gene expression. Reducing BMP signaling activity by Noggin rescued pulmonary atelectasis of Fstl1-deficient mice. Therefore, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence to demonstrate that Fstl1 modulates lung development and alveolar maturation, in part, through BMP4 signaling. PMID:21482757

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and normal protein permeability in the lungs of critically ill patients: a case for low pathogenicity?

    PubMed Central

    Verheij, Joanne; Groeneveld, AB Johan; Beishuizen, Albertus; Lingen, Arthur van; Simoons-Smit, Alberdina M; van Schijndel, Rob JM Strack

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The pathogenicity of late respiratory infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in the critically ill is unclear. Methods In four critically ill patients with persistent pulmonary infiltrates of unknown origin and isolation of HSV-1 from tracheal aspirate or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, at 7 (1–11) days after start of mechanical ventilatory support, a pulmonary leak index (PLI) for 67Gallium (67Ga)-transferrin (upper limit of normal 14.1 × 10-3/min) was measured. Results The PLI ranged between 7.5 and 14.0 × 10-3/min in the study patients. Two patients received a course of acyclovir and all survived. Conclusions The normal capillary permeability observed in the lungs argues against pathogenicity of HSV-1 in the critically ill, and favors that isolation of the virus reflects reactivation in the course of serious illness and immunodepresssion, rather than primary or superimposed infection in the lungs. PMID:15153242

  12. Type II pneumocyte-restricted green fluorescent protein expression after lentiviral transduction of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Stephanie; Gruh, Ina; Winkler, Monica E; Beier, Jennifer; Radtke, Kerstin; Schmiedl, Andreas; Groos, Stephanie; Haverich, Axel; Martin, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Type II alveolar epithelial (AT2) cell-specific reporter expression has been highly useful in the study of embryology and alveolar regeneration in transgenic mice. Technologies enabling efficient gene transfer and cell type-restricted transgene expression in AT2 cells would allow for correction of AT2 cell-based diseases such as genetic surfactant deficiencies. Moreover, such approaches are urgently required to investigate differentiation of AT2 cells from adult and embryonic stem cells of other species than mouse. Using a human surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter fragment, we have constructed lentiviral vectors enabling AT2-restricted transgene expression and identification of stem cell-derived AT2 cells. Lung epithelial cell lines M3E3/C3, H441, RLE-6TN, A549, MLE-12, and MLE-15 were characterized at the molecular and ultrastructural levels to identify cell lines useful to assess the cell type specificity of our vector constructs. After transduction, no green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was observed in nontarget cells including bronchial H441 cells, pulmonary A549 cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells. In contrast, and in correlation with endogenous SP-C expression, lentiviral transduction resulted in stable GFP expression in MLE-12 and MLE-15 AT2 cells. In conclusion, we have constructed a lentiviral vector mediating SP-C promoter-dependent GFP expression. Transgene expression strictly corresponds with an AT2 phenotype of the transduced cells. In particular, the generated vector should facilitate local alveolar gene therapy and investigation of alveolar regeneration and stem cell differentiation. PMID:18052721

  13. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Phosphatase-1 Modulates Regional Effects of Injurious Mechanical Ventilation in Rodent Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moo Suk; Edwards, Michael G.; Sergew, Amen; Riches, David W. H.; Albert, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Mechanical ventilation induces heterogeneous lung injury by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor-κB. Mechanisms regulating regional injury and protective effects of prone positioning are unclear. Objectives: To determine the key regulators of the lung regional protective effects of prone positioning in rodent lungs exposed to injurious ventilation. Methods: Adult rats were ventilated with high (18 ml/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure [PEEP] 0) or low Vt (6 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H2O; 3 h) in supine or prone position. Dorsal–caudal lung mRNA was analyzed by microarray and MAPK phosphatases (MKP)-1 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MKP-1−/− or wild-type mice were ventilated with very high (24 ml/kg; PEEP 0) or low Vt (6–7 ml/kg; PEEP 3 cm H2O). The MKP-1 regulator PG490-88 (MRx-108; 0.75 mg/kg) or phosphate-buffered saline was administered preventilation. Injury was assessed by lung mechanics, bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts, protein content, and lung injury scoring. Immunoblotting for MKP-1, and IκBα and cytokine ELISAs were performed on lung lysates. Measurements and Main Results: Prone positioning was protective against injurious ventilation in rats. Expression profiling demonstrated MKP-1 20-fold higher in rats ventilated prone rather than supine and regional reduction in p38 and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation. MKP-1−/− mice experienced amplified injury. PG490-88 improved static lung compliance and injury scores, reduced bronchioalveolar lavage cell counts and cytokine levels, and induced MKP-1 and IκBα. Conclusions: Injurious ventilation induces MAPK in an MKP-1–dependent fashion. Prone positioning is protective and induces MKP-1. PG490-88 induced MKP-1 and was protective against high Vt in a nuclear factor-κB–dependent manner. MKP-1 is a potential target for modulating regional effects of injurious ventilation. PMID:22582160

  14. Albumin leak across human pulmonary microvascular vs. umbilical vein endothelial cells under septic conditions.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Jennifer L; Wang, Lefeng; Cepinskas, Gediminas; Sandig, Martin; Inculet, Richard; McCormack, David G; Mehta, Sanjay

    2006-01-01

    Human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell (HPMVEC) injury is central to the pathophysiology of human lung injury. However, septic HPMVEC barrier dysfunction and the contribution of neutrophils have not been directly addressed in vitro. Instead, human EC responses are often extrapolated from studies of human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC). We hypothesized that HUVEC was not a good model for investigating HPMVEC barrier function under septic conditions. HPMVEC was isolated from lung tissue resected from lung cancer patients using magnetic bead-bound anti-PECAM-1 antibody. In confluent monolayers in 3-mum cell-culture inserts, we assessed trans-EC Evans-Blue (EB)-conjugated albumin leak under basal, unstimulated conditions and following stimulation with either lipopolysaccharide or a mixture of equal concentrations of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and IFN-gamma (cytomix). Basal EB-albumin leak was significantly lower across HPMVEC than HUVEC (0.64 +/- 0.06% vs. 1.13 +/- 0.10%, respectively, P < 0.001). Lipopolysaccharide and cytomix increased leak across both HPMVEC and HUVEC in a dose-dependent manner, with a similar increase relative to basal leak in both cell types. The presence of neutrophils markedly and dose-dependently enhanced cytomix-induced EB-albumin leak across HPMVEC (P < 0.01), but had no effect on EB-albumin leak across HUVEC. Both cytomix and lipopolysaccharide-induced albumin leak was not associated with a loss of cell viability. In conclusion, HPMVEC barrier dysfunction under septic conditions is dramatically enhanced by neutrophil presence, and HUVEC is not a suitable model for studying HPMVEC septic barrier responses. The direct study of HPMVEC septic responses will lead to a better understanding of human lung injury. PMID:16376951

  15. Pipe Leak Detection Technology Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that one of the nation’s biggest infrastructural needs is the replacement or rehabilitation of the water distribution and transmission systems. The institution of more effective pipe leak detection technology will im...

  16. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  17. Leak prevention critical for ASTs

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.

    1994-08-01

    Aboveground storage tanks can be crafted to prevent leaks caused by vandalism, overfill accidents and faulty valves. New designs and safety devices available in aboveground storage tanks (ASTs) have made ASTs viable option for owners of commercial, institutional and governmental facilities with storage needs of less than 20,000 gallons.

  18. Variable gas leak rate valve

    DOEpatents

    Eernisse, Errol P.; Peterson, Gary D.

    1976-01-01

    A variable gas leak rate valve which utilizes a poled piezoelectric element to control opening and closing of the valve. The gas flow may be around a cylindrical rod with a tubular piezoelectric member encircling the rod for seating thereagainst to block passage of gas and for reopening thereof upon application of suitable electrical fields.

  19. NOS-2 Inhibition in Phosgene-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Filipczak, Piotr T.; Senft, Albert P.; Seagrave, JeanClare; Weber, Waylon; Kuehl, Philip J.; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; McDonald, Jacob D.; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Phosgene exposure via an industrial or warfare release produces severe acute lung injury (ALI) with high mortality, characterized by massive pulmonary edema, disruption of epithelial tight junctions, surfactant dysfunction, and oxidative stress. There are no targeted treatments for phosgene-induced ALI. Previous studies demonstrated that nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS-2) is upregulated in the lungs after phosgene exposure; however, the role of NOS-2 in the pathogenesis of phosgene-induced ALI remains unknown. We previously demonstrated that NOS-2 expression in lung epithelium exacerbates inhaled endotoxin-induced ALI in mice, mediated partially through downregulation of surfactant protein B (SP-B) expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that a selective NOS-2 inhibitor delivered to the lung epithelium by inhalation would mitigate phosgene-induced ALI. Inhaled phosgene produced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, histologic lung injury, and lung NOS-2 expression at 24 h. Administration of the selective NOS-2 inhibitor 1400 W via inhalation, but not via systemic delivery, significantly attenuated phosgene-induced ALI and preserved epithelial barrier integrity. Furthermore, aerosolized 1400 W augmented expression of SP-B and prevented downregulation of tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), both critical for maintenance of normal lung physiology and barrier integrity. We also demonstrate for the first time that NOS-2-derived nitric oxide downregulates the ZO-1 expression at the transcriptional level in human lung epithelial cells, providing a novel target for ameliorating vascular leak in ALI. Our data demonstrate that lung NOS-2 plays a critical role in the development of phosgene-induced ALI and suggest that aerosolized NOS-2 inhibitors offer a novel therapeutic strategy for its treatment. PMID:25870319

  20. Correlation of c-fos protein expression with neuropeptide content in the lung of bronchial asthmatic rat

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyan; Yang, Xudong; Hou, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the correlation between the c-fos protein expression and neuropeptide content in the lung of bronchial asthmatic rats. Methods: Thirty-two (32) SD rats were randomly allocated into 4 groups of the normal control, the non-acute asthma, the acute asthma and the dexamethasone intervention. Immunohistochemistry was performed for histological observation, and substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: SP concentration in the alveolar lavage of asthmatic rat was significantly higher than that in the normal control group (P < 0.0001), whereas VIP concentration was significantly lower (P < 0.0001). The optical density of c-fos protein in the lung tissues of groups of the non-acute asthma, the acute asthma and the dexamethasone intervention was positively correlated with SP concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (r = 0.908, r = 0.967, r = 0.865), and negatively correlated with the VIP concentration in the alveolar lavage (r = -0.974, r = -0.949, r = -0.962). Conclusion: The c-fos protein expression and neuropeptide content in the lungs of asthmatic rats are related with asthma attacks. PMID:25674230

  1. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  2. Stochastic Consequence Analysis for Waste Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    HEY, B.E.

    2000-05-31

    This analysis evaluates the radiological consequences of potential Hanford Tank Farm waste transfer leaks. These include ex-tank leaks into structures, underneath the soil, and exposed to the atmosphere. It also includes potential misroutes, tank overflow

  3. Anaerobic polymers as high vacuum leak sealants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, B. R. F.

    1982-01-01

    Anaerobic polymers are useful as solventless leak sealants with good vacuum properties at moderate temperatures. Loctite 290 can seal leaks in a range generally encountered in carefully constructed ultrahigh vacuum and high vacuum systems. It was found that small leaks are sealed best under vacuum, whereas large leaks should be sealed at atmospheric pressure. The high-temperature behavior of Loctite 290 is limited by its fast cure, which prevents deep penetration into small leaks; cracking eventually occurs at the entrance to the leak. Repeated thermal cycling to about 300 C is possible, however, provided viscosity, curing time, and leak size are properly matched to ensure penetration into the body of the leak. This may require special formulations for high temperature vacuum applications.

  4. IRON INCREASES EXPRESSION OF IRON-EXPORT PROTEIN MTP1 IN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accumulation of reactive iron in acute and chronic lung disease suggests that iron-driven free radical formation could contribute to tissue injury. Safe transport and sequestration of this metal is likely to be of importance in lung defense. We provide evidence for the expression...

  5. Detecting Leaks With An Infrared Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easter, Barry P.; Steffins, Alfred P., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed test reveals small leak in gas pipe - for example, leak through fatigue crack induced by vibration - even though insulation covers pipe. Infrared-sensitive video camera aimed at part(s) containing suspected leak(s). Insulated pipe pressurized with gas that absorbs infrared light. If crack were present, escaping gas travels along outside of pipe until it reached edge of insulation. Gas emerging from edge of insulation appears as dark cloud in video image.

  6. STS-35 scrub 3 hydrogen leak analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seymour, Dave

    1991-01-01

    During the summer of 1990, space shuttle Columbia experienced both an external tank/orbiter disconnect hydrogen leak and multiple internal aft compartment hydrogen leaks. After the third scrub of STS-35, a leak investigation team was organized. In support of this team, an analysis of the data obtained during scrub 3 was performed. Based on this analysis, the engine 2 prevalve was concluded to be the most likely leak location and to account for most of the observed leakage.

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein induces lung epithelial cell cycle arrest through a p53 dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Bian, Tao; Gibbs, John D; Örvell, Claes; Imani, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the major cause of viral respiratory infections in children. Our previous study showed that the RSV infection induced lung epithelial cell cycle arrest, which enhanced virus replication. To address the mechanism of RSV-induced cell cycle arrest, we examined the contribution of RSV-matrix (RSV-M) protein. In this report, we show that in both the A549 cell line and primary human bronchial epithelial (PHBE) cells, transfection with RSV-M protein caused the cells to proliferate at a slower rate than in control cells. The cell cycle analysis showed that RSV-M protein induced G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and G1 and G2/M phase arrest in PHBE cells. Interestingly, RSV-M expression induced p53 and p21 accumulation and decreased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Further, induction of cell cycle arrest by RSV-M was not observed in a p53-deficient epithelial cell line (H1299). However, cell cycle arrest was restored after transfection of p53 cDNA into H1299 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that RSV-M protein regulates lung epithelial cell cycle through a p53-dependent pathway, which enhances RSV replication. PMID:22662266

  8. Sensitivities of Soap Solutions in Leak Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuck, D.; Lam, D. Q.; Daniels, C.

    1985-01-01

    Document describes method for determining minimum leak rate to which soap-solution leak detectors sensitive. Bubbles formed at smaller leak rates than previously assumed. In addition to presenting test results, document discusses effects of joint-flange configurations, properties of soap solutions, and correlation of test results with earlier data.

  9. Applicability of avidin protein coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug carriers in the lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rijt, S. H.; Bölükbas, D. A.; Argyo, C.; Wipplinger, K.; Naureen, M.; Datz, S.; Eickelberg, O.; Meiners, S.; Bein, T.; Schmid, O.; Stoeger, T.

    2016-04-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up by lung epithelial cells, but induced a prolonged inflammatory response in the lung and macrophage cell death. In contrast, MSN-AVI co-localized with alveolar epithelial type 1 and type 2 cells in the lung in the absence of sustained inflammatory responses or cell death, and showed preferential epithelial cell uptake in in vitro co-cultures. Further, MSN-AVI particles demonstrated uniform particle distribution in mouse lungs and slow clearance rates. Thus, we provide evidence that avidin functionalized MSNs (MSN-AVI) have the potential to serve as versatile biocompatible drug carriers for lung-specific drug delivery.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up

  10. Mucosal immunisation with novel Streptococcus pneumoniae protein antigens enhances bacterial clearance in an acute mouse lung infection model.

    PubMed

    Jomaa, Maha; Kyd, Jennelle M; Cripps, Allan W

    2005-04-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae contains many proteins that have not been evaluated as potential protective vaccine antigens. In this study we isolated proteins from a serotype 3 strain of S. pneumoniae for use in mouse immunisation studies. Separation of the protein mix was achieved by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis followed by electro-elution to isolate individual proteins. This procedure successfully separated 21 fractions from which six proteins were selected based on purity and quantity and were initially denoted by their molecular masses: 14-, 34-, 38-, 48-, 57- and 75-kDa. The immunogenicity of these proteins was investigated in a mucosal immunisation model in mice involving a primary inoculation to the intestinal Peyer's patches followed by an intra-tracheal boost two weeks later. The immune response was assessed by enhancement of pulmonary clearance of infection, recruitment of phagocytes to the lungs and induction of an antibody response. Two of the proteins, the 14-kDa identified as a L7/L12 ribosomal protein, and the 34-kDa identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase resulted in up to 99% and 94%, respectively, enhanced clearance of infection within 5 h following pulmonary challenge with S. pneumoniae. This study has shown that novel pneumococcal proteins have the potential to be vaccine candidates to enhance clearance of an acute mucosal S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:15780579

  11. Interaction of ribosomal protein L22 with casein kinase 2α: a novel mechanism for understanding the biology of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxia; Sun, Haibo; He, Ji; Wang, Hong; Yu, Xiaowei; Ma, Lei; Zhu, Changliang

    2014-07-01

    Dysfunction of ribosomal proteins (RPs) may play an important role in molecular tumorigenesis, such as lung cancer, acting in extraribosomal functions. Many protein-protein interaction studies and genetic screens have confirmed the extraribosomal capacity of RPs. As reported, ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22) dysfunction could increase cancer risk. In the present study, we examined RPL22-protein complexes in lung cancer cells. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) was used to screen the RPL22-protein complexes, and GST pull-down experiments and confocal microscopy were used to assess the protein-protein interaction. The experiment of kinase assay was used to study the function of the RPL22-protein complexes. The results showed that several differentially expressed proteins were isolated and identified by LC-MS/MS, which revealed that one of the protein complexes included casein kinase 2α (CK2α). RPL22 and CK2α interact in vitro. RPL22 also inhibited CK2α substrate phosphorylation in vitro. This is the first report of the RPL22-CK2α relationship in lung cancer. Dysregulated CK2 may impact cell proliferation and apoptosis, key features of cancer cell biology. Our results indicate that RPL22 may be a candidate anticancer agent due to its CK2α-binding and -inhibitory functions in human lung cancer. PMID:24840952

  12. Extracellular matrix structure and tissue stiffness control postnatal lung development through the lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5/Tie2 signaling system.

    PubMed

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Jiang, Elisabeth; Jiang, Amanda; Mammoto, Akiko

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties of the tissues and remodeling of extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in organ development. Recently, we have reported that low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 5/Tie2 signaling controls postnatal lung development by modulating angiogenesis. Here we show that tissue stiffness modulated by the ECM cross-linking enzyme, lysyl oxidase (LOX), regulates postnatal lung development through LRP5-Tie2 signaling. The expression of LRP5 and Tie2 is up-regulated twofold in lung microvascular endothelial cells when cultured on stiff matrix compared to those cultured on soft matrix in vitro. LOX inhibitor, β-aminopropionitrile, disrupts lung ECM (collagen I, III, and VI, and elastin) structures, softens neonatal mouse lung tissue by 20%, and down-regulates the expression of LRP5 and Tie2 by 20 and 60%, respectively, which leads to the inhibition of postnatal lung development (30% increase in mean linear intercept, 1.5-fold increase in air space area). Importantly, hyperoxia treatment (Postnatal Days 1-10) disrupts ECM structure and stiffens mouse lung tissue by up-regulating LOX activity, thereby increasing LRP5 and Tie2 expression and deregulating alveolar morphogenesis in neonatal mice, which is attenuated by inhibiting LOX activity. These findings suggest that appropriate physical properties of lung tissue are necessary for physiological postnatal lung development, and deregulation of this mechanism contributes to postnatal lung developmental disorders, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. PMID:23841513

  13. Association between arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP) and lung function in a Korean population.

    PubMed

    Ro, M; Kim, S; Pyun, J-A; Shin, C; Cho, N H; Lee, J-Y; Koh, I; Kwack, K

    2012-08-01

    Arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase-activating protein (ALOX5AP) plays a role in the 5-lipoxygenase (LO) pathway, which includes the LTC(4), LTD(4), LTE(4) and LTB(4). These leukotrienes are known causative factors of asthma, allergy, atopy and cardiovascular diseases. ALOX5AP lacks enzyme activity and acts by helping 5-LO function. In this study, healthy and general subjects who live in rural and urban areas of Korea were tested for the association of ALOX5AP polymorphisms with lung function. Lung function was also estimated by calculating the predicted values for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1) _%PRED) and the proportion of the forced vital capacity exhaled in the first second (FEV(1) /FVC_PRED). The linear regression was adjusted for residence area, gender, age, height and smoking status. The analysis revealed associations between FEV(1) and the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs9506352 and the haplotype TCAC (permuted P-value < 0.05). The linkage disequilibrium block that included the significant SNPs overlapped with SNPs that were revealed previously to associate with myocardial infarction and asthma and to affect lung function. This study is the first to demonstrate the association between lung function and ALOX5AP polymorphisms in a healthy and general population. PMID:22537113

  14. Human Pulmonary Surfactant Protein SP-A1 Provides Maximal Efficiency of Lung Interfacial Films.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pascual, Alicia; Arroyo, Raquel; Floros, Joanna; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipoprotein complex that reduces surface tension to prevent alveolar collapse and contributes to the protection of the respiratory surface from the entry of pathogens. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a hydrophilic glycoprotein of the collectin family, and its main function is related to host defense. However, previous studies have shown that SP-A also aids in the formation and biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant films at the air-water interface. Humans, unlike rodents, have two genes, SFTPA1 and SFTPA2. The encoded proteins, SP-A1 and SP-A2, differ quantitatively or qualitatively in function. It has been shown that both gene products are necessary for tubular myelin formation, an extracellular structural form of lung surfactant. The goal of this study was to investigate potential differences in the biophysical properties of surfactants containing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both. For this purpose, we have studied for the first time, to our knowledge, the biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant from individual humanized transgenic mice expressing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both SP-A1 and SP-A2, in the captive bubble surfactometer. We observed that pulmonary surfactant containing SP-A1 reaches lower surface tension after postexpansion interfacial adsorption than surfactants containing no SP-A or only SP-A2. Under interfacial compression-expansion cycling conditions, surfactant films containing SP-A1 also performed better, particularly with respect to the reorganization of the films that takes place during compression. On the other hand, addition of recombinant SP-A1 to a surfactant preparation reconstituted from the hydrophobic fraction of a porcine surfactant made it more resistant to inhibition by serum than the addition of equivalent amounts of SP-A2. We conclude that the presence of SP-A1 allows pulmonary surfactant to adopt a particularly favorable structure with optimal biophysical properties. PMID:27508436

  15. Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular protein permeability in the dog

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, C.H.; Dauber, I.M.; Weil, J.V.

    1986-10-01

    Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular permeability consistently in some species but fails to reliably cause injury in the dog. We wondered whether this phenomenon depended on the method of injury assessment, as others have relied on edema measurement; we quantified injury by monitoring the rate of extravascular protein accumulation. /sup 113m/In-labeled protein and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled erythrocytes were injected into anesthetized dogs and monitored by an externally placed lung probe. A protein leak index, the rate of extravascular protein accumulation, was derived from the rate of increase in lung protein counts corrected for changes in intravascular protein activity. After administration of Salmonella enteriditis endotoxin (4 micrograms/kg), the protein leak index was elevated 2.5-fold (41.1 +/- 4.6 X 10(-4) min-1) compared with control (16.0 +/- 2.8 X 10(-4) min-1). In contrast, wet-to-dry weight ratios failed to increase after endotoxin (4.6 +/- 0.8 vs. control values of 4.2 +/- 0.5 g/g dry bloodless lung). However, we observed that endotoxin increased lung dry weight (per unit body weight), which may have attenuated the change in wet-to-dry weight ratios. To determine whether low microvascular pressures following endotoxin attenuated edema formation, we increased pulmonary arterial wedge pressures in five dogs by saline infusion, which caused an increase in wet-to-dry weight ratios following endotoxin but no change in the five controls. We conclude that low dose endotoxin causes pulmonary vascular protein leak in the dog while edema formation is minimal or absent.

  16. Leak detection method and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, B.A.

    1982-05-11

    A method and apparatus are described for using sulfur hexafluoride to detect leaks in fluid processing systems. Leak detection can be performed with the processing system continuing in operation. This apparatus detects leakage through a partition separating a portion of a first path from portion of a second path in a fluid processing system, while operation of the system is continued. The apparatus comprises a combination of 1) means for introducing a known quantity of sulfur hexafluoride into fluid flowing in the first path upstream of a partition; 2) means for continuously removing a sample of fluid flowing in the second path at a locus downstream of the partition; 3) means for removing normally liquid components from the sample; 4) means for testing the sample to determine the presence of sulfur hexafluoride; and 5) means for indicating the amount of sulfur hexafluoride in the sample. 2 claims.

  17. Leaking electricity in domestic appliances

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Alan; Rosen, Karen

    1999-05-01

    Many types of home electronic equipment draw electric power when switched off or not performing their principal functions. Standby power use (or ''leaking electricity'') for most appliances ranges from 1 - 20 watts. Even though standby use of each device is small, the combined standby power use of all appliances in a home can easily exceed 50 watts. Leaking electricity is already responsible for 5 to 10 percent of residential electricity use in the United States and over 10 percent in Japan. An increasing number of white goods also have standby power requirements. There is a growing international effort to limit standby power to around one watt per device. New and existing technologies are available to meet this target at little or no extra cost.

  18. Hydrogen Leak Detection Sensor Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Barton D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the characteristics of the Hydrogen Sensor database. The database is the result of NASA's continuing interest in and improvement of its ability to detect and assess gas leaks in space applications. The database specifics and a snapshot of an entry in the database are reviewed. Attempts were made to determine the applicability of each of the 65 sensors for ground and/or vehicle use.

  19. Schlieren optics for leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Robert E.; Ruffin, Alranzo B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an optical method of leak detection. Various modifications of schlieren optics were explored with initial emphasis on leak detection of the plumbing within the orbital maneuvering system of the space shuttle (OMS pod). The schlieren scheme envisioned for OMS pod leak detection was that of a high contrast pattern on flexible reflecting material imaged onto a negative of the same pattern. We find that the OMS pod geometry constrains the characteristic length scale of the pattern to the order of 0.001 inch. Our experiments suggest that optical modulation transfer efficiency will be very low for such patterns, which will limit the sensitivity of the technique. Optical elements which allow a negative of the scene to be reversibly recorded using light from the scene itself were explored for their potential in adaptive single-ended schlieren systems. Elements studied include photochromic glass, bacteriorhodopsin, and a transmissive liquid crystal display. The dynamics of writing and reading patterns were studied using intensity profiles from recorded images. Schlieren detection of index gradients in air was demonstrated.

  20. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  1. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  2. Efficacy of species-specific protein antibiotics in a murine model of acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    PubMed Central

    McCaughey, Laura C.; Ritchie, Neil. D.; Douce, Gillian R.; Evans, Thomas J.; Walker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Protein antibiotics, known as bacteriocins, are widely produced by bacteria for intraspecies competition. The potency and targeted action of bacteriocins suggests that they could be developed into clinically useful antibiotics against highly drug resistant Gram-negative pathogens for which there are few therapeutic options. Here we show that Pseudomonas aeruginosa specific bacteriocins, known as pyocins, show strong efficacy in a murine model of P. aeruginosa lung infection, with the concentration of pyocin S5 required to afford protection from a lethal infection at least 100-fold lower than the most commonly used inhaled antibiotic tobramycin. Additionally, pyocins are stable in the lung, poorly immunogenic at high concentrations and efficacy is maintained in the presence of pyocin specific antibodies after repeated pyocin administration. Bacteriocin encoding genes are frequently found in microbial genomes and could therefore offer a ready supply of highly targeted and potent antibiotics active against problematic Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:27444885

  3. Establishment of a quantitative PCR system for discriminating chitinase-like proteins: catalytically inactive breast regression protein-39 and Ym1 are constitutive genes in mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mice and humans produce chitinase-like proteins (CLPs), which are highly homologous to chitinases but lack chitinolytic activity. Mice express primarily three CLPs, including breast regression protein-39 (BRP-39) [chitinase 3-like-1 (Chi3l1) or 38-kDa glycoprotein (gp38k)], Ym1 (Chi3l3) and Ym2 (Chi3l4). Recently, CLPs have attracted considerable attention due to their increased expression in a number of pathological conditions, including asthma, allergies, rheumatoid arthritis and malignant tumors. Although the exact functions of CLPs are largely unknown, the significance of their increased expression levels during pathophysiological states needs to be determined. The quantification of BRP-39, Ym1 and Ym2 is an important step in gaining insight into the in vivo regulation of the CLPs. Methods We constructed a standard DNA for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) by containing three CLPs target fragments and five reference genes cDNA in a one-to-one ratio. We evaluated this system by analyzing the eight target cDNA sequences. Tissue cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription from total RNA from four embryonic stages and eight adult tissues were analyzed using the qPCR system with the standard DNA. Results We established a qPCR system detecting CLPs and comparing their expression levels with those of five reference genes using the same scale in mouse tissues. We found that BRP-39 and Ym1 were abundant in the mouse lung, whereas Ym2 mRNA was abundant in the stomach, followed by lung. The expression levels of BRP-39 and Ym1 in the mouse lung were higher than those of two active chitinases and were comparable to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a housekeeping gene which is constitutively expressed in all tissues. Conclusion Our results indicate that catalytically inactive BRP-39 and Ym1 are constitutive genes in normal mouse lung. PMID:25294623

  4. Protective effect of geranylgeranylacetone, an inducer of heat shock protein 70, against drug-induced lung injury/fibrosis in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Fujibayashi, Takayoshi; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Jijiwa, Mayumi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Kojima, Toshihisa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    Background To determine whether oral administration of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), a nontoxic anti-ulcer drug that is an inducer of heat shock protein (HSP) 70, protects against drug-induced lung injury/fibrosis in vivo. Methods We used a bleomycin (BLM)-induced lung fibrosis model in which mice were treated with oral 600 mg/kg of GGA before and after BLM administration. Inflammation and fibrosis were evaluated by histological scoring, hydroxyproline content in the lung and inflammatory cell count, and quantification by ELISA of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Apoptosis was evaluated by the TUNEL method. The induction of HSP70 in the lung was examined with western blot analysis and its localization was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results We confirmed the presence of inflammation and fibrosis in the BLM-induced lung injury model and induction of HSP70 by oral administration of GGA. GGA prevented apoptosis of cellular constituents of lung tissue, such as epithelial cells, most likely related to the de novo induction of HSP70 in the lungs. GGA-treated mice also showed less fibrosis of the lungs, associated with the findings of suppression of both production of MIP-2 and inflammatory cell accumulation in the injured lung, compared with vehicle-treated mice. Conclusion GGA had a protective effect on drug-induced lung injury/fibrosis. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs such as methotrexate, which are indispensable for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, often cause interstitial lung diseases, an adverse event that currently cannot be prevented. Clinical use of GGA for drug-induced pulmonary fibrosis might be considered in the future. PMID:19758434

  5. Detection of the Mr 110,000 lung resistance-related protein LRP/MVP with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Schroeijers, A B; Scheffer, G L; Reurs, A W; Pijnenborg, A C; Abbondanza, C; Wiemer, E A; Scheper, R J

    2001-11-01

    The Mr 110,000 lung resistance-related protein (LRP), also termed the major vault protein (MVP), constitutes >70% of subcellular ribonucleoprotein particles called vaults. Overexpression of LRP/MVP and vaults has been linked directly to MDR in cancer cells. Clinically, LRP/MVP expression can be of value to predict response to chemotherapy and prognosis. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against LRP/MVP have played a critical role in determining the relevance of this protein in clinical drug resistance. We compared the applicability of the previously described MAbs LRP-56, LMR-5, LRP, 1027, 1032, and newly isolated MAbs MVP-9, MVP-16, MVP-18, and MVP-37 for the immunodetection of LRP/MVP by immunoblotting analysis and by immunocyto- and histochemistry. The availability of a broader panel of reagents for the specific and sensitive immunodetection of LRP/MVP should greatly facilitate biological and clinical studies of vault-related MDR. PMID:11668191

  6. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak: basis and roles in cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bers, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized SR calcium (Ca) release is critical to normal cardiac myocyte excitation-contraction coupling, and ideally this release shuts off completely between heartbeats. However, other SR Ca release events are referred to collectively as SR Ca leak (which includes Ca sparks and waves as well as smaller events not detectable as Ca sparks). Much, but not all, of the SR Ca leak occurs via ryanodine receptors and can be exacerbated in pathological states such as heart failure. The extent of SR Ca leak is important because it can (a) reduce SR Ca available for release, causing systolic dysfunction; (b) elevate diastolic [Ca]i, contributing to diastolic dysfunction; (c) cause triggered arrhythmias; and (d) be energetically costly because of extra ATP used to repump Ca. This review addresses quantitative aspects and manifestations of SR Ca leak and its measurement, and how leak is modulated by Ca, associated proteins, and posttranslational modifications in health and disease. PMID:24245942

  7. Sealant provides economical solution to subsurface leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, S.

    1999-02-01

    A series of unique field-tested leak sealants have been developed that can withstand the extreme pressure and temperature conditions found in the oilfield. The unique quality of the sealants is that the sealing mechanism is activated by the differential pressure created through a leak site. The sealants are comparable with oil- and glycol-based hydraulic fluids and are particularly useful for sealing leaks in subsurface safety valves, wellhead tubing and casing hanger seals, PBR seal joints, umbilical leaks and subsea well control systems. The chemical remains fluid until it is released through a leak site. The sealant mimics platelets in the human body by forming deposits on leak walls. This process creates a matrix across the leak similar to coagulating blood on a cut. Leak sites can be metal-to-metal seals, elastomer seals, pinhole leaks, or connection leaks. The pressure-activated sealant is stable at high pressures and temperatures up to 15,000 psi and 320 F and does not react with elastomers. The sealant will not plug valves because any pressure from that occurs while opening and closing the valve only lasts for a few seconds, and it is a sustained pressure drop that is required to activate the chemical.

