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Sample records for lung surfactant centrifugation

  1. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  2. Agglutination of lung surfactant with glucan.

    PubMed Central

    De Lucca, A J; Brogden, K A; French, A D

    1992-01-01

    Respirable cotton dust, implicated in the pathogenesis of byssinosis, contains a number of bioactive compounds. These include lipopolysaccharide (LPS), tannins, bacterial peptides, byssinosin, iacinilene C, and 1,3-beta-D-glucan. The exact aetiological agent of byssinosis in such dust has not been definitively identified nor has its mechanism of action on lower lung surfaces been determined. In the present study 1,3-beta-D-glucan, Enterobacter agglomerans LPS, and ovine pulmonary surfactant were mixed in varying combinations. After incubation, their characteristics were determined by sucrose density centrifugation, TLC, and carbohydrate analysis. Precipitates were found in mixtures containing surfactant-glucan and surfactant-glucan-LPS, but not in surfactant-LPS. Precipitates were not seen in the surfactant, LPS, and glucan controls. The formation of a precipitate did not increase the density of the surfactant glucan mixture when compared by density gradient centrifugation with the surfactant control. The interaction between surfactant and glucan was analysed by molecular modelling. The energy of a surfactant-glucan complex (60.07 kcal/mol) was calculated to be much lower than the sum of glucan (47.09 kcal/mol) and surfactant (30.98 kcal/mol) when added separately. The results indicate that 1,3-beta-D-glucan does interact with surfactant and this complex may play a part in the pathogenesis of byssinosis by altering lung physiology maintained by pulmonary surfactant. Images PMID:1463675

  3. Computer simulations of lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Baoukina, Svetlana; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-10-01

    Lung surfactant lines the gas-exchange interface in the lungs and reduces the surface tension, which is necessary for breathing. Lung surfactant consists mainly of lipids with a small amount of proteins and forms a monolayer at the air-water interface connected to bilayer reservoirs. Lung surfactant function involves transfer of material between the monolayer and bilayers during the breathing cycle. Lipids and proteins are organized laterally in the monolayer; selected species are possibly preferentially transferred to bilayers. The complex 3D structure of lung surfactant and the exact roles of lipid organization and proteins remain important goals for research. We review recent simulation studies on the properties of lipid monolayers, monolayers with phase coexistence, monolayer-bilayer transformations, lipid-protein interactions, and effects of nanoparticles on lung surfactant. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:26922885

  4. Aerosol delivery of synthetic lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is a widely accepted technique of non-invasive respiratory support in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome due to lack of lung surfactant. If this approach fails, the next step is often intubation, mechanical ventilation (MV) and intratracheal instillation of clinical lung surfactant. Objective. To investigate whether aerosol delivery of advanced synthetic lung surfactant, consisting of peptide mimics of surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and synthetic lipids, during nCPAP improves lung function in surfactant-deficient rabbits. Methods. Experimental synthetic lung surfactants were produced by formulating 3% Super Mini-B peptide (SMB surfactant), a highly surface active SP-B mimic, and a combination of 1.5% SMB and 1.5% of the SP-C mimic SP-Css ion-lock 1 (BC surfactant), with a synthetic lipid mixture. After testing aerosol generation using a vibrating membrane nebulizer and aerosol conditioning (particle size, surfactant composition and surface activity), we investigated the effects of aerosol delivery of synthetic SMB and BC surfactant preparations on oxygenation and lung compliance in saline-lavaged, surfactant-deficient rabbits, supported with either nCPAP or MV. Results. Particle size distribution of the surfactant aerosols was within the 1–3 µm distribution range and surfactant activity was not affected by aerosolization. At a dose equivalent to clinical surfactant therapy in premature infants (100 mg/kg), aerosol delivery of both synthetic surfactant preparations led to a quick and clinically relevant improvement in oxygenation and lung compliance in the rabbits. Lung function recovered to a greater extent in rabbits supported with MV than with nCPAP. BC surfactant outperformed SMB surfactant in improving lung function and was associated with higher phospholipid values in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid; these findings were irrespective of the type of ventilatory support

  5. Surfactant Delivery into the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James; Filoche, Marcel

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a multiscale, compartmentalized model of surfactant and liquid delivery into the lung. Assuming liquid plug propagation, the airway compartment accounts for the plug's volume deposition (coating) on the airway wall, while the bifurcation compartment accounts for plug splitting from the parent airway to the two daughter airways. Generally the split is unequal due to gravity and geometry effects. Both the deposition ratio RD (deposition volume/airway volume), and the splitting ratio, RS, of the daughters volumes are solved independently from one another. Then they are used in a 3D airway network geometry to achieve the distribution of delivery into the lung. The airway geometry is selected for neonatal as well as adult applications, and can be advanced from symmetric, to stochastically asymmetric, to personalized. RD depends primarily on the capillary number, Ca, while RS depends on Ca, the Reynolds number, Re, the Bond number, Bo, the dose volume, VD, and the branch angles. The model predicts the distribution of coating on the airway walls and the remaining plug volume delivered to the alveolar region at the end of the tree. Using this model, we are able to simulate and test various delivery protocols, in order to optimize delivery and improve the respiratory function.

  6. Rheology of Natural Lung Surfactant Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zsadzinski, Joseph

    2004-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) is a lipoprotein mixture lining the inside of the pulmonary alveoli which has the ability to lower the surface tension of the air-liquid hypophase interface to value near zero thus reducing the work of breathing and which also prevents the alveolar collapse. A lack or malfunction of lung surfactant, as it is often the case for premature infants, leads to respiratory distress syndrome. RDS can be treated by supplying replacement LS to the infants and several medications derived from natural sources, are now widely used. The lung surfactant is adsorbed at the air-liquid interface and is subjected to incessant compression expansion cycles therefore Langmuir monolayers provide a suitable model to investigate the physical properties of lung surfactant films. Using a magnetic needle rheometer, we measured the shear viscosity of natural lung surfactant spread at the air-liquid interface upon compression and expansion cycles for three different formulations. The shear viscosity of Survanta changes by orders of magnitude along one cycle while for Curosurf samples it changes only slightly and for Infasurf films it remains constant. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in composition between the three formulations leading to different organizations on the molecular scale.

  7. Biophysical alteration of lung surfactant by extracts of cotton dust.

    PubMed Central

    DeLucca, A J; Brogden, K A; Catalano, E A; Morris, N M

    1991-01-01

    Byssinosis, a lung disease that can affect cotton mill workers, may be caused in part by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Gram negative bacteria. In vitro, LPS complexes with sheep lung surfactant (SLS). To determine whether LPS in extracts of cotton dust alters the biophysical characteristics of lung surfactant, aqueous extracts (1.0% w:v) of sterile surgical cotton (SSC) and a bulk raw cotton dust (1182DB) were prepared. Aliquots of the soluble extracts were incubated with SLS and studied by sucrose gradient centrifugation, surface tension analysis, and high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The chromatography was employed to analyse for 3-hydroxymyristate (3-HM), a fatty acid indicating LPS. Also, purified Enterobacter agglomerans LPS and 3-HM as controls and as mixtures with SLS, were studied by HPLC. Sucrose gradient centrifugation showed that SLS-SSC, SLS-1182DB, and the SLS control had similar densities that differed from the remaining controls. The SLS-1182DB exhibited a floccule absent in the other samples. Surface tension values of SLS-SSC and SLS-1182DB differed significantly from all controls but only slightly from one another. 3-Hydroxymyristate was detected by HPLC in the 3-HM control, EA-LPS, SLS-EA-LPS, and SLS-1182DB, but not in SLS-SSC or the remaining controls. Apparently, 3-HM was below the HPLC detection range in SSC. The data indicate that LPS in the 1182DB, SSC and EA-LPS samples complexed with SLS. Floccule development in SLS-1182DB but not in SLS-EA-LPS suggests a further component(s) present in the bulk raw cotton dust, as well as LPS, which complexes with SLS. The data suggest that biophysical alterations to lung surfactant may play a part in the pathogenesis of byssinosis. Images PMID:1993159

  8. Surfactant protein D in human lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Hartl, D; Griese, M

    2006-06-01

    The lung is continuously exposed to inhaled pollutants, microbes and allergens. Therefore, the pulmonary immune system has to defend against harmful pathogens, while an inappropriate inflammatory response to harmless particles must be avoided. In the bronchoalveolar space this critical balance is maintained by innate immune proteins, termed surfactant proteins. Among these, surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a central role in the pulmonary host defence and the modulation of allergic responses. Several human lung diseases are characterized by decreased levels of bronchoalveolar SP-D. Thus, recombinant SP-D has been proposed as a therapeutical option for cystic fibrosis, neonatal lung disease and smoking-induced emphysema. Furthermore, SP-D serum levels can be used as disease activity markers for interstitial lung diseases. This review illustrates the emerging role of SP-D translated from in vitro studies to human lung diseases. PMID:16684127

  9. Lung surfactants and different contributions to thin film stability.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Eline; Bhamla, M Saad; Kao, Peter; Fuller, Gerald G; Vermant, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The surfactant lining the walls of the alveoli in the lungs increases pulmonary compliance and prevents collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. In premature born infants, surfactant deficiency causes problems, and lung surfactant replacements are instilled to facilitate breathing. These pulmonary surfactants, which form complex structured fluid-fluid interfaces, need to spread with great efficiency and once in the alveolus they have to form a thin stable film. In the present work, we investigate the mechanisms affecting the stability of surfactant-laden thin films during spreading, using drainage flows from a hemispherical dome. Three commercial lung surfactant replacements Survanta, Curosurf and Infasurf, along with the phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), are used. The surface of the dome can be covered with human alveolar epithelial cells and experiments are conducted at the physiological temperature. Drainage is slowed down due to the presence of all the different lung surfactant replacements and therefore the thin films show enhanced stability. However, a scaling analysis combined with visualization experiments demonstrates that different mechanisms are involved. For Curosurf and Infasurf, Marangoni stresses are essential to impart stability and interfacial shear rheology does not play a role, in agreement with what is observed for simple surfactants. Survanta, which was historically the first natural surfactant used, is rheologically active. For DPPC the dilatational properties play a role. Understanding these different modes of stabilization for natural surfactants can benefit the design of effective synthetic surfactant replacements for treating infant and adult respiratory disorders. PMID:26307946

  10. Lung injury and surfactant metabolism after hyperventilation of premature lambs.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, M; Kallapur, S; Michna, J; Jobe, A H

    2000-03-01

    We asked whether lung injury and surfactant metabolism differed in preterm lambs after a 1-h period of hyperventilation to P(CO2) values of 25-30 mm Hg. The lambs then were surfactant treated and conventionally ventilated (CV) or high-frequency oscillatory ventilated (HFOV) for an additional 1 or 8 h. The results were compared with lambs that were not hyperventilated or surfactant treated but were ventilated with CV or HFOV. The 1-h hyperventilation resulted in increased alveolar protein, increased recovery of intravascular [131I]albumin in the lungs, and an increase in tumor necrosis factor-alpha mRNA. There were no differences between CV or HFOV in alveolar or total lung recoveries of saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC), tracer doses of [14C]Sat PC and [125I]surfactant protein-B, or in percent Sat PC in large aggregate surfactant in surfactant-treated lambs. The lambs not hyperventilated or treated with surfactant had lower large aggregate pools and lower recoveries of [14C]Sat PC and [125I]surfactant protein-B in total lungs than for the surfactant-treated lungs, but there were no differences between the CV and HFOV groups. Hyperventilation followed by surfactant treatment resulted in a mild injury, but the subsequent use of CV or HFOV did not result in differences in surfactant metabolism. PMID:10709742

  11. Pulmonary surfactants and their role in pathophysiology of lung disorders.

    PubMed

    Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant is an agent that decreases the surface tension between two media. The surface tension between gaseous-aqueous interphase in the lungs is decreased by the presence of a thin layer of fluid known as pulmonary surfactant. The pulmonary surfactant is produced by the alveolar type-II (AT-II) cells of the lungs. It is essential for efficient exchange of gases and for maintaining the structural integrity of alveoli. Surfactant is a secretory product, composed of lipids and proteins. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol are the major lipid constituents and SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D are four types of surfactant associated proteins. The lipid and protein components are synthesized separately and are packaged into the lamellar bodies in the AT-II cells. Lamellar bodies are the main organelle for the synthesis and metabolism of surfactants. The synthesis, secretion and recycling of the surfactant lipids and proteins is regulated by complex genetic and metabolic mechanisms. The lipid-protein interaction is very important for the structural organization of surfactant monolayer and its functioning. Alterations in surfactant homeostasis or biophysical properties can result in surfactant insufficiency which may be responsible for diseases like respiratory distress syndrome, lung proteinosis, interstitial lung diseases and chronic lung diseases. The biochemical, physiological, developmental and clinical aspects of pulmonary surfactant are presented in this article to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases. PMID:23441475

  12. Beneficial effects of synthetic KL₄ surfactant in experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, A; Alvarez, L; Santos, M; López-Sánchez, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L; Varela, A; Segal, R; Casals, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratracheal administration of a new synthetic surfactant that includes the cationic, hydrophobic 21-residue peptide KLLLLKLLLLKLLLLKLLLLK (KL₄), might be effective in reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation. Single left lung transplantation was performed in Landrace pigs 22 h post-harvest. KL₄ surfactant at a dose of 25 mg total phospholipid·kg body weight⁻¹ (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹) was instilled at 37°C to the donor left lung (n = 8) prior to explantation. Saline (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹; 37°C) was instilled into the donor left lung of the untreated group (n = 6). Lung function in recipients was measured during 2 h of reperfusion. Recipient left lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided native cytometric, inflammatory marker and surfactant data. KL(4) surfactant treatment recovered oxygen levels in the recipient blood (mean ± sd arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction 424 ± 60 versus 263 ± 101 mmHg in untreated group; p=0.01) and normalised alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference. Surfactant biophysical function was also recovered in KL₄ surfactant-treated lungs. This was associated with decreased C-reactive protein levels in BAL, and recovery of surfactant protein A content, normalised protein/phospholipid ratios, and lower levels of both lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls in large surfactant aggregates. These findings suggest an important protective role for KL₄ surfactant treatment in lung transplantation. PMID:20650990

  13. [Pulmonary surfactant homeostasis associated genetic abnormalities and lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaojing; Sun, Xiuzhu; Du, Weihua; Hao, Haisheng; Zhao, Xueming; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huabin; Liu, Yan

    2016-08-10

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is synthesized and secreted by alveolar epithelial type II (AEII) cells, which is a complex compound formed by proteins and lipids. Surfactant participates in a range of physiological processes such as reducing the surface tension, keeping the balance of alveolar fluid, maintaining normal alveolar morphology and conducting host defense. Genetic disorders of the surfactant homeostasis genes may result in lack of surfactant or cytotoxicity, and lead to multiple lung diseases in neonates, children and adults, including neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, interstitial pneumonia, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. This paper has provided a review for the functions and processes of pulmonary surfactant metabolism, as well as the connection between disorders of surfactant homeostasis genes and lung diseases. PMID:27455022

  14. Role of lymphatics in removal of sheep lung surfactant lipid.

    PubMed

    Tarpey, M M; O'Brodovich, H M; Young, S L

    1983-04-01

    To study the role of lung lymphatics in the removal of surfactant lipid from the sheep lung, we injected [1-14C]palmitate intravenously into six animals previously fitted with a cannula draining the caudal mediastinal lymph node. Lung lymph was collected for 100 h after injection of radiolabel. We obtained alveolar lavage material through a tracheostomy in four other animals after intravenous injection of [9,10-3H]palmitate. We measured radioactivity at several time points in lipid extracts from lymph, lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Alveolar lavage disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) specific activity peaked at about 40 h and was reduced to 30% of this value by 82 h. About 2% of the injected radiolabel was incorporated into lung tissue lipids. Only 4% of the level of labeling achieved in lung tissue lipids was found in lung lymph lipid during 100 h of lymph collection. Sixty-three percent of radiolabel in lymph lipid was recovered in phospholipids, and 29% of phospholipid radiolabel was found in DSPC. The distribution of phosphorus and palmitate radiolabel in lung lymph phospholipid did not closely resemble that of surfactant lipid. No rise in lung lymph DSPC specific activity was observed following the peak in lavage specific activity. If surfactant lipid is removed from the alveolar compartment without extensive recycling, then we conclude that the lung lymphatics do not play a major role in the clearance of surfactant lipid from the alveolar surface. PMID:6687883

  15. Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

  16. [Study of novel artificial lung surfactants incorporating partially fluorinated amphiphiles].

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    Lung surfactants (LS), a complex of ∼90 wt% lipids (mainly dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine or DPPC) and ∼10 wt% surfactant proteins (SP-A, -B, -C, and -D), adsorb to an air-alveolar fluid interface and then lower its surface tension down to near zero during expiration. Intratracheal instillation of exogenous LS preparations can effectively compensate for surfactant deficiency in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Surfacten® (Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma Corporation, Osaka, Japan), a modified bovine lung extract and an effective surfactant replacement in treatment for RDS patients, is supplemented with DPPC, palmitic acid, and tripalmitin. For the premature infants suffering from RDS, instillation of Surfacten® leads to a dramatic improvement in lung function and compliance. Herein, the author reviews potential use of newly designed preparations containing a mimicking peptide of SP-B and also introduces the current research on the preparations incorporated with partially fluorinated amphiphiles to improve their efficacy. PMID:22790027

  17. Surfactant Proteins in Smoking-Related Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Papiris, Spyridon; Papadaki, Georgia; Manali, Effrosyni D; Roussou, Aneza; Spathis, Aris; Karakitsos, Petros; Kostikas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a highly surface-active mixture of proteins and lipids that is synthesized and secreted in the alveoli by type II epithelial cells and is found in the fluid lining the alveolar surface. The protein part of surfactant constitutes two hydrophilic proteins (SP-A and SP-D) that regulate surfactant metabolism and have immunologic functions, and two hydrophobic proteins (SP-B and SP-C), which play a direct role in the organization of the surfactant structure in the interphase and in the stabilization of the lipid layers during the respiratory cycle. Several studies have shown that cigarette smoke seems to affect, in several ways, both surfactant homeostasis and function. The alterations in surfactants' biophysical properties caused by cigarette smoking, contribute to the development of several smoking related lung diseases. In this review we provide information on biochemical and physiological aspects of the pulmonary surfactant and on its possible association with the development of two major chronic diseases of the lung known to be related to smoking, i.e. chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Additional information on the possible role of surfactant protein alterations and/or dysfunction in the combination of these two conditions, recently described as combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE) are also provided. PMID:26420367

  18. A Function of Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, M. L.; Bisagno, A. M.; Zasadzinski, J. A. N.; Bruni, R.; Waring, A. J.

    1993-07-01

    The primary function of lung surfactant is to form monolayers at the alveolar interface capable of lowering the normal surface tension to near zero. To accomplish this process, the surfactant must be capable of maintaining a coherent, tightly packed monolayer that avoids collapse during expiration. The positively charged amino-terminal peptide SP-B1-25 of lung surfactant-specific protein SP-B increases the collapse pressure of an important component of lung surfactant, palmitic acid (PA), to nearly 70 millinewtons per meter. This alteration of the PA isotherms removes the driving force for "squeeze-out" of the fatty acids from the primarily dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers of lung surfactant. An uncharged mutant of SP-B1-25 induced little change in the isotherms, suggesting that a specific charge interaction between the cationic peptide and the anionic lipid is responsible for the stabilization. The effect of SP-B1-25 on fatty acid isotherms is remarkably similar to that of simple poly-cations, suggesting that such polymers might be useful as components of replacement surfactants for the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome.

  19. Regulation of lung surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Goss, Victoria; Hunt, Alan N; Postle, Anthony D

    2013-02-01

    The alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cell is highly specialised for the synthesis and storage, in intracellular lamellar bodies, of phospholipid destined for secretion as pulmonary surfactant into the alveolus. Regulation of the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism has been extensively characterised at both molecular and functional levels, but understanding of surfactant phospholipid metabolism in vivo in either healthy or, especially, diseased lungs is still relatively poorly understood. This review will integrate recent advances in the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid metabolism with metabolic studies in vivo in both experimental animals and human subjects. It will highlight developments in the application of stable isotope-labelled precursor substrates and mass spectrometry to probe lung phospholipid metabolism in terms of individual molecular lipid species and identify areas where a more comprehensive metabolic model would have considerable potential for direct application to disease states. PMID:23200861

  20. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  1. Transcriptional responses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to lung surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Ute; Rohde, Kyle H.; Wang, Zhengdong; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.; Russell, David G.

    2009-01-01

    This study uses microarray analyses to examine gene expression profiles for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) induced by exposure in vitro to bovine lung surfactant preparations that vary in apoprotein content: (i) whole lung surfactant (WLS) containing the complete mix of endogenous lipids and surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -B, -C, and -D; (ii) extracted lung surfactant (CLSE) containing lipids plus SP-B and -C; (iii) column-purified surfactant lipids (PPL) containing no apoproteins, and (iv) purified human SP-A. Exposure to WLS evoked a multitude of transcriptional responses in Mtb, with 52 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated at 30 min exposure, plus 146 genes up-regulated and 27 genes down-regulated at 2 h. Notably, WLS rapidly induced several membrane-associated lipases that presumptively act on surfactant lipids as substrates, and a large number of genes involved in the synthesis of phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM), a cell wall component known to be important in macrophage interactions and Mtb virulence. Exposure of Mtb to CLSE, PPL, or purified SP-A caused a substantially weaker transcriptional response (≤20 genes were induced) suggesting that interactions among multiple lipid-protein components of WLS may contribute to its effects on Mtb transcription. PMID:19272305

  2. Surfactant Lipidomics in Healthy Children and Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liebisch, Gerhard; Rauch, Daniela; Stückler, Ferdinand; Schmitz, Gerd; Zarbock, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Lipids account for the majority of pulmonary surfactant, which is essential for normal breathing. We asked if interstitial lung diseases (ILD) in children may disrupt alveolar surfactant and give clues for disease categorization. Methods Comprehensive lipidomics profiles of broncho-alveolar lavage fluid were generated in 115 children by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS). Two reference populations were compared to a broad range of children with ILD. Results Class and species composition in healthy children did not differ from that in children with ILD related to diffuse developmental disorders, chronic tachypnoe of infancy, ILD related to lung vessels and the heart, and ILD related to reactive lymphoid lesions. As groups, ILDs related to the alveolar surfactant region, ILD related to unclear respiratory distress syndrome in the mature neonate, or in part ILD related to growth abnormalities reflecting deficient alveolarisation, had significant alterations of some surfactant specific phospholipids. Additionally, lipids derived from inflammatory processes were identified and differentiated. In children with ABCA3-deficiency from two ILD causing mutations saturated and monounsaturated phosphatidylcholine species with 30 and 32 carbons and almost all phosphatidylglycerol species were severely reduced. In other alveolar disorders lipidomic profiles may be of less diagnostic value, but nevertheless may substantiate lack of significant involvement of mechanisms related to surfactant lipid metabolism. Conclusions Lipidomic profiling may identify specific forms of ILD in children with surfactant alterations and characterized the molecular species pattern likely to be transported by ABCA3 in vivo. PMID:25692779

  3. Near-Field Microscopy Studies of Lung Surfactant Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aga, Rachel; Dunn, Robert

    2003-03-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), the fourth leading cause of infant mortality in the United States, arises from an insufficiently developed lung surfactant (LS). Healthy LS, a mixture of lipids and proteins that coats the inner surface of the lungs, reduces the alveolar surface tension to a few millinewtons per meter and, thus, facilitates breathing by stabilizing the large surface area changes associated with respiration. In the absence of an effective LS, surfactant collapse pressure (i.e., monolayer compressibility) and the ability of the monolayer to re-spread during the breathing cycle are reduced, resulting in labored breathing, reduced oxygen transport, and often death in those afflicted. In this study, we investigate the mechanism of collapse and re-spreading of a monolayer formed by a replacement surfactant commonly used in treatment of RDS. Through confocal microscopy fluorescence images obtained at a series of pressures near collapse, we find evidence for multilayer formation in the films. A further understanding of the collapse mechanism is obtained by comparing high resolution fluorescence and topography information measured with near-field scanning optical microscopy. The combined data from both confocal and near-field measurements are used to develop a model of lung surfactant collapse and re-spreading.

  4. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide promotes destabilization of lung surfactant-like films.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, Olga; Keough, Kevin M W; Casals, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    The airspaces are lined with a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)-rich film called pulmonary surfactant, which is named for its ability to maintain normal respiratory mechanics by reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Inhaled airborne particles containing bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may incorporate into the surfactant monolayer. In this study, we evaluated the effect of smooth LPS (S-LPS), containing the entire core oligosaccharide region and the O-antigen, on the biophysical properties of lung surfactant-like films composed of either DPPC or DPPC/palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG)/palmitic acid (PA) (28:9:5.6, w/w/w). Our results show that low amounts of S-LPS fluidized DPPC monolayers, as demonstrated by fluorescence microscopy and changes in the compressibility modulus. This promoted early collapse and prevented the attainment of high surface pressures. These destabilizing effects could not be relieved by repeated compression-expansion cycles. Similar effects were observed with surfactant-like films composed of DPPC/POPG/PA. On the other hand, the interaction of SP-A, a surfactant membrane-associated alveolar protein that also binds to LPS, with surfactant-like films containing S-LPS increased monolayer destabilization due to the extraction of lipid molecules from the monolayer, leading to the dissolution of monolayer material in the aqueous subphase. This suggests that SP-A may act as an LPS scavenger. PMID:21190662

  5. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  6. Dynamics of Surfactant Liquid Plugs at Bifurcating Lung Airway Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavana, Hossein

    2013-11-01

    A surfactant liquid plug forms in the trachea during surfactant replacement therapy (SRT) of premature babies. Under air pressure, the plug propagates downstream and continuously divides into smaller daughter plugs at continuously branching lung airways. Propagating plugs deposit a thin film on airway walls to reduce surface tension and facilitate breathing. The effectiveness of SRT greatly depends on the final distribution of instilled surfactant within airways. To understand this process, we investigate dynamics of splitting of surfactant plugs in engineered bifurcating airway models. A liquid plug is instilled in the parent tube to propagate and split at the bifurcation. A split ratio, R, is defined as the ratio of daughter plug lengths in the top and bottom daughter airway tubes and studied as a function of the 3D orientation of airways and different flow conditions. For a given Capillary number (Ca), orienting airways farther away from a horizontal position reduced R due to the flow of a larger volume into the gravitationally favored daughter airway. At each orientation, R increased with 0.0005 < Ca < 0.05. This effect diminished by decrease in airways diameter. This approach will help elucidate surfactant distribution in airways and develop effective SRT strategies.

  7. Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow transition in lung surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2010-11-01

    The lining of normal lungs is covered by surfactants, because otherwise the surface tension of the aqueous layer would be too large to allow breathing. A lack of functioning surfactants can lead to respiratory distress syndrome, a potentially fatal condition in both premature infants and adults, and a major cause of death in the US and world-wide. We use a home-built Brewster angle microscope on an optically accessible deep channel viscometer to simultaneously observe the mesoscale structures of DPPC, the primary constituent of lung surfactant, on water surface and measure the interfacial velocity field. The measured interfacial velocity is compared to Navier-Stokes computations with the Boussinesq-Scriven surface model. Results show that DPPC monolayer behaves i) purely elastically at low surface pressures on water, ii) viscoelastically at modest surface pressures, exhibiting non-zero surface shear viscosity that is independent of the shear rate and flow inertia, and iii) at surface pressures approaching film collapse, DPPC loses its fluid characteristics, and a Newtonian surface model no longer captures its hydrodynamics.

  8. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the lung: implication in lung surfactant secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE (target SNARE) proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23 (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein 23), in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, -3 and -8 are shown in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in LB (lamellar body) fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the LB marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. We suggest that VAMP-2 is the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) involved in regulated surfactant secretion. PMID:22571236

  9. CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Rushing, F.C.

    1960-09-01

    A vibration damping mechanism for damping vibration forces occurring during the operation of a centrifuge is described. The vibration damping mechanism comprises a plurality of nested spaced cylindrical elements surrounding the rotating shaft of the centrifuge. Some of the elements are held substantially stationary while the others are held with respect to a pair of hearings spaced along the rotating shaft. A fluid is retained about the cylindrical elements.

  10. Functional significance and control of release of pulmonary surfactant in the lizard lung.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S

    1995-10-01

    The amount of pulmonary surfactant in the lungs of the bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) increases with increasing body temperature. This increase coincides with a decrease in lung compliance. The relationship between surfactant and lung compliance and the principal stimuli for surfactant release and composition (temperature, ventilatory pattern, and autonomic neurotransmitters) were investigated. We chose to investigate ventilatory pattern (which causes mechanical deformation of the type II cells) and adrenergic agents, because they are the major stimuli for surfactant release in mammals. To examine the effects of body temperature and ventilatory pattern, isolated lungs were ventilated at either 18 or 37 degrees C at different ventilatory regimens. An isolated perfused lung preparation at 27 degrees C was used to analyze the effects of autonomic neurotransmitters. Ventilatory pattern did not affect surfactant release, composition, or lung compliance at either 18 or 37 degrees C. An increase in temperature increased phospholipid reuptake and disproportionately increased cholesterol degradation/uptake. Epinephrine and acetylcholine stimulated phospholipid but not cholesterol release. Removal of surfactant caused a decrease in compliance, regardless of the experimental temperature. Temperature appears to be the principal determinant of lung compliance in the bearded dragon, acting directly to increase the tone of the smooth muscle. Increasing the ambient temperature may result in greater surfactant turnover by increasing cholesterol reuptake/degradation directly and by increasing circulating epinephrine, thereby indirectly increasing phospholipid secretion. We suggest that changing ventilatory pattern may be inadequate as a mechanism for maintaining surfactant homeostasis, given the discontinuous, highly variable reptilian breathing pattern. PMID:7485601

  11. Molecular mobility in the monolayers of foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Lalchev, Z I; Todorov, R K; Christova, Y T; Wilde, P J; Mackie, A R; Clark, D C

    1996-01-01

    Certain physical properties of a range of foam film types that are believed to exist in vivo in the lung have been investigated. The contribution of different lung surfactant components found in porcine lung surfactant to molecular surface diffusion in the plane of foam films has been investigated for the first time. The influence of the type and thickness of black foam films, temperature, electrolyte concentration, and extract composition on surface diffusion has been studied using the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique. Fluorescent phospholipid probe molecules in foam films stabilized by porcine lung surfactant samples or their hydrophobic extracts consisting of surfactant lipids and hydrophobic lung surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, exhibited more rapid diffusion than observed in films of its principal lipid component alone, L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine dipalmitoyl. This effect appears to be due to contributions from minor lipid components present in the total surfactant lipid extracts. The minor lipid components influence the surface diffusion in foam films both by their negative charge and by lowering the phase transition temperature of lung surfactant samples. In contrast, the presence of high concentrations of the hydrophillic surfactant protein A (SP-A) and non-lung-surfactant proteins in the sample reduced the diffusion coefficient (D) of the lipid analog in the adsorbed layer of the films. Hysteresis behavior of D was observed during temperature cycling, with the cooling curve lying above the heating curve. However, in cases where some surface molecular aggregation and surface heterogeneity were observed during cooling, the films became more rigid and molecules at the interfaces became immobilized. The thickness, size, capillary pressure, configuration, and composition of foam films of lung surfactant prepared in vitro support their investigation as realistic structural analogs of the surface films that exist in vivo in the lung

  12. Lung Surfactant and Organelles after an Exposure to Dibenzoxazepine (CR)

    PubMed Central

    Pattle, R. E.; Schock, C.; Dirnhuber, P.; Creasey, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Rats were exposed to a heavy dosage of the sensory irritant dibenz (b.f.)-1,4 oxazepine (CR). No change in the lung surfactant could be detected by the methods used. Electron micrography showed that the ordinary lamellated osmiophilic bodies (LOPBs) and their precursors were unaffected. Bodies containing both mitochondrial cristae and dense osmiophilic whorls (“mitochondrial lamellated bodies”, or MLBs) were found in the type II cells of some animals up to 15 days after the exposure. These whorls originate from the bounding membranes and cristae; serial sections show that they usually abut on the boundary of the organelle. A large proportion of the mitochondria in any cell may be affected by this process. Unequivocal evidence that the MLBs finally evolve into LOPBs without cristae was not obtained in this series; the ultimate fate of the MLBs and the cells containing them is uncertain. The MLBs may perhaps act as an emergency source of surfactant. ImagesFigs. 9-10Figs. 6-8Figs. 1-2Figs. 3-5 PMID:4479334

  13. Effects of exogenous surfactant on the non-heart-beating donor lung graft in experimental lung transplantation - a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Gudrun; Knudsen, Lars; Madershahian, Navid; Mühlfeld, Christian; Frank, Konrad; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wittwer, Thorsten; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    The use of non-heart-beating donor (NHBD) lungs may help to overcome the shortage of lung grafts in clinical lung transplantation, but warm ischaemia and ischaemia/reperfusion injury (I/R injury) resulting in primary graft dysfunction represent a considerable threat. Thus, better strategies for optimized preservation of lung grafts are urgently needed. Surfactant dysfunction has been shown to contribute to I/R injury, and surfactant replacement therapy is effective in enhancing lung function and structural integrity in related rat models. In the present study we hypothesize that surfactant replacement therapy reduces oedema formation in a pig model of NHBD lung transplantation. Oedema formation was quantified with (SF) and without (non-SF) surfactant replacement therapy in interstitial and alveolar compartments by means of design-based stereology in NHBD lungs 7 h after cardiac arrest, reperfusion and transplantation. A sham-operated group served as control. In both NHBD groups, nearly all animals died within the first hours after transplantation due to right heart failure. Both SF and non-SF developed an interstitial oedema of similar degree, as shown by an increase in septal wall volume and arithmetic mean thickness as well as an increase in the volume of peribron-chovascular connective tissue. Regarding intra-alveolar oedema, no statistically significant difference could be found between SF and non-SF. In conclusion, surfactant replacement therapy cannot prevent poor outcome after prolonged warm ischaemia of 7 h in this model. While the beneficial effects of surfactant replacement therapy have been observed in several experimental and clinical studies related to heart-beating donor lungs and cold ischaemia, it is unlikely that surfactant replacement therapy will overcome the shortage of organs in the context of prolonged warm ischaemia, for example, 7 h. Moreover, our data demonstrate that right heart function and dysfunctions of the pulmonary vascular bed are

