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Sample records for lung transplantation experience

  1. Pediatric lung transplantation: 10 years of experience

    PubMed Central

    Camargo, Priscila C. L. B.; Pato, Eduardo Z. S.; Campos, Silvia V.; Afonso, José E.; Carraro, Rafael M.; Costa, André N.; Teixeira, Ricardo H. O. B.; Samano, Marcos N.; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a well-established treatment for advanced lung diseases. In children, the diseases that most commonly lead to the need for a transplantation are cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension, and bronchiolitis. However, the number of pediatric lung transplantations being performed is low compared with the number of transplants performed in the adult age group. The objective of this study was to demonstrate our experience with pediatric lung transplants over a 10-year period in a program initially designed for adults. PMID:24860860

  2. Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Lung Transplant? A lung transplant is surgery to remove a person's diseased lung ... a healthy lung from a deceased donor. Lung transplants are used for people who are likely to ...

  3. Experience of the Reina Sofia hospital in lobar lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, D; Algar, F J; Moreno, P; Illana, J; Alvarez, A; Cerezo, F; Baamonde, C; Santos, F; Vaquero, J M; Redel, J; Salvatierra, A

    2010-10-01

    The number of patients awaiting lung transplantation has steadily increased over the past decade, but the number of donors has remained relatively stable. Owing to the increasing scarcity of donor lungs, especially for pediatric and small adult recipients, advanced operative strategies for the use of larger grafts for smaller recipients have been developed. Size matching between donors and recipients represents one of the organ distribution criteria widely accepted by lung transplantation teams. However, in some cases it is not possible to allocate a donor to the corresponding size-compatible recipient. To avoid possible complications derived from the implantation of oversized lungs into smaller recipients, various methods of downsizing are applied for cadaveric donor lungs, such as lobar transplantation. We review our experience in 6 patients undergoing volume reduction of the lung graft by lobar resection at the time of transplantation. Graft volume reduction by anatomic resection (lobar transplantation) is a reliable and safe procedure to overcome size disparities between the donor and the recipient of a lung transplant, and thus to maximize the number of donors. PMID:20970656

  4. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/20675678 . Kotloff RM, Keshavjee S. Lung transplantation. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst MD, et ... 58. Solomon M, Grasemann H, Keshavjee S. Pediatric lung transplantation. Pediatr Clin North Am . 2010; 57(2):375- ...

  5. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  6. Lung transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases that may require a lung transplant are: Cystic fibrosis Damage to the arteries of the lung because ... BC; Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pulmonary Therapies Committee; ... Therapies Committee. Cystic fibrosis pulmonary guidelines: ...

  7. Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation may be the only intervention that can prolong survival and improve quality of life for those individuals with advanced lung disease who are acceptable candidates for the procedure. However, these candidates may be extremely ill and require ventilator and/or circulatory support as a bridge to transplantation, and lung transplantation recipients are at risk of numerous post-transplant complications that include surgical complications, primary graft dysfunction, acute rejection, opportunistic infection, and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), which may be caused by chronic rejection. Many advances in pre- and post-transplant management have led to improved outcomes over the past decade. These include the creation of sound guidelines for candidate selection, improved surgical techniques, advances in donor lung preservation, an improving ability to suppress and treat allograft rejection, the development of prophylaxis protocols to decrease the incidence of opportunistic infection, more effective therapies for treating infectious complications, and the development of novel therapies to treat and manage CLAD. A major obstacle to prolonged survival beyond the early post-operative time period is the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), which is the most common form of CLAD. This manuscript discusses recent and evolving advances in the field of lung transplantation. PMID:23710330

  8. Lung Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... years. Their conditions are so severe that other treatments, such as medicines or breathing devices, no longer work. Lung transplants most often are used to treat people who have severe COPD Cystic fibrosis Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency Pulmonary ...

  9. Who Needs a Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Needs a Lung Transplant? Your doctor may recommend a lung transplant ... lungs to pick up oxygen. Applying to a Lung Transplant Program Lung transplants are done in medical ...

  10. Liver and lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis: an adult cystic fibrosis centre's experience.

    PubMed

    Sivam, S; Al-Hindawi, Y; Di Michiel, J; Moriarty, C; Spratt, P; Jansz, P; Malouf, M; Plit, M; Pleass, H; Havryk, A; Bowen, D; Haber, P; Glanville, A R; Bye, P T P

    2016-07-01

    Liver disease develops in one-third of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It is rare for liver disease to have its onset after 20 years of age. Lung disease, however, is usually more severe in adulthood. A retrospective analysis was performed on nine patients. Three patients required lung transplantation approximately a decade after liver transplant, and another underwent combined liver and lung transplants. Four additional patients with liver transplants are awaiting assessment for lung transplants. One patient is awaiting combined liver and lung transplants. With increased survival in CF, several patients may require more than single organ transplantation. PMID:27405894

  11. Lung transplantation at Duke

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Alice L.; Hartwig, Matthew G.

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation represents the gold-standard therapy for patients with end-stage lung disease. Utilization of this therapy continues to rise. The Lung Transplant Program at Duke University Medical Center was established in 1992, and since that time has grown to one of the highest volume centers in the world. The program to date has performed over 1,600 lung transplants. This report represents an up-to-date review of the practice and management strategies employed for safe and effective lung transplantation at our center. Specific attention is paid to the evaluation of candidacy for lung transplantation, donor selection, surgical approach, and postoperative management. These evidence-based strategies form the foundation of the clinical transplantation program at Duke. PMID:27076968

  12. Anesthetic experience in patient for single lung transplantation with previous contralateral pneumonectomy -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji-Hyun; Cha, Seung-Cheol; Hwang, Jin-Hwan; Woo, Seong Chang

    2012-05-01

    A 48-year-old woman with cystic fibrosis and a previous left pneumonectomy had surgery planned for single lung transplantation under general anesthesia. Due to progressive dyspnea and recurrent respiratory infection, she could not maintain her normal daily life without lung transplantation. The anesthetic management and surgical procedure was expected to be difficult because of the left mediastinal shift and an asymmetric thorax after the left pneumonectomy, but the single lung transplantation was successfully done under cardiopulmonary bypass. PMID:22679547

  13. Immunosuppression for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Choo Y.; Madsen, Joren C.; Rosengard, Bruce R.; Allan, James S.

    2010-01-01

    1. ABSTRACT As a result of advances in surgical techniques, immunosuppressive therapy, and postoperative management, lung transplantation has become an established therapeutic option for individuals with a variety of end-stage lung diseases. The current 1-year actuarial survival rate following lung transplantation is approaching 80%. However, the 5- year actuarial survival rate has remained virtually unchanged at approximately 50% over the last 15 years due to the processes of acute and chronic lung allograft rejection (1). Clinicians still rely on a vast array of immunosuppressive agents to suppress the process of graft rejection, but find themselves limited by an inescapable therapeutic paradox. Insufficient immunosuppression results in graft loss due to rejection, while excess immunosuppression results in increased morbidity and mortality from opportunistic infections and malignancies. Indeed, graft rejection, infection, and malignancy are the three principal causes of mortality for the lung transplant recipient. One should also keep in mind that graft loss in a lung transplant recipient is usually a fatal event, since there is no practical means of long-term mechanical support, and since the prospects of re-transplantation are low, given the shortage of acceptable donor grafts. This chapter reviews the current state of immunosuppressive therapy for lung transplantation and suggests alternative paradigms for the management of future lung transplant recipients. PMID:19273152

  14. Xenogeneic lung transplantation models

    PubMed Central

    Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Study of lung xenografts has proven useful to understand the remaining barriers to successful transplantation of other organ xenografts. In this chapter, the history and current status of lung xenotransplantation will be briefly reviewed and two different experimental models, the ex vivo porcine-to-human lung perfusion and the in vivo xenogeneic lung transplantation, will be presented. We will focus on the technical details of these lung xenograft models in sufficient detail, list the needed materials and mention analysis techniques to allow others to adopt them with minimal learning curve. PMID:22565996

  15. Overview of Clinical Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jonathan C.; Keshavjee, Shaf

    2014-01-01

    Since the first successful lung transplant 30 years ago, lung transplantation has rapidly become an established standard of care to treat end-stage lung disease in selected patients. Advances in lung preservation, surgical technique, and immunosuppression regimens have resulted in the routine performance of lung transplantation around the world for an increasing number of patients, with wider indications. Despite this, donor shortages and chronic lung allograft dysfunction continue to prevent lung transplantation from reaching its full potential. With research into the underlying mechanisms of acute and chronic lung graft dysfunction and advances in personalized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to both the donor lung and the lung transplant recipient, there is increasing confidence that we will improve short- and long-term outcomes in the near future. PMID:24384816

  16. What Are the Risks of Lung Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Risks of Lung Transplant? A lung transplant can improve your quality of life and ... highest. In recent years, short-term survival after lung transplant has improved. Recent data on single-lung ...

  17. Longitudinal Analysis of the Lung Microbiome in Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Borewicz, Klaudyna; Pragman, Alexa A.; Kim, Hyeun Bum; Hertz, Marshall; Wendt, Christine; Isaacson, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung transplant recipients experience poor long-term survival, largely due to chronic rejection. The pathogenesis of chronic rejection is incompletely understood, but bacterial colonization of the lung is associated with chronic rejection, while antibiotic use slows its progression. The lung harbors a bacterial community, termed the microbiome, which is present both in health and disease. We hypothesize that the lung microbiome will change following transplantation, and these changes may correspond to the development of rejection. Twelve bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples were obtained from four patients at three time points after transplantation and two BALF samples were obtained from healthy, non-transplant controls. The microbiome of each sample was determined by pyrosequencing the 16S rDNA hypervariable 3 region. The data were analyzed using mothur, Ribosomal Database Project Classifier, Fast UniFrac, and Metastats. Transplanted lungs contained more bacterial sequences and demonstrated more microbial diversity than did control lungs. Bacteria in the phyla Proteobacteria (class Betaproteobacteria) predominated in the transplant samples. In contrast, the microbiome of the healthy lung consisted of the phyla Proteobacteria (class Gammaproteobacteria) and Firmicutes. The microbiome of the transplanted lung is vastly different from that of healthy lungs, mainly due to the presence of the family Burkholderiaceae in transplant samples. PMID:23173619

  18. Heart-lung transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100147.htm Heart-lung transplant - series To use the sharing features on this ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Heart Transplantation Lung Transplantation A.D.A.M., Inc. is ...

  19. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Frederick R.; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H.; Barr, Mark L.; Blackwell, Laura S.; Bosma, Otto H.; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D. R.; Jensen, Judy L.; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D.; Quittner, Alexandra L.; Robinson, Walter M.; Romero, Sandy L.; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C.; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.; Vrijlandt, Elianne J. L. E.; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S.; Liou, Theodore G.

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing and transplantation on the patient's quality of life. Although recent population-based analyses of the US lung allocation system for the CF population have raised controversies about the survival benefits of transplantation, studies from the United Kingdom and Canada have suggested a definite survival advantage for those receiving transplants. In response to these and other controversies, leaders in transplantation and CF met together in Lansdowne, Virginia, to consider the state of the art in lung transplantation for CF in an international context, focusing on advances in surgical technique, measurement of outcomes, use of prognostic criteria, variations in local control over listing, and prioritization among the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and The Netherlands, patient adherence before and after transplantation and other issues in the broader context of lung transplantation. Finally, the conference members carefully considered how efforts to improve outcomes for lung transplantation for CF lung disease might best be studied. This Roundtable seeks to communicate the substance of our discussions. PMID:20008865

  20. What to Expect During a Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect During a Lung Transplant Just before lung transplant surgery, you will ... airway and its blood vessels to your heart. Lung Transplant The illustration shows the process of a ...

  1. Heart-lung transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A combined heart-lung transplant may be recommended for patients who have both cardiac and lung disease. The most common reasons for a combined heart-lung transplant are pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, ...

  2. Physical therapy in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Downs, A M

    1996-06-01

    Lung transplantation requires the skillful attention of a health care team to provide optimal results. The physical therapist is an integral part of this team, providing expertise in exercise testing and prescription in all phases, from initial evaluation through postoperative rehabilitation and beyond. In addition, the physical therapist promotes effective ventilation, offers techniques for enhanced coughing and mucociliary clearance, and provides treatment of the musculoskeletal system. Lung transplantation is reserved for patients in whom all other treatments have been exhausted. It is important for the physical therapist to stay abreast of the evolving field of lung transplantation, including medications and complications. The physical therapist has a critical role in helping lung transplant recipients achieve optimal function, increased survival, and improved quality of life. PMID:8650277

  3. Topical amphotericin B application in severe bronchial aspergillosis after lung transplantation: report of experiences in 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Boettcher, H; Bewig, B; Hirt, S W; Möller, F; Cremer, J

    2000-12-01

    Ulcerative tracheobronchial aspergillosis after lung transplantation (ltx) may lead to bronchial-pulmonary artery fistula that results in fatal bleeding. We report our early experience with combined systemic, aerolized and topical application of amphotericin B in 3 cases of bronchial aspergillosis after ltx. Two patients are still alive, but 1 died of bleeding from a fistula between the left upper lobe bronchus and the pulmonary artery. Aspergillosis in the second patient resolved with minimal stenosis of the left main and the left upper lobe bronchus, and the third patient developed an anastomotic stenosis that was successfully dilated. PMID:11124494

  4. Bronchoscopic procedures and lung biopsies in pediatric lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jackson Y; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Gregory I

    2015-12-01

    Bronchoscopy remains a pivotal diagnostic and therapeutic intervention in pediatric patients undergoing lung transplantation (LTx). Whether performed as part of a surveillance protocol or if clinically indicated, fibre-optic bronchoscopy allows direct visualization of the transplanted allograft, and in particular, an assessment of the patency of the bronchial anastomosis (or tracheal anastomosis following heart-lung transplantation). Additionally, bronchoscopy facilitates differentiation of infective processes from rejection episodes through collection and subsequent assessment of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsy (TBBx) samples. Indeed, the diagnostic criteria for the grading of acute cellular rejection is dependent upon the histopathological assessment of biopsy samples collected at the time of bronchoscopy. Typically, performed in an out-patient setting, bronchoscopy is generally a safe procedure, although complications related to hemorrhage and pneumothorax are occasionally seen. Airway complications, including stenosis, malacia, and dehiscence are diagnosed at bronchoscopy, and subsequent management including balloon dilatation, laser therapy and stent insertion can also be performed bronchoscopically. Finally, bronchoscopy has been and continues to be an important research tool allowing a better understanding of the immuno-biology of the lung allograft through the collection and analysis of collected BAL and TBBx samples. Whilst new investigational tools continue to evolve, the simple visualization and collection of samples within the lung allograft by bronchoscopy remains the gold standard in the evaluation of the lung allograft. This review describes the use and experience of bronchoscopy following lung transplantation in the pediatric setting. PMID:25940429

  5. Lung Transplantation: The State of the Airways.

    PubMed

    Husain, Aliya N; Garrity, Edward R

    2016-03-01

    Context .- Lung transplantation has become a viable option for definitive treatment of several end-stage lung diseases for which there are no other options available. However, long-term survival continues to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction, which primarily affects the airways. Objective . -To highlight the complications occurring mainly in the airways of the lung transplant recipient from the early to late posttransplant periods. Data Sources .- Review literature focusing on the airways in patients with lung transplants and clinical experience of the authors. Conclusions .- Postsurgical complications and infections of the airways have decreased because of better techniques and management. Acute cellular rejection of the airways can be distinguished from infection pathologically and on cultures. Separating small from large airways need not be an issue because both are risk factors for bronchiolitis obliterans. Grading of airway rejection needs to be standardized. Chronic lung allograft dysfunction consists of both bronchiolitis obliterans and restrictive allograft syndrome, neither of which can be treated very effectively at present. PMID:26927718

  6. What To Expect Before a Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... NHLBI on Twitter. What To Expect Before a Lung Transplant If you get into a medical center's ... friends also can offer support. When a Donor Lung Becomes Available OPTN matches donor lungs to recipients ...