  8. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β Modulate the Severity of Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyu; Bone, Nathaniel; Jiang, Shaoning; Park, Dae Won; Tadie, Jean-Marc; Deshane, Jessy; Rodriguez, Cilina Ann; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Abraham, Edward; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw W

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in metabolic and bioenergetic homeostasis contribute to sepsis-mediated organ injury. However, how AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major sensor and regulator of energy expenditure and production, affects development of organ injury and loss of innate capacity during polymicrobial sepsis remains unclear. In the present experiments, we found that cross-talk between the AMPK and GSK3β signaling pathways controls chemotaxis and the ability of neutrophils and macrophages to kill bacteria ex vivo. In mice with polymicrobial abdominal sepsis or more severe sepsis induced by the combination of hemorrhage and intraabdominal infection, administration of the AMPK activator metformin or the GSK3β inhibitor SB216763 reduced the severity of acute lung injury (ALI). Improved survival in metformin-treated septic mice was correlated with preservation of mitochondrial complex V (ATP synthase) function and increased amounts of ETC complex III and IV. Although immunosuppression is a consequence of sepsis, metformin effectively increased innate immune capacity to eradicate P. aeruginosa in the lungs of septic mice. We also found that AMPK activation diminished accumulation of the immunosuppressive transcriptional factor HIF-1α as well as the development of endotoxin tolerance in LPS-treated macrophages. Furthermore, AMPK-dependent preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential also prevented LPS-mediated dysfunction of neutrophil chemotaxis. These results indicate that AMPK activation reduces the severity of polymicrobial sepsis-induced lung injury and prevents the development of sepsis-associated immunosuppression. PMID:26650187

  9. Epigenetic alterations leading to TMPRSS4 promoter hypomethylation and protein overexpression predict poor prognosis in squamous lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Maria; Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Redrado, Miriam; de Aberasturi, Arrate L.; Segura, Victor; Bodegas, Maria Elena; Pajares, Maria J.; Pio, Ruben; Freire, Javier; Gomez-Roman, Javier; Montuenga, Luis M.; Esteller, Manel; Sandoval, Juan; Calvo, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, which highlights the need of innovative therapeutic options. Although targeted therapies can be successfully used in a subset of patients with lung adenocarcinomas (ADC), they are not appropriate for patients with squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). In addition, there is an unmet need for the identification of prognostic biomarkers that can select patients at risk of relapse in early stages. Here, we have used several cohorts of NSCLC patients to analyze the prognostic value of both protein expression and DNA promoter methylation status of the prometastatic serine protease TMPRSS4. Moreover, expression and promoter methylation was evaluated in a panel of 46 lung cancer cell lines. We have demonstrated that a high TMPRSS4 expression is an independent prognostic factor in SCC. Similarly, aberrant hypomethylation in tumors, which correlates with high TMPRSS4 expression, is an independent prognostic predictor in SCC. The inverse correlation between expression and methylation status was also observed in cell lines. In vitro studies showed that treatment of cells lacking TMPRSS4 expression with a demethylating agent significantly increased TMPRSS4 levels. In conclusion, TMPRSS4 is a novel independent prognostic biomarker regulated by epigenetic changes in SCC and a potential therapeutic target in this tumor type, where targeted therapy is still underdeveloped. PMID:26989022

  10. Antenatal maternal low protein diet: ACE-2 in the mouse lung and sexually dimorphic programming of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravi; Van-Wickle, Jonathan; Goyal, Dipali; Longo, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Elevated blood pressure is an important global health problem, and in-utero under-nutrition may be an important factor in the pathogenesis of hypertension. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that antenatal maternal low protein diet (MLPD) leads to sexually dimorphic developmental programming of the components of the pulmonary renin-angiotensin system. This may be important in the antenatal MLPD-associated development of hypertension. In pregnant mice, we administered normal (control) and isocaloric 50% protein restricted diet, commencing one week before mating and continuing until delivery of the pups. From the 18th to 24th week postnatal, we measured blood pressure in the offspring by use of a non-invasive tail-cuff method. In the same mice, we examined the mRNA and protein expression of the key components of the pulmonary renin-angiotensin system. Also, we examined microRNA complementary to angiotensin converting enzymes (ACE) 2 in the offspring lungs. Our results demonstrate that as a consequence of antenatal MLPD: 1) pup birthweight was significantly reduced in both sexes. 2) female offspring developed hypertension, but males did not. 3) In female offspring, ACE-2 protein expression was significantly reduced without any change in the mRNA levels. 4) miRNA 429, which has a binding site on ACE-2 - 3' UTR was significantly upregulated in the female antenatal MLPD offspring. 5) In males, ACE-2 mRNA and protein expression were unaltered. We conclude that in the mouse, antenatal MLPD-induced reduction of ACE-2 in the female offspring lung may be an important mechanisms in sexually dimorphic programming of hypertension. PMID:25971747

  11. ERCC1 protein as a guide for individualized therapy of late-stage advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    GAO, ZHIQIANG; HAN, BAOHUI; SHEN, JIE; GU, AIQIN; QI, DAJIANG; HUANG, JINSU; SHI, CHUNLEI; XIONG, LIWEN; ZHAO, YIZHUO; JIANG, LIYAN; WANG, HUIMIN; CHEN, YURONG

    2011-01-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) protein has been associated with cisplatin resistance. The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between ERCC1 protein levels and the therapeutic effect of individualized therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 190 advanced NSCLC patients were included in this study. Patients were randomized into either the individualized therapy group or the standard therapy group at a ratio of 2:1. Patients in the standard therapy group were treated with either gemcitabine plus cisplatin or vinorelbine plus cisplatin. The expression of ERCC1 protein in lung cancer tissues of patients from the individualized therapy group was detected with immunohistochemistry. Patients with low ERCC1 levels received either gemcitabine plus cisplatin or vinorelbine plus cisplatin, and patients with high levels received gemcitabine plus vinorelbine. The main outcome assessments were response rate (RR), overall survival (OS) and time to progression (TTP). Follow-up data were recorded until September 30, 2010. RR, 1-year survival rate and TTP were not statistically significant. The median survival time was 10.10 months in the standard therapy group (95% CI 8.48–11.92) and 13.59 months in the individualized therapy group (95% CI 11.86–14.74). The difference in median survival time was significantly different between these groups (P=0.036). The median survival time was longer in the individualized group compared to the standard therapy group. ERCC1 protein expression in advanced NSCLC patients, however, was not significantly correlated with RR, OS and TTP in the individualized therapy group. Therefore, this study suggests that ERCC1 protein levels should be assessed in combination with additional biomarkers to determine an optimal index for individualized therapy in advanced NSCLC patients. PMID:22977580

  12. Vacuum leak detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Jr., David

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting leakage in a vacuum system involves a moisture trap chamber connected to the vacuum system and to a pressure gauge. Moisture in the trap chamber is captured by freezing or by a moisture adsorbent to reduce the residual water vapor pressure therein to a negligible amount. The pressure gauge is then read to determine whether the vacuum system is leaky. By directing a stream of carbon dioxide or helium at potentially leaky parts of the vacuum system, the apparatus can be used with supplemental means to locate leaks.

  13. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  14. Long-life leak standard assembly

    DOEpatents

    Basford, James A.; Mathis, John E.; Wright, Harlan C.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a portable leak standard assembly which is capable of providing a stream of high-purity reference gas at a virtually constant flow rate over an extensive period of time. The leak assembly comprises a high pressure reservoir coupled to a metal leak valve through a valve-controlled conduit. A reproducible leak valve useful in this assembly is provided by a metal tube crimped with a selected pressure loading for forming an orifice in the tube with this orifice being of a sufficient size to provide the selected flow rate. The leak valve assembly is formed of metal so that it can be "baked-out" in a vacuum furnace to rid the reservoir and attendent components of volatile impurities which reduce the efficiency of the leak standard.

  15. Aerosol delivery of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 effectively suppresses lung tumorigenesis in K-rasLA1 mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, S-H; Kim, J-E; Lee, J-H; Minai-Tehrani, A; Han, K; Chae, C; Cho, Y-H; Yun, J-H; Park, K; Kim, Y-S; Cho, M-H

    2013-06-01

    Conventional radiotherapy or chemotherapy for the long-term survival of patients with lung cancer is still difficult for treatment in metastatic and advanced tumors. Therefore, the safe and effective approaches to the treatment of lung cancer are needed. In this study, the effect of delivered eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E)-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) on lung cancer progression was evaluated. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-M3/4E-BP1 was delivered into 6-week-old K-rasLA1 lung cancer model mice through a nose-only inhalation system twice a week for 4 weeks. Long-term repeated delivery of 4E-BP1 effectively reduced tumor progression in the lungs of K-rasLA1 mice. Reduction of eIF4E by overexpression of 4E-BP1 resulted in suppression of cap-dependent protein expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In addition, delivered 4E-BP1 inhibited the proliferation of lung cancer cells in K-rasLA1 mice model. Our results suggest that long-term repeated viral delivery of 4E-BP1 may provide a useful tool for designing lung cancer treatment. PMID:23640516

  16. Overexpression of the regulator of G-protein signaling 5 reduces the survival rate and enhances the radiation response of human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zumin; Zuo, Yufang; Wang, Jin; Yu, Zhonghua; Peng, Fang; Chen, Yuanyuan; Dong, Yong; Hu, Xiao; Zhou, Qichao; Ma, Honglian; Bao, Yong; Chen, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling 5 (RGS5) belongs to the R4 subfamily of RGS proteins, a family of GTPase activating proteins, which is dynamically regulated in various biological processes including blood pressure regulation, smooth muscle cell pathology, fat metabolism and tumor angiogenesis. Low-expression of RGS5 was reported to be associated with tumor progression in lung cancer. In the present study, we examined the potential roles of RGS5 in human lung cancer cells by overexpressing RGS5 in the cancer cells and further explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. The RGS5 gene was cloned and transfected into the human lung cancer cell lines A549 and Calu-3. The cells were tested for apoptosis with flow cytometry, for viability with MTT, for mobility and adhesion capacity. The radiosensitization effect of RGS5 was measured by a colony formation assay. The mechanisms of RGS5 functioning was also investigated by detection of protein expression with western blot analysis, including PARP, caspase 3 and 9, bax, bcl2, Rock1, Rock2, CDC42, phospho-p53 (Serine 15) and p53. The present study demonstrated that RGS5 overexpression remarkably induced apoptosis in human lung cancer cells, which was suggested to be through mitochondrial mechanisms. Overexpression of RGS5 resulted in significantly lower adhesion and migration abilities of the lung cancer cells (P<0.01). Furthermore, overexpression of RGS5 sensitized the lung cancer cells to radiation. In conclusion, the present study showed that RGS5 played an inhibitory role in human lung cancer cells through induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, RGS5 enhanced the cytotoxic effect of radiation in the human lung cancer cells. Our results indicated that RGS5 may be a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:25891540

  17. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid and Serum Canine Surfactant Protein A Concentrations in Dogs with Chronic Cough by Bronchial and Interstitial Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    YAMAYA, Yoshiki; SUZUKI, Kazuyuki; WATARI, Toshihiro; ASANO, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We measured bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum canine surfactant protein (cSP)-A concentrations in dogs with chronic cough. There were no significant differences between bronchial and interstitial lung diseases in BALF cSP-A concentrations. However, serum cSP-A concentrations in dogs with the interstitial lung disease as diffuse panbronchiolitis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were significantly higher than those in dogs with the bronchial disease as chronic bronchitis. These results suggest that serum cSP-A concentrations may be a useful and noninvasive biomarker to understand the existence of interstitial lung damage in dogs with chronic cough. PMID:24366151

  18. Biodistribution and Efficacy of Targeted Pulmonary Delivery of a Protein Kinase C-δ Inhibitory Peptide: Impact on Indirect Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Mondrinos, Mark J; Knight, Linda C; Kennedy, Paul A; Wu, Jichuan; Kauffman, Matthew; Baker, Sandy T; Wolfson, Marla R; Kilpatrick, Laurie E

    2015-10-01

    Sepsis and sepsis-induced lung injury remain a leading cause of death in intensive care units. We identified protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) as a critical regulator of the acute inflammatory response and demonstrated that PKCδ inhibition was lung-protective in a rodent sepsis model, suggesting that targeting PKCδ is a potential strategy for preserving pulmonary function in the setting of indirect lung injury. In this study, whole-body organ biodistribution and pulmonary cellular distribution of a transactivator of transcription (TAT)-conjugated PKCδ inhibitory peptide (PKCδ-TAT) was determined following intratracheal (IT) delivery in control and septic [cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)] rats to ascertain the impact of disease pathology on biodistribution and efficacy. There was negligible lung uptake of radiolabeled peptide upon intravenous delivery [<1% initial dose (ID)], whereas IT administration resulted in lung retention of >65% ID with minimal uptake in liver or kidney (<2% ID). IT delivery of a fluorescent-tagged (tetramethylrhodamine-PKCδ-TAT) peptide demonstrated uniform spatial distribution and cellular uptake throughout the peripheral lung. IT delivery of PKCδ-TAT at the time of CLP surgery significantly reduced PKCδ activation (tyrosine phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and cleavage) and acute lung inflammation, resulting in improved lung function and gas exchange. Importantly, peptide efficacy was similar when delivered at 4 hours post-CLP, demonstrating therapeutic relevance. Conversely, spatial lung distribution and efficacy were significantly impaired at 8 hours post-CLP, which corresponded to marked histopathological progression of lung injury. These studies establish a functional connection between peptide spatial distribution, inflammatory histopathology in the lung, and efficacy of this anti-inflammatory peptide. PMID:26243739

  19. Leak detection using structure-borne noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Stephen D. (Inventor); Chimenti, Dale E. (Inventor); Roberts, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for detection and location of air leaks in a pressure vessel, such as a spacecraft, includes sensing structure-borne ultrasound waveforms associated with turbulence caused by a leak from a plurality of sensors and cross correlating the waveforms to determine existence and location of the leak. Different configurations of sensors and corresponding methods can be used. An apparatus for performing the methods is also provided.

  20. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  1. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapatic R.

    1994-01-01

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  2. The matricellular protein CCN1 enhances TGF-β1/SMAD3-dependent profibrotic signaling in fibroblasts and contributes to fibrogenic responses to lung injury.

    PubMed

    Kurundkar, Ashish R; Kurundkar, Deepali; Rangarajan, Sunad; Locy, Morgan L; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Rui-Ming; Zmijewski, Jaroslaw; Thannickal, Victor J

    2016-06-01

    Matricellular proteins mediate pleiotropic effects during tissue injury and repair. CCN1 is a matricellular protein that has been implicated in angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound repair. In this study, we identified CCN1 as a gene that is differentially up-regulated in alveolar mesenchymal cells of human subjects with rapidly progressive idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Elevated levels of CCN1 mRNA were confirmed in lung tissues of IPF subjects undergoing lung transplantation, and CCN1 protein was predominantly localized to fibroblastic foci. CCN1 expression in ex vivo IPF lung fibroblasts correlated with gene expression of the extracellular matrix proteins, collagen (Col)1a1, Col1a2, and fibronectin as well as the myofibroblast marker, α-smooth muscle actin. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of CCN1 down-regulated the constitutive expression of these profibrotic genes in IPF fibroblasts. TGF-β1, a known mediator of tissue fibrogenesis, induces gene and protein expression of CCN1 via a mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (SMAD3)-dependent mechanism. Importantly, endogenous CCN1 potentiates TGF-β1-induced SMAD3 activation and induction of profibrotic genes, supporting a positive feedback loop leading to myofibroblast activation. In vivo RNAi-mediated silencing of CCN1 attenuates fibrogenic responses to bleomycin-induced lung injury. These studies support previously unrecognized, cooperative interaction between the CCN1 matricellular protein and canonical TGF-β1/SMAD3 signaling that promotes lung fibrosis.-Kurundkar, A. R., Kurundkar, D., Rangarajan, S., Locy, M. L., Zhou, Y., Liu, R.-M., Zmijewski, J., Thannickal, V. J. The matricellular protein CCN1 enhances TGF-β1/SMAD3-dependent profibrotic signaling in fibroblasts and contributes to fibrogenic responses to lung injury. PMID:26884454

  3. Endotherapy of leaks and fistula

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Goenka, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Perforations, leaks and fistula involving gastrointestinal (GI) tract are increasing encountered in clinical practice. There is a changing paradigm for their management with surgical approach being replaced by conservative approach including endoscopic therapy. Clips (through the scope and over the scope) and covered stent are front runners for endotherapy for GI leaks and fistula. Over the scope clips introduced recently, can treat larger defects compared to through the scope clips. Covered stents are suited for larger defects and those associated with luminal narrowing. However cervical esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction, stomach and right colonic lesions may be better for clip therapy rather than stenting. Recent developments in this field include use of endovac therapy which consists of a sponge with suction device, biodegradable stent, use of fibrin glue and some endo-suturing device. Conservative therapy with no surgical or endoscopic intervention, may be suitable for a small subset of patients. An algorithm based on location, size of defect, associated stricture, infection and available expertise needs to be developed to reduce the mortality and morbidity of this difficult clinical problem. PMID:26140097

  4. Effect of Buddhist meditation on serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, pulse rate, lung volume and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Sudsuang, R; Chentanez, V; Veluvan, K

    1991-09-01

    Serum cortisol and total protein levels, blood pressure, heart rate, lung volume, and reaction time were studied in 52 males 20-25 years of age practicing Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation, and in 30 males of the same age group not practicing meditation. It was found that after meditation, serum cortisol levels were significantly reduced, serum total protein level significantly increased, and systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and pulse rate significantly reduced. Vital capacity, tidal volume and maximal voluntary ventilation were significantly lower after meditation than before. There were also significant decreases in reaction time after mediation practice. The percentage decrease in reaction time during meditation was 22%, while in subjects untrained in meditation, the percentage decrease was only 7%. Results from these studies indicate that practising Dhammakaya Buddhist meditation produces biochemical and physiological changes and reduces the reaction time. PMID:1801007

  5. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta by antisense oligonucleotides sensitises A549 lung cancer cells to vincristine and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Ahlbrecht, Katrin; Brischwein, Klaus; Liu, Chao; Bader, Peter; Müller, Cornelia; Niethammer, Dietrich; Beck, James F

    2004-06-25

    Previous studies point to protein kinase C (PKC) isozyme eta as a resistance factor in cancer cells. Therefore, we investigated whether down-regulation of PKCeta with second generation antisense oligonucleotides (ODNs) would sensitise A549 human lung carcinoma cells to cytostatics. The effects were compared to the outcome of Bcl-xL down-regulation. Upon treatment with antisense ODNs, PKCeta and Bcl-xL were both significantly reduced on mRNA and protein level. Down-regulation of either PKCeta or Bcl-xL in combination with vincristine or paclitaxel resulted in a significant increase in caspase-3 activity compared to that in the control oligonucleotide treated cells. In addition, PKCeta down-regulation augmented vincristine-induced dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. In conclusion, these results confirm that PKCeta might represent a considerable resistance factor and an interesting target to improve anticancer chemotherapy. PMID:15159020

  6. The 78-kD Glucose-Regulated Protein Regulates Endoplasmic Reticulum Homeostasis and Distal Epithelial Cell Survival during Lung Development.

    PubMed

    Flodby, Per; Li, Changgong; Liu, Yixin; Wang, Hongjun; Marconett, Crystal N; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Minoo, Parviz; Lee, Amy S; Zhou, Beiyun

    2016-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), a chronic lung disease of prematurity, has been linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. To investigate a causal role for ER stress in BPD pathogenesis, we generated conditional knockout (KO) mice (cGrp78(f/f)) with lung epithelial cell-specific KO of Grp78, a gene encoding the ER chaperone 78-kD glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a master regulator of ER homeostasis and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Lung epithelial-specific Grp78 KO disrupted lung morphogenesis, causing developmental arrest, increased alveolar epithelial type II cell apoptosis, and decreased surfactant protein and type I cell marker expression in perinatal lungs. cGrp78(f/f) pups died immediately after birth, likely owing to respiratory distress. Importantly, Grp78 KO triggered UPR activation with marked induction of the proapoptotic transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP). Increased expression of genes involved in oxidative stress and cell death and decreased expression of genes encoding antioxidant enzymes suggest a role for oxidative stress in alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis. Increased Smad3 phosphorylation and expression of transforming growth factor-β/Smad3 targets Cdkn1a (encoding p21) and Gadd45a suggest that interactions among the apoptotic arm of the UPR, oxidative stress, and transforming growth factor-β/Smad signaling pathways contribute to Grp78 KO-induced AEC apoptosis and developmental arrest. Chemical chaperone Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduced UPR activation and apoptosis in cGrp78(f/f) lungs cultured ex vivo, confirming a role for ER stress in observed AEC abnormalities. These results demonstrate a key role for GRP78 in AEC survival and gene expression during lung development through modulation of ER stress, and suggest the UPR as a potential therapeutic target in BPD. PMID:26816051

  7. Interactions of the C-terminus of lung surfactant protein B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; Farver, R Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H; Mills, Frank D; Elliott, Douglas W; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2008-11-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B(59-80) forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B(59-80) in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B(59-80); in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B(59-80) penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL(4), a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B(59-80) as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae based on their degree of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  8. Pulmonary Delivery of Butyrylcholinesterase as a Model Protein to the Lung.

    PubMed

    Rahhal, Tojan B; Fromen, Catherine A; Wilson, Erin M; Kai, Marc P; Shen, Tammy W; Luft, J Christopher; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary delivery has great potential for delivering biologics to the lung if the challenges of maintaining activity, stability, and ideal aerosol characteristics can be overcome. To study the interactions of a biologic in the lung, we chose butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) as our model enzyme, which has application for use as a bioscavenger protecting against organophosphate exposure or for use with pseudocholinesterase deficient patients. In mice, orotracheal administration of free BuChE resulted in 72 h detection in the lungs and 48 h in the broncheoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Free BuChE administered to the lung of all mouse backgrounds (Nude, C57BL/6, and BALB/c) showed evidence of an acute cytokine (IL-6, TNF-α, MIP2, and KC) and cellular immune response that subsided within 48 h, indicating relatively safe administration of this non-native biologic. We then developed a formulation of BuChE using Particle Replication in Non-Wetting Templates (PRINT). Aerosol characterization demonstrated biologically active BuChE 1 μm cylindrical particles with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 2.77 μm, indicative of promising airway deposition via dry powder inhalers (DPI). Furthermore, particulate BuChE delivered via dry powder insufflation showed residence time of 48 h in the lungs and BALF. The in vivo residence time, immune response, and safety of particulate BuChE delivered via a pulmonary route, along with the cascade impaction distribution of dry powder PRINT BuChE, showed promise in the ability to deliver active enzymes with ideal deposition characteristics. These findings provide evidence for the feasibility of optimizing the use of BuChE in the clinic; PRINT BuChE particles can be readily formulated for use in DPIs, providing a convenient and effective treatment option. PMID:27012934

  9. Protein profiling of paraquat-exposed rat lungs following treatment with Acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) berry extract.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Sik; Jung, Hana; Zerin, Tamanna; Song, Ho-Yeon

    2013-03-01

    Paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium chloride, PQ) is a non-selective herbicide, and PQ poisoning by accidental or intentional ingestion is a cause of numerous fatalities around the world every year. Although a great deal of research has been conducted into the development of an acceptable treatment for PQ poisoning, no effective guidelines for patients have been developed thus far. Acai berry extract and juice have been highlighted in this regard, due to their observed antioxidant effects in various diseases. Furthermore, the acai berry has been used in dietary supplements, as it contains a variety of nutrients, including proteins, lipids, vitamins A, C and E and polyphenols. In this study, we conducted proteomic analysis of PQ-poisoned rat lungs to evaluate the changes in protein expression induced by PQ and to identify any protective effects of acai berry on the PQ poisoning. Our data revealed that the expression of the calcium signaling-related proteins calcium binding protein 1 (CaBP1), FK506 binding protein 4 (FKBP4), S100A6 and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc, also known as osteonectin) were induced by PQ treatment and downregulated by acai berry treatment. However, the levels of protein kinase C substrate 80K-H were shown to be downregulated as the result of PQ treatment. Our results indicated that these proteins may function as biomarkers for acute poisoning by PQ exposure. Further studies may be necessary to understand their clinical relevance with regard to PQ poisoning. PMID:23291665

  10. Influence of agglomeration and specific lung lining lipid/protein interaction on short-term inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Driessen, Marc D; Raesch, Simon; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Schulze, Christine; Vacano, Bernhard von; Vennemann, Antje; Wiemann, Martin; Ruge, Christian A; Platsch, Herbert; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Tomm, Janina M; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J; Luch, Andreas; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Haase, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Lung lining fluid is the first biological barrier nanoparticles (NPs) encounter during inhalation. As previous inhalation studies revealed considerable differences between surface functionalized NPs with respect to deposition and toxicity, our aim was to investigate the influence of lipid and/or protein binding on these processes. Thus, we analyzed a set of surface functionalized NPs including different SiO2 and ZrO2 in pure phospholipids, CuroSurf(TM) and purified native porcine pulmonary surfactant (nS). Lipid binding was surprisingly low for pure phospholipids and only few NPs attracted a minimal lipid corona. Additional presence of hydrophobic surfactant protein (SP) B in CuroSurf(TM) promoted lipid binding to NPs functionalized with Amino or PEG residues. The presence of the hydrophilic SP A in nS facilitated lipid binding to all NPs. In line with this the degree of lipid and protein affinities for different surface functionalized SiO2 NPs in nS followed the same order (SiO2 Phosphate ∼ unmodified SiO2 < SiO2 PEG < SiO2 Amino NPs). Agglomeration and biomolecule interaction of NPs in nS was mainly influenced by surface charge and hydrophobicity. Toxicological differences as observed in short-term inhalation studies (STIS) were mainly influenced by the core composition and/or surface reactivity of NPs. However, agglomeration in lipid media and lipid/protein affinity appeared to play a modulatory role on short-term inhalation toxicity. For instance, lipophilic NPs like ZrO2, which are interacting with nS to a higher extent, exhibited a far higher lung burden than their hydrophilic counterparts, which deserves further attention to predict or model effects of respirable NPs. PMID:26984182

  11. 3pK, a new mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase located in the small cell lung cancer tumor suppressor gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Latif, F; Duh, F M; Bernal, R; Smola, U; Li, H; Kuzmin, I; Wixler, V; Geil, L; Shrestha, S

    1996-01-01

    NotI linking clones, localized to the human chromosome 3p21.3 region and homozygously deleted in small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H740 and NCI-H1450, were used to search for a putative tumor suppressor gene(s). One of these clones, NL1G210, detected a 2.5-kb mRNA in all examined human tissues, expression being especially high in the heart and skeletal muscle. Two overlapping cDNA clones containing the entire open reading frame were isolated from a human heart cDNA library and fully characterized. Computer analysis and a search of the GenBank database to reveal high sequence identity of the product of this gene to serine-threonine kinases, especially to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a recently described substrate of mitogen-activated kinases. Sequence identitiy was 72% at the nucleotide level and 75% at the amino acid level, strongly suggesting that this protein is a serine-threonine kinase. Here we demonstrate that the new gene, referred to as 3pK (for chromosome 3p kinase), in fact encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated protein serine-threonine kinase with a novel substrate specificity. PMID:8622688

  12. Silencing Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 (ANGPTL4) Protects Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury Via Regulating SIRT1 /NF-kB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Li, Shaoying; Zhao, Yunfeng; Qian, Pin; Ji, Fuyun; Qian, Lanlan; Wu, Xueling; Qian, Guisheng