  14. A double injection ADSA-CSD methodology for lung surfactant inhibition and reversal studies.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Policova, Zdenka; Dang, Andrew; Acosta, Edgar J; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2009-10-15

    This paper presents a continuation of the development of a drop shape method for film studies, ADSA-CSD (Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis-Constrained Sessile Drop). ADSA-CSD has certain advantages over conventional methods. The development presented here allows complete exchange of the subphase of a spread or adsorbed film. This feature allows certain studies relevant to lung surfactant research that cannot be readily performed by other means. The key feature of the design is a second capillary into the bulk of the drop to facilitate addition or removal of a secondary liquid. The development will be illustrated through studies concerning lung surfactant inhibition. After forming a sessile drop of a basic lung surfactant preparation, the bulk phase can be removed and exchanged for one containing different inhibitors. Such studies mimic the leakage of plasma and blood proteins into the alveolar spaces altering the surface activity of lung surfactant in a phenomenon called surfactant inhibition. The resistance of the lung surfactant to specific inhibitors can be readily evaluated using the method. The new method is also useful for surfactant reversal studies, i.e. the ability to restore the normal surface activity of an inhibited lung surfactant film by using special additives. Results show a distinctive difference between the inhibition when an inhibitor is mixed with and when it is injected under a preformed surfactant film. None of the inhibitors studied (serum, albumin, fibrinogen, and cholesterol) were able to penetrate a preexisting film formed by the basic preparation (BLES and protasan), while all of them can alter the surface activity of such preparation when mixed with the preparation. Preliminary results show that reversal of serum inhibition can be easily achieved and evaluated using the modified methodology. PMID:19586757

  15. Effects of surfactant/budesonide therapy on oxidative modifications in the lung in experimental meconium-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Tomcikova Mikusiakova, L; Kosutova, P; Antosova, M; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-02-01

    Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is a serious condition, which can be treated with exogenous surfactant and mechanical ventilation. However, meconium-induced inflammation, lung edema and oxidative damage may inactivate delivered surfactant and thereby reduce effectiveness of the therapy. As we presumed that addition of anti-inflammatory agent into the surfactant may alleviate inflammation and enhance efficiency of the therapy, this study was performed to evaluate effects of surfactant therapy enriched with budesonide versus surfactant-only therapy on markers of oxidative stress in experimental model of MAS. Meconium suspension (25 mg/ml, 4 ml/kg) was instilled into the trachea of young rabbits, whereas one group of animals received saline instead of meconium (C group, n = 6). In meconium-instilled animals, respiratory failure developed within 30 min. Then, meconium-instilled animals were divided into 3 groups according to therapy (n = 6 each): with surfactant therapy (M + S group), with surfactant + budesonide therapy (M + S + B), and without therapy (M group). Surfactant therapy consisted of two bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) with diluted surfactant (Curosurf, 5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted surfactant (100 mg phospholipids/kg), which was in M + S + B group enriched with budesonide (Pulmicort, 0.5 mg/ml). Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 hours. At the end of experiment, blood sample was taken for differential white blood cell (WBC) count. After euthanizing animals, left lung was saline-lavaged and cell differential in BAL was determined. Oxidative damage, i.e. oxidation of lipids (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and conjugated dienes) and proteins (dityrosine and lysine-lipoperoxidation products) was estimated in lung homogenate and isolated mitochondria. Total antioxidant capacity was evaluated in lung homogenate and plasma. Meconium instillation increased transmigration of neutrophils and production of free

  16. Altered lipid synthesis in type II pneumonocytes exposed to lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, N R; Tesan, M; Tyler, N E; Bleasdale, J E

    1986-01-01

    When type II pneumonocytes were exposed to purified lung surfactant that contained 1-palmitoyl-2-[3H]palmitoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine, radiolabelled surfactant was apparently taken up by the cells since it could not be removed by either repeated washing or exchange with non-radiolabelled surfactant, but was released when the cells were lysed. After 4 h of exposure to [3H]surfactant, more than half of the 3H within cells remained in disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Incorporation of [3H]choline, [14C]palmitate and [14C]acetate into glycerophospholipids was decreased in type II cells exposed to surfactant and this inhibition, like surfactant uptake, was half-maximal when the extracellular concentration of surfactant was approx. 0.1 mumol of lipid P/ml. Inhibition of incorporation of radiolabelled precursors by surfactant occurred rapidly and reversibly and was not due solely to dilution of the specific radioactivity of intracellular precursors. Activity of dihydroxyacetone-phosphate acyltransferase, but not glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, was decreased in type II cells exposed to surfactant and this was reflected by a decrease in the 14C/3H ratio of total lipids synthesized when cells incubated with [U-14C]glycerol and [2-3H]glycerol were exposed to surfactant. Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol, either individually or mixed in the molar ratio found in surfactant, did not mimic purified surfactant in the inhibition of glycerophospholipid synthesis. In contrast, an apoprotein fraction isolated from surfactant inhibited greatly the incorporation of [3H]choline into lipids and this inhibitory activity was labile to heat and to trypsin. It is concluded that the apparent uptake of surfactant by type II cells in vitro is accompanied by an inhibition of glycerophospholipid synthesis via a mechanism that involves a surfactant apoprotein. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3827860

  17. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications. PMID:25742123

  18. Keeping lung surfactant where it belongs: protein regulation of two-dimensional viscosity.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zasadzinski, Joseph A

    2005-07-01

    Lung surfactant causes the surface tension, gamma, in the alveoli to drop to nearly zero on exhalation; in the upper airways gamma is approximately 30 mN/m and constant. Hence, a surface tension gradient exists between alveoli and airways that should lead to surfactant flow out of the alveoli and elimination of the surface tension gradient. However, the lung surfactant specific protein SP-C enhances the resistance to surfactant flow by regulating the ratio of solid to fluid phase in the monolayer, leading to a jamming transition at which the monolayer transforms from fluidlike to solidlike. The accompanying three orders of magnitude increase in surface viscosity helps minimize surfactant flow to the airways and likely stabilizes the alveoli against collapse. PMID:15833995

  19. [Lung diseases in children associated with inherited disorders of surfactant metabolism].

    PubMed

    Delestrain, C; Flamein, F; Jonard, L; Couderc, R; Guillot, L; Fanen, P; Epaud, R

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a unique mixture of lipids and specific proteins that reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface, preventing collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. Recessive loss-of-function mutations of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) was initially described in infants who develop respiratory failure at birth. More recently, mutations in other constitutive surfactant proteins like surfactant protein C or implied in its metabolism like ATP-binding cassette, sub-family A, member 3 (ABCA3) or NK2 homeobox (NKX2-1) were identified in newborn with respiratory distress but also in children with diffuse infiltrative pneumonia. Intra-alveolar accumulation of protein related to surfactant dysfunction leads to cough, hypoxemia and radiological abnormalities including ground-glass opacities and lung cysts. The clinical and radiological features associated with these genetic disorders, along with their treatment and outcome, are reviewed. PMID:23856024

  20. Overcoming inactivation of the lung surfactant by serum proteins: a potential role for fluorocarbons?

    PubMed

    Krafft, Marie Pierre

    2015-08-14

    In many pulmonary conditions serum proteins interfere with the normal adsorption of components of the lung surfactant to the surface of the alveoli, resulting in lung surfactant inactivation, with potentially serious untoward consequences. Here, we review the strategies that have recently been designed in order to counteract the biophysical mechanisms of inactivation of the surfactant. One approach includes protein analogues or peptides that mimic the native proteins responsible for innate resistance to inactivation. Another perspective uses water-soluble additives, such as electrolytes and hydrophilic polymers that are prone to enhance adsorption of phospholipids. An alternative, more recent approach consists of using fluorocarbons, that is, highly hydrophobic inert compounds that were investigated for partial liquid ventilation, that modify interfacial properties and can act as carriers of exogenous lung surfactant. The latter approach that allows fluidisation of phospholipid monolayers while maintaining capacity to reach near-zero surface tension definitely warrants further investigation. PMID:26110877

  1. Tensiometric and Phase Domain Behavior of Lung Surfactant on Mucus-like Viscoelastic Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Schenck, Daniel M; Fiegel, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Lung surfactant has been observed at all surfaces of the airway lining fluids and is an important contributor to normal lung function. In the conducting airways, the surfactant film lies atop a viscoelastic mucus gel. In this work, we report on the characterization of the tensiometric and phase domain behavior of lung surfactant at the air-liquid interface of mucus-like viscoelastic gels. Poly(acrylic acid) hydrogels were formulated to serve as a model mucus with bulk rheological properties that matched those of tracheobronchial mucus secretions. Infasurf (Calfactant), a commercially available pulmonary surfactant derived from calf lung extract, was spread onto the hydrogel surface. The surface tension lowering ability and relaxation of Infasurf films on the hydrogels was quantified and compared to Infasurf behavior on an aqueous subphase. Infasurf phase domains during surface compression were characterized by fluorescence microscopy and phase shifting interferometry. We observed that increasing the bulk viscoelastic properties of the model mucus hydrogels reduced the ability of Infasurf films to lower surface tension and inhibited film relaxation. A shift in the formation of Infasurf condensed phase domains from smaller, more spherical domains to large, agglomerated, multilayer structures was observed with increasing viscoelastic properties of the subphase. These studies demonstrate that the surface behavior of lung surfactant on viscoelastic surfaces, such as those found in the conducting airways, differs significantly from aqueous, surfactant-laden systems. PMID:26894883

  2. Characterization of Particulate Matter Transport across the Lung-Surfactant Barrier using Langmuir Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Jeremy; Dennin, Michael; Levine, Alex; George, Steven

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the transport of particulate matter acros the lung using a monolayer of bovine lung surfactant tagged with NBD in conjunction with alveolar lung cells below the air-water interface. The monolaye dynamically compressed and expanded to induce phase transitions as well as buckling and folding. Polystyrene spheres ranging from 20 to 500 nm in diameter were tagged with fluorescent molecules and deposited on the monolayer. We will present results of preliminary studies of the transport of beads from the air-water surface to the lung cells through the monolayer. Characterization of the transfer will focus on differential fluorescence microscopy to distinguish uncoated beads from beads from beads coated with surfactant monolayers. The presence or absence of surfactant associated with the beads provides insight into potential transfer mechanisms and will serve as an input into models of the bead transfer. We gladly acknowledge the support of NSF grant DMR-1309402.

  3. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-02-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs.

  4. Autonomic control of the pulmonary surfactant system and lung compliance in the lizard.

    PubMed

    Wood, P G; Andrew, L K; Daniels, C B; Orgeig, S; Roberts, C T

    1997-01-01

    An increase in body temperature in the bearded dragon, Pogona vitticeps, is accompanied by an increase in the amount of pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of proteins and lipids, with the latter consisting predominantly of phospholipid and cholesterol. This increase may result from a temperature-induced change in autonomic input to the lungs, as perfusing the isolated lungs of P. vitticeps with either acetylcholine or adrenaline increases surfactant phospholipid release. However, whether acetylcholine acts via intrapulmonary sympathetic ganglia or directly on alveolar Type II cells is unknown. Moreover, the relative importance of circulating catecholamines and pulmonary sympathetic nerves on the control of the surfactant system is also obscure. Here, we describe the mechanism of the modulation of the surfactant system and the effect of this modulation on lung compliance. The role of acetylcholine was determined by perfusing isolated lungs with acetylcholine, acetylcholine and the ganglionic antagonist hexamethonium, or acetylcholine, hexamethonium, and the muscarinic antagonist atropine. Perfusing with acetylcholine significantly increased phospholipid release but did not affect cholesterol release. While histological examination of the lung revealed the presence of a large autonomic ganglion at the apex, blocking sympathetic ganglia with hexamethonium did not prevent the acetylcholine-mediated increase in phospholipid. However, the increase was inhibited by blocking muscarinic receptors with atropine, which indicates that acetylcholine acts on muscarinic receptors to stimulate phospholipid release. By increasing pulmonary smooth muscle tone, acetylcholine decreased opening pressure and increased static inflation pressures. Plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline increased with increasing temperature and were accompanied by a greater surfactant content in the lungs. While surfactant content was also higher in animals that exercised, plasma levels of adrenaline

  5. KL4 Peptide Induces Reversible Collapse Structures on Multiple Length Scales in Model Lung Surfactant

    PubMed Central

    Holten-Andersen, Niels; Michael Henderson, J.; Walther, Frans J.; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Notter, Robert H.; Lee, Ka Yee C.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of KL4, a 21-residue amphipathic peptide approximating the overall ratio of positively charged to hydrophobic amino acids in surfactant protein B (SP-B), on the structure and collapse of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol monolayers. As reported in prior work on model lung surfactant phospholipid films containing SP-B and SP-B peptides, our experiments show that KL4 improves surfactant film reversibility during repetitive interfacial cycling in association with the formation of reversible collapse structures on multiple length scales. Emphasis is on exploring a general mechanistic connection between peptide-induced nano- and microscale reversible collapse structures (silos and folds). PMID:22208194

  6. Effects of smoke inhalation on surfactant phospholipids and phospholipase A2 activity in the mouse lung.

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, M.; Moores, H. K.; Scott, J. E.; Janigan, D. T.; Hajela, R.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of smoke inhalation on the pulmonary surfactant system were examined in mice exposed for 30 minutes to smoke generated from the burning of polyurethane foam. At 8 or 12 hours after exposure, surfactants were isolated separately from lung lavage (extracellular surfactant) and residual lung tissue (intracellular surfactant) for phospholipid analysis. Calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) was measured on a microsomal fraction prepared from the tissue homogenate. Smoke inhalation produced a twofold increase in extracellular surfactant total phospholipid. While there was no change in the total phospholipid or phosphatidylcholine (PC) content of the intracellular surfactant, smoke inhalation significantly decreased the disaturated species of PC (DSPC). The specific activity of PLA2 was reduced by more than 50% in both groups of exposed mice. Smoke inhalation appears to result in selective depletion of the DSPC of intracellular surfactant and PLA2 involved in its synthesis. This depletion may be compensated for by increased secretion or slower breakdown of the material present in the extracellular compartment. Images Figure 1 PMID:1987765

  7. Exposure of the hydrophobic components of porcine lung surfactant to oxidant stress alters surface tension properties.

    PubMed Central

    Gilliard, N; Heldt, G P; Loredo, J; Gasser, H; Redl, H; Merritt, T A; Spragg, R G

    1994-01-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that oxidation of lung surfactant results in loss of surface tension lowering function. Porcine lung surfactant was exposed to conditions known to cause lipid peroxidation (0.2 mM FeCl2 + 0.1 mM H2O2 or 5 microM CuCl2). Lipid peroxidation was verified by detection of conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, fluorescent products, hydroxy alkenals, and loss of unsaturated fatty acids. Exposed samples had significantly diminished surface tension lowering ability in vitro as measured in a bubble surfactometer. Samples exposed to FeCl2 + H2O2 had significantly diminished surface tension lowering ability in vivo as indicated by their reduced ability to improve lung compliance of surfactant-deficient fetal rabbits. Oxidation of phospholipid mixtures with surface tension lowering activity and containing unsaturated acyl groups resulted in partial loss of activity as determined in vitro. These results suggest that the effect of oxidants on lung surfactant function is due, in part, to effects on the phospholipid components and that acute pulmonary inflammation accompanied by oxygen radical production may result in surfactant lipid peroxidation and loss of surface tension lowering function. PMID:8200999

  8. Surfactant therapy restores gas exchange in lung injury due to paraquat intoxication in rats.

    PubMed

    So, K L; de Buijzer, E; Gommers, D; Kaisers, U; van Genderen, P J; Lachmann, B

    1998-08-01

    Paraquat is a weed killer which causes often fatal lung damage in humans and other animals. There is evidence that the pulmonary surfactant system is involved in the pathophysiology of respiratory failure after paraquat intoxication and, therefore, the possible therapeutic effect of intratracheal surfactant administration on gas exchange in rats with progressive lung injury induced by paraquat poisoning was studied. In one group of rats, the time course of the development of lung injury due to paraquat intoxication was characterized. In a second group of rats, 72 h after paraquat intoxication, the animals underwent mechanical ventilation and only those animals in which the arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction (Pa,O2/FI,O2) decreased to below 20 kPa (150 mmHg) received exogenous surfactant (200 mg x kg(-1) body weight). Within 3 days the rats in group 1 developed progressive respiratory failure, demonstrated not only by impaired gas exchange and lung mechanics but also by increased minimal surface tension and increased protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In group 2, intratracheal surfactant administration increased Pa,O2/FI,O2 significantly within 5 min (14.4+/-2.4 kPa (108+/-18 mmHg)) to (55.2+/-53 kPa (414+/-40 mmHg)) and sustained this level for at least 2 h. It is concluded that intratracheal surfactant administration is a promising approach in the treatment of severe respiratory failure caused by paraquat poisoning. PMID:9727775

  9. Compatible solutes: ectoine and hydroxyectoine improve functional nanostructures in artificial lung surfactants.

    PubMed

    Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Sachan, Amit Kumar; Kerth, Andreas; Lentzen, Georg; Neuhaus, Thorsten; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2011-12-01

    Ectoine and hydroxyectoine belong to the family of compatible solutes and are among the most abundant osmolytes in nature. These compatible solutes protect biomolecules from extreme conditions and maintain their native function. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of ectoine and hydroxyectoine on the domain structures of artificial lung surfactant films consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and the lung surfactant specific surfactant protein C (SP-C) in a molar ratio of 80:20:0.4. The pressure-area isotherms are found to be almost unchanged by both compatible solutes. The topology of the fluid domains shown by scanning force microscopy, which is thought to be responsible for the biophysical behavior under compression, however, is modified giving rise to the assumption that ectoine and hydroxyectoine are favorable for a proper lung surfactant function. This is further evidenced by the analysis of the insertion kinetics of lipid vesicles into the lipid-peptide monolayer, which is clearly enhanced in the presence of both compatible solutes. Thus, we could show that ectoine and hydroxyectoine enhance the function of lung surfactant in a simple model system, which might provide an additional rationale to inhalative therapy. PMID:21889490

  10. Effect of long-term simulated weightlessness on surfactant and water balance in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Bryndina, I G; Vasilieva, N N; Krivonogova, Yu A; Baranov, V M

    2013-07-01

    Weightlessness produces adaptive and maladaptive changes in the respiratory system. We assessed the effects of 30-day antiorthostatic hanging as a model of microgravity on the water balance in the lungs and surface activity and phospholipid composition of pulmonary surfactant in C57Bl/6 mice. Long-term antiorthostatic hanging increased water content in the lungs and reduced surface-active properties of the surfactant. This was accompanied by an increase in the content of alveolar phospholipids and changes in their fractional composition (increase in the relative content of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine). PMID:24137589

  11. Lung protease/anti-protease network and modulation of mucus production and surfactant activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Descamps, Delphyne; Chignard, Michel; Touqui, Lhousseine; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2010-11-01

    Lung epithelium guarantees gas-exchange (performed in the alveoli) and protects from external insults (pathogens, pollutants…) present within inhaled air. Both functions are facilitated by secretions lining airway surface liquid, mucus (in the upper airways) and pulmonary surfactant (in the alveoli). Mucins, the main glycoproteins present within the mucus, are responsible for its rheologic properties and participate in lung defense mechanisms. In parallel, lung collectins are pattern recognition molecules present in pulmonary surfactant that also modulate lung defense. During chronic airways diseases, excessive protease activity can promote mucus hypersecretion and degradation of lung collectins and therefore contribute to the pathophysiology of these diseases. Importantly, secretion of local and systemic anti-proteases might be crucial to equilibrate the protease/anti-protease unbalance and therefore preserve the function of lung host defense compounds and airway surface liquid homeostasis. In this review we will present information relative to proteases able to modulate mucin production and lung collectin integrity, two important compounds of innate immune defense. One strategy to preserve physiological mucus production and collectin integrity during chronic airways diseases might be the over-expression of local 'alarm' anti-proteases such as SLPI and elafin. Interestingly, a cross-talk between lung collectins and anti-protease activity has recently been described, implicating the presence within the lung of a complex network between proteases, anti-proteases and pattern recognition molecules, which aims to keep or restore homeostasis in resting or inflamed lungs. PMID:20493919

  12. Partitioning lung and plasma proteins: circulating surfactant proteins as biomarkers of alveolocapillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Doyle, I R; Nicholas, T E; Bersten, A D

    1999-03-01

    1. The alveolocapillary membrane faces an extraordinary task in partitioning the plasma and lung hypophase proteins, with a surface area approximately 50-fold that of the body and only 0.1-0.2 micron thick. 2. Lung permeability is compromised under a variety of circumstances and the delineation between physiological and pathological changes in permeability is not always clear. Although the tight junctions of the epithelium, rather than the endothelium, are regarded as the major barrier to fluid and protein flux, it is becoming apparent that the permeability of both are dynamically regulated. 3. Whereas increased permeability and the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolar compartment has dire consequences, fortuitously the flux of surfactant proteins from the airspaces into the circulation may provide a sensitive means of non-invasively monitoring the lung, with important implications for treatment modalities. 4. Surfactant proteins are unique in that they are present in the alveolar hypophase in high concentrations. They diffuse down their vast concentration gradients (approximately 1:1500-7000) into the circulation in a manner that reflects lung function and injury score. Surfactant proteins vary markedly in size (approximately 20-650 kDa) and changes in the relative amounts appear particularly diagnostic with regard to disease severity. Alveolar levels of surfactant proteins remain remarkably constant despite respiratory disease and, unlike the flux of plasma proteins into the alveolus, which may reach equilibrium in acute lung injury, the flux of surfactant proteins is unidirectional because of the concentration gradient and because they are rapidly cleared from the circulation. 5. Ultimately, the diagnostic usefulness of surfactant proteins as markers of alveolocapillary permeability will demand a sound understanding of their kinetics through the vascular compartment. PMID:10081613

  13. Effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi Y; Gitiafroz, Roya; Acosta, Edgar; Policova, Zdenka; Cox, Peter N; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2005-11-01

    The in vitro adsorption kinetics of lung surfactant at air-water interfaces is affected by both the composition of the surfactant preparations and the conditions under which the assessment is conducted. Relevant experimental conditions are surfactant concentration, temperature, subphase pH, electrolyte concentration, humidity, and gas composition of the atmosphere exposed to the interface. The effect of humidity on the adsorption kinetics of a therapeutic lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), was studied by measuring the dynamic surface tension (DST). Axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) was used in conjunction with three different experimental methodologies, i.e., captive bubble (CB), pendant drop (PD), and constrained sessile drop (CSD), to measure the DST. The experimental results obtained from these three methodologies show that for 100% relative humidity (RH) at 37 degrees C the rate of adsorption of BLES at an air-water interface is substantially slower than for low humidity. It is also found that there is a difference in the rate of surface tension decrease measured from the PD and CB/CSD methods. These experimental results agree well with an adsorption model that considers the combined effects of entropic force, electrostatic interaction, and gravity. These findings have implications for the development and evaluation of new formulations for surfactant replacement therapy. PMID:16262325

  14. Lessons from the biophysics of interfaces: lung surfactant and tear fluid.

    PubMed

    Rantamäki, Antti H; Telenius, Jelena; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Holopainen, Juha M

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide insight into the biophysical properties and functions of tear fluid and lung surfactant--two similar fluids covering the epithelium of two distinctive organs. Both fluids form a layer-like structure that essentially comprise of an aqueous layer next to the epithelium and an anterior lipid layer at the air-water interface. The aqueous layers contain soluble proteins and metabolites, and they are responsible for the host defence system and nutrition of the organ. However, many proteins also interact with the lipid layer and are important for the surface-active function of the fluid film. The lipid layer of lung surfactant comprises mainly of phospholipids, especially phosphatidylcholines, and only small amounts of non-polar lipids, mainly cholesterol. In contrast, tear fluid lipid layer comprises of a mixture of polar and non-polar lipids. However, the relative proportion and the spectrum of different polar and non-polar lipids seem to be more extensive in tear fluid than in lung surfactant. The differing lipid compositions generate distinctive lipid layer structures. Despite the structural differences, these lipid layers decrease the surface tension of the air-water interface. The structure of the tear film lipid layer also minimises the evaporation of the tear fluid. In lung surfactant surface activity is crucial for the function of the organ, as the lipid layer prevents the collapse of the lung alveoli during the compression-expansion cycle of breathing. Similarly the tear film experiences a compression-expansion cycle during blinking. The dynamics of this cycle have been studied to a lesser extent and are not as clear as those of lung surfactant. The common structure and properties suggest a similar behaviour under rapid compression-expansion for both fluids. PMID:21352946

  15. Lung surfactant dysfunction in tuberculosis: effect of mycobacterial tubercular lipids on dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine surface activity.

    PubMed

    Chimote, G; Banerjee, R

    2005-11-10

    In pulmonary tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria reside in the alveoli and are in close proximity with the alveolar surfactant. Mycolic acid in its free form and as cord factor, constitute the major lipids of the mycobacterial cell wall. They can detach from the bacteria easily and are known to be moderately surface active. We hypothesize that these surface-active mycobacterial cell wall lipids could interact with the pulmonary surfactant and result in lung surfactant dysfunction. In this study, the major phospholipid of the lung surfactant, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and binary mixtures of DPPC:phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in 9:1 and 7:3 ratios were modelled as lung surfactant monolayers and the inhibitory potential of mycolic acid and cord factor on the surface activity of DPPC and DPPC:PG mixtures was evaluated using Langmuir monolayers. The mycobacterial lipids caused common profile changes in all the isotherms: increase in minimum surface tension, compressibility and percentage area change required for change in surface tension from 30 to 10 mN/m. Higher minimum surface tension values were achieved in the presence of mycolic acid (18.2+/-0.7 mN/m) and cord factor (13.28+/-1.2 mN/m) as compared to 0 mN/m, achieved by pure DPPC film. Similarly higher values of compressibility (0.375+/-0.005 m/mN for mycolic acid:DPPC and 0.197+/-0.003 m/mN for cord factor:DPPC monolayers) were obtained in presence of mycolic acid and cord factor. Thus, mycolic acid and cord factor were said to be inhibitory towards lung surfactant phospholipids. Higher surface tension and compressibility values in presence of tubercular lipids are suggestive of an unstable and fluid surfactant film, which will fail to achieve low surface tensions and can contribute to alveolar collapse in patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. In conclusion a biophysical inhibition of lung surfactant may play a role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and may serve as a target for

  16. A novel nanobody specific for respiratory surfactant protein A has potential for lung targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan-Mei; He, Xian; Li, Nan; Yu, Feng; Hu, Yang; Wang, Liu-Sheng; Zhang, Peng; Du, Yu-Kui; Du, Shan-Shan; Yin, Zhao-Fang; Wei, Ya-Ru; Mulet, Xavier; Coia, Greg; Weng, Dong; He, Jian-Hua; Wu, Min; Li, Hui-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Lung-targeting drugs are thought to be potential therapies of refractory lung diseases by maximizing local drug concentrations in the lung to avoid systemic circulation. However, a major limitation in developing lung-targeted drugs is the acquirement of lung-specific ligands. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SPA) is predominantly synthesized by type II alveolar epithelial cells, and may serve as a potential lung-targeting ligand. Here, we generated recombinant rat pulmonary SPA (rSPA) as an antigen and immunized an alpaca to produce two nanobodies (the smallest naturally occurring antibodies) specific for rSPA, designated Nb6 and Nb17. To assess these nanobodies’ potential for lung targeting, we evaluated their specificity to lung tissue and toxicity in mice. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that these anti-rSPA nanobodies selectively bound to rat lungs with high affinity. Furthermore, we intravenously injected fluorescein isothiocyanate-Nb17 in nude mice and observed its preferential accumulation in the lung to other tissues, suggesting high affinity of the nanobody for the lung. Studying acute and chronic toxicity of Nb17 revealed its safety in rats without causing apparent histological alterations. Collectively, we have generated and characterized lung-specific nanobodies, which may be applicable for lung drug delivery. PMID:25926731

  17. A Proposed In Vitro Method to Assess Effects of Inhaled Particles on Lung Surfactant Function.

    PubMed

    Sørli, Jorid B; Da Silva, Emilie; Bäckman, Per; Levin, Marcus; Thomsen, Birthe L; Koponen, Ismo K; Larsen, Søren T

    2016-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) lining is a thin liquid film covering the air-liquid interface of the respiratory tract. LS reduces surface tension, enabling lung surface expansion and contraction with minimal work during respiration. Disruption of surface tension is believed to play a key role in severe lung conditions. Inhalation of aerosols that interfere with the LS may induce a toxic response and, as a part of the safety assessment of chemicals and inhaled medicines, it may be relevant to study their impact on LS function. Here, we present a novel in vitro method, based on the constrained drop surfactometer, to study LS functionality after aerosol exposure. The applicability of the method was investigated using three inhaled asthma medicines, micronized lactose, a pharmaceutical excipient used in inhaled medication, and micronized albumin, a known inhibitor of surfactant function. The surfactometer was modified to allow particles mixed in air to flow through the chamber holding the surfactant drop. The deposited dose was measured with a custom-built quartz crystal microbalance. The alterations allowed the study of continuously increasing quantified doses of particles, allowing determination of the dose of particles that affects the LS function. The tested pharmaceuticals did not inhibit the function of a model LS even at extreme doses--neither did lactose. Micronized albumin, however, impaired surfactant function. The method can discriminate between safe inhaled aerosols--as exemplified by the approved inhaled medicines and the pharmaceutical excipient lactose--and albumin known to impair lung functionality by inhibiting LS function. PMID:26524226

  18. Lung Surfactant Microbubbles Increase Lipophilic Drug Payload for Ultrasound-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sirsi, Shashank R.; Fung, Chinpong; Garg, Sumit; Tianning, Mary Y.; Mountford, Paul A.; Borden, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The cavitation response of circulating microbubbles to targeted ultrasound can be used for noninvasive, site-specific delivery of shell-loaded materials. One challenge for microbubble-mediated delivery of lipophilic compounds is the limitation of drug loading into the microbubble shell, which is commonly a single phospholipid monolayer. In this study, we investigated the use of natural lung surfactant extract (Survanta®, Abbott Nutrition) as a microbubble shell material in order to improve drug payload and delivery. Pulmonary surfactant extracts such as Survanta contain hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SP-B and SP-C) that facilitate lipid folding and retention on lipid monolayers. Here, we show that Survanta-based microbubbles exhibit wrinkles in bright-field microscopy and increased lipid retention on the microbubble surface in the form of surface-associated aggregates observed with fluorescence microscopy. The payload of a model lipophilic drug (DiO), measured by flow cytometry, increased by over 2-fold compared to lipid-coated microbubbles lacking SP-B and SP-C. Lung surfactant microbubbles were highly echogenic to contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging at low acoustic intensities. At higher ultrasound intensity, excess lipid was observed to be acoustically cleaved for localized release. To demonstrate targeting, a biotinylated lipopolymer was incorporated into the shell, and the microbubbles were subjected to a sequence of radiation force and fragmentation pulses as they passed through an avidinated hollow fiber. Lung surfactant microbubbles showed a 3-fold increase in targeted deposition of the model fluorescent drug compared to lipid-only microbubbles. Our results demonstrate that lung surfactant microbubbles maintain the acoustic responsiveness of lipid-coated microbubbles with the added benefit of increased lipophilic drug payload. PMID:23781287

  19. Hyaluronan with dextran added to therapeutic lung surfactants improves effectiveness in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Taeusch, H William; Clements, John A

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants in current clinical use are largely ineffective in treating acute lung injury (ALI)/ acute respiratory distress syndrome. In part, this ineffectiveness is due to inactivation of surfactant by serum leakage into the alveoli. Previously, we reported that adding hyaluronan and some nonionic polymers to synthetic lipids combined with native SP-B and SP-C enhanced surface activity. In this study, we first tested two therapeutic lung surfactants and then retested after adding hyaluronan, polyethylene glycol or dextran alone or in two-polymer combinations including hyaluronan in the absence or presence of serum. Surface activities were measured in a modified bubble surfactometer. Results indicate that the inhibition threshold (defined as the amount of serum required to produce a minimum surface tension above 10 mN/m after 5 minutes of cycling) was 35 times higher with hyaluronan plus dextran added to Infasurf than with Infasurf alone, and better than all other mixtures tested. The threshold for Survanta with hyaluronan plus polyethylene glycol was 7 times higher than Survanta alone. We next tested selected surfactant mixtures in an animal model that mimicked ALI. All measurements of lung function showed significant improvement (P ≤ .05) with hyaluronan, or with hyaluronan and dextran added to Infasurf compared to Infasurf alone. Also, for these two groups, lung function was still improving at the end of the experiment. We conclude that certain polymers added to clinical surfactants can greatly increase resistance to inactivation in vitro, while in vivo, both Infasurf mixtures containing hyaluronan tended to normalize measures of lung function unlike other mixtures tested. PMID:23638643

  20. Biophysical behavior of lung surfactant: implications for respiratory physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Notter, R H

    1988-07-01

    The major emphasis of this article has been the complex, multicomponent system of surfactants that are required for proper pulmonary mechanics and function in the mammalian lung. Although LS was discovered over 30 years ago, and soon after was linked directly with neonatal RDS, it has taken a significant time for researchers to develop a fundamental understanding of the pulmonary surfactant system, and its actions and roles in respiratory physiology. Nonetheless, knowledge about LS has increased greatly over the past decade, and it is now clear that exogenous surfactant replacement therapy for infants with RDS provides a substantial clinical advantage for these patients. Indeed, the therapy is life-saving in many very small premature infants, and as experience accrues, and therapy is optimized, this advance is clearly a major step forward in neonatology. Perhaps the most prominent theme that has been presented throughout the discussion here is that pulmonary surfactant research must take advantage of interdisciplinary descriptions and cross-correlations for accurate and rapid progress. One positive feature of prior work on lung surfactant replacement and RDS is that its difficulty has forced investigators toward a level of understanding that is sound enough to extend LS research into related fields, such as lung injury and ARDS. These areas have their own complications, including a much more diverse pathology and injury progressions than found with neonatal RDS. In fact, if defining the role of lung surfactant in ARDS (and developing replacement therapy for it) had been the goal of investigators before considering neonatal RDS, it is difficult to imagine a positive outcome. The situation now, however, is one where it is realistic to think of recognizing when and how LS effects will occur in different ARDS lung injuries, so that surfactant replacement will have the best opportunity to help mitigate their progressive pathology. In dealing with ARDS, it is well to

  1. A comparison of conventional surfactant treatment and partial liquid ventilation on the lung volume of injured ventilated small lungs.