  7. Bioengineering Lungs for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah E; Charest, Jonathan M; Ren, Xi; Ott, Harald C

    2016-05-01

    Whole lung extracellular matrix scaffolds can be created by perfusion of cadaveric organs with decellularizing detergents, providing a platform for organ regeneration. Lung epithelial engineering must address both the proximal airway cells that function to metabolize toxins and aid mucociliary clearance and the distal pneumocytes that facilitate gas exchange. Engineered pulmonary vasculature must support in vivo blood perfusion with low resistance and intact barrier function and be antithrombotic. Repopulating the native lung matrix with sufficient cell numbers in appropriate anatomic locations is required to enable organ function. PMID:27112255

  8. Lung and heart-lung transplantation. Evolution and new applications.

    PubMed Central

    Bolman, R M; Shumway, S J; Estrin, J A; Hertz, M I

    1991-01-01

    Heart-lung transplantation (HLT) and lung transplantation (LT) are effective treatment modalities for patients with advanced pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease. Lung transplantation offers potential advantages over HLT, including reduced pretransplant waiting time and improved efficiency of organ utilization, and is currently being offered to patients formerly treated by HLT. To explore the relative merits of these procedures, the authors examined the results in 44 procedures (23 HLT and 21 LT) in 42 patients transplanted at their institution. Heart-lung transplant recipients included 20 adults and three children (ages 5,5 and 3). Most HLT patients had primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) (n = 9) or Eisenmenger's syndrome (ES) (n = 8). Twenty-two of twenty-three patients have been long-term survivors (mean follow-up = 17.8 months, Kapaln-Meier survival at 12 months = 85%). Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) has occurred in five patients (22%), and all have died. Of 21 LTs in 19 patients, nine had obstructive and eight had restrictive lung diseases. Three single-LT (SLT) patients had PPH, and one had ES secondary to a ventricular septal defect. Mean pulmonary artery pressures fell from 55 +/- 6 mm Hg before SLT to 21 +/- 3 mm Hg after SLT; p less than 0.001. Three pediatric patients (ages 4, 10, 17, and 17[re-transplant]) have undergone four SLTs. With mean follow-up of 6.4 months, LT patients have survival at 12 months of 80% (Kaplan-Meier). Lung transplant patients wait a far shorter time for their transplant than do HLT patients (166 vs. 384 days, p less than 0.03). Three patients (19%) have evidence of OB after SLT, with one death. By virtue of equal intermediate-term outcomes, shorter waiting times, and better use of donor organs in comparison with HLT, LT should be offered whenever possible to patients with end-stage pulmonary parenchymal or vascular disease. The authors' pediatric LT and HLT experience (7 treatments in 6 patients) is the largest reported

  9. Bridge to lung transplantation and rescue post-transplant: the expanding role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gulack, Brian C.; Hirji, Sameer A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last several decades, the growth of lung transplantation has been hindered by a much higher demand for donor lungs than can be supplied, leading to considerable waiting time and mortality among patients waiting for transplant. This has led to the search for an alternative bridging strategy in patients with end-stage lung disease. The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as a bridge to lung transplantation as well as a rescue strategy post-transplant for primary graft dysfunction (PGD) has been studied previously, however due to initially poor outcomes, its use was not heavily instituted. In recent years, with significant improvement in technologies, several single and multi-center studies have shown promising outcomes related to the use of ECMO as a bridging strategy as well as a therapy for patients suffering from PGD post-transplant. These results have challenged our current notion on ECMO use and hence forced us to reexamine the utility, efficacy and safety of ECMO in conjunction with lung transplantation. Through this review, we will address the various aspects related to ECMO use as a bridge to lung transplantation as well as a rescue post-transplant in the treatment of PGD. We will emphasize newer technologies related to ECMO use, examine recent observational studies and randomized trials of ECMO use before and after lung transplantation, and reflect upon our own institutional experience with the use of ECMO in these difficult clinical situations. PMID:25132974

  10. Paraquat Poisoning—Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Matthew, Henry; Logan, Andrew; Woodruff, M. F. A.; Heard, Brian

    1968-01-01

    A 15-year-old boy ingested a mouthful of paraquat and developed severe respiratory distress. Treatment included the transplantation of one lung, but subsequently changes developed in the graft which are thought to have been due to paraquat, and the patient died two weeks after the operation The dangers of keeping poisonous substances in incorrectly labelled bottles has once again been demonstrated, while the pattern of paraquat poisoning, especially the development of proliferative alveolitis and terminal bronchiolitis, is confirmed. Immediate forced diuresis followed by haemodialysis is necessary to remove paraquat, thereby perhaps avoiding initiation of the changes in the lungs. The technical feasibility of human lung transplantation has again been demonstrated. It has also been shown that infection does not necessarily pose an insuperable problem, at any rate if, as in the case described, there was no preoperative pulmonary infection in either recipient or donor. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5-8Fig. 9-12Fig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15-16Fig. 16 PMID:4877735

  11. Surgical treatment of pulmonary hypertension: Lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jason; Russo, Mark J.; Muller, Charlie; Vigneswaran, Wickii T.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious and progressive disorder that results in right ventricular dysfunction that lead to subsequent right heart failure and death. When untreated the median survival for these patients is 2.8 years. Over the past decade advances in disease specific medical therapy considerably changed the natural history. This is reflected in a threefold decrease in the number of patients undergoing lung transplantation for PH which used to be main stay of treatment. Despite the successful development of medical therapy lung transplant still remains the gold standard for patients who fail medical therapy. Referral for lung transplant is recommended when patients have a less than 2-3 years of predicted survival or in NYHA class III or IV. Both single and bilateral lung transplants have been successfully performed for PH but outcome analyses and survival comparisons generally favor a bilateral lung transplant. PMID:22140622

  12. State of the Art of Combined Heart-Lung Transplantation for Advanced Cardiac and Pulmonary Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Idrees, Jay J; Pettersson, Gösta B

    2016-04-01

    Over the last several decades, significant advances and improvements in care of transplant patients have resulted in markedly improved outcomes. A number of options are available for patients with advanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction requiring transplantation. There is a debate about when isolated heart or isolated lung transplantation is no longer possible or advisable and combined heart-lung transplantation is justified. Organ availability and allocation severely limit the latter option to very few well-selected patients. We review practice patterns, trends, and outcomes after triple-organ heart-lung transplant (HLTx) worldwide, as well as our own experience with heart-lung transplant in the modern era. PMID:26922590

  13. Lung Transplantation for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Katsutoshi; Okada, Yoshinori; Akiba, Miki; Kondo, Takashi; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Okumura, Meinoshin; Chen, Fengshi; Date, Hiroshi; Shiraishi, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Akinori; Yamasaki, Naoya; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Chida, Masayuki; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Hirai, Toyohiro; Seyama, Kuniaki; Mishima, Michiaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation has been established as the definitive treatment option for patients with advanced lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). However, the prognosis after registration and the circumstances of lung transplantation with sirolimus therapy have never been reported. Methods In this national survey, we analyzed data from 98 LAM patients registered for lung transplantation in the Japan Organ Transplantation Network. Results Transplantation was performed in 57 patients as of March 2014. Survival rate was 86.7% at 1 year, 82.5% at 3 years, 73.7% at 5 years, and 73.7% at 10 years. Of the 98 patients, 21 had an inactive status and received sirolimus more frequently than those with an active history (67% vs. 5%, p<0.001). Nine of twelve patients who remained inactive as of March 2014 initiated sirolimus before or while on a waiting list, and remained on sirolimus thereafter. Although the statistical analysis showed no statistically significant difference, the survival rate after registration tended to be better for lung transplant recipients than for those who awaited transplantation (p = 0.053). Conclusions Lung transplantation is a satisfactory therapeutic option for advanced LAM, but the circumstances for pre-transplantation LAM patients are likely to alter with the use of sirolimus. PMID:26771878

  14. Lung cancer treatment outcomes in recipients of lung transplant

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lingling; Pennell, Nathan A.; Elson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung transplant recipients develop lung cancer more commonly than the general population. The best treatment approach for these patients is unclear. The goal of this study is to evaluate treatment outcomes in this population. Methods We used the Cleveland Clinic lung transplant database to identify patients diagnosed with lung cancer at the time of or after lung transplant. Transplant and lung cancer-related data were retrospectively reviewed. Results Among 847 patients underwent lung transplant between 2005 and 2013, 17 (2%) were diagnosed with lung cancer and included. Median age was 61 (range, 48–70) years. Majority were stage I/II (n=11), one had stage IIIA, five had stage IV. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were more common than small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (n=15 vs. 2). Curative treatment was performed as lobectomy in native lung (n=1), and radiation in transplanted lung (n=2). Chemotherapy was given in 10 patients, primarily carboplatin-based doublets with docetaxel, pemetrexed, or etoposide. Six of these received palliative chemotherapy for either metastases at diagnosis (n=3) or recurrence after early stage disease (n=3). Except for one patient with complete response, all others had progressive disease following palliative chemotherapy. Overall, patients who received chemotherapy had a median survival of 7.5 months from the initiation of chemotherapy, but 30% developed grade 5 sepsis. Median survival for stage I–IIIA and stage IV were 23.2 and 2.5 months respectively. Conclusions Lung cancer in lung transplant recipients carries various clinical courses. Patients with metastatic disease have substantial toxicities from chemotherapy and poor survival. Early stage patients should be offered treatment with modified dosages to decrease the risk of severe toxicities. PMID:26798588

  15. Airway anastomosis for lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Diso, Daniele; Rendina, Erino Angelo; Venuta, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LT) is the only viable option for a selected group of patients with end stage pulmonary diseases. During the recent years satisfactory results in terms of long-term survival and quality of life have been achieved with improvements in surgical technique, immunosuppression and perioperative management. Since the beginning, the airway anastomosis has been considered crucial and significant efforts have been made to understand the healing process. A number of experimental studies allowed improving the surgical technique by modifying the technique of suturing, the anastomotic protection and type and dose of immunosuppression, reducing the risk of airway complications. Furthermore, a huge progress has been made in the management of such complications. Early diagnosis of bronchial complications and their prompt and correct management are crucial to achieve long-term survival. PMID:26981271

  16. Comorbidities impacting on prognosis after lung transplant.

    PubMed

    Vaquero Barrios, José Manuel; Redel Montero, Javier; Santos Luna, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to give an overview of the clinical circumstances presenting before lung transplant that may have negative repercussions on the long and short-term prognosis of the transplant. Methods for screening and diagnosis of common comorbidities with negative impact on the prognosis of the transplant are proposed, both for pulmonary and extrapulmonary diseases, and measures aimed at correcting these factors are discussed. Coordination and information exchange between referral centers and transplant centers would allow these comorbidities to be detected and corrected, with the aim of minimizing the risks and improving the life expectancy of transplant receivers. PMID:24355755

  17. Leukocyte filtration in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kurusz, Mark; Roach, John D; Vertrees, Roger A; Girouard, Mark K; Lick, Scott D

    2002-05-01

    Controlled reperfusion of the transplanted lung has been used in nine consecutive patients to decrease manifestations of lung reperfusion injury. An extracorporeal circuit containing a roller pump, heat exchanger and leukodepleting filter is primed with substrate-enhanced reperfusion solution mixed with approximately 2000 ml of the patient's blood. This solution is slowly recirculated to remove leukocytes prior to reperfusion. When the pulmonary anastomoses are completed, the pulmonary artery is cannulated through the untied anastomosis using a catheter containing a pressure lumen for measurement of infusion pressure. An atrial clamp is left in place on the patient's native atrial cuff to decrease the risk of systemic air embolism during the brief period of reperfusion from the extracorporeal reservoir. During reperfusion, the water bath to the heat exchanger is kept at 35 degrees C and the flow rate for reperfusion solution is between 150 and 200 m/min, keeping the pulmonary artery pressure <14 mmHg. Eight of nine patients were ventilated on 40% inspired oxygen within a few hours of operation and 7/9 were extubated on or before postoperative day 1. Six of nine patients are long-term survivors. PMID:12009087

  18. Airway stenoses after lung transplantation: management with expanding metal stents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R; McNeil, K; Dennis, C; Parry, A; Large, S; Nashef, S A; Wells, F C; Flower, C; Wallwork, J

    1994-01-01

    Success in lung transplantation has been hindered by airway complications, usually as a result of anastomotic ischemia and stenosis. We report our experience with expanding metal stents in managing airway stenoses after lung transplantation. From April 1984 through November 1993, 46 single lung, 5 double lung, and 154 heart-lung transplantations were performed at Papworth Hospital. All patients received immunosuppression with azathioprine, cyclosporine, methylprednisolone, and induction antithymocyte globulin. Fourteen patients (nine single lung, two double lung, and three heart-lung) had an airway stenosis requiring a stent. The most common features were shortness of breath, wheezing or stridor, and a fall in pulmonary function tests (11 patients). Three patients had pneumonia. Airway stenosis was diagnosed on bronchoscopy an average of 61 days after transplantation (range 3 to 245 days). Stent placement occurred an average of 18 days after the diagnosis (range 2 to 84 days). One heart-lung transplant recipient received a silicone rubber stent. All other patients received expanding metal stents. Six patients required multiple stent placements. After stent placement the average increase in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 117%. Infection complicated the stenoses in 12 patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus fumigatus were the most common pathogens, each occurring in six cases. Multiple pathogens were isolated in seven cases. Three patients died as a direct consequence of their airway problems. Two died of pneumonia despite stenting, and a third died of acute occlusion of the silicone rubber stent. Expanding metal stents are an effective treatment of airway stenoses in lung transplant recipients. Patients with suspected airway problems should be referred for early bronchoscopy with the potential for stent placement. PMID:7803417