    2015-10-01

    Lung inflammation and alveolar epithelial cell death are critical events in the development and progression of acute lung injury (ALI). Although angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) participates in inflammation, whether it plays important roles in ALI and alveolar epithelial cell inflammatory injury remains unclear. We therefore investigated the role of angptl4 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and the associated mechanisms. Lentivirus-mediated short interfering RNA targeted to the mouse angptl4 gene (AngsiRNA) and a negative control lentivirus (NCsiRNA) were intranasally administered to mice. Lung inflammatory injury and the underlying mechanisms for regulation of angptl4 on the LPS-induced ALI were subsequently determined. We reported that angptl4 levels were increased both in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells and lung tissues obtained from a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. Angptl4 expression was induced by LPS in alveolar epithelial cells, whereas LPS-induced lung inflammation (neutrophils infiltration in the lung tissues, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6), lung permeability (lung wet/dry weight ratio and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein concentration), tissue damage (caspase3 activation), and mortality rates were attenuated in AngsiRNA-treated mice. The inflammatory reaction (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6) and apoptosis rates were reduced in AngsiRNA(h)-treated A549 cells. Moreover, angptl4 promoted NF-kBp65 expression and suppressed SIRT1 expression both in mouse lungs and A549 cells. Additionally, SIRT1 antagonist nicotinamide (NAM) attenuated the inhibitory effects of AngsiRNA both on LPS-induced NF-kBp65 expression and IL6 expression. These findings suggest that silencing angptl4 protects against LPS-induced ALI via regulating SIRT1/NF-kB signaling pathway. PMID:25727991

  13. FGFR1 mRNA and Protein Expression, not Gene Copy Number, Predict FGFR TKI Sensitivity Across All Lung Cancer Histologies

    PubMed Central

    Wynes, Murry W.; Hinz, Trista K.; Gao, Dexiang; Martini, Michael; Marek, Lindsay A.; Ware, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Michael G.; Böhm, Diana; Perner, Sven; Helfrich, Barbara A.; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Jassem, Jacek; Wojtylak, Szymon; Sejda, Aleksandra; Gozgit, Joseph M.; Bunn, Paul A.; Camidge, D. Ross; Tan, Aik-Choon; Hirsch, Fred R.; Heasley, Lynn E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose FGFR1 gene copy number (GCN) is being evaluated as a biomarker for FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) response in squamous-cell lung cancers (SCC). The exclusive use of FGFR1 GCN for predicting FGFR TKI sensitivity assumes increased GCN is the only mechanism for biologically-relevant increases in FGFR1 signaling. Herein, we tested whether FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression may serve as better biomarkers of FGFR TKI sensitivity in lung cancer. Experimental Design Histologically diverse lung cancer cell lines were submitted to assays for ponatinib sensitivity, a potent FGFR TKI. A tissue microarray comprised of resected lung tumors was submitted to FGFR1 GCN and mRNA analyses and the results were validated with TCGA lung cancer data. Results 14/58 cell lines exhibited ponatinib sensitivity (IC50 values ≤ 50 nM) that correlated with FGFR1 mRNA and protein expression, but not with FGFR1 GCN or histology. Moreover, ponatinib sensitivity associated with mRNA expression of the ligands, FGF2 and FGF9. In resected tumors, 22% of adenocarcinomas and 28% of SCCs expressed high FGFR1 mRNA. Importantly, only 46% of SCCs with increased FGFR1 GCN expressed high mRNA. Lung cancer TCGA data validated these findings and unveiled overlap of FGFR1 mRNA positivity with KRAS and PIK3CA mutations. Conclusions FGFR1 dependency is frequent across various lung cancer histologies and FGFR1 mRNA may serve as a better biomarker of FGFR TKI response in lung cancer than FGFR1 GCN. The study provides important and timely insight into clinical testing of FGFR TKIs in lung cancer and other solid tumor types. PMID:24771645

  14. Transcriptional mechanisms and protein kinase signaling mediate organic dust induction of IL-8 expression in lung epithelial and THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Gottipati, Koteswara R.; Bandari, Shiva Kumar; Nonnenmann, Matthew W.; Levin, Jeffrey L.; Dooley, Gregory P.; Reynolds, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to the agricultural work environment is a risk factor for the development of respiratory symptoms and chronic lung diseases. Inflammation is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of tissue injury and disease. Cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating lung inflammatory responses to agricultural dust are not yet fully understood. We studied the effects of poultry dust extract on molecular regulation of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a proinflammatory cytokine, in A549 and Beas2B lung epithelial and THP-1 monocytic cells. Our findings indicate that poultry dust extract potently induces IL-8 levels by increasing IL-8 gene transcription without altering IL-8 mRNA stability. Increase in IL-8 promoter activity was due to enhanced binding of activator protein 1 and NF-κB. IL-8 induction was associated with protein kinase C (PKC) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and inhibited by PKC and MAPK inhibitors. IL-8 increase was not inhibited by polymyxin B or l-nitroarginine methyl ester, indicating lack of involvement of lipopolysaccharide and nitric oxide in the induction. Lung epithelial and THP-1 cells share common mechanisms for induction of IL-8 levels. Our findings identify key roles for transcriptional mechanisms and protein kinase signaling pathways for IL-8 induction and provide insights into the mechanisms regulating lung inflammatory responses to organic dust exposure. PMID:25398986

  15. Exposure to Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Is Associated With Activation of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases Signaling and Apoptosis in Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Kevin M.; Nalabotu, Siva K.; Manne, Nandini D.P.K.; Kolli, Madhukar B.; Nandyala, Geeta; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Ma, Jane Y.; Blough, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: With recent advances in nanoparticle manufacturing and applications, potential exposure to nanoparticles in various settings is becoming increasing likely. No investigation has yet been performed to assess whether respiratory tract exposure to cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles is associated with alterations in protein signaling, inflammation, and apoptosis in rat lungs. Methods: Specific-pathogen-free male Sprague-Dawley rats were instilled with either vehicle (saline) or CeO2 nanoparticles at a dosage of 7.0 mg/kg and euthanized 1, 3, 14, 28, 56, or 90 days after exposure. Lung tissues were collected and evaluated for the expression of proteins associated with inflammation and cellular apoptosis. Results: No change in lung weight was detected over the course of the study; however, cerium accumulation in the lungs, gross histological changes, an increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, elevated cleaved caspase-3 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, and diminished phosphorylation of ERK-1/2-MAPK were detected after CeO2 instillation (p<0.05). Conclusions: Taken together, these data suggest that high-dose respiratory exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with lung inflammation, the activation of signaling protein kinases, and cellular apoptosis, which may be indicative of a long-term localized inflammatory response. PMID:26081650

  16. Accumulation of radium in ferruginous protein bodies formed in lung tissue: association of resulting radiation hotspots with malignant mesothelioma and other malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Eizo; Makishima, Akio; Hagino, Kyoko; Okabe, Kazunori

    2009-01-01

    While exposure to fibers and particles has been proposed to be associated with several different lung malignancies including mesothelioma, the mechanism for the carcinogenesis is not fully understood. Along with mineralogical observation, we have analyzed forty-four major and trace elements in extracted asbestos bodies (fibers and proteins attached to them) with coexisting fiber-free ferruginous protein bodies from extirpative lungs of individuals with malignant mesothelioma. These observations together with patients’ characteristics suggest that inhaled iron-rich asbestos fibers and dust particles, and excess iron deposited by continuous cigarette smoking would induce ferruginous protein body formation resulting in ferritin aggregates in lung tissue. Chemical analysis of ferruginous protein bodies extracted from lung tissues reveals anomalously high concentrations of radioactive radium, reaching millions of times higher concentration than that of seawater. Continuous and prolonged internal exposure to hotspot ionizing radiation from radium and its daughter nuclides could cause strong and frequent DNA damage in lung tissue, initiate different types of tumour cells, including malignant mesothelioma cells, and may cause cancers. PMID:19644223

  17. Depletion of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) causes G0 arrest in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Weber, Megan J.; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) regulates global protein synthesis in a variety of human dividing cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. More specifically, APP depletion causes an increase of both cap- and IRES-dependent translation. Since growth and proliferation are tightly coupled processes, here we asked what effects artificial downregulation of APP could have elicited in NSCLC cells proliferation. APP depletion caused a G0/G1 arrest through destabilization of the cyclin-C protein and reduced pRb phosphorylation at residues Ser802/811. siRNA to cyclin-C mirrored the cell cycle distribution observed when silencing APP. Cells arrested in G0/G1 (and with augmented global protein synthesis) increased their size and underwent a necrotic cell death due to cell membrane permeabilization. These phenotypes were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain, indicating a novel role for APP in regulating early cell cycle entry decisions. It is seems that APP moderates the rate of protein synthesis before the cell clears growth factors- and nutrients-dependent checkpoint in mid G1. Our results raise questions on how such processes interact in the context of (at least) dividing NSCLC cells. The data presented here suggest that APP, although required for G0/G1 transitions, moderates the rate of protein synthesis before the cell fully commits to cell cycle progression following mechanisms, which seem additional to concurrent signals deriving from the PI3-K/Akt/mTORC-1 axis. APP appears to play a central role in regulating cell cycle entry with the rate of protein synthesis; and its loss-of-function causes cell size abnormalities and death. PMID:25502341

  18. Depletion of Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) causes G0 arrest in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Anna; Galluzzo, Paola; Weber, Megan J; Alani, Sara; Bocchetta, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    We recently reported that Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) regulates global protein synthesis in a variety of human dividing cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. More specifically, APP depletion causes an increase of both cap- and IRES-dependent translation. Since growth and proliferation are tightly coupled processes, here, we asked what effects artificial downregulation of APP could have elicited in NSCLC cells proliferation. APP depletion caused a G0/G1 arrest through destabilization of the cyclin-C protein and reduced pRb phosphorylation at residues Ser802/811. siRNA to cyclin-C mirrored the cell cycle distribution observed when silencing APP. Cells arrested in G0/G1 (and with augmented global protein synthesis) increased their size and underwent a necrotic cell death due to cell membrane permeabilization. These phenotypes were reversed by overexpression of the APP C-terminal domain, indicating a novel role for APP in regulating early cell cycle entry decisions. It is seems that APP moderates the rate of protein synthesis before the cell clears growth factors- and nutrients-dependent checkpoint in mid G1. Our results raise questions on how such processes interact in the context of (at least) dividing NSCLC cells. The data presented here suggest that APP, although required for G0/G1 transitions, moderates the rate of protein synthesis before the cell fully commits to cell cycle progression following mechanisms, which seem additional to concurrent signals deriving from the PI3-K/Akt/mTORC-1 axis. APP appears to play a central role in regulating cell cycle entry with the rate of protein synthesis; and its loss-of-function causes cell size abnormalities and death. PMID:25502341

  19. Decreased Expression of Surfactant Protein Genes Is Associated with an Increased Expression of Forkhead Box M1 Gene in the Fetal Lung Tissues of Premature Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Won-Ho; Chang, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyung Suk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recently, Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) was reported to be correlated with lung maturation and expression of surfactant proteins (SPs) in mice models. However, no study has been conducted in rabbit lungs despite their high homology with human lungs. Thus, we attempted to investigate serial changes in the expressions of FoxM1 and SP-A/B throughout lung maturation in rabbit fetuses. Materials and Methods Pregnant New Zealand White rabbits were grouped according to gestational age from 5 days before to 2 days after the day of expected full term delivery (F5, F4, F3, F2, F1, F0, P1, and P2). A total of 64 fetuses were enrolled after Cesarean sections. The expressions of mRNA and proteins of FoxM1 and SP-A/B in fetal lung tissue were tested by quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, their correlations were analyzed. Results The mRNA expression of SP-A/B showed an increasing tendency positively correlated with gestational age, while the expression of FoxM1 mRNA and protein decreased from F5 to F0. A significant negative correlation was found between the expression levels of FoxM1 and SP-A/B (SP-A: R=-0.517, p=0.001; SP-B: R=-0.615, p<0.001). Conclusion Preterm rabbits demonstrated high expression of FoxM1 mRNA and protein in the lungs compared to full term rabbits. Also, the expression of SP-A/B was inversely related with serial changes in FoxM1 expression. This is the first report to suggest an association between FoxM1 and expression of SP-A/B and lung maturation in preterm rabbits. PMID:24142647

  20. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has determined will provide... delayed” and the reason for the delay if a leak is not repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery...

  1. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired...) Repair requires replacing the existing seal design with a new system that the owner or operator has... repaired within 15 calendar days after discovery of the leak as specified in paragraphs (f)(4)(i) and...

  2. LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS IN NEVADA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Points represent Leaking Underground Storage Tanks (LUST) for the State of Nevada. This database was developed and is maintained by the Nevada Department of Environmental Quality (NDEP), Bureau of Corrective Actions. Each point represents a tank where a leak event has occurred. ...

  3. Capacitive system detects and locates fluid leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Electronic monitoring system automatically detects and locates minute leaks in seams of large fluid storage tanks and pipelines covered with thermal insulation. The system uses a capacitive tape-sensing element that is adhesively bonded over seams where fluid leaks are likely to occur.

  4. Remote rocket engine leak detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maram, J. M.

    1993-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have been successfully used for detection of leaks in rocket engine components using introduced gases such as sulfur hexafluoride and nitrous oxide. The approach used and past applications of the technology are described. The potential for direct detection of launch system propellant leaks is discussed.

  5. Measuring Pinhole Leaks - A Novel Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Carol Anne

    2009-01-01

    Both of the shuttle pads have one of these large liquid hydrogen tanks and the Shuttle program is currently using both pads. However, just recently, there has been increasing concerns over possible air leaks from the outside into the evacuated region. A method to detect leaks involving measuring the change in the boil-off rate of the liquid hydrogen in the tank.

  6. Distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sonjian

    2013-05-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySenseTM) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySenseTM system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  7. Distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Kempen, C.; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian

    2013-05-01

    With the increase worldwide demand for hydrocarbon fuels and the vast development of new fuel production and delivery infrastructure installations around the world, there is a growing need for reliable fuel leak detection technologies to provide safety and reduce environmental risks. Hydrocarbon leaks (gas or liquid) pose an extreme danger and need to be detected very quickly to avoid potential disasters. Gas leaks have the greatest potential for causing damage due to the explosion risk from the dispersion of gas clouds. This paper describes progress towards the development of a fast response, high sensitivity, distributed fiber optic fuel leak detection (HySensTM) system based on the use of an optical fiber that uses a hydrocarbon sensitive fluorescent coating to detect the presence of fuel leaks present in close proximity along the length of the sensor fiber. The HySenseTM system operates in two modes, leak detection and leak localization, and will trigger an alarm within seconds of exposure contact. The fast and accurate response of the sensor provides reliable fluid leak detection for pipelines, tanks, airports, pumps, and valves to detect and minimize any potential catastrophic damage.

  8. Fighting the Epidemic of Nuclear Plant Leaks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Udell, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    The current epidemic of steam generator tube leaks alone should put to rest the rosy future once envisioned for nuclear power. It is impossible to regulate quality into a nuclear plant; it must be built and designed that way. The economic impact of the leaks is discussed. (RM)

  9. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time... 40 Protection of Environment 15 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Leak repair. 65.105 Section 65.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED)...

  10. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, J.C.; Payne, J.J.

    1996-09-03

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time. 18 figs.

  11. Leak checker data logging system

    DOEpatents

    Gannon, Jeffrey C.; Payne, John J.

    1996-01-01

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

  12. Leak checker data logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, J.J.; Gannon, J.C.

    1994-12-31

    A portable, high speed, computer-based data logging system for field testing systems or components located some distance apart employs a plurality of spaced mass spectrometers and is particularly adapted for monitoring the vacuum integrity of a long string of a superconducting magnets such as used in high energy particle accelerators. The system provides precise tracking of a gas such as helium through the magnet string when the helium is released into the vacuum by monitoring the spaced mass spectrometers allowing for control, display and storage of various parameters involved with leak detection and localization. A system user can observe the flow of helium through the magnet string on a real-time basis hour the exact moment of opening of the helium input valve. Graph reading can be normalized to compensate for magnet sections that deplete vacuum faster than other sections between testing to permit repetitive testing of vacuum integrity in reduced time.

  13. Functional expression of choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) in small cell lung carcinoma cells: a target molecule for lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Inazu, Masato; Yamada, Tomoko; Kubota, Nobuo; Yamanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2013-10-01

    Choline is essential for the synthesis of the major membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine and the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). Elevated levels of choline and up-regulated choline kinase activity have been detected in cancer cells. Thus, the intracellular accumulation of choline through choline transporters is the rate-limiting step in phospholipid metabolism and a prerequisite for cancer cell proliferation. However, the uptake system for choline and the functional expression of choline transporters in lung cancer cells are poorly understood. We examined the molecular and functional characterization of choline uptake in the small cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H69. Choline uptake was saturable and mediated by a single transport system. Interestingly, removal of Na(+) from the uptake buffer strongly enhanced choline uptake. This increase in choline uptake under the Na(+)-free conditions was inhibited by dimethylamiloride (DMA), a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) inhibitor. Various organic cations and the choline analog hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibited the choline uptake and cell viability. A correlation analysis of the potencies of organic cations for the inhibition of choline uptake and cell viability showed a strong correlation (R=0.8077). RT-PCR revealed that choline transporter-like protein 1 (CTL1) mRNA and NHE1 are mainly expressed. HC-3 and CTL1 siRNA inhibited choline uptake and cell viability, and increased caspase-3/7 activity. The conversion of choline to ACh was confirmed, and this conversion was enhanced under Na(+)-free conditions, which in turn was sensitive to HC-3. These results indicate that choline uptake through CTL1 is used for ACh synthesis. Both an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (eserine) and a butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor (ethopropazine) increased cell proliferation, and these effects were inhibited by 4-DAMP, a mAChR3 antagonist. We conclude that NCI-H69 cells express the choline transporter CTL1 which uses a directed H

  14. Identification of target proteins of mangiferin in mice with acute lung injury using functionalized magnetic microspheres based on click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajia; Nie, Yan; Li, Yunjuan; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Wei; Deng, Jiagang; Wang, Peng George; Bai, Gang

    2015-11-18

    Prevention of the occurrence and development of inflammation is a vital therapeutic strategy for treating acute lung injury (ALI). Increasing evidence has shown that a wealth of ingredients from natural foods and plants have potential anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, mangiferin, a natural C-glucosyl xanthone that is primarily obtained from the peels and kernels of mango fruits and the bark of the Mangifera indica L. tree, alleviated the inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. Mangiferin-modified magnetic microspheres (MMs) were developed on the basis of click chemistry to capture the target proteins of mangiferin. Mass spectrometry and molecular docking identified 70 kDa heat-shock protein 5 (Hspa5) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (Ywhae) as mangiferin-binding proteins. Furthermore, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that mangiferin exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by binding Hspa5 and Ywhae to suppress downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thoroughly revealing the mechanism and function of mangiferin will contribute to the development and utilization of agricultural resources from M. indica L. PMID:26488336

  15. Evaluation of androgen receptor and GATA binding protein 3 as immunohistochemical markers in the diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma to the lung.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Yukinori; Yoshida, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masahide; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma in the lungs from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas is important for determining prognosis and treatment. We evaluated novel breast specific markers, androgen receptor (AR) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) immunohistostaining, for this differential, and compare to other traditional markers. The specimens comprised 33 metastatic breast carcinomas to the lung, 566 primary lung tumors (170 adenocarcinomas, 157 squamous cell carcinomas, 31 pleomorphic carcinomas, 115 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 43 small cell carcinomas, and 49 typical carcinoids) and 42 malignant mesotheliomas. They were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies to AR, GATA3, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), mammaglobin, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15). Of the metastatic breast carcinomas, immunohistostaining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 27 cases (81.8%), 24 cases (72.7%), 26 cases (78.8%), 13 cases (39.4%), 12 cases (36.4%), 9 cases (27.3%), respectively. Of primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas, staining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 18 cases (3%), 3 cases (0.5%), 4 cases (0.7%), 2 cases (0.3%), 0 case (0%), 2 cases (0.3%), respectively. Immunohistochemistry of AR and GATA3 are reliable for differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas. PMID:25727644

  16. Evaluation of correlation between CT image features and ERCC1 protein expression in assessing lung cancer prognosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Emaminejad, Nastaran; Qian, Wei; Sun, Shenshen; Kang, Yan; Guan, Yubao; Lure, Fleming; Zheng, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Stage I non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC) usually have favorable prognosis. However, high percentage of NSCLC patients have cancer relapse after surgery. Accurately predicting cancer prognosis is important to optimally treat and manage the patients to minimize the risk of cancer relapse. Studies have shown that an excision repair crosscomplementing 1 (ERCC1) gene was a potentially useful genetic biomarker to predict prognosis of NSCLC patients. Meanwhile, studies also found that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was highly associated with lung cancer prognosis. In this study, we investigated and evaluated the correlations between COPD image features and ERCC1 gene expression. A database involving 106 NSCLC patients was used. Each patient had a thoracic CT examination and ERCC1 genetic test. We applied a computer-aided detection scheme to segment and quantify COPD image features. A logistic regression method and a multilayer perceptron network were applied to analyze the correlation between the computed COPD image features and ERCC1 protein expression. A multilayer perceptron network (MPN) was also developed to test performance of using COPD-related image features to predict ERCC1 protein expression. A nine feature based logistic regression analysis showed the average COPD feature values in the low and high ERCC1 protein expression groups are significantly different (p < 0.01). Using a five-fold cross validation method, the MPN yielded an area under ROC curve (AUC = 0.669±0.053) in classifying between the low and high ERCC1 expression cases. The study indicates that CT phenotype features are associated with the genetic tests, which may provide supplementary information to help improve accuracy in assessing prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  17. Inhibition of HERG1 K+ channel protein expression decreases cell proliferation of human small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Glassmeier, Günter; Hempel, Kathrin; Wulfsen, Iris; Bauer, Christiane K; Schumacher, Udo; Schwarz, Jürgen R

    2012-02-01

    HERG (human ether-à-go-go-related gene) K(+) currents fulfill important ionic functions in cardiac and other excitable cells. In addition, HERG channels influence cell growth and migration in various types of tumor cells. The mechanisms underlying these functions are still not resolved. Here, we investigated the role of HERG channels for cell growth in a cell line (SW2) derived from small cell lung cancer (SCLC), a malignant variant of lung cancer. The two HERG1 isoforms (HERG1a, HERG1b) as well as HERG2 and HERG3 are expressed in SW2 cells. Inhibition of HERG currents by acute or sustained application of E-4031, a specific ERG channel blocker, depolarized SW2 cells by 10-15 mV. This result indicated that HERG K(+) conductance contributes considerably to the maintenance of the resting potential of about -45 mV. Blockage of HERG channels by E-4031 for up to 72 h did not affect cell proliferation. In contrast, siRNA-induced inhibition of HERG1 protein expression decreased cell proliferation by about 50%. Reduction of HERG1 protein expression was confirmed by Western blots. HERG current was almost absent in SW2 cells transfected with siRNA against HERG1. Qualitatively similar results were obtained in three other SCLC cell lines (OH1, OH3, H82), suggesting that the HERG1 channel protein is involved in SCLC cell growth, whereas the ion-conducting function of HERG1 seems not to be important for cell growth. PMID:22075718

  18. Leak detection for underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Durgin, P.B. ); Young, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 29, 1992. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on leak detection for underground storage tanks that leaked fuel. A widespread concern was protection of groundwater supplies from these leaking tanks. In some cases, the papers report on research that was conducted two or three years ago but has never been adequately directed to the underground storage tank leak-detection audience. In other cases, the papers report on the latest leak-detection research. The symposium was divided into four sessions that were entitled: Internal Monitoring; External Monitoring; Regulations and Standards; and Site and Risk Evaluation. Individual papers have been cataloged separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  19. Microwave Radar Detection of Gas Pipeline Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Kanareykin, D. B.; Asanov, V.; Bakhtiari, S.; Raptis, A. C.

    2003-03-01

    We are developing a microwave radar sensing and imaging system to detect and locate gas leaks in natural gas pipelines. The underlying detection principle is radar backscattering from the index-of-refraction inhomogeneities introduced by the dispersion of methane in air. An essential first step in the development effort is modeling to estimate the radar cross section. This paper describes the modeling results and the experimental efforts underway to validate the model. For the case of leaks from small holes in a pressurized gas pipeline, we modeled the gas dynamics of the leak jet to determine the plume geometry and the variation of methane concentration in air as a function of distance from the leak source. From the static and dynamic changes in the index of refraction in the turbulent plume, the radar backscatter cross sections were calculated. The results show that the radar cross sections of the leak plumes should be detectable by special-purpose radars.

  20. Ultrasonic Detectors Safely Identify Dangerous, Costly Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    In 1990, NASA grounded its space shuttle fleet. The reason: leaks detected in the hydrogen fuel systems of the Space Shuttles Atlantis and Columbia. Unless the sources of the leaks could be identified and fixed, the shuttles would not be safe to fly. To help locate the existing leaks and check for others, Kennedy Space Center engineers used portable ultrasonic detectors to scan the fuel systems. As a gas or liquid escapes from a leak, the resulting turbulence creates ultrasonic noise, explains Gary Mohr, president of Elmsford, New York-based UE Systems Inc., a long-time leader in ultrasonic detector technologies. "In lay terms, the leak is like a dog whistle, and the detector is like the dog ear." Because the ultrasound emissions from a leak are highly localized, they can be used not only to identify the presence of a leak but also to help pinpoint a leak s location. The NASA engineers employed UE s detectors to examine the shuttle fuel tanks and solid rocket boosters, but encountered difficulty with the devices limited range-certain areas of the shuttle proved difficult or unsafe to scan up close. To remedy the problem, the engineers created a long-range attachment for the detectors, similar to "a zoom lens on a camera," Mohr says. "If you are on the ground, and the leak is 50 feet away, the detector would now give you the same impression as if you were only 25 feet away." The enhancement also had the effect of reducing background noise, allowing for a clearer, more precise detection of a leak s location.

  1. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona. PMID:26575243

  2. Regression of lung and colon cancer xenografts by depleting or inhibiting RLIP76 (Ral-binding protein 1).

    PubMed

    Singhal, Sharad S; Singhal, Jyotsana; Yadav, Sushma; Dwivedi, Seema; Boor, Paul J; Awasthi, Yogesh C; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2007-05-01

    Ral-binding protein 1 (RALBP1) is a stress-responsive and stress-protective multispecific transporter of glutathione conjugates (GS-E) and xenobiotic toxins. It is frequently overexpressed in malignant cells and plays a prominent antiapoptotic role selectively in cancer cells through its ability to control cellular concentration of proapoptotic oxidized lipid byproducts. In the absence of chemotherapy, depletion or inhibition of RALBP1 causes regression of syngeneic mouse B16 melanoma. Because RALBP1 transports anthracycline and Vinca alkaloid drugs, as well as GS-E, and because it confers resistance to these drugs, we proposed that depletion or inhibition of RALBP1 should cause regression of human solid tumors that overexpress RALBP1 and augment chemotherapy efficacy. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H358 and H520 and colon SW480 cell lines were used. Cytotoxic synergy between anti-RALBP1 immunoglobulin G (IgG), cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II) [CDDP], and vinorelbine was examined in cell culture and xenografts of NSCLC cells. Effects of RALBP1 depletion by antisense were examined in xenografts of NSCLC H358, NSCLC H520, and colon SW480 cells. RALBP1 depletion by phosphorothioate antisense was confirmed and was associated with rapid, complete, and sustained remissions in established s.c. human lung and colon xenografts. RALBP1 inhibition by anti-RALBP1 IgG was equally as effective as antisense and enhanced CDDP-vinorelbine in lung cancer xenografts. These studies show that RALBP1 is a transporter that serves as a key effector function in cancer cell survival and is a valid target for cancer therapy, and confirm that inhibitory modulation of RALBP1 transport activity at the cell surface is sufficient for antitumor effects. PMID:17483352

  3. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 deficiency reduces spontaneous metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Sundaram, Sneha

    2016-04-26

    Adipose-produced pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to obesity and cancer. This 2x2 experiment was designed to investigate effects of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) deficiency on pulmonary metastasis of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in MCP-1 deficient and wild-type mice fed a modified AIN93G diet containing 16% and 45% of energy from corn oil, respectively. The high-fat diet significantly increased the number and size (cross-sectional area and volume) of lung metastases compared to the AIN93G control diet. Deficiency in MCP-1 reduced lung metastases by 37% in high-fat diet-fed mice; it reduced metastatic cross-sectional area by 46% and volume by 69% compared to wild-type mice. Adipose and plasma concentrations of MCP-1 were significantly higher in high-fat diet-fed wild-type mice than in their AIN93G-fed counterparts; they were not detectable in MCP-1 deficient mice regardless of diet. Plasma concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 were significantly higher in MCP-1 deficient mice compared to wild-type mice. We conclude that adipose-produced MCP-1 contributes to high-fat diet-enhanced metastasis. While MCP-1 deficiency reduces metastasis, the elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and angiogenic factors in the absence of MCP-1 may support the metastatic development and growth of LLC in MCP-1 deficient mice. PMID:27028862

  4. GMI, an Immunomodulatory Protein from Ganoderma microsporum, Potentiates Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Autophagy in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hsin, I-Lun; Ou, Chu-Chyn; Wu, Ming-Fang; Jan, Ming-Shiou; Hsiao, Yi-Min; Lin, Ching-Hsiung; Ko, Jiunn-Liang

    2015-05-01

    Cisplatin-based therapy is common in the treatment of several types of cancers, including lung cancers. In our previous study, GMI, an immunomodulatory protein cloned from Ganoderma microsporum, induced a cytotoxic effect in lung cancer cells via autophagy. The aim of this study is to examine the role of GMI in enhancing cisplatin-mediated cell death. On the basis of MTT assay and Combination Index, GMI and cisplatin cotreatment induced a synergistic cytotoxic effect. GMI and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by sub-G1, nuclear condensation, and annexin-V/propidium iodide analyses. On Western blot, expressions of γH2AX and cleaved forms of PARP, caspase-3, and caspase-7 were induced by combined treatment. Akt/mTOR pathway activity, LC3-II expression, and acidic vesicular organelle development demonstrated that cisplatin does not abolish GMI-mediated autophagy. Cyto-ID Green/hoechst 33342 double staining and time-dependent experiment indicated that GMI and cisplatin-treated A549 cells simultaneously express autophagosomes and apoptotic nuclei. To elucidate the role of autophagy in inducing apoptosis by GMI and cisplatin, chemical inhibitors and LC3 shRNA were used to inhibit autophagy. The results showed that 3-methyladenine decreases, while chloroquine increases GMI and cisplatin cotreatment-induced cleavage of caspase-7 and PARP. LC3 silencing abolished activation of apoptosis in A549 cells. Caspase inhibitors and caspase-7 silencing mitigated GMI and cisplatin-elicited cell viability inhibition and apoptosis. This is the first study to reveal the novel function of GMI in potentiating cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. GMI and cisplatin induce apoptosis via autophagy/caspase-7-dependent and survivin- and ERCC1-independent pathway. GMI may be a potential cisplatin adjuvant against lung cancer. PMID:25811903