    PubMed

    Proquitté, Hans; Hartenstein, Sebastian; Koelsch, Uwe; Wauer, Roland R; Rüdiger, Mario; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2013-08-01

    As an alternative to surfactant therapy (ST), partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) has been considered as a treatment for acute lung injury (ALI) in newborns. The instilled PFC is much heavier than the instilled surfactant and the aim of this study was to investigate whether PLV, compared to ST, increases the end-expiratory volume of the lung (VL). Fifteen newborn piglets (age <12 h, mean weight 678 g) underwent saline lung lavage to achieve a surfactant depletion. Thereafter animals were randomized to PLV (n = 8), receiving PFC PF5080 (3M, Germany) at 30 mL kg(-1), and ST (n = 7) receiving 120 mg Curosurf®. Blood gases, hemodynamics and static compliance were measured initially (baseline), immediately after ALI, and after 240 min mechanical ventilation with either technique. Subsequently all piglets were killed; the lungs were removed in toto and frozen in liquid N2. After freeze-drying the lungs were cut into lung cubes (LCs) with edge lengths of 0.7 cm, to calculate VL. All LCs were weighed and the density of the dried lung tissue was calculated. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups PLV and ST (means ± SD) were noted in body weight (676 ± 16 g versus 679 ± 17 g; P = 0.974) or lung dry weight (1.64 ± 0.29 g versus 1.79 ± 0.48 g; P = 0.48). Oxygenation index and ventilatory efficacy index did not differ significantly between both groups at any time. VL (34.28 ± 6.13 mL versus 26.22 ± 8.1 mL; P < 0.05) and the density of the dried lung tissue (48.07 ± 5.02 mg mL(-1) versus 69.07 ± 5.30 mg mL(-1); P < 0.001), however, differed significantly between the PLV and ST groups. A 4 h PLV treatment of injured ventilated small lungs increased VL by 30% and decreased lung density by 31% compared to ST treatment, indicating greater lung distension after PLV compared to ST. PMID:23893018

  2. Adsorption of surfactant lipids by single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse lung upon pharyngeal aspiration.

    PubMed

    Kapralov, Alexander A; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E; Kisin, Elena R; Kotchey, Gregg P; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A; Kagan, Valerian E

    2012-05-22

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells, and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids: phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (∼108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted "coating" whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B, and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  3. Surfactant protein B gene variations enhance susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung in German patients

    PubMed Central

    Seifart, C; Seifart, U; Plagens, A; Wolf, M; von Wichert, P

    2002-01-01

    Genetic factors are thought to influence the risk for lung cancer. Since pulmonary surfactant mediates the response to inhaled carcinogenic substances, candidate genes may be among those coding for pulmonary surfactant proteins. In the present matched case–control study a polymorphism within intron 4 of the gene coding for surfactant specific protein B was analysed in 357 individuals. They were divided into 117 patients with lung cancer (40 patients with small cell lung cancer, 77 patients with non small cell lung cancer), matched controls and 123 healthy individuals. Surfactant protein B gene variants were analysed using specific PCR and cloned surfactant protein B sequences as controls. The frequency of the intron 4 variation was similar in both control groups (13.0% and 9.4%), whereas it was increased in the small cell lung cancer group (17.5%) and the non small cell lung cancer group (16.9%). The gene variation was found significantly more frequently in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (25.0%, P=0.016, odds ratio=3.2, 95%CI=1.24–8.28) than in the controls. These results indicate an association of the surfactant protein B intron 4 variants and/or its flanking loci with mechanisms that may enhance lung cancer susceptibility, especially to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 37, 212–217. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600353 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12107845

  4. Speckle patterns during the spreading of lung surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llovera-González, Juan J.; Moreno-Yeras, Alfredo B.; Martínez-Muñoz, Diana M.; Ferreira, Marcia Zotti Justo; Shin Nishitani, Wagner; Almeida, Alexandre Barros; Alencar, Adriano M.; Muramatsu, Mikiya; Serra-Toledo, Rolando L.

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a very important product in the medical treatment of the syndrome of insufficiency respiratory in neonates. The synthesis of this surfactant in labs need to optimize the rate of spreading in the alveolar interstitial liquid obtaining a monolayer of the phospholipids membrane base capable to maintains several of the dynamical properties of the respiratory system during breathing. The recover of theses mechanical properties has to be archived using the minimal quantities of product and with the optimal proteins composition (SP-B in special). In this paper we show our results of obtaining and process speckle pattern images of the spreading of phospholipids membrane composed the matrix of this product (DPPC) when physiologic interstitial liquid are presented.

  5. Expression and Localization of Lung Surfactant Proteins in Human Testis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Walter; Matthies, Cord; Ruf, Christian; Hartmann, Arndt; Garreis, Fabian; Paulsen, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Surfactant proteins (SPs) have been described in various tissues and fluids including tissues of the nasolacrimal apparatus, airways and digestive tract. Human testis have a glandular function as a part of the reproductive and the endocrine system, but no data are available on SPs in human testis and prostate under healthy and pathologic conditions. Objective The aim of the study was the detection and characterization of the surfactant proteins A, B, C and D (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, SP-D) in human testis. Additionally tissue samples affected by testicular cancer were investigated. Results Surfactant proteins A, B, C and D were detected using RT-PCR in healthy testis. By means of Western blot analysis, these SPs were detected at the protein level in normal testis, seminoma and seminal fluid, but not in spermatozoa. Expression of SPs was weaker in seminoma compared to normal testicular tissue. SPs were localized in combination with vimentin immunohistochemically in cells of Sertoli and Leydig. Conclusion Surfactant proteins seem to be inherent part of the human testis. By means of physicochemical properties the proteins appear to play a role during immunological and rheological process of the testicular tissue. The presence of SP-B and SP-C in cells of Sertoli correlates with their function of fluid secretion and may support transportation of spermatozoa. In seminoma the expression of all SP's was generally weaker compared to normal germ cells. This could lead to a reduction of immunomodulatory and rheology processes in the germ cell tumor. PMID:26599233

  6. Antiinflammatory Effect of N-Acetylcysteine Combined with Exogenous Surfactant in Meconium-Induced Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Mikolka, P; Kopincova, J; Mikusiakova, L Tomcikova; Kosutova, P; Calkovska, A; Mokra, D

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) can be treated by exogenous surfactant (S). However, aspirated meconium initiates local inflammation and oxidation which may inactivate surfactant and reduce its action. This experimental study estimated whether combined use of surfactant and the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can enhance effectiveness of therapy. Meconium-instilled rabbits were non-treated (M), treated with monotherapies (M + S, M + NAC), combined therapy (M + S + NAC), or received saline instead of meconium (controls, C). Surfactant therapy consisted of two lung lavages (BAL) with diluted Curosurf (5 mg phospholipids/ml, 10 ml/kg) followed by undiluted Curosurf (100 mg phospholipids/kg). N-acetylcysteine (Acc Injekt, 10 mg/kg) was given intravenously in M + S + NAC group 10 min after surfactant therapy. Animals were oxygen-ventilated for additional 5 h. Then, differential white cell count in the blood (WBC) was determined. Left lung was saline-lavaged and differential cell count in BAL was determined. In right lung tissue, wet/dry weight ratio, oxidation markers (TBARS, 3NT) and interleukines (IL-2, IL-6, IL-13, and TNFα) using ELISA and RT-PCR were estimated. Combined S + NAC therapy significantly decreased W/D ratio, TBARS, 3NT, and IL, whereas the effect of monotherapies (either S or NAC) was less obvious. In conclusion, addition of NAC to surfactant treatment may enhance the therapeutic outcome in MAS. PMID:27283193

  7. Glucocorticoids and beta-adrenergic-receptor agonists: their combined effect on fetal rabbit lung surfactant.

    PubMed

    Ekelund, L; Enhorning, G

    1985-08-15

    In a previous study on pregnant rabbits (Am J Obstet Gynecol 1983; 147:437) we found that a prolonged infusion of the beta 2-adrenergic-receptor agonist terbutaline would first cause a release of fetal pulmonary surfactant, so that more was available in the airways. However, the airway fluid then contained less surfactant, indicating a depletion of stores. Since terbutaline is often used in high doses as a tocolytic agent, surfactant depletion could be a serious side effect. With further studies on rabbits, we wanted to test the hypothesis that with an accelerated surfactant synthesis, achieved with glucocorticoids, the increased release, evoked with the terbutaline, would never cause a depletion of the surfactant stores. Our results supported this hypothesis. Betamethasone, administered to the pregnant doe on the twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh days of gestation, 0.1 mg/kg, increased compliance of the fetal lungs, and more phospholipid phosphorus could be lavaged from the airways. These effects were further increased when, following steroid administration, the doe was infused with terbutaline. Depletion of the surfactant stores was never seen when betamethasone was given prior to the beta-adrenergic-receptor agonist. PMID:3839627

  8. Computational Models of Ventilator Induced Lung Injury and Surfactant Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Jason H.T.; Smith, Bradford J.; Allen, Gilman B.

    2014-01-01

    Managing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) invariably involves the administration of mechanical ventilation, the challenge being to avoid the iatrogenic sequellum known as ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Devising individualized ventilation strategies in ARDS requires that patient-specific lung physiology be taken into account, and this is greatly aided by the use of computational models of lung mechanical function that can be matched to physiological measurements made in a given patient. In this review, we discuss recent models that have the potential to serve as the basis for devising minimally injurious modes of mechanical ventilation in ARDS patients. PMID:26904138

  9. Functional importance of the NH2-terminal insertion sequence of lung surfactant protein B

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Shelli L.; Pocivavsek, Luka; Waring, Alan J.; Walther, Frans J.; Hernandez-Juviel, Jose M.; Ruchala, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is required for proper surface activity of pulmonary surfactant. In model lung surfactant lipid systems composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids, the unsaturated lipids are removed from the film at high compression. It is thought that SP-B helps anchor these lipids closely to the monolayer in three-dimensional cylindrical structures termed “nanosilos” seen by atomic force microscopy imaging of deposited monolayers at high surface pressures. Here we explore the role of the SP-B NH2 terminus in the formation and stability of these cylindrical structures, specifically the distribution of lipid stack height, width, and density with four SP-B truncation peptides: SP-B 1–25, SP-B 9–25, SP-B 11–25, and SP-B 1–25Nflex (prolines 2 and 4 substituted with alanine). The first nine amino acids, termed the insertion sequence and the interface seeking tryptophan residue 9, are shown to stabilize the formation of nanosilos while an increase in the insertion sequence flexibility (SP-B 1–25Nflex) may improve peptide functionality. This provides a functional understanding of the insertion sequence beyond anchoring the protein to the two-dimensional membrane lining the lung, as it also stabilizes formation of nanosilos, creating reversible repositories for fluid lipids at high compression. In lavaged, surfactant-deficient rats, instillation of a mixture of SP-B 1–25 (as a monomer or dimer) and synthetic lung lavage lipids quickly improved oxygenation and dynamic compliance, whereas SP-B 11–25 surfactants showed oxygenation and dynamic compliance values similar to that of lipids alone, demonstrating a positive correlation between formation of stable, but reversible, nanosilos and in vivo efficacy. PMID:20023175

  10. Human Pulmonary Surfactant Protein SP-A1 Provides Maximal Efficiency of Lung Interfacial Films.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pascual, Alicia; Arroyo, Raquel; Floros, Joanna; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipoprotein complex that reduces surface tension to prevent alveolar collapse and contributes to the protection of the respiratory surface from the entry of pathogens. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a hydrophilic glycoprotein of the collectin family, and its main function is related to host defense. However, previous studies have shown that SP-A also aids in the formation and biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant films at the air-water interface. Humans, unlike rodents, have two genes, SFTPA1 and SFTPA2. The encoded proteins, SP-A1 and SP-A2, differ quantitatively or qualitatively in function. It has been shown that both gene products are necessary for tubular myelin formation, an extracellular structural form of lung surfactant. The goal of this study was to investigate potential differences in the biophysical properties of surfactants containing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both. For this purpose, we have studied for the first time, to our knowledge, the biophysical properties of pulmonary surfactant from individual humanized transgenic mice expressing human SP-A1, SP-A2, or both SP-A1 and SP-A2, in the captive bubble surfactometer. We observed that pulmonary surfactant containing SP-A1 reaches lower surface tension after postexpansion interfacial adsorption than surfactants containing no SP-A or only SP-A2. Under interfacial compression-expansion cycling conditions, surfactant films containing SP-A1 also performed better, particularly with respect to the reorganization of the films that takes place during compression. On the other hand, addition of recombinant SP-A1 to a surfactant preparation reconstituted from the hydrophobic fraction of a porcine surfactant made it more resistant to inhibition by serum than the addition of equivalent amounts of SP-A2. We conclude that the presence of SP-A1 allows pulmonary surfactant to adopt a particularly favorable structure with optimal biophysical properties. PMID:27508436

  11. Altered surfactant homeostasis and alveolar epithelial cell stress in amiodarone-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Henneke, Ingrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Liebisch, Gerhard; Chambers, Rachel C; Ochs, Matthias; Schmitz, Gerd; Vancheri, Carlo; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is a highly efficient antiarrhythmic drug with potentially serious side effects. Severe pulmonary toxicity is reported in patients receiving AD even at low doses and may cause interstitial pneumonia as well as lung fibrosis. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECII) has been suggested to play an important role in this disease. In the current study, we aimed to establish a murine model of AD-induced lung fibrosis and analyze surfactant homeostasis, lysosomal, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this model. AD/vehicle was instilled intratracheally into C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Extent of lung fibrosis development was assessed by trichrome staining and hydroxyproline measurement. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Phospholipids (PLs) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Surfactant proteins (SP) and markers for apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress were studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AECII morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Extensive lung fibrosis and AECII hyperplasia were observed in AD-treated mice already at day 7. Surfactant PL and SP accumulated in AECII over time. In parallel, induction of apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress was encountered in AECII of mice lungs and in MLE12 cells treated with AD. In vitro, siRNA-mediated knockdown of cathepsin D did not alter the AD-induced apoptotic response. Our data suggest that mice exposed to intratracheal AD develop severe pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit extensive surfactant alterations and cellular stress, but AD-induced AECII apoptosis is not mediated primarily via cathepsin D. PMID:25163675

  12. Surfactant dysfunction during overexpression of TGF-β1 precedes profibrotic lung remodeling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Boden, Caroline; Echaide, Mercedes; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Kolb, Martin; Gauldie, Jack; Maus, Ulrich A; Ochs, Matthias; Knudsen, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is involved in regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and fibrogenesis, inducing myofibroblast migration and increasing extracellular matrix synthesis. Here, TGF-β1 effects on pulmonary structure and function were analyzed. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of TGF-β1 in mice lungs was performed and evaluated by design-based stereology, invasive pulmonary function testing, and detailed analyses of the surfactant system 1 and 2 wk after gene transfer. After 1 wk decreased static compliance was linked with a dramatic alveolar derecruitment without edema formation or increase in the volume of septal wall tissue or collagen fibrils. Abnormally high surface tension correlated with downregulation of surfactant proteins B and C. TTF-1 expression was reduced, and, using PLA (proximity ligand assay) technology, we found Smad3 and TTF-1 forming complexes in vivo, which are normally translocated into the nucleus of the alveolar epithelial type II cells (AE2C) but in the presence of TGF-β1 remain in the cytoplasm. AE2C show altered morphology, resulting in loss of total apical surface area per lung and polarity. These changes of AE2C were progressive 2 wk after gene transfer and correlated with lung compliance. Although static lung compliance remained low, the volume of septal wall tissue and collagen fibrils increased 2 wk after gene transfer. In this animal model, the primary effect of TGF-β1 signaling in the lung is downregulation of surfactant proteins, high surface tension, alveolar derecruitment, and mechanical stress, which precede fibrotic tissue remodeling and progressive loss of AE2C polarity. Initial TTF-1 dysfunction is potentially linked to downregulation of surfactant proteins. PMID:27106287

  13. Role of surfactant protein A in non-infectious lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hisatsugu; Mitsuhashi, Atsushi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a large multimeric protein found in the airways and alveoli of the lungs. SP-A is a member of the collectin family of proteins, characterized by NH2-terminal collagen-like regions and COOH-terminal lectin domains. Although other surfactant proteins such as SP-B function to reduce surface tension in the lungs, SP-A as well as SP-D regulates the pulmonary immune response. To date, a number of studies have shown the immunoregulatory function of SP-A, mainly in the field of infectious diseases. By binding to a wide variety of pathogens, SP-A opsonizes and enhances pathogen uptake by phagocytes. In addition to the effect on pathogens, recent studies have shown that SP-A also modulates lung immune system in the area of non-infectious lung diseases. In this review, the potential role of SP-A in the multiple aspects of pulmonary host defense will be discussed, focusing mainly on non-infectious lung diseases such as acute and chronic pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. J. Med. Invest. 61: 1-6, February, 2014. PMID:24705741

  14. The Effects of Lung Protective Ventilation or Hypercapnic Acidosis on Gas Exchange and Lung Injury in Surfactant Deficient Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hummler, Helmut D.; Banke, Katharina; Wolfson, Marla R.; Buonocore, Giuseppe; Ebsen, Michael; Bernhard, Wolfgang; Tsikas, Dimitrios; Fuchs, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Background Permissive hypercapnia has been shown to reduce lung injury in subjects with surfactant deficiency. Experimental studies suggest that hypercapnic acidosis by itself rather than decreased tidal volume may be a key protective factor. Objectives To study the differential effects of a lung protective ventilatory strategy or hypercapnic acidosis on gas exchange, hemodynamics and lung injury in an animal model of surfactant deficiency. Methods 30 anesthetized, surfactant-depleted rabbits were mechanically ventilated (FiO2 = 0.8, PEEP = 7cmH2O) and randomized into three groups: Normoventilation-Normocapnia (NN)-group: tidal volume (Vt) = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 40 mmHg; Normoventilation-Hypercapnia (NH)-group: Vt = 7.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg by increasing FiCO2; and a Hypoventilation-Hypercapnia (HH)-group: Vt = 4.5 ml/kg, target PaCO2 = 80 mmHg. Plasma lactate and interleukin (IL)-8 were measured every 2 h. Animals were sacrificed after 6 h to perform bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), to measure lung wet-to-dry weight, lung tissue IL-8, and to obtain lung histology. Results PaO2 was significantly higher in the HH-group compared to the NN-group (p<0.05), with values of the NH-group between the HH- and NN-groups. Other markers of lung injury (wet-dry-weight, BAL-Protein, histology-score, plasma-IL-8 and lung tissue IL-8) resulted in significantly lower values for the HH-group compared to the NN-group and trends for the NH-group towards lower values compared to the NN-group. Lactate was significantly lower in both hypercapnia groups compared to the NN-group. Conclusion Whereas hypercapnic acidosis may have some beneficial effects, a significant effect on lung injury and systemic inflammatory response is dependent upon a lower tidal volume rather than resultant arterial CO2 tensions and pH alone. PMID:26840779

  15. More Than a Monolayer: Relating Lung Surfactant Structure and Mechanics to Composition

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Coralie; Alig, Tim; Yoon, Joonsung; Bringezu, Frank; Warriner, Heidi; Zasadzinski, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    Survanta, a clinically used bovine lung surfactant extract, in contact with surfactant in the subphase, shows a coexistence of discrete monolayer islands of solid phase coexisting with continuous multilayer “reservoirs” of fluid phase adjacent to the air-water interface. Exchange between the monolayer, the multilayer reservoir, and the subphase determines surfactant mechanical properties such as the monolayer collapse pressure and surface viscosity by regulating solid-fluid coexistence. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction shows that the solid phase domains consist of two-dimensional crystals similar to those formed by mixtures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitic acid. The condensed domains grow as the surface pressure is increased until they coalesce, trapping protrusions of liquid matrix. At ∼40 mN/m, a plateau exists in the isotherm at which the solid phase fraction increases from ∼60 to 90%, at which the surface viscosity diverges. The viscosity is driven by the percolation of the solid phase domains, which depends on the solid phase area fraction of the monolayer. The high viscosity may lead to high monolayer collapse pressures, help prevent atelectasis, and minimize the flow of lung surfactant out of the alveoli due to surface tension gradients. PMID:15454404

  16. Expression of a human surfactant protein C mutation associated with interstitial lung disease disrupts lung development in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bridges, James P; Wert, Susan E; Nogee, Lawrence M; Weaver, Timothy E

    2003-12-26

    Surfactant Protein C (SP-C) is a secreted transmembrane protein that is exclusively expressed by alveolar type II epithelial cells of the lung. SP-C associates with surfactant lipids to reduce surface tension within the alveolus, maintaining lung volume at end expiration. Mutations in the gene encoding SP-C (SFTPC) have recently been linked to chronic lung disease in children and adults. The goal of this study was to determine whether a disease-linked mutation in SFTPC causes lung disease in transgenic mice. The SFTPC mutation, designated g.1728 G --> A, results in the deletion of exon4, generating a truncated form of SP-C (SP-C(Deltaexon4)). cDNA encoding SP-C(Deltaexon4) was constitutively expressed in type II epithelial cells of transgenic mice. Viable F0 transgene-positive mice were not generated after two separate rounds of pronuclear injections. Histological analysis of lung tissue harvested from embryonic day 17.5 F0 transgene-positive fetuses revealed that SP-C(Deltaexon4) caused a dose-dependent disruption in branching morphogenesis of the lung associated with epithelial cell cytotoxicity. Transient expression of SP-C(Deltaexon4) in isolated type II epithelial cells or HEK293 cells resulted in incomplete processing of the mutant proprotein, a dose-dependent increase in BiP transcription, trapping of the proprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum, and rapid degradation via a proteasome-dependent pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that the g.1728 G --> A mutation causes misfolding of the SP-C proprotein with subsequent induction of the unfolded protein response and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathways ultimately resulting in disrupted lung morphogenesis. PMID:14525980

  17. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide

    PubMed Central

    Notter, Robert H.; Wang, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46–48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22–24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  18. Activity and biophysical inhibition resistance of a novel synthetic lung surfactant containing Super-Mini-B DATK peptide.

    PubMed

    Notter, Robert H; Wang, Zhengdong; Walther, Frans J

    2016-01-01

    Background/objectives. This study examines the surface activity, resistance to biophysical inhibition, and pulmonary efficacy of a synthetic lung surfactant containing glycerophospholipids combined with Super Mini-B (S-MB) DATK, a novel and stable molecular mimic of lung surfactant protein (SP)-B. The objective of the work is to test whether S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant has favorable biophysical and physiological activity for future use in treating surfactant deficiency or dysfunction in lung disease or injury. Methods. The structure of S-MB DATK peptide was analyzed by homology modeling and by FTIR spectroscopy. The in vitro surface activity and inhibition resistance of synthetic S-MB DATK surfactant was assessed in the presence and absence of albumin, lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC), and free fatty acids (palmitoleic and oleic acid). Adsorption and dynamic surface tension lowering were measured with a stirred subphase dish apparatus and a pulsating bubble surfactometer (20 cycles/min, 50% area compression, 37 °C). In vivo pulmonary activity of S-MB DATK surfactant was measured in ventilated rabbits with surfactant deficiency/dysfunction induced by repeated lung lavages that resulted in arterial PO2 values <100 mmHg. Results. S-MB DATK surfactant had very high surface activity in all assessments. The preparation adsorbed rapidly to surface pressures of 46-48 mN/m at 37 °C (low equilibrium surface tensions of 22-24 mN/m), and reduced surface tension to <1 mN/m under dynamic compression on the pulsating bubble surfactometer. S-MB DATK surfactant showed a significant ability to resist inhibition by serum albumin, C16:0 lyso-PC, and free fatty acids, but surfactant inhibition was mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration. S-MB DATK synthetic surfactant quickly improved arterial oxygenation and lung compliance after intratracheal instillation to ventilated rabbits with severe surfactant deficiency. Conclusions. S-MB DATK is an active mimic of native SP

  19. Surfactant-based drug delivery systems for treating drug-resistant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S R; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Among all cancers, lung cancer is the major cause of deaths. Lung cancer can be categorized into two classes for prognostic and treatment purposes: small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Both categories of cancer are resistant to certain drugs. Various mechanisms behind drug resistance are over-expression of superficial membrane proteins [glycoprotein (P-gp)], lung resistance-associated proteins, aberration of the intracellular enzyme system, enhancement of the cell repair system and deregulation of cell apoptosis. Structure-performance relationships and chemical compatibility are consequently major fundamentals in surfactant-based formulations, with the intention that a great deal investigation is committed to this region. With the purpose to understand the potential of P-gp in transportation of anti-tumor drugs to cancer cells with much effectiveness and specificity, several surfactant-based delivery systems have been developed which may include microspheres, nanosized drug carriers (nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, stealth liposomes, nanogels, polymer-drug conjugates), novel powders, hydrogels and mixed micellar systems intended for systemic and/or localized delivery. PMID:25013959

  20. Long-chain Acylcarnitines Reduce Lung Function by Inhibiting Pulmonary Surfactant.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Chikara; Bharathi, Sivakama; Uppala, Radha; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Wang, Dongning; McHugh, Kevin; Zou, Ye; Wang, Jieru; Alcorn, John F; Zuo, Yi Y; Hirschey, Matthew D; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-09-25

    The role of mitochondrial energy metabolism in maintaining lung function is not understood. We previously observed reduced lung function in mice lacking the fatty acid oxidation enzyme long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD). Here, we demonstrate that long-chain acylcarnitines, a class of lipids secreted by mitochondria when metabolism is inhibited, accumulate at the air-fluid interface in LCAD(-/-) lungs. Acylcarnitine accumulation is exacerbated by stress such as influenza infection or by dietary supplementation with l-carnitine. Long-chain acylcarnitines co-localize with pulmonary surfactant, a unique film of phospholipids and proteins that reduces surface tension and prevents alveolar collapse during breathing. In vitro, the long-chain species palmitoylcarnitine directly inhibits the surface adsorption of pulmonary surfactant as well as its ability to reduce surface tension. Treatment of LCAD(-/-) mice with mildronate, a drug that inhibits carnitine synthesis, eliminates acylcarnitines and improves lung function. Finally, acylcarnitines are detectable in normal human lavage fluid. Thus, long-chain acylcarnitines may represent a risk factor for lung injury in humans with dysfunctional fatty acid oxidation. PMID:26240137

  1. Effect of clay nanoparticles on model lung surfactant: a potential marker of hazard from nanoaerosol inhalation.

    PubMed

    Kondej, Dorota; Sosnowski, Tomasz R

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates influence of different aluminosillicate nanoparticles (NPs) which are found in air in selected workplaces on the properties of the phospholipid (DPPC) monolayer at air-saline interface considered as ex vivo model of the lung surfactant (LS). The measurements were done under physiological-like conditions (deformable liquid interface at 37 °C) for NP concentrations matching the calculated lung doses after exposure in the working environment. Measured surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms and compressibility curves demonstrated NP-induced changes in the structure and mechanical properties of the lipid monolayer. It was shown that hydrophilic nanomaterials (halloysite and bentonite) induced concentration-dependent impairment of DPPC's ability of attaining high surface pressures on interfacial compression, suggesting a possibility of reduction of physiological function of natural LS. Hydrophobic montmorillonites affected DPPC monolayer in the opposite way; however, they significantly changed the mechanical properties of the air-liquid interface during compression. The results support the hypothesis of possible reduction or even degradation of the natural function of the lung surfactant induced by particle-phospholipid interactions after inhalation of nanoclays. Presented data do not only supplement the earlier results obtained with another LS model (animal-derived surfactant in oscillating bubble experiments) but also offer an explanation of physicochemical mechanisms responsible for detrimental effects which arise after deposition of inhaled nanomaterials on the surface of the respiratory system. PMID:26527341

  2. [Stress-resistance and the condition of surfactant system and water balance in the lung of suspended rats].

    PubMed

    Bryndina, I G; Vasilieva, N N; Baranov, V M

    2013-01-01

    White male rats with the body mass of 180-220 grams were distributed into the open-field active (presumably stress-resistant) and open-field inactive (presumably stress vulnerable) groups for a 10-day experimental suspension with the purpose to evaluate the surfactant activity in bronchoalveolar lavages, total phospholipids and their fractions, and water balance in the lung. In modeled microgravity, augmented blood filling of the rat's lung increases the alveolar phospholipid content and alters the phospholipid fractional composition in the pulmonary surfactant. Ten-day suspension raises pulmonary surfactant activity to a greater extent in stress-resistant animals rather than in their stress vulnerable peers. PMID:24032163

  3. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant in rat lungs after inhalation of nanomaterials: Fullerenes, nickel oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kadoya, Chikara; Lee, Byeong-Woo; Ogami, Akira; Oyabu, Takako; Nishi, Ken-ichiro; Yamamoto, Makoto; Todoroki, Motoi; Morimoto, Yasuo; Tanaka, Isamu; Myojo, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    The health risks of inhalation exposure to engineered nanomaterials in the workplace are a major concern in recent years, and hazard assessments of these materials are being conducted. The pulmonary surfactant of lung alveoli is the first biological entity to have contact with airborne nanomaterials in inhaled air. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the pulmonary surfactant components of rat lungs after a 4-week inhalation exposure to three different nanomaterials: fullerenes, nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), with similar levels of average aerosol concentration (0.13-0.37 mg/m(3)). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of the rat lungs stored after previous inhalation studies was analyzed, focusing on total protein and the surfactant components, such as phospholipids and surfactant-specific SP-D (surfactant protein D) and the BALF surface tension, which is affected by SP-B and SP-C. Compared with a control group, significant changes in the BALF surface tension and the concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D were observed in rats exposed to NiO nanoparticles, but not in those exposed to fullerenes. Surface tension and the levels of surfactant phospholipids and proteins were also significantly different in rats exposed to MWCNTs. The concentrations of phospholipids, total protein and SP-D and BALF surface tension were correlated significantly with the polymorphonuclear neutrophil counts in the BALF. These results suggest that pulmonary surfactant components can be used as measures of lung inflammation. PMID:25950198

  4. Human lung surfactant protein A exists in several different oligomeric states: oligomer size distribution varies between patient groups.