  19. Moving Back to the Future: Use of Organ Care System Lung for Lobectomy Before Lobar Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Mohite, Prashant N; Patil, Nikhil P; García-Sáez, Diana; Schmack, Bastian; Soresi, Simona; Dohmen, Pascal M; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R; De Robertis, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lung transplantation remains the gold standard treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease. Lobar lung transplantation allows for transplantation of size-mismatch donor lungs in small recipients; however, donor lung volume reduction represents a challenging surgical technique. In this paper we present our initial experience with bilateral lobectomy in donor lungs before lobar lung transplantation using normothermic perfusion on the Organ Care System (OCS) Lung. MATERIAL AND METHODS Specifics of the surgical technique for donor lung instrumentation on the OCS, lobar dissection on the OCS, and right and left donor lobectomies are presented in detail. RESULTS Potential advantages of the use of the OCS for lobectomy for lobar lung transplantation are described in this section. Donor lung volume reduction utilizing OCS appeared to be easier and safer compared to the conventional cold storage technique, due to continuous perfusion of the lungs with blood and well-distended vessels that offer the feel of live lobectomy. Moreover, the OCS represents a platform for donor organ assessment and optimization of its function before transplantation. CONCLUSIONS Donor lung volume reduction was safe and feasible utilizing the OCS, which could be a useful tool for volume reduction in cases of size mismatch. Further research is needed to evaluate early and long-term results after lobar lung transplantation using the OCS in clinical studies. PMID:27425199

  20. Moving Back to the Future: Use of Organ Care System Lung for Lobectomy Before Lobar Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sabashnikov, Anton; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Mohite, Prashant N.; Patil, Nikhil P.; García-Sáez, Diana; Schmack, Bastian; Soresi, Simona; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R.; De Robertis, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation remains the gold standard treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease. Lobar lung transplantation allows for transplantation of size-mismatch donor lungs in small recipients; however, donor lung volume reduction represents a challenging surgical technique. In this paper we present our initial experience with bilateral lobectomy in donor lungs before lobar lung transplantation using normothermic perfusion on the Organ Care System (OCS) Lung. Material/Methods Specifics of the surgical technique for donor lung instrumentation on the OCS, lobar dissection on the OCS, and right and left donor lobectomies are presented in detail. Results Potential advantages of the use of the OCS for lobectomy for lobar lung transplantation are described in this section. Donor lung volume reduction utilizing OCS appeared to be easier and safer compared to the conventional cold storage technique, due to continuous perfusion of the lungs with blood and well-distended vessels that offer the feel of live lobectomy. Moreover, the OCS represents a platform for donor organ assessment and optimization of its function before transplantation. Conclusions Donor lung volume reduction was safe and feasible utilizing the OCS, which could be a useful tool for volume reduction in cases of size mismatch. Further research is needed to evaluate early and long-term results after lobar lung transplantation using the OCS in clinical studies. PMID:27425199

  1. Long-Term Lung Transplantation in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Aoyama, A.; Tonsho, M.; Ng, C. Y.; Lee, S.; Millington, T.; Nadazdin, O.; Wain, J. C.; Cosimi, A. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Smith, R. N.; Colvin, R. B.; Kawai, T.; Madsen, J. C.; Benichou, G.; Allan, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical technique and clinical care, lung transplantation still remains a short-term solution for the treatment of end-stage lung disease. To date, there has been limited experience in experimental lung transplantation using nonhuman primate models. Therefore, we have endeavored to develop a long-term, nonhuman primate model of orthotopic lung transplantation for the ultimate purpose of designing protocols to induce tolerance of lung grafts. Here, we report our initial results in developing this model and our observation that the nonhuman primate lung is particularly prone to rejection. This propensity toward rejection may be a consequence of 1) upregulated nonspecific inflammation, and 2) a larger number of pre-existing alloreactive memory T cells, leading to augmented deleterious immune responses. Our data show that triple-drug immunosuppression mimicking clinical practice is not sufficient to prevent acute rejection in nonhuman primate lung transplantation. The addition of horse-derived anti-thymocyte globulin and a monoclonal antibody to the IL-6 receptor allowed six out of six lung recipients to be free of rejection for over 120 days. PMID:25772308

  2. Guidelines for the selection of lung transplantation candidates.

    PubMed

    Román, Antonio; Ussetti, Pietat; Solé, Amparo; Zurbano, Felipe; Borro, José M; Vaquero, José M; de Pablo, Alicia; Morales, Pilar; Blanco, Marina; Bravo, Carlos; Cifrian, José; de la Torre, Mercedes; Gámez, Pablo; Laporta, Rosalía; Monforte, Víctor; Mons, Roberto; Salvatierra, Angel; Santos, Francisco; Solé, Joan; Varela, Andrés

    2011-06-01

    The present guidelines have been prepared with the consensus of at least one representative of each of the hospitals with lung transplantation programs in Spain. In addition, prior to their publication, these guidelines have been reviewed by a group of prominent reviewers who are recognized for their professional experience in the field of lung transplantation. Within the following pages, the reader will find the selection criteria for lung transplantation candidates, when and how to remit a patient to a transplantation center and, lastly, when to add the patient to the waiting list. A level of evidence has been identified for the most relevant questions. Our intention is for this document to be a practical guide for pulmonologists who do not directly participate in lung transplantations but who should consider this treatment for their patients. Finally, these guidelines also propose an information form in order to compile in an organized manner the patient data of the potential candidate for lung transplantation, which are relevant in order to be able to make the best decisions possible. PMID:21536362

  3. Challenging immunosuppression treatment in lung transplant recipients with kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Högerle, Benjamin A; Kohli, Neeraj; Habibi-Parker, Kirsty; Lyster, Haifa; Reed, Anna; Carby, Martin; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R; Sabashnikov, Anton; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Soresi, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure after lung transplantation is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Calcineurin inhibitors are immunosuppressants which play a major role in terms of postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. We report our preliminary experience with the anti-interleukin-2 monoclonal antibody Basiliximab utilized as a "calcineurin inhibitor-free window" in the setting of early postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. Between 2012 and 2015 nine lung transplant patients who developed kidney failure for more than 14 days were included. Basiliximab was administrated in three doses (Day 0, 4, and 20) whilst Tacrolimus was discontinued or reduced to maintain a serum level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. Baseline glomerular filtration rate pre transplant was normal for all patients. Seven patients completely recovered from kidney failure (67%, mean eGFR pre and post Basiliximab: 42.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 69 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and were switched back on Tacrolimus. Only one of these patients still needs ongoing renal replacement therapy. Two patients showed no recovery from kidney failure and did not survive. Basiliximab might be a safe and feasible therapeutical option in patients which are affected by calcineurin inhibitor-related kidney failure in the early post lung transplant period. Further studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results. PMID:26892232

  4. Obliterative airway remodelling in transplanted and non-transplanted lungs.

    PubMed

    Jonigk, Danny; Theophile, Katharina; Hussein, Kais; Bock, Oliver; Lehmann, Ulrich; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Gottlieb, Jens; Fischer, Stefan; Simon, Andre; Welte, Tobias; Maegel, Lavinia; Kreipe, Hans; Laenger, Florian

    2010-09-01

    Obliterative airway remodelling is a morphological sequence in a variety of pulmonary diseases. Notably, bronchiolitis obliterans represents one of the key complications of lung transplantation, induced by (immigrating) myofibroblasts. A comparative expression analysis of obliterative airway remodelling in transplanted and non-transplanted patients has not been reported so far. Obliterated and unremodelled airways from explanted lungs (n = 19) from patients suffering from chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, graft-versus-host disease and toxic exposure were isolated by laser-assisted microdissection. Airways from lung allografts harvested shortly before and after transplantation (n = 4) as well as fibroblastic foci from lungs with interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (n = 4) served as references. Pre-amplified cDNA was analysed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for expression of fibrosis, inflammation and apoptosis-associated genes. Composition of infiltrating cells and protein expression were assessed by conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. Bronchiolitis obliterans in transplanted patients showed a significant increase of BMP-7 expression (p = 0.0141 compared with controls), while TGF-beta1 and FGF-2 as well as BMP-4 and BMP-7 were up-regulated in fibroblastic foci in interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (p < 0.0424 compared with controls). Regarding other fibrosis-associated genes (BMP-6, SMAD-3, CASP-3 and CASP-9, FASLG, NF-KB1, IL-1 and IL-2) as well as cellularity and cellular composition, no significant differences between obliterative airway remodelling in transplanted and non-transplanted patients could be shown. Obliterative airway remodelling in lung allografts and in non-transplanted patients share many morphological and genetic traits. BMPs, especially BMP-7, warrant further investigation as possible markers for the aggravation of airway remodelling. PMID:20632031

  5. A consensus document for the selection of lung transplant candidates: 2014--an update from the Pulmonary Transplantation Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weill, David; Benden, Christian; Corris, Paul A; Dark, John H; Davis, R Duane; Keshavjee, Shaf; Lederer, David J; Mulligan, Michael J; Patterson, G Alexander; Singer, Lianne G; Snell, Greg I; Verleden, Geert M; Zamora, Martin R; Glanville, Allan R

    2015-01-01

    The appropriate selection of lung transplant recipients is an important determinant of outcomes. This consensus document is an update of the recipient selection guidelines published in 2006. The Pulmonary Council of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) organized a Writing Committee of international experts to provide consensus opinion regarding the appropriate timing of referral and listing of candidates for lung transplantation. A comprehensive search of the medical literature was conducted with the assistance of a medical librarian. Writing Committee members were assigned specific topics to research and discuss. The Chairs of the Writing Committee were responsible for evaluating the completeness of the literature search, providing editorial support for the manuscript, and organizing group discussions regarding its content. The consensus document makes specific recommendations regarding the timing of referral and of listing for lung transplantation. These recommendations include discussions not present in previous ISHLT guidelines, including lung allocation scores, bridging to transplant with mechanical circulatory and ventilator support, and expanded indications for lung transplantation. In the absence of high-grade evidence to support decision making, these consensus guidelines remain part of a continuum of expert opinion based on available studies and personal experience. Some positions are immutable. Although transplant is rightly a treatment of last resort for end-stage lung disease, early referral allows proper evaluation and thorough patient education. Subsequent waiting list activation implies a tacit agreement that transplant offers a significant individual survival advantage. It is both the challenge and the responsibility of the transplant community globally to ensure organ allocation maximizes the potential benefits of a scarce resource, thereby achieving that advantage. PMID:25085497

  6. Lung transplantation from donors after circulatory death using portable ex vivo lung perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Bozso, Sabin; Vasanthan, Vishnu; Luc, Jessica GY; Kinaschuk, Katie; Freed, Darren; Nagendran, Jayan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Donation after circulatory death is a novel method of increasing the number of donor lungs available for transplantation. Using organs from donors after circulatory death has the potential to increase the number of transplants performed. METHODS: Three bilateral lung transplants from donors after circulatory death were performed over a six-month period. Following organ retrieval, all sets of lungs were placed on a portable ex vivo lung perfusion device for evaluation and preservation. RESULTS: Lung function remained stable during portable ex vivo perfusion, with improvement in partial pressure of oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen ratios. Mechanical ventilation was discontinued within 48 h for each recipient and no patient stayed in the intensive care unit longer than eight days. There was no postgraft dysfunction at 72 h in two of the three recipients. Ninety-day mortality for all recipients was 0% and all maintain excellent forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced vital capacity values post-transplantation. CONCLUSION: The authors report excellent results with their initial experience using donors after circulatory death after portable ex vivo lung perfusion. It is hoped this will allow for the most efficient use of available donor lungs, leading to more transplants and fewer deaths for potential recipients on wait lists. PMID:25379654

  7. Lung transplant immunosuppression – time for a new approach?

    PubMed Central

    Witt, CA; Puri, V; Gelman, AE; Krupnick, AS; Kreisel, D

    2015-01-01

    Summary Outcomes after lung transplantation remain worse compared to other solid organ transplants, which is in large part due to high rates of graft rejection. Despite emerging data that immune responses to lungs differ from other organs, immunosuppression for lung transplant recipients is still based on strategies established for recipients of other grafts. There exists an urgent need to develop immunosuppressive strategies for lung transplant recipients that take the unique immunological features of this organ into account. PMID:25220652

  8. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tokman, Sofya; Hahn, M Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Patel, Vipul J; Walia, Rajat; Omar, Ashraf

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  9. Lung Transplant Recipient with Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, M. Frances; Abdelrazek, Hesham; Patel, Vipul J.; Walia, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a progressive lung disease characterized by accumulated surfactant-like lipoproteinaceous material in the alveoli and distal bronchioles. This accumulation is the result of impaired clearance by alveolar macrophages. PAP has been described in 11 solid organ transplant recipients, 9 of whom were treated with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. We report a case of a lung transplant recipient treated with prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and tacrolimus who ultimately developed PAP, which worsened when MMF was replaced with everolimus. PMID:27213073

  10. MECHANICAL VENTILATION FOR THE LUNG TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Lindsey; Reed, Robert M.; Parekh, Kalpaj R.; Bhama, Jay K.; Pena, Tahuanty; Rajagopal, Srinivasan; Schmidt, Gregory A.; Klesney-Tait, Julia A.; Eberlein, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) is an important aspect in the intraoperative and early postoperative management of lung transplant (LTx)-recipients. There are no randomized-controlled trials of LTx-recipient MV strategies; however there are LTx center experiences and international survey studies reported. The main early complication of LTx is primary graft dysfunction (PGD), which is similar to the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We aim to summarize information pertinent to LTx-MV, as well as PGD, ARDS, and intraoperative MV and to synthesize these available data into recommendations. Based on the available evidence, we recommend lung-protective MV with low-tidal-volumes (≤6 mL/kg predicted body weight [PBW]) and positive end-expiratory pressure for the LTx-recipient. In our opinion, the MV strategy should be based on donor characteristics (donor PBW as a parameter of actual allograft size), rather than based on recipient characteristics; however this donor-characteristics-based protective MV is based on indirect evidence and requires validation in prospective clinical studies. PMID:26495241

  11. Lung transplantation: overall approach regarding its major aspects.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Priscila Cilene León Bueno; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Campos, Silvia Vidal; Afonso Junior, José Eduardo; Costa, André Nathan; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a well-established treatment for patients with advanced lung disease. The evaluation of a candidate for transplantation is a complex task and involves a multidisciplinary team that follows the patient beyond the postoperative period. Currently, the mean time on the waiting list for lung transplantation in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is approximately 18 months. For Brazil as a whole, data from the Brazilian Organ Transplant Association show that, in 2014, there were 67 lung transplants and 204 patients on the waiting list for lung transplantation. Lung transplantation is most often indicated in cases of COPD, cystic fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, and pulmonary hypertension. This comprehensive review aimed to address the major aspects of lung transplantation: indications, contraindications, evaluation of transplant candidates, evaluation of donor candidates, management of transplant recipients, and major complications. To that end, we based our research on the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines and on the protocols used by our Lung Transplant Group in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. PMID:26785965

  12. Lung transplantation: overall approach regarding its major aspects

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Priscila Cilene León Bueno; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Campos, Silvia Vidal; Afonso, José Eduardo; Costa, André Nathan; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a well-established treatment for patients with advanced lung disease. The evaluation of a candidate for transplantation is a complex task and involves a multidisciplinary team that follows the patient beyond the postoperative period. Currently, the mean time on the waiting list for lung transplantation in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is approximately 18 months. For Brazil as a whole, data from the Brazilian Organ Transplant Association show that, in 2014, there were 67 lung transplants and 204 patients on the waiting list for lung transplantation. Lung transplantation is most often indicated in cases of COPD, cystic fibrosis, interstitial lung disease, non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, and pulmonary hypertension. This comprehensive review aimed to address the major aspects of lung transplantation: indications, contraindications, evaluation of transplant candidates, evaluation of donor candidates, management of transplant recipients, and major complications. To that end, we based our research on the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines and on the protocols used by our Lung Transplant Group in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. PMID:26785965

  13. Probable Phaeoacremonium parasiticum as a cause of cavitary native lung nodules after single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shah, S K; Parto, P; Lombard, G A; James, M A; Beckles, D L; Lick, S; Valentine, V G

    2013-02-01

    Lung nodules after lung transplantation most often represent infection or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the allograft. Conversely, native lung nodules in single lung transplant recipients are more likely to be bronchogenic carcinoma. We present a patient who developed native lung cavitary nodules. Although malignancy was anticipated, evaluation revealed probable Phaeoacremonium parasiticum infection. Phaeoacremonium parasiticum is a dematiaceous fungus first described as a cause of soft tissue infection in a renal transplant patient. Lung nodules have not been previously described and this is the first case, to our knowledge, of P. parasiticum identified after lung transplantation. PMID:23279754

  14. [Ischemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation].