  5. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit inhibitor reverses acquired radioresistance in lung adenocarcinoma by suppressing DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Li, Hang; Peng, Wen; He, Xin-Yun; Huang, Min; Qiu, Dong; Xue, Ying-Bo; Lu, Liang

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying lung cancer radioresistance remain to be fully elucidated. The DNA repair pathway is a predominant target of radiotherapy, which is considered to be involved in the acquired radioresistance of cancer cells. The present study aimed to establish a radioresistant cell model using the A549 human lung cancer cell line, and to further investigate the potential mechanisms underlying the radioresistance. The A549R radioresistant lung cancer cell variant was established by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated γ-ray irradiation at a total dose of 60 Gy. Colony formation assays were then used to determine cell survival following γ-ray exposure. The established radioresistant cells were subsequently treated with or without the NU7026 DNA-PKcs inhibitor. The levels of DNA damage were determined by counting the number of fluorescent γ-H2AX foci in the cells. The cellular capacity for DNA repair was assessed using antibodies for the detection of various DNA repair pathway proteins. The radioresistant sub-clones exhibited significantly decreased survival following NU7026 treatment, compared with the parental cells, as determined by colony formation assays (P<0.05), and this finding was found to be dose-dependent. Treatment with the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) inhibitor significantly reduced γ-H2AX foci formation (P<0.05) following acute radiation exposure in the radioresistant sub-clones, compared with the parental control cells. The decreased levels of γ-H2AX were accompanied by an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells in the radioresistant cell line following post-radiation treatment with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor. The expression levels of proteins associated with the DNA repair pathway were altered markedly in the cells treated with NU7026. The results of the present study suggested that radioresistance may be associated with enhanced DNA repair following exposure to radiation, resulting in reduced apoptosis. Therefore, the

  6. PTRF/Cavin-1 and MIF Proteins Are Identified as Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Biomarkers by Label-Free Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Gámez-Pozo, Angelo; Sánchez-Navarro, Iker; Calvo, Enrique; Agulló-Ortuño, María Teresa; López-Vacas, Rocío; Díaz, Esther; Camafeita, Emilio; Nistal, Manuel; Madero, Rosario; Espinosa, Enrique; López, Juan Antonio; Vara, Juan Ángel Fresno

    2012-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome sequence, biomedical sciences have entered in the “omics” era, mainly due to high-throughput genomics techniques and the recent application of mass spectrometry to proteomics analyses. However, there is still a time lag between these technological advances and their application in the clinical setting. Our work is designed to build bridges between high-performance proteomics and clinical routine. Protein extracts were obtained from fresh frozen normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer samples. We applied a phosphopeptide enrichment followed by LC-MS/MS. Subsequent label-free quantification and bioinformatics analyses were performed. We assessed protein patterns on these samples, showing dozens of differential markers between normal and tumor tissue. Gene ontology and interactome analyses identified signaling pathways altered on tumor tissue. We have identified two proteins, PTRF/cavin-1 and MIF, which are differentially expressed between normal lung and non-small cell lung cancer. These potential biomarkers were validated using western blot and immunohistochemistry. The application of discovery-based proteomics analyses in clinical samples allowed us to identify new potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:22461895

  7. Blind Leak Detection for Closed Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter; Johnson, Ricky; Todd, Douglas; Russell, Samuel; Walker, James

    2003-01-01

    The current inspection technique for locating interstitial leaking in the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzles is the application of a liquid leak check solution in the openings where the interstitials space between the tubing and the structural jacket vent out the aft end of the nozzle, while its cooling tubes are pressurized to 25 psig with Helium. When a leak is found, it is classified, and if the leak is severe enough the suspect tube is cut open so that a boroscope can be inserted to find the leak point. Since the boroscope can only cover a finite tube length and since it is impossible to identify which tube (to the right or left of the identified interstitial) is leaking, many extra and undesired repairs have been made to fix just one leak. In certain instances when the interstitials are interlinked by poor braze bonding, many interstitials will show indications of leaking from a single source. What is desired is a technique that can identify the leak source so that a single repair can be performed. Dr, Samuel Russell and James Walker, both with NASA/MSFC have developed a thermographic inspection system that addresses a single repair approach. They have teamed with Boeing/Rocketdyne to repackage the inspection processes to be suitable to address full scale Shuttle development and flight hardware and implement the process at NASA centers. The methods and results presented address the thermographic identification of interstitial leaks in the Space Shuttle Main Engine nozzles. A highly sensitive digital infrared camera (capable of detecting a delta temperature difference of 0.025 C) is used to record the cooling effects associated with a leak source, such as a crack or pinhole, hidden within the nozzle wall by observing the inner hot wall surface as the nozzle is pressurized, These images are enhanced by digitally subtracting a thermal reference image taken before pressurization. The method provides a non-intrusive way of locating the tube that is leaking and the

  8. Stanniocalcin-1 inhibits thrombin-induced signaling and protects from bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Luping; Zhang, Lin; Ju, Huiming; Li, Qingtian; Pan, Jenny Szu-Chin; Al-Lawati, Zahraa; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin-induced and proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated signaling increases ROS production, activates ERK, and promotes inflammation and fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced lung injury. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) activates anti-oxidant pathways, inhibits inflammation and provides cytoprotection; hence, we hypothesized that STC1 will inhibit thrombin/PAR1 signaling and protect from bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. We determined thrombin level and activity, thrombin-induced PAR-1-mediated signaling, superoxide generation and lung pathology after intra-tracheal administration of bleomycin to WT and STC1 Tg mice. Lungs of bleomycin-treated WT mice display: severe pneumonitis; increased generation of superoxide; vascular leak; increased thrombin protein abundance and activity; activation of ERK; greater cytokine/chemokine release and infiltration with T-cells and macrophages. Lungs of STC1 Tg mice displayed none of the above changes. Mechanistic analysis in cultured pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) suggests that STC1 inhibits thrombin-induced and PAR1-mediated ERK activation through suppression of superoxide. In conclusion, STC1 blunts bleomycin-induced rise in thrombin protein and activity, diminishes thrombin-induced signaling through PAR1 to ERK, and inhibits bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. Moreover, our study identifies a new set of cytokines/chemokines, which play a role in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced lung injury. These findings broaden the array of potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung diseases characterized by thrombin activation, oxidant stress and inflammation. PMID:26640170

  9. Protein Kinase Cι Drives a NOTCH3-dependent Stem-like Phenotype in Mutant KRAS Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed A; Justilien, Verline; Jamieson, Lee; Murray, Nicole R; Fields, Alan P

    2016-03-14

    We report that the protein kinase Cι (PKCι) oncogene controls expression of NOTCH3, a key driver of stemness, in KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma (LADC). PKCι activates NOTCH3 expression by phosphorylating the ELF3 transcription factor and driving ELF3 occupancy on the NOTCH3 promoter. PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signaling controls the tumor-initiating cell phenotype by regulating asymmetric cell division, a process necessary for tumor initiation and maintenance. Primary LADC tumors exhibit PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signaling, and combined pharmacologic blockade of PKCι and NOTCH synergistically inhibits tumorigenic behavior in vitro and LADC growth in vivo demonstrating the therapeutic potential of PKCι-ELF3-NOTCH3 signal inhibition to more effectively treat KRAS LADC. PMID:26977885

  10. Molecular docking studies of Traditional Chinese Medicinal compounds against known protein targets to treat non-small cell lung carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-Fang; Huang, Zuo-An; Du, Xue-Kui; Yang, Ming-Lei; Huang, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    In silico drug design using virtual screening, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME)/Tox data analysis, automated docking and molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of lead compounds for further in vitro analysis is a cost effective strategy. The present study used this strategy to discover novel lead compounds from an in-house database of Traditional Chinese Medicinal (TCM) compounds against epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein for targeting non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After virtual screening of an initial dataset of 2,242 TCM compounds, leads were identified based on binding energy and ADME/Tox data and subjected to automated docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation. Triptolide, a top compound identified by this vigorous in silico screening, was then tested in vitro on the H2347 cell line carrying wild-type EGFR, revealing an anti-proliferative potency similar to that of known drugs against NSCLC. PMID:27279494

  11. The Effect on Cognition of Mitochondrial Respiratory System Proteins in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in the Course of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Michalak, S; Rybacka-Mossakowska, J; Gazdulska, J; Gołda-Gocka, I; Ramlau, R

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) represent an easily available population of cells for the studies on remote effects of lung cancer. NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) Fe-S protein-1 (Ndufs1), a marker of mitochondrial complex I, and mitochondrially encoded cytochrome c oxidase 1 (MTCO1), a marker of complex IV, may participate in cognitive decline during the course of lung cancer. In this study, Ndufs1 and MTCO1 expression in PBMC was evaluated by means of ELISA in 80 lung cancer patients. Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were conducted Trail Making Tests (TMT-A and TMT-B) at baseline and after the 6 months' follow-up. Autoantibodies were identified by means of indirect immunofluorescence and line blot. We found that enhanced levels of Ndufs1 in PBMC were related to impaired cognitive performance; TMT-A of 13.6 ± 3.1 s and TMT-B of 162.5 ± 46.4 s compared with 8.6 ± 4.5 s (p = 0.003) and 124.8 ± 51.8 s (p < 0.05), respectively, in the case of low Ndufs-1 levels. The Ndufs1 expression at baseline was associated with MMSE - τb (Kendall's tau-b) = -0.31; p = 0.024; TMT-A - τb = 0.30; p = 0.001), and TMT-B - τb = 0.199; p = 0.012) after the 6 months' follow-up. Higher MTCO1 expression was accompanied by worse TMT-A results than in case of inhibited MTCO1; 11.1 ± 5.8 s vs. 8.5 ± 4.1 s; respectively; p = 0.048. MTCO1 expression was correlated with TMT-A results (τb = 0.17; p = 0.034) at baseline. We conclude that stimulation of PBMC mitochondrial function in lung cancer patients is associated with cognitive impairment. Mitochondrial dysfunction in PBMC may reflect cytotoxicity responsible for neurological deficits. PMID:26987334

  12. Differential regulation of Gli proteins by Sufu in the lung affects PDGF signaling and myofibroblast development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling relies on three Gli transcription factors to mediate Hh responses. This process is controlled in part by a major negative regulator, Sufu, through its effects on Gli protein level, distribution and activity. In this report, we showed that Sufu regulates Gli1 protein...

  13. Effects of short-term cigarette smoke exposure on Fischer 344 rats and on selected lung proteins.

    PubMed

    Carter, Charleata A; Misra, Manoj

    2010-04-01

    A short-term 5-day cigarette smoke exposure study was conducted in Fischer 344 rats to identify smoke-induced lung protein changes. Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats at 5 weeks of age were randomly assigned to one of four exposure groups. Animals received filtered air (control) or 75, 200, or 400 mg total particulate matter (TPM)/m(3) of diluted Kentucky reference 3R4F cigarette smoke. Nose-only exposures were conducted for 3 hours/day for 5 consecutive days. Mean body weights were significantly reduced only in male rats exposed to 400 mg TPM/m(3). Body weight gains were significantly reduced in 200- and 400-mg TPM/m(3)-exposed males and in all smoke-exposed females compared with controls. Alveolar histiocytosis increased slightly in all smoke exposed-females and 200- and 400-mg TPM/m(3)-exposed males. Cyclooxygenase-2 staining increased at 400 mg TPM/m(3). Matrix metalloproteinase-12 staining of alveolar macrophages and bronchiolar epithelia increased in smoke-exposed animals, especially 400-mg TPM/m(3)-exposed females. Protein kinase C-alpha staining increased in macrophages at 200- and 400-mg TPM/m(3) doses. c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases staining decreased in smoke-exposed tissues. The identified changed proteins play roles in inflammation, transformation, proliferation, stress activation, and apoptosis. PMID:20215583

  14. Elucidation of Lipid Binding Sites on Lung Surfactant Protein A Using X-ray Crystallography, Mutagenesis, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Goh, Boon Chong; Wu, Huixing; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Schulten, Klaus; Seaton, Barbara A; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a collagenous C-type lectin (collectin) that is critical for pulmonary defense against inhaled microorganisms. Bifunctional avidity of SP-A for pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as lipid A and for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major component of surfactant membranes lining the air-liquid interface of the lung, ensures that the protein is poised for first-line interactions with inhaled pathogens. To improve our understanding of the motifs that are required for interactions with microbes and surfactant structures, we explored the role of the tyrosine-rich binding surface on the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A in the interaction with DPPC and lipid A using crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics simulations. Critical binding features for DPPC binding include a three-walled tyrosine cage that binds the choline headgroup through cation-π interactions and a positively charged cluster that binds the phosphoryl group. This basic cluster is also critical for binding of lipid A, a bacterial PAMP and target for SP-A. Molecular dynamics simulations further predict that SP-A binds lipid A more tightly than DPPC. These results suggest that the differential binding properties of SP-A favor transfer of the protein from surfactant DPPC to pathogen membranes containing appropriate lipid PAMPs to effect key host defense functions. PMID:27324153

  15. Broad distribution of the multidrug resistance-related vault lung resistance protein in normal human tissues and tumors.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, M A; Scheffer, G L; Flens, M J; Giaccone, G; Broxterman, H J; Meijer, C J; van der Valk, P; Scheper, R J

    1996-03-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) to anticancer drugs is a major cause of treatment failure in cancer. The lung resistance protein LRP is a newly described protein related to MDR in several in vitro models. LRP has been shown to be a strong predictor of poor response to chemotherapy and prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and in ovarian carcinoma patients. Recently, based on a 57% and 88% amino acid identity with major vault proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum and Rattus norvegicus, respectively, we identified LRP as the human major vault protein, the main component of highly conserved cellular organelles named vaults. We have studied the immunohistochemical expression of LRP in freshly frozen normal human tissues and 174 cancer specimens of 28 tumor types. LRP was broadly distributed in normal and malignant cells, but distinct patterns of expression were noticed. High LRP expression was seen in bronchus, digestive tract, renal proximal tubules, keratinocytes, macrophages, and adrenal cortex whereas varying ing levels were observed in other organs. LRP was detected in all tumor types examined, but its frequency varied, fairly reflecting the chemosensitivity of different cancers. For example, low rates of LRP positivity were seen in testicular cancer, neuroblastoma, and acute myeloid leukemia; intermediate in ovarian cancer; and high in colon, renal, and pancreatic carcinomas. The wide occurrence of LRP in normal and transformed cells in humans, its similar distribution to that of vaults in other species, as well as the high level of conservation among eukaryotic cells of both the amino acid sequence of the major vault protein and the composition and structure of vaults, suggest that vault function is important to eukaryotic cells. PMID:8774142

  16. Acquired Substrate Preference for GAB1 Protein Bestows Transforming Activity to ERBB2 Kinase Lung Cancer Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ying-Xin; Wong, Lily; Marino, Michael P.; Ou, Wu; Shen, Yi; Wu, Wen Jin; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Reiser, Jakob; Johnson, Gibbes R.

    2013-01-01

    Activating mutations in the αC-β4 loop of the ERBB2 kinase domain, such as ERBB2YVMA and ERBB2G776VC, have been identified in human lung cancers and found to drive tumor formation. Here we observe that the docking protein GAB1 is hyper-phosphorylated in carcinomas from transgenic mice and in cell lines expressing these ERBB2 cancer mutants. Using dominant negative GAB1 mutants lacking canonical tyrosine residues for SHP2 and PI3K interactions or lentiviral shRNA that targets GAB1, we demonstrate that GAB1 phosphorylation is required for ERBB2 mutant-induced cell signaling, cell transformation, and tumorigenesis. An enzyme kinetic analysis comparing ERBB2YVMA to wild type using physiologically relevant peptide substrates reveals that ERBB2YVMA kinase adopts a striking preference for GAB1 phosphorylation sites as evidenced by ∼150-fold increases in the specificity constants (kcat/Km) for several GAB1 peptides, and this change in substrate selectivity was predominantly attributed to the peptide binding affinities as reflected by the apparent Km values. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ERBB2YVMA phosphorylates GAB1 protein ∼70-fold faster than wild type ERBB2 in vitro. Notably, the mutation does not significantly alter the Km for ATP or sensitivity to lapatinib, suggesting that, unlike EGFR lung cancer mutants, the ATP binding cleft of the kinase is not significantly changed. Taken together, our results indicate that the acquired substrate preference for GAB1 is critical for the ERBB2 mutant-induced oncogenesis. PMID:23612964

  17. Acquired substrate preference for GAB1 protein bestows transforming activity to ERBB2 kinase lung cancer mutants.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ying-Xin; Wong, Lily; Marino, Michael P; Ou, Wu; Shen, Yi; Wu, Wen Jin; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Reiser, Jakob; Johnson, Gibbes R

    2013-06-01

    Activating mutations in the αC-β4 loop of the ERBB2 kinase domain, such as ERBB2(YVMA) and ERBB2(G776VC), have been identified in human lung cancers and found to drive tumor formation. Here we observe that the docking protein GAB1 is hyper-phosphorylated in carcinomas from transgenic mice and in cell lines expressing these ERBB2 cancer mutants. Using dominant negative GAB1 mutants lacking canonical tyrosine residues for SHP2 and PI3K interactions or lentiviral shRNA that targets GAB1, we demonstrate that GAB1 phosphorylation is required for ERBB2 mutant-induced cell signaling, cell transformation, and tumorigenesis. An enzyme kinetic analysis comparing ERBB2(YVMA) to wild type using physiologically relevant peptide substrates reveals that ERBB2(YVMA) kinase adopts a striking preference for GAB1 phosphorylation sites as evidenced by ∼150-fold increases in the specificity constants (kcat/Km) for several GAB1 peptides, and this change in substrate selectivity was predominantly attributed to the peptide binding affinities as reflected by the apparent Km values. Furthermore, we demonstrate that ERBB2(YVMA) phosphorylates GAB1 protein ∼70-fold faster than wild type ERBB2 in vitro. Notably, the mutation does not significantly alter the Km for ATP or sensitivity to lapatinib, suggesting that, unlike EGFR lung cancer mutants, the ATP binding cleft of the kinase is not significantly changed. Taken together, our results indicate that the acquired substrate preference for GAB1 is critical for the ERBB2 mutant-induced oncogenesis. PMID:23612964

  18. Effects of the lung surfactant protein B construct Mini-B on lipid bilayer order and topography

    PubMed Central

    Palleboina, Dharamaraju; Waring, Alan J.; Notter, Robert H.; Booth, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic lung surfactant protein, SP-B, is essential for survival. Cycling of lung volume during respiration requires a surface-active lipid–protein layer at the alveolar air–water interface. SP-B may contribute to surfactant layer maintenance and renewal by facilitating contact and transfer between the surface layer and bilayer reservoirs of surfactant material. However, only small effects of SP-B on phospholipid orientational order in model systems have been reported. In this study, N-terminal (SP-B8–25) and C-terminal (SP-B63–78) helices of SP-B, either linked as Mini-B or unlinked but present in equal amounts, were incorporated into either model phospholipid mixtures or into bovine lipid extract surfactant in the form of vesicle dispersions or mechanically oriented bilayer samples. Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used to characterize effects of these peptides on phospholipid chain orientational order, headgroup orientation, and the response of lipid–peptide mixtures to mechanical orientation by mica plates. Only small effects on chain orientational order or headgroup orientation, in either vesicle or mechanically oriented samples, were seen. In mechanically constrained samples, however, Mini-B and its component helices did have specific effects on the propensity of lipid–peptide mixtures to form unoriented bilayer populations which do not exchange with the oriented fraction on the timescale of the NMR experiment. Modification of local bilayer orientation, even in the presence of mechanical constraint, may be relevant to the transfer of material from bilayer reservoirs to a flat surface-active layer, a process that likely requires contact facilitated by the formation of highly curved protrusions. PMID:22903196

  19. Evaluation of the clinical relevance of the expression and function of P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance protein and lung resistance protein in patients with primary acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia Maria; Paterakis, George; Androutsos, George; Anagnostopoulos, Nikolaos; Galanopoulos, Athanasios; Kalmantis, Themistoklis; Meletis, John; Rombos, Yiannis; Sagriotis, Alexandros; Symeonidis, Argyrios; Tiniakou, Maria; Zoumbos, Nikolaos; Yataganas, Xenophon

    2002-02-01

    The multidrug resistance (MDR) transporter-proteins P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and lung resistance protein (LRP) have been associated with treatment failure. The aim of this study was to investigate prospectively the clinical significance of expression and function of the MDR proteins, considering other prognostic factors, such as age, immunophenotype, and cytogenetics. Mononuclear cells of peripheral blood or bone marrow from 61 patients with de novo acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) were analyzed. The monoclonal antibodies JSB1, MRPm6 and LRP56 were used for expression studies. Accumulation and retention studies were performed using the substrates Daunorubicin, Calcein-AM, Rhodamine-123 and DiOC(2) in the presence or absence of the modifiers Verapamil, Genistein, Probenecid, BIBW22S and PSC833. Induction treatment consisted of a 3+7 combination of Ida/Ara-C for patients < or = 60 years of age and a 3+5 Ida/VP-16 combination per OS for patients >60. MDR function was expressed as the ratio of mean fluorescence intensity substrate in the presence of modifier over the substrate alone (resistance index, RI). Patients with advanced age, low CD15 expression and high RI for accumulation of DiOC(2) in the presence of BIBW22S had significantly lower complete remission (CR) rates. No factor was prognostic for event-free survival analysis, which was limited to remitters only. Overall survival was shorter in patients with advanced age, poor prognosis cytogenetics, high CD7 expression, and high RI for Daunorubicin efflux modulated by Verapamil. These results suggest that MDR transporter-proteins have a limited role in the treatment failure of patients treated with Idarubicin-based regimens. PMID:11755464

  20. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM). E S Roberts1, R Jaskot2, J Richards2, and K L Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC a...

  1. Decreased expression of the type I isozyme of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in tumor cell lines of lung epithelial origin.

    PubMed

    Lange-Carter, C A; Fossli, T; Jahnsen, T; Malkinson, A M

    1990-05-15

    A spontaneous transformant derived from a mouse lung epithelial cell line exhibited decreased cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. DEAE column chromatography demonstrated that this was caused by specific loss of the type I PKA isozyme (PKA I). Western immunoblot analysis indicated that indeed several mouse lung tumor-derived cell lines and spontaneous transformants of immortalized, nontumorigenic lung cell lines contained less PKA I regulatory subunit (RI) protein than normal cell lines. PKA II regulatory subunit protein differed only slightly among cell lines and showed no conspicuous trend between normal and neoplastic cells. The decrease in RI was apparently concomitant with decreased catalytic (C) subunit levels in neoplastic cells since no free catalytic subunit activity was detected by DEAE chromatography. Northern blot analysis using RI alpha and C alpha cDNA probes showed that the levels of RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs paralleled their intracellular protein concentrations; neoplastic cell lines contained significantly less RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs than the normal cell line. The decreased expression of both RI and C subunits therefore results in a net decrease of PKA I in neoplastic lung cells, an isozymic difference which may account for the differential effects of cAMP analogs on cell growth and differentiation in normal and neoplastic cells. PMID:2159459

  2. ZrO2 nanoparticles labeled via a native protein corona: detection by fluorescence microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Silge, Anja; Bräutigam, Katharina; Bocklitz, Thomas; Rösch, Petra; Vennemann, Antje; Schmitz, Inge; Popp, Jürgen; Wiemann, Martin

    2015-08-01

    ZrO2 nanoparticles are frequently used in composite materials such as dental fillers from where they may be released and inhaled upon polishing and grinding. Since the overall distribution of ZrO2 NP inside the lung parenchyma can hardly be observed by routine histology, here a labeling with a fluorphore was used secondary to the adsorption of serum proteins. Particles were then intratracheally instilled into rat lungs. After 3 h fluorescent structures consisted of agglomerates scattered throughout the lung parenchyma, which were mainly concentrated in alveolar macrophages after 3 d. A detection method based on Raman microspectroscopy was established to investigate the chemical composition of those fluorescent structures in detail. Raman measurements were arranged such that no spectral interference with the protein-bound fluorescence label was evident. Applying chemometrical methods, Raman signals of the ZrO2 nanomaterial were co-localized with the fluorescence label, indicating the stability of the nanomaterial-protein-dye complex inside the rat lung. The combination of Raman microspectroscopy and adsorptive fluorescence labeling may, therefore, become a useful tool for studying the localization of protein-coated nanomaterials in cells and tissues. PMID:26087290

  3. Mammalian transcription in support of hybrid mRNA and protein synthesis in testis and lung.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Carolyn; Sikora, Curtis; Lawson, Vannice; Dong, Karen; Cheng, Min; Oko, Richard; van der Hoorn, Frans A

    2006-12-15

    Post-transcriptional mechanisms including differential splicing expand the protein repertoire beyond that provided by the one gene-one protein model. Trans-splicing has been observed in mammalian systems but is low level (sometimes referred to as noise), and a contribution to hybrid protein expression is unclear. In the study of rat sperm tail proteins a cDNA, called 1038, was isolated representing a hybrid mRNA derived in part from the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme 3 (Oaz3) gene located on rat chromosome 2 fused to sequences encoded by a novel gene on chromosome 4. Cytoplasmic Oaz3 mRNA is completely testis specific. However, in several tissues Oaz3 is transcribed and contributes to hybrid 1038 mRNA synthesis, without concurrent Oaz3 mRNA synthesis. 1038 mRNA directs synthesis of a hybrid 14-kDa protein, part chromosome 2- and part chromosome 4-derived as shown in vitro and in transfected cells. Antisera that recognize a chromosome 4-encoded C-terminal peptide confirm the hybrid character of endogenous 14-kDa protein and its presence in sperm tail structures and 1038-positive tissue. Our data suggest that the testis-specific OAZ3 gene may be an example of a mammalian gene that in several tissues is transcribed to contribute to a hybrid mRNA and protein. This finding expands the repertoire of known mechanisms available to cells to generate proteome diversity. PMID:17040916

  4. Tank leak detection using electrical resistance methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Binley, A.; LaBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous liquids and high-level radioactive wastes are stored worldwide in surface and underground tanks. Frequently these tanks are found to leak, thereby resulting in not only a loss of stored inventory, but in contamination to soils and groundwater. It is important to develop a reliable method of detecting leaks before large quantities are emitted into the environment surround the tanks. Two field experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) as a leak detection method under metal underground storage tanks (UST). This paper provides a summary of the field experiments performed under a 15 m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation.

  5. Role of repair protein Rad51 in regulating the response to gefitinib in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Hong, Jhao-Hao; Wang, Lyu-Han; Cheng, Chau-Ming; Ciou, Shih-Ci; Lin, Szu-Ting; Jheng, Ming-Yan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2008-11-01

    Gefitinib (Iressa, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that can block growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation. High-level Rad51 expression has been reported in chemoresistant or radioresistant carcinomas. In this study, we examined the role of Rad51 in regulating the response to gefitinib among different human lung cancer cell lines. The H520 line (human squamous cell carcinoma) was less sensitive to gefitinib compared with the H1650 (human adenocarcinoma) or A549 (human bronchioloalveolar carcinoma) lines. In H1650 and A549 cells but not in H520 cells, gefitinib decreased cellular levels of phospho-ERK1/2 and Rad51 protein and message levels. Moreover, gefitinib decreased Rad51 protein levels by enhancing Rad51 protein instability through 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. Inhibition of endogenous Rad51 levels by si-Rad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity. In contrast, transfection with constitutively active MKK1 vector could restore both Rad51 protein levels and cell survival inhibited by gefitinib. The MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling pathway constitutes the upstream signaling for maintaining Rad51 message and protein levels. Rad51 protein can protect lung cancer cells from cytotoxic effects induced by gefitinib. Suppression of Rad51 may be a novel lung cancer therapeutic modality to overcome drug resistance to gefitinib. PMID:19001445

  6. Environmental policy -- A leaking drum?

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.

    1995-07-01

    Twenty years ago, the US had virtually no overall environmental policy. Since then, one has evolved as a result of accumulated legislation, much of which was crafted in reaction to specific events, typically real or potential disasters. The familiar names of Love Canal, Times Beach, Bhopal and others are the symbolic anchor points of that evolution, which yielded Superfund, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, and other environmental statutes. The laws in each case were developed in response to particular environmental and health issues--clean water for drinking and recreation, unpolluted air, safe production of chemicals and chemical-based products. The result was a growing body of environmental legislation that eventually became an accumulate of requirements lacking internal consistency or coherence. Because policymaking followed, rather than guided, legislative actions, the policy itself became inconsistent and sometimes illogical. Like a drum that gradually and indiscriminately is filled with a mixture of mutually reactive chemicals, environmental policy increasingly became a volatile source of concern for those industries in whose midst it had been placed. Lately, there is growing consensus that the drum not only has been overfilled, it also is leaking.