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, T. P.; Malhotra, R.; Sim, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a complex molecule composed of up to 18 polypeptide chains. In vivo, SP-A probably binds to a wide range of inhaled materials via the interaction of surface carbohydrates with the lectin domains of SP-A and mediates their interaction with cells as part of a natural defense system. Multiplicity of lectin domains gives high-affinity binding to carbohydrate-bearing surfaces. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Gel filtration analyses were performed on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from three patient groups: pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (n = 12), birch pollen allergy (n = 11), and healthy volunteers (n = 4). Sucrose density gradient centrifugation was employed to determine molecular weights of SP-A oligomers. SP-A was solubilized from the lipid phase to compare oligomeric state with that of water soluble SP-A. RESULTS: SP-A exists as fully assembled complexes with 18 polypeptide chains, but it is also consistently found in smaller oligomeric forms. This is true for both the water- and lipid-soluble fractions of SP-A. CONCLUSION: The three patient groups analyzed show a shift towards lower oligomeric forms of SP-A in the following sequence: healthy-pulmonary alveolar proteinosis-pollen allergy. Depolymerization would be expected to lead to loss of binding affinity for carbohydrate-rich surfaces, with loss or alteration of biological function. While there are many complex factors involved in the establishment of an allergy, it is possible that reduced participation of SP-A in clearing a potential allergen from the lungs could be an early step in the chain of events. Images Fig. 4 FIG. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:9606179

  5. Constrained sessile drop as a new configuration to measure low surface tension in lung surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Laura M Y; Lu, James J; Chan, Yawen W; Ng, Amy; Zhang, Ling; Hoorfar, Mina; Policova, Zdenka; Grundke, Karina; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2004-08-01

    Existing methodology for surface tension measurements based on drop shapes suffers from the shortcoming that it is not capable to function at very low surface tension if the liquid dispersion is opaque, such as therapeutic lung surfactants at clinically relevant concentrations. The novel configuration proposed here removes the two big restrictions, i.e., the film leakage problem that is encountered with such methods as the pulsating bubble surfactometer as well as the pendant drop arrangement, and the problem of the opaqueness of the liquid, as in the original captive bubble arrangement. A sharp knife edge is the key design feature in the constrained sessile drop that avoids film leakage at low surface tension. The use of the constrained sessile drop configuration in conjunction with axisymmetric drop shape analysis to measure surface tension allows complete automation of the setup. Dynamic studies with lung surfactant can be performed readily by changing the volume of a sessile drop, and thus the surface area, by means of a motor-driven syringe. To illustrate the validity of using this configuration, experiments were performed using an exogenous lung surfactant preparation, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) at 5.0 mg/ml. A comparison of results obtained for BLES at low concentration between the constrained sessile drop and captive bubble arrangement shows excellent agreement between the two approaches. When the surface area of the BLES film (0.5 mg/ml) was compressed by about the same amount in both systems, the minimum surface tensions attained were identical within the 95% confidence limits. PMID:15064296

  6. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles in pulmonary glucocorticoid delivery: characterization and interaction with human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Paolino, Donatella; Celia, Christian; Fresta, Massimo; Carafa, Maria; Alhaique, Franco

    2010-10-01

    Non-ionic surfactant vesicles (NSVs) were proposed for the pulmonary delivery of glucocorticoids such as beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) for the treatment of inflammatory lung diseases, e.g. asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and various type of pulmonary fibrosis. The thin layer evaporation method followed by sonication was used to prepare small non-ionic surfactant vesicles containing beclomethasone dipropionate. Light scattering experiments showed that beclomethasone dipropionate-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles were larger than unloaded ones and showed a significant (P<0.001) decrease of the zeta potential. The morphological analysis, by freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy, showed the maintenance of a vesicular structure in the presence of the drug. The colloidal and storage stability were evaluated by Turbiscan Lab Expert, which evidenced the good stability of BDP-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles, thus showing no significant variations of mean size and no colloidal phase segregation. Primary human lung fibroblast (HLF) cells were used for in vitro investigation of vesicle tolerability, carrier-cell interaction, intracellular drug uptake and drug-loaded vesicle anti-inflammatory activity. The investigated NSVs did not show a significant cytotoxic activity at all incubation times for concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 1 μM. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed vesicular carrier localization at the level of the cytoplasm compartment, where the glucocorticoid receptor (target site) is localized. BDP-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles elicited a significant improvement of the HLF intracellular uptake of the drug with respect to the free drug solution, drug/surfactant mixtures and empty vesicles used as references. The treatment of HLF cells with BDP-loaded non-ionic surfactant vesicles determined a noticeable increase of the drug anti-inflammatory activity by reducing the secretion of both constitutive and interleukin-1

  7. Size influences the effect of hydrophobic nanoparticles on lung surfactant model systems.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula V; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Koshkina, Olga; Maskos, Michael; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar lung surfactant (LS) is a complex lipid protein mixture that forms an interfacial monolayer reducing the surface tension to near zero values and thus preventing the lungs from collapse. Due to the expanding field of nanotechnology and the corresponding unavoidable exposure of human beings from the air, it is crucial to study the potential effects of nanoparticles (NPs) on the structural organization of the lung surfactant system. In the present study, we investigated both, the domain structure in pure DPPC monolayers as well as in lung surfactant model systems. In the pure lipid system we found that two different sized hydrophobic polymeric nanoparticles with diameter of ~12 nm and ~136 nm have contrasting effect on the functional and structural behavior. The small nanoparticles inserted into fluid domains at the LE-LC phase transition are not visibly disturbing the phase transition but disrupting the domain morphology of the LE phase. The large nanoparticles led to an expanded isotherm and to a significant decrease in the line tension and thus to a drastic disruption of the domain structures at a much lower number of nanoparticles with respect to the lipid. The surface activity of the model LS films again showed drastic variations due to presence of different sized NPs illustrated by the film balance isotherms and the atomic force microscopy. AFM revealed laterally profuse multilayer protrusion formation on compression but only in the presence of 136 nm sized nanoparticles. Moreover we investigated the vesicle insertion process into a preformed monolayer. A severe inhibition was observed only in the presence of ~136 nm NPs compared to minor effects in the presence of ~12 nm NPs. Our study clearly shows that the size of the nanoparticles made of the same material determines the interaction with biological membranes. PMID:24411261

  8. Surfactant Dysfunction and Lung Inflammation in the Female Mouse Model of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-Jiang; Abramova, Elena; Golden, Thea N.; Sims, Michael; James, Melane L.; Beers, Michael F.; Gow, Andrew J.; Krymskaya, Vera P.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung disease caused by mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 or TSC2. LAM affects women almost exclusively, and it is characterized by neoplastic growth of atypical smooth muscle–like TSC2-null LAM cells in the pulmonary interstitium, cystic destruction of lung parenchyma, and progressive decline in lung function. In this study, we hypothesized that TSC2-null lesions promote a proinflammatory environment, which contributes to lung parenchyma destruction. Using a TSC2-null female murine LAM model, we demonstrate that TSC2-null lesions promote alveolar macrophage accumulation, recruitment of immature multinucleated cells, an increased induction of proinflammatory genes, nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2, IL-6, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1)/keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and up-regulation of IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid also contained an increased level of surfactant protein (SP)-D, but not SP-A, significant reduction of SP-B levels, and a resultant increase in alveolar surface tension. Consistent with the growth of TSC2-null lesions, NO levels were also increased and, in turn, modified SP-D through S-nitrosylation, forming S-nitrosylated SP-D, a known consequence of lung inflammation. Progressive growth of TSC2-null lesions was accompanied by elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9. This report demonstrates a link between growth of TSC2-null lesions and inflammation-induced surfactant dysfunction that might contribute to lung destruction in LAM. PMID:25474372

  9. Surfactant dysfunction and lung inflammation in the female mouse model of lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Abramova, Elena; Golden, Thea N; Sims, Michael; James, Melane L; Beers, Michael F; Gow, Andrew J; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung disease caused by mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 or TSC2. LAM affects women almost exclusively, and it is characterized by neoplastic growth of atypical smooth muscle-like TSC2-null LAM cells in the pulmonary interstitium, cystic destruction of lung parenchyma, and progressive decline in lung function. In this study, we hypothesized that TSC2-null lesions promote a proinflammatory environment, which contributes to lung parenchyma destruction. Using a TSC2-null female murine LAM model, we demonstrate that TSC2-null lesions promote alveolar macrophage accumulation, recruitment of immature multinucleated cells, an increased induction of proinflammatory genes, nitric oxide (NO) synthase 2, IL-6, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1)/keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and up-regulation of IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and transforming growth factor-β1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid also contained an increased level of surfactant protein (SP)-D, but not SP-A, significant reduction of SP-B levels, and a resultant increase in alveolar surface tension. Consistent with the growth of TSC2-null lesions, NO levels were also increased and, in turn, modified SP-D through S-nitrosylation, forming S-nitrosylated SP-D, a known consequence of lung inflammation. Progressive growth of TSC2-null lesions was accompanied by elevated levels of matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9. This report demonstrates a link between growth of TSC2-null lesions and inflammation-induced surfactant dysfunction that might contribute to lung destruction in LAM. PMID:25474372

  10. Thyroid transcription factor-1, hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β and surfactant protein A and B in the developing chick lung

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, XIN; YUTZEY, KATHERINE E.; WHITSETT, JEFFREY A.

    1998-01-01

    Expression of surfactant proteins SP-A, SP-B and the transcription factors TTF-1 and HNF-3β was identified by immunohistochemistry in the developing chicken. SP-B, a small hydrophobic peptide critical for lung function and surfactant homeostasis in mammals, was detected in the epithelial cells of parabronchi in embryonic chicken lung from the 15th day of incubation, prior to the onset of the breathing movements and was expressed at high levels in the posthatching chicken lung. SP-A, an abundant surfactant protein involved in innate defence of the mammalian lung, was detected in the chick embryo in subsets of epithelial cells in the mesobronchus, starting from d 15 and was detected in the posthatching chicken lung. The transcription factors hepatocyte nuclear factor 3β (HNF-3β) and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), both regulators epithelial cell differentiation and gene expression in mammalian species, were detected at the onset of lung bud formation (d 4 of incubation) and throughout lung development. Abundant nuclear expression was detected in nuclei of respiratory epithelial cells of developing bronchial tubules for both transcription factors. In contrast to the surfactant proteins, expression of both TTF-1 and HNF-3β decreased markedly in posthatching chicken lung. The expression of SP-A and SP-B in chick lung demonstrates the conservation of surfactant proteins in vertebrates. The temporospatial pattern of TTF-1 and HNF-3β overlaps with that of SP-A and SP-B, supporting their potential roles in chick lung development and demonstrating the conservation of regulatory mechanisms contributing to gene expression in respiratory epithelial cells in vertebrates. PMID:9877295

  11. Surfactant Lipids at the Host-Environment Interface. Metabolic Sensors, Suppressors, and Effectors of Inflammatory Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Fessler, Michael B; Summer, Ross S

    2016-05-01

    The lipid composition of pulmonary surfactant is unlike that of any other body fluid. This extracellular lipid reservoir is also uniquely susceptible by virtue of its direct and continuous exposure to environmental oxidants, inflammatory agents, and pathogens. Historically, the greatest attention has been focused on those biophysical features of surfactant that serve to reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface. More recently, surfactant lipids have also been recognized as bioactive molecules that maintain immune quiescence in the lung but can also be remodeled by the inhaled environment into neolipids that mediate key roles in inflammation, immunity, and fibrosis. This review focuses on the roles in inflammatory and infectious lung disease of two classes of native surfactant lipids, glycerophospholipids and sterols, and their corresponding oxidized species, oxidized glycerophospholipids and oxysterols. We highlight evidence that surfactant composition is sensitive to circulating lipoproteins and that the lipid milieu of the alveolus should thus be recognized as susceptible to diet and common systemic metabolic disorders. We also discuss intriguing evidence suggesting that oxidized surfactant lipids may represent an evolutionary link between immunity and tissue homeostasis that arose in the primordial lung. Taken together, the emerging picture is one in which the unique environmental susceptibility of the lung, together with its unique extracellular lipid requirements, may have made this organ both an evolutionary hub and an engine for lipid-immune cross-talk. PMID:26859434

  12. Circulating pro-surfactant protein B as a risk biomarker for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Ayumu; Hanash, Samir; Rundle, Andrew; McKeague, Ian; Tang, Deliang; Darakjy, Salima; Gaziano, J. Michael; Sesso, Howard D.; Perera, Frederica

    2013-01-01

    Background Our prior studies of lung cancer suggested that a novel biomarker (pro-surfactant protein B or pro-SFTPB) might serve as a predictive marker for this disease. We aimed to determine the potential utility of pro-SFTPB for distinguishing lung cancer cases from matched controls as a risk marker. Methods Study subjects were drawn from the longitudinal Physicians’ Health Study (PHS). Cases (n = 188) included individuals who were cancer-free at study enrollment but developed lung cancer during follow-up. Controls (n = 337) were subjects who did not develop lung cancer. Cases and controls were matched on date of study enrollment, age at enrollment, and smoking status and amount. Baseline plasma samples drawn at enrollment were analyzed for pro-SFTPB using ELISA to detect differences in protein expression levels for cases and controls. Results Pro-SFTPB-non-detectable status was significantly associated with lung cancer risk (OR = 5.88, 95% CI 1.24, 27.48). Among subjects with detectable levels of the protein, increasing plasma concentration of pro-SFTPB was associated with higher lung cancer risk (OR = 1.41 per unit increase in log pro-SFTPB, 95% CI 1.08, 1.84). Conclusion These results suggest a non-linear, J-shaped association between plasma pro-SFTPB levels and lung cancer risk, with both non-detectable and higher levels of the marker being associated with lung cancer. Impact These results show promise of a risk marker that could contribute to predicting risk for lung cancer development and to narrowing the high risk population for low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening. PMID:23897585

  13. [Surfactant and water balance of lung in intracerebral hemorrhage at conditions of capsaicin blockade of vagus nerve].

    PubMed

    Urakova, M A; Bryndina, I G

    2015-03-01

    It is known that intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is accompanied by the development of neurogenic pulmonary edema and insufficiency of surfactant function. The present study was undertaken for evaluation of the role of vagal afferents in the mechanisms of ICH effects on pulmonary surfactant and water balance of the lung. We explored the surface activity and biochemical composition of surfactant, as well as blood supply, total, intravascular and extravascular fluid content in lung after ICH, simulated by intraventricular administration of autologous blood against the background of bilateral blockade of capsaicin-sensitive vagal affere its. The blockade was caused by the capsaicin application (50 mcmol) on the cervical part of the nerves. Intracerebralhemorrhage was accompanied by the decrease of surfactant activity which appeared by the enhancement of minimal, maximal and static surface tension of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), the reduction of total phospholipids including their main fraction phosphatidylcholine, the increase of lysophosphatidyicholine content and hyperhydration of the lung. The level of total proteins in BAL elevated, confirmed the enhanced permeability of the alveolar-blood barrier. The exhaustion of neuropeptides in capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents led to the partial restoration of surface active properties of lung, normalization of phospholipids and protein contents and water balance parameters. The obtained results suggest that capsaicin-sensitive vagal afferents play a pivotal role in the disturbances of surfactant function and water balance of the lung after ICH. PMID:26016324

  14. Pneumocytes Assemble Lung Surfactant as Highly Packed/Dehydrated States with Optimal Surface Activity.

    PubMed

    Cerrada, Alejandro; Haller, Thomas; Cruz, Antonio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) is an essential complex of lipids and specific proteins synthesized in alveolar type II pneumocytes, where it is assembled and stored intracellularly as multilayered organelles known as lamellar bodies (LBs). Once secreted upon physiological stimulation, LBs maintain a densely packed structure in the form of lamellar body-like particles (LBPs), which are efficiently transferred into the alveolar air-water interface, lowering surface tension to avoid lung collapse at end-expiration. In this work, the structural organization of membranes in LBs and LBPs freshly secreted by primary cultures of rat ATII cells has been compared with that of native lung surfactant membranes isolated from porcine bronchoalveolar lavage. PS assembles in LBs as crystalline-like highly ordered structures, with a highly packed and dehydrated state, which is maintained at supraphysiological temperatures. This relatively ordered/packed state is retained in secreted LBPs. The micro- and nanostructural examination of LBPs suggests the existence of high levels of structural complexity in comparison with the material purified from lavages, which may contain partially inactivated or spent structures. Additionally, freshly secreted surfactant LBPs exhibit superior activity when generating interfacial films and a higher intrinsic resistance to inactivating agents, such as serum proteins or meconium. We propose that LBs are assembled as an energy-activated structure competent to form very efficient interfacial films, and that the organization of lipids and proteins and the properties displayed by the films formed by LBPs are likely similar to those established at the alveolar interface and represent the actual functional structure of surfactant as it sustains respiration. PMID:26636941

  15. In vitro dissolution of uranium-contaminated soil in simulated lung fluid containing a pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Spitler, Grant; Spitz, Henry; Glasser, Stephan; Hoffman, M Kathryn; Bowen, James

    2015-03-01

    During the latter part of the twentieth century, the United States developed a highly technical nuclear weapons complex that involved workers at many facilities performing complex missions at a number of different industrial sites across the country. Now, many of these sites are being remediated to remove legacy materials including chemical and radioactive wastes. Along with remediation comes the responsibility to adequately assess risk to cleanup workers who could be exposed to any hazardous materials, including resuspended uranium dust, encountered during environmental restoration. Inhalation of resuspended uranium represents one of the exposure hazards at an abandoned former metal rolling mill where approximately 11 thousand tons of uranium metal was rolled between 1947 and 1958. Residual uranium contamination in the dirt floor of this abandoned site has been exposed to rain, ice, snow, and other environmental factors for more than 50 y. This report describes the solubility of the uranium contamination in this dirt measured in vitro using a modified recipe for simulated lung fluid that contains a pulmonary surfactant. Small (0.1 g) aliquots of dirt collected at this site were sequentially dissolved in simulated lung fluid for increasing periods of time up to 30 d. Solubility was classified according to the ICRP categories as fast, medium, and slow. Results demonstrate that the solubility designation for the uranium contamination in the dirt is approximately 50% fast, 15% medium, and 35-40% slow. There was no observed difference in solubility when a pulmonary surfactant was added to the simulated lung fluid. PMID:25627945

  16. Fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in centrifugal precipitation chromatography using cationic surfactant CTAB containing inorganic salts NaCl and NH(4)Cl.

    PubMed

    Tomanee, Panarat; Hsu, James T; Ito, Yoichiro

    2004-10-01

    Centrifugal precipitation chromatography (CPC) is a separation system that mainly employs a moving concentration gradient of precipitating agent along a channel and solutes of interest undergo repetitive precipitation-dissolution, fractionate at different locations, and elute out from the channel according to their solubility in the precipitating agent solution. We report here for the first time the use of a CPC system for fractionation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA in clarified lysate produced from bacterial culture. The cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was initially used as a precipitating agent; however, all biomolecules showed no differential solubility in the moving concentration gradient of this surfactant and, as a result, no separation of protein, RNA, and plasmid DNA occurred. To overcome this problem, inorganic salts such as NaCl and NH(4)Cl were introduced into solution of CTAB. The protein and RNA were found to have higher solubility with the addition of these salts and separated from the plasmid DNA. Decreasing surface charge density of CTAB upon addition of NaCl and NH(4)Cl was believed to lead to lower surfactant complexation, and therefore caused differential solubility and fractionation of these biomolecules. Addition of CaCl(2) did not improve solubility and separation of RNA from plasmid DNA. PMID:15384057

  17. The pharmacological modulation of [3H]-disaturated phosphatidylcholine overflow from perifused lung slices of adult rats: a new method for the study of lung surfactant secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Gilfillan, A. M.; Hollingsworth, M.; Jones, A. W.

    1983-01-01

    Lung slices from adult rats incubated in [methyl-3H]-choline chloride formed [3H]-disaturated phosphatidylcholine ( [3H]-DSPC) which was used as an index of lung surfactant. The slices were perifused after 3 h incubation in [methyl-3H]-choline chloride and the overflow of [3H]-DSPC, as a rate coefficient, was used as a measure of surfactant secretion. The basal overflow of [3H]-DSPC rapidly declined over the first 30 min of perifusion and then declined slowly. Salbutamol induced a prolonged, and sometimes delayed, increase in [3H]-DSPC overflow, which was reduced by (+/-)-propranolol. Potassium chloride produced an immediate, and usually transient, increase in [3H]-DSPC overflow which was not modified by atropine or (+/-)-propranolol. Adenosine 5'-triphosphate, but not phenylephrine, also increased [3H]-DSPC overflow. This method can measure the magnitude and time-course of lung surfactant secretion induced by drugs. PMID:6689133

  18. Adaptations to hibernation in lung surfactant composition of 13-lined ground squirrels influence surfactant lipid phase segregation properties.

    PubMed

    Suri, Lakshmi N M; Cruz, Antonio; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Staples, James F; Possmayer, Fred; Orgeig, Sandra; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lines the entire alveolar surface, serving primarily to reduce the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant films adsorb as a monolayer interspersed with multilayers with surfactant lipids segregating into different phases or domains. Temperature variation, which influences lipid physical properties, affects both the lipid phase segregation and the surface activity of surfactants. In hibernating animals, such as 13-lined ground squirrels, which vary their body temperature, surfactant must be functional over a wide range of temperatures. We hypothesised that surfactant from the 13-lined ground squirrel, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, would undergo appropriate lipid structural re-arrangements at air-water interfaces to generate phase separation, sufficient to attain the low surface tensions required to remain stable at both low and high body temperatures. Here, we examined pressure-area isotherms at 10, 25 and 37°C and found that surfactant films from both hibernating and summer-active squirrels reached their highest surface pressure on the Wilhelmy-Langmuir balance at 10°C. Epifluorescence microscopy demonstrated that films of hibernating squirrel surfactant display different lipid micro-domain organisation characteristics than surfactant from summer-active squirrels. These differences were also reflected at the nanoscale as determined by atomic force microscopy. Such re-arrangement of lipid domains in the relatively more fluid surfactant films of hibernating squirrels may contribute to overcoming collapse pressures and support low surface tension during the normal breathing cycle at low body temperatures. PMID:23506681

  19. Pro–Surfactant Protein B As a Biomarker for Lung Cancer Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Sin, Don D.; Tammemagi, C. Martin; Lam, Stephen; Barnett, Matt J.; Duan, Xiaobo; Tam, Anthony; Auman, Heidi; Feng, Ziding; Goodman, Gary E.; Hanash, Samir; Taguchi, Ayumu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Preliminary studies have identified pro–surfactant protein B (pro-SFTPB) to be a promising blood biomarker for non–small-cell lung cancer. We conducted a study to determine the independent predictive potential of pro-SFTPB in identifying individuals who are subsequently diagnosed with lung cancer. Patients and Methods Pro-SFTPB levels were measured in 2,485 individuals, who enrolled onto the Pan-Canadian Early Detection of Lung Cancer Study by using plasma sample collected at the baseline visit. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to evaluate the predictive ability of pro-SFTPB in addition to known lung cancer risk factors. Calibration and discrimination were evaluated, the latter by an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). External validation was performed with samples collected in the Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial (CARET) participants using a case-control study design. Results Adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, personal history of cancer, family history of lung cancer, forced expiratory volume in one second percent predicted, average number of cigarettes smoked per day, and smoking duration, pro-SFTPB (log transformed) had an odds ratio of 2.220 (95% CI, 1.727 to 2.853; P < .001). The AUCs of the full model with and without pro-SFTPB were 0.741 (95% CI, 0.696 to 0.783) and 0.669 (95% CI, 0.620 to 0.717; difference in AUC P < .001). In the CARET Study, the use of pro-SFPTB yielded an AUC of 0.683 (95% CI, 0.604 to 0.761). Conclusion Pro-SFTPB in plasma is an independent predictor of lung cancer and may be a valuable addition to existing lung cancer risk prediction models. PMID:24248694

  20. Probing perturbation of bovine lung surfactant extracts by albumin using DSC and 2H-NMR.

    PubMed

    Nag, Kaushik; Keough, Kevin M W; Morrow, Michael R

    2006-05-15

    Lung surfactant (LS), a lipid-protein mixture, forms films at the lung air-water interface and prevents alveolar collapse at end expiration. In lung disease and injury, the surface activity of LS is inhibited by leakage of serum proteins such as albumin into the alveolar hypophase. Multilamellar vesicular dispersions of a clinically used replacement, bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES), to which (2% by weight) chain-perdeuterated dipalmitoylphosphatidycholine (DPPG mixtures-d(62)) had been added, were studied using deuterium-NMR spectroscopy ((2)H-NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC scans of BLES showed a broad gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition between 10-35 degrees C, with a temperature of maximum heat flow (T(max)) around 27 degrees C. Incorporation of the DPPC-d(62) into BLES-reconstituted vesicles did not alter the T(max) or the transition range as observed by DSC or the hydrocarbon stretching modes of the lipids observed using infrared spectroscopy. Transition enthalpy change and (2)H-NMR order parameter profiles were not significantly altered by addition of calcium and cholesterol to BLES. (2)H-NMR spectra of the DPPC-d(62) probes in these samples were characteristic of a single average lipid environment at all temperatures. This suggested either continuous ordering of the bilayer through the transition during cooling or averaging of the DPPC-d(62) environment by rapid diffusion between small domains on a short timescale relative to that characteristic of the (2)H-NMR experiment. Addition of 10% by weight of soluble bovine serum albumin (1:0.1, BLES/albumin, dry wt/wt) broadened the transition slightly and resulted in the superposition of (2)H-NMR spectral features characteristic of coexisting fluid and ordered phases. This suggests the persistence of phase-separated domains throughout the transition regime (5-35 degrees C) of BLES with albumin. The study suggests albumin can cause segregation of protein bound-lipid domains in

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of phase and structural transitions in model lung surfactant mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Susan L.

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that reduces and regulates the surface tension in the lungs, thereby decreasing the work of breathing. A thorough understanding of LS function is critical to the development and optimization of synthetic surfactants for the treatment of neonatal and adult respiratory distress syndrome. We have utilized coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulation to study the dynamic, hysteretic changes occurring in the structure and phase of model surfactant mixtures with varying temperature, pressure and composition. In particular, we have studied the effects of the LS components palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG), palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC), palmitic acid (PA), cholesterol, and two surface-active proteins SP-B 1--25 (the 25-residue N-terminal fragment of SP-B), and SP-C on model surfactant monolayers containing the primary lipid component dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The results indicate that POPG, POPC, SP-B1--25 and SP-C act as fluidizers and PA and cholesterol act as condensing agents, which change the phase-transition temperature, LC-LE phase distribution, and the extent of hysteresis. To explore the role of LS proteins SP-B and SP-C in storing and redelivering lipid from lipid monolayers during the compression and re-expansion occurring in lungs during breathing, we have simulated 2D-to-3D transitions at the interface. These simulations show that at near-zero surface tension the presence of a fluidizing agent, such as POPG, SP-C, or SP-B 1--25 decreases the monolayers resistance to bending allowing the monolayers to form large undulations and ultimately folds. Another folding mechanism is also observed in monolayers containing peptides, involving the lipid-mediated aggregation of the peptides into a defect, from which the fold can nucleate. The occurrence of folding depends on the hydrophobic character of the peptides; if the number of hydrophobic residues is decreased

  2. Determination of phosphatidylcholine and disaturated phosphatidylcholine content in lung surfactant by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Scarim, J; Ghanbari, H; Taylor, V; Menon, G

    1989-04-01

    A rapid isocratic method for determining the total phosphatidylcholine and disaturated phosphatidylcholine levels in lung surfactant preparations by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is described. The analysis was performed on a 3.9 x 300 mm mu-Porasil column with detection by refractive index. The lipids were eluted with a solvent system of chloroform-acetonitrile-methanol-water-85% phosphoric acid 650:650:500:130:2 (v/v/v/v/v). A 4.6 x 30 mm silica guard column was used in place of an injector loop which served as a sample concentrator and purifier. Phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylglycerol, all known components of lung surfactants, were eluted from the loop column and were prevented from reaching the analytical column. Sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine elute later than the phosphatidylcholines on the analytical column. The method was developed so that phosphatidylcholines elute as a single peak regardless of the fatty acid chain length (C12-C20). When the sample was first oxidized with a potassium permanganate-potassium metaperiodate solution, and potentially interfering oxidation products were removed by extraction into a basic aqueous phase, then only the disaturated phosphatidylcholines were analyzed. PMID:2754340

  3. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Juviel, José M.; Gordon, Larry M.; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  4. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Hernández-Juviel, José M; Gordon, Larry M; Waring, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf(®), a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  5. Developmental regulation of chicken surfactant protein A and its localization in lung.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Cuperus, Tryntsje; van Dijk, Albert; Skjødt, Karsten; Hansen, Søren; Haagsman, Henk P; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2016-08-01

    Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) is a collagenous C-type lectin (collectin) that plays an important role in the early stage of the host immune response. In chicken, SP-A (cSP-A) is expressed as a 26 kDa glycosylated protein in the lung. Using immunohistochemistry, cSP-A protein was detected mainly in the lung lining fluid covering the parabronchial epithelia. Specific cSP-A producing epithelial cells, resembling mammalian type II cells, were identified in the parabronchi. Gene expression of cSP-A markedly increased from embryonic day 14 onwards until the time of hatch, comparable to the SP-A homologue chicken lung lectin, while mannan binding lectin and collectins CL-L1 and CL-K1 only showed slightly changed expression during development. cSP-A protein could be detected as early as ED 18 in lung tissue using Western blotting, and expression increased steadily until day 28 post-hatch. Our observations are a first step towards understanding the role of this protein in vivo. PMID:26976230

  6. An alternatively spliced surfactant protein B mRNA in normal human lung: disease implication.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Z; Wang, G; Demello, D E; Floros, J

    1999-01-01

    We identified an alternatively-spliced surfactant protein B (SP-B) mRNA from normal human lung with a 12 nt deletion at the beginning of exon 8. This deletion causes a loss of four amino acids in the SP-B precursor protein. Sequence comparison of the 3' splice sites reveals only one difference in the frequency of U/C in the 11 predominantly-pyrimidine nucleotide tract, 73% for the normal and 45% for the alternatively-spliced SP-B mRNA (77-99% for the consensus sequence). Analysis of SP-B mRNA in lung indicates that the abundance of the alternatively-spliced form is very low and varies among individuals. Although the relative abundance of the deletion form of SP-B mRNA remains constant among normal lungs, it is found with relatively higher abundance in the lungs of some individuals with diseases such as congenital alveolar proteinosis, respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, alveolar capillary dysplasia and hypophosphatasia. This observation points to the possibility that the alternative splicing is a potential regulatory mechanism of SP-B and may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease under certain circumstances. PMID:10493923

  7. The effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 deficiency on pulmonary surfactant in a mouse model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Cory M; Cybulskie, Candice; Milos, Scott; Zuo, Yi Y; McCaig, Lynda A; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2016-06-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is characterized by arterial hypoxemia accompanied by severe inflammation and alterations to the pulmonary surfactant system. Published data has demonstrated a protective effect of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (Mmp3) deficiency against the inflammatory response associated with ARDS; however, the effect of Mmp3 on physiologic parameters and alterations to surfactant have not been previously studied. It was hypothesized that Mmp3 deficient (Mmp3(-/-)) mice would be protected against lung dysfunction associated with ARDS and maintain a functional pulmonary surfactant system. Wild type (WT) and Mmp3(-/-) mice were subjected to acid-aspiration followed by mechanical ventilation. Mmp3(-/-) mice maintained higher arterial oxygenation compared with WT mice at the completion of ventilation. Significant increase in functional large aggregate surfactant forms were observed in Mmp3(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. These findings further support a role of Mmp3 as an attractive therapeutic target for drug development in the setting of ARDS. PMID:27096327

  8. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-01-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100-200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity. PMID:25403950

  9. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: Pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-11-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100-200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity.

  10. Endogenous lung surfactant inspired pH responsive nanovesicle aerosols: Pulmonary compatible and site-specific drug delivery in lung metastases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nitin; Shirsath, Nitesh; Singh, Ankur; Joshi, Kalpana S.; Banerjee, Rinti

    2014-01-01

    Concerns related to pulmonary toxicity and non-specificity of nanoparticles have limited their clinical applications for aerosol delivery of chemotherapeutics in lung cancer. We hypothesized that pulmonary surfactant mimetic nanoparticles that offer pH responsive release specifically in tumor may be a possible solution to overcome these issues. We therefore developed lung surfactant mimetic and pH responsive lipid nanovesicles for aerosol delivery of paclitaxel in metastatic lung cancer. 100–200 nm sized nanovesicles showed improved fusogenicity and cytosolic drug release, specifically with cancer cells, thereby resulting in improved cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in B16F10 murine melanoma cells and cytocompatibility with normal lung fibroblasts (MRC 5). The nanovesicles showed airway patency similar to that of endogenous pulmonary surfactant and did not elicit inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages. Their aerosol administration while significantly improving the biodistribution of paclitaxel in comparison to Taxol (i.v.), also showed significantly higher metastastes inhibition (~75%) in comparison to that of i.v. Taxol and i.v. Abraxane. No signs of interstitial pulmonary fiborisis, chronic inflammation and any other pulmonary toxicity were observed with nanovesicle formulation. Overall, these nanovesicles may be a potential platform to efficiently deliver hydrophobic drugs as aerosol in metastatic lung cancer and other lung diseases, without causing pulmonary toxicity. PMID:25403950

  11. Proteasome dysfunction inhibits surfactant protein gene expression in lung epithelial cells: mechanism of inhibition of SP-B gene expression.