    PubMed

    Gennai, Stéphane; Pison, Christophe; Briot, Raphaël

    2014-09-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion is characterized by diffuse alveolar damage arising from the first hours after transplantation. The first etiology of the primary graft dysfunction in lung is ischemia-reperfusion. It is burdened by an important morbi-mortality. Lung ischemia-reperfusion increases the oxidative stress, inactivates the sodium pump, increases the intracellular calcium, leads to cellular death and the liberation of pro-inflammatory mediators. Researches relative to the reduction of the lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries are numerous but few of them found a place in common clinical practice, because of an insufficient level of proofs. Ex vivolung evaluation is a suitable technique in order to evaluate therapeutics supposed to limit lung ischemia-reperfusion injuries. PMID:24935680

  15. [Lung transplantation in patients with interstitial lung disease/idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Murer, Christian; Benden, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation is an established therapy for advanced lung disease. Among the common disease indications for lung transplantation, patients with interstitial lung disease, in particular, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), have the worst prognosis. Thus referral to a transplant center should ideally be realised at the time of diagnosis of usual interstitial pneumonitis (UIP), regardless of lung function, in order to carry out a through initial assessment and evaluation. PMID:26884220

  16. Lung Transplantation in Cystic Fibrosis: Trends and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Sweet, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    This article is not an overview of all facets of lung transplantation in cystic fibrosis (CF), but rather it is intended as a review of current allocation controversies, as well as of trends in diagnostics and management in lung transplant recipients and in patients with end-stage lung disease. Despite changes in donor and recipient selection, long-term survival in pediatric lung transplant has continued to be limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). Due to, in part, this short survival benefit, transplant continues to be an appropriate option for only a subset of pediatric patients with CF. The feasibility of transplant as a therapeutic option is also affected by the limited pediatric organ supply, which has moreover contributed to controversy over lung allocation. Debates over the allocation of this scarce resource, however, may also help to drive innovation in the field of lung transplant. Longer pretransplant survival—as aided by new lung bypass technologies, for example—could help to alleviate organ shortages, as well as facilitate the transport of organs to suitable pediatric recipients. Improved diagnosis and treatment for CLAD and for antibody-mediated rejection have the potential to extend survival in pediatric lung transplant. Regardless, the relative rarity of transplant could pose future challenges for pediatric lung transplant programs, which require adequate numbers of patients to maintain proper expertise. PMID:26697265

  17. Lung procurement for transplantation: new criteria for lung donor selection.

    PubMed

    Moretti, M P; Betto, C; Gambacorta, M; Vesconi, S; Scalamogna, M; Benazzi, E; Ravini, M

    2010-05-01

    In Italy, like everywhere in the world, the organ shortage for transplantation is a real problem. It is well known that lung donors (LD) are particularly difficult to procure and that management of the organ do not care during the diagnosis of cerebral death represents a difficult challenge. In this context, the salvage of the so-called "marginal donors" may increase the pool of donors, favoring organ retrieval. To increase lung procurement, the intensivist must recognize "marginal donors," optimizing organ selection and function. The aim of our study was to review LD procured in 2008, as identified by the unrestricted criteria, of the Nord Italian Transplant program Center (NITp). Particularly, the age and habits of donors and the presence of a parenchyma contusion were not sufficient per se to exclude donation. We revisited lung ventilation and monitoring modalities during cerebral death before retrieval. In 2008, the application of enlarged criteria for LD enabled us to collect 21 LD, namely 33% of all cerebral deaths, versus 13% in 2007. Seeking to maintain good gas exchange and lung function, we implemented a safe ventilation program avoided high peak pressures, and fluid therapy properly guided by the cardiac index and extravascular lung water index monitoring. Specific actions to improve LD procurement may help cope with the organ-donor shortage. Although our series was small, our results were encouraging; they underline the necessity to continuously review donor criteria and care, allowing good donor/recipient matching. PMID:20534222

  18. Zurich University Hospital lung transplantation programme: update 2012.

    PubMed

    Inci, Ilhan; Schuurmans, Macé M; Boehler, Annette; Weder, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Lung transplantation is an established therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease in selected patients. During the last 30 years more than 34,000 transplantations have been performed worldwide. Emphysema, pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis and primary pulmonary hypertension are the most common indications. This type of surgical treatment is increasingly successful, with better early and late survival rates. However, lung transplantation is still hampered by persisting problems such as donor organ shortage, primary graft dysfunction, late graft dysfunction and morbidity related to long-term immunosuppression. The first lung transplantation in Switzerland was performed the 10th November 1992 at Zurich University Hospital. Since then the lung transplant programme has progressively increased its yearly transplant volume. Since the beginning of our lung transplantation programme, overall patient survival has increased steadily and has been at benchmark levels since the year 2000. The most important factors influencing this result are presumably good teamwork among all involved specialists, improved surgical techniques, and close and long-term patient follow-up by the transplant pulmonologists. In this paper we present our programme structure, managing strategies for some specific problems and outcome after lung transplantation. The results presented here are from recipients who underwent lung transplantation up to the end of 2011. PMID:23986418

  19. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  20. Successful lung transplantation after donor lung reconditioning with urokinase in ex vivo lung perfusion system.

    PubMed

    Inci, Ilhan; Yamada, Yoshito; Hillinger, Sven; Jungraithmayr, Wolfgang; Trinkwitz, Michael; Weder, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism is considered a contraindication to lung donation for transplantation as it might result in graft dysfunction. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel method to assess and recondition a questionable donor graft before transplantation. In this report we present a case of successful bilateral lung transplant after donor lung assessment and treatment with a fibrinolytic agent, urokinase, during EVLP. PMID:25441801

  1. Evolving practice: X-linked agammaglobulinemia and lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S; Kotecha, S; Douglass, J A; Paul, E; Hore-Lacey, F; Stirling, R; Snell, G I; Westall, G P

    2015-04-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a rare primary humoral immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by agammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections and bronchiectasis. Despite the association with end-stage bronchiectasis, the literature on XLA and lung transplantation is extremely limited. We report a series of 6 XLA patients with bronchiectasis who underwent lung transplantation. Short-term outcomes were excellent however long-term outcomes were disappointing with a high incidence of pulmonary sepsis and chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). PMID:25736826

  2. Imaging in lung transplants: Checklist for the radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rachna; Chansakul, Thanissara; Goldberg, Hilary J

    2014-01-01

    Post lung transplant complications can have overlapping clinical and imaging features, and hence, the time point at which they occur is a key distinguisher. Complications of lung transplantation may occur along a continuum in the immediate or longer postoperative period, including surgical and mechanical problems due to size mismatch and vascular as well as airway anastomotic complication, injuries from ischemia and reperfusion, acute and chronic rejection, pulmonary infections, and post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder. Life expectancy after lung transplantation has been limited primarily by chronic rejection and infection. Multiple detector computed tomography (MDCT) is critical for evaluation and early diagnosis of complications to enable selection of effective therapy and decrease morbidity and mortality among lung transplant recipients. PMID:25489125

  3. Transfer of peanut allergy following lung transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schuller, A; Barnig, C; Matau, C; Geny, S; Gosselin, M; Moal, M C; Champion, G; Atal, L; de Blay, F; Massard, G; Kessler, R

    2011-12-01

    This case study describes a patient who developed peanut allergy following lung transplantation. A 54-year-old woman underwent bilateral lung transplantation on June 2009 owing to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. She had no history of food allergy before transplantation. The donor, however, was a 20-year-old man who was fatally injured during an automobile accident; he was allergic to peanuts. At 3 months after transplantation, the lung recipient presented with acute dyspnea and urticaria 15 minutes after consuming food containing peanut derivatives. Pre- and posttransplantation recipient blood samples analyzed for the presence of IgE antibodies specific for peanut allergens confirmed that the allergy had been passively transfered as a consequence of transplantation. Food allergy following solid organ transplantation is thought to be rare, mostly occurring in children. Two mechanisms may explain the observations described for the patient reported in this study: de novo development of peanut allergies after transplantation, or passive transfer of peanut allergies from a peanut-sensitized organ donor. This case report documenting pre- and posttransplantation IgE status in a lung transplantation case suggested that the allergic status of organ donors should be thoroughly assessed before transplantation, and potential allergy transfer risks must be discussed with the transplant team and the patient. PMID:22172896

  4. Obesity and Primary Graft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kawut, Steven M.; Wickersham, Nancy; Winterbottom, Christopher; Bhorade, Sangeeta; Palmer, Scott M.; Lee, James; Diamond, Joshua M.; Wille, Keith M.; Weinacker, Ann; Lama, Vibha N.; Crespo, Maria; Orens, Jonathan B.; Sonett, Joshua R.; Arcasoy, Selim M.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christie, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Obesity has been linked to acute lung injury and is a risk factor for early mortality after lung transplantation. Objectives: To examine the associations of obesity and plasma adipokines with the risk of primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study of 512 adult lung transplant recipients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease enrolled in the Lung Transplant Outcomes Group Study. In a nested case-control study, we measured plasma leptin, adiponectin, and resistin before lung transplantation and 6 and 24 hours after lung transplantation in 40 cases of primary graft dysfunction and 80 control subjects. Generalized linear mixed models and logistic regression were used to estimate risk ratios and odds ratios. Measurements and Main Results: Grade 3 primary graft dysfunction developed within 72 hours of transplantation in 29% participants. Obesity was associated with a twofold increased risk of primary graft dysfunction (adjusted risk ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–2.6). The risk of primary graft dysfunction increased by 40% (confidence interval, 30–50%) for each 5 kg/m2 increase in body mass index after accounting for center, diagnosis, cardiopulmonary bypass, and transplant procedure. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with a greater risk of primary graft dysfunction (sex-adjusted P = 0.02). The associations of both obesity and leptin with primary graft dysfunction tended to be stronger among those who did not undergo cardiopulmonary bypass. Conclusions: Obesity is an independent risk factor for primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation. PMID:21799077

  5. Lung Transplantation and Survival in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; Cox, David R.; Cahill, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The effects of lung transplantation on the survival and quality of life in children with cystic fibrosis are uncertain. METHODS We used data from the U.S. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry and from the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network to identify children with cystic fibrosis who were on the waiting list for lung transplantation during the period from 1992 through 2002. We performed proportional-hazards survival modeling, using multiple clinically relevant covariates that were available before the children were on the waiting list and the interactions of these covariates with lung transplantation as a time-dependent covariate. The data were insufficient in quality and quantity for a retrospective quality-of-life analysis. RESULTS A total of 248 of the 514 children on the waiting list underwent lung transplantation in the United States during the period from 1992 through 2002. Proportional-hazards modeling identified four variables besides transplantation that were associated with changes in survival. Burkholderia cepacia infection was associated with a trend toward decreased survival, regardless of whether the patient underwent transplantation. A diagnosis of diabetes before the patient was placed on the waiting list decreased survival while the patient was on the waiting list but did not decrease survival after transplantation, whereas older age did not affect waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Staphylococcus aureus infection increased waiting-list survival but decreased post-transplantation survival. Using age, diabetes status, and S. aureus infection status as covariates, we estimated the effect of transplantation on survival for each patient group, expressed as a hazard factor of less than 1 for a benefit and more than 1 for a risk of harm. Five patients had a significant estimated benefit, 283 patients had a significant risk of harm, 102 patients had an insignificant benefit, and 124 patients

  6. Uncontrolled Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death Donors (uDCDDs) as a Source of Lungs for Transplant.

    PubMed

    Egan, T M; Requard, J J

    2015-08-01

    In April 2014, the American Journal of Transplantation published a report on the first lung transplant in the United States recovered from an uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death donor (uDCDD), assessed by ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). The article identified logistical and ethical issues related to introduction of lung transplant from uDCDDs. In an open clinical trial, we have Food and Drug Administration and Institutional Review Board approval to transplant lungs recovered from uDCDDs judged suitable after EVLP. Through this project and other experiences with lung recovery from uDCDDs, we have identified solutions to many logistical challenges and have addressed ethical issues surrounding lung transplant from uDCDDs that were mentioned in this case report. Here, we discuss those challenges, including issues related to recovery of other solid organs from uDCDDs. Despite logistical challenges, uDCDDs could solve the critical shortage of lungs for transplant. Furthermore, by avoiding the deleterious impact of brain death and days of positive pressure ventilation, and by using opportunities to treat lungs in the decedent or during EVLP, lungs recovered from uDCDDs may ultimately prove to be better than lungs currently being transplanted from conventional brain-dead organ donors. PMID:25873272

  7. Special considerations for the use of lung transplantation in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Florian A; Benden, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Lung transplantation has become an accepted therapy in infants, children and adolescents suffering from end-stage lung diseases, an impaired quality of life as well as a reduced life expectancy. Within Europe, pediatric lung transplantation is largely performed in predominantly adult centers due to a relatively low overall case volume. Children do represent a specific and challenging cohort facing a transplant procedure, where the selection of potential candidates becomes a crucial step to maximize net survival benefit. Therefore, interdisciplinary evaluation and early listing in view of current indications and contraindications, adequate preoperative education of the child and family members, discussion of possibly required bridging procedures in case of deterioration, appropriate technical planning of the operation, adherence to postoperative medical treatment and follow-up are all crucial steps in this demanding puzzle. In this article, the authors review recent advances in the field of pediatric lung transplantation and outline challenges in the future. PMID:26998955

  8. Imaging in Lung Transplantation: Surgical Considerations of Donor and Recipient.

    PubMed

    Backhus, Leah M; Mulligan, Michael S; Ha, Richard; Shriki, Jabi E; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2016-03-01

    Modifications in recipient and donor criteria and innovations in donor management hold promise for increasing rates of lung transplantation, yet availability of donors remains a limiting resource. Imaging is critical in the work-up of donor and recipient including identification of conditions that may portend to poor posttransplant outcomes or necessitate modifications in surgical technique. This article describes the radiologic principles that guide selection of patients and surgical procedures in lung transplantation. PMID:26896228