  7. The cholesterol-binding protein NPC2 restrains recruitment of stromal macrophage-lineage cells to early-stage lung tumours.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Tamihiro; Jin, Hong; Giblett, Susan; Patel, Bipin; Patel, Falguni; Foster, Charles; Pritchard, Catrin

    2015-09-01

    The tumour microenvironment is known to play an integral role in facilitating cancer progression at advanced stages, but its function in some pre-cancerous lesions remains elusive. We have used the (V600) (E)BRAF-driven mouse lung model that develop premalignant lesions to understand stroma-tumour interactions during pre-cancerous development. In this model, we have found that immature macrophage-lineage cells (IMCs) producing PDGFA, TGFβ and CC chemokines are recruited to the stroma of premalignant lung adenomas through CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1)-dependent mechanisms. Stromal IMCs promote proliferation and transcriptional alterations suggestive of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in isolated premalignant lung tumour cells ex vivo, and are required for the maintenance of early-stage lung tumours in vivo. Furthermore, we have found that IMC recruitment to the microenvironment is restrained by the cholesterol-binding protein, Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2). Studies on isolated cells ex vivo confirm that NPC2 is secreted from tumour cells and is taken up by IMCs wherein it suppresses secretion of the CCR1 ligand CC chemokine 6 (CCL6), at least in part by facilitating its lysosomal degradation. Together, these findings show that NPC2 secreted by premalignant lung tumours suppresses IMC recruitment to the microenvironment in a paracrine manner, thus identifying a novel target for the development of chemopreventive strategies in lung cancer. PMID:26183450

  8. Aortic Carboxypeptidase-like Protein (ACLP) Enhances Lung Myofibroblast Differentiation through Transforming Growth Factor β Receptor-dependent and -independent Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Tumelty, Kathleen E.; Smith, Barbara D.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Layne, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic and fatal lung disease characterized by the overgrowth, hardening, and scarring of lung tissue. The exact mechanisms of how IPF develops and progresses are unknown. IPF is characterized by extracellular matrix remodeling and accumulation of active TGFβ, which promotes collagen expression and the differentiation of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA)-positive myofibroblasts. Aortic carboxypeptidase-like protein (ACLP) is an extracellular matrix protein secreted by fibroblasts and myofibroblasts and is expressed in fibrotic human lung tissue and in mice with bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Importantly, ACLP knockout mice are significantly protected from bleomycin-induced fibrosis. The goal of this study was to identify the mechanisms of ACLP action on fibroblast differentiation. As primary lung fibroblasts differentiated into myofibroblasts, ACLP expression preceded SMA and collagen expression. Recombinant ACLP induced SMA and collagen expression in mouse and human lung fibroblasts. Knockdown of ACLP slowed the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition and partially reverted differentiated myofibroblasts by reducing SMA expression. We hypothesized that ACLP stimulates myofibroblast formation partly through activating TGFβ signaling. Treatment of fibroblasts with recombinant ACLP induced phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad3. This phosphorylation and induction of SMA was dependent on TGFβ receptor binding and kinase activity. ACLP-induced collagen expression was independent of interaction with the TGFβ receptor. These findings indicate that ACLP stimulates the fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transition by promoting SMA expression via TGFβ signaling and promoting collagen expression through a TGFβ receptor-independent pathway. PMID:24344132

  9. Betulinic acid decreases specificity protein 1 (Sp1) level via increasing the sumoylation of sp1 to inhibit lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tsung-I; Wang, Mei-Chun; Chen, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shih-Ting; Yeh, Yu-Min; Su, Wu-Chou; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that the inhibitory effect of betulinic acid (BA) on specificity protein 1 (Sp1) expression is involved in the prevention of cancer progression, but the mechanism of this effect remains to be delineated. In this study, we determined that BA treatment in HeLa cells increased the sumoylation of Sp1 by inhibiting sentrin-specific protease 1 expression. The subsequent recruitment of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase RING finger protein 4 resulted in ubiquitin-mediated degradation in a 26S-proteosome-dependent pathway. In addition, both BA treatment and mithramycin A (MMA) treatment inhibited lung tumor growth and down-regulated Sp1 protein expression in Kras(G12D)-induced lung cancers of bitransgenic mice. In gene expression profiles of Kras(G12D)-induced lung cancers in bitransgenic mice with and without Sp1 inhibition, 542 genes were affected by MMA treatment. One of the gene products, cyclin A2, which was involved in the S and G(2)/M phase transition during cell cycle progression, was investigated in detail because its expression was regulated by Sp1. The down-regulation of cyclin A2 by BA treatment resulted in decreased retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and cell cycle G(2)/M arrest. The BA-mediated cellular Sp1 degradation and antitumor effect were also confirmed in a xenograft mouse model by using H1299 cells. The knockdown of Sp1 in lung cancer cells attenuated the tumor-suppressive effect of BA. Taken together, the results of this study clarify the mechanism of BA-mediated Sp1 degradation and identify a pivotal role for Sp1 in the BA-induced repression of lung cancer growth. PMID:22956772

  10. Accumulation of isolevuglandin-modified protein in normal and fibrotic lung

    PubMed Central

    Mont, Stacey; Davies, Sean S.; Roberts second, L. Jackson; Mernaugh, Raymond L.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Segal, Brahm H.; Zackert, William; Kropski, Jonathan A.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Sekhar, Konjeti R.; Galligan, James J.; Massion, Pierre P.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Travis, Elizabeth L.; Freeman, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein lysine modification by γ-ketoaldehyde isomers derived from arachidonic acid, termed isolevuglandins (IsoLGs), is emerging as a mechanistic link between pathogenic reactive oxygen species and disease progression. However, the questions of whether covalent modification of proteins by IsoLGs are subject to genetic regulation and the identity of IsoLG-modified proteins remain unclear. Herein we show that Nrf2 and Nox2 are key regulators of IsoLG modification in pulmonary tissue and report on the identity of proteins analyzed by LC-MS following immunoaffinity purification of IsoLG-modified proteins. Gene ontology analysis revealed that proteins in numerous cellular pathways are susceptible to IsoLG modification. Although cells tolerate basal levels of modification, exceeding them induces apoptosis. We found prominent modification in a murine model of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, two diseases considered to be promoted by gene-regulated oxidant stress. Based on these results we hypothesize that IsoLG modification is a hitherto unrecognized sequelae that contributes to radiation-induced pulmonary injury and IPF. PMID:27118599

  11. Accumulation of isolevuglandin-modified protein in normal and fibrotic lung.

    PubMed

    Mont, Stacey; Davies, Sean S; Roberts Second, L Jackson; Mernaugh, Raymond L; McDonald, W Hayes; Segal, Brahm H; Zackert, William; Kropski, Jonathan A; Blackwell, Timothy S; Sekhar, Konjeti R; Galligan, James J; Massion, Pierre P; Marnett, Lawrence J; Travis, Elizabeth L; Freeman, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Protein lysine modification by γ-ketoaldehyde isomers derived from arachidonic acid, termed isolevuglandins (IsoLGs), is emerging as a mechanistic link between pathogenic reactive oxygen species and disease progression. However, the questions of whether covalent modification of proteins by IsoLGs are subject to genetic regulation and the identity of IsoLG-modified proteins remain unclear. Herein we show that Nrf2 and Nox2 are key regulators of IsoLG modification in pulmonary tissue and report on the identity of proteins analyzed by LC-MS following immunoaffinity purification of IsoLG-modified proteins. Gene ontology analysis revealed that proteins in numerous cellular pathways are susceptible to IsoLG modification. Although cells tolerate basal levels of modification, exceeding them induces apoptosis. We found prominent modification in a murine model of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, two diseases considered to be promoted by gene-regulated oxidant stress. Based on these results we hypothesize that IsoLG modification is a hitherto unrecognized sequelae that contributes to radiation-induced pulmonary injury and IPF. PMID:27118599

  12. SET antagonist enhances the chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer cells by reactivating protein phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man-Hsin; Wang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yen-Lin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Tai, Wei-Tien; Chao, Ting-Ting; Yu, Hui-Chuan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SET is known as a potent PP2A inhibitor, however, its oncogenic role including its tumorigenic potential and involvement in the development of chemoresistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not yet been fully discussed. In present study, we investigated the oncogenic role of SET by SET-knockdown and showed that SET silencing impaired cell growth rate, colony formation and tumor sphere formation in A549 cells. Notably, silencing SET enhanced the pro-apoptotic effects of paclitaxel, while ectopic expression of SET diminished the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Since the SET protein was shown to affect chemosensitivity, we next examined whether combining a novel SET antagonist, EMQA, sensitized NSCLC cells to paclitaxel. Both the in vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment was synergistic. Importantly, we found that downregulating p-Akt by inhibiting SET-mediated protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inactivation determined the pro-apoptotic effects of EMQA and paclitaxel combination treatment. To dissect the critical site for EMQA functioning, we generated several truncated SET proteins. By analysis of the effects of EMQA on the binding affinities of different truncated SET proteins to PP2A-catalytic subunits, we revealed that the 227–277 amino-acid sequence is critical for EMQA-induced SET inhibition. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of SET in NSCLC, particularly in the development of chemoresistance. The synergistic effects of paclitaxel and the SET antagonist shown in current study encourage further validation of the clinical potential of this combination. PMID:26575017

  13. CONTAINMENT AND BARRIER LEAK DETECTION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes regulatory requirements for construction of containment unit and leak detection monitoring, identifies and describes monitoring and measurement devices currently being used or researched, and provides case studies on the use of these techniques. Informati...

  14. Gasleak: A leak stopper; New computer program tracks gas leak repairs

    SciTech Connect

    Macdissi, T.J.; Reisner, R.K. )

    1988-11-01

    Keeping track of gas leaks in a large distribution system can be difficult and time-consuming job. This article presents GASLEAK, a personal computer program that tracks and assists in the scheduling of gas leak repairs. GASLEAK is a compiled menu-driven database program designed to operate on an IBM of IBM-compatible personal computer. The GASLEAK program allows the operator to enter, update, erase and report on gas leak information.

  15. mpileaks - an MPI opject leak debugging library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-11-14

    The mpileaks tool is to be used by MPI application developers to track and report leaked MPI objects, such as requests, groups, and datatypes. This debugging tool is useful as a quality assurance check for MPI applications, or it can be used to identify leaks fatal to long-running MPI applications. It provides an efficient method to report bugs that are otherwise fifficult to identify.

  16. Hydraulic-Leak Detector for Hidden Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Loo, S.

    1986-01-01

    Slow leakage of fluid made obvious. Indicator consists of wick wrapped at one end around joint to be monitored. Wick absorbs hydraulic fluid leaking from joint and transmits to opposite end, located outside cover plate and visible to inspector. Leakage manifested as discoloration of outside end of wick. Indicator reveals leaks in hidden fittings on hydraulic lines. Fast inspection of joints without disassembly. Used in aerospace, petroleum, chemical, nuclear, and other industries where removing covers for inspection impossible, difficult, or time-consuming.

  17. Effects of antenatal application of ambroxol and glucocorticoid on lung morphometry and signal transduction of bone morphogenetic protein in the fetal rat.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Guo, Xi-Rong; Zhou, Xiao-Yu

    2012-07-01

    Antenatal ambroxol, dexamethasone (Dex) and betamethasone (Beta) are used to prevent neonate respiratory distress syndrome. The present study aimed to investigate the role of ambroxol, Dex and Beta administered antenatally on lung morphogenesis and signal transduction of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) in rat embryo. Fetal lungs treated with ambroxol, 1-day Beta, 3-day Dex and 3-day Beta were more mature compared to the controls as determined by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Expression of BMP4 and bone morphogenetic protein receptor II (BMPR‑II) mRNA was upregulated in the 1-day-Beta-, 3-day-Dex- and 3-day-Beta-treated animals. BMP4 and BMPR-II protein were significantly increased in the 1-day-Beta-, 3-day-Dex- and 3-day-Beta-treated animals. Ambroxol, Dex and Beta promoted the morphological development of rat fetal lung; Beta was more effective than Dex. A multi-dose of glucocorticoids exhited a more beneficial effect than a single dose. The effects of Beta and Dex may be mediated by regulation of BMP signal transduction in rat fetal lung. PMID:22552703

  18. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of “cancer drivers” connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation level, and (4) mRNA level. In this study, a computational method is proposed to identify novel lung adenocarcinoma drivers based on dysfunctional genes on the methylation, microRNA, mutation and mRNA levels. First, a large network was constructed using protein-protein interactions. Next, we searched all of the shortest paths connecting dysfunctional genes on different levels and extracted new candidate genes lying on these paths. Finally, the obtained candidate genes were filtered by a permutation test and an additional strict selection procedure involving a betweenness ratio and an interaction score. Several candidate genes remained, which are deemed to be related to two different levels of cancer. The analyses confirmed our assertions that some have the potential to contribute to the tumorigenesis process on multiple levels. PMID:27412431

  19. Identification of novel candidate drivers connecting different dysfunctional levels for lung adenocarcinoma using protein-protein interactions and a shortest path approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Jiang, Yang; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Tumors are formed by the abnormal proliferation of somatic cells with disordered growth regulation under the influence of tumorigenic factors. Recently, the theory of "cancer drivers" connects tumor initiation with several specific mutations in the so-called cancer driver genes. According to the differentiation of four basic levels between tumor and adjacent normal tissues, the cancer drivers can be divided into the following: (1) Methylation level, (2) microRNA level, (3) mutation level, and (4) mRNA level. In this study, a computational method is proposed to identify novel lung adenocarcinoma drivers based on dysfunctional genes on the methylation, microRNA, mutation and mRNA levels. First, a large network was constructed using protein-protein interactions. Next, we searched all of the shortest paths connecting dysfunctional genes on different levels and extracted new candidate genes lying on these paths. Finally, the obtained candidate genes were filtered by a permutation test and an additional strict selection procedure involving a betweenness ratio and an interaction score. Several candidate genes remained, which are deemed to be related to two different levels of cancer. The analyses confirmed our assertions that some have the potential to contribute to the tumorigenesis process on multiple levels. PMID:27412431

  20. Isoflurane ameliorates acute lung injury by preserving epithelial tight junction integrity

    PubMed Central

    Englert, Joshua A.; Macias, Alvaro A.; Amador-Munoz, Diana; Vera, Miguel Pinilla; Isabelle, Colleen; Guan, Jiazhen; Magaoay, Brady; Velandia, Margarita Suarez; Coronata, Anna; Lee, Awapuhi; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Baron, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isoflurane may be protective in pre-clinical models of lung injury but its use in patients with lung injury remains controversial and the mechanism of its protective effects remains unclear. We hypothesized that this protection is mediated at the level of alveolar tight junctions and investigated the possibility in a two-hit model of lung injury that mirrors human acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods Wild-type mice were treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to nebulized endotoxin (n=8) or saline control (n=9) then allowed to recover for 24 hrs prior to mechanical ventilation (MV, tidal volume 15 mL/kg, 2 hrs) producing ventilator-induced lung injury. Mouse lung epithelial cells were similarly treated with isoflurane one hour after exposure to lipopolysaccharide. Cells were cyclically stretched the following day to mirror the MV protocol used in vivo. Results Mice treated with isoflurane following exposure to inhaled endotoxin and prior to MV exhibited significantly less physiologic lung dysfunction. These effects appeared to be mediated by decreased vascular leak, but not altered inflammatory indices. Mouse lung epithelial cells treated with lipopolysaccharide and cyclic stretch and lungs harvested from mice following treatment with lipopolysaccharide and MV had decreased levels of a key tight junction protein (i.e. zona occludens 1) that was rescued by isoflurane treatment. Conclusions Isoflurane rescued lung injury induced by a two-hit model of endotoxin exposure followed by MV by maintaining the integrity of the alveolar-capillary barrier possibly by modulating the expression of a key tight junction protein. PMID:26068207

  1. Modeling Leaking Gas Plume Migration

    SciTech Connect

    Silin, Dmitriy; Patzek, Tad; Benson, Sally M.

    2007-08-20

    In this study, we obtain simple estimates of 1-D plume propagation velocity taking into account the density and viscosity contrast between CO{sub 2} and brine. Application of the Buckley-Leverett model to describe buoyancy-driven countercurrent flow of two immiscible phases leads to a transparent theory predicting the evolution of the plume. We obtain that the plume does not migrate upward like a gas bubble in bulk water. Rather, it stretches upward until it reaches a seal or until the fluids become immobile. A simple formula requiring no complex numerical calculations describes the velocity of plume propagation. This solution is a simplification of a more comprehensive theory of countercurrent plume migration that does not lend itself to a simple analytical solution (Silin et al., 2006). The range of applicability of the simplified solution is assessed and provided. This work is motivated by the growing interest in injecting carbon dioxide into deep geological formations as a means of avoiding its atmospheric emissions and consequent global warming. One of the potential problems associated with the geologic method of sequestration is leakage of CO{sub 2} from the underground storage reservoir into sources of drinking water. Ideally, the injected green-house gases will stay in the injection zone for a geologically long time and eventually will dissolve in the formation brine and remain trapped by mineralization. However, naturally present or inadvertently created conduits in the cap rock may result in a gas leak from primary storage. Even in supercritical state, the carbon dioxide viscosity and density are lower than those of the indigenous formation brine. Therefore, buoyancy will tend to drive the CO{sub 2} upward unless it is trapped beneath a low permeability seal. Theoretical and experimental studies of buoyancy-driven supercritical CO{sub 2} flow, including estimation of time scales associated with plume evolution, are critical for developing technology

  2. Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Gencorp Aerojet Automated Hydrogen Gas Leak Detection System was developed through the cooperation of industry, academia, and the Government. Although the original purpose of the system was to detect leaks in the main engine of the space shuttle while on the launch pad, it also has significant commercial potential in applications for which there are no existing commercial systems. With high sensitivity, the system can detect hydrogen leaks at low concentrations in inert environments. The sensors are integrated with hardware and software to form a complete system. Several of these systems have already been purchased for use on the Ford Motor Company assembly line for natural gas vehicles. This system to detect trace hydrogen gas leaks from pressurized systems consists of a microprocessor-based control unit that operates a network of sensors. The sensors can be deployed around pipes, connectors, flanges, and tanks of pressurized systems where leaks may occur. The control unit monitors the sensors and provides the operator with a visual representation of the magnitude and locations of the leak as a function of time. The system can be customized to fit the user's needs; for example, it can monitor and display the condition of the flanges and fittings associated with the tank of a natural gas vehicle.

  3. Down-regulation of Heat Shock Protein HSP90ab1 in Radiation-damaged Lung Cells other than Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Peter; Fitze, Guido; Baretton, Gustavo B.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) leads to fibrosing alveolitis (FA) after a lag period of several weeks to months. In a rat model, FA starts at 8 weeks after IR. Before that, at 5.5 weeks after IR, the transcription factors Sp1 (stimulating protein 1) and AP-1 (activator protein 1) are inactivated. To find genes/proteins that were down-regulated at that time, differentially expressed genes were identified in a subtractive cDNA library and verified by quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction), western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IH). The mRNA of the molecular chaperone HSP90AB1 (heat shock protein 90 kDa alpha, class B member 1) was down-regulated 5.5 weeks after IR. Later, when FA manifested, HSP90ab1 protein was down-regulated by more than 90% in lung cells with the exception of mast cells. In most mast cells of the normal lung, both HSP90ab1 and HSP70, another major HSP, show a very low level of expression. HSP70 was massively up-regulated in all mast cells three months after irradiation whereas HSP90AB1 was up-regulated only in a portion of mast cells. The strong changes in the expression of central molecular chaperones may contribute to the well-known disturbance of cellular functions in radiation-damaged lung tissue. PMID:24670792

  4. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Leaks under lagging. 230.64 Section 230.64... Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out of service at once any boiler that has developed a leak under the lagging due to a crack in the shell, or...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vacuum-side leak verification. 1065....345 Vacuum-side leak verification. (a) Scope and frequency. Verify that there are no significant vacuum-side leaks using one of the leak tests described in this section. For laboratory testing,...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vacuum-side leak verification. 1065....345 Vacuum-side leak verification. (a) Scope and frequency. Verify that there are no significant vacuum-side leaks using one of the leak tests described in this section. For laboratory testing,...

  7. Human lung surfactant protein A exists in several different oligomeric states: oligomer size distribution varies between patient groups.

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, T. P.; Malhotra, R.; Sim, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a complex molecule composed of up to 18 polypeptide chains. In vivo, SP-A probably binds to a wide range of inhaled materials via the interaction of surface carbohydrates with the lectin domains of SP-A and mediates their interaction with cells as part of a natural defense system. Multiplicity of lectin domains gives high-affinity binding to carbohydrate-bearing surfaces. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Gel filtration analyses were performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from three patient groups: pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (n = 12), birch pollen allergy (n = 11), and healthy volunteers (n = 4). Sucrose density gradient centrifugation was employed to determine molecular weights of SP-A oligomers. SP-A was solubilized from the lipid phase to compare oligomeric state with that of water soluble SP-A. RESULTS: SP-A exists as fully assembled complexes with 18 polypeptide chains, but it is also consistently found in smaller oligomeric forms. This is true for both the water- and lipid-soluble fractions of SP-A. CONCLUSION: The three patient groups analyzed show a shift towards lower oligomeric forms of SP-A in the following sequence: healthy-pulmonary alveolar proteinosis-pollen allergy. Depolymerization would be expected to lead to loss of binding affinity for carbohydrate-rich surfaces, with loss or alteration of biological function. While there are many complex factors involved in the establishment of an allergy, it is possible that reduced participation of SP-A in clearing a potential allergen from the lungs could be an early step in the chain of events. Images Fig. 4 FIG. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:9606179

  8. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Transplant? A lung transplant is surgery to remove a person's diseased lung ... a healthy lung from a deceased donor. Lung transplants are used for people who are likely to ...

  9. L1CAM protein expression is associated with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) is potentially involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). EMT marker expression is of prognostic significance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The relevance of L1CAM for NSCLC is unclear. We investigated the protein expression of L1CAM in a cohort of NSCLC patients. L1CAM protein expression was correlated with clinico-pathological parameters including survival and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Results L1CAM protein expression was found in 25% of squamous cell carcinomas and 24% of adenocarcinomas and correlated with blood vessel invasion and metastasis (p < 0.05). L1CAM was an independent predictor of survival in a multivariate analysis including pT, pN, and pM category, and tumor differentiation grade. L1CAM expression positively correlated with vimentin, beta-catenin, and slug, but inversely with E-cadherin (all p-values < 0.05). E-cadherin expression was higher in the tumor center than in the tumor periphery, whereas L1CAM and vimentin were expressed at the tumor-stroma interface. In L1CAM-negative A549 cells the L1CAM expression was upregulated and matrigel invasion was increased after stimulation with TGF-beta1. In L1CAM-positive SK-LU-1 and SK-LC-LL cells matrigel invasion was decreased after L1CAM siRNA knockdown. Conclusions A subset of NSCLCs with vessel tropism and increased metastasis aberrantly expresses L1CAM. L1CAM is a novel prognostic marker for NSCLCs that is upregulated by EMT induction and appears to be instrumental for enhanced cell invasion. PMID:21985405

  10. Leak Testing and Implications of Operations to Locate Leak Horizons at West Hackberry Well 108

    SciTech Connect

    SATTLER, ALLAN R.; EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; PIECHOCKI, ALAN

    2002-06-01

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve site at West Hackberry, Louisiana has historically experienced casing leaks. Numerous West Hackberry oil storage caverns have wells exhibiting communication between the interior 10 3/4 x 20-inch (oil) annulus and the ''outer cemented'' 20 x 26-inch annulus. Well 108 in Cavern 108 exhibits this behavior. It is thought that one, if not the primary, cause of this communication is casing thread leaks at the 20-inch casing joints combined with microannuli along the cement casing interfaces and other cracks/flaws in the cemented 20 x 26-inch annulus. An operation consisting of a series of nitrogen leak tests, similar to cavern integrity tests, was performed on Cavern 108 in an effort to determine the leak horizons and to see if these leak horizons coincided with those of casing joints. Certain leaky, threaded casing joints were identified between 400 and 1500 feet. A new leak detection procedure was developed as a result of this test, and this methodology for identifying and interpreting such casing joint leaks is presented in this report. Analysis of the test data showed that individual joint leaks could be successfully identified, but not without some degree of ambiguity. This ambiguity is attributed to changes in the fluid content of the leak path (nitrogen forcing out oil) and possibly to very plausible changes in characteristics of the flow path during the test. These changes dominated the test response and made the identification of individual leak horizons difficult. One consequence of concern from the testing was a progressive increase in the leak rate measured during testing due to nitrogen cleaning small amounts of oil out of the leak paths and very likely due to the changes of the leak path during the flow test. Therefore, careful consideration must be given before attempting similar tests. Although such leaks have caused no known environmental or economic problems to date, the leaks may be significant because of the potential

  11. Laser-Pulse/Fiber-Optic Liquid-Leak Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padgett, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    Several potential leak sites monitored using single sensing fiber. Fluid systems monitored quickly for leaks in remote, hazardous, or inaccessible locations by system of compact, lightweight fiber-optic leak sensors presently undergoing development. Sensors installed at potential leak sites as joints, couplings, and fittings. Sensor read by sending laser pulse along fiber, then noting presence or relative amplitude of return pulse. Leak-monitoring technique applicable to wide range of fluid systems and minimizes human exposure to toxic or dangerous fluids.

  12. Carbonyl reductase inactivation may contribute to mouse lung tumor promotion by electrophilic metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene: protein alkylation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shearn, Colin T; Fritz, Kristofer S; Meier, Brent W; Kirichenko, Oleg V; Thompson, John A

    2008-08-01

    Promotion of lung tumors in mice by the food additive butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) is mediated by electrophilic metabolites produced in the target organ. Identifying the proteins alkylated by these quinone methides (QMs) is a necessary step in understanding the underlying mechanisms. Covalent adducts of the antioxidant enzymes peroxiredoxin 6 and Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase were detected previously in lung cytosols from BALB/c mice injected with BHT, and complimentary in vitro studies demonstrated that QM alkylation causes inactivation and enhances oxidative stress. In the present work, adducts of another protective enzyme, carbonyl reductase (CBR), were detected by Western blotting and mass spectrometry in mitochondria from lungs of mice one day after a single injection of BHT and throughout a 28-day period of weekly injections required to achieve tumor promotion. BHT treatment was accompanied by the accumulation of protein carbonyls in lung cytosol from sustained oxidative stress. Studies in vitro demonstrated that CBR activity in lung homogenates was susceptible to concentration- and time-dependent inhibition by QMs. Recombinant CBR underwent irreversible inhibition during QM exposure, and mass spectrometry was utilized to identify alkylation sites at Cys 51, Lys 17, Lys 189, Lys 201, His 28, and His 204. Except for Lys 17, all of these adducts were eliminated as a cause of enzyme inhibition either by chemical modification (cysteine) or site-directed mutagenesis (lysines and histidines). The data demonstrated that Lys 17 is the critical alkylation target, consistent with the role of this basic residue in NADPH binding. These data support the possibility that CBR inhibition occurs in BHT-treated mice, thereby compromising one pathway for inactivating lipid peroxidation products, particularly 4-oxo-2-nonenal. These data, in concert with previous evidence for the inactivation of antioxidant enzymes, provide a molecular basis to explain lung inflammation leading to

  13. Single-Shell Tanks Leak Integrity Elements/ SX Farm Leak Causes and Locations - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    Girardot, Crystal; Harlow, Don; Venetz, Theodore; Washenfelder, Dennis; Johnson, Jeremy

    2012-07-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-91F Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal 1-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX- 111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and dry-wells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  14. SINGLE-SHELL TANKS LEAK INTEGRITY ELEMENTS/SX FARM LEAK CAUSES AND LOCATIONS - 12127

    SciTech Connect

    VENETZ TJ; WASHENFELDER D; JOHNSON J; GIRARDOT C

    2012-01-25

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) developed an enhanced single-shell tank (SST) integrity project in 2009. An expert panel on SST integrity was created to provide recommendations supporting the development of the project. One primary recommendation was to expand the leak assessment reports (substitute report or LD-1) to include leak causes and locations. The recommendation has been included in the M-045-9IF Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) as one of four targets relating to SST leak integrity. The 241-SX Farm (SX Farm) tanks with leak losses were addressed on an individual tank basis as part of LD-1. Currently, 8 out of 23 SSTs that have been reported to having a liner leak are located in SX Farm. This percentage was the highest compared to other tank farms which is why SX Farm was analyzed first. The SX Farm is comprised of fifteen SSTs built 1953-1954. The tanks are arranged in rows of three tanks each, forming a cascade. Each of the SX Farm tanks has a nominal I-million-gal storage capacity. Of the fifteen tanks in SX Farm, an assessment reported leak losses for the following tanks: 241-SX-107, 241-SX-108, 241-SX-109, 241-SX-111, 241-SX-112, 241-SX-113, 241-SX-114 and 241-SX-115. The method used to identify leak location consisted of reviewing in-tank and ex-tank leak detection information. This provided the basic data identifying where and when the first leaks were detected. In-tank leak detection consisted of liquid level measurement that can be augmented with photographs which can provide an indication of the vertical leak location on the sidewall. Ex-tank leak detection for the leaking tanks consisted of soil radiation data from laterals and drywells near the tank. The in-tank and ex-tank leak detection can provide an indication of the possible leak location radially around and under the tank. Potential leak causes were determined using in-tank and ex-tank information that is not directly related to

  15. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein enhances the responsiveness of alveolar macrophages to bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Implications for cytokine production in normal and injured lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T R; Mathison, J C; Tobias, P S; Letúrcq, D J; Moriarty, A M; Maunder, R J; Ulevitch, R J

    1992-01-01

    A plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) has been shown to regulate the response of rabbit peritoneal macrophages and human blood monocytes to endotoxin (LPS). We investigated whether LBP is present in lung fluids and the effects of LBP on the response of lung macrophages to LPS. Immunoreactive LBP was detectable in the lavage fluids of patients with the adult respiratory distress syndrome by immunoprecipitation followed by Western blotting, and also by specific immunoassay. In rabbits, the LBP appeared to originate outside of the lungs, inasmuch as mRNA transcripts for LBP were identified in total cellular RNA from liver, but not from lung homogenates or alveolar macrophages. Purified LBP enhanced the response of human and rabbit alveolar macrophages to both smooth form LPS (Escherichia coli O111B:4) and rough form LPS (Salmonella minnesota Re595). In the presence of LBP and LPS, the onset of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) production occurred earlier and at an LPS threshold dose that was as much as 1,000-fold lower for both types of LPS. In rabbit alveolar macrophages treated with LBP and LPS, TNF alpha mRNA appeared earlier, reached higher levels, and had a prolonged half-life as compared with LPS treatment alone. Neither LPS nor LPS and LBP affected pHi or [Cai++] in alveolar macrophages. Specific monoclonal antibodies to CD14, a receptor that binds LPS/LBP complexes, inhibited TNF alpha production by human alveolar macrophages stimulated with LPS alone or with LPS/LBP complexes, indicating the importance of CD14 in mediating the effects of LPS on alveolar macrophages. Thus, immunoreactive LBP accumulates in lung lavage fluids in patients with lung injury and enhances LPS-stimulated TNF alpha gene expression in alveolar macrophages by a pathway that depends on the CD14 receptor. LBP may play an important role in augmenting TNF alpha expression by alveolar macrophages within the lungs. Images PMID:1281827

  16. Detecting Conductive Liquid Leaking from Nonconductive Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    A method that can be implemented with relatively simple electronic circuitry provides a capability for detecting leakage of an electrically conductive liquid from an electrically nonconductive underground pipe. Alternatively or in addition, the method can be applied to locate the pipe, whether or not there is a leak. Although the method is subject to limitations (some of which are described below), it is still attractive as an additional option for detecting leaks and locating pipes without need for extensive digging. The method is based on capacitive coupling of an alternating electrical signal from the liquid to a portable electronic unit that resembles a metal detector. A signal voltage is applied to the liquid at some convenient point along the pipe: for example, the signal could be coupled into the liquid via an aboveground metal pipe fitting, the interior surface of which is in contact with the liquid. The signal is conducted through the liquid in the pipe; in the case of diffusive leak of liquid into the surrounding ground, the signal is conducted through the leak, into the portion of the adjacent ground that has become soaked with the liquid. (A drip leak cannot be detected by this method because there is no conductive path between the liquid inside and the liquid outside the pipe.) The portable unit includes an electrically conductive plate connected to the input terminal of an amplifier. When the plate is brought near the pipe or the leaked liquid, a small portion of the signal power is coupled capacitively from the liquid to the plate. The user scans the plate near the ground surface to find the locus of maximum signal strength. The leak can be identified as a relatively wide area, contiguous with the location of the pipe, over which the signal is detectable.