    PubMed

    Das, Aparajita; Boggaram, Vijayakumar

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins maintain lung function through their actions to reduce alveolar surface tension and control of innate immune responses in the lung. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is responsible for the degradation of majority of intracellular proteins in eukaryotic cells, and proteasome dysfunction has been linked to the development of neurodegenerative, cardiac, and other diseases. Proteasome function is impaired in interstitial lung diseases associated with surfactant protein C (SP-C) mutation mapping to the BRICHOS domain located in the proSP-C protein. In this study we determined the effects of proteasome inhibition on surfactant protein expression in H441 and MLE-12 lung epithelial cells to understand the relationship between proteasome dysfunction and surfactant protein gene expression. Proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and MG132 reduced the levels of SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNAs in a concentration-dependent manner in H441 and MLE-12 cells. In H441 cells, lactacystin and MG132 inhibition of SP-B mRNA was associated with similar decreases in SP-B protein, and the inhibition was due to inhibition of gene transcription. Proteasome inhibitors decreased thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1)/Nkx2.1 DNA binding activity, and the reduced TTF-1 DNA binding activity was due to reduced expression levels of TTF-1 protein. These data indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is essential for the maintenance of surfactant protein gene expression and that disruption of this pathway inhibits surfactant protein gene expression via reduced expression of TTF-1 protein. PMID:16905641

  12. Sequential treatments of premature lambs with an artificial surfactant and natural surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, M; Jobe, A; Jacobs, H; Jones, S J

    1981-01-01

    To test an artificial surfactant in vivo, six 120-d gestational age lambs were treated at birth with a mixture of a 9:1 M ratio of [14C]dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPC) and phosphatidylglycerol at a dose of 100 mg DPC/kg. Nine other lambs were not treated. The mean PO2 values of the lambs treated with artificial surfactant were 65.7 +/- 11 mm Hg vs. 24.8 +/- 1.6 mm Hg for the untreated lambs (P less than 0.001). All lambs then were treated with 50 mg/natural surfactant lipid per kg, which promptly improved PO2 in all lambs. The PO2 values of those lambs previously treated with artificial surfactant remained greater than 100 mm Hg for 2.5 +/- 0.5 h vs. 0.9 +/- 0.3 h for lambs untreated with artificial surfactant (P less than 0.01). The pH and PCO2 values were not strikingly different between the two groups of lambs. Airway samples taken from lambs treated with artificial surfactant before treatment with natural surfactant had minimal surface tensions of 32 +/- 2.9 dyn/cm, whereas the artificial surfactant reisolated from these samples by centrifugation had minimum surface tension of 0 dyn/cm. The minimum surface tension of artificial surfactant was inhibited by fetal lung fluid from the premature lambs, whereas the minimum surface tension of natural surfactant was much less sensitive to inhibition. Artificial surfactant did not improve the pressure-volume characteristics of unventilated premature lung, whereas natural surfactant did. The change in specific activity of [14C]DPC following treatment with natural surfactant indicated that approximately 50% of the DPC initially administered was no longer associated with the airways. PMID:6790576

  13. DNA Methylation Profile and Expression of Surfactant Protein A2 gene in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Grageda, Melissa; Silveyra, Patricia; Thomas, Neal J.; DiAngelo, Susan L.; Floros, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the methylation profile of genes allow for the identification of biomarkers that may guide diagnosis and effective treatment of disease. Human surfactant protein A (SP-A) plays an important role in lung homeostasis and immunity, and is encoded by two genes (SFTPA1 and SFTPA2). The goal of this study was to identify differentially methylated CpG sites in the promoter region of the SFTPA2 gene in lung cancer tissue, and to determine the correlation between the promoter’s methylation profile and gene expression. For this, we collected 28 pairs of cancerous human lung tissue and adjacent non-cancerous (NC) lung tissue: 17 adenocarcinoma (AC), 9 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 2 AC with SCC features, and we evaluated DNA methylation of the SFTPA2 promoter region by bisulfite conversion. Our results identified a higher methylation ratio in one CpG site of the SFTPA2 gene in cancerous tissue vs. NC tissue (0.36 vs. 0.11, p=0.001). When assessing AC samples, we also found cancerous tissues associated with a higher methylation ratio (0.43 vs. 0.10, p=0.02). In the SCC group, although cancerous tissue showed a higher methylation ratio (0.22 vs. 0.11), this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.35). Expression of SFTPA2 mRNA and total SP-A protein was significantly lower in cancer tissue when compared to adjacent NC tissue (p<0.001), and correlated with the hypermethylated status of a SFTPA2 CpG site in AC samples. The findings of this pilot study may hold promise for future use of SFTPA2 as a biomarker for the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:25514367

  14. Increased palmitoyl-myristoyl-phosphatidylcholine in neonatal rat surfactant is lung specific and correlates with oral myristic acid supply.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Wolfgang; Raith, Marco; Pynn, Christopher J; Gille, Christian; Stichtenoth, Guido; Stoll, Dieter; Schleicher, Erwin; Poets, Christian F

    2011-08-01

    Surfactant predominantly comprises phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, together with phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols, neutral lipids, and surfactant proteins-A to -D. Together, dipalmitoyl-PC (PC16:0/16:0), palmitoyl-myristoyl-PC (PC16:0/14:0), and palmitoyl-palmitoleoyl-PC (PC16:0/16:1) make up 75-80% of mammalian surfactant PC, the proportions of which vary during development and in chronic lung diseases. PC16:0/14:0, which exerts specific effects on macrophage differentiation in vitro, increases in surfactant during alveolarization (at the expense of PC16:0/16:0), a prenatal event in humans but postnatal in rats. The mechanisms responsible and the significance of this reversible increase are, however, not understood. We hypothesized that, in rats, myristic acid (C14:0) enriched milk is key to lung-specific PC16:0/14:0 increases in surfactant. We found that surfactant PC16:0/14:0 in suckling rats correlates with C14:0 concentration in plasma chylomicrons and lung tissue triglycerides, and that PC16:0/14:0 fractions reflect exogenous C14:0 supply. Significantly, C14:0 was increased neither in plasma PC, nor in liver triglycerides, free fatty acids, or PC. Lauric acid was also abundant in triglycerides, but was not incorporated into surfactant PC. Comparing a C14:0-rich milk diet with a C14:0-poor carbohydrate diet revealed increased C14:0 and decreased C16:0 in plasma and lung triglycerides, respectively. PC16:0/14:0 enrichment at the expense of PC16:0/16:0 did not impair surfactant surface tension function. However, the PC profile of the alveolar macrophages from the milk-fed animals changed from PC16:0/16:0 rich to PC16:0/14:0 rich. This was accompanied by reduced reactive oxygen species production. We propose that nutritional supply with C14:0 and its lung-specific enrichment may contribute to decreased reactive oxygen species production during alveolarization. PMID:21636561

  15. Determination of Lipid-Protein Interactions in Lung Surfactants Using Computer Simulations and Structural Bioinformatics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaznessis, Yiannis

    2001-06-01

    Proteins are the primary components of the networks that conduct the flows of mass, energy and information in living organisms. The discovery of the principles of protein structure and function allows the development of design rules for biological activities. The microscopic nature of the operating mechanisms of protein activity, and the vast complexity of the networks of interaction call for the employment of powerful computational methodologies that can decipher the physicochemical and evolutionary principles underlying protein structure and function. An example will be presented that reflects the strength of computational approaches. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and structural bioinformatics tools are employed to investigate the interactions between the first 25 N-terminal residues of surfactant protein B (SP-B 1-25) and the lipid components of the lung surfactant (LS). An understanding of the molecular level interactions between the LS components is essential for the establishment of design rules for the development of synthetic LS and the treatment of the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, which results from deficiency or inactivation of LS.

  16. Eosinophil-Associated Lung Diseases. A Cry for Surfactant Proteins A and D Help?

    PubMed Central

    Ledford, Julie G.; Addison, Kenneth J.; Foster, Matthew W.

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D (SP-A/-D) play important roles in numerous eosinophil-dominated diseases, including asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and allergic rhinitis. In these settings, SP-A/-D have been shown to modulate eosinophil chemotaxis, inhibit eosinophil mediator release, and mediate macrophage clearance of apoptotic eosinophils. Dysregulation of SP-A/-D function in eosinophil-dominated diseases is also not uncommon. Alterations in serum SP-A/-D levels are associated with disease severity in allergic rhinitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, oligimerization of SP-A/-D, necessary for their proper function, can be perturbed by reactive nitrogen species, which are increased in eosinophilic disease. In this review, we highlight the associations of eosinophilic lung diseases with SP-A and SP-D levels and functions. PMID:24960334

  17. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B).

    PubMed

    Hemming, Joanna M; Hughes, Brian R; Rennie, Adrian R; Tomas, Salvador; Campbell, Richard A; Hughes, Arwel V; Arnold, Thomas; Botchway, Stanley W; Thompson, Katherine C

    2015-08-25

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air-water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1-25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1-25,63-78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (~2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air-water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air-water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  18. Persistence of LPS-induced lung inflammation in surfactant protein-C-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Stephan W; Maxfield, Melissa D; Ruetschilling, Teah L; Akinbi, Henry T; Baatz, John E; Kitzmiller, Joseph A; Page, Kristen; Xu, Yan; Bao, Erik L; Korfhagen, Thomas R

    2013-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein-C (SP-C) gene-targeted mice (Sftpc(-/-)) develop progressive lung inflammation and remodeling. We hypothesized that SP-C deficiency reduces the ability to suppress repetitive inflammatory injury. Sftpc(+/+) and Sftpc(-/-) mice given three doses of bacterial LPS developed airway and airspace inflammation, which was more intense in the Sftpc(-/-) mice at 3 and 5 days after the final dose. Compared with Sftpc(+/+)mice, inflammatory injury persisted in the lungs of Sftpc(-/-) mice 30 days after the final LPS challenge. Sftpc(-/-) mice showed LPS-induced airway goblet cell hyperplasia with increased detection of Sam pointed Ets domain and FoxA3 transcription factors. Sftpc(-/-) type II alveolar epithelial cells had increased cytokine expression after LPS exposure relative to Sftpc(+/+) cells, indicating that type II cell dysfunction contributes to inflammatory sensitivity. Microarray analyses of isolated type II cells identified a pattern of enhanced expression of inflammatory genes consistent with an intrinsic low-level inflammation resulting from SP-C deficiency. SP-C-containing clinical surfactant extract (Survanta) or SP-C/phospholipid vesicles blocked LPS signaling through the LPS receptor (Toll-like receptor [TLR] 4/CD14/MD2) in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, indicating that SP-C blocks LPS-induced cytokine production by a TLR4-dependent mechanism. Phospholipid vesicles alone did not modify the TLR4 response. In vivo deficiency of SP-C leads to inflammation, increased cytokine production by type II cells, and persistent inflammation after repetitive LPS stimulation. PMID:23795648

  19. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air–water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1–25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1–25,63–78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (∼2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air–water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air–water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  20. Sustained Inflation at Birth Did Not Alter Lung Injury from Mechanical Ventilation in Surfactant-Treated Fetal Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, Noah H.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Miura, Yuichiro; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sustained inflations (SI) are used with the initiation of ventilation at birth to rapidly recruit functional residual capacity and may decrease lung injury and the need for mechanical ventilation in preterm infants. However, a 20 second SI in surfactant-deficient preterm lambs caused an acute phase injury response without decreasing lung injury from subsequent mechanical ventilation. Hypothesis A 20 second SI at birth will decrease lung injury from mechanical ventilation in surfactant-treated preterm fetal lambs. Methods The head and chest of fetal sheep at 126±1 day GA were exteriorized, with tracheostomy and removal of fetal lung fluid prior to treatment with surfactant (300 mg in 15 ml saline). Fetal lambs were randomized to one of four 15 minute interventions: 1) PEEP 8 cmH2O; 2) 20 sec SI at 40 cmH2O, then PEEP 8 cmH2O; 3) mechanical ventilation with 7 ml/kg tidal volume; or 4) 20 sec SI then mechanical ventilation at 7 ml/kg. Fetal lambs remained on placental support for the intervention and for 30 min after the intervention. Results SI recruited a mean volume of 6.8±0.8 mL/kg. SI did not alter respiratory physiology during mechanical ventilation. Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, HSP60, and total protein in lung fluid similarly increased in both ventilation groups. Modest pro-inflammatory cytokine and acute phase responses, with or without SI, were similar with ventilation. SI alone did not increase markers of injury. Conclusion In surfactant treated fetal lambs, a 20 sec SI did not alter ventilation physiology or markers of lung injury from mechanical ventilation. PMID:25419969

  1. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor modulates surfactant protein B and C expression in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiangsong; Zheng, Liduan; Dodd-o, Jeffrey; Langer, John; Wang, Danming; Li, Dechun

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a robust pulmonary expression of hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF) during the perinatal period, when surfactant protein (SP) synthesis begins. We hypothesized that HIMF modulates SP expression and participates in lung development and maturation. The temporal-spatial expression of HIMF, SP-B, and SP-C in developing mouse lungs was examined by immunohistochemical staining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. The expression and localization of SP-B and SP-C were investigated in mouse lungs after intratracheal instillation of HIMF in adult mice. The effects of HIMF on SP-B and SP-C transcription activity, and on mRNA degradation, were investigated in mouse lung epithelial (MLE)-12 and C10 cells using the promoter-luciferase reporter assay and actinomycin D incubation. The activation of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was explored by Western blot. Intratracheal instillation of HIMF resulted in significant increases of SP-B and SP-C production, predominantly localized to alveolar type II cells. In MLE-12 and C10 cells, HIMF enhanced SP-B and SP-C mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. Meanwhile, HIMF increased transcription activity and prevented actinomycin D-facilitated SP-B and SP-C mRNA degradation in MLE-12 cells. Incubation of cells with LY294002, PD098059, or U0126 abolished HIMF-induced Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation and suppressed HIMF-induced SP-B and SP-C production, whereas SB203580 had no effect. These results indicate that HIMF induces SP-B and SP-C production in mouse lungs and alveolar type II-like cell lines via activations of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that HIMF plays critical roles in lung development and maturation. PMID:16166744

  2. Ultrastructural changes of the intracellular surfactant pool in a rat model of lung transplantation-related events

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, involved in primary graft dysfunction following lung transplantation, leads to inactivation of intra-alveolar surfactant which facilitates injury of the blood-air barrier. The alveolar epithelial type II cells (AE2 cells) synthesize, store and secrete surfactant; thus, an intracellular surfactant pool stored in lamellar bodies (Lb) can be distinguished from the intra-alveolar surfactant pool. The aim of this study was to investigate ultrastructural alterations of the intracellular surfactant pool in a model, mimicking transplantation-related procedures including flush perfusion, cold ischemia and reperfusion combined with mechanical ventilation. Methods Using design-based stereology at the light and electron microscopic level, number, surface area and mean volume of AE2 cells as well as number, size and total volume of Lb were determined in a group subjected to transplantation-related procedures including both I/R injury and mechanical ventilation (I/R group) and a control group. Results After I/R injury, the mean number of Lb per AE2 cell was significantly reduced compared to the control group, accompanied by a significant increase in the luminal surface area per AE2 cell in the I/R group. This increase in the luminal surface area correlated with the decrease in surface area of Lb per AE2. The number-weighted mean volume of Lb in the I/R group showed a tendency to increase. Conclusion We suggest that in this animal model the reduction of the number of Lb per AE2 cell is most likely due to stimulated exocytosis of Lb into the alveolar space. The loss of Lb is partly compensated by an increased size of Lb thus maintaining total volume of Lb per AE2 cell and lung. This mechanism counteracts at least in part the inactivation of the intra-alveolar surfactant. PMID:21669009

  3. Overcoming Rapid Inactivation of Lung Surfactant: Analogies Between Competitive Adsorption and Colloid Stability

    PubMed Central

    Zasadzinski, Joseph A.; Stenger, Patrick C.; Shieh, Ian; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2009-01-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a mixture of lipids and proteins that line the alveolar air-liquid interface, lowering the interfacial tension to levels that make breathing possible. In acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inactivation of LS is believed to play an important role in the development and severity of the disease. This review examines the competitive adsorption of LS and surface-active contaminants, such as serum proteins, present in the alveolar fluids of ARDS patients, and how this competitive adsorption can cause normal amounts of otherwise normal LS to be ineffective in lowering the interfacial tension. LS and serum proteins compete for the air-water interface when both are present in solution either in the alveolar fluids or in a Langmuir trough. Equilibrium favors LS as it has the lower equilibrium surface pressure, but the smaller proteins are kinetically favored over multi-micron LS bilayer aggregates by faster diffusion. If albumin reaches the interface, it creates an energy barrier to subsequent LS adsorption that slows or prevents the adsorption of the necessary amounts of LS required to lower surface tension. This process can be understood in terms of classic colloid stability theory in which an energy barrier to diffusion stabilizes colloidal suspensions against aggregation. This analogy provides qualitative and quantitative predictions regarding the origin of surfactant inactivation. An important corollary is that any additive that promotes colloid coagulation, such as increased electrolyte concentration, multivalent ions, hydrophilic non-adsorbing polymers such as PEG, dextran, etc. or polyelectrolytes such as chitosan, added to LS, also promotes LS adsorption in the presence of serum proteins and helps reverse surfactant inactivation. The theory provides quantitative tools to determine the optimal concentration of these additives and suggests that multiple additives may have a synergistic effect. A variety of physical and chemical

  4. Immunohistochemical characteristics of surfactant proteins a, B, C and d in inflammatory and tumorigenic lung lesions of f344 rats.

    PubMed

    Yokohira, Masanao; Yamakawa, Keiko; Nakano, Yuko; Numano, Takamasa; Furukawa, Fumio; Kishi, Sosuke; Ninomiya, Fumiko; Kanie, Shohei; Hitotsumachi, Hiroko; Saoo, Kousuke; Imaida, Katsumi

    2014-10-01

    Surfactant proteins (SPs), originally known as human lung surfactants, are essential to respiratory structure and function. There are 4 subtypes, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D, with SP-A and SP-D having immunological functions, and SP-B and SP-C having physicochemical properties that reduce the surface tension at biological interfaces. In this experiment, the expressions of SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D in lung neoplastic lesions induced by N-bis (2-hydroxypropyl) nitrosamine (DHPN) and inflammatory lesions due to quartz instillation were examined and compared immunohistochemically. Formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) lung samples featuring inflammation were obtained with a rat quartz instillation model, and neoplastic lesions, hyperplasias and adenomas, were obtained with the rat DHPN-induced lung carcinogenesis model. In the rat quartz instillation model, male 10-week old F344 rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation (IT) to quartz at a dose of 2 mg/rat suspended in saline (0.2 ml) on day 0, and sacrificed on day 28. Lung tumorigenesis in F344 male rats was initiated by DHPN in drinking water for 2 weeks, and the animals were then sacrificed in week 30. Lung proliferative lesions, hyperplasias and adenomas, were observed with DHPN, and inflammation was observed with quartz. The expressions of SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D were examined immunohistochemically. SP-B and SP-C showed strong expression in lung hyperplasias and adenomas, while SP-A and SP-D were observed in mucus or exudates in inflammatory alveoli. These results suggest the possibility that SP-B and SP-C are related to lung tumorigenesis. PMID:25378802

  5. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions surfactant dysfunction surfactant dysfunction Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Surfactant dysfunction is a lung disorder that causes breathing ...

  6. Surfactant protein D suppresses lung cancer progression by downregulation of epidermal growth factor signaling.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Y; Takahashi, M; Ariki, S; Asakawa, D; Tajiri, M; Wada, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Nishitani, C; Takamiya, R; Saito, A; Uehara, Y; Hashimoto, J; Kurimura, Y; Takahashi, H; Kuroki, Y

    2015-02-12

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a member of the collectin family that has an important role in maintaining pulmonary homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrated that SP-D inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. We found that SP-D suppressed epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling in A549 cells, H441 human lung adenocarcinoma cells and human EGF receptor (EGFR) stable expression CHO-K1 cells. A binding study using (125)I-EGF demonstrated that SP-D downregulated the binding of EGF to EGFR. A ligand blot indicated that SP-D bound to EGFR, and a lectin blot suggested that EGFR in A549 cells had both high-mannose type and complex type N-glycans. We purified the recombinant extracellular domain of EGFR (soluble EGFR=soluble EGFR (sEGFR)), and demonstrated that SP-D directly bound to sEGFR in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. The binding of SP-D to sEGFR was suppressed by EDTA, mannose or N-glycopeptidase F treatment. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated that N-glycans in domain III of EGFR were of a high-mannose type. These data suggest that SP-D reduces EGF binding to EGFR through the interaction between the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D and N-glycans of EGFR, and downregulates EGF signaling. Our finding suggests the novel type of regulation system of EGF signaling involving lectin-to-carbohydrate interaction and downregulation of ligand binding. PMID:24608429

  7. Patterns of neutrophil serine protease-dependent cleavage of surfactant protein D in inflammatory lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Jessica; McDonald, Barbara; Accurso, Frank J; Crouch, Erika C; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2008-04-01

    The manuscript presents definitive studies of surfactant protein D (SP-D) in the context of inflammatory lung fluids. The extent of SP-D depletion in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of children affected with cystic fibrosis (CF) is demonstrated to correlate best with the presence of the active neutrophil serine protease (NSP) elastase. Novel C-terminal SP-D fragments of 27 kDa and 11 kDa were identified in patient lavage fluid in addition to the previously described N-terminal, 35-kDa fragment by the use of isoelectrofocusing, modified blotting conditions, and region-specific antibodies. SP-D cleavage sites were identified. In vitro treatment of recombinant human SP-D dodecamers with NSPs replicated the fragmentation, but unexpectedly, the pattern of SP-D fragments generated by NSPs was dependent on calcium concentration. Whereas the 35- and 11-kDa fragments were generated when incubations were performed in low calcium (200 microM CaCl(2)), incubations in physiological calcium (2 mM) with higher amounts of elastase or proteinase-3 generated C-terminal 27, 21, and 14 kDa fragments, representing cleavage within the collagen and neck regions. Studies in which recombinant SP-D cleavage by individual NSPs was quantitatively evaluated under low and high calcium conditions showed that the most potent NSP for cleaving SP-D is elastase, followed by proteinase-3, followed by cathepsin G. These relative potency findings were considered in the context of other studies that showed that active NSPs in CF BALF are in the order: elastase, followed by cathepsin G, followed by proteinase-3. The findings support a pre-eminent role for neutrophil elastase as the critical protease responsible for SP-D depletion in inflammatory lung disease. PMID:18211966

  8. Surfactant lipids regulate LPS-induced interleukin-8 production in A549 lung epithelial cells by inhibiting translocation of TLR4 into lipid raft domains

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Wondwossen; Alghaithy, Abdulaziz A.; Parton, Joan; Jones, Kenneth P.; Jackson, Simon K.

    2010-01-01

    In addition to providing mechanical stability, growing evidence suggests that surfactant lipid components can modulate inflammatory responses in the lung. However, little is known of the molecular mechanisms involved in the immunomodulatory action of surfactant lipids. This study investigates the effect of the lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and the major surfactant phospholipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) on interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene and protein expression in human A549 lung epithelial cells using immunoassay and PCR techniques. To examine potential mechanisms of the surfactant lipid effects, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, and membrane lipid raft domains were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The lipid-rich surfactant preparations Survanta®, Curosurf®, and DPPC, at physiological concentrations, significantly downregulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced IL-8 expression in A549 cells both at the mRNA and protein levels. The surfactant preparations did not affect the cell surface expression of TLR4 or the binding of LPS to the cells. However, LPS treatment induced translocation of TLR4 into membrane lipid raft microdomains, and this translocation was inhibited by incubation of the cells with the surfactant lipid. This study provides important mechanistic details of the immune-modulating action of pulmonary surfactant lipids. PMID:19648651

  9. Surface shear viscosity of a lung surfactant: Newtonian to non-Newtonian transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoughi, Amir; Hirsa, Amir; Lopez, Juan

    2011-11-01

    DPPC molecule is the most prevalent constituent of lung surfactant, and understanding its behavior as a monolayer may lead to better simulations of respiration. At low surface pressures (i.e. large surface tensions, corresponding to area per molecule of about 50 angstrom squared, or greater), DPPC behaves as a purely viscous film with surface shear viscosity that is Reynolds number independent. Transition to a non-Newtonian regime occurs at large surface pressures. At the small scales associated with the liquid lining of the alveoli, the relative effects of surface viscosities can be comparable to that of surface tension. Here, we examine the interfacial hydrodynamics by isolating the effects of the surface shear viscosity. DPPC monolayer is spread from a concentrated solution at the air/water interface in a deep channel viscometer, consisting of an annular region between two stationary cylinders and a rotating floor. The interfacial velocity is measured non-invasively (without any seeding particles) using Brewster angle microscopy with short laser pulses. The departure from Newtonian behavior is quantified by comparisons to numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes with a BoussinesqâScriven surface model and various surface shear viscosities.

  10. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona. PMID:26575243

  11. Double-blind clinical trial of calf lung surfactant extract for the prevention of hyaline membrane disease in extremely premature infants.

    PubMed

    Kwong, M S; Egan, E A; Notter, R H; Shapiro, D L

    1985-10-01

    A prospective, double-blind, controlled trial was conducted to determine whether instillation of an exogenous surfactant into the lungs before the first breath could prevent hyaline membrane disease. The surfactant is calf lung lipid extracted from saline lung lavage. Entry was limited to infants who were 24 to 28 weeks' gestation, who were born at Children's Hospital of Buffalo, and whose mothers had not received betamethasone for more than 24 hours before birth. Treated infants received 3 mL (90 mg) of calf lung surfactant extract instilled into their trachea before the first breath; control infants received 3 mL of normal saline. A prospective scoring system and respiratory support variables were used to compare the groups. At 48 hours of age, only two of 14 calf lung surfactant extract-treated infants (14%) had hyaline membrane disease compared with seven of 13 control infants (54%) (P = .033). Inspired oxygen, mean airway pressure, ventilator rate and ventilator efficiency index were also lower in the treated group during the first 48 hours of life (P less than .01 to P less than .001). Calf lung surfactant extract instillation at birth appears to be an effective material and method of preventing hyaline membrane disease in extremely premature infants. PMID:3900906

  12. Effects of simulated microgravity on surfactant and water balance of lung in animals with different resistance to stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryndina, Irina; Vasilieva, Natalia

    Weightlessness is accompanied by redistribution of blood flow in lung, changes of lung volumes and gas exchange (Prisk et al., 2002; Grigoriev, Baranov, 2003). On the other hand, it is known that microgravity is considered as a kind of moderate stress (Grigoriev et al., 2004). Stress response may differ in animals resistant or vulnerable to stress (Sudakov, 2007). To study the effects of simulated microgravity upon lung, we used 20 male albino rats tested for behavior in the "open field" and than divided into active (stress resistant - SR ) and passive (stress vulnerable - CV) groups. Two mouse lines were used with similar goal - C57Bl/6 and BALB/c mice (n=16). According to data obtained earlier, BALB/c mice referred as more stress vulnerable, in contrast to C57BL/6 mice, which are considered to be relatively stress resistant (Flint et al., 2007). We have previously shown that changes in lung surfactant system after psychosocial stress or long-term immobilization are less pronounced in stress resistant rats (Vasilieva, Bryndina, 2012). The aim of this work is to study the properties and biochemical composition of pulmonary surfactant and lung water balance in rats and mice with different stress resistance in antiorthostatic suspension (AOS) of short and long duration. Simulated microgravity was reproduced according to procedure of Ilyin-Novikov in modification of Morey-Holton. The duration of exposure was 10 days for rats and 30 days for mice. The properties of pulmonary surfactant were assessed by the evaluation of surface activity (surface tension - ST), the content of total phospholipids (PL) and their fractions. Simultaneously we calculated the gravimetric water balance indices: lung coefficient, "dry residue" and wet-to-dry ratio. Total and extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary blood supply were estimated as well. The experiments demonstrated that there was a decrease of surface tension of surfactant films after 10-day AOS in both groups of rats (to a greater

  13. Elucidation of Lipid Binding Sites on Lung Surfactant Protein A Using X-ray Crystallography, Mutagenesis, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Goh, Boon Chong; Wu, Huixing; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Schulten, Klaus; Seaton, Barbara A; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a collagenous C-type lectin (collectin) that is critical for pulmonary defense against inhaled microorganisms. Bifunctional avidity of SP-A for pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as lipid A and for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major component of surfactant membranes lining the air-liquid interface of the lung, ensures that the protein is poised for first-line interactions with inhaled pathogens. To improve our understanding of the motifs that are required for interactions with microbes and surfactant structures, we explored the role of the tyrosine-rich binding surface on the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A in the interaction with DPPC and lipid A using crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics simulations. Critical binding features for DPPC binding include a three-walled tyrosine cage that binds the choline headgroup through cation-π interactions and a positively charged cluster that binds the phosphoryl group. This basic cluster is also critical for binding of lipid A, a bacterial PAMP and target for SP-A. Molecular dynamics simulations further predict that SP-A binds lipid A more tightly than DPPC. These results suggest that the differential binding properties of SP-A favor transfer of the protein from surfactant DPPC to pathogen membranes containing appropriate lipid PAMPs to effect key host defense functions. PMID:27324153

  14. Effect of serum, cholesterol and low density lipoprotein on the functionality and structure of lung surfactant films.

    PubMed

    Nahak, Prasant; Nag, Kaushik; Hillier, Ashley; Devraj, Ravi; Thompson, David W; Manna, Kausik; Makino, Kimiko; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu; Panda, Amiya Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipid and protein, responsible for alveolar stability, becomes dysfunctional due to alteration of its structure and function by leaked serum materials in disease. Serum proteins, cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were studied with bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) using Langmuir films, and bilayer dispersions using Raman spectroscopy. While small amount of cholesterol (10 wt%) and LDL did not significantly affect the adsorption and surface tension lowering properties of BLES. However serum lipids, whole serum as well as higher amounts of cholesterol, and LDL dramatically altered the surface properties of BLES films, as well as gel-fluid structures formed in such films observed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Raman-spectroscopic studies revealed that serum proteins, LDL and excess cholesterol had fluidizing effects on BLES bilayers dispersion, monitored from the changes in hydrocarbon vibrational modes during gel-fluid thermal phase transitions. This study clearly suggests that patho-physiological amounts of serum lipids (and not proteins) significantly alter the molecular arrangement of surfactant in films and bilayers, and can be used to model lung disease. PMID:25409691

  15. Effects of perfluorohexane vapor on relative blood flow distribution in an animal model of surfactant-depleted lung injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubler, Matthias; Souders, Jennifer E.; Shade, Erin D.; Polissar, Nayak L.; Bleyl, Jorg U.; Hlastala, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that treatment with vaporized perfluorocarbon affects the relative pulmonary blood flow distribution in an animal model of surfactant-depleted acute lung injury. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled trial. SETTING: A university research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Fourteen New Zealand White rabbits (weighing 3.0-4.5 kg). INTERVENTIONS: The animals were ventilated with an FIO(2) of 1.0 before induction of acute lung injury. Acute lung injury was induced by repeated saline lung lavages. Eight rabbits were randomized to 60 mins of treatment with an inspiratory perfluorohexane vapor concentration of 0.2 in oxygen. To compensate for the reduced FIO(2) during perfluorohexane treatment, FIO(2) was reduced to 0.8 in control animals. Change in relative pulmonary blood flow distribution was assessed by using fluorescent-labeled microspheres. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Microsphere data showed a redistribution of relative pulmonary blood flow attributable to depletion of surfactant. Relative pulmonary blood flow shifted from areas that were initially high-flow to areas that were initially low-flow. During the study period, relative pulmonary blood flow of high-flow areas decreased further in the control group, whereas it increased in the treatment group. This difference was statistically significant between the groups (p =.02) as well as in the treatment group compared with the initial injury (p =.03). Shunt increased in both groups over time (control group, 30% +/- 10% to 63% +/- 20%; treatment group, 37% +/- 20% to 49% +/- 23%), but the changes compared with injury were significantly less in the treatment group (p =.03). CONCLUSION: Short treatment with perfluorohexane vapor partially reversed the shift of relative pulmonary blood flow from high-flow to low-flow areas attributable to surfactant depletion.