  9. The surgical technique of bilateral sequential lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hayanga, J. W. Awori

    2014-01-01

    Since the first successful lung transplant performed three decades ago, the technique of lung transplantation has evolved with acceptable short- and long-term outcomes such that it has become the standard for those with end stage pulmonary disease. Herein, we describe our current favored approach and discuss some of the current areas in need of further investigation as they relate to the technical aspects of the operation. PMID:25132973

  10. To transplant or not? The importance of psychosocial and behavioural factors before lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dobbels, F; Verleden, G; Dupont, L; Vanhaecke, J; De Geest, S

    2006-01-01

    The gratifying results of lung transplantation in terms of survival and quality of life stimulate the referral of an ever-increasing number of patients with end-stage lung disease. This in turn compounds the organ shortage, which is the limiting factor in the transplantation rate. In the absence of good alternative treatment modalities, an evidence-based pretransplant screening process is a prerequisite to determine which patients will benefit most from transplantation. Within this evidence-based screening process, medical selection criteria are well established. There is a growing awareness that psychosocial and behavioural factors may determine outcome after transplantation as well. This paper reviews the available evidence for psychosocial and behavioural factors in the screening process for lung transplantation. The relation of various factors with post-transplant outcome was explored. Psychosocial characteristics before transplantation consist of 1) anxiety and depression, 2) personality disorders, 3) neurocognitive problems, and 4) lack of social support. Pretransplant behavioural factors include 1) noncompliance with medication, 2) alcohol abuse or dependence, 3) smoking, 4) noncompliance with dietary guidelines, and 5) noncompliance with monitoring of vital parameters and infections. It appears that the lack of rigorous studies limit the feasibility of an evidence-based screening process. Prospective studies are crucial to this further investigation of the relationship between psychosocial and behavioural determinants before transplantation and outcomes after transplantation, in terms of compliance, morbidity, and mortality. Identification of modifiable risk factors for poor outcome before transplantation is a first step in developing interventions. PMID:16509176

  11. Translational Insights on Lung Transplantation: Learning from Immunology.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed Shehata Ali

    2015-09-01

    The introduction of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) in the practice of lung transplantation has allowed the reconditioning of the marginal grafts and their conversion into transplantable grafts. In addition, EVLP can provide a platform for the application of various preventive measures to decrease the incidence of post-transplant complications. While the Toronto team targets the attenuation of the cytokine production within the graft through gene therapy to up-regulate IL-10, other measures could be applied to achieve significant attenuation of the cytokine load of the graft. This manuscript provides a short overview on the importance of the attenuation of the cytokine production within the transplanted lung grafts and some possible strategies to achieve this goal. PMID:26412634

  12. Autologous endothelial progenitor cells improve allograft survival in porcine lung transplantation with prolonged ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Yi-Ting; Roan, Jun-Neng; Fang, Shih-Yuan; Chang, Shi-Wei; Tseng, Yau-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background As endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) attenuated acute lung injury (ALI) in rabbit model, we hypothesized that autologous EPCs preserved lung graft function during the acute reperfusion period of lung transplantation and tested the therapeutic potential of EPCs in a porcine model of lung transplantation with prolonged graft ischemia. Methods Day-7 EPCs isolated from the recipient subjects or plain culture media were administered into the left pulmonary artery immediately before restoration of pulmonary blood flow in a porcine lung allotransplantation model, with the transplantation surgeons blinded to the content of injection. Hemodynamics and arterial blood gas were recorded, and the right pulmonary artery was occluded 30 min after reperfusion to evaluate the lung graft function. The lung grafts were sectioned for histological examination at the end of experiments. The total ischemic time for lung graft was approximately 14 h. Results All animals receiving plain medium died within 40 min after reperfusion, but 3 out of 5 (60%) piglets receiving EPCs survived up to 4 h after diversion of the entire cardiac output into the lung graft (P<0.01). The donor body weight, recipient body weight, cold ischemic time, and time for anastomosis were comparable between the EPC and control group (P=0.989, 0.822, 0.843, and 0.452, respectively). The mean aortic pressure decreased, and the cardiac output and mean pulmonary artery pressure elevated after right pulmonary artery occlusion. All these parameters were gradually compensated in the EPC group but decompensated in the control group. Better preservation of gas exchange function, reduced thrombi formation in the terminal pulmonary arterioles, and attenuated interstitial hemorrhage of the lung graft were observed in the EPC group. Conclusions We concluded autologous EPCs significantly enhanced the function of lung allograft and improved survival in a porcine model of lung transplantation with prolonged ischemia

  13. Penicillium marneffei infection in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Stathakis, A; Lim, K P; Boan, P; Lavender, M; Wrobel, J; Musk, M; Heath, C H

    2015-06-01

    Penicillium marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus that can cause severe opportunistic infections in endemic regions of Southeast Asia, particularly in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1, but has rarely been reported in solid organ transplant recipients. Herein, we report the first case, to our knowledge, of P. marneffei infection in a lung transplant recipient, occurring in a 41-year-old woman 28 months post lung transplantation, after recent travel to Vietnam. We have reviewed the literature to derive some management principles for this rare infection in this clinical context. The number of P. marneffei infections in transplant recipients may increase, as a result of increasing rates of transplantation and travel to endemic areas. PMID:25809145

  14. Proteome Profiling in Lung Injury after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Viken, Kevin J; Dey, Sanjoy; Steinbach, Michael S; Wu, Baolin; Jagtap, Pratik D; Higgins, LeeAnn; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Kumar, Vipin; Arora, Mukta; Bitterman, Peter B; Ingbar, David H; Wendt, Chris H

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary complications due to infection and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome (IPS), a noninfectious lung injury in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, are frequent causes of transplantation-related mortality and morbidity. Our objective was to characterize the global bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein expression of IPS to identify proteins and pathways that differentiate IPS from infectious lung injury after HSCT. We studied 30 BALF samples from patients who developed lung injury within 180 days of HSCT or cellular therapy transfusion (natural killer cell transfusion). Adult subjects were classified as having IPS or infectious lung injury by the criteria outlined in the 2011 American Thoracic Society statement. BALF was depleted of hemoglobin and 14 high-abundance proteins, treated with trypsin, and labeled with isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) 8-plex reagent for two-dimensional capillary liquid chromatography (LC) and data dependent peptide tandem mass spectrometry (MS) on an Orbitrap Velos system in higher-energy collision-induced dissociation activation mode. Protein identification employed a target-decoy strategy using ProteinPilot within Galaxy P. The relative protein abundance was determined with reference to a global internal standard consisting of pooled BALF from patients with respiratory failure and no history of HSCT. A variance weighted t-test controlling for a false discovery rate of ≤5% was used to identify proteins that showed differential expression between IPS and infectious lung injury. The biological relevance of these proteins was determined by using gene ontology enrichment analysis and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. We characterized 12 IPS and 18 infectious lung injury BALF samples. In the 5 iTRAQ LC-MS/MS experiments 845, 735, 532, 615, and 594 proteins were identified for a total of 1125 unique proteins and 368 common proteins across all 5 LC-MS/MS experiments. When comparing IPS to

  15. A rare occurrence of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Albores, Jeffrey; Seki, Atsuko; Fishbein, Michael C; Abtin, Fereidoun; Lynch, Joseph P; Wang, Tisha; Weigt, S Samuel

    2013-06-01

    We present a case of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) initially diagnosed 28 months after left single-lung transplantation for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The diagnosis was based upon the presence of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive and surfactant immunostain-positive acellular lipoproteinaceous material within alveoli seen on transbronchial biopsy as well as in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The patient eventually also displayed a characteristic "crazy paving" pattern on radiographic imaging. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor antibodies were negative, consistent with secondary PAP. PAP is a rare interstitial lung disease with only a few reported cases occurring after lung transplantation. The etiology is thought to be related to a defect in macrophage function caused by immunosuppression. Reduced immunosuppression has been associated with stabilization, but not reversal, of the condition in the case reported here. PAP is an exceptionally rare cause of dyspnea and radiographic infiltrates after lung transplantation and may be related to toxicity of immune-suppressive medications. PMID:23821516

  16. Ex vivo lung perfusion in clinical lung transplantation--state of the art.

    PubMed

    Andreasson, Anders S I; Dark, John H; Fisher, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) has emerged as a new technique for assessing and potentially reconditioning human donor lungs previously unacceptable for clinical transplantation with the potential to dramatically push the limits of organ acceptability. With the recent introduction of portable EVLP, a new era in lung preservation may be upon us with the opportunity to also limit organ ischaemic times and potentially improve the outcome of donor lungs already deemed acceptable for transplantation. It took over half a century for the technique to evolve from basic theory to semi-automated circuits fit for clinical use that are now rapidly being adopted in transplant centres across the globe. With this field in constant evolution and many unanswered questions remaining, our review serves as an update on the state of the art of EVLP in clinical lung transplantation. PMID:25061215

  17. Successful emergent lung transplantation after remote ex vivo perfusion optimization and transportation of donor lungs.

    PubMed

    Wigfield, C H; Cypel, M; Yeung, J; Waddell, T; Alex, C; Johnson, C; Keshavjee, S; Love, R B

    2012-10-01

    A recent clinical trial provided evidence that ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) results in optimized human donor lungs for transplantation. Excellent recipient outcomes were documented after 4 h of normothermic perfusion. We report a clinical case utilizing remote EVLP to assess and improve function of initially otherwise unacceptable injured donor lungs followed by transportation and subsequent bilateral lung transplantation in a patient with virally induced refractory respiratory failure supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. This is the first lung transplantation with the application of remote EVLP, wherein the donor lungs were transported from the donor hospital to a center for EVLP and then transported to another hospital for transplantation. It is also the first case of lung transplantation in the United States utilizing EVLP for functional optimization leading to successful transplantation. Organ procurement data, EVLP assessment, and the pre- and postoperative course of the recipient are presented. The available evidence supporting EVLP, the humanitarian and cooperative utilization of lungs otherwise discarded, are discussed. PMID:23009140

  18. Recurrence of lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Nine years after a bilateral lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Khawaja S; Aryan, Zahra; Mehta, Atul C; Akindipe, Olufemi; Budev, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare, slowly progressive lethal lung disease primary afflicting young women. LAM is characterized by proliferation of abnormal smooth muscle cells that target the lungs, causing cystic destruction and eventual respiratory failure leading to death. Recent ten year mortality due to end stage LAM has been reported to be approximately 10%-20%, but may vary. The decline in lung function in LAM is gradual, occurring at a rate of about 3% to 15% per year but can vary from patient to patient. But recently therapy with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors such as sirolimus has shown promising results in the stabilization of lung function and reduction of chylous effusions in LAM. Lung transplantation is a viable option for patients who continue to have decline in lung function despite mTOR therapy. Unique issues that may occur post-transplant in a recipient with LAM include development of chylous effusion and a risk of recurrence. We describe a case of LAM recurrence in a bilateral lung transplant recipient who developed histological findings of LAM nine years after transplantation. PMID:27011924

  19. Atelectasis--an unusual and late complication of lung transplant.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Al-Kaade, S; Keller, C A; deMello, D E

    2002-06-01

    We report a previously unrecognized late complication of allograft lung transplantation - persistent recurrent atelectasis of the transplanted lung. The patient developed sudden, severe respiratory distress about 2 yr after a right lung transplant, because of acute atelectasis of her transplanted lung. Multiple transbronchial biopsies at the time revealed minimal inflammation and no evidence of rejection. She was treated with surfactant replacement therapy, and her collapsed lung fully expanded following surfactant installation. To eliminate the possibility of acquired deficiency of surfactant lipids or proteins, ultrastructural examination and immunostains for surfactant proteins were performed in a transbronchial lung biopsy. No deficiency of surfactant lipids or proteins was found. On ultrastructural examination of the lung biopsy, the number of Type II cells per alveolus and the number of lamellar bodies per square micron of Type II cell cross-sectional area was increased compared with an age-matched control. We conclude that synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins was unimpaired and because of the patient's response to surfactant replacement therapy, that the increase in number of lamellar bodies could reflect a compensatory mechanism for a surfactant functional defect. The patient later developed breast carcinoma to which she succumbed. We raise the possibility that the functional surfactant defect is a hitherto unrecognized non-metastatic manifestation of malignancy. PMID:12010150

  20. [Therapeutic Drug Management for Transplanted Women with a Planned Pregnancy: About Two Cases of Lung and Heart-lung Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Zecchini, Céline; Chanoine, Sébastien; Chapuis, Claire; Claustre, Johanna; Schir, Edith; Allenet, Benoît; Saint Raymond, Christel; Bedouch, Pierrick

    2015-01-01

    Advances in lung transplantation allow the women of childbearing age to consider becoming mothers. When planning to become pregnant, a therapeutic drug management of immunosuppressive drugs and associated therapies is required. It must take into account teratogenic and fetotoxic drugs, as well as pharmacokinetic changes encountered during pregnancy. Increasingly data are currently available on the management of immunosuppressive drugs and associated therapies during pregnancy. We report the case management of drug therapy before and during pregnancy in two patients after a lung or heart-lung transplantation. To prevent the emergence of complications for mother and child, a literature review has been necessary to manage drug therapies of each patient. PMID:26223163

  1. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Altered Motility in Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Castor, John M; Wood, Richard K.; Muir, Andrew J.; Palmer, Scott M.; Shimpi, Rahul A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation has become an effective therapeutic option for selected patients with end stage lung disease. Long-term survival is limited by chronic rejection manifest as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). The aspiration of gastric contents has been implicated as a causative or additive factor leading to BOS. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and altered foregut motility are common both before and after lung transplantation. Further, the normal defense mechanisms against reflux are impaired in the allograft. Recent studies using biomarkers of aspiration have added to previous association studies to provide a growing body of evidence supporting the link between rejection and GER. Further, the addition of high-resolution manometry (HRM) and impedance technology to characterize bolus transit and the presence and extent of reflux regardless of pH might better identify at-risk patients. Although additional prospective studies are needed, fundoplication appears useful in the prevention or treatment of post-transplant BOS. Purpose This review will highlight the existing literature on the relationship of gastroesophageal reflux and altered motility to lung transplant rejection, particularly BOS. The article will conclude with a discussion of the evaluation and management of patients undergoing lung transplantation at our center. PMID:20507544

  2. Successful extended hypothermic cardiopulmonary preservation for heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bando, K; Teramoto, S; Tago, M; Teraoka, H; Seno, S; Senoo, Y