  17. Prospective evaluation of C-reactive protein, smoking and lung cancer death in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Bittoni, Marisa A; Focht, Brian C; Clinton, Steven K; Buckworth, Janet; Harris, Randall E

    2015-10-01

    Chronic inflammation plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined associations between lung cancer, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), a measure of systemic inflammation, and inflammatory lifestyle factors, such as smoking and obesity. This study prospectively examined the relationship between CRP and lung cancer death and its interrelationships with several lifestyle factors. Baseline data on smoking and other lifestyle variables were collected for 8,950 participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III: 1988-1994). Baseline CRP levels were measured in serum samples by nephelometry. Mortality status was ascertained through probabilistic record matching using the National Death Index through 2006. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for CRP and lung cancer death, with adjustment for smoking and other variables. During 18 years of follow-up, 219 individuals died from lung cancer. Multivariate regression models revealed a dose-response effect for elevated CRP and risk of lung cancer death when adjusting for age, gender, BMI and smoking. Compared to individuals with CRP <3 mg/l, lung cancer death was significantly associated with elevated levels of CRP: HR=1.63 (95% CI=1.15-2.26) for 3-7 mg/l and HR=2.44 (95% CI=1.81‑3.45) for CRP >7 mg/l, P-trend <0.0001). The risk of lung cancer death for smokers increased 9-fold in adjusted models (P<0.0001). When stratified by gender and smoking status the effects of CRP were similar for smokers and males but did not reach statistical significance for females and non-smokers. This study supports a dose-dependent relationship between lung cancer death and CRP for males and smokers, but additional efforts are needed to better elucidate these relationships in women and non-smokers. The results suggest that CRP may emerge as a valuable tool in identifying high-risk subgroups of smokers for lung cancer prevention

  18. Discovery and Validation of Predictive Biomarkers of Survival for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Radical Radiotherapy: Two Proteins With Predictive Value

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Michael J.; Zhou, Cong; Backen, Alison; Pernemalm, Maria; Williamson, Andrew J.K.; Priest, Lynsey J.C.; Koh, Pek; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Blackhall, Fiona H.; Dive, Caroline; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer-related death world-wide. Radiotherapy alone or in conjunction with chemotherapy is the standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Currently there is no predictive marker with clinical utility to guide treatment decisions in NSCLC patients undergoing radiotherapy. Identification of such markers would allow treatment options to be considered for more effective therapy. To enable the identification of appropriate protein biomarkers, plasma samples were collected from patients with non-small cell lung cancer before and during radiotherapy for longitudinal comparison following a protocol that carries sufficient power for effective discovery proteomics. Plasma samples from patients pre- and during radiotherapy who had survived > 18 mo were compared to the same time points from patients who survived < 14 mo using an 8 channel isobaric tagging tandem mass spectrometry discovery proteomics platform. Over 650 proteins were detected and relatively quantified. Proteins which showed a change during radiotherapy were selected for validation using an orthogonal antibody-based approach. Two of these proteins were verified in a separate patient cohort: values of CRP and LRG1 combined gave a highly significant indication of extended survival post one week of radiotherapy treatment. PMID:26425690

  19. Pathway focused protein profiling indicates differential function for IL-1B, -18 and VEGF during initiation and resolution of lung inflammation evoked by carbon nanoparticle exposure in mice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Carbonaceous nanoparticles possess an emerging source of human exposure due to the massive release of combustion products and the ongoing revolution in nanotechnology. Pulmonary inflammation caused by deposited nanoparticles is central for their adverse health effects. Epidemiological studies suggest that individuals with favourable lung physiology are at lower risk for particulate matter associated respiratory diseases probably due to efficient control of inflammation and repair process. Therefore we selected a mouse strain C3H/HeJ (C3) with robust lung physiology and exposed it to moderately toxic carbon nanoparticles (CNP) to study the elicited pulmonary inflammation and its resolution. Methods 5 μg, 20 μg and 50 μg CNP were intratracheally (i.t.) instilled in C3 mice to identify the optimal dose for subsequent time course studies. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed using histology, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) analysis and by a panel of 62 protein markers. Results 1 day after instillation of CNP, C3 mice exhibited a typical dose response, with the lowest dose (5 μg) representing the 'no effect level' as reflected by polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN), and BAL/lung concentrations of pro-inflammatory proteins. Histological analysis and BAL-protein concentration did not reveal any evidence of tissue injury in 20 μg CNP instilled animals. Accordingly time course assessment of the inflammatory response was performed after 3 and 7 days with this dose (20 μg). Compared to day 1, BAL PMN counts were significantly decreased at day 3 and completely returned to normal by day 7. We have identified protein markers related to the acute response and also to the time dependent response in lung and BAL. After complete resolution of PMN influx on day 7, we detected elevated concentrations of 20 markers that included IL1B, IL18, FGF2, EDN1, and VEGF in lung and/or BAL. Biological pathway analysis revealed these factors to be involved in a closely regulated

  20. Acceleration of Lung Regeneration by Platelet-Rich Plasma Extract through the Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 5-Tie2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Chen, Zhao; Jiang, Amanda; Jiang, Elisabeth; Ingber, Donald E; Mammoto, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, plays a key role in organ development, homeostasis, and regeneration. The cooperation of multiple angiogenic factors, rather than a single factor, is required for physiological angiogenesis. Recently, we have reported that soluble platelet-rich plasma (PRP) extract, which contains abundant angiopoietin-1 and multiple other angiogenic factors, stimulates angiogenesis and maintains vascular integrity in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we have demonstrated that mouse PRP extract increases phosphorylation levels of the Wnt coreceptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and thereby activates angiogenic factor receptor Tie2 in endothelial cells (ECs) and accelerates EC sprouting and lung epithelial cell budding in vitro. PRP extract also increases phosphorylation levels of Tie2 in the mouse lungs and accelerates compensatory lung growth and recovery of exercise capacity after unilateral pneumonectomy in mice, whereas soluble Tie2 receptor or Lrp5 knockdown attenuates the effects of PRP extract. Because human PRP extract is generated from autologous peripheral blood and can be stored at -80°C, our findings may lead to the development of novel therapeutic interventions for various angiogenesis-related lung diseases and to the improvement of strategies for lung regeneration. PMID:26091161

  1. Transforming growth factor-β inhibits IQ motif containing guanosine triphosphatase activating protein 1 expression in lung fibroblasts via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chuanyue; Zhang, Xianlong; Xie, Ying; Cheng, Jiawen

    2015-07-01

    IQ motif containing guanosine triphosphatase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) is associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrogenesis (IPF); however, characterization of the expression of IQGAP1 in lung fibroblasts has remained elusive. The present study therefore evaluated IQGAP1 expression in mouse and human lung fibroblasts under fibrotic conditions via western blot analysis. It was revealed that IQGAP1 expression levels were significantly decreased in lung fibroblasts isolated from bleomycin-challenged mice than in those of control mice. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induced differentiation, as well as decreased expression of IQGAP1 in WI-38 cells human lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation restored the TGF-β-induced inhibition of IQGAP1 expression in WI-38 cells. In lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-challenged WI-38 cells, the expression of IQGAP1 was also decreased, while neutralized anti-TGF-β antibody treatment restored the LPA-induced inhibition of IQGAP1 expression. These data indicated that TGF-β inhibited IQGAP1 expression in lung fibroblasts via the NF-κB signaling pathway, presenting a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of IPF. PMID:25684348

  2. Role of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) in lung injury in response to acute ozone exposure of SP-A deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Rizwanul; Umstead, Todd M.; Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Guo Xiaoxuan; Hawgood, Samuel; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna . E-mail: jfloros@psu.edu

    2007-04-01

    Millions are exposed to ozone levels above recommended limits, impairing lung function, causing epithelial damage and inflammation, and predisposing some individuals to pneumonia, asthma, and other lung conditions. Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) plays a role in host defense, the regulation of inflammation, and repair of tissue damage. We tested the hypothesis that the lungs of SP-A(-/-) (KO) mice are more susceptible to ozone-induced damage. We compared the effects of ozone on KO and wild type (WT) mice on the C57BL/6 genetic background by exposing them to 2 parts/million of ozone for 3 or 6 h and sacrificing them 0, 4, and 24 h later. Lungs were subject to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or used to measure endpoints of oxidative stress and inflammation. Despite more total protein in BAL of KO mice after a 3 h ozone exposure, WT mice had increased oxidation of protein and had oxidized SP-A dimers. In KO mice there was epithelial damage as assessed by increased LDH activity and there was increased phospholipid content. In WT mice there were more BAL PMNs and elevated macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Changes in MIP-2 and MCP-1 were observed in both KO and WT, however mRNA levels differed. In KO mice MIP-2 mRNA levels changed little with ozone, but in WT levels they were significantly increased. In summary, several aspects of the inflammatory response differ between WT and KO mice. These in vivo findings appear to implicate SP-A in regulating inflammation and limiting epithelial damage in response to ozone exposure.

  3. Intrafetal glucose infusion alters glucocorticoid signaling and reduces surfactant protein mRNA expression in the lung of the late-gestation sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    McGillick, Erin V; Morrison, Janna L; McMillen, I Caroline; Orgeig, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Increased circulating fetal glucose and insulin concentrations are potential inhibitors of fetal lung maturation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in infants of diabetic mothers. In this study, we examined the effect of intrafetal glucose infusion on mRNA expression of glucose transporters, insulin-like growth factor signaling, glucocorticoid regulatory genes, and surfactant proteins in the lung of the late-gestation sheep fetus. The numerical density of the cells responsible for producing surfactant was determined using immunohistochemistry. Glucose infusion for 10 days did not affect mRNA expression of glucose transporters or IGFs but did decrease IGF-1R expression. There was reduced mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid-converting enzyme HSD11B-1 and the glucocorticoid receptor, potentially reducing glucocorticoid responsiveness in the fetal lung. Furthermore, surfactant protein (SFTP) mRNA expression was reduced in the lung following glucose infusion, while the number of SFTP-B-positive cells remained unchanged. These findings suggest the presence of a glucocorticoid-mediated mechanism regulating delayed maturation of the surfactant system in the sheep fetus following glucose infusion and provide evidence for the link between abnormal glycemic control during pregnancy and the increased risk of RDS in infants of uncontrolled diabetic mothers. PMID:24990855

  4. Operational Philosophy Concerning Manned Spacecraft Cabin Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeSimpelaere, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The last thirty years have seen the Space Shuttle as the prime United States spacecraft for manned spaceflight missions. Many lessons have been learned about spacecraft design and operation throughout these years. Over the next few decades, a large increase of manned spaceflight in the commercial sector is expected. This will result in the exposure of commercial crews and passengers to many of the same risks crews of the Space Shuttle have encountered. One of the more dire situations that can be encountered is the loss of pressure in the habitable volume of the spacecraft during on orbit operations. This is referred to as a cabin leak. This paper seeks to establish a general cabin leak response philosophy with the intent of educating future spacecraft designers and operators. After establishing a relative definition for a cabin leak, the paper covers general descriptions of detection equipment, detection methods, and general operational methods for management of a cabin leak. Subsequently, all these items are addressed from the perspective of the Space Shuttle Program, as this will be of the most value to future spacecraft due to similar operating profiles. Emphasis here is placed upon why and how these methods and philosophies have evolved to meet the Space Shuttle s needs. This includes the core ideas of: considerations of maintaining higher cabin pressures vs. lower cabin pressures, the pros and cons of a system designed to feed the leak with gas from pressurized tanks vs. using pressure suits to protect against lower cabin pressures, timeline and consumables constraints, re-entry considerations with leaks of unknown origin, and the impact the International Space Station (ISS) has had to the standard Space Shuttle cabin leak response philosophy. This last item in itself includes: procedural management differences, hardware considerations, additional capabilities due to the presence of the ISS and its resource, and ISS docking/undocking considerations with a

  5. Automated hydrostatic testing for pipeline leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, B. ); Musilli, M. )

    1994-11-01

    Leaks in pipelines carrying such products as crude oil and crude oil by-products lead not only to loss of product, but present the prospect of blowouts in the future that can cause millions of dollars in property damage and costly EPA-mandated cleanups. These leaks are considered sufficiently serious that the US Department of Transportation, which is charged with regulating the safety of pipelines throughout the country, may at times require pipeline operators to hydrostatically test their pipelines. One fully automated pipeline leak locating method based on computer analysis of dynamic pressure signals uses three IBM-compatible personal computers and two 16-channel high-speed analog-to-digital interfaces. The system detects leaks by means of dynamic pressure changes sampled at a high rate and locates them precisely by means of pressure signal velocity. In this way, leaks as small as 3--13mm (0.125--0.5 in.) can be located with an accuracy of a single pipe length in a pipeline section of 160 km (100 mi). This article describes the instrumentation needed and the test procedure used.

  6. Differential Response of Heat Shock Proteins to Uphill and Downhill Exercise in Heart, Skeletal Muscle, Lung and Kidney Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Pablo C. B.; Moura, Carolina S.; Morato, Priscila N.; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Running on a horizontal plane is known to increase the concentration of the stress biomarker heat-shock protein (HSP), but no comparison of the expression of HSP70 has yet been established between the uphill (predominantly concentric) and downhill (predominantly eccentric) muscle contractions exercise. The objective of the study was to investigate the relationships between eccentric and concentric contractions on the HSP70 response of the lung, kidney, gastrocnemius, soleus and heart. Twenty-four male Wistar weanling rats were divided into four groups: non-exercised and three different grades of treadmill exercise groups: horizontal, uphill (+7%) and downhill (-7% of inclination). At the optimal time-point of six hours after the exercise, serum uric acid, creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined by standard methods and HSP70 by the Western blot analysis. HSP70 responds differently to different types of running. For kidney, heart, soleus and gastrocnemius, the HSP70 expression increased, 230, 180, 150 and 120% respectively of the reference (horizontal). When the contraction was concentric (uphill) and compared to downhill the increase in response of HSP70 was greater in 80% for kidney, 75% for gastrocnemius, 60% for soleus and 280% for the heart. Uric acid was about 50% higher (0.64 ± 0.03 mg·dL−1) in the uphill group as compared to the horizontal or downhill groups. Similarly, the activities of serum CK and LDH were both 100% greater for both the uphill and downhill groups as compared to the horizontal group (2383 ± 253 and 647.00 ± 73 U/L, respectively). The responsiveness of HSP70 appeared to be quite different depending on the type of tissue, suggesting that the impact of exercise was not restricted to the muscles, but extended to the kidney tissue. The uphill exercise increases HSP70 beyond the eccentric type and the horizontal running was a lower HSP70 responsive stimulus. Key Points Exercise can induce increases in HSP70 in

  7. Downregulation of super oxide dismutase level in protein might be due to sulfur mustard induced toxicity in lung.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, Leila; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) has been identified as an important chemical weapon. During the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-88, the extensive usage of SM against Iranian civilians and military forces was proven. This agent has been shown to cause severe damage mainly in the skin, eyes, lungs, and respiratory tract in Iranian veterans. The most common disease is bronchiolitis obliterans (BO)). SM increases the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are known as protective antioxidants against the harmful effects of ROS. Twenty exposed SM individuals (43.2±6.4 years), and 10 normal controls (41.3±2.5 years) were enrolled in this study. Evaluation of SODs was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that CuZnSOD and MnSOD mRNA were up-regulated 2.79±1.09 and 2.49±1.11 folds, respectively in SM-injured patients in comparison with control levels. In contrast, Immunohistochemistry results showed downregulation of CuZnSOD protein expression in SM injured patients. Our results revealed that SODs may play an important role in cellular protection against oxidative stress due to mustard gas toxicity in airway wall of SM exposed patients. PMID:23754354

  8. Prognostic significance of phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1 in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyoun Wook; Lee, Eun Hee; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Seok-Hyun; Kim, Tae Gyu; Hwang, Sang Won; Kang, Kyung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binding protein (4E-BP1) results in release of eIF4E, which sequentially relieves translational repression and enhances oncogenic protein synthesis. We assessed the expression of phosphorylated 4E-BP1 (p-4E-BP1) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its correlation with clinicopathological parameters and patient survival. In addition, we investigated whether phosphorylation site made a difference in outcome. Tissue microarray blocks were generated from 73 NSCLC samples and immunohistochemically stained for p-4E-BP1 Thr37/46 and p-4E-BP1 Thr70. Both p-4E-BP1 Thr37/46 and p-4E-BP1 Thr70 were more highly expressed in squamous cell carcinoma than in adenocarcinoma (P = 0.006 and P = 0.003, respectively). Expression of p-4E-BP1 Thr70 was higher in tumours with a diameter larger than 3 cm (P = 0.024) and nodal metastasis (P = 0.053). High p-4E-BP1 Thr70 expression significantly correlated with worse overall survival (P = 0.001) and was an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio 2.64, P = 0.004). p-4E-BP1 Thr37/46 had no prognostic significance. Phosphorylation site affected the prognostic significance of p-4E-BP1. p-4E-BP1 Thr70 is a candidate biomarker to predict poor prognosis in patients with NSCLC. PMID:26097581

  9. Serum surfactant protein-A, but not surfactant protein-D or KL-6, can predict preclinical lung damage induced by smoking.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Kanoh, Soichiro; Motoyoshi, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    Serum surfactant protein (SP)-A offers a useful clinical marker for interstitial lung disease (ILD). However, SP-A is occasionally elevated in non-ILD pulmonary patients. The present study was conducted to investigate factors that affect serum SP- A levels in respiratory medicine. Serum SP-A, serum SP-D, serum Klebs von den Lungen (KL)-6 and pulmonary function tests were evaluated in 929 patients (current smokers, n=255; ex-smokers, n=242; never-smokers, n=432) without ILD or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Serum SP-A was significantly higher in current smokers than in never- or ex-smokers (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Serum SP- A was significantly higher in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary thromboembolism than in other diseases (p<0.01). Serum SP-A correlated positively with amount of smoking (p<0.01) and negatively with forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (p<0.05). Serum SP-D and KL-6 were unaffected by smoking. Smoking should be taken into account when evaluating serum SP-A levels, and different baseline levels of serum SP-A should be established for smokers and non-smokers. Serum SP-A may also represent a useful marker for predicting COPD in the preclinical stage. PMID:18595202

  10. Increased lung prolyl hydroxylase and decreased glucocorticoid receptor are related to decreased surfactant protein in the growth-restricted sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, Sandra; McGillick, Erin V; Botting, Kimberley J; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-07-01

    Experimental placental restriction (PR) by carunclectomy in fetal sheep results in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), chronic hypoxemia, increased plasma cortisol, and decreased lung surfactant protein (SP) expression. The mechanisms responsible for decreased SP expression are unknown but may involve decreased glucocorticoid (GC) action or changes in hypoxia signaling. Endometrial caruncles were removed from nonpregnant ewes to induce PR. Lungs were collected from control and PR fetuses at 130-135 (n = 19) and 139-145 (n = 28) days of gestation. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were used to quantify lung mRNA and protein expression, respectively, of molecular regulators and downstream targets of the GC and hypoxia-signaling pathways. We confirmed a decrease in SP-A, -B, and -C, but not SP-D, mRNA expression in PR fetuses at both ages. There was a net downregulation of GC signaling with a reduction in GC receptor (GR)-α and -β protein expression and a decrease in the cofactor, GATA-6. GC-responsive genes including transforming growth factor-β1, IL-1β, and β2-adrenergic receptor were not stimulated. Prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)2 mRNA and protein and PHD3 mRNA expression increased with a concomitant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-1β mRNA expression. There was an increase in mRNA expression of several, but not all, hypoxia-responsive genes. Hence, both GC and hypoxia signaling may contribute to reduced SP expression. Although acute hypoxia normally inactivates PHDs, chronic hypoxemia in the PR fetus increased PHD abundance, which normally prevents HIF signaling. This may represent a mechanism by which chronic hypoxemia contributes to the decrease in SP production in the IUGR fetal lung. PMID:25934670

  11. ICPP water inventory study leak test report

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, B.T.

    1993-12-01

    Data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) indicate that there are three areas where perched water bodies (groundwater) are suspect to exist beneath the ICPP. Questions have been raised concerning the recharge sources for the northwest (NW) perched water body which is located below the northwest area of the ICPP. In response to these questions, a Water Inventory Study was initiated to determine the extent and the potential impacts of the ICPP water systems as a recharge source. A key part of the Water Inventory Study was the leak test investigation, performed to leak test the ICPP water piping distribution system, or portions thereof, which could potentially contribute to the recharge of the NW perched water body. This report provides an overview and the results of the leak test investigation and will be incorporated into the overall Water Inventory Study Report.

  12. Remote Leak Detection: Indirect Thermal Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing technologies are being considered for efficient, low cost gas leak detection. Eleven specific techniques have been identified for further study and evaluation of several of these is underway. The Indirect Thermal Technique is one of the techniques that is being explored. For this technique, an infrared camera is used to detect the temperature change of a pipe or fitting at the site of a gas leak. This temperature change is caused by the change in temperature of the gas expanding from the leak site. During the 10-week NFFP program, the theory behind the technique was further developed, experiments were performed to determine the conditions for which the technique might be viable, and a proof-of-concept system was developed and tested in the laboratory.

  13. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  14. Health effects of the Bhopal gas leak: a review.

    PubMed

    Dhara, R

    1992-09-01

    The methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas leak from the Union Carbide plant at Bhopal, India in 1984 was the worst industrial disaster in history. Exposure estimates of gas concentrations in the area range from 85 to 0.12 ppm. Of the approximately 200,000 persons exposed, 3598 deaths have resulted as of November 1989. Chronic inflammatory damage to the eyes and lungs appears to be the main cause of morbidity. Reproductive health problems in the form of increased spontaneous abortions and psychological problems have been reported. Questions about the nature of MIC toxicity have been raised by the persistence of multi-systemic symptoms in survivors. Animal studies using radio-labeled MIC given by the inhalation route have shown that the radio-label is capable of crossing the lung membranes and being distributed to many organs of the body. This paper reviews health effects of gas exposure from published studies and discusses some of the clinical and epidemiological issues being debated. PMID:1306166

  15. Co-active receptor tyrosine kinases mitigate the effect of FGFR inhibitors in FGFR1-amplified lung cancers with low FGFR1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kotani, H; Ebi, H; Kitai, H; Nanjo, S; Kita, K; Huynh, T G; Ooi, A; Faber, A C; Mino-Kenudson, M; Yano, S

    2016-07-01

    Targeted therapies are effective in subsets of lung cancers with EGFR mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocations. Large-scale genomics have recently expanded the lung cancer landscape with FGFR1 amplification found in 10-20% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). However, the response rates have been low for biomarker-directed fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor therapy in SCC, which contrasts to the relatively high rates of response seen in EGFR mutant and ALK-translocated lung cancers treated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors and ALK inhibitors, respectively. In order to better understand the low response rates of FGFR1-amplified lung cancers to FGFR inhibitors, relationships between gene copy number, mRNA expression and protein expression of FGFR1 were assessed in cell lines, tumor specimens and data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. The importance of these factors for the sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors was determined by analyzing drug screen data and conducting in vitro and in vivo experiments. We report that there was a discrepancy between FGFR1 amplification level and FGFR1 protein expression in a number of these cell lines, and the cancers with unexpectedly low FGFR1 expression were uniformly resistant to the different FGFR inhibitors. Further interrogation of the receptor tyrosine kinase activity in these discordant cell lines revealed co-activation of HER2 and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα) caused by gene amplification or ligand overexpression maintained phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and MEK/ERK signaling even in the presence of FGFR inhibitor. Accordingly, co-inhibition of FGFR1 and HER2 or PDGFRα led to enhanced drug responses. In contrast, FGFR1-amplified high FGFR1 protein-expressing lung cancers are sensitive to FGFR inhibitor monotherapy by downregulating ERK signaling. Addition of a PI3K inhibitor to these high FGFR1 protein-expressing cancers further sensitized them to FGFR

  16. Laser Schlieren System Detects Sounds Of Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, Parthasarathy P.; Alwar, A. Vijayaragavan

    1990-01-01

    Hostile environments monitored safely and noninvasively. Modified laser schlieren system acts as microphone to detect sounds of leaks remotely. Sensitive to acoustical frequencies above audible range and especially suited for monitoring leaks of high-pressure steam from boilers or chemical vapors from processing equipment. Does not require placement of delicate equipment in harsh environment monitored, and no contact needed with boiler or other unit being monitored. Detects sound waves via variation of index of refraction of air at acoustical frequencies. Used to monitor sound frequencies beyond range of human hearing.

  17. Apparatus for Leak Testing Pressurized Hoses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D. (Inventor); Garrison, Steve G. (Inventor); Gant, Bobby D. (Inventor); Palmer, John R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A hose-attaching apparatus for leak-testing a pressurized hose may include a hose-attaching member. A bore may extend through the hose-attaching member. An internal annular cavity may extend coaxially around the bore. At least one of a detector probe hole and a detector probe may be connected to the internal annular cavity. At least a portion of the bore may have a diameter which is at least one of substantially equal to and less than a diameter of a hose to be leak-tested.

  18. Technique for detecting liquid metal leaks

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.

    1979-01-01

    In a system employing flowing liquid metal as a heat transfer medium in contact with tubular members containing a working fluid, i.e., steam, liquid metal leaks through the wall of the tubular member are detected by dislodging the liquid metal compounds forming in the tubular member at the leak locations and subsequently transporting the dislodged compound in the form of an aerosol to a detector responsive to the liquid metal compound. In the application to a sodium cooled tubular member, the detector would consist of a sodium responsive device, such as a sodium ion detector.

  19. Single-Shell Tank Leak Integrity Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Harlow, D. G.; Girardot, C. L.; Venetz, T. J.

    2015-03-26

    This document summarizes and evaluates the information in the Hanford Tri-Party Agreement Interim Milestone M-045-91F Targets completed between 2010 and 2015. 1) Common factors of SST liner failures (M-045-91F-T02), 2) the feasibility of testing for ionic conductivity between the inside and outside of SSTs (M-045-91F-T03, and 3) the causes, locations, and rates of leaks from leaking SSTs (M-045-91F-T04).

  20. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation of the death-associated protein kinase gene is early and frequent in murine lung tumors induced by cigarette smoke and tobacco carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Pulling, Leah C; Vuillemenot, Brian R; Hutt, Julie A; Devereux, Theodora R; Belinsky, Steven A

    2004-06-01

    Loss of expression of the death-associated protein (DAP)-kinase gene by aberrant promoter methylation may play an important role in cancer development and progression. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the commonality for inactivation of the DAP-kinase gene in adenocarcinomas induced in mice by chronic exposure to mainstream cigarette smoke, the tobacco carcinogens 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and vinyl carbamate, and the occupational carcinogen methylene chloride. The timing for inactivation was also determined in alveolar hyperplasias that arise in lung cancer induced in the A/J mouse by NNK. The DAP-kinase gene was not expressed in three of five NNK-induced lung tumor-derived cell lines or in a spontaneously arising lung tumor-derived cell line. Treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored expression; dense methylation throughout the DAP-kinase CpG island detected by bisulfite sequencing supported methylation as the inactivating event in these cell lines. Methylation-specific PCR detected inactivation of the DAP-kinase gene in 43% of tumors associated with cigarette smoke, a frequency similar to those reported in human non-small cell lung cancer. In addition, DAP-kinase methylation was detected in 52%, 60%, and 50% of tumors associated with NNK, vinyl carbamate, and methylene chloride, respectively. Methylation was observed at similar prevalence in both NNK-induced hyperplasias and adenocarcinomas (46% versus 52%), suggesting that inactivation of this gene is one pathway for tumor development in the mouse lung. Bisulfite sequencing of both premalignant and malignant lesions revealed dense methylation, substantiating that this gene is functionally inactivated at the earliest histological stages of adenocarcinoma development. This study is the first to use a murine model of cigarette smoke-induced lung cancer and demonstrate commonality for inactivation by promoter hypermethylation of a gene implicated in the development

  1. Clinical Utility of a Plasma Protein Classifier for Indeterminate Lung Nodules.

    PubMed

    Vachani, Anil; Hammoud, Zane; Springmeyer, Steven; Cohen, Neri; Nguyen, Dao; Williamson, Christina; Starnes, Sandra; Hunsucker, Stephen; Law, Scott; Li, Xiao-Jun; Porter, Alexander; Kearney, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules is a complex challenge. Most are benign but frequently undergo invasive and costly procedures to rule out malignancy. A plasma protein classifier was developed that identifies likely benign nodules that can be triaged to CT surveillance to avoid unnecessary invasive procedures. The clinical utility of this classifier was assessed in a prospective-retrospective analysis of a study enrolling 475 patients with nodules 8-30 mm in diameter who had an invasive procedure to confirm diagnosis at 12 sites. Using this classifier, 32.0 % (CI 19.5-46.7) of surgeries and 31.8 % (CI 20.9-44.4) of invasive procedures (biopsy and/or surgery) on benign nodules could have been avoided. Patients with malignancy triaged to CT surveillance by the classifier would have been 24.0 % (CI 19.2-29.4). This rate is similar to that described in clinical practices (24.5 % CI 16.2-34.4). This study demonstrates the clinical utility of a non-invasive blood test for pulmonary nodules. PMID:26376647

  2. Glucose-related protein (GRP78) and its relationship to the drug-resistance proteins P170, GST-pi, LRP56 and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Koomägi, R; Mattern, J; Volm, M

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have documented that induction of the glucose-related protein (GRP78) is associated with the development of drug-resistance to antitumor drugs. However, nothing has been reported concerning GRP78 in human lung tumors and its relationship to several resistance proteins and angiogenesis. Therefore, this study analyzed the expression of GRP78 in a series of 62 consecutive lung cancer patients and examined whether or not a relationship exists between GRP78, several resistance proteins and microvessel density (MVD). Secondary, it evaluated the relationship of GRP78, LRP56 and GST-pi in cancer cell lines under hypoxic conditions and in sensitive and resistant cell lines. We determined that a relationship exists between GRP78 and the resistance proteins P170, LRP56 and GST-pi in human lung cancer. Furthermore, we observed an up-regulation of GRP78 in the resistant cell lines LUTC-ML54, OAW-Dox and OAW-Tax, but not in sensitive cell lines. Abnormal vascularization of malignant tumors is associated with the development of hypoxic regions. In hypoxic regions, several proteins, including drug resistance proteins, are expressed in greater quantities. Our study detected an inverse correlation between GRP78 and MVD. Carcinomas with low MVD exhibited a higher expression of GRP78. Furthermore, protein expression of GRP78, GST-pi and LRP56 increased in the cell lines A-549, RPMI-2650 and SC-MES-1 under hypoxic conditions. These observations suggest that hypoxia, tumor vascularization and the simultaneous expression of many resistance-related proteins, including GRP78, may play an important role in drug response and therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:10628396

  3. Induction of C/EBP homologous protein-mediated apoptosis and autophagy by licochalcone A in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Chen, Xin; Wang, Zhao-Yu; Chai, Ke; Wang, Ya-Fang; Xu, Xiao-Huang; Wang, Xiao-Wen; Lu, Jia-Hong; Wang, Yi-Tao; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Licochalcone A (LCA), a flavonoid isolated from the famous Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, presents obvious anti-cancer effects. In this study, the anti-cancer effects and potential mechanisms of LCA in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were studied. LCA decreased cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase release, and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in NSCLC cells while not in human embryonic lung fibroblast cells. The expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II) and formation of GFP-LC3 punta, two autophagic markers, were increased after treatment with LCA. LCA-induced LC3-II expression was increased when combined with chloroquine (CQ), while knock-down of autophagy related protein (ATG) 7 or ATG5 reversed LCA-induced LC3-II expression and GFP-LC3 punta formation, suggesting that LCA induced autophagy in NSCLC cells. Inhibition of autophagy could not reverse the LCA-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis. In addition, LCA increased the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress related proteins, such as binding immunoglobulin protein and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Knock-down of CHOP reversed LCA-induced cell viability decrease, apoptosis, and autophagy. Taken together, LCA-induced autophagic effect is an accompanied phenomenon in NSCLC cells, and CHOP is critical for LCA-induced cell viability decrease, apoptosis, and autophagy. PMID:27184816

  4. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 in metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakurina, G. V.; Kolegova, E. S.; Cheremisina, O. V.; Zavyalov, A. A.; Shishkin, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    Progression of tumors and metastasis in particular is one of the main reasons of the high mortality rate among cancer patients. The primary role in developing metastases plays cell locomotion which requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Form, dynamics, localization and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins, which include the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). The study is devoted to the investigation of CAP1 level depending on the presence or absence of metastases in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results show the contribution of CAP1 to SCCHN and NSCLC progression. We detected the connection between the tissue protein CAP1 level and the stage of NSCLC and SCCHN disease. Also the levels of the CAP1 protein in tissues of primary tumors and metastases in lung cancer were different. Our data showed that CAP is important in the development of metastases, which suggests further perspectives in the study of this protein for projecting metastasis of NSCLC and SCCHN.