  16. Surfactant before the first inflation at birth improves spatial distribution of ventilation and reduces lung injury in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Tingay, David G; Wallace, Megan J; Bhatia, Risha; Schmölzer, Georg M; Zahra, Valerie A; Dolan, Melinda J; Hooper, Stuart B; Davis, Peter G

    2014-02-01

    The interrelationship between the role of surfactant and a sustained inflation (SI) to aid ex utero transition of the preterm lung is unknown. We compared the effect of surfactant administered before and after an initial SI on gas exchange, lung mechanics, spatial distribution of ventilation, and lung injury in preterm lambs. Gestational-age lambs (127 days; 9 per group) received 100 mg/kg of a surfactant (Curosurf) either prior (Surf+SI) or 10 min after birth (SI+Surf). At birth, a 20-s, 35 cmH2O SI was applied, followed by 70 min of positive pressure ventilation. Oxygenation, carbon dioxide removal, respiratory system compliance, end-expiratory thoracic volume (via respiratory inductive plethysmography), and distribution of end-expiratory volume and ventilation (via electrical impedance tomography) were measured throughout. Early markers of lung injury were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. During the first 15 min, oxygenation, carbon dioxide removal, and compliance were better in the Surf+SI group (all P < 0.05). End-expiratory volume on completion of the sustained inflation was higher in the Surf+SI group than the SI+Surf group; 11 ± 1 ml/kg vs. 7 ± 1 ml/kg (mean ± SE) (P = 0.043; t-test), but was not different at later time points. Although neither achieved homogenous aeration, spatial ventilation was more uniform in the Surf+SI group throughout; 50.1 ± 10.9% of total ventilation in the left hemithorax at 70 min vs. 42.6 ± 11.1% in the SI+Surf group. Surf+SI resulted in lower mRNA levels of CYR61 and EGR1 compared with SI+Surf (P < 0.001, one-way ANOVA). Surfactant status of the fetal preterm lung at birth influences the mechanical and injury response to a sustained inflation and ventilation by changing surface tension of the air/fluid interface. PMID:24356523

  17. Non-ionic surfactant modified cationic liposomes mediated gene transfection in vitro and in the mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wuxiao; Izumisawa, Tomohiro; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; Qi, Xianrong; Kitamoto, Dai; Maitani, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    As reported previously, cationic liposomes formulated with dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) and N,N-methyl hydroxyethyl aminopropane carbamoyl cholesterol (MHAPC-liposomes) achieved efficient gene transfection in the mouse lung following intratracheal injection. We have studied here the role of surfactants, mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A) and polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), in affecting gene transfection of MHAPC-lipoplexes (complex with pCMV-luc DNA) in A549 cells and in the mouse lung. MEL-A increased gene transfection of MHAPC-lipoplexes significantly in vitro and slightly in the mouse lung, while Tween 80 decreased it both in vitro and in vivo. As assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and fluorescence imaging, MEL-A might faciliate gene dissociation from MHAPC-lipoplexes with fluorescein-labeled oligodeoxynucleotide (FITC-ODN) after internalization into the cells and retained the lipoplexes in the mouse lung for prolonged time, while Tween 80 was inefficient to deliver foreign gene into target cells and in the lung. These results demonstrated that MEL-A is advantageous to Tween 80 in the modification of cationic liposomes as gene delivery vectors in the lung. PMID:19182397

  18. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Omodeo Salè, Fausta; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  19. Altered Lipid Composition of Surfactant and Lung Tissue in Murine Experimental Malaria-Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Scaccabarozzi, Diletta; Deroost, Katrien; Lays, Natacha; Taramelli, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    Malaria-associated acute lung injury (MA-ALI) and its more severe form malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (MA-ARDS) are common, often fatal complications of severe malaria infections. However, little is known about their pathogenesis. In this study, biochemical alterations of the lipid composition of the lungs were investigated as possible contributing factors to the severity of murine MA-ALI/ARDS. C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 to induce lethal MA-ARDS, or with Plasmodium chabaudi AS, a parasite strain that does not induce lung pathology. The lipid profile of the lung tissue from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 developing MA-ALI/ARDS, but not that from mice without lung pathology or controls, was characterized by high levels of phospholipids -mainly phosphatidylcholine- and esterified cholesterol. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the linoleic/oleic fatty acid ratio of the latter reflect the fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterol esters. In spite of the increased total polyunsaturated fatty acid pool, which augments the relative oxidability of the lung membranes, and the presence of hemozoin, a known pro-oxidant, no excess oxidative stress was detected in the lungs of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice. The bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of Plasmodium berghei NK65 infected mice was characterized by high levels of plasma proteins. The phospholipid profile of BAL large and small aggregate fractions was also different from uninfected controls, with a significant increase in the amounts of sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine and the decrease in phosphatidylglycerol. Both the increase of proteins and lysophosphatidylcholine are known to decrease the intrinsic surface activity of surfactant. Together, these data indicate that an altered lipid composition of lung tissue and BAL fluid, partially ascribed to oedema and lipoprotein infiltration, is a characteristic feature of murine

  20. Effects of a cationic and hydrophobic peptide, KL4, on model lung surfactant lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Koppenol, S; Yu, H; Zografi, G

    1998-04-01

    We report on the surface behavior of a hydrophobic, cationic peptide, [lysine-(leucine)4]4-lysine (KL4), spread at the air/water interface at 25 degrees C and pH 7.2, and its effect at very low molar ratios on the surface properties of the zwitterionic phospholipid 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and the anionic forms of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylglycerol (POPG) and palmitic acid (PA), in various combinations. Surface properties were evaluated by measuring equilibrium spreading pressures (pi(e)) and surface pressure-area isotherms (pi-A) with the Wilhelmy plate technique. Surface phase separation was observed with fluorescence microscopy. KL4 itself forms a single-phase monolayer, stable up to a surface pressure pi of 30 mN/m, and forms an immiscible monolayer mixture with DPPC. No strong interaction was detected between POPG and KL4 in the low pi region, whereas a stable monolayer of the PA/KL4 binary mixture forms, which is attributed to ionic interactions between oppositely charged PA and KL4. KL4 has significant effects on the DPPC/POPG mixture, in that it promotes surface phase separation while also increasing pi(e) and pi(max), and these effects are greatly enhanced in the presence of PA. In the model we have proposed, KL4 facilitates the separation of DPPC-rich and POPG/PA-rich phases to achieve surface refinement. It is these two phases that can fulfill the important lung surfactant functions of high surface pressure stability and efficient spreading. PMID:9545051

  1. Effects of the lung surfactant protein B construct Mini-B on lipid bilayer order and topography

    PubMed Central

    Palleboina, Dharamaraju; Waring, Alan J.; Notter, Robert H.; Booth, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic lung surfactant protein, SP-B, is essential for survival. Cycling of lung volume during respiration requires a surface-active lipid–protein layer at the alveolar air–water interface. SP-B may contribute to surfactant layer maintenance and renewal by facilitating contact and transfer between the surface layer and bilayer reservoirs of surfactant material. However, only small effects of SP-B on phospholipid orientational order in model systems have been reported. In this study, N-terminal (SP-B8–25) and C-terminal (SP-B63–78) helices of SP-B, either linked as Mini-B or unlinked but present in equal amounts, were incorporated into either model phospholipid mixtures or into bovine lipid extract surfactant in the form of vesicle dispersions or mechanically oriented bilayer samples. Deuterium and phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used to characterize effects of these peptides on phospholipid chain orientational order, headgroup orientation, and the response of lipid–peptide mixtures to mechanical orientation by mica plates. Only small effects on chain orientational order or headgroup orientation, in either vesicle or mechanically oriented samples, were seen. In mechanically constrained samples, however, Mini-B and its component helices did have specific effects on the propensity of lipid–peptide mixtures to form unoriented bilayer populations which do not exchange with the oriented fraction on the timescale of the NMR experiment. Modification of local bilayer orientation, even in the presence of mechanical constraint, may be relevant to the transfer of material from bilayer reservoirs to a flat surface-active layer, a process that likely requires contact facilitated by the formation of highly curved protrusions. PMID:22903196

  2. Mutant surfactant A2 proteins associated with familial pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer induce TGF-β1 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Cano, Christopher A.; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the lung surfactant proteins are found in patients with interstitial lung disease and lung cancer, but their pathologic mechanism is poorly understood. Here we show that bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from humans heterozygous for a missense mutation in the gene encoding surfactant protein (SP)-A2 (SFTPA2) contains more TGF-β1 than control samples. Expression of mutant SP-A2 in lung epithelial cells leads to secretion of latent TGF-β1, which is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling. TGF-β1 secretion is not observed in lung epithelial cells expressing the common SP-A2 variants or other misfolded proteins capable of increasing cellular endoplasmic reticulum stress. Activation of the unfolded protein response is necessary for maximal TGF-β1 secretion because gene silencing of the unfolded protein response transducers leads to an ∼50% decrease in mutant SP-A2–mediated TGF-β1 secretion. Expression of the mutant SP-A2 proteins leads to the coordinated increase in gene expression of TGF-β1 and two TGF-β1–binding proteins, LTBP-1 and LTBP-4; expression of the latter is necessary for secretion of this cytokine. Inhibition of the TGF-β autocrine positive feedback loop by a pan–TGF-β–neutralizing antibody, a TGF-β receptor antagonist, or LTBP gene silencing results in the reversal of TGF-β–mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cell death. Because secretion of latent TGF-β1 is induced specifically by mutant SP-A2 proteins, therapeutics targeted to block this pathway may be especially beneficial for this molecularly defined subgroup of patients. PMID:23223528

  3. Lost after translation: insights from pulmonary surfactant for understanding the role of alveolar epithelial dysfunction and cellular quality control in fibrotic lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Surafel; Nureki, Shin-Ichi; Beers, Michael F

    2015-09-15

    Dating back nearly 35 years ago to the Witschi hypothesis, epithelial cell dysfunction and abnormal wound healing have reemerged as central concepts in the pathophysiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in adults and in interstitial lung disease in children. Alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells represent a metabolically active compartment in the distal air spaces responsible for pulmonary surfactant biosynthesis and function as a progenitor population required for maintenance of alveolar integrity. Rare mutations in surfactant system components have provided new clues to understanding broader questions regarding the role of AT2 cell dysfunction in the pathophysiology of fibrotic lung diseases. Drawing on data generated from a variety of model systems expressing disease-related surfactant component mutations [surfactant proteins A and C (SP-A and SP-C); the lipid transporter ABCA3], this review will examine the concept of epithelial dysfunction in fibrotic lung disease, provide an update on AT2 cell and surfactant biology, summarize cellular responses to mutant surfactant components [including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and intrinsic apoptosis], and examine quality control pathways (unfolded protein response, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, macroautophagy) that can be utilized to restore AT2 homeostasis. This integrated response and its derangement will be placed in the context of cell stress and quality control signatures found in patients with familial or sporadic IPF as well as non-surfactant-related AT2 cell dysfunction syndromes associated with a fibrotic lung phenotype. Finally, the need for targeted therapeutic strategies for pulmonary fibrosis that address epithelial ER stress, its downstream signaling, and cell quality control are discussed. PMID:26186947

  4. Internalization of SiO₂ nanoparticles by alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial cells and its modulation by the lung surfactant substitute Curosurf.

    PubMed

    Vranic, Sandra; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Darnis, Cécile; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Boggetto, Nicole; Marano, Francelyne; Boland, Sonja; Baeza-Squiban, Armelle

    2013-05-01

    Because of an increasing exposure to environmental and occupational nanoparticles (NPs), the potential risk of these materials for human health should be better assessed. Since one of the main routes of entry of NPs is via the lungs, it is of paramount importance to further characterize their impact on the respiratory system. Here, we have studied the uptake of fluorescently labeled SiO₂ NPs (50 and 100 nm) by epithelial cells (NCI-H292) and alveolar macrophages (MHS) in the presence or absence of pulmonary surfactant. The quantification of NP uptake was performed by measuring cell-associated fluorescence using flow cytometry and spectrometric techniques in order to identify the most suitable methodology. Internalization was shown to be time and dose dependent, and differences in terms of uptake were noted between epithelial cells and macrophages. In the light of our observations, we conclude that flow cytometry is a more reliable technique for the study of NP internalization, and importantly, that the hydrophobic fraction of lung surfactant is critical for downregulating NP uptake in both cell types. PMID:23288678

  5. NMR shielding and a thermodynamic study of the effect of environmental exposure to petrochemical solvent on DPPC, an important component of lung surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monajjemi, M.; Afsharnezhad, S.; Jaafari, M. R.; Abdolahi, T.; Nikosade, A.; Monajemi, H.

    2007-12-01

    The chemical and petrochemical industries are the major air polluters. Millions of workers are exposed to toxic chemicals on the job, and it is becoming more toxic, causing much damage to respiratory system, today. One of the main components of lung alveoli is a surfactant. DPPC (Dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine) is the predominant lipid component in the lung surfactant, which is responsible for lowering surface tension in alveoli. In this article, we used an approximate model and ab initio computations to describe interactions between DPPC and some chemical solvents, such as benzene, toluene, heptane, acetone, chloroform, ether, and ethanol, which cause lung injuries and lead to respiratory distress such as ARDS. The effect of these solvents on the conformation and disordering of the DPPC head group was investigated by calculations at the Hatree-Fock level using the 6-31G basis set with the Onsager continuum solvation, GAIO, and frequency models. The simulation model was confirmed by accurate NMR measurements as concerns conformational energy. Water can be the most suitable solvent for DPPC. Furthermore, this study shows that ethanol has the most destructive effect on the conformation and lipid disorder of the DPPC head group of the lung surfactant in our model. Our finding will be useful for detecting the dysfunction of DPPC in the lung surfactant caused by acute or chronic exposures to air toxics from petrochemical organic solvent emission source and chronic alcohol consumption, which may lead to ARDS.

  6. Interactions of the C-terminus of lung surfactant protein B with lipid bilayers are modulated by acyl chain saturation.

    PubMed

    Antharam, Vijay C; Farver, R Suzanne; Kuznetsova, Anna; Sippel, Katherine H; Mills, Frank D; Elliott, Douglas W; Sternin, Edward; Long, Joanna R

    2008-11-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is critical to minimizing surface tension in the alveoli. The C-terminus of SP-B, residues 59-80, has much of the surface activity of the full protein and serves as a template for the development of synthetic surfactant replacements. The molecular mechanisms responsible for its ability to restore lung compliance were investigated with circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, and (31)P and (2)H solid-state NMR spectroscopy. SP-B(59-80) forms an amphipathic helix which alters lipid organization and acyl chain dynamics in fluid lamellar phase 4:1 DPPC:POPG and 3:1 POPC:POPG MLVs. At higher levels of SP-B(59-80) in the POPC:POPG lipid system a transition to a nonlamellar phase is observed while DPPC:POPG mixtures remain in a lamellar phase. Deuterium NMR shows an increase in acyl chain order in DPPC:POPG MLVs on addition of SP-B(59-80); in POPC:POPG MLVs, acyl chain order parameters decrease. Our results indicate SP-B(59-80) penetrates deeply into DPPC:POPG bilayers and binds more peripherally to POPC:POPG bilayers. Similar behavior has been observed for KL(4), a peptide mimetic of SP-B which was originally designed using SP-B(59-80) as a template and has been clinically demonstrated to be successful in treating respiratory distress syndrome. The ability of these helical peptides to differentially partition into lipid lamellae based on their degree of monounsaturation and subsequent changes in lipid dynamics suggest a mechanism for lipid organization and trafficking within the dynamic lung environment. PMID:18694722

  7. Serum surfactant protein-A, but not surfactant protein-D or KL-6, can predict preclinical lung damage induced by smoking.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hideo; Kanoh, Soichiro; Motoyoshi, Kazuo

    2008-06-01

    Serum surfactant protein (SP)-A offers a useful clinical marker for interstitial lung disease (ILD). However, SP-A is occasionally elevated in non-ILD pulmonary patients. The present study was conducted to investigate factors that affect serum SP- A levels in respiratory medicine. Serum SP-A, serum SP-D, serum Klebs von den Lungen (KL)-6 and pulmonary function tests were evaluated in 929 patients (current smokers, n=255; ex-smokers, n=242; never-smokers, n=432) without ILD or pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Serum SP-A was significantly higher in current smokers than in never- or ex-smokers (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Serum SP- A was significantly higher in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary thromboembolism than in other diseases (p<0.01). Serum SP-A correlated positively with amount of smoking (p<0.01) and negatively with forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity (p<0.05). Serum SP-D and KL-6 were unaffected by smoking. Smoking should be taken into account when evaluating serum SP-A levels, and different baseline levels of serum SP-A should be established for smokers and non-smokers. Serum SP-A may also represent a useful marker for predicting COPD in the preclinical stage. PMID:18595202

  8. Intrafetal glucose infusion alters glucocorticoid signaling and reduces surfactant protein mRNA expression in the lung of the late-gestation sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    McGillick, Erin V; Morrison, Janna L; McMillen, I Caroline; Orgeig, Sandra

    2014-09-01

    Increased circulating fetal glucose and insulin concentrations are potential inhibitors of fetal lung maturation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in infants of diabetic mothers. In this study, we examined the effect of intrafetal glucose infusion on mRNA expression of glucose transporters, insulin-like growth factor signaling, glucocorticoid regulatory genes, and surfactant proteins in the lung of the late-gestation sheep fetus. The numerical density of the cells responsible for producing surfactant was determined using immunohistochemistry. Glucose infusion for 10 days did not affect mRNA expression of glucose transporters or IGFs but did decrease IGF-1R expression. There was reduced mRNA expression of the glucocorticoid-converting enzyme HSD11B-1 and the glucocorticoid receptor, potentially reducing glucocorticoid responsiveness in the fetal lung. Furthermore, surfactant protein (SFTP) mRNA expression was reduced in the lung following glucose infusion, while the number of SFTP-B-positive cells remained unchanged. These findings suggest the presence of a glucocorticoid-mediated mechanism regulating delayed maturation of the surfactant system in the sheep fetus following glucose infusion and provide evidence for the link between abnormal glycemic control during pregnancy and the increased risk of RDS in infants of uncontrolled diabetic mothers. PMID:24990855

  9. Development, optimization and evaluation of surfactant-based pulmonary nanolipid carrier system of paclitaxel for the management of drug resistance lung cancer using Box-Behnken design.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Murthy, R S Rayasa; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) along with various surfactants loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) were prepared by an emulsification technique using a Box-Behnken design. The Box-Behnken design indicated that the most effective factors on the size and PDI were at high surfactant concentration (1.5%), low lipids ratio (6:4) and medium homogenization speed (6000 rpm). Among all the formulations, Tween 20-loaded NLCs show least particle size compared to Tween 80 and Tween 60. Entrapment efficiency of Tween 20, Tween 80 and Tween 60-loaded formulations were 82.40, 85.60 and 79.78%, respectively. Drug release of Tween 80, Tween 20 and Tween 60-loaded NLCs is 64.9, 62.3 and 59.7%, respectively (within 72 h). Maximum cellular uptake was observed with Tween 20 formulation on Caco-2 cell lines. Furthermore, spray drying of resultant NLCs was showed good flow properties and was selected for drug delivery to deeper airways. In-vivo studies demonstrated the better localization of drug within the lungs using different surfactant-based pulmonary delivery systems. From this study, we have concluded that delivering drugs through pulmonary route is advantageous for local action in lungs as maximum amount of drug concentration was observed in lungs. The surfactants could prove to be beneficial in treating drug resistance lung cancer by inhibiting P-gp efflux in the form of nano lipidic carriers. PMID:25544602

  10. Expression of the 35kDa and low molecular weight surfactant-associated proteins in the lungs of infants dying with respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    deMello, D E; Phelps, D S; Patel, G; Floros, J; Lagunoff, D

    1989-06-01

    Newborn respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) results from a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant has three ultrastructural forms: lamellar bodies, which, when secreted from Type II pneumocytes, transform into tubular myelin; tubular myelin in turn gives rise to the phospholipid monolayer at the air-fluid interface in the alveolus that constitutes functional surfactant. It has been shown previously that the lungs of infants dying from RDS lacked tubular myelin despite the presence of abundant lamellar bodies, whereas the lungs of control infants dying from other causes had both tubular myelin and lamellar bodies. An abnormality in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin in RDS was proposed as a possible explanation for this finding. To evaluate the role of surfactant proteins (SPs) in this conversion, the authors re-examined the lungs of 11 RDS infants and 10 control infants for reactivity with antisera to high and low molecular weight SPs. In control infants, abundant intense staining with antisera to both types of SPs was found, but in the RDS lungs, staining was weaker than that in controls and less intense for high molecular weight compared to low molecular weight SPs. In lungs from patients with RDS, although staining increased with increasing gestational and post-natal ages, the intensity was less than control levels at all ages. The correlation of deficiency of SPs in RDS with lack of tubular myelin suggests that SPs may be involved in the conversion of normal lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and that the deficiency of SPs could explain the persistent respiratory distress in the presence of surfactant phospholipid synthesis. PMID:2757118

  11. Interactions between DPPC as a component of lung surfactant and amorphous silica nanoparticles investigated by HILIC-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Silina, Yuliya E; Welck, Jennifer; Kraegeloh, Annette; Koch, Marcus; Fink-Straube, Claudia

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports a rapid HILIC-ESI-MS assay to quantify dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) as component of lung surfactant for nanosafety studies. The technique was used to investigate the concentration-dependent sorption of DPPC to two-sizes of amorphous SiO2 nanoparticles (SiO2-NPs) in a MeOH:H2O (50/50v/v) mixture and in cell culture medium. In MeOH:H2O (50/50v/v), the sorption of DPPC was positively correlated with the nanoparticles concentration. A substantial affinity of small amorphous SiO2-NPs (25nm) to DPPC standard solution compared to bigger SiO2-NPs (75nm) was not confirmed for biological specimens. After dispersion of SiO2-NPs in DPPC containing cell culture medium, the capacity of the SiO2-NPs to bind DPPC was reduced in comparison to a mixture of MeOH:H2O (50/50v/v) regardless from the nanoparticles size. Furthermore, HILIC-ESI-MS revealed that A549 cells internalized DPPC during growth in serum containing medium complemented with DPPC. This finding was in a good agreement with the potential of alveolar type II cells to recycle surfactant components. Binding of lipids present in the cell culture medium to amorphous SiO2-NPs was supported by means of HILIC-ESI-MS, TEM and ICP-MS independently. PMID:27442798

  12. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid and Serum Canine Surfactant Protein A Concentrations in Dogs with Chronic Cough by Bronchial and Interstitial Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    YAMAYA, Yoshiki; SUZUKI, Kazuyuki; WATARI, Toshihiro; ASANO, Ryuji

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We measured bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum canine surfactant protein (cSP)-A concentrations in dogs with chronic cough. There were no significant differences between bronchial and interstitial lung diseases in BALF cSP-A concentrations. However, serum cSP-A concentrations in dogs with the interstitial lung disease as diffuse panbronchiolitis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis were significantly higher than those in dogs with the bronchial disease as chronic bronchitis. These results suggest that serum cSP-A concentrations may be a useful and noninvasive biomarker to understand the existence of interstitial lung damage in dogs with chronic cough. PMID:24366151

  13. A specific phospholipase C activity regulates phosphatidylinositol levels in lung surfactant of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spyridakis, Spyros; Leondaritis, George; Nakos, George; Lekka, Marilena E; Galanopoulou, Dia

    2010-03-01

    Lung surfactant (LS) is a lipid-rich material lining the inside of the lungs. It reduces surface tension at the liquid/air interface and thus, it confers protection of the alveoli from collapsing. The surface-active component of LS is dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine, while anionic phospholipids such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) and primarily phosphatidylglycerol are involved in the stabilization of the LS monolayer. The exact role of PtdIns in this system is not well-understood; however, PtdIns levels change dramatically during the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) evolution. In this report we present evidence of a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, which may regulate PtdIns levels. Characterization of this extracellular activity showed specificity for PtdIns and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, sharing the typical substrate concentration-, pH-, and calcium-dependencies with mammalian PI-PLCs. Fractionation of BAL fluid showed that PI-PLC did not co-fractionate with large surfactant aggregates, but it was found mainly in the soluble fraction. Importantly, analysis of BAL samples from control subjects and from patients with ARDS showed that the PI-PLC specific activity was decreased by 4-fold in ARDS samples concurrently with the increase in BAL PtdIns levels. Thus, we have identified for the first time an extracellular PI-PLC enzyme activity that may be acutely involved in the regulation of PtdIns levels in LS. PMID:19491339

  14. Lung Fibrosis-associated Surfactant Protein A1 and C Variants Induce Latent Transforming Growth Factor β1 Secretion in Lung Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Dey, Moushumi; Yuan, Wen-Cheng; Nathanielsz, Peter W.; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations of surfactant proteins are recognized as important causes of inherited lung fibrosis. Here, we study rare and common surfactant protein (SP)-A1 and SP-C variants, either discovered in our familial pulmonary fibrosis cohort or described by others. We show that expression of two SP-A1 (R219W and R242*) and three SP-C (I73T, M71V, and L188Q) variant proteins lead to the secretion of the profibrotic latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung epithelial cell lines. The secreted TGF-β1 is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling and is dependent upon expression of the latent TGF-β1 binding proteins. The dependence upon unfolded protein response (UPR) mediators for TGF-β1 induction differs for each variant. TGF-β1 secretion induced by the expression of the common SP-A1 R219W variant is nearly completely blocked by silencing the UPR transducers IRE-1α and ATF6. In contrast, the secretion of TGF-β1 induced by two rare SP-C mutant proteins (I73T and M71V), is largely unaffected by UPR silencing or by the addition of the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, implicating a UPR-independent mechanism for these variants. Blocking TGF-β1 secretion reverses cell death of RLE-6TN cells expressing these SP-A1 and SP-C variants suggesting that anti-TGF-β therapeutics may be beneficial to this molecularly defined subgroup of pulmonary fibrosis patients. PMID:23926107

  15. Lung fibrosis-associated surfactant protein A1 and C variants induce latent transforming growth factor β1 secretion in lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Dey, Moushumi; Yuan, Wen-Cheng; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2013-09-20

    Missense mutations of surfactant proteins are recognized as important causes of inherited lung fibrosis. Here, we study rare and common surfactant protein (SP)-A1 and SP-C variants, either discovered in our familial pulmonary fibrosis cohort or described by others. We show that expression of two SP-A1 (R219W and R242*) and three SP-C (I73T, M71V, and L188Q) variant proteins lead to the secretion of the profibrotic latent transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in lung epithelial cell lines. The secreted TGF-β1 is capable of autocrine and paracrine signaling and is dependent upon expression of the latent TGF-β1 binding proteins. The dependence upon unfolded protein response (UPR) mediators for TGF-β1 induction differs for each variant. TGF-β1 secretion induced by the expression of the common SP-A1 R219W variant is nearly completely blocked by silencing the UPR transducers IRE-1α and ATF6. In contrast, the secretion of TGF-β1 induced by two rare SP-C mutant proteins (I73T and M71V), is largely unaffected by UPR silencing or by the addition of the small molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid, implicating a UPR-independent mechanism for these variants. Blocking TGF-β1 secretion reverses cell death of RLE-6TN cells expressing these SP-A1 and SP-C variants suggesting that anti-TGF-β therapeutics may be beneficial to this molecularly defined subgroup of pulmonary fibrosis patients. PMID:23926107

  16. Adsorption of Surfactant Lipids by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Mouse Lung upon Pharyngeal Aspiration: Role in Uptake by Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kapralov, Alexander A.; Feng, Wei Hong; Amoscato, Andrew A.; Yanamala, Naveena; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Winnica, Daniel E.; Kisin, Elena R.; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Gou, Pingping; Sparvero, Louis J.; Ray, Prabir; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Fadeel, Bengt; Star, Alexander; Shvedova, Anna A.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary route represents one of the most important portals of entry for nanoparticles into the body. However, the in vivo interactions of nanoparticles with biomolecules of the lung have not been sufficiently studied. Here, using an established mouse model of pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), we recovered SWCNTs from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf), purified them from possible contamination with lung cells and examined the composition of phospholipids adsorbed on SWCNTs by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. We found that SWCNTs selectively adsorbed two types of the most abundant surfactant phospholipids – phosphatidylcholines (PC) and phosphatidylglycerols (PG). Molecular speciation of these phospholipids was also consistent with pulmonary surfactant. Quantitation of adsorbed lipids by LC-MS along with the structural assessments of phospholipid binding by atomic force microscopy and molecular modeling indicated that the phospholipids (~108 molecules per SWCNT) formed an uninterrupted “coating” whereby the hydrophobic alkyl chains of the phospholipids were adsorbed onto the SWCNT with the polar head groups pointed away from the SWCNT into the aqueous phase. In addition, the presence of surfactant proteins A, B and D on SWCNTs was determined by LC-MS. Finally, we demonstrated that the presence of this surfactant coating markedly enhanced the in vitro uptake of SWCNTs by macrophages. Taken together, this is the first demonstration of the in vivo adsorption of the surfactant lipids and proteins on SWCNTs in a physiologically relevant animal model. PMID:22463369

  17. Effect of humidity on lung surfactant films subjected to dynamic compression/expansion cycles.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Edgar J; Gitiafroz, Roya; Zuo, Yi Y; Policova, Zdenka; Cox, Peter N; Hair, Michael L; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2007-03-15

    The surface activity of bovine lipid extracted surfactant (BLES) preparations used in surfactant replacement therapy is studied in dynamic film compression/expansion cycles as a function of relative humidity, surfactant concentration, compression rate, and compression periodicity. BLES droplets were formed in a constrained sessile droplet configuration (CSD). Images obtained during cycling were analyzed using axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) to yield surface tension, surface area, and drop volume data. The experiments were conducted in a chamber that allowed both humid (100% RH), and "dry" air (i.e. less than 20% RH) environments. It was observed that in humid environments BLES films are not stable and tend to have poor surface activity compared to BLES films exposed to dry air. Further analysis of the data reveal that if BLES films are compressed fast enough (i.e. at physiological conditions) to avoid film hydration, lower minimum surface tensions are achieved. A film hydration-relaxation mechanism is proposed to explain these observations. PMID:16877051

  18. CENTRIFUGE APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.; Urey, H.C.; Cohen, K.

    1960-08-01

    A high-speed centrifuge for the separation of gaseous isotopes is designed comprising a centrifugal pump mounted on the outlet of a centrifuge bowl and arranged to pump the heavy and light fractions out of the centrifuge bowl in two separate streams.

  19. Variations in Battery Life of a Heart—Lung Machine Using Different Pump Speeds, Pressure Loads, Boot Material, Centrifugal Pump Head, Multiple Pump Usage, and Battery Age

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Cornelius; Hargrove, Martin; O’Donnell, Aonghus; Aherne, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Electrical failure during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) has previously been reported to occur in 1 of every 1500 cases. Most heart—lung machine pump consoles are equipped with built-in battery back-up units. Battery run times of these devices are variable and have not been reported. Different conditions of use can extend battery life in the event of electrical failure. This study was designed to examine the run time of a fully charged battery under various conditions of pump speed, pressure loads, pump boot material, multiple pump usage, and battery life. Battery life using a centrifugal pump also was examined. The results of this study show that battery life is affected by pump speed, circuit pressure, boot stiffness, and the number of pumps in service. Centrifugal pumps also show a reduced drain on battery when compared with roller pumps. These elements affect the longevity and performance of the battery. This information could be of value to the individual during power failure as these are variables that can affect the battery life during such a challenging scenario. PMID:16350380

  20. Surfactant metabolism and anti-oxidative capacity in hyperoxic neonatal rat lungs: effects of keratinocyte growth factor on gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Koslowski, Roland; Kasper, Michael; Schaal, Katharina; Knels, Lilla; Lange, Marco; Bernhard, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    Development of preterm infant lungs is frequently impaired resulting in bronchopulmoary dysplasia (BPD). BPD results from interruption of physiologic anabolic intrauterine conditions, the inflammatory basis and therapeutic consequences of premature delivery, including increased oxygen supply for air breathing. The latter requires surfactant, produced by alveolar type II (AT II) cells to lower surface tension at the pulmonary air:liquid interface. Its main components are specific phosphatidylcholine (PC) species including dipalmitoyl-PC, anionic phospholipids and surfactant proteins. Local antioxidative enzymes are essential to cope with the pro-inflammatory side effects of normal alveolar oxygen pressures. However, respiratory insufficiency frequently requires increased oxygen supply. To cope with the injurious effects of hyperoxia to epithelia, recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rhKGF) was proposed as a surfactant stimulating, non-catabolic and epithelial-protective therapeutic. The aim of the present study was to examine the qualification of rhKGF to improve expression parameters of lung maturity in newborn rats under hyperoxic conditions (85% O(2) for 7 days). In response to rhKGF proliferating cell nuclear antigen mRNA, as a feature of stimulated proliferation, was elevated. Similarly, the expressions of ATP-binding cassette protein A3 gene, a differentiation marker of AT II cells and of peroxiredoxin 6, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, three genes involved in oxygen radical protection were increased. Furthermore, mRNA levels of acyl-coA:lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1, catalyzing dipalmitoyl-PC synthesis by acyl remodeling, and adipose triglyceride lipase, considered as responsible for fatty acid supply for surfactant PC synthesis, were elevated. These results, together with a considerable body of other confirmative evidence, suggest that rhKGF should be developed into a therapeutic option to treat preterm infants at risk for

  1. [Effect of betamethasone on the lipid composition of pulmonary surfactant, ependymal cells and lung tissue after surgical procedures on the thorax of dogs].

    PubMed

    Ledwozyw, A; Jabłonka, S; Kadziołka, W; Komar, E

    1986-01-01

    The lipid composition of pulmonary surfactant, ependymal cells and pulmonary tissue after surgery on the thorax in dogs was determined. 24 hrs after removal of one lung, in the other one there occurred changes in the quantity of respective classes of phospholipids of the pulmonary surfactant, manifesting themselves by a considerable drop in the amount of phosphatidylcholine (by 25%), phosphatidylethylamine (by 47%), phosphatidylglycerol (by 98%) and phosphatidylcholine: sphingomyelin ratio (by 63%), as well as by a rise in the amount of lysophosphatidylcholine (by 83%), phosphatidylserine (by 54%) and sphingomyelin (by 25%). In dogs receiving betamethasone in the post-operative period the changes were less intense: the amount of phosphatidylcholine decreased by 15%, phosphatidylethanolamine by 29%, phosphatidylglycerol by 94% and phosphatidylcholine: sphingomyelin ratio by 63%. The amount of lysophosphatidylcholine increased by 26.7%, phosphatidylserine by 29.1% and sphingomyelin by 22.2%. Similar changes were observed in the phospholipids of lining cells, while changes in the composition of phospholipids of pulmonary tissue in most cases appeared insignificant. Insignificant, too, were changes in the composition of neutral lipids of the tissular fractions examined. The described changes in dogs not receiving betamethasone correspond to those found in man in the course of acute respiratory insufficiency syndrome. Betamethasone was found to exert a protective effect on the phospholipids of pulmonary surfactant, soothing the biochemical changes brought about by surgical removal of one lung. PMID:3325943

  2. Review: The intersection of surfactant homeostasis and innate host defense of the lung: lessons from newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    The study of pulmonary surfactant, directed towards prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants, led to the identification of novel proteins/genes that determine the synthesis, packaging, secretion, function, and catabolism of alveolar surfactant. The surfactant proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D, and the surfactant lipid associated transporter, ABCA3, play critical roles in surfactant homeostasis. The study of their structure and function provided insight into a system that integrates the biophysical need to reduce surface tension in the alveoli and the innate host defenses required to maintain pulmonary structure and function after birth. Alveolar homeostasis depends on the intrinsic, multifunctional structures of the surfactant-associated proteins and the shared transcriptional regulatory modules that determine both the expression of genes involved in surfactant production as well as those critical for host defense. Identification of the surfactant proteins and the elucidation of the genetic networks regulating alveolar homeostasis have provided the basis for understanding and diagnosing rare and common pulmonary disorders, including respiratory distress syndrome, inherited disorders of surfactant homeostasis, and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:20351134

  3. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveolus, thereby maintaining lung volumes during the respiratory cycle. In premature newborn infants, the lack of surfactant causes atelectasis and respiratory failure, characteristic of respiratory of distress syndrome. Surfactant is comprised of lipids and associated proteins that are required for surfactant function. Surfactant proteins B and C and a lamellar body associated transport protein, ABCA3 play critical roles in surfactant synthesis and function. Mutations in the genes encoding these proteins cause lethal respiratory distress in newborn infants. This review discusses the clinical and pathological findings associated with these inherited disorders of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:16798578

  4. CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATORS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.

    1959-03-10

    A centrifugal separator is described for separating gaseous mixtures where the temperature gradients both longitudinally and radially of the centrifuge may be controlled effectively to produce a maximum separation of the process gases flowing through. Tbe invention provides for the balancing of increases and decreases in temperature in various zones of the centrifuge chamber as the result of compression and expansions respectively, of process gases and may be employed effectively both to neutralize harmful temperature gradients and to utilize beneficial temperaturc gradients within the centrifuge.