    1989-07-01

    The inability to obtain sufficiently extended hypothermic organ preservation is a major restriction on clinical heart-lung transplantation. We used core cooling, nonrecirculating retrograde heart perfusion, and lung immersion with liposomal recombinant human superoxide dismutase in an attempt to provide effective 12-hour cardiopulmonary preservation. Donor dogs supported by cardiopulmonary bypass were rapidly cooled to 15 degrees C with cardioplegic arrest, and heterotopic heart and unilateral left lung transplantations were performed. In control dogs (n = 7), hearts and lungs, harvested after core cooling and cardioplegic arrest, were transplanted with a total mean ischemic time of 88 +/- 5 minutes. In group II (n = 7), heart-lung blocks were similarly excised but preserved at 4 degrees C for 12 hours (756 +/- 30 minutes) and then transplanted. During preservation, the lungs were immersed in hyperosmolar extracellular solution. For the heart, retrograde coronary sinus perfusion was performed with intracellular solution containing perfluorochemicals at a temperature of 4 degrees C and a rate of 30 ml/hr for 12 hours. In group III (n = 7), donor organs were similarly excised and preserved for 12 hours (726 +/- 39 minutes), except that liposomal recombinant human superoxide dismutase was administered during harvest, preservation, and reperfusion. Myocardial function, assessed by the ratio of end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension, after the 12-hour preservation period in both experimental groups was similar to that of the control group 4 and 6 hours after transplantation. The mean arterial oxygen capacity of the transplanted left lung during ventilation with an inspired oxygen concentration of 40% was also similar in each group. In contrast, the 12-hour preservation of pulmonary function assessed by pulmonary vascular resistance, the accumulation of extravascular lung water, and histologic evidence of alveolar wall injury, interstitial edema, and

  3. Leaky lysosomes in lung transplant macrophages: azithromycin prevents oxidative damage

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung allografts contain large amounts of iron (Fe), which inside lung macrophages may promote oxidative lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP), cell death and inflammation. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) accumulates 1000-fold inside the acidic lysosomes and may interfere with the lysosomal pool of Fe. Objective Oxidative lysosomal leakage was assessed in lung macrophages from lung transplant recipients without or with AZM treatment and from healthy subjects. The efficiency of AZM to protect lysosomes and cells against oxidants was further assessed employing murine J774 macrophages. Methods Macrophages harvested from 8 transplant recipients (5 without and 3 with ongoing AZM treatment) and 7 healthy subjects, and J774 cells pre-treated with AZM, a high-molecular-weight derivative of the Fe chelator desferrioxamine or ammonium chloride were oxidatively stressed. LMP, cell death, Fe, reduced glutathione (GSH) and H-ferritin were assessed. Results Oxidant challenged macrophages from transplants recipients without AZM exhibited significantly more LMP and cell death than macrophages from healthy subjects. Those macrophages contained significantly more Fe, while GSH and H-ferritin did not differ significantly. Although macrophages from transplant recipients treated with AZM contained both significantly more Fe and less GSH, which would sensitize cells to oxidants, these macrophages resisted oxidant challenge well. The preventive effect of AZM on oxidative LMP and J774 cell death was 60 to 300 times greater than the other drugs tested. Conclusions AZM makes lung transplant macrophages and their lysososomes more resistant to oxidant challenge. Possibly, prevention of obliterative bronchiolitis in lung transplants by AZM is partly due to this action. PMID:23006592

  4. Practical Guidelines: Lung Transplantation in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hirche, T. O.; Knoop, C.; Hebestreit, H.; Shimmin, D.; Solé, A.; Elborn, J. S.; Ellemunter, H.; Aurora, P.; Hogardt, M.; Wagner, T. O. F.; ECORN-CF Study Group

    2014-01-01

    There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX) in cystic fibrosis (CF). The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation. PMID:24800072

  5. Lung transplantation and extracorporeal photopheresis: The answer to bronchiolitis obliterans?

    PubMed

    Yung, Gordon L; Craig, Vanessa

    2015-04-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) is a rare condition characterized by narrowing of small airways. Although it can be caused by variety of conditions, most cases occur after lung and bone marrow transplantation in the form of graft-versus-host-disease and chronic rejection, respectively. Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) has emerged as a promising treatment for the condition, especially for BO after lung transplantation. Available data suggest that around two-thirds of patients may demonstrate either slowing or cessation of disease progression after treatment with ECP. Recent researches also provide interesting insights into possible mechanism of action of ECP in BO. PMID:25881738

  6. Cavitary lung lesion 6 years after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Arun Kumar; Arava, Sudheer; Bagchi, Soumita; Madan, Karan; Das, Chandan J; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnoses of a cavitary lung lesion in renal transplant recipients would include infection, malignancy and less commonly inflammatory diseases. Bacterial infection, Tuberculosis, Nocardiosis, fungal infections like Aspergillosis and Cryptococcosis need to be considered in these patients. Pulmonary cryptococcosis usually presents 16-21 mo after transplantation, more frequently in patients who have a high level of cumulative immunosuppression. Here we discuss an interesting patient who never received any induction/anti-rejection therapy but developed both BK virus nephropathy as well as severe pulmonary Cryptococcal infection after remaining stable for 6 years after transplantation. This case highlights the risk of serious opportunistic infections even in apparently low immunologic risk transplant recipients many years after transplantation. PMID:27358792

  7. Cavitary lung lesion 6 years after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Arun Kumar; Arava, Sudheer; Bagchi, Soumita; Madan, Karan; Das, Chandan J; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-06-24

    The differential diagnoses of a cavitary lung lesion in renal transplant recipients would include infection, malignancy and less commonly inflammatory diseases. Bacterial infection, Tuberculosis, Nocardiosis, fungal infections like Aspergillosis and Cryptococcosis need to be considered in these patients. Pulmonary cryptococcosis usually presents 16-21 mo after transplantation, more frequently in patients who have a high level of cumulative immunosuppression. Here we discuss an interesting patient who never received any induction/anti-rejection therapy but developed both BK virus nephropathy as well as severe pulmonary Cryptococcal infection after remaining stable for 6 years after transplantation. This case highlights the risk of serious opportunistic infections even in apparently low immunologic risk transplant recipients many years after transplantation. PMID:27358792

  8. Answers about Lung Transplantation for Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... East PH Medical Resources Worldwide Resources in Other Languages Recursos en Español Connect with a Global Community ... essence, when undergoing transplant, a recipient trades their current medical disease for another medical condition that has ...

  9. Lobar lung transplantation--is it comparable with standard lung transplantation?

    PubMed

    Slama, Alexis; Ghanim, Bahil; Klikovits, Thomas; Scheed, Axel; Hoda, Mir A; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Jaksch, Peter; Matilla, Jose; Taghavi, Sharokh; Klepetko, Walter; Aigner, Clemens

    2014-09-01

    Lobar lung transplantation is used mainly for urgent small recipients who are less likely to obtain size matched lungs in due time. Only limited numbers have been published, and we herewith report the largest series of lobar-LuTX. We analyzed our LuTX database from 1/2001 to 12/2012 and compared the outcome of lobar-LuTX recipients with those receiving standard LuTX. Seven hundred and seventy-eighty LuTX (group 1) were performed either in standard technique by implanting the whole lungs (n = 539) or with downsizing by wedge resection of the right middle lobe and/or the left lingula (n = 239). One hundred and thirty-eight LuTX were performed in lobar technique (group 2) to overcome more pronounced size discrepancies. Patients in group 1 had a different spectrum of diagnoses and were less frequently bridged to LuTX (P < 0.001). Intubation time, ICU stay, and hospital stay were shorter in group 1 (P < 0.001). One-year survival was 84.8% vs. 65.1%, and 5-years survival 69.9% vs. 54.9% (P < 0.001). In multivariate analyzes, procedure, diagnosis, and pre-operative bridging were shown to be significant prognostic factors in survival. Early postoperative outcome in Lobar LuTX was significantly inferior to standard LuTX recipients. However, survival rates of successfully dismissed patients were comparable with standard LuTX (P = 0.168); thereby, Lobar-LuTX remains an important option in the management of urgent small recipients. PMID:24810771

  10. Regeneration and orthotopic transplantation of a bioartificial lung.

    PubMed

    Ott, Harald C; Clippinger, Ben; Conrad, Claudius; Schuetz, Christian; Pomerantseva, Irina; Ikonomou, Laertis; Kotton, Darrell; Vacanti, Joseph P

    2010-08-01

    About 2,000 patients now await a donor lung in the United States. Worldwide, 50 million individuals are living with end-stage lung disease. Creation of a bioartificial lung requires engineering of viable lung architecture enabling ventilation, perfusion and gas exchange. We decellularized lungs by detergent perfusion and yielded scaffolds with acellular vasculature, airways and alveoli. To regenerate gas exchange tissue, we seeded scaffolds with epithelial and endothelial cells. To establish function, we perfused and ventilated cell-seeded constructs in a bioreactor simulating the physiologic environment of developing lung. By day 5, constructs could be perfused with blood and ventilated using physiologic pressures, and they generated gas exchange comparable to that of isolated native lungs. To show in vivo function, we transplanted regenerated lungs into orthotopic position. After transplantation, constructs were perfused by the recipient's circulation and ventilated by means of the recipient's airway and respiratory muscles, and they provided gas exchange in vivo for up to 6 h after extubation. PMID:20628374

  11. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pencheva, Ventsislava P.; Petrova, Daniela S.; Genov, Diyan K.; Georgiev, Ognian B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001), arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015), living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004), therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038), immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011), azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023), and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041). The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001). Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. PMID:26958045

  12. Persistent Human Cosavirus Infection in Lung Transplant Recipient, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Campanini, Giulia; Rovida, Francesca; Meloni, Federica; Cascina, Alessandro; Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Piralla, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Human cosavirus is a novel picornavirus recently identified in feces from children in southern Asia. We report infection with human cosavirus in a patient in the Mediterranean area. The patient was an adult double lung transplant recipient who had chronic diarrhea associated with persistent infection with human cosavirus. PMID:24047954

  13. Mycobacterium bovis hip bursitis in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Dan, J M; Crespo, M; Silveira, F P; Kaplan, R; Aslam, S

    2016-02-01

    We present a report of extrapulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection in a lung transplant recipient. M. bovis is acquired predominantly by zoonotic transmission, particularly from consumption of unpasteurized foods. We discuss epidemiologic exposure, especially as relates to the Mexico-US border, clinical characteristics, resistance profile, and treatment. PMID:26671334

  14. The putative role of mast cells in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jungraithmayr, W

    2015-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were primarily recognized as effector cells of allergy. These cells are acting predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment, such as skin, gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract. Only recently, MCs have gained increased recognition as cells of functional plasticity with immune-regulatory properties that influence both the innate and the adaptive immune response in inflammatory disorders, cancer and transplantation. Through the secretion of both proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators, MCs can either ameliorate or deteriorate the course and outcome in lung transplantation. Recent research from other models recognized the immune-protective activity of MCs including its role as an important source of IL-10 and TGF-β for the modulation of alloreactive T cell responses or assistance in Treg activity. This paper summarizes the current understanding of MCs in lung transplantation and discusses MC-mediated immune-mechanisms by which the outcome of the engrafted organ is modulated. PMID:25693471

  15. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca’ Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2/FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2/FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40–84] vs. 39 [36–46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  16. Ex vivo lung perfusion to improve donor lung function and increase the number of organs available for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Valenza, Franco; Rosso, Lorenzo; Coppola, Silvia; Froio, Sara; Palleschi, Alessandro; Tosi, Davide; Mendogni, Paolo; Salice, Valentina; Ruggeri, Giulia M; Fumagalli, Jacopo; Villa, Alessandro; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the initial clinical experience of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) at the Fondazione Ca' Granda in Milan between January 2011 and May 2013. EVLP was considered if donor PaO2 /FiO2 was below 300 mmHg or if lung function was doubtful. Donors with massive lung contusion, aspiration, purulent secretions, pneumonia, or sepsis were excluded. EVLP was run with a low-flow, open atrium and low hematocrit technique. Thirty-five lung transplants from brain death donors were performed, seven of which after EVLP. EVLP donors were older (54 ± 9 years vs. 40 ± 15 years, EVLP versus Standard, P < 0.05), had lower PaO2 /FiO2 (264 ± 78 mmHg vs. 453 ± 119 mmHg, P < 0.05), and more chest X-ray abnormalities (P < 0.05). EVLP recipients were more often admitted to intensive care unit as urgent cases (57% vs. 18%, P = 0.05); lung allocation score at transplantation was higher (79 [40-84] vs. 39 [36-46], P < 0.05). After transplantation, primary graft dysfunction (PGD72 grade 3, 32% vs. 28%, EVLP versus Standard, P = 1), mortality at 30 days (0% vs. 0%, P = 1), and overall survival (71% vs. 86%, EVLP versus Standard P = 0.27) were not different between groups. EVLP enabled a 20% increase in available donor organs and resulted in successful transplants with lungs that would have otherwise been rejected (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01967953). PMID:24628890

  17. Beneficial effects of synthetic KL₄ surfactant in experimental lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sáenz, A; Alvarez, L; Santos, M; López-Sánchez, A; Castillo-Olivares, J L; Varela, A; Segal, R; Casals, C

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether intratracheal administration of a new synthetic surfactant that includes the cationic, hydrophobic 21-residue peptide KLLLLKLLLLKLLLLKLLLLK (KL₄), might be effective in reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury after lung transplantation. Single left lung transplantation was performed in Landrace pigs 22 h post-harvest. KL₄ surfactant at a dose of 25 mg total phospholipid·kg body weight⁻¹ (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹) was instilled at 37°C to the donor left lung (n = 8) prior to explantation. Saline (2.5 mL·kg body weight⁻¹; 37°C) was instilled into the donor left lung of the untreated group (n = 6). Lung function in recipients was measured during 2 h of reperfusion. Recipient left lung bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) provided native cytometric, inflammatory marker and surfactant data. KL(4) surfactant treatment recovered oxygen levels in the recipient blood (mean ± sd arterial oxygen tension/inspiratory oxygen fraction 424 ± 60 versus 263 ± 101 mmHg in untreated group; p=0.01) and normalised alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference. Surfactant biophysical function was also recovered in KL₄ surfactant-treated lungs. This was associated with decreased C-reactive protein levels in BAL, and recovery of surfactant protein A content, normalised protein/phospholipid ratios, and lower levels of both lipid peroxides and protein carbonyls in large surfactant aggregates. These findings suggest an important protective role for KL₄ surfactant treatment in lung transplantation. PMID:20650990

  18. Lung-enriched Organisms and Aberrant Bacterial and Fungal Respiratory Microbiota after Lung Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, Emily S.; Diamond, Joshua M.; Bittinger, Kyle; Fitzgerald, Ayannah S.; Yadav, Anjana; Haas, Andrew R.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Long-term survival after lung transplantation is limited by infectious complications and by bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), a form of chronic rejection linked in part to microbial triggers. Objectives: To define microbial populations in the respiratory tract of transplant patients comprehensively using unbiased high-density sequencing. Methods: Lung was sampled by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and upper respiratory tract by oropharyngeal wash (OW). Bacterial 16S rDNA and fungal internal transcribed spacer sequencing was used to profile organisms present. Outlier analysis plots defining taxa enriched in lung relative to OW were used to identify bacteria enriched in lung against a background of oropharyngeal carryover. Measurements and Main Results: Lung transplant recipients had higher bacterial burden in BAL than control subjects, frequent appearance of dominant organisms, greater distance between communities in BAL and OW indicating more distinct populations, and decreased respiratory tract microbial richness and diversity. Fungal populations were typically dominated by Candida in both sites or by Aspergillus in BAL but not OW. 16S outlier analysis identified lung-enriched taxa indicating bacteria replicating in the lower respiratory tract. In some cases this confirmed respiratory cultures but in others revealed enrichment by anaerobic organisms or mixed outgrowth of upper respiratory flora and provided quantitative data on relative abundances of bacteria found by culture. Conclusions: Respiratory tract microbial communities in lung transplant recipients differ in structure and composition from healthy subjects. Outlier analysis can identify specific bacteria replicating in lung. These findings provide novel approaches to address the relationship between microbial communities and transplant outcome and aid in assessing lung infections. PMID:22798321

  19. Impairment of bronchial mucociliary clearance in long-term survivors of heart/lung and double-lung transplantation. The Paris-Sud Lung Transplant Group.