  5. Induction of apoptotic effects of antiproliferative protein from the seeds of Borreria hispida on lung cancer (A549) and cervical cancer (HeLa) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rupachandra, S; Sarada, D V L

    2014-01-01

    A 35 KDa protein referred to as F3 was purified from the seeds of Borreria hispida by precipitation with 80% ammonium sulphate and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 column. RP-HPLC analysis of protein fraction (F3) on an analytical C-18 column produced a single peak, detected at 220 nm. F3 showed an apparent molecular weight of 35 KDa by SDS PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis of F3 showed the closest homology with the sequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase of Pyrococcus horikoshii. The protein (F3) exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations ranging from 10 µg to 1000 µg/mL, as revealed by the MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed the increased growth of sub-G0 population in both cell lines exposed to a concentration of 1000 µg/mL of protein fraction F3 as examined from flow cytometry. This is the first report of a protein from the seeds of Borreria hispida with antiproliferative and apoptotic activity in lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells. PMID:24605320

  6. Induction of Apoptotic Effects of Antiproliferative Protein from the Seeds of Borreria hispida on Lung Cancer (A549) and Cervical Cancer (HeLa) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rupachandra, S.; Sarada, D. V. L.

    2014-01-01

    A 35 KDa protein referred to as F3 was purified from the seeds of Borreria hispida by precipitation with 80% ammonium sulphate and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 column. RP-HPLC analysis of protein fraction (F3) on an analytical C-18 column produced a single peak, detected at 220 nm. F3 showed an apparent molecular weight of 35 KDa by SDS PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis of F3 showed the closest homology with the sequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase of Pyrococcus horikoshii. The protein (F3) exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations ranging from 10 µg to 1000 µg/mL, as revealed by the MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed the increased growth of sub-G0 population in both cell lines exposed to a concentration of 1000 µg/mL of protein fraction F3 as examined from flow cytometry. This is the first report of a protein from the seeds of Borreria hispida with antiproliferative and apoptotic activity in lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells. PMID:24605320

  7. Induction of C/EBP homologous protein-mediated apoptosis and autophagy by licochalcone A in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Chen, Xin; Wang, Zhao-Yu; Chai, Ke; Wang, Ya-Fang; Xu, Xiao-Huang; Wang, Xiao-Wen; Lu, Jia-Hong; Wang, Yi-Tao; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Licochalcone A (LCA), a flavonoid isolated from the famous Chinese medicinal herb Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch, presents obvious anti-cancer effects. In this study, the anti-cancer effects and potential mechanisms of LCA in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were studied. LCA decreased cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase release, and induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in NSCLC cells while not in human embryonic lung fibroblast cells. The expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II) and formation of GFP-LC3 punta, two autophagic markers, were increased after treatment with LCA. LCA-induced LC3-II expression was increased when combined with chloroquine (CQ), while knock-down of autophagy related protein (ATG) 7 or ATG5 reversed LCA-induced LC3-II expression and GFP-LC3 punta formation, suggesting that LCA induced autophagy in NSCLC cells. Inhibition of autophagy could not reverse the LCA-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis. In addition, LCA increased the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress related proteins, such as binding immunoglobulin protein and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Knock-down of CHOP reversed LCA-induced cell viability decrease, apoptosis, and autophagy. Taken together, LCA-induced autophagic effect is an accompanied phenomenon in NSCLC cells, and CHOP is critical for LCA-induced cell viability decrease, apoptosis, and autophagy. PMID:27184816

  8. Intermediate filament proteins in classic and variant types of small cell lung carcinoma cell lines: a biochemical and immunochemical analysis using a panel of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Broers, J L; Carney, D N; Klein Rot, M; Schaart, G; Lane, E B; Vooijs, G P; Ramaekers, F C

    1986-07-01

    The intermediate filament protein (IFP) characteristics of a panel of lung cancer cell lines including adenocarcinoma (two cell lines) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC, three classic and three variant cell lines) were examined using one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoretic techniques, immunocytochemical techniques and immunoblotting assays. A panel of 28 monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to the five different types of IFP were used. The results of our studies indicate that these human lung adenocarcinoma, classic SCLC and variant SCLC cell lines can be differentiated on the basis of their pattern of IFP. The main conclusions from this study can be summarized as follows. The two adenocarcinoma cell lines contain cytokeratins 7, 8, 18, and sometimes 19, next to vimentin intermediate filament (IF). The three classic-type SCLC cell lines contain only cytokeratin IFs but not vimentin IF or neurofilaments (NFs). Cytokeratin polypeptides 7, 8, 18 and 19 could be detected. All three variant-type SCLC cell lines do not contain detectable amounts of cytokeratins. In contrast, two out of three variant SCLC cell lines contain neurofilament proteins. All three variant-type SCLC cell lines contain vimentin IF. Using immunoblotting assays with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to defined NF proteins the presence of the 68 X 10(3) Mr and the 160 X 10(3) Mr NF polypeptide could be demonstrated in two variant SCLC cell lines. As patients with SCLC-variant phenotype have a poorer prognosis after cytotoxic therapy than patients with 'pure' SCLC, the use of antibodies to IFP in staining fresh lung tumours, especially anaplastic ones, may differentiate the two subtypes of SCLC. Such a distinction would have a major impact on therapy selections and may be of prognostic importance. PMID:2433295

  9. Systemic and lung protein changes in sarcoidosis. Lymphocyte counts, gallium uptake values, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels may reflect different aspects of disease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Check, I.J.; Kidd, M.R.; Staton, G.W. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    BAL lymphocyte percentages, quantitated gallium-67 lung uptake, and SACE levels have all been proposed as measures of disease activity in sarcoidosis. We analyzed 32 paired sera and BAL fluids from sarcoidosis patients by high-resolution agarose electrophoresis to look for protein changes characteristic of systemic or local inflammation and compared the results with those from the above tests. Nine patients (group 1) had serum inflammatory protein changes and increased total protein, albumin, beta 1-globulin (transferrin), and gamma-globulin levels in fluid recovered by BAL. Thirteen patients (group 2) had normal protein levels in sera but abnormal protein levels in BAL specimens. Ten patients (group 3) had normal protein levels in sera and in BAL specimens. Patients in groups 1 and 2 had a disproportionate increase in beta 1-globulin (transferrin) and gamma-globulin levels in their BAL specimens. The BAL lymphocyte percentage changes paralleled the BAL protein level changes, suggesting relationships among the immunoregulatory role of these cells, increased local immunoglobulin synthesis, and the pathogenesis of altered alveolar permeability. Gallium-67 uptake was highest in patients with serum inflammatory protein changes. Thus, systemic inflammation may facilitate pulmonary gallium-67 uptake, possibly by changes in BAL fluid or serum transferrin saturation and/or kinetics. SACE levels showed no relationship to changes in the levels of serum or BAL proteins. These data suggest that the various proposed measures of disease activity reflect different aspects of inflammation in sarcoidosis.

  10. Protein C inhibits endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes in A549 lung cancer cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, I.; Majerus, P.W.

    1987-05-01

    We investigated the effect of protein C on the endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes. We previously showed that exposure of umbilical vein endothelial cells to thrombin stimulated the internalization and degradation of thrombin. A similar internalization was stimulated by a monoclonal antithrombomodulin antibody. We have repeated these studies in the presence of protein C and found that endocytosis of /sup 125/I-thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes, but not /sup 125/I-antithrombomodulin-thrombomodulin complexes, is inhibited. Activated protein C did not inhibit endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes. Protein C inhibited both internalization and degradation of /sup 125/I-thrombin and diisopropylphosphoryl (DIP) /sup 125/I-thrombin in human lung cancer cells (A549). These effects were observed at protein C concentrations found in human plasma. Protein S had no effect on the inhibition of endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes by protein C. We propose that protein C may regulate the rate of endocytosis of thrombin-thrombomodulin complexes in vivo and thereby control the capacity for endothelium to activate protein C.

  11. New insights on the palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) proteins: Based on molecular and functional analysis of its homolog of YH1/SPLUNC1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xiangning; Wu, Jingjing; French, Samuel W; He, Zhiwei

    2016-06-01

    The palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) proteins are intricate immune molecules and arisen questions from them are still unresolved. In order to identify the role of PLUNC family proteins, we had analyzed its homolog protein YH1/SPLUNC1, which highly expresses in nontumor nasopharyngeal epithelium while expresses weakly in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) tissues. It is found that YH1/SPLUNC1 protein expression level was higher in chronic normal nasopharynx inflammatory cells compared to NPC tissue cells. An approach to produce active YH1/SPLUNC1 protein had been established and recombinant YH1/SPLUNC1 protein could bind to all four Gram-positive and four Gram-negative bacteria we tested, and triggered the aggregation of those bacteria. Interestingly, YH1/SPLUNC1 protein has antimicrobial activity, and it can directly kill Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter haemolyticus. The microorganism cell showed morphological changes in cell wall such as cell damage and cytoplasmic leakage after exposure to YH1/SPLUNC1 protein, indicating that YH1/SPLUNC1 directly killed the microorganisms by cell wall permeabilization. All these results indicated that YH1/SPLUNC1 might be an important antimicrobial protein involved in innate immunity defense. PMID:26654795

  12. Lung Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  13. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  14. Lung metastases

    MedlinePlus

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs) and spread through the ...

  15. Suppression of autophagy by CUB domain-containing protein 1 signaling is essential for anchorage-independent survival of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Uekita, Takamasa; Fujii, Satoko; Miyazawa, Yuri; Hashiguchi, Akinori; Abe, Hitosi; Sakamoto, Michiie; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2013-07-01

    CUB (C1r/C1s, urchin embryonic growth factor, BMP1) domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) has been implicated in promoting metastasis of cancer cells through several mechanisms, including the inhibition of anoikis, which is cell death triggered by the loss of extracellular matrix interactions. However, the mechanism inhibiting cell death regulated by CDCP1 remains elusive. Inhibition of CDCP1 expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced the cell death of suspended cancer cells without cleaving caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis; cell death was not inhibited by a general caspase inhibitor, suggesting that the loss of CDCP1 induces caspase-independent cell death. In contrast, knockdown of CDCP1 as well as protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), a downstream effector of CDCP1, in a suspension culture of lung cancer cells resulted in marked induction of membranous microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II protein, a hallmark of autophagy, and caused the formation of an autophagosome structure visualized using green fluorescent protein-tagged LC3-II. Expression and phosphorylation of exogenous CDCP1 by Fyn kinase reduced the formation of autophagosomes and inhibited phosphorylation of CDCP1 by PP2, a Src kinase inhibitor or inhibited PKCδ by rottlerin, stimulating autophagosome formation. Moreover, death of suspended lung cancer cells induced by CDCP1 siRNA or by PKCδ siRNA was reduced by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. These results indicate that CDCP1-PKCδ signaling plays a critical role in inhibiting autophagy, which is responsible for anoikis resistance of lung cancer cells. PMID:23510015

  16. Catheter-based treatment of paravalvular leaks.

    PubMed

    Taramasso, Maurizio; Maisano, Francesco; Pozzoli, Alberto; Alfieri, Ottavio; Meier, Bernhard; Nietlispach, Fabian

    2016-05-17

    The incidence of paravalvular leaks after surgical valve replacement is estimated to be 2-17%. Paravalvular leaks (PVL) can be asymptomatic and not require treatment or can cause haemolysis or heart failure. If symptomatic or if the severity of the leak is moderate or severe, redo surgery is a therapeutic option, but this is accompanied by a high perioperative risk and a high recurrence rate. A lower risk alternative is percutaneous PVL closure, with a 1-2% risk of periprocedural death or need for reoperation. These procedures are often intricate, which is reflected by a rather modest rate of procedural success (reported to be around 80%). This requires that better technical solutions become available in the future. Today, only two dedicated devices for PVL closure exist, the AMPLATZER Vascular Plug III and the paravalvular leak device. Besides, many non-dedicated devices are used, such as atrial septal occluders, ventricular septal occluders and a variety of vascular plugs. While aortic PVL are approached with a retrograde transarterial approach, mitral PVL can be approached using either an antegrade transvenous approach (transseptal), a retrograde transapical approach or, rarely, a retrograde transaortic approach. PMID:27174113

  17. Locating Small Leaks in Large Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, W. F.

    1983-01-01

    Test tool for detecting minute leads in bimetal joints, welds, or other locations employs fine-control valve and hypodermic needle. Test item is connected in conventional manner to helium mass spectrometer tuned to read extremely small amounts of helium gas. Uniqueness of method is ability to detect tiny leaks, through surfaces, not discoverable by gross coverage of test structures by helium gas.

  18. COPPER PITTING AND PINHOLE LEAK RESEARCH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Localized copper corrosion or pitting is a significant problem at many water utilities across the United States. Copper pinhole leak problems resulting from extensive pitting are widely under reported. Given the sensitive nature of the problem, extent of damage possible, costs o...

  19. Subcapsular bile leak following percutaneous drainage

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Korsvik, H.E.; Parker, J.A.

    1984-10-01

    The authors describe the scintigraphic appearance of a case of subcapsular biliary leak. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy using Tc-99m labeled radiopharmaceuticals is employed primarily for the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and for the demonstration of biliary tract patentcy. This procedure can also provide functional and morphologic information for evaluation of biliary tract trauma.

  20. Weld leaks rapidly and safely detected

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Test method detects leaks that occur during hydrostatic pressure testing of welded joints in metal tanks. A strip of aluminum foil and a strip of water-soluble paper are placed over the weld. A voltage applied between the tank wall and the foil strip is monitored to detect a decrease in ohmic resistance caused by water leakage into the paper layer.

  1. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONSOLIDATED... allowed for a valve if valve assembly replacement is necessary during the process unit shutdown, and...

  2. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time.... First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland nuts and... bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into the...

  3. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  4. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60..., tightening the packing gland nuts and/or ensuring that the seal flush is operating at design pressure and..., and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  5. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time.... First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland nuts and... bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into the...

  6. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  7. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60..., tightening the packing gland nuts and/or ensuring that the seal flush is operating at design pressure and..., and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60..., tightening the packing gland nuts and/or ensuring that the seal flush is operating at design pressure and..., and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  9. 40 CFR 65.105 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of appendix A of 40 CFR part 60 at the time.... First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland nuts and... bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into the...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... detected. First attempt at repair for pumps includes, but is not limited to, tightening the packing gland... the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  11. Microphone Detects Boiler-Tube Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Unit simple, sensitive, rugged, and reliable. Diaphragmless microphone detects leaks from small boiler tubes. Porous plug retains carbon granules in tube while allowing pressure changes to penetrate to granules. Has greater life expectancy than previous controllers and used in variety of hot corrosive atmospheres.

  12. GASFLOW analysis of a tritium leak accident

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, R.F.; Fujita, R.K.; Travis, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    The consequences of an earthquake-induced fire involving a tritium leak were analyzed using the GASFLOW computer code. Modeling features required by the analysis include ventilation boundary conditions, flow of a gas mixture in an enclosure containing obstacles, thermally induced buoyancy, and combustion phenomena.

  13. 40 CFR 63.1024 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A at the time the leak is successfully repaired... at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or injecting lubricant into...

  14. 40 CFR 63.1005 - Leak repair.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... successful repair of the leak. (3) Maximum instrument reading measured by Method 21 of 40 CFR part 60... temperature. First attempt at repair for valves includes, but is not limited to, tightening the bonnet bolts, and/or replacing the bonnet bolts, and/or tightening the packing gland nuts, and/or...

  15. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  16. REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 73 NIST REFLEAK: NIST Leak/Recharge Simulation Program for Refrigerant Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   REFLEAK estimates composition changes of zeotropic mixtures in leak and recharge processes.

  17. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  18. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  19. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  20. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  1. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  2. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  3. 40 CFR 86.328-79 - Leak checks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... checks. (a) Vacuum side leak check. (1) Any location within the analysis system where a vacuum leak could affect the test results must be checked. (2) The maximum allowable leakage rate on the vacuum side is...

  4. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  5. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  6. A new tumour associated antigen of non-small cell lung cancer: tumour liberated proteins (TLP)--a possible new tumor marker.

    PubMed

    Garaci, E; Sinibaldi, P; Rasi, G

    1996-01-01

    TLP (Tumour Liberated Proteins) is a 214 kDa protein, isolated from lung cancer tissue and synthetic nonapeptide CSH-275 is a major epitope identified on a 100 kDa TLP fragment and used to create antibodies in rabbit (antiserum termed CSH-419). CSH-419 antiserum, labelled or conjugated as necessary, was used to detect TLP on sera from NSCLC patients by a new ELISA test set up as a 1 step sandwich format test. This ELISA was performed on sera from 534 individuals. TLP was detected in 53.1% of NSCLC patients, with a 0% response in patients with cancers other than NSCLC, 7.6% response in unknown blood donors, and 17.4% response in patients with chronic lung diseases correlated with an elevated risk for lung cancer. TLP was particularly present in early stages of disease: 75% in stage I, 56% in stage II and III and 45% in stage IV. The presence of TLP antigen in sera from NSCLC patients indicates that TLP could represent an useful tumour marker. PMID:8694552

  7. Ran Binding Protein 9 (RanBP9) is a novel mediator of cellular DNA damage response in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Dario; Scarpa, Mario; Tessari, Anna; Uka, Rexhep; Amari, Foued; Lee, Cindy; Richmond, Timothy; Foray, Claudia; Sheetz, Tyler; Braddom, Ashley; Burd, Christin E.; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Ludwig, Thomas; Croce, Carlo M.; Coppola, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Ran Binding Protein 9 (RanBP9, also known as RanBPM) is an evolutionary conserved scaffold protein present both in the nucleus and the cytoplasm of cells whose biological functions remain elusive. We show that active ATM phosphorylates RanBP9 on at least two different residues (S181 and S603). In response to IR, RanBP9 rapidly accumulates into the nucleus of lung cancer cells, but this nuclear accumulation is prevented by ATM inhibition. RanBP9 stable silencing in three different lung cancer cell lines significantly affects the DNA Damage Response (DDR), resulting in delayed activation of key components of the cellular response to IR such as ATM itself, Chk2, γH2AX, and p53. Accordingly, abrogation of RanBP9 expression reduces homologous recombination-dependent DNA repair efficiency, causing an abnormal activation of IR-induced senescence and apoptosis. In summary, here we report that RanBP9 is a novel mediator of the cellular DDR, whose accumulation into the nucleus upon IR is dependent on ATM kinase activity. RanBP9 absence hampers the molecular mechanisms leading to efficient repair of damaged DNA, resulting in enhanced sensitivity to genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that targeting RanBP9 might enhance lung cancer cell sensitivity to genotoxic anti-neoplastic treatment. PMID:26943034

  8. Ginkgo biloba Extract Decreases Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Migration by Downregulating Metastasis-Associated Factor Heat-Shock Protein 27

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jong-Rung; Liu, Po-Len; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Chan; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Chong, Inn-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones that protect proteins from damage. HSP27 expression is associated with cancer transformation and invasion. Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb761), the most widely sold herbal supplement, has antiangiogenic effects and induces tumor apoptosis. Data regarding the effect of EGb761 on HSP expression is limited, particularly in cancer. HSP27 expression in paired tumors and normal lung tissues of 64 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were detected by real-time PCR, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. NSCLC cell lines (A549/H441) were used to examine the migratory abilities in vitro. NSCLC tissue showed higher HSP27 expression than normal lung tissue. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed that NSCLC patients with low HSP27 expression ratio (<1) had significantly longer survival time than those with a high expression ratio (>1) (p = 0.04). EGb761 inhibited HSP27 expression and migratory ability of A549/H441 cells, which is the same as HSP27-siRNA transfection effect. Moreover, EGb761 treatment activated the AKT and p38 pathways and did not affect the expression of PI3K, ERK, and JNK pathways. HSP27 is a poor prognostic indicator of NSCLC. EGb761 can decrease the migration ability of A549/H441 by inhibiting HSP27 expression most likely through AKT and p38 MAPK pathways activation. PMID:24618684

  9. MicroRNA-194 restrains the cell progression of non-small cell lung cancer by targeting human nuclear distribution protein C.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lirong; Di, Qingguo; Sun, Baohua; Wang, Xiaosheng; Li, Min; Shi, Jian

    2016-06-01

    NSCLC accounts for over 80% of all lung cancers and is associated with poor prognosis. Human nuclear distribution C (hNUDC) was predicted to be the target gene of microRNA-194 (miR-194). The present study was designed to demonstrate the mechanism of miR-194 in the regulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) via targeting the hNUDC. The hNUDC expression was found to strongly be increased while the miR-194 decreased significantly in the NSCLC cell lines when compared with the healthy controls. Moreover, the luciferase report confirmed the targeting reaction between miR-194 and hNUDC. After transfection with miR-194 mimic into NSCLC cells, we found that the miR-194 overexpression resulted in abnormal nuclear division, decreased cell proliferation and inhibited the expression of hNUDC and Mpl/ERK pathway proteins. Furthermore, the hNUDC overexpression affected the suppression effect of miR-194 in 95D cells, indicating that miR-194 suppresses tumor cell process by inhibiting the hNUDC expression. In brief, the present study suggests that the upregulation of miR-194 affects the hNUDC expression, leading to a downregulated expression of Mpl/ERK pathway proteins, and suppresses the mitosis and proliferation of NSCLC cells. These results offer a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27035759

  10. Experiences with leak rate calculations methods for LBB application

    SciTech Connect

    Grebner, H.; Kastner, W.; Hoefler, A.; Maussner, G.

    1997-04-01

    In this paper, three leak rate computer programs for the application of leak before break analysis are described and compared. The programs are compared to each other and to results of an HDR Reactor experiment and two real crack cases. The programs analyzed are PIPELEAK, FLORA, and PICEP. Generally, the different leak rate models are in agreement. To obtain reasonable agreement between measured and calculated leak rates, it was necessary to also use data from detailed crack investigations.

  11. Induction of COX-2 protein expression by vanadate in A549 human lung carcinoma cell line through EGF receptor and p38 MAPK-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, P.-S.; Mak, O.-T.; Huang, H.-J. . E-mail: haojen@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2006-01-13

    Vanadate is a transition metal widely distributed in the environment. It has been reported that vanadate associated with air pollution particles can modify DNA synthesis, causing cell growth arrest, and apoptosis. Moreover, vanadium exposure was also found to cause the synthesis of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, and prostaglandin E{sub 2}. Here, we found that exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma cells to vanadate led to extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun NH{sub 2}-terminal protein kinases (JNKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38) activation, and COX-2 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, but not PD098059 and SP600125, specific inhibitor of MKK1 and selective inhibitor of JNK, respectively, suppressed COX-2 expression. Furthermore, the epithelial growth factor (EGF) receptor specific inhibitor (PD153035) reduced vanadate-induced COX-2 expression. However, scavenging of vanadate-induced reactive oxygen species by catalase, a specific H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibitor, or DPI, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, resulted in no inhibition on COX-2 expression. Together, we suggested that EGF receptor and p38 MAPK signaling pathway may be involved in vanadate-induced COX-2 protein expression in A549 human lung carcinoma cell line.

  12. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation. PMID:26198867

  13. Thrombin stimulates albumin transcytosis in lung microvascular endothelial cells via activation of acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Wolfgang M; Wittenberg, Claudia; Lee, Warren L; Reppien, Eike; Goldenberg, Neil M; Lindner, Karsten; Gao, Yizhuo; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Drab, Marek; Mühlfeld, Christian; Dombrowsky, Heike; Ochs, Matthias; Schütze, Stefan; Uhlig, Stefan

    2016-04-15

    Transcellular albumin transport occurs via caveolae that are abundant in lung microvascular endothelial cells. Stimulation of albumin transcytosis by proinflammatory mediators may contribute to alveolar protein leak in lung injury, yet the regulation of albumin transport and its underlying molecular mechanisms are so far incompletely understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that thrombin may stimulate transcellular albumin transport across lung microvascular endothelial cells in an acid-sphingomyelinase dependent manner. Thrombin increased the transport of fluorescently labeled albumin across confluent human lung microvascular endothelial cell (HMVEC-L) monolayers to an extent that markedly exceeds the rate of passive diffusion. Thrombin activated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and increased ceramide production in HMVEC-L, but not in bovine pulmonary artery cells, which showed little albumin transport in response to thrombin. Thrombin increased total caveolin-1 (cav-1) content in both whole cell lysates and lipid rafts from HMVEC-L, and this effect was blocked by inhibition of ASM or de novo protein biosynthesis. Thrombin-induced uptake of albumin into lung microvascular endothelial cells was confirmed in isolated-perfused lungs by real-time fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of gold-labeled albumin. Inhibition of ASM attenuated thrombin-induced albumin transport both in confluent HMVEC-L and in intact lungs, whereas HMVEC-L treatment with exogenous ASM increased albumin transport and enriched lipid rafts in cav-1. Our findings indicate that thrombin stimulates transcellular albumin transport in an acid sphingomyelinase-dependent manner by inducing de novo synthesis of cav-1 and its recruitment to membrane lipid rafts. PMID:26851257

  14. Double Shell Tank AY-102 Radioactive Waste Leak Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Washenfelder, Dennis J.

    2014-04-10

    PowerPoint. The objectives of this presentation are to: Describe Effort to Determine Whether Tank AY-102 Leaked; Review Probable Causes of the Tank AY-102 Leak; and, Discuss Influence of Leak on Hanford’s Double-Shell Tank Integrity Program.

  15. Leak Detection and Location Technology Assessment for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Coffey, Neil C.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2008-01-01

    Micro Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) and other impacts can cause leaks in the International Space Station and other aerospace vehicles. The early detection and location of leaks is paramount to astronaut safety. Therefore this document surveys the state of the art in leak detection and location technology for aerospace vehicles.

  16. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  17. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  18. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  19. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  20. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  1. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  2. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  3. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  4. 49 CFR 195.134 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.134 Section 195.134... PIPELINE Design Requirements § 195.134 CPM leak detection. This section applies to each hazardous liquid... computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system and each replaced component of an existing...

  5. 49 CFR 195.444 - CPM leak detection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CPM leak detection. 195.444 Section 195.444... PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.444 CPM leak detection. Each computational pipeline monitoring (CPM) leak detection system installed on a hazardous liquid pipeline transporting liquid in...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.345 - Vacuum-side leak verification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... test. You may use any gas analyzer for this test. If you use a FID for this test, correct for any HC... used for this test. Perform a vacuum-side leak test as follows: (1) Prepare a gas analyzer as you would... a leak. (e) Vacuum-decay leak test. To perform this test you must apply a vacuum to the...