  5. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  6. Diseases of pulmonary surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  7. Decreased Expression of Surfactant Protein Genes Is Associated with an Increased Expression of Forkhead Box M1 Gene in the Fetal Lung Tissues of Premature Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Won-Ho; Chang, Ji-Young; Lee, Kyung Suk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Recently, Forkhead box M1 (FoxM1) was reported to be correlated with lung maturation and expression of surfactant proteins (SPs) in mice models. However, no study has been conducted in rabbit lungs despite their high homology with human lungs. Thus, we attempted to investigate serial changes in the expressions of FoxM1 and SP-A/B throughout lung maturation in rabbit fetuses. Materials and Methods Pregnant New Zealand White rabbits were grouped according to gestational age from 5 days before to 2 days after the day of expected full term delivery (F5, F4, F3, F2, F1, F0, P1, and P2). A total of 64 fetuses were enrolled after Cesarean sections. The expressions of mRNA and proteins of FoxM1 and SP-A/B in fetal lung tissue were tested by quantitative reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, their correlations were analyzed. Results The mRNA expression of SP-A/B showed an increasing tendency positively correlated with gestational age, while the expression of FoxM1 mRNA and protein decreased from F5 to F0. A significant negative correlation was found between the expression levels of FoxM1 and SP-A/B (SP-A: R=-0.517, p=0.001; SP-B: R=-0.615, p<0.001). Conclusion Preterm rabbits demonstrated high expression of FoxM1 mRNA and protein in the lungs compared to full term rabbits. Also, the expression of SP-A/B was inversely related with serial changes in FoxM1 expression. This is the first report to suggest an association between FoxM1 and expression of SP-A/B and lung maturation in preterm rabbits. PMID:24142647

  8. Experimental Study on How Human Lung Surfactant Protein SP-B1-25 is Oxidized by Ozone in the Presence of Fe(II) and Ascorbic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colussi, A. J.; Enami, S.; Hoffmann, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    We will report the results of experiments on the chemical fate of the human lung surfactant protein SP-B1-25 upon exposure to gaseous ozone in realistic aqueous media simulating the conditions prevalent in epithelial lining fluids in polluted ambient air. Our experiments consist of exposing aqueous microjets containing SP-B1-25, the natural antioxidant ascorbic acid, and the Fe2+ carried by most atmospheric fine particulates, under mild acidic conditions, such as those created by the innate lung host defense response. Reactants and the products of such interactions are detected via online electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We will show that ascorbic acid largely inhibits the ozonation of SP-B1-25 in the absence of Fe2+, leading to the formation of an ascorbic acid ozonide (Enami et al., PNAS 2008). In the presence of Fe2+, however, the ozonide decomposes into reactive intermediates that result in the partial oxidation of SP-B1-25, presumable affecting its function as surfactant. We infer that these experimental results establish a plausible causal link for the observed synergic adverse health effects of ambient ozone and fine particulates

  9. Combined effect of synthetic protein, Mini-B, and cholesterol on a model lung surfactant mixture at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Aishik; Hui, Erica; Waring, Alan J; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-04-01

    The overall goal of this work is to study the combined effects of Mini-B, a 34 residue synthetic analog of the lung surfactant protein SP-B, and cholesterol, a neutral lipid, on a model binary lipid mixture containing dipalmitolphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG), that is often used to mimic the primary phospholipid composition of lung surfactants. Using surface pressure vs. mean molecular area isotherms, fluorescence imaging and analysis of lipid domain size distributions; we report on changes in the structure, function and stability of the model lipid-protein films in the presence and absence of varying composition of cholesterol. Our results indicate that at low cholesterol concentrations, Mini-B can prevent cholesterol's tendency to lower the line tension between lipid domain boundaries, while maintaining Mini-B's ability to cause reversible collapse resulting in the formation of surface associated reservoirs. Our results also show that lowering the line tension between domains can adversely impact monolayer folding mechanisms. We propose that small amounts of cholesterol and synthetic protein Mini-B can together achieve the seemingly opposing requirements of efficient LS: fluid enough to flow at the air-water interface, while being rigid enough to oppose irreversible collapse at ultra-low surface tensions. PMID:26775740

  10. Centrifuge apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sartory, Walter K.; Eveleigh, John W.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for operating a continuous flow blood separation centrifuge are provided. The hematocrit of the entrant whole blood is continuously maintained at an optimum constant value by the addition of plasma to the entrant blood. The hematocrit of the separated red cells is monitored to indicate the degree of separation taking place, thereby providing a basis for regulating the flow through the centrifuge.

  11. Surfactant secretion is stimulated by decreased alveolar CO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Chander, A.; Dodia, C.R.; Gullo, J.; Fisher, A.B.

    1986-03-05

    The authors investigated the hypothesis that altered intracellular pH may modulate lung surfactant secretion. They have used isolated perfused lung preparation to investigate release of (/sup 3/H)choline labeled phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the alveolar space of rat lungs ventilated with 5%, 2.5%, or 0% CO/sub 2/ in air. Adult rats were injected i.p. 40uCi of (/sup 3/H-methyl) choline and lungs removed after 45 min. Lungs were perfused for 15 or 60 min. with KRB plus 25 mM HEPES. At the end of perfusion lungs were lavaged five times with 7 ml of ice cold saline. Lavage fluid, was centrifuged, lyophilized, and both lung and lavage fluid extracted for lipids. Lipid choline label in lavage fluid, expressed as percent of that in lung lipids, from control lungs (5% CO/sub 2/) showed 0.6 +/- 0.1 % at 15 min and 1.1 +/- 0.3% (mean +/- SE, n=6) label at 60 min. When perfused with 50 ..mu..M 1-isoproterenol, the label after 60 min perfusion increased to 2.76 +/- 0.33 (n=3). Ventilation with air containing 2.5% CO/sub 2/ and 0% CO/sub 2/ showed 6.1 +/- 2.1 % (n=4) and 6.4 +/- 1.8% (n=4) label in lavage fluid. Addition of 25mM sodium acetate in the perfusion medium and ventilation with 0% CO/sub 2/ in air lowered release of label to 4.2 +/- 1.4% (n=4). These results show that low pCO/sub 2/ increases surfactant PC secretion in lung and suggest that intracellular alkalosis triggers surfactant release.

  12. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations. PMID:12640270

  13. Centrifugal Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-02-06

    The article discusses small high speed centrifugal compressors. This topic was covered in a previous ASHRAE Journal column (2003). This article reviews another configuration which has become an established product. The operation, energy savings and market potential of this offering are addressed as well.

  14. Increased lung prolyl hydroxylase and decreased glucocorticoid receptor are related to decreased surfactant protein in the growth-restricted sheep fetus.

    PubMed

    Orgeig, Sandra; McGillick, Erin V; Botting, Kimberley J; Zhang, Song; McMillen, I Caroline; Morrison, Janna L

    2015-07-01

    Experimental placental restriction (PR) by carunclectomy in fetal sheep results in intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), chronic hypoxemia, increased plasma cortisol, and decreased lung surfactant protein (SP) expression. The mechanisms responsible for decreased SP expression are unknown but may involve decreased glucocorticoid (GC) action or changes in hypoxia signaling. Endometrial caruncles were removed from nonpregnant ewes to induce PR. Lungs were collected from control and PR fetuses at 130-135 (n = 19) and 139-145 (n = 28) days of gestation. qRT-PCR and Western blotting were used to quantify lung mRNA and protein expression, respectively, of molecular regulators and downstream targets of the GC and hypoxia-signaling pathways. We confirmed a decrease in SP-A, -B, and -C, but not SP-D, mRNA expression in PR fetuses at both ages. There was a net downregulation of GC signaling with a reduction in GC receptor (GR)-α and -β protein expression and a decrease in the cofactor, GATA-6. GC-responsive genes including transforming growth factor-β1, IL-1β, and β2-adrenergic receptor were not stimulated. Prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD)2 mRNA and protein and PHD3 mRNA expression increased with a concomitant increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-1β mRNA expression. There was an increase in mRNA expression of several, but not all, hypoxia-responsive genes. Hence, both GC and hypoxia signaling may contribute to reduced SP expression. Although acute hypoxia normally inactivates PHDs, chronic hypoxemia in the PR fetus increased PHD abundance, which normally prevents HIF signaling. This may represent a mechanism by which chronic hypoxemia contributes to the decrease in SP production in the IUGR fetal lung. PMID:25934670

  15. Dose-response comparisons of five lung surfactant factor (LSF) preparations in an animal model of adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    PubMed Central

    Häfner, D.; Beume, R.; Kilian, U.; Krasznai, G.; Lachmann, B.

    1995-01-01

    1. We have examined the effects of five different lung surfactant factor (LSF) preparations in the rat lung lavage model. In this model repetitive lung lavage leads to lung injury with some similarities to adult respiratory distress syndrome with poor gas exchange and protein leakage into the alveolar spaces. These pathological sequelae can be reversed by LSF instillation soon after lavage. 2. The tested LSF preparations were: two bovine: Survanta and Alveofact: two synthetic: Exosurf and a protein-free phospholipid based LSF (PL-LSF) and one Recombinant LSF at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg kg-1 body weight and an untreated control group. 3. Tracheotomized rats (10-12 per dose) were pressure-controlled ventilated (Siemens Servo Ventilator 900C) with 100% oxygen at a respiratory rate of 30 breaths min-1, inspiration expiration ratio of 1:2, peak inspiratory pressure (PIP) of 28 cmH2O at positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 8 cmH2O. Two hours after LSF administration, PEEP and in parallel PIP was reduced from 8 to 6 (1st reduction), from 6 to 3 (2nd reduction) and from 3 to 0 cmH2O (3rd reduction). 4. Partial arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2, mmHg) at 5 min and 120 min after LSF administration and during the 2nd PEEP reduction (PaO2(PEEP23/3)) were used for statistical comparison. All LSF preparations caused a dose-dependent increase for the PaO2(120'), whereas during the 2nd PEEP reduction only bovine and recombinant LSF exhibited dose-dependency. Exosurf did not increase PaO2 after administration of the highest dose. At the highest dose Exosurf exerted no further improvement but rather a tendency to relapse.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7582456

  16. Role of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) in lung injury in response to acute ozone exposure of SP-A deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Haque, Rizwanul; Umstead, Todd M.; Ponnuru, Padmavathi; Guo Xiaoxuan; Hawgood, Samuel; Phelps, David S.; Floros, Joanna . E-mail: jfloros@psu.edu

    2007-04-01

    Millions are exposed to ozone levels above recommended limits, impairing lung function, causing epithelial damage and inflammation, and predisposing some individuals to pneumonia, asthma, and other lung conditions. Surfactant protein-A (SP-A) plays a role in host defense, the regulation of inflammation, and repair of tissue damage. We tested the hypothesis that the lungs of SP-A(-/-) (KO) mice are more susceptible to ozone-induced damage. We compared the effects of ozone on KO and wild type (WT) mice on the C57BL/6 genetic background by exposing them to 2 parts/million of ozone for 3 or 6 h and sacrificing them 0, 4, and 24 h later. Lungs were subject to bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or used to measure endpoints of oxidative stress and inflammation. Despite more total protein in BAL of KO mice after a 3 h ozone exposure, WT mice had increased oxidation of protein and had oxidized SP-A dimers. In KO mice there was epithelial damage as assessed by increased LDH activity and there was increased phospholipid content. In WT mice there were more BAL PMNs and elevated macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Changes in MIP-2 and MCP-1 were observed in both KO and WT, however mRNA levels differed. In KO mice MIP-2 mRNA levels changed little with ozone, but in WT levels they were significantly increased. In summary, several aspects of the inflammatory response differ between WT and KO mice. These in vivo findings appear to implicate SP-A in regulating inflammation and limiting epithelial damage in response to ozone exposure.

  17. Molecular species of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol in rat lung surfactant and different pools of pneumocytes type II.

    PubMed Central

    Schlame, M; Casals, C; Rüstow, B; Rabe, H; Kunze, D

    1988-01-01

    It is not yet completely understood how a cell is able to export specific phospholipids, like dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (dipalmitoyl-PC), which is secreted by pneumocytes type II, into pulmonary surfactant. The acyl species composition of [3H]PC which was synthesized in type II cells in the presence of [2-3H]glycerol resembled the species composition of PC localized in intracellular pneumocyte membranes. This species pattern was different from the pattern of PC of lamellar bodies, i.e., intracellularly stored surfactant, by a higher proportion of dipalmitoyl-PC mainly at expense of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC. Lamellar body PC in turn showed the same species distribution as surfactant PC. The data suggest that subcellular compartmentation and/or intracellular transfer of PC destined to storage in lamellar bodies, but not secretion of lamellar bodies, involves an enrichment of dipalmitoyl-PC and a depletion of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-PC. In contrast, the acyl species pattern of phosphatidylglycerol does not seem to undergo gross changes on the path from synthesis to secretion. PMID:3421943

  18. Pulmonary lung surfactant synthetic peptide concentration-dependent modulation of DPPC and POPG acyl chain order in a DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid lipid mixture.

    PubMed

    Krill, S L; Gupta, S L; Smith, T

    1994-05-01

    Lung surfactant-associated protein interaction with lipid matrices and the effects on lipid thermotropic phase behavior are areas of active research. Many studies limit the lipids to a single or two-component system. The current investigation utilizes a three-lipid component matrix (DPPC:POPG:palmitic acid) to investigate the impact of a synthetic surfactant protein B fragment (SP-B 53-78 DiACM) on the dynamic surface activity of the lipid admixture as measured by a Wilhelmy surface balance. Also, the modulation of the individual lipid acyl chain order by the peptide within the lipid matrix is studied through the use of thermal perturbation FTIR spectroscopy. The data clearly demonstrate a concentration-dependent effect of the peptide on the surface activity with an improvement in the dynamic surface tension diagram characteristics (decreased surface tension and increased collapse plateau) especially at low, 0.36 M%, peptide concentrations. These effects are diminished upon further addition of the peptide. FTIR spectral data demonstrate that the peptide addition results in a significant increase in the acyl chain order of the DPPC and POPG components as measured by the position of the methylene stretching vibrational bands. DPPC is most sensitive to the peptide presence, while the palmitic acid is least affected. The transition temperatures of the individual lipids are also increased with the addition of the peptide. The presence of POPG in the matrix achieves the surface activity similarly seen with natural lung surfactant relative to a DPPC/palmitic acid lipid matrix alone. Its presence increases the sensitivity of the DPPC acyl chains to the presence of the peptide. These effects on the chain order are most probably related to the increased acyl chain fluidity which POPG imparts to the lipid matrix because of the presence of the cis double bond. The phosphatidylglycerol headgroup also adds a negative charge to the lipid matrix which enhances the peptide

  19. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is composed of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23026158

  20. Expression of p53 protein, Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus matrix protein, and surfactant protein in the lungs of sheep with pulmonary adenomatosis.

    PubMed

    İlhan, Fatma; Vural, Sevil A; Yıldırım, Serkan; Sözdutmaz, İbrahim; Alcigir, Mehmet E

    2016-05-01

    Ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (OPA) is a naturally occurring cancer in sheep that is caused by the Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV). Because the pathologic and epidemiologic features of OPA are similar to those of bronchoalveolar carcinoma in humans, OPA is considered a useful animal model for pulmonary carcinogenesis. In this study, 3,512 lungs from various breeds of sheep were collected and macroscopically examined. OPA was identified in 30 sheep, and samples of these animals were further examined by histologic, immunohistochemical (p53 protein, surfactant protein A [SP-A], proliferating cell nuclear antigen [PCNA], JSRV matrix protein [MA]), and PCR methods. Papillary or acinar adenocarcinomas were detected microscopically in the affected areas. Immunoreactivity for p53 PAb240 was detected in 13 sheep, whereas p53 DO-1 was not detected in any of the OPA animals. PCNA immunoreactivity was recorded in 27 animals. SP-A and JSRV MA protein was immunopositive in all 30. JSRV proviral DNA was detected by PCR analysis in all of the lung samples collected from OPA animals. In addition, the pulmonary SP-A levels were increased in tumor cells. The results of this study suggest that PCNA and p53 protein expression may be useful indicators in monitoring malignancy of pulmonary tumors. PMID:27016721

  1. The Role of Surfactant in Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Christopher Cheng-Hwa; Ma, Sze

    2012-01-01

    The key feature of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the insufficient production of surfactant in the lungs of preterm infants. As a result, researchers have looked into the possibility of surfactant replacement therapy as a means of preventing and treating RDS. We sought to identify the role of surfactant in the prevention and management of RDS, comparing the various types, doses, and modes of administration, and the recent development. A PubMed search was carried out up to March 2012 using phrases: surfactant, respiratory distress syndrome, protein-containing surfactant, protein-free surfactant, natural surfactant, animal-derived surfactant, synthetic surfactant, lucinactant, surfaxin, surfactant protein-B, surfactant protein-C. Natural, or animal-derived, surfactant is currently the surfactant of choice in comparison to protein-free synthetic surfactant. However, it is hoped that the development of protein-containing synthetic surfactant, such as lucinactant, will rival the efficacy of natural surfactants, but without the risks of their possible side effects. Administration techniques have also been developed with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and selective surfactant administration now recommended; multiple surfactant doses have also reported better outcomes. An aerosolised form of surfactant is being trialled in the hope that surfactant can be administered in a non-invasive way. Overall, the advancement, concerning the structure of surfactant and its mode of administration, offers an encouraging future in the management of RDS. PMID:22859930

  2. Interaction of soot derived multi-carbon nanoparticles with lung surfactants and their possible internalization inside alveolar cavity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradip; Bohidar, H B

    2010-10-01

    A systematic investigation of interaction of multi-carbon nanoparticles, obtained from soot, with dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), a clinical pulmonary phospholipid surfactant, sold under trade name "Survanta", was undertaken to establish a model for internalization of these nanoparticles inside alveolar cavity. In vitro experiments were carried out to establish the phospholipid assisted dispersion mechanism of carbon nanoclusters (size approximately 150 nm, zeta potential approximately -15 mV) in water. Results obtained from an array of experimental methods, like dynamic laser light scattering, electrophoresis, UV-absorption spectroscopy, surface tension studies and transmission electron microscopy, revealed that the carbon nanoparticles interacted with DPPC predominantly via hydrophobic interactions. Selective surface adsorption of DPPC molecules on nanoparticle surface was found to be strongly dependent on the concentration of the phospholipid. DPPC, a gemini surfactant, formed a rigid monolayer around the carbon nanocluster even at nanomolar concentration and provided excellent stability to the dispersion. Based on the experimental data it is proposed that the free-energy gain involved in the hydrophobic interactions will facilitate the internalization of these nanoparticles on the inner wall of the alveolar cavity. PMID:21299046

  3. Surfactant Therapy of ALI and ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, K; Willson, D; Notter, RH

    2011-01-01

    This article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its utility in mitigating clinical acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Biophysical research has documented that lung surfactant dysfunction can be reversed or mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration, and multiple studies in animals with ALI/ARDS have shown that respiratory function and pulmonary mechanics in vivo can be improved by exogenous surfactant administration. Exogenous surfactant therapy is a routine intervention in neonatal intensive care, and is life-saving in preventing or treating the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) in premature infants. In applications relevant for lung injury-related respiratory failure and ALI/ARDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be beneficial in term infants with pneumonia and meconium aspiration lung injury, and in children up to age 21 with direct pulmonary forms of ALI/ARDS. However, extension of exogenous surfactant therapy to adults with respiratory failure and clinical ALI/ARDS remains a challenge. Coverage here reviews clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS, particularly focusing on its potential advantages in patients with direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes. Also discussed is the rationale for mechanism-based therapies utilizing exogenous surfactant in combination with agents targeting other aspects of the multifaceted pathophysiology of inflammatory lung injury. Additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactant therapy in ALI/ARDS are also described, including the difficulty of effectively delivering surfactants to injured lungs and the existence of activity differences between clinical surfactant drugs. PMID:21742216

  4. Interdependent TTF1 - ErbB4 interactions are critical for surfactant protein-B homeostasis in primary mouse lung alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Marten, Elger; Nielsen, Heber C; Dammann, Christiane E L

    2015-09-01

    ErbB4 receptor and thyroid transcription factor (TTF)-1 are important modulators of fetal alveolar type II (ATII) cell development and injury. ErbB4 is an upstream regulator of TTF-1, promoting its expression in MLE-12 cells, an ATII cell line. Both proteins are known to promote surfactant protein-B gene (SftpB) and protein (SP-B) expression, but their feedback interactions on each other are not known. We hypothesized that TTF-1 expression has a feedback effect on ErbB4 expression in an in-vitro model of isolated mouse ATII cells. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the effects of overexpressing HER4 and Nkx2.1, the genes of ErbB4 and TTF-1 on TTF-1 and ErbB4 protein expression, respectively, as well as SP-B protein expression in primary fetal mouse lung ATII cells. Transient ErbB4 protein overexpression upregulated TTF-1 protein expression in primary fetal ATII cells, similarly to results previously shown in MLE-12 cells. Transient TTF-1 protein overexpression down regulated ErbB4 protein expression in both cell types. TTF-1 protein was upregulated in primary transgenic ErbB4-depleted adult ATII cells, however SP-B protein expression in these adult transgenic ATII cells was not affected by the absence of ErbB4. The observation that TTF-1 is upregulated in fetal ATII cells by ErbB4 overexpression and also in ErbB4-deleted adult ATII cells suggests additional factors interact with ErbB4 to regulate TTF-1 levels. We conclude that the interdependency of TTF-1 and ErbB4 is important for surfactant protein levels. The interactive regulation of ErbB4 and TTF-1 needs further elucidation. PMID:26198867

  5. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, L.S.; Leonard, R.A.

    1993-10-19

    A method is described for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor. 6 figures.

  6. Centrifugal pyrocontactor

    DOEpatents

    Chow, Lorac S.; Leonard, Ralph A.

    1993-01-01

    A method for mixing and separating immiscible liquid salts and liquid metals in a centrifugal contractor. The method includes introducing the liquids into an annular mixing zone and intensely mixing the liquids using vertical vanes attached to a rotor cooperating with vertical baffles, a horizontal baffle, and bottom vanes attached to the contactor housing. The liquids enter the contactor in the range of 700-800 degrees Celsius. The liquids are separated in the rotor into a dense phase and a light phase which are discharged from the contactor.

  7. Surfactant protein B deficiency: insights into surfactant function through clinical surfactant protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M W

    2001-01-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B) deficiency is a disorder of surfactant function with complete or transient absence of SP-B in term neonates. SP-B, 1 of 4 described surfactant-associated proteins, plays a key role in surfactant metabolism, particularly in intracellular packaging of surfactant components, formation of tubular myelin, and the presentation of the surfactant phospholipid monolayer to the air-fluid interface within the alveolus. Neonates with clinical SP-B deficiency best demonstrate the key role of SP-B in surfactant function. "Classic" deficiency results in severe respiratory failure in term infants and death unless lung transplantation is performed. Because the initial description of complete deficiency secondary to a homozygous frameshift mutation in codon 121 of the SP-B cDNA, partial deficiencies with differing genetic backgrounds and less severe clinical courses have been reported. These partial deficiency states may provide a clearer picture of genotype/phenotype relationships in SP-B function and surfactant metabolism. SP-B deficiency or dysfunction may be more common than once thought and may play a significant role in neonatal lung disease. PMID:11202476

  8. The protective effect of different airway humidification liquids to lung after tracheotomy in traumatic brain injury: The role of pulmonary surfactant protein-A (SP-A).

    PubMed

    Su, Xinyang; Li, Zefu; Wang, Meilin; Li, Zhenzhu; Wang, Qingbo; Lu, Wenxian; Li, Xiaoli; Zhou, Youfei; Xu, Hongmei

    2016-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to establish a rat model of a brain injury with tracheotomy and compared the wetting effects of different airway humidification liquids, afterward, the best airway humidification liquid was selected for the clinical trial, thus providing a theoretical basis for selecting a proper airway humidification liquid in a clinical setting. Rats were divided into a sham group, group A (0.9% NaCl), group B (0.45% NaCl), group C (0.9% NaCl+ambroxol) and group D (0.9% NaCl+Pulmicort). An established rat model of traumatic brain injury with tracheotomy was used. Brain tissue samples were taken to determine water content, while lung tissue samples were taken to determine wet/dry weight ratio (W/D), histological changes and expression levels of SP-A mRNA and SP-A protein. 30 patients with brain injury and tracheotomy were selected and divided into two groups based on the airway humidification liquid instilled in the trachea tube, 0.45% NaCl and 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol. Blood was then extracted from the patients to measure the levels of SP-A, interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The difference between group C and other groups in lung W/D and expression levels of SP-A mRNA and SP-A protein was significant (P<0.05). In comparison, the histological changes showed that the lung tissue damage was smallest in group C compared to the three other groups. Aspect of patients, 0.45% NaCl group and 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol group were significantly different in the levels of SP-A, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α (P<0.01). In the present study, 0.9% NaCl+ambroxol promote the synthesis and secretion of pulmonary surfactant, and has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, which inhibit the release of inflammatory factors and cytokines, making it an ideal airway humidification liquid. PMID:26611525

  9. Genetic disorders of surfactant homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Xu, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation to air breathing at birth requires the precise orchestration of cellular processes to initiate fluid clearance, enhance pulmonary blood flow, and to synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant needed to reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic programs regulating the synthesis of the surfactant proteins and lipids required for the production and function of pulmonary surfactant are highly conserved across vertebrates, and include proteins that regulate the synthesis and packaging of pulmonary surfactant proteins and lipids. Surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and -C) are small, uniquely hydrophobic proteins that play important roles in the stability and spreading of surfactant lipids in the alveolus. Deletion or mutations in SP-B and -C cause acute and chronic lung disease in neonates and infants. SP-B and -C are synthesized and packaged with surfactant phospholipids in lamellar bodies. Normal lamellar body formation requires SP-B and a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of ATP-dependent membrane-associated transport proteins, ABCA3. Mutations in ABCA3 cause fatal respiratory disease in newborns and severe chronic lung disease in infancy. Expression of SP-B, -C, and ABCA3 are coregulated during late gestation by transcriptional programs influenced by thyroid transcription factor-1 and forkhead box a2, transcription factors that regulate both differentiation of the respiratory epithelium and transcription of genes required for perinatal adaptation to air breathing. PMID:15985750

  10. Cholesterol-mediated surfactant dysfunction is mitigated by surfactant protein A.

    PubMed

    Hiansen, Joshua Qua; Keating, Eleonora; Aspros, Alex; Yao, Li-Juan; Bosma, Karen J; Yamashita, Cory M; Lewis, James F; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W

    2015-03-01

    The ability of pulmonary surfactant to reduce surface tension at the alveolar surface is impaired in various lung diseases. Recent animal studies indicate that elevated levels of cholesterol within surfactant may contribute to its inhibition. It was hypothesized that elevated cholesterol levels within surfactant inhibit human surfactant biophysical function and that these effects can be reversed by surfactant protein A (SP-A). The initial experiment examined the function of surfactant from mechanically ventilated trauma patients in the presence and absence of a cholesterol sequestering agent, methyl-β-cyclodextrin. The results demonstrated improved surface activity when cholesterol was sequestered in vitro using a captive bubble surfactometer (CBS). These results were explored further by reconstitution of surfactant with various concentrations of cholesterol with and without SP-A, and testing of the functionality of these samples in vitro with the CBS and in vivo using surfactant depleted rats. Overall, the results consistently demonstrated that surfactant function was inhibited by levels of cholesterol of 10% (w/w phospholipid) but this inhibition was mitigated by the presence of SP-A. It is concluded that cholesterol-induced surfactant inhibition can actively contribute to physiological impairment of the lungs in mechanically ventilated patients and that SP-A levels may be important to maintain surfactant function in the presence of high cholesterol within surfactant. PMID:25522687

  11. Pulmonary Surfactant: An Immunological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chroneos, Zissis C.; Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Shepherd, Virginia L.

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has two crucial roles in respiratory function; first, as a biophysical entity it reduces surface tension at the air water interface, facilitating gas exchange and alveolar stability during breathing, and, second, as an innate component of the lung's immune system it helps maintain sterility and balance immune reactions in the distal airways. Pulmonary surfactant consists of 90% lipids and 10% protein. There are four surfactant proteins named SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D; their distinct interactions with surfactant phospholipids are necessary for the ultra-structural organization, stability, metabolism, and lowering of surface tension. In addition, SP-A and SP-D bind pathogens, inflict damage to microbial membranes, and regulate microbial phagocytosis and activation or deactivation of inflammatory responses by alveolar macrophages. SP-A and SP-D, also known as pulmonary collectins, mediate microbial phagocytosis via SP-A and SP-D receptors and the coordinated induction of other innate receptors. Several receptors (SP-R210, CD91/calreticulin, SIRPα, and toll-like receptors) mediate the immunological functions of SP-A and SP-D. However, accumulating evidence indicate that SP-B and SP-C and one or more lipid constituents of surfactant share similar immuno-regulatory properties as SP-A and SP-D. The present review discusses current knowledge on the interaction of surfactant with lung innate host defense. PMID:20054141

  12. Centrifugal reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    High, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    Efficient compressor uses centrifugal force to compress gas. System incorporates two coupled dc motors, each driving separate centrifugal reciprocating-compressor assembly. Motors are synchronized to accelerate and decelerate alternately.

  13. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  14. Genetic Disorders of Surfactant Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wert, Susan E.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Nogee, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding the surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C) and the phospholipid transporter, ABCA3, are associated with respiratory distress and interstitial lung disease in the pediatric population. Expression of these proteins is regulated developmentally, increasing with gestational age, and is critical for pulmonary surfactant function at birth. Pulmonary surfactant is a unique mixture of lipids and proteins that reduces surface tension at the air-liquid interface, preventing collapse of the lung at the end of expiration. SP-B and ABCA3 are required for the normal organization and packaging of surfactant phospholipids into specialized secretory organelles, known as lamellar bodies, while both SP-B and SP-C are important for adsorption of secreted surfactant phospholipids to the alveolar surface. In general, mutations in the SP-B gene SFTPB are associated with fatal respiratory distress in the neonatal period, and mutations in the SP-C gene SFTPC are more commonly associated with interstitial lung disease in older infants, children, and adults. Mutations in the ABCA3 gene are associated with both phenotypes. Despite this general classification, there is considerable overlap in the clinical and histologic characteristics of these genetic disorders. In this review, similarities and differences in the presentation of these disorders with an emphasis on their histochemical and ultrastructural features will be described, along with a brief discussion of surfactant metabolism. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of lung disease caused by mutations in these genes will also be discussed. PMID:19220077

  15. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  16. An overview of pulmonary surfactant in the neonate: genetics, metabolism, and the role of surfactant in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Nkadi, Paul O; Merritt, T Allen; Pillers, De-Ann M

    2009-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids (PL) and proteins (SP) that reduce surface tension at the air-liquid interface of the alveolus. It is made up of about 70-80% PL, mainly dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 10% SP-A, B, C and D, and 10% neutral lipids, mainly cholesterol. Surfactant is synthesized, assembled, transported and secreted into the alveolus where it is degraded and then recycled. Metabolism of surfactant is slower in newborns, especially preterm, than in adults. Defective pulmonary surfactant metabolism results in respiratory distress with attendant morbidity and mortality. This occurs due to accelerated breakdown by oxidation, proteolytic degradation, inhibition or inherited defects of surfactant metabolism. Prenatal corticosteroids, surfactant replacement, whole lung lavage and lung transplantation have yielded results in managing some of these defects. Gene therapy could prove valuable in treating inherited defects of surfactant metabolism. PMID:19299177

  17. Alveolar surfactant homeostasis and the pathogenesis of pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Weaver, Timothy E

    2010-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  18. Alveolar Surfactant Homeostasis and the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    The alveolar region of the lung creates an extensive epithelial surface that mediates the transfer of oxygen and carbon dioxide required for respiration after birth. Maintenance of pulmonary function depends on the function of type II epithelial cells that synthesize and secrete pulmonary surfactant lipids and proteins, reducing the collapsing forces created at the air-liquid interface in the alveoli. Genetic and acquired disorders associated with the surfactant system cause both acute and chronic lung disease. Mutations in the ABCA3, SFTPA, SFTPB, SFTPC, SCL34A2, and TERT genes disrupt type II cell function and/or surfactant homeostasis, causing neonatal respiratory failure and chronic interstitial lung disease. Defects in GM-CSF receptor function disrupt surfactant clearance, causing pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Abnormalities in the surfactant system and disruption of type II cell homeostasis underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic, providing the basis for improved diagnosis and therapies of these rare lung diseases. PMID:19824815

  19. Infasurf and Curosurf: Theoretical and Practical Considerations with New Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thuy N.; Cunsolo, Stephanie M.; Gal, Peter; Ransom, J. Laurence

    2003-01-01

    Type II pneumocytes, normally responsible for surfactant production and release, are insufficiently formed and differentiated in the premature infant born before 34 weeks' gestation. Without an adequate amount of pulmonary surfactant, alveolar surface tension increases, leading to collapse and decreased lung compliance. Pulmonary surfactants are naturally occurring substances made of lipids and proteins. They lower surface tension at the interface between the air in the lungs, specifically at the alveoli, and the blood in the capillaries. This review examines the relative benefits of the two most recently marketed surfactants, calfactan (Infasurf) and poractant alfa (Curosurf). PMID:23300398

  20. METHOD OF CENTRIFUGE OPERATION

    DOEpatents

    Cohen, K.

    1960-05-10

    A method of isotope separation is described in which two streams are flowed axially of, and countercurrently through, a cylindrical centrifuge bowl. Under the influence of a centrifugal field, the light fraction is concentrated in a stream flowing through the central portion of the bowl, whereas the heavy fraction is concentrated in a stream at the periphery thereof.

  1. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  2. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their analogues.

    PubMed

    Walther, Frans J; Waring, Alan J; Sherman, Mark A; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Gordon, Larry M

    2007-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and four surfactant-associated proteins (SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D). Its major function in the lung alveolus is to reduce surface tension at the air-water interface in the terminal airways by the formation of a surface-active film enriched in surfactant lipids, hence preventing cellular collapse during respiration. Surfactant therapy using bovine or porcine lung surfactant extracts, which contain only polar lipids and native SP-B and SP-C, has dramatically improved the therapeutic outcomes of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). One important goal of surfactant researchers is to replace animal-derived therapies with fully synthetic preparations based on SP-B and SP-C, produced by recombinant technology or peptide synthesis, and reconstituted with selected synthetic lipids. Here, we review recent research developments with peptide analogues of SP-B and SP-C, designed using either the known primary sequence and three-dimensional (3D) structure of the native proteins or, alternatively, the known 3D structures of closely homologous proteins. Such SP-B and SP-C mimics offer the possibility of studying the mechanisms of action of the respective native proteins, and may allow the design of optimized surfactant formulations for specific pulmonary diseases (e.g., acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)). These synthetic surfactant preparations may also be a cost-saving therapeutic approach, with better quality control than may be obtained with animal-based treatments. PMID:17575474

  3. Delivery and performance of surfactant replacement therapies to treat pulmonary disorders

    PubMed Central

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Kaviratna, Anubhav; Berkland, Cory; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for optimal pulmonary function throughout life. An absence or deficiency of surfactant can affect the surfactant pool leading to respiratory distress. Even if the coupling between surfactant dysfunction and the underlying disease is not always well understood, using exogenous surfactants as replacement is usually a standard therapeutic option in respiratory distress. Exogenous surfactants have been extensively studied in animal models and clinical trials. The present article provides an update on the evolution of surfactant therapy, types of surfactant treatment, and development of newer-generation surfactants. The differences in the performance between various surfactants are highlighted and advanced research that has been conducted so far in developing the optimal delivery of surfactant is discussed. PMID:23919474

  4. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  5. Surfactant and its role in the pathobiology of pulmonary infection.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Jennifer R; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex surface-active substance comprised of key phospholipids and proteins that has many essential functions. Surfactant's unique composition is integrally related to its surface-active properties, its critical role in host defense, and emerging immunomodulatory activities ascribed to surfactant lipids. Together these effector functions provide for lung stability and protection from a barrage of potentially virulent infectious pathogens. PMID:21945366

  6. DESIGN INFORMATION REPORT: CENTRIFUGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the 1960s, manufacturers began to design centrifuges specifically for wastewater sludge applications. In addition, sludge thickening and dewatering processes were improved with the introduction of polyelectrolytes for chemical sludge conditioning. The report contains a brief d...