    PubMed

    Herve, P; Silbert, D; Cerrina, J; Simonneau, G; Dartevelle, P

    1993-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate bronchial mucociliary clearance after heart/lung and double lung transplantation. Bronchial mucociliary clearance was measured using a noninvasive radioaerosol technique: 99mTc-labeled albumin was aerosolized using a spinning-top generator (mass median aerodynamic diameter, 7.5 mu; geometric standard deviation, 1.5 mu). Radioactivity counts were acquired during 60 min with a gamma camera. A region of interest was drawn over the right lung delineated by a 133Xe lung ventilation image. Bronchial mucociliary clearance was assessed as the percentage of decrease in radioactivity per hour calculated on time-activity curves fitted by a monoexponential model. To exclude patients with acute lung rejection, opportunistic lung infection, and obliterative bronchiolitis, all patients with transplants underwent pulmonary function tests and bronchoscopic examination before clearance measurement. Eight heart/lung and five double-lung nonsmoking transplant patients with normal lung histology were studied 19.3 +/- 4.0 mo after surgery and compared to nine normal nonsmokers. A similar proximal deposition of the aerosol was obtained in patients with transplants and normal subjects; skew values of distribution histograms of aerosol radioactivity counts were 2.1 +/- 0.2 and 1.8 +/- 0.1, respectively, and the ratios between central and peripheral 99mTc radioactivity counts were 2.4 +/- 0.1 and 2.3 +/- 0.2, respectively. No significant difference was observed in bronchial clearance values between patients with heart/lung and double-lung transplants (26.4 +/- 3.0 percent/h vs 35.9 +/- 3.5 percent/h). Conversely, bronchial clearance was significantly lower in transplant recipients (30.0 +/- 2.5 percent/h) than in normal controls (58.7 +/- 6.2 percent/h; p < 0.001). This decreased bronchial clearance can be expected to increase the risk of lung infection in long-term survivors of heart/lung and double-lung transplantation. PMID:8380268

  20. What to Expect After a Lung Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery. You'll be taught how to do deep breathing exercises with an incentive spirometer (spi-ROM- ... This hand-held device helps you take slow, deep breaths. You also may have lung function tests ...

  1. A staged approach for a lung-liver transplant patient using ex vivo reconditioned lungs first followed by an urgent liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Van De Wauwer, Caroline; Verschuuren, Erik A M; Nossent, George D; van der Bij, Wim; den Hamer, Inez J; Klinkenberg, Theo J; van den Berg, Aad P; de Boer, Marieke T; Mariani, Massimo A; Erasmus, Michiel E

    2015-01-01

    Combined lung-liver transplantation is a logistically challenging procedure hampered by shortage of organ donors. We describe the case of a young patient with end-stage lung disease due to of cystic fibrosis and liver cirrhosis who needed combined lung-liver transplantation. The long waiting for this caused an interesting clinical dilemma. We decided to change our policy in this situation by listing him only for the lung transplantation and to apply for a high urgent liver transplantation if the liver failed after the lung transplantation. This strategy enabled us to use lungs treated with ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) from an unsuitable donor after circulatory death. After conditioning for 4 h via EVLP, the pO2 was 59.7 kPa. The lungs were transplanted successfully. He developed an acute-on-chronic liver failure for which he received a successful liver transplantation 19 days after the lung transplantation. PMID:25070399

  2. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three‐dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity‐modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart‐transplanted oncologic patients. PMID:27148425

  3. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Francesca M; Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-04-26

    Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart-transplanted oncologic patients. PMID:27148425

  4. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion and Transplant: State of the Art and View to the Future.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Mohamed S A

    2015-12-01

    After the first clinical application of ex vivo lung perfusion in 2001, the technique has been used in many lung transplant centers worldwide. In addition, many modifications have been tested, leading to the development of various ex vivo lung perfusion systems and application protocols. Currently, the Lund protocol, the Toronto protocol, and Organ Care System Lung protocol are the clinically applied ex vivo lung perfusion protocols, based on the favorable results of the safety studies. Accordingly, the comparison among these EVLP systems and protocols should be an important research target, in order to provide the evidence based medical data that would recommend one protocol over the others. In this manuscript, the current experience with EVLP is reviewed and some molecular and clinical targets, that could be used to compare the various protocols of the technique, are introduced. PMID:26643670

  5. Effect of lung transplantation on diaphragmatic function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wanke, T.; Merkle, M.; Formanek, D.; Zifko, U.; Wieselthaler, G.; Zwick, H.; Klepetko, W.; Burghuber, O. C.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--To date there are no data on the effects of lung transplantation on diaphragmatic function in patients with end stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is not known whether the relation between the transdiaphragmatic pressure (PDI) and lung volume is altered in recipients after transplantation as a result of changes in diaphragmatic structure caused by chronic hyperinflation. The effect of lung transplantation on diaphragmatic strength was determined in patients with COPD and the relation between postoperative PDI and lung volume analysed. METHODS--Diaphragmatic strength was assessed in eight double lung transplant recipients, six single lung transplant recipients, and in 14 patients with COPD whose lung function was similar to those of the transplant recipients preoperatively. PDI obtained during unilateral and bilateral phrenic nerve stimulation at 1 Hz (twitch PDI) at functional residual capacity (FRC) and during maximal sniff manoeuvres (sniff PDI) at various levels of inspiratory vital capacity (VCin) served as parameters for diaphragmatic strength. Sniff PDI assessed at the various VCin levels were used to analyse the PDI/lung volume relation. RESULTS--Lung transplantation caused a reduction in lung volume, especially in the double lung transplant recipients. As a consequence sniff PDI was higher in the double lung transplant recipients than in the patients with COPD at all levels of VCin analysed. However, sniff PDI values analysed at comparable intrathoracic gas volumes were not reduced in the patients with COPD when compared with those who underwent lung transplantation. Bilateral twitch PDI values were similar in the patients with COPD and in the lung transplant recipients. In the single lung transplant recipients unilateral twitch PDI values were similar on the transplanted and the non-transplanted side. The relation between PDI and lung volume was similar in the patients with COPD and in the lung transplant recipients

  6. Onset of Inflammation With Ischemia: Implications for Donor Lung Preservation and Transplant Survival.

    PubMed

    Tao, J-Q; Sorokina, E M; Vazquez Medina, J P; Mishra, M K; Yamada, Y; Satalin, J; Nieman, G F; Nellen, J R; Beduhn, B; Cantu, E; Habashi, N M; Jungraithmayr, W; Christie, J D; Chatterjee, S

    2016-09-01

    Lungs stored ahead of transplant surgery experience ischemia. Pulmonary ischemia differs from ischemia in the systemic organs in that stop of blood flow in the lung leads to loss of shear alone because the lung parenchyma does not rely on blood flow for its cellular oxygen requirements. Our earlier studies on the ischemia-induced mechanosignaling cascade showed that the pulmonary endothelium responds to stop of flow by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that ROS produced in this way led to induction of proinflammatory mediators. In this study, we used lungs or cells subjected to various periods of storage and evaluated the induction of several proinflammatory mediators. Isolated murine, porcine and human lungs in situ showed increased expression of cellular adhesion molecules; the damage-associated molecular pattern protein high-mobility group box 1 and the corresponding pattern recognition receptor, called the receptor for advanced glycation end products; and induction stabilization and translocation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and its downstream effector VEGFA, all of which are participants in inflammation. We concluded that signaling with lung preservation drives expression of inflammatory mediators that potentially predispose the donor lung to an inflammatory response after transplant. PMID:26998598

  7. Fatal obstructive lung disease after haploidentical sibling cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, K; Toyoda, Y; Ishida, Y; Honda, K; Nagao, T; Ijiri, R; Tanaka, Y; Goto, K; Hiroki, K; Kigasawa, H; Nishihira, H

    1998-05-01

    We report the case of a patient with fatal obstructive lung disease after an HLA-haploidentical sibling cord blood transplant (CBT), with severe acute GVHD. A 2-year-old girl developed expiratory air trapping gradually with acute and chronic GVHD after CBT for the treatment of ALL. Anti-CMV and immunosuppressive therapy were ineffective, and the patient died of progressive respiratory acidosis. Necropsy of the lung revealed severe bronchiolitis obliterans with cytomegalic inclusion cells in the granulation tissues of the bronchiolitis. Thus, immunologic and GVHD problems can occur even in CBT. PMID:9613788

  8. Rhodococcal lung abscess in a renal transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Koh-Wei; Thevarajah, Bharathan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background: Rhodococcus species are relatively rare human pathogens, but are being increasingly recognized as causes of infection especially in immunosuppressed patients. Case Report: We present a case of Rhodococcus lung abscess in a patient 10 months post-cadaveric renal transplant, successfully treated with a combination of antibiotics. She required a prolonged course of oral antibiotics for 6 months. She did not require surgical intervention. Chest X-rays and CT thorax showed complete resolution of the initial lesion. We also review the medical literature related to Rhodococcus infection in patients with renal transplantation. Rhodococcus infection should be considered as in the differential diagnosis of immunosuppressed patients who present with lung abscess/mass. Conclusions: A literature review indicates this is a potentially fatal condition with disseminated sepsis/abscesses. PMID:23569526

  9. Simkania negevensis and acute cellular rejection in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Alainna J; Resende, Mariangela R; Prochnow, Taisa; McGilvray, Ian; Pilewski, Joseph M; Crespo, Maria M; Singer, Lianne G; McCurry, Kenneth R; Kolls, Jay K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liles, W Conrad; Husain, Shahid

    2015-08-01

    Simkania negevensis infection has been hypothesized to play a role in lung transplant rejection. The incidence of S. negevensis infection and its association with acute cellular rejection (ACR) were determined in a prospective cohort study of 78 lung transplant recipients (LTRs) in Toronto, Canada, and Pittsburgh, USA, from July 2007 to January 2010. Simkania negevensis testing was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The relationship between S. negevensis and ACR was examined using Cox proportional hazards models and generalized linear and latent mixed models. Cumulative incidence estimates for time-to-ACR in S. negevensis PCR-positive vs. PCR-negative LTRs were 52.7% vs. 31.1% at six months and 68.9% vs. 44.6% at one yr, respectively. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend toward a higher risk of ACR among S. negevensis PCR-positive vs. PCR-negative LTRs in all statistical models. PMID:26009941

  10. Thrombotic microangiopathy associated with tacrolimus in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reig Mezquida, Juan Pablo; Jover, Amparo Solé; Ansótegui Barrera, Emilio; Escrivá Peiró, Juan; Pastor Colom, Maria Desamparados; Pastor Guillem, Juan

    2015-05-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a rare complication associated with the use of calcineurin inhibitors in lung transplantation, irrespective of the underlying disease of the graft recipient. It usually occurs in incomplete forms, complicating and delaying diagnosis until damage is already irreversible. It is unrelated to time from transplantation and often presents with concomitant infection, which tends to confound diagnosis. The cases discussed here have a common causative agent and all present with concomitant infection. Treatment recommendations have changed in recent years with the introduction of plasmapheresis or, more recently, the availability of the antibody eculizumab. Notwithstanding, the most cost-effective measure is withdrawal or switching of the calcineurin inhibitor. TMA is an underdiagnosed clinical entity that should be considered in the management of transplantation patients. PMID:25138798

  11. When the Battle is Lost and Won: Delayed Chest Closure After Bilateral Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Soresi, Simona; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Simon, André R.; Popov, Aron-Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we summarize benefits of delayed chest closure strategy in lung transplantation, addressing indications, different surgical techniques, and additional perioperative treatment. Delayed chest closure seems to be a valuable and safe strategy in managing patients with various conditions after lung transplantation, such as instable hemodynamics, need for high respiratory pressures, coagulopathy, and size mismatch. Therefore, this approach should be considered in lung transplant centers to give patients time to recover before the chest is closed. PMID:26456363

  12. When the Battle is Lost and Won: Delayed Chest Closure After Bilateral Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Soresi, Simona; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Simon, André R; Popov, Aron-Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we summarize benefits of delayed chest closure strategy in lung transplantation, addressing indications, different surgical techniques, and additional perioperative treatment. Delayed chest closure seems to be a valuable and safe strategy in managing patients with various conditions after lung transplantation, such as instable hemodynamics, need for high respiratory pressures, coagulopathy, and size mismatch. Therefore, this approach should be considered in lung transplant centers to give patients time to recover before the chest is closed. PMID:26456363

  13. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction 33 Days after Lung Transplant in a Patient with Non-Significant CAD before Transplantation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Saeed Alipour; Dousti, Amir; Naghashzadeh, Farah; Ataeinia, Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction after lung transplantation is not well illustrated in the literature. We present a patient with documented non significant Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) in coronary angiography before lung transplant who was referred to our hospital with acute Myocardial Infarction (MI) 33 days following lung transplantation.