  7. Correlation of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α single gene polymorphisms with the susceptibility to pigeon breeder’s lung in chinese uygur population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Chen, Ying; Yang, Xiaohong; Wang, Wenyi; Pang, Baosen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with the susceptibility to pigeon breeder’s lung (PBL) in Chinese Uygur population. Methods: A total of 92 Uygur from Xinjiang, China were enrolled in the study. Among them, there were 32 patients with PBL, 30 negative controls with history of exposure to pigeons and 30 normal controls without pigeons contact. SNP genotyping for 24 SNPs of MIP-1α were performed. Results: Genotype distribution of MIP-1α SNPs rs1049191, rs1049195, rs3210166, rs1130374 and rs5029407 were significantly different among the three groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: MIP-1α SNPs rs1049191, rs1049195, rs3210166, rs1130374 and rs5029407 might have correlation with the susceptibility to pigeon breeder’s lung in Chinese Uygur population. PMID:26550319

  8. Expression of the 35kDa and low molecular weight surfactant-associated proteins in the lungs of infants dying with respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    deMello, D E; Phelps, D S; Patel, G; Floros, J; Lagunoff, D

    1989-06-01

    Newborn respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) results from a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant has three ultrastructural forms: lamellar bodies, which, when secreted from Type II pneumocytes, transform into tubular myelin; tubular myelin in turn gives rise to the phospholipid monolayer at the air-fluid interface in the alveolus that constitutes functional surfactant. It has been shown previously that the lungs of infants dying from RDS lacked tubular myelin despite the presence of abundant lamellar bodies, whereas the lungs of control infants dying from other causes had both tubular myelin and lamellar bodies. An abnormality in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin in RDS was proposed as a possible explanation for this finding. To evaluate the role of surfactant proteins (SPs) in this conversion, the authors re-examined the lungs of 11 RDS infants and 10 control infants for reactivity with antisera to high and low molecular weight SPs. In control infants, abundant intense staining with antisera to both types of SPs was found, but in the RDS lungs, staining was weaker than that in controls and less intense for high molecular weight compared to low molecular weight SPs. In lungs from patients with RDS, although staining increased with increasing gestational and post-natal ages, the intensity was less than control levels at all ages. The correlation of deficiency of SPs in RDS with lack of tubular myelin suggests that SPs may be involved in the conversion of normal lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and that the deficiency of SPs could explain the persistent respiratory distress in the presence of surfactant phospholipid synthesis. PMID:2757118

  9. Combination of protein coding and noncoding gene expression as a robust prognostic classifier in stage I lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Ichiro; Okayama, Hirokazu; Schetter, Aaron J; Robles, Ana I; Kohno, Takashi; Bowman, Elise D; Kazandjian, Dickran; Welsh, Judith A; Oue, Naohide; Saito, Motonobu; Miyashita, Masao; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Skaug, Vidar; Mollerup, Steen; Haugen, Aage; Yokota, Jun; Harris, Curtis C

    2013-07-01

    Prognostic tests for patients with early-stage lung cancer may provide needed guidance on postoperative surveillance and therapeutic decisions. We used a novel strategy to develop and validate a prognostic classifier for early-stage lung cancer. Specifically, we focused on 42 genes with roles in lung cancer or cancer prognosis. Expression of these biologically relevant genes and their association with relapse-free survival (RFS) were evaluated using microarray data from 148 patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma. Seven genes associated with RFS were further examined by quantitative reverse transcription PCR in 291 lung adenocarcinoma tissues from Japan, the United States, and Norway. Only BRCA1, HIF1A, DLC1, and XPO1 were each significantly associated with prognosis in the Japan and US/Norway cohorts. A Cox regression-based classifier was developed using these four genes on the Japan cohort and validated in stage I lung adenocarcinoma from the US/Norway cohort and three publicly available lung adenocarcinoma expression profiling datasets. The results suggest that the classifier is robust across ethnically and geographically diverse populations regardless of the technology used to measure gene expression. We evaluated the combination of the four-gene classifier with miRNA miR-21 (MIR21) expression and found that the combination improved associations with prognosis, which were significant in stratified analyses on stage IA and stage IB patients. Thus, the four coding gene classifier, alone or with miR-21 expression, may provide a clinically useful tool to identify high-risk patients and guide recommendations regarding adjuvant therapy and postoperative surveillance of patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23639940

  10. Early secreted antigenic target of 6 kDa (ESAT-6) protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression in lung epithelial cells via protein kinase signaling and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Boggaram, Vijay; Gottipati, Koteswara R; Wang, Xisheng; Samten, Buka

    2013-08-30

    Early secreted antigenic target of 6 kDa (ESAT-6) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is critical for the virulence and pathogenicity of M. tuberculosis. IL-8, a major chemotactic cytokine for neutrophils and T lymphocytes, plays important roles in the development of lung injury. To further understand the role of ESAT-6 in lung pathology associated with tuberculosis development, we studied the effects of ESAT-6 on the regulation of IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells. ESAT-6 induced IL-8 expression by increasing IL-8 gene transcription and mRNA stability. ESAT-6 induction of IL-8 promoter activity was dependent on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding and sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of PKC and ERK and p38 MAPK pathways. ESAT-6 activated ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and rapidly induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Dimethylthiourea but not mannitol inhibited IL-8 induction by ESAT-6, further supporting the involvement of ROS in the induction of IL-8 expression. Exposure of mice to ESAT-6 induced localized inflammatory cell aggregate formation with characteristics of early granuloma concomitant with increased keratinocyte chemoattractant CXCL1 staining in bronchiolar and alveolar type II epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. Our studies have identified a signal transduction pathway involving ROS, PKC, ERK, and p38 MAPKs and NF-κB and AP-1 in the ESAT-6 induction of IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells. This has important implications for the understanding of lung innate immune responses to tuberculosis and the pathogenesis of lung injury in tuberculosis. PMID:23867456

  11. Arsenite and Cadmium Activate MAPK/ERK via Membrane Estrogen Receptors and G-Protein Coupled Estrogen Receptor Signaling in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Huff, Mary O; Todd, Sarah L; Smith, Aaron L; Elpers, Julie T; Smith, Alexander P; Murphy, Robert D; Bleser-Shartzer, Allison S; Hoerter, Jacob E; Radde, Brandie N; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-07-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that cadmium and arsenic exposure increase lung cancer risk. Cadmium and arsenic are environmental contaminants that act as endocrine disruptors (EDs) by activating estrogen receptors (ERs) in breast and other cancer cell lines but their activity as EDs in lung cancer is untested. Here, we examined the effect of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) and sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) on the proliferation of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. Results demonstrated that both CdCl2 and NaAsO2 stimulated cell proliferation at environmentally relevant nM concentrations in a similar manner to 17β-estradiol (E2) in H1793, H2073, and H1944 cells but not in H1792 or H1299 cells. Further studies in H1793 cells showed that 100 nM CdCl2 and NaAsO2 rapidly stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, extracellular-signal-regulated kinases) phosphorylation with a peak detected at 15 min. Inhibitor studies suggest that rapid MAPK phosphorylation by NaAsO2, CdCl2, and E2 involves ER, Src, epidermal growth factor receptor, and G-protein coupled ER (GPER) in a pertussis toxin-sensitive pathway. CdCl2 and E2 activation of MAPK may also involve ERβ. This study supports the involvement of membrane ER and GPER signaling in mediating cellular responses to environmentally relevant nM concentrations of CdCl2 and NaAsO2 in lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27071941

  12. Lactate-Dehydrogenase 5 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer and correlates with the expression of the transketolase-like protein 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Aims As one of the five Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzymes, LDH5 has the highest efficiency to catalyze pyruvate transformation to lactate. LDH5 overexpression in cancer cells induces an upregulated glycolytic metabolism and reduced dependence on the presence of oxygen. Here we analyzed LDH5 protein expression in a well characterized large cohort of primary lung cancers in correlation to clinico-pathological data and its possible impact on patient survival. Methods Primary lung cancers (n = 269) and non neoplastic lung tissue (n = 35) were tested for LDH5 expression by immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal LDH5 antibody (ab53010). The results of LDH5 expression were correlated to clinico-pathological data as well as to patient's survival. In addition, the results of the previously tested Transketolase like 1 protein (TKTL1) expression were correlated to LDH5 expression. Results 89.5% (n = 238) of NSCLC revealed LDH5 expression whereas LDH5 expression was not detected in non neoplastic lung tissues (n = 34) (p < 0.0001). LDH5 overexpression was associated with histological type (adenocarcinoma = 57%, squamous cell carcinoma = 45%, large cell carcinoma = 46%, p = 0.006). No significant correlation could be detected with regard to TNM-stage, grading or survival. A two sided correlation between the expression of TKTL1 and LDH5 could be shown (p = 0.002) within the overall cohort as well as for each grading and pN group. A significant correlation between LDH5 and TKTL1 within each histologic tumortype could not be revealed. Conclusions LDH5 is overexpressed in NSCLC and could hence serve as an additional marker for malignancy. Furthermore, LDH5 correlates positively with the prognostic marker TKTL1. Our results confirm a close link between the two metabolic enzymes and indicate an alteration in the glucose metabolism in the process of malignant transformation. PMID:20385008

  13. EGFR protein expression using a specific intracellular domain antibody and PTEN and clinical outcomes in squamous cell lung cancer patients with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hyun; Oh, Jisu; Zhang, Xianglan; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Chung, Jin-haeng; Lee, Jong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this research was to examine the molecular and clinical features that are related with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) efficacy in previously treated patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL). Materials and methods This retrospective study included 67 SCCL patients with obtainable lung cancer tissue and records on EGFR-TKI treatment response and survival. EGFR protein expression in lung cancer tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry with a specific antibody that recognizes the intracellular domain (ID) of EGFR. PTEN expression in lung cancer tissue was also evaluated with immunohistochemistry. PI3KCA gene amplification was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and FGFR1 amplification was assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Results EGFR ID expression (hazard ratio [HR] 0.53, P=0.022) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) (HR 0.43, P=0.022) were significantly related with progression-free survival following EGFR-TKIs treatment. PTEN expression (HR 0.52, P=0.025) was significantly related to overall survival. The group of EGFR-positive or PTEN-positive patients with ECOG PS of 0 or 1 had better clinical outcomes than patients who were EGFR-negative and PTEN-negative or who had poor ECOG PS with longer median progression-free survival (2.1 vs 1.0 months, P=0.05) and overall survival (6.2 vs 2.1 months, P=0.05). Conclusion EGFR expression using an ID-specific antibody and PTEN protein expression may be used to identify SCCL patients who might benefit from EGFR-TKI treatment. PMID:27578983

  14. Oleic acid-induced lung injury in rabbits: effect of fibrinogen depletion with Arvin

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, M.F.; Doerschuk, C.M.; Brumwell, M.L.; Belzberg, A.; Hogg, J.C.

    1988-03-01

    The role of fibrinogen in the evolution of the increased permeability after oleic acid-induced lung injury was studied in New Zealand White rabbits. Animals depleted of fibrinogen by treatment with Malayan pit viper venom were compared with untreated rabbits immediately and at 1 and 24 h after injury. The increased permeability to albumin and elevated extravascular lung water (EVLW) associated with lung injury returned to control values by 24 h in untreated animals. Fibrinogen-depleted animals had a higher mortality (10/25 vs. 2/17, P less than 0.02) and showed a greater immediate increase in permeability to albumin that returned to control values at 1 and 24 h after injury, as well as trends toward elevated blood-free dry lung weight and larger increases in EVLW that persisted for 24 h. These findings indicate that fibrinogen-related proteins play an important role in controlling the microvascular injury that is produced by oleic acid. However, when these proteins are depleted, other mechanisms partially control the leak at later stages of the repair process.

  15. A2B adenosine receptor dampens hypoxia-induced vascular leak

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, Tobias; Faigle, Marion; Grenz, Almut; Laucher, Stefanie; Thompson, Linda F.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine has been implicated in adaptation to hypoxia and previous studies demonstrated a central role in vascular responses. Here, we examined the contribution of individual adenosine receptors (ARs: A1AR/A2AAR/A2BAR/A3AR) to vascular leak induced by hypoxia. Initial profiling studies revealed that siRNA-mediated repression of the A2BAR selectively increased endothelial leak in response to hypoxia in vitro. In parallel, vascular permeability was significantly increased in vascular organs of A2BAR−/−-mice subjected to ambient hypoxia (8% oxygen, 4 hours; eg, lung: 2.1 ± 0.12-fold increase). By contrast, hypoxia-induced vascular leak was not accentuated in A1AR−/−-, A2AAR−/−-, or A3AR−/−-deficient mice, suggesting a degree of specificity for the A2BAR. Further studies in wild type mice revealed that the selective A2BAR antagonist PSB1115 resulted in profound increases in hypoxia-associated vascular leakage while A2BAR agonist (BAY60-6583 [2-[6-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-[4-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-. phenyl]pyridin-2-ylsulfanyl]acetamide]) treatment was associated with almost complete reversal of hypoxia-induced vascular leakage (eg, lung: 2.0 ± 0.21-fold reduction). Studies in bone marrow chimeric A2BAR mice suggested a predominant role of vascular A2BARs in this response, while hypoxia-associated increases in tissue neutrophils were, at least in part, mediated by A2BAR expressing hematopoietic cells. Taken together, these studies provide pharmacologic and genetic evidence for vascular A2BAR signaling as central control point of hypoxia-associated vascular leak. PMID:18056839

  16. Does the Clearance of Inhaled (99m)Tc-Sestamibi Correlate with Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 Expression in the Human Lung?

    PubMed

    Mohan, Hosahalli K; Routledge, Thomas; Cane, Paul; Livieratos, Lefteris; Ballinger, James R; Peters, Adrien M

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To examine the relation between the lung elimination rate of inhaled technetium 99m ((99m)Tc)-sestamibi and immunohistochemical expression of bronchopulmonary multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) and permeability glycoprotein (P-gp) and assess the repeatability of the inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi clearance technique. Materials and Methods (99m)Tc-sestamibi is a known substrate for P-gp and MRP1, which are established cellular drug efflux transporters. The elimination rate of (99m)Tc-sestamibi from the lungs after inhalation as an aerosol has been hypothesized to be regulated by expression of these transporters. Institutional ethics committee approval was received for this prospective study. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. The clearance of inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi from the lungs of 13 patients due to undergo surgery for primary lung cancer (five of 13) or spontaneous pneumothorax (eight of 13) was estimated after dynamic imaging of the lungs during a period of 40 minutes. The time taken to clear 50% of inhaled sestamibi (T1/2) was compared with a semiquantitative immunohistochemical assessment (grade 0-3) of MRP1 and P-gp expression in the lung by using parametric and nonparametric tests. The study was repeated in five participants to assess the repeatability of the technique by using a Bland Altman analysis method. Results MRP1 expression was seen in 12 of 13 patients, while P-gp expression was seen in only two. The mean (99m)Tc-sestamibi elimination rate was faster in patients (n = 6) with low levels of MRP1 expression (grade 0-1) and mean T1/2 of 105 minutes ± 20 (standard deviation), compared with those with higher levels of MRP1 expression (grade 2-3, n = 7) and mean T1/2 of 149 minutes ± 28 (P = .008). Bland-Altman analysis revealed excellent agreement between test and retest values. Conclusion Inhaled (99m)Tc-sestamibi clearance study is a repeatable technique demonstrating significant correlation with MRP1 expression in

  17. Role of Krev Interaction Trapped-1 in Prostacyclin-Induced Protection against Lung Vascular Permeability Induced by Excessive Mechanical Forces and Thrombin Receptor Activating Peptide 6.

    PubMed

    Meliton, Angelo; Meng, Fanyong; Tian, Yufeng; Shah, Alok A; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2015-12-01

    Mechanisms of vascular endothelial cell (EC) barrier regulation during acute lung injury (ALI) or other pathologies associated with increased vascular leakiness are an active area of research. Adaptor protein krev interaction trapped-1 (KRIT1) participates in angiogenesis, lumen formation, and stabilization of EC adherens junctions (AJs) in mature vasculature. We tested a role of KRIT1 in the regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling induced by mechanical stimulation and barrier dysfunction relevant to ventilator-induced lung injury and investigated KRIT1 involvement in EC barrier protection by prostacyclin (PC). PC stimulated Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1)-dependent association of KRIT1 with vascular endothelial cadherin at AJs, with KRIT1-dependent cortical cytoskeletal remodeling leading to EC barrier enhancement. KRIT1 knockdown exacerbated Rho-GTPase activation and EC barrier disruption induced by pathologic 18% cyclic stretch and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) 6 and attenuated the protective effects of PC. In the two-hit model of ALI caused by high tidal volume (HTV) mechanical ventilation and TRAP6 injection, KRIT1 functional deficiency in KRIT1(+/-) mice increased basal lung vascular leak and augmented vascular leak and lung injury caused by exposure to HTV and TRAP6. Down-regulation of KRIT1 also diminished the protective effects of PC against TRAP6/HTV-induced lung injury. These results demonstrate a KRIT1-dependent mechanism of vascular EC barrier control in basal conditions and in the two-hit model of ALI caused by excessive mechanical forces and TRAP6 via negative regulation of Rho activity and enhancement of cell junctions. We also conclude that the stimulation of the Rap1-KRIT1 signaling module is a major mechanism of vascular endothelial barrier protection by PC in the injured lung. PMID:25923142

  18. Medium- and high-pressure sonic leak pinpointing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebler, J. E.; Ziolkowski, C. J.; Craig, J. M.; Saha, N. C.

    1983-05-01

    A detector to pinpoint natural gas leaks in medium and high pressure distribution systems ( 15psi) has been developed through the prototype stage. The device can detect acoustic emissions from leaking gas in the 2-5 KHz range. The actual leak pinpointing sensor, which is moved from one position to another above the pipe until the leak site is pinpointed, and a background noise monitor, offset from the pipe area, that is used to substract background noise from the signal developed by the leak pinpointing sensor. The prototype device is handportable, rugged, and low in cost, yet sensitive and easy to use in the field, as demonstrated with preliminary field tests.

  19. Hydrogen leak detection in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G

    1992-01-01

    This study focuses on a helium gas jet flowing into room air. Measurements of helium concentration and velocity in the jet-air mixture are reported. The objective is to learn about jet characteristics so that dynamically similar hydrogen leaks may be located in the Space Shuttle. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long sample tubes which draw gas from the payload bay, mid body, aft engine compartment and external tank. The overall purpose of this study is to improve the HGDS especially in its potential for locating hydrogen leaks. A rapid-response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested, following on the work done in this program last summer. The apparatus included a Perkin Elmer MGA-1200 mass spectrometer and air velocity transducer, both monitored by a Macintosh IIFX computer using LabVIEW software. A jet of helium flowing into the lab air simulated a gas leak. Steady helium or hydrogen-nitrogen jets were logged for concentration and velocity, and the power spectral density of each was computed. Last year, large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MGA-1200 was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MGA data. No peaks were detected in the power spectrum, so in the present study, 10 Hz bandwidth-averaged power levels were examined at regular frequency intervals. The practical consequences of last year's study are as follows: sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second so that transients could be observed and analyzed with frequency response methods. Many more experiments and conditions were observed in this second summer, including the effects of orifice diameter

  20. Hydrogen leak detection in the Space Shuttle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barile, Ronald G.

    1992-09-01

    This study focuses on a helium gas jet flowing into room air. Measurements of helium concentration and velocity in the jet-air mixture are reported. The objective is to learn about jet characteristics so that dynamically similar hydrogen leaks may be located in the Space Shuttle. The hazardous gas detection system (HGDS) in the mobile launch pad uses mass spectrometers to monitor the shuttle environment for leaks. The mass spectrometers are fed by long sample tubes which draw gas from the payload bay, mid body, aft engine compartment and external tank. The overall purpose of this study is to improve the HGDS especially in its potential for locating hydrogen leaks. A rapid-response leak detection experiment was designed, built, and tested, following on the work done in this program last summer. The apparatus included a Perkin Elmer MGA-1200 mass spectrometer and air velocity transducer, both monitored by a Macintosh IIFX computer using LabVIEW software. A jet of helium flowing into the lab air simulated a gas leak. Steady helium or hydrogen-nitrogen jets were logged for concentration and velocity, and the power spectral density of each was computed. Last year, large eddies and vortices were visually seen with Schlieren imaging, and they were detected in the time plots of the various instruments. The response time of the MGA-1200 was found in the range of 0.05 to 0.1 sec. Pulsed concentration waves were clearly detected at 25 cycles per sec by spectral analysis of MGA data. No peaks were detected in the power spectrum, so in the present study, 10 Hz bandwidth-averaged power levels were examined at regular frequency intervals. The practical consequences of last year's study are as follows: sampling frequency should be increased above the present rate of 1 sample per second so that transients could be observed and analyzed with frequency response methods. Many more experiments and conditions were observed in this second summer, including the effects of orifice diameter

  1. Method for mapping a natural gas leak

    DOEpatents

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Luong, Amy Khai; Kulp, Thomas J.; Devdas, Sanjay

    2009-02-03

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formatted into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimposed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  2. Nonglycosylated G-Protein Vaccine Protects against Homologous and Heterologous Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Challenge, while Glycosylated G Enhances RSV Lung Pathology and Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Sandra; Coyle, Elizabeth M.; Golding, Hana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT New efforts are under way to develop a vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) that will provide protective immunity without the potential for vaccine-associated disease enhancement such as that observed in infants following vaccination with formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine. In addition to the F fusion protein, the G attachment surface protein is a target for neutralizing antibodies and thus represents an important vaccine candidate. However, glycosylated G protein expressed in mammalian cells has been shown to induce pulmonary eosinophilia upon RSV infection in a mouse model. In the current study, we evaluated in parallel the safety and protective efficacy of the RSV A2 recombinant unglycosylated G protein ectodomain (amino acids 67 to 298) expressed in Escherichia coli (REG) and those of glycosylated G produced in mammalian cells (RMG) in a mouse RSV challenge model. Vaccination with REG generated neutralizing antibodies against RSV A2 in 7/11 BALB/c mice, while RMG did not elicit neutralizing antibodies. Total serum binding antibodies against the recombinant proteins (both REG and RMG) were measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and were found to be >10-fold higher for REG- than for RMG-vaccinated animals. Reduction of lung viral loads to undetectable levels after homologous (RSV-A2) and heterologous (RSV-B1) viral challenge was observed in 7/8 animals vaccinated with REG but not in RMG-vaccinated animals. Furthermore, enhanced lung pathology and elevated Th2 cytokines/chemokines were observed exclusively in animals vaccinated with RMG (but not in those vaccinated with REG or phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]) after homologous or heterologous RSV challenge. This study suggests that bacterially produced unglycosylated G protein could be developed alone or as a component of a protective vaccine against RSV disease. IMPORTANCE New efforts are under way to develop vaccines against RSV that will provide protective immunity without the potential

  3. [Dexamethasone increases the expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) in lung tissues of bronchial asthmatic mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenxing; He, Sheng; Wei, Liping; Lin, Lin; Xiong, Hanzhen; Li, Junhong; Chen, Peifen; Lai, Wenyan

    2016-05-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs (RECK) in the lung tissues of bronchial asthmatic mice and the effect of dexamethasone treatment on its expression. Methods Thirty BALB/c mice were randomly divided into three equal groups: a control group, an asthmatic group and a dexamethasone-treated group. The asthmatic mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection and inhalation with ovalbumin (OVA). The number of eosinophils (EOS) and lymphocytes (Lym) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were counted. HE staining was used to observe airway inflammation and remodeling. The mRNA and protein expression of RECK were determined by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results Compared with the control group and the dexamethasone-treated group, the total cell number and EOS number in the BALF of the asthma group significantly increased. The expression of RECK mRNA in the asthmatic group was significantly lower than that in the control group and the dexamethasone-treated group. Immunohistochemistry showed that RECK was mainly expressed in the airway epithelial cells and inflammatory cells. RECK protein expression was highest in the control group and lowest in the asthmatic group. Conclusion Dexamethasone can increase the expression of RECK in the lung tissues of asthmatic mice. PMID:27126937

  4. Combined effect of synthetic protein, Mini-B, and cholesterol on a model lung surfactant mixture at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Hui, Erica; Waring, Alan J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of this work is to study the combined effects of Mini-B, a 34 residue synthetic analog of the lung surfactant protein SP-B, and cholesterol, a neutral lipid, on a model binary lipid mixture containing dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), that is often used to mimic the primary phospholipid composition of lung surfactants. Using surface pressure vs. mean molecular area isotherms, fluorescence imaging and analysis of lipid domain size distributions; we report on changes in the structure, function and stability of the model lipid-protein films in the presence and absence of varying composition of cholesterol. Our results indicate that at low cholesterol concentrations, Mini-B can prevent cholesterol's tendency to lower the line tension between lipid domain boundaries, while maintaining Mini-B's ability to cause reversible collapse resulting in the formation of surface associated reservoirs. Our results also show that lowering the line tension between domains can adversely impact monolayer folding mechanisms. We propose that small amounts of cholesterol and synthetic protein Mini-B can together achieve the seemingly opposing requirements of efficient LS: fluid enough to flow at the air-water interface, while being rigid enough to oppose irreversible collapse at ultra-low surface tensions. PMID:26775740

  5. Natural gas pipeline leaks across Washington, DC.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert B; Down, Adrian; Phillips, Nathan G; Ackley, Robert C; Cook, Charles W; Plata, Desiree L; Zhao, Kaiguang

    2014-01-01

    Pipeline safety in the United States has increased in recent decades, but incidents involving natural gas pipelines still cause an average of 17 fatalities and $133 M in property damage annually. Natural gas leaks are also the largest anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4) in the U.S. To reduce pipeline leakage and increase consumer safety, we deployed a Picarro G2301 Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer in a car, mapping 5893 natural gas leaks (2.5 to 88.6 ppm CH4) across 1500 road miles of Washington, DC. The δ(13)C-isotopic signatures of the methane (-38.2‰ ± 3.9‰ s.d.) and ethane (-36.5 ± 1.1 s.d.) and the CH4:C2H6 ratios (25.5 ± 8.9 s.d.) closely matched the pipeline gas (-39.0‰ and -36.2‰ for methane and ethane; 19.0 for CH4/C2H6). Emissions from four street leaks ranged from 9200 to 38,200 L CH4 day(-1) each, comparable to natural gas used by 1.7 to 7.0 homes, respectively. At 19 tested locations, 12 potentially explosive (Grade 1) methane concentrations of 50,000 to 500,000 ppm were detected in manholes. Financial incentives and targeted programs among companies, public utility commissions, and scientists to reduce leaks and replace old cast-iron pipes will improve consumer safety and air quality, save money, and lower greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:24432903

  6. Effects of leukotriene B4 in the human lung. Recruitment of neutrophils into the alveolar spaces without a change in protein permeability.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T R; Pistorese, B P; Chi, E Y; Goodman, R B; Matthay, M A

    1989-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a major product of human alveolar macrophages and has potent chemotactic activity for neutrophils (PMN) in vitro. To evaluate the effects of LTB4 in the normal human lung, we instilled LTB4 (5 X 10(-7)M, 10 ml) into a subsegment of the right middle lobe and 0.9% NaCl (10 ml) into a subsegment of the lingula using a fiberoptic bronchoscope in 12 healthy human volunteers. 4 h later, we performed bronchoalveolar lavage of the same subsegments. Compared with the NaCl instillation, LTB4 caused a large increase in lavage total cells (NaCl = 6.8 +/- 1.0 X 10(6) vs. LTB4 = 26.4 +/- 5.0 X 10(6), P less than 0.01), most of which were PMN (NaCl = 12.2 +/- 4.6% vs. LTB4 = 55.7 +/- 6.0%, P less than 0.001). In contrast, there was only a small increase in lavage total protein, and the lavage total protein correlated weakly with lavage total cells and PMN. The production of superoxide anion by the lavage PMN in response to phorbol myristate acetate was similar to that of peripheral blood PMN. The migration of lavage PMN was normal toward the chemotactic peptide FMLP, but reduced toward LTB4 and zymosan-activated human serum. Morphometric analysis using transmission electron microscopy indicated a selective loss of small granules in the lung neutrophils as compared with peripheral blood neutrophils. The data indicate that in the normal human lung, LTB4 can recruit active PMN into the airspaces without causing a significant change in the protein permeability of the epithelial barrier. Images PMID:2553777

  7. Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G.

    1995-04-01

    Regulatory Guide 1.45, {open_quotes}Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,{close_quotes} was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break Evaluation Procedures{close_quotes} where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break.

  8. Airborne pipeline leak detection: UV or IR?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, François; Gravel, Jean-François; Allard, Martin

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a study of different approaches to the measurement of the above ground vapor plume created by the spill caused by a small 0.1 l/min (or less) leak in an underground liquid petroleum pipeline. The scenarios are those for the measurement from an airborne platform. The usual approach is that of IR absorption, but in the case of liquid petroleum products, there are drawbacks that will be discussed, especially when using alkanes to detect a leak. The optical measurements studied include UV enhanced Raman lidar, UV fluorescence lidar and IR absorption path integrated lidars. The breadboards used for testing the different approaches will be described along with the set-ups for leak simulation. Although IR absorption would intuitively be the most sensitive, it is shown that UV-Raman could be an alternative. When using the very broad alkane signature in the IR, the varying ground spectral reflectance are a problem. It is also determined that integrated path measurements are preferred, the UV enhanced Raman measurements showing that the vapor plume stays very close to the ground.

  9. Waste Transfer Leaks Control Decision Record

    SciTech Connect

    RYAN, G.W.

    2000-06-27

    Control decision meetings for Waste Transfer Leaks were held on April 24,25,26, and 27, 2000. The agenda for the control decision meetings is included in Appendix A, and attendee lists are included in Appendix B. The purpose of the control decision meetings was to review and revise previously selected controls for the prevention or mitigation of waste transfer leak accidents. Re-evaluation of the controls is warranted due to revisions in the hazard and accident analysis for these Tank Farm events. In particular, calculated radiological consequences are significantly reduced from those currently reported in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Revised hazard and accident analysis and a revised control recommendation will be reflected in an Authorization Basis Amendment to be submitted at the Department of Energy, Office of River Protection's (ORP's) request by June 30, 2000 to satisfy ORP Performance Incentive (PI) 2.1.1, Revision 1, ''Authorization Basis Management Process Efficiency Improvement''. The scope of the control decision meetings was to address all waste transfer leak-related hazardous conditions identified in the Tank Farm hazard analysis database, excluding those associated with the use of the Replacement Cross-Site Transfer System (RCSTS) slurry line and sluicing of Tank 241-C-106, which is addressed in FSAR Addendum 1. The scope of this control decision process does include future waste feed delivery waste transfer operations.

  10. Imaging spectrometer for fugitive gas leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnrichs, Michele

    1999-12-01

    Under contract to the U.S. Air Force and Navy, Pacific Advanced Technology has developed a very sensitive infrared imaging spectrometer that can perform remote imaging and spectro-radiometry. One of the most exciting applications for this technology is in the remote monitoring of smoke stack emissions and fugitive leaks. To date remote continuous emission monitoring (CEM) systems have not been approved by the EPA, however, they are under consideration. If the remote sensing technology is available with the sensitivity to monitor emission at the required levels and man portable it can reduce the cost and improve the reliability of performing such measurements. Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) believes that it currently has this technology available to industry. This paper will present results from a field test where gas vapors during a refueling process were imaged and identified. In addition images of propane from a leaking stove will be presented. We at PAT have developed a real time image processing board that enhances the signal to noise ratio of low contrast gases and makes them easily viewable using the Image Multispectral Sensing (IMSS) imaging spectrometer. The IMSS imaging spectrometer is the size of a camcorder. Currently the data is stored in a Notebook computer thus allowing the system to be easily carried into power plants to look for fugitive leaks. In the future the IMSS will have an embedded processor and DSP and will be able to transfer data over an Ethernet link.

  11. The Effects of Combined Antioxidant Supplementation on Antioxidant Capacity, DNA Single-Strand Breaks and Regulation of Insulin Growth Factor-1/IGF-Binding Protein 3 in the Ferret Model of Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and its major binding protein, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) are implicated in lung cancer and other malignancies. We have previously shown that the combination of three major antioxidants [beta-carotene (BC), alpha-tocopherol (AT) and ascorbic acid (...

  12. Primary Spontaneous Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks and Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Mario A.; Bialer, Omer Y.; Bruce, Beau B.; Newman, Nancy J.; Biousse, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is increasingly recognized as a cause of spontaneous cerebrospinal (CSF) leak in the ENT and neurosurgical literature. The diagnosis of IIH in patients with spontaneous CSF leaks is classically made a few weeks after surgical repair of the CSF leak when symptoms and signs of elevated intracranial