  7. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOEpatents

    Hahs, Charles A.; Burbage, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  8. Synthetic pulmonary surfactant preparations: new developments and future trends.

    PubMed

    Mingarro, Ismael; Lukovic, Dunja; Vilar, Marçal; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a lipid-protein complex that coats the interior of the alveoli and enables the lungs to function properly. Upon its synthesis, lung surfactant adsorbs at the interface between the air and the hypophase, a capillary aqueous layer covering the alveoli. By lowering and modulating surface tension during breathing, lung surfactant reduces respiratory work of expansion, and stabilises alveoli against collapse during expiration. Pulmonary surfactant deficiency, or dysfunction, contributes to several respiratory pathologies, such as infant respiratory distress syndrome (IRDS) in premature neonates, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in children and adults. The main clinical exogenous surfactants currently in use to treat some of these pathologies are essentially organic extracts obtained from animal lungs. Although very efficient, natural surfactants bear serious defects: i) they could vary in composition from batch to batch; ii) their production involves relatively high costs, and sources are limited; and iii) they carry a potential risk of transmission of animal infectious agents and the possibility of immunological reaction. All these caveats justify the necessity for a highly controlled synthetic material. In the present review the efforts aimed at new surfactant development, including the modification of existing exogenous surfactants by adding molecules that can enhance their activity, and the progress achieved in the production of completely new preparations, are discussed. PMID:18288994

  9. Pulmonary surfactant adsorption is increased by hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Taeusch, H William; Dybbro, Eric; Lu, Karen W

    2008-04-01

    In acute lung injuries, inactivating agents may interfere with transfer (adsorption) of pulmonary surfactants to the interface between air and the aqueous layer that coats the interior of alveoli. Some ionic and nonionic polymers reduce surfactant inactivation in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested directly whether an ionic polymer, hyaluronan, or a nonionic polymer, polyethylene glycol, enhanced adsorption of a surfactant used clinically. We used three different methods of measuring adsorption in vitro: a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer; a King/Clements device; and a spreading trough. In addition we measured the effects of both polymers on surfactant turbidity, using this assay as a nonspecific index of aggregation. We found that both hyaluronan and polyethylene glycol significantly increased the rate and degree of surfactant material adsorbed to the surface in all three assays. Hyaluronan was effective in lower concentrations (20-fold) than polyethylene glycol and, unlike polyethylene glycol, hyaluronan did not increase apparent aggregation of surfactant. Surfactant adsorption in the presence of serum was also enhanced by both polymers regardless of whether hyaluronan or polyethylene glycol was included with serum in the subphase or added to the surfactant applied to the surface. Therefore, endogenous polymers in the alveolar subphase, or exogenous polymers added to surfactant used as therapy, may both be important for reducing inactivation of surfactant that occurs with various lung injuries. PMID:18065212

  10. Washing of soils spiked with various pollutants by surfactant solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.C.C.; Chang, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    In this study, the batch-type of washing with surfactant solutions was employed for the treatment of soils artificially contaminated with various volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals. 15 industrial grade surfactants were tested. Washing was conducing by adding surfactant solution to the soils and mixing for one hour, then centrifuging it and analyzing the supernatant. Deionized water was used for soil washing for comparison. Results indicated that deionized water performed as well as Surfactant No. 1 in washing VOC-contaminated soils. Therefore, it is concluded that the VOCs tested can be easily washed from soils by rain water. In washing PAH-contaminated soils, nonionic surfactants performed better than anionic surfactants in terms of removal efficiency. The amphoteric surfactant performed worst in washing PAH-contaminated soils. Generally, surfactants are useful in removing cadmium from soils, but are not useful for the removal of lead and copper. Amphoteric, anionic, and low pH cationic surfactants were the most effective of those tested. For PAH/heavy metals-contaminated soils, removal efficiencies were lower than that of soils containing a single contaminant.

  11. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  12. Attack on centrifugal costs

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.F.

    1986-03-01

    The Monsanto Chocolate Bayou plant has had an aggressive and successful energy conservation program. The combined efforts have resulted in a 80% reduction in unit energy consumption compared to 1972. The approach of using system audits to optimize fluid systems was developed. Since most of the fluid movers are centrifugal, the name Centrifugal Savings Task Force was adopted. There are three tools that are particularly valuable in optimizing fluid systems. First, a working level understanding of the Affinity Laws seems a must. In addition, the performance curves for the fluid movers is needed. The last need is accurate system field data. Systems effectively managed at the Chocolate Bayou plant were process air improvement, feed-water pressure reduction, combustion air blower turbine speed control, and cooling tower pressure reduction. Optimization of centrifugal systems is an often-overlooked opportunity for energy savings. The basic guidelines are to move only the fluid needed, and move it at as low a pressure as possible.

  13. Surfactant replacement therapy for adult respiratory distress syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Evans, D A; Wilmott, R W; Whitsett, J A

    1996-05-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy may have a role in the treatment of ARDS in children. The current studies suggest that rapid instillation of exogenous surfactant is more effective than slow tracheal instillation or aerosolized delivery. Studies suggest that exogenous surfactant given early in the development of ARDS is more effective than therapy provided late in the course of the disease. Natural surfactants appear to be more effective than artificial surfactants due to the presence of SP-B and SP-C, which prevent inhibition of the exogenous surfactant by the protein leakage into the alveolus that is characteristic of ARDS. Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy appears to be safe and well tolerated. A surfactant that can be delivered by aerosol would be useful since this is more easily tolerated by the patients, requires less surfactant, and would be more cost effective when compared with tracheal instillation. Aerosolized surfactant could be given to patients who have not yet required mechanical ventilation, thus potentially preventing the progression of the acute lung injury to respiratory failure. The recent failure of a large multi-center trial of aerosolized Exosurf for the treatment of sepsis-related ARDS72 may have been due to the failure of the delivery system as opposed to the surfactant used in the trial; therefore, further research into aerosol delivery systems is needed. There may be different responses to exogenous surfactant therapy by patients with ARDS of different etiologies, such as aspiration pneumonia, sepsis, or trauma. Well-planned placebo-controlled trials will be required to determine these differences. The data supporting the role of surfactant replacement for the treatment of ARDS in children is growing. However, before widespread use of surfactant is considered, a multi-center, placebo-controlled trial will be required to establish the safety and efficacy of surfactant replacement in such patients. PMID:8726159

  14. The surfactant system protects both fetus and newborn.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant complex and its individual components decrease surface tension, silence inflammatory responses, bind and destroy air-borne microbes, facilitate phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages and bind endogenous and exogenous molecules. Surfactant components generally decrease harmful inflammatory responses. New exogenous surfactants and new indications for surfactant therapy remain to be studied. At term the pool of human surfactant from developing airways extends to the amniotic cavity and to the gastrointestinal tract. Preterm labor-inducing inflammatory ligands (interleukin-1 or lipopolysaccharide) cause a robust induction of surfactant complex and lower the risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The effect of antenatal glucocorticoid therapy is complementary. According to transgenic experiments or genetic evidence in humans, surfactant proteins A, D or C (SP-A, SP-D, SP-C), expressed in fetal tissue, influence the onset of term or preterm labor. After birth, the surface tension-reducing and the inflammation-silencing effects of exogenous and endogenous surfactant are complementary. Surfactant proteins influence the genetic predisposition of RDS, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and airway infections in early infancy. Moderate to severe BPD has a strong genetic predisposition. Deleterious mutations of SP-B, ABCA3 or SP-C cause congenital interstitial lung disease that mimics the phenotype of established severe BPD. I propose that lung surfactant protects both the fetus and the newborn. Surfactant ameliorates inflammatory responses that are harmful to the mother, fetus and infant. In chorioamnionitis, inflammatory ligands are carried from the fetal membranes to the alveolar space via amniotic fluid and developing airways. They induce surfactant synthesis and secretion. Surfactant ameliorates severe inflammatory responses in fetal compartments and promotes spontaneous preterm birth. PMID:23736009

  15. Geotechnical centrifuge under construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Modifications are underway at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in California to transform a centrifuge used in the Apollo space program to the largest geotechnical centrifuge in the free world. The centrifuge, to be finished in August and opened next January, following check out and tuning, will enable geoscientists to model stratigraphic features down to 275 m below the earth's surface. Scientists will be able to model processes that are coupled with body force loading, including earthquake response of earth structures and soil structure interaction; rubbled-bed behavior during in situ coal gasification or in oil shale in situ retorts; behavior of frozen soil; frost heave; behavior of offshore structures; wave-seabed interactions; explosive cratering; and blast-induced liquefaction.The centrifuge will have a load capacity of 900-g-tons (short); that is, it will be able to carry a net soil load of 3 short tons to a centripetal acceleration of 300 times the acceleration caused by gravity. Modified for a total cost of $2.4 million, the centrifuge will have an arm with a 7.6-m radius and a swinging platform or bucket at its end that will be able to carry a payload container measuring 2.1×2.1 m. An additional future input of $500,000 would enable the purchase of a larger bucket that could accommodate a load of up to 20 tons, according to Charles Babendreier, program director for geotechnical engineering at the National Science Foundation. Additional cooling for the motor would also be required. The centrifuge has the capability of accelerating the 20-ton load to 100 g.

  16. Regulation of surfactant secretion in alveolar type II cells.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2007-08-01

    Molecular mechanisms of surfactant delivery to the air/liquid interface in the lung, which is crucial to lower the surface tension, have been studied for more than two decades. Lung surfactant is synthesized in the alveolar type II cells. Its delivery to the cell surface is preceded by surfactant component synthesis, packaging into specialized organelles termed lamellar bodies, delivery to the apical plasma membrane and fusion. Secreted surfactant undergoes reuptake, intracellular processing, and finally resecretion of recycled material. This review focuses on the mechanisms of delivery of surfactant components to and their secretion from lamellar bodies. Lamellar bodies-independent secretion is also considered. Signal transduction pathways involved in regulation of these processes are discussed as well as disorders associated with their malfunction. PMID:17496061

  17. Pulmonary surfactant proteins and polymer combinations reduce surfactant inhibition by serum.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Echaide, Mercedes; Taeusch, H William

    2011-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is an inflammatory condition that can be associated with capillary leak of serum into alveoli causing inactivation of surfactant. Resistance to inactivation is affected by types and concentrations of surfactant proteins, lipids, and polymers. Our aim was to investigate the effects of different combinations of these three components. A simple lipid mixture (DPPC/POPG) or a more complex lipid mixture (DPPC/POPC/POPG/cholesterol) was used. Native surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C obtained from pig lung lavage were added either singly or combined at two concentrations. Also, non-ionic polymers polyethylene glycol and dextran and the anionic polymer hyaluronan were added either singly or in pairs with hyaluronan included. Non-ionic polymers work by different mechanisms than anionic polymers, thus the purpose of placing them together in the same surfactant mixture was to evaluate if the combination would show enhanced beneficial effects. The resulting surfactant mixtures were studied in the presence or absence of serum. A modified bubble surfactometer was used to evaluate surface activities. Mixtures that included both SP-B and SP-C plus hyaluronan and either dextran or polyethylene glycol were found to be the most resistant to inhibition by serum. These mixtures, as well as some with either SP-B or SP-C with combined polymers were as or more resistant to inactivation than native surfactant. These results suggest that improved formulations of lung surfactants are possible and may be useful in reducing some types of surfactant inactivation in treating lung injuries. PMID:21741354

  18. Enhancing Centrifugal Separation With Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, F. T.

    1986-01-01

    Separation of biological cells by coil-planet centrifuge enhanced by electrophoresis. By itself, coil-planet centrifuge offers relatively gentle method of separating cells under low centrifugal force in physiological medium that keeps cells alive. With addition of voltage gradient to separation column of centrifuge, separation still gentle but faster and more complete. Since separation apparatus contains no rotary seal, probability of leakage, contamination, corrosion, and short circuits reduced.

  19. Lung surfactant proteins A and D can inhibit specific IgE binding to the allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus and block allergen-induced histamine release from human basophils

    PubMed Central

    MADAN, T; KISHORE, U; SHAH, A; EGGLETON, P; STRONG, P; WANG, J Y; AGGRAWAL, S S; SARMA, P U; REID, K B M

    1997-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which, in the immunocompetent host, causes allergic disorders such as allergic rhinitis, allergic sinusitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). In the present study, the interaction of 3-week culture filtrate (3wcf) allergens and various purified glycosylated and non-glycosylated allergens of A. fumigatus with lung surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, was investigated. Purified SP-A and SP-D, isolated from human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, bound to the 3wcf allergens and purified allergens, gp55 and gp45, in a carbohydrate-specific and calcium-dependent manner. Both SP-A and SP-D did not bind to deglycosylated allergens, suggesting that the ability of SP-A and SP-D to bind certain allergens is mediated through their carbohydrate recognition domains, interacting with the carbohydrate residues on the allergen. Both SP-A and SP-D could inhibit the ability of allergen-specific IgE from Aspergillosis patients to bind these allergens, suggesting that SP-A and SP-D may be involved in the modulation of allergic sensitization and/or development of allergic reactions. The view that SP-A and SP-D play a protective role against airborne allergens is further supported by the demonstration of their ability to inhibit A. fumigatus allergen-induced histamine release from allergic patients' basophils. PMID:9367408

  20. Lung surfactant proteins A and D can inhibit specific IgE binding to the allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus and block allergen-induced histamine release from human basophils.

    PubMed

    Madan, T; Kishore, U; Shah, A; Eggleton, P; Strong, P; Wang, J Y; Aggrawal, S S; Sarma, P U; Reid, K B

    1997-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which, in the immunocompetent host, causes allergic disorders such as allergic rhinitis, allergic sinusitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). In the present study, the interaction of 3-week culture filtrate (3wcf) allergens and various purified glycosylated and non-glycosylated allergens of A. fumigatus with lung surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, was investigated. Purified SP-A and SP-D, isolated from human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, bound to the 3wcf allergens and purified allergens, gp55 and gp45, in a carbohydrate-specific and calcium-dependent manner. Both SP-A and SP-D did not bind to deglycosylated allergens, suggesting that the ability of SP-A and SP-D to bind certain allergens is mediated through their carbohydrate recognition domains, interacting with the carbohydrate residues on the allergen. Both SP-A and SP-D could inhibit the ability of allergen-specific IgE from Aspergillosis patients to bind these allergens, suggesting that SP-A and SP-D may be involved in the modulation of allergic sensitization and/or development of allergic reactions. The view that SP-A and SP-D play a protective role against airborne allergens is further supported by the demonstration of their ability to inhibit A. fumigatus allergen-induced histamine release from allergic patients' basophils. PMID:9367408

  1. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  2. Lightweight Shield for Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luper, C.

    1982-01-01

    Centrifuge bowl composed of laminated aluminum offers required combination of high strength at reduced weight. Around outside wall of bowl core of 1/16 inch thick spun aluminum are wrapped two layers of aluminum, each also one-sixteenth inch thick. Layered structure prevents cracks from propagating through wall.

  3. Effect of a bovine lung surfactant protein isolate (SP-B/C) on egg phosphatidylglycerol acyl chain order in a lipid mixture with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and palmitic acid.

    PubMed

    Krill, S L; Gupta, S L

    1994-04-01

    Dynamic surface tension measurements of films of a d62 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine:L-alpha-phosphatidyl-DL - glycerol:d31 palmitic acid (d62-DPPC:EggPG:d31-PA) lipid matrix in the presence of a bovine pulmonary surfactant protein isolate (SP-B/C) demonstrate the improved surface activity over that of the lipids alone. Thus, significant interaction of the proteins with the lipid matrix is demonstrated. The effect of SP-B/C on the acyl chain order of the negatively charged EggPG within a d62-DPPC:EggPG:d31-PA lipid matrix in D2O saline was investigated in thermal perturbation Fourier transform IR spectroscopic studies. The EggPG thermotropic phase behavior was determined independently of the other lipid components with perdeuterated lipids and D2O. The data demonstrate the high degree of EggPG acyl chain disorder in the absence of the protein isolate. A broad transition occurs between 30 and 40 degrees C. The addition of the protein isolate did not alter the acyl chain order at 0.281 and 1.46 mg/mL of protein. However, alterations in the lipid carbonyl vibrational mode were observed. PMID:8046609

  4. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  5. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  6. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  7. Liquid and surfactant delivery into pulmonary airways

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, David; Fujioka, Hideki; Takayama, Shuichi; Grotberg, James B.

    2008-01-01

    We describe the mechanisms by which liquids and surfactants can be delivered into the pulmonary airways. These are instilled and transported throughout the lung in clinical therapies such as surfactant replacement therapy, partial liquid ventilation and drug delivery. The success of these treatments is contingent on the liquid distribution and the delivery to targeted regions of the lung. The targeting of a liquid plug can be influenced by a variety of factors such as the physical properties of the liquid, the interfacial activity, the gravitational orientation, instillation method and propagation speed. We provide a review of experimental and theoretical studies that examine these effects in single tubes or channels, in tubes with single bifurcations and in the whole lung. PMID:18585985

  8. Structure-function relationships in pulmonary surfactant membranes: from biophysics to therapy.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Elena; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is an essential lipid-protein complex to maintain an operative respiratory surface at the mammalian lungs. It reduces surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface to stabilise the lungs against physical forces operating along the compression-expansion breathing cycles. At the same time, surfactant integrates elements establishing a primary barrier against the entry of pathogens. Lack or deficiencies of the surfactant system are associated with respiratory pathologies, which treatment often includes supplementation with exogenous materials. The present review summarises current models on the molecular mechanisms of surfactant function, with particular emphasis in its biophysical properties to stabilise the lungs and the molecular alterations connecting impaired surfactant with diseased organs. It also provides a perspective on the current surfactant-based strategies to treat respiratory pathologies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy. PMID:24525076

  9. [The ocular surfactant system and its relevance in the dry eye].

    PubMed

    Schicht, M; Posa, A; Paulsen, F; Bräuer, L

    2010-11-01

    The amphiphilic surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) are tightly bound to phospholipids. These proteins play important roles in maintaining the surface tension-lowering properties of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) are hydrophilic and are thought to have a role in recycling surfactant and, especially, in improving host defense in the lung. Moreover, SP-A supports the hydrophobic surfactant proteins B and during surfactant subtype assembly and inhibits the secretion of lamellar bodies into the alveolar space. During recent years surfactant proteins have also been detected at locations outside the lung such as the lacrimal apparatus. In this review, the latest information regarding SP function and regulation in the human lacrimal system, the tear film and the ocular surface is summarised with regard to dry eye, rheological and antimicrobial properties of the tear film, tear outflow, certain disease states and possible therapeutic perspectives. PMID:21077020

  10. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  11. Centrifugally decoupling touchdown bearings

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F

    2014-06-24

    Centrifugally decoupling mechanical bearing systems provide thin tensioned metallic ribbons contained in a support structure. This assembly rotates around a stationary shaft being centered at low speeds by the action of the metal ribbons. Tension springs are connected on one end to the ribbons and on the other end to the support structure. The ribbons pass through slots in the inner ring of the support structure. The spring preloading thus insures contact (or near-contact) between the ribbons and the shaft at rotation speeds below the transition speed. Above this speed, however, the centrifugal force on the ribbons produces a tensile force on them that exceeds the spring tensile force so that the ribbons curve outward, effectively decoupling them from mechanical contact with the shaft. They still remain, however, in position to act as a touchdown bearing in case of abnormally high transverse accelerations.

  12. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Collin; Polley, Dennis C.; Ferritto, Frank; Elston, Dirk M.

    2013-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is a common cause of progressive permanent apical alopecia. This unique form of alopecia includes entities previously know as “hot comb alopecia,” “follicular degeneration syndrome,” “pseudopelade” in African Americans and “central elliptical pseudopelade” in Caucasians. The etiology appears to be multifactorial and the condition occurs in all races. PMID:23440368

  13. Centrifugal fan monitoring guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Piety, K.R.; Piety, R.W.; Greene, R.H.; Johnson, E.L. )

    1991-07-01

    This study provide guidelines on the vibration monitoring of centrifugal fans in fossil-fired utility plants. Based on an intensive analysis of a fan database, it provides a substantial amount of detailed information relating to vibration patterns and vibration amplitudes and recommends parameter bands and alarm levels. The study focuses on forced draft, induced draft, primary air, and gas recirculating fans. 8 refs., 19 figs., 19 tabs.

  14. Centrifugal adsorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R. (Inventor); Tsao, Yow-Min D. (Inventor); Lee, Wenshan (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A gas-liquid separator uses a helical passageway to impart a spiral motion to a fluid passing therethrough. The centrifugal force generated by the spiraling motion urges the liquid component of the fluid radially outward which forces the gas component radially inward. The gas component is then separated through a gas-permeable, liquid-impervious membrane and discharged through a central passageway. A filter material captures target substances contained in the fluid.

  15. Oscillatory counter-centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shujing; Nadim, Ali

    2016-02-01

    In ordinary centrifugation, a suspended particle that is heavier than the displaced fluid migrates away from the rotation axis when the fluid-filled container rotates steadily about that axis. In contrast a particle that is lighter than the displaced fluid (e.g., a bubble) migrates toward the rotation axis in a centrifuge. In this paper, we show theoretically that if a fluid-filled container rotates in an oscillatory manner as a rigid body about an axis, at high enough oscillation frequencies, the sense of migration of suspended particles is reversed. That is, in that case particles denser than the fluid migrate inward, while those that are lighter than the fluid move outward. We term this unusual phenomenon "Oscillatory Counter-Centrifugation" or OCC, for short. Through application of the method of averaging to the equations of motion, we derive a simple criterion to predict the occurrence of OCC. The analysis also reveals that the time-average of the Coriolis force in the radial direction is the term that is responsible for this effect. In addition, we analyze the effects of the Basset history force and the Rubinow-Keller lift force on particle trajectories and find that OCC persists even when these forces are active. The phenomenon awaits experimental verification.

  16. Gas Centrifuges and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, David

    2004-09-15

    Gas centrifuges have been an ideal enrichment method for a wide variety of countries. Many countries have built gas centrifuges to make enriched uranium for peaceful nuclear purposes. Other countries have secretly sought centrifuges to make highly enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. In more recent times, several countries have secretly sought or built gas centrifuges in regions of tension. The main countries that have been of interest in the last two decades have been Pakistan, Iraq, Iran, and North Korea. Currently, most attention is focused on Iran, Pakistan, and North Korea. These states did not have the indigenous abilities to make gas centrifuges, focusing instead on illicit and questionable foreign procurement. The presentation covered the following main sections: Spread of centrifuges through illicit procurement; Role of export controls in stopping proliferation; Increasing the transparency of gas centrifuge programs in non-nuclear weapon states; and, Verified dismantlement of gas centrifuge programs. Gas centrifuges are important providers of low enriched uranium for civil nuclear power reactors. They also pose special nuclear proliferation risks. We all have special responsibilities to prevent the spread of gas centrifuges into regions of tension and to mitigate the consequences of their spread into the Middle East, South Asia, and North Asia.

  17. Biomarker tests for fetal lung maturity.

    PubMed

    Leung-Pineda, Van; Gronowski, Ann M

    2010-12-01

    The production of surfactant is a key step in fetal lung development. Surfactant decreases alveolar surface tension, thereby preventing alveolar collapse and allowing efficient gas exchange. The lack of adequate amounts of lung surfactant results in respiratory distress syndrome. Tests that assess surfactant concentrations in amniotic fluid are good predictors of infants that will not develop respiratory distress syndrome. The most frequently used test to assess fetal lung maturity (TDx FLM II) will not be available after December 2011. Therefore, we review the currently available tests for fetal lung maturity including lecithin:sphingomyelin ratio, phosphatidyl glycerol, surfactant:albumin ratio and lamellar body counts. Herein, we discuss their clinical utility and consider a suitable replacement for the future. PMID:21133706

  18. Extraction and Quantification of Carbon Nanotubes in Biological Matrices with Application to Rat Lung Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Doudrick, Kyle; Corson, Nancy; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison; Herckes, Pierre; Halden, Rolf U.; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Extraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from biological matrices such as rat lung tissue is integral to developing a quantification method for evaluating the environmental and human health exposure and toxicity of CNTs. The ability of various chemical treatment methods, including Solvable (2.5% sodium hydroxide/surfactant mixture), ammonium hydroxide, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and proteinase K, to extract CNTs from rat lung tissue was evaluated. CNTs were quantified using programmed thermal analysis (PTA). Two CNTs were used to represent the lower (500°C) and upper (800°C) PTA limit of CNT thermal stability. The recovery efficiency of each of the eight chemical reagents evaluated was found to depend on the ability to (1) minimize oxidation of CNTs, (2) remove interfering background carbon from the rat lung tissue, and (3) separate the solid-phase CNTs from the liquid-phase dissolved tissue via centrifugation. A two-step extraction method using Solvable and proteinase K emerged as the optimal approach, enabling a recovery of 98 ± 15% of a 2.9 ± 0.19 µg CNT loading that was spiked into whole rat lungs. Due to its high yield and applicability to low organ burdens of nanomaterials, this extraction method is particularly well suited for in vivo studies to quantify clearance rates and retained CNTs in lungs and other organs. PMID:23992048

  19. Pulmonary surfactant: no mere paint on the alveolar wall.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, T E

    1996-12-01

    The gas-liquid interface within the alveolus is completely lined with a complex mixture of lipids and unique proteins termed pulmonary surfactant, which both reduces surface tension and permits it to vary directly with the radius of curvature. In this way it minimizes the work of breathing and permits alveoli of different sizes to exist in equilibrium. However, surfactant does far more in that it also controls fluid balance in the lung and appears to play a key role in host defence. Either a deficiency in surfactant or an aberrant surfactant results in atelectasis and oedema. The surfactant system is very dynamic: alveolar surfactant phosphatidylcholine, the principal component, having a half life of only a few hours, with as much as 85% being recycled. Although distortion of the alveolar type II cell is now accepted as the principal stimulus for release, much remains to be discovered of modulating factors and intracellular signalling in the control of surfactant homeostasis. Likewise, many questions remain concerning the control of synthesis of the surfactant phospholipids, neutral lipids and proteins and their assembly into the tubular myelin form of alveolar surfactant, the refining of the monolayer with breathing, the control of re-uptake of different components into the type II cells and the roles of the proteins. PMID:9441113

  20. The Magnetic Centrifugal Mass Filter

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-08-04

    Mass filters using rotating plasmas have been considered for separating nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel. We propose a new mass filter that utilizes centrifugal and magnetic confinement of ions in a way similar to the asymmetric centrifugal trap. This magnetic centrifugal mass filter is shown to be more proliferation resistant than present technology. This filter is collisional and produces well confined output streams, among other advantages. __________________________________________________

  1. Centrifuge impact cratering experiment 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Transient crates motions, cratering flow fields, crates dynamics, determining impact conditions from total crater welt, centrifuge quarter-space cratering, and impact cratering mechanics research is documented.

  2. CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

    1999-10-01

    The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

  3. Composition, structure and mechanical properties define performance of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films.

    PubMed

    Parra, Elisa; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory surface in the mammalian lung is stabilized by pulmonary surfactant, a membrane-based system composed of multiple lipids and specific proteins, the primary function of which is to minimize the surface tension at the alveolar air-liquid interface, optimizing the mechanics of breathing and avoiding alveolar collapse, especially at the end of expiration. The goal of the present review is to summarize current knowledge regarding the structure, lipid-protein interactions and mechanical features of surfactant membranes and films and how these properties correlate with surfactant biological function inside the lungs. Surfactant mechanical properties can be severely compromised by different agents, which lead to surfactant inhibition and ultimately contributes to the development of pulmonary disorders and pathologies in newborns, children and adults. A detailed comprehension of the unique mechanical and rheological properties of surfactant layers is crucial for the diagnostics and treatment of lung diseases, either by analyzing the contribution of surfactant impairment to the pathophysiology or by improving the formulations in surfactant replacement therapies. Finally, a short review is also included on the most relevant experimental techniques currently employed to evaluate lung surfactant mechanics, rheology, and inhibition and reactivation processes. PMID:25260665

  4. Centrifugal-reciprocating compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higa, W. H. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A centrifugal compressor is described which includes at least one pair of cylinders arranged in coaxial alignment and supported for angular displacement about a common axis of rotation normally disecting a common longitudinal axis of symmetry for the cylinders. The cylinders are characterized by ported closures located at the mutually remote ends thereof through which the cylinders are charged and discharged, and a pair of piston heads seated within the cylinders and supported for floating displacement in compressive strokes in response to unidirectional angular displacement imparted to the cylinders.

  5. National geotechnical centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, J. A.; Kunz, N.; Vallotton, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    A high G-ton centrifuge, able to take a 2700 kg (6000 lb) payload up to 300 G, is described. The stability of dams and embankments, the bearing capacity of soil foundations, and the dynamic behavior of foundations due to vibration of machinery are examples of applications. A power rating of 6,000 kW (9,000 hp) was established for the motor. An acceptable maximum speed of 70 rpm was determined. A speed increase with a ratio of 1:3 is discussed. The isolated tension straps, the anti-spreader bar and the flexwall bucket, and safety precautions are also discussed.

  6. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  7. Positive end-expiratory pressure preserves surfactant function in preterm lambs.

    PubMed

    Michna, J; Jobe, A H; Ikegami, M

    1999-08-01

    Ventilation style influences lung injury and the amount of large-aggregate biophysically active surfactant in adult lungs. We asked how positive end-expiratory pressures (PEEP) would influence clinical responses and surfactant pools in surfactant-treated preterm lambs ventilated for 7 h with tidal volumes (VT) of 10 ml/kg. The 126-d gestation preterms were delivered and treated with 100 mg/kg recombinant human surfactant protein C (rSP-C) containing surfactant and ventilated with zero, 4, or 7 cm H(2)O of PEEP. A comparison group was treated with natural sheep surfactant and ventilated with zero PEEP. Physiologic measurements were similar for lambs treated with rSP-C surfactant and natural surfactant. PEEP 4 and 7 improved oxygenation and compliance relative to either group of lambs ventilated with PEEP zero. The maximal lung volumes measured at 40 cm H(2)O pressure after 7 h ventilation for the PEEP 4 and 7 groups were more than double those measured for either PEEP zero group. Alveolar surfactant pools were larger for the PEEP 7 group, and the large-aggregate fraction was increased for the PEEP 4 and 7 groups, resulting in large-aggregate pool sizes that were 3-fold higher for the PEEP 4 and 4-fold higher for the PEEP 7 groups relative to the PEEP zero group treated with rSP-C surfactant. All large-aggregate surfactants lowered minimal surface tensions of a captive bubble to less than 5 mN/m. In preterm surfactant-treated lambs PEEP improved lung function and maintained more of an rSP-C surfactant in the biophysically active form. PMID:10430740

  8. Surfactant administration in neonates: A review of delivery methods.

    PubMed

    Nouraeyan, Nina; Lambrinakos-Raymond, Alicia; Leone, Marisa; Sant'Anna, Guilherme

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant has revolutionized the treatment of respiratory distress syndrome and some other respiratory conditions that affect the fragile neonatal lung. Despite its widespread use, the optimal method of surfactant administration in preterm infants has yet to be clearly determined. The present article reviews several aspects of administration techniques that can influence surfactant delivery into the pulmonary airways: the bolus volume, injection rate, gravity and orientation, ventilation strategies, alveolar recruitment, and viscosity and surface tension of the fluid instilled. Based on the present review, knowledge gaps regarding the best way to administer surfactant to neonates remain. From the available evidence, however, the most effective way to optimize surfactant delivery and obtain a more homogeneous distribution of the drug is by using rapid bolus instillation in combination with appropriate alveolar recruitment techniques. PMID:26078618

  9. Surfactant Uptake Dynamics in Mammalian Cells Elucidated with Quantitative Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Okuno, Masanari; Kano, Hideaki; Fujii, Kenkichi; Bito, Kotatsu; Naito, Satoru; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of surfactant-induced cell lysis has been studied with quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microspectroscopy. The dynamics of surfactant molecules as well as intracellular biomolecules in living Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL) cells has been examined for a low surfactant concentration (0.01 w%). By using an isotope labeled surfactant having CD bonds, surfactant uptake dynamics in living cells has been traced in detail. The simultaneous CARS imaging of the cell itself and the internalized surfactant has shown that the surfactant molecules is first accumulated inside a CHL cell followed by a sudden leak of cytosolic components such as proteins to the outside of the cell. This finding indicates that surfactant uptake occurs prior to the cell lysis, contrary to what has been believed: surface adsorption of surfactant molecules has been thought to occur first with subsequent disruption of cell membranes. Quantitative CARS microspectroscopy enables us to determine the molecular concentration of the surfactant molecules accumulated in a cell. We have also investigated the effect of a drug, nocodazole, on the surfactant uptake dynamics. As a result of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization by nocodazole, the surfactant uptake rate is significantly lowered. This fact suggests that intracellular membrane trafficking contributes to the surfactant uptake mechanism. PMID:24710120

  10. Centrifugal shot blast system

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997.