  14. Removal of metallic tracheobronchial stents in lung transplantation with flexible bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Airway complications are among the most challenging problems after lung transplantation, and Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS) are used to treat airway complications such as stenosis or malacia at the bronchial anastomosis sites. Several transplantation centers are reluctant to use SEMS since their removal is sometimes needed and usually requires the use of rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia. The objective of the current report is to describe our experience in SEMS retrieval by flexible bronchoscopy under conscious sedation. Methods A retrospective review was done of patients requiring tracheobronchial stent placement after lung transplantation in which the SEMS had to be removed. The retrieval procedure was done by flexible bronchoscopy on a day-care ambulatory basis. Results Between January 2004 and January 2010, out of 305 lung transplantation patients, 24 (7.8%) underwent SEMS placement. Indications included bronchial stenosis in 20 and bronchomalacia in 4. In six patients (25%) the SEMS had to be removed due to excessive granulation tissue formation and stent obstruction. The average time from SEMS placement to retrieval was 30 months (range 16-48 months). The stent was completely removed in five patients and partially removed in one patient; no major complications were encountered, and all patients were discharged within 3 hours of the procedure. In all procedures, new SEMS was successfully re-inserted thereafter. Conclusions The retrieval of SEMS in patients that underwent lung transplantation can be effectively and safely done under conscious sedation using flexible bronchoscopy on a day-care basis, this observation should encourage increasing usage of SEMS in highly selected patients. PMID:20831830

  15. Viral metagenomics reveal blooms of anelloviruses in the respiratory tract of lung transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jacque C.; Chehoud, Christel; Bittinger, Kyle; Bailey, Aubrey; Diamond, Joshua M.; Cantu, Edward; Haas, Andrew R.; Abbas, Arwa; Frye, Laura; Christie, Jason D.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Collman, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the lung virome in health and disease. Outcomes of lung transplantation are known to be influenced by several recognized respiratory viruses, but global understanding of the virome of the transplanted lung is incomplete. To define the DNA virome within the respiratory tract following lung transplantation we carried out metagenomic analysis of allograft bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and compared to healthy and HIV+ subjects. Viral concentrates were purified from BAL and analyzed by shotgun DNA sequencing. All of the BAL samples contained reads mapping to anelloviruses, with high proportions in lung transplant samples. Anellovirus populations in transplant recipients were complex, with multiple concurrent variants. Q-PCR quantification revealed that anellovirus sequences were 56-fold more abundant in BAL from lung transplant recipients compared with healthy controls or HIV+ subjects (p<0.0001). Anellovirus sequences were also more abundant in upper respiratory tract specimens from lung transplant recipients than controls (p=0.006). Comparison to metagenomic data on bacterial populations showed that high anellovirus loads correlated with dysbiotic bacterial communities in allograft BAL (p=0.00816). Thus the respiratory tracts of lung transplant recipients contain high levels and complex populations of anelloviruses, warranting studies of anellovirus lung infection and transplant outcome. PMID:25403800

  16. Pulmonary transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R D; Pasque, M K

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: More than 2700 lung transplants have been performed since the initial clinical success in 1983. The evolution in the techniques of lung transplantation and patient management and the effects on results are reviewed. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Improvements in donor management, lung preservation, operative techniques, immunosuppression management, infection prophylaxis and treatment, rejection surveillance, and long-term follow-up have occurred in the decade following the first clinically successful lung transplant. A wider spectrum of diseases and patients treated with lung transplant have accentuated the shortage of suitable lung donors. The organ shortage has led to the use of marginal donors and a limited experience using living, related donors. METHODS: Changes in techniques and patient selection and management are reviewed and controversial issues and problems are highlighted. RESULTS: One-year survival of greater than 90% for single-lung transplant recipients and greater than 85% for bilateral lung transplant recipients have been achieved. Complications caused by airway complications has been reduced greatly. Obliterative bronchiolitis develops in 20% to 50% of long-term survivors and is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality after the first year after transplant. CONCLUSIONS: Lung transplantation has evolved into an effective therapy for a wide variety of causes of end-stage lung disease. Wider applicability requires solutions to the problems of donor shortage and development of obliterative bronchiolitis. Images Figure 1. PMID:7826157

  17. Invasive pulmonary Aspergillosis in organ transplants--Focus on lung transplants.

    PubMed

    Geltner, Christian; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia

    2016-03-01

    Infections with filamentous fungi are common in transplant recipients. The risk for aspergillosis and other invasive pulmonary mycosis (IPM) is high in patients undergoing stem cell and lung transplantations. The mortality rates range from 20% to 60% and depend on a number of risk factors. The typical manifestations of IPM are lung infiltrates, consolidations, and fungal tracheobronchitis. The most common infectious agent is Aspergillus fumigatus. Infections caused by non-Aspergillus molds are more frequent for various reasons. The species distribution of non-Aspergillus molds varies in different locations. Furthermore, infections caused by Mucor and Penicillium are increasing, as are infections caused by species resistant to azoles and amphotericin B. Most centers use antifungal prophylaxis with inhaled amphotericin B or oral azoles. Early diagnosis and therapy is crucial. Reliable information on the local microbiological spectrum is a prerequisite for the effective treatment of molds with primary or secondary resistance to antimycotic drugs. PMID:26879476

  18. The HMGB1-RAGE axis mediates traumatic brain injury-induced pulmonary dysfunction in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Daniel J; Gracon, Adam S A; Ripsch, Matthew S; Fisher, Amanda J; Cheon, Bo M; Pandya, Pankita H; Vittal, Ragini; Capitano, Maegan L; Kim, Youngsong; Allette, Yohance M; Riley, Amanda A; McCarthy, Brian P; Territo, Paul R; Hutchins, Gary D; Broxmeyer, Hal E; Sandusky, George E; White, Fletcher A; Wilkes, David S

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in systemic inflammatory responses that affect the lung. This is especially critical in the setting of lung transplantation, where more than half of donor allografts are obtained postmortem from individuals with TBI. The mechanism by which TBI causes pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear but may involve the interaction of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein with the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). To investigate the role of HMGB1 and RAGE in TBI-induced lung dysfunction, RAGE-sufficient (wild-type) or RAGE-deficient (RAGE(-/-)) C57BL/6 mice were subjected to TBI through controlled cortical impact and studied for cardiopulmonary injury. Compared to control animals, TBI induced systemic hypoxia, acute lung injury, pulmonary neutrophilia, and decreased compliance (a measure of the lungs' ability to expand), all of which were attenuated in RAGE(-/-) mice. Neutralizing systemic HMGB1 induced by TBI reversed hypoxia and improved lung compliance. Compared to wild-type donors, lungs from RAGE(-/-) TBI donors did not develop acute lung injury after transplantation. In a study of clinical transplantation, elevated systemic HMGB1 in donors correlated with impaired systemic oxygenation of the donor lung before transplantation and predicted impaired oxygenation after transplantation. These data suggest that the HMGB1-RAGE axis plays a role in the mechanism by which TBI induces lung dysfunction and that targeting this pathway before transplant may improve recipient outcomes after lung transplantation. PMID:25186179

  19. Noninvasive monitoring of infection and rejection after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Martin, Lance; Kertesz, Michael; Patel, Kapil; Kowarsky, Mark; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Luikart, Helen; Neff, Norma F; Okamoto, Jennifer; Nicolls, Mark R; Cornfield, David; Weill, David; Valantine, Hannah; Khush, Kiran K; Quake, Stephen R

    2015-10-27

    The survival rate following lung transplantation is among the lowest of all solid-organ transplants, and current diagnostic tests often fail to distinguish between infection and rejection, the two primary posttransplant clinical complications. We describe a diagnostic assay that simultaneously monitors for rejection and infection in lung transplant recipients by sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma. We determined that the levels of donor-derived cfDNA directly correlate with the results of invasive tests of rejection (area under the curve 0.9). We also analyzed the nonhuman cfDNA as a hypothesis-free approach to test for infections. Cytomegalovirus is most frequently assayed clinically, and the levels of CMV-derived sequences in cfDNA are consistent with clinical results. We furthermore show that hypothesis-free monitoring for pathogens using cfDNA reveals undiagnosed cases of infection, and that certain infectious pathogens such as human herpesvirus (HHV) 6, HHV-7, and adenovirus, which are not often tested clinically, occur with high frequency in this cohort. PMID:26460048

  20. Noninvasive monitoring of infection and rejection after lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Martin, Lance; Kertesz, Michael; Patel, Kapil; Kowarsky, Mark; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Luikart, Helen; Neff, Norma F.; Okamoto, Jennifer; Nicolls, Mark R.; Cornfield, David; Weill, David; Valantine, Hannah; Khush, Kiran K.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The survival rate following lung transplantation is among the lowest of all solid-organ transplants, and current diagnostic tests often fail to distinguish between infection and rejection, the two primary posttransplant clinical complications. We describe a diagnostic assay that simultaneously monitors for rejection and infection in lung transplant recipients by sequencing of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma. We determined that the levels of donor-derived cfDNA directly correlate with the results of invasive tests of rejection (area under the curve 0.9). We also analyzed the nonhuman cfDNA as a hypothesis-free approach to test for infections. Cytomegalovirus is most frequently assayed clinically, and the levels of CMV-derived sequences in cfDNA are consistent with clinical results. We furthermore show that hypothesis-free monitoring for pathogens using cfDNA reveals undiagnosed cases of infection, and that certain infectious pathogens such as human herpesvirus (HHV) 6, HHV-7, and adenovirus, which are not often tested clinically, occur with high frequency in this cohort. PMID:26460048

  1. A Violaceous Nodule in a Lung-transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Milford, Emily; Winslow, Caroline; Danhof, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a rare complication of solid organ or allogenic bone marrow transplantation. Cases localized to the skin are even rarer, with only around 100 cases recorded in the literature [2]. We present a case of 60 year-old-woman, a lung transplant recipient, who presented with an asymptomatic violaceous nodule on her left medial calf. Histopathology was consistent with PTLD of the B-cell subtype, EBV negative. This case is unique in that it was of the B cell subtype of cutaneous PTLD, which has been less commonly observed than the T cell subtype. In addition, the case was EBV negative, which is rare in B cell cutaneous PTLD. The patient was treated with rituximab 600 mg IV weekly for four weeks and cytomegalovirus immune globulin (Cytogam) 100 mg/kg once, with resolution of the nodule. PMID:27617611

  2. Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Despite improvement in median life expectancy and overall health, some children with cystic fibrosis (CF) progress to end-stage lung or liver disease and become candidates for transplant. Transplants for children with CF hold the promise to extend and improve the quality of life, but barriers to successful long-term outcomes include shortage of suitable donor organs; potential complications from the surgical procedure and immunosuppressants; risk of rejection and infection; and the need for lifelong, strict adherence to a complex medical regimen. This article reviews the indications and complications of lung and liver transplantation in children with CF. PMID:27469184

  3. Physiology of sleep and breathing before and after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pierucci, Paola; Malouf, Monique

    2014-09-01

    During the past 20 years, lung transplantation (LTX) has evolved and it is now accepted as a mainstream modality for care of patients with severe life-threatening respiratory diseases that are refractory to maximal conventional therapies. Improvements in surgical techniques and in antirejection medications have resulted in prolonged survival in these patients. Several studies have explored quality of life after LTX and its improvement has been noted especially in the early period between 3 and 6 months. This article discusses the salient features of the physiology of breathing and sleep disturbances before and after LTX and its alterations during sleep. PMID:25156767

  4. Improved quality of life after lung transplantation in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, Karin M; van der Bij, Wim; Erasmus, Michiel E; Duiverman, Eric J; Koëter, Gerard H; TenVergert, Elisabeth M

    2004-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of lung transplantation (LgTX) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a group of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), compared to patients with other diagnoses (non-CF). HRQL was assessed before transplantation in a group of 32 CF patients and 183 non-CF patients. After LgTX, we conducted a prospective longitudinal study among 10 CF patients and 35 non-CF patients who survived at least 31 months after LgTX. Measures were the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZUNG), the Index of Well-Being (IWB), and the Karnofsky Performance Index. Patients in the CF group were younger, spent more days on the waiting list, and were more likely to be working or going to school than patients with other indications. Before transplantation, CF patients and non-CF patients experienced restrictions on almost all HRQL measures, compared to the general population. On the NHP dimensions of mobility and energy, CF patients had significantly better scores than non-CF patients. Between 1-4 months after transplantation, scores on the NHP, ZUNG, and Karnofsky performance indices improved, and STAI and IWB scores even occurred within the reference value in both groups. Significantly better scores in the CF group compared to the non-CF group were found on the NHP dimension of mobility 4 months after transplantation, and on the dimension of sleep 7 and 13 months after transplantation. Scores remained more or less stable over time in both groups. It may be concluded that patients in both groups experience major restrictions in HRQL before transplantation. However, pretransplant non-CF patients experience more restrictions than CF patients. After LgTX, both groups of patients showed substantial improvement in HRQL, and this improvement was maintained until 31 months after LgTX. PMID:15095325

  5. Broader Geographic Sharing of Pediatric Donor Lungs Improves Pediatric Access to Transplant.

    PubMed

    Tsuang, W M; Chan, K M; Skeans, M A; Pyke, J; Hertz, M I; Israni, A J; Robbins-Callahan, L; Visner, G; Wang, X; Wozniak, T C; Valapour, M

    2016-03-01

    US pediatric transplant candidates have limited access to lung transplant due to the small number of donors within current geographic boundaries, leading to assertions that the current lung allocation system does not adequately serve pediatric patients. We hypothesized that broader geographic sharing of pediatric (adolescent, 12-17 years; child, <12 years) donor lungs would increase pediatric candidate access to transplant. We used the thoracic simulated allocation model to simulate broader geographic sharing. Simulation 1 used current allocation rules. Simulation 2 offered adolescent donor lungs across a wider geographic area to adolescents. Simulation 3 offered child donor lungs across a wider geographic area to adolescents. Simulation 4 combined simulations 2 and 3. Simulation 5 prioritized adolescent donor lungs to children across a wider geographic area. Simulation 4 resulted in 461 adolescent transplants per 100 patient-years on the waiting list (range 417-542), compared with 206 (range 180-228) under current rules. Simulation 5 resulted in 388 adolescent transplants per 100 patient-years on the waiting list (range 348-418) and likely increased transplant rates for children. Adult transplant rates, waitlist mortality, and 1-year posttransplant mortality were not adversely affected. Broader geographic sharing of pediatric donor lungs may increase pediatric candidate access to lung transplant. PMID:26523747

  6. Venovenous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation With Atrial Septostomy as a Bridge to Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kon, Zachary N; Pasrija, Chetan; Shah, Aakash; Griffith, Bartley P; Garcia, Jose P

    2016-03-01

    We report the first successful bridge to lung transplantation using venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) with an atrial septostomy for both pulmonary and right ventricular support. This strategy may provide an alternative to other forms of ECMO support as a bridge to lung transplantation, and potentially allow for ambulation and rehabilitation. PMID:26897198

  7. Shear stress-related mechanosignaling with lung ischemia: lessons from basic research can inform lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, Gary F.; Christie, Jason D.; Fisher, Aron B.

    2014-01-01

    Cessation of blood flow represents a physical event that is sensed by the pulmonary endothelium leading to a signaling cascade that has been termed “mechanotransduction.” This paradigm has clinical relevance for conditions such as pulmonary embolism, lung bypass surgery, and organ procurement and storage during lung transplantation. On the basis of our findings with stop of flow, we postulate that normal blood flow is “sensed” by the endothelium by virtue of its location at the interface of the blood and vessel wall and that this signal is necessary to maintain the endothelial cell membrane potential. Stop of flow is sensed by a “mechanosome” consisting of PECAM-VEGF receptor-VE cadherin that is located in the endothelial cell caveolae. Activation of the mechanosome results in endothelial cell membrane depolarization that in turn leads to activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX2) to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Endothelial depolarization additionally results in opening of T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, increased intracellular Ca2+, and activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with resultant generation of NO. Increased NO causes vasodilatation whereas ROS provide a signal for neovascularization; however, with lung transplantation overproduction of ROS and NO can cause oxidative injury and/or activation of proteins that drive inflammation and cell death. Understanding the key events in the mechanosignaling cascade has important lessons for the design of strategies or interventions that may reduce injury during storage of donor lungs with the goal to increase the availability of lungs suitable for donation and thus improving access to lung transplantation. PMID:25239915

  8. Shear stress-related mechanosignaling with lung ischemia: lessons from basic research can inform lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Shampa; Nieman, Gary F; Christie, Jason D; Fisher, Aron B

    2014-11-01

    Cessation of blood flow represents a physical event that is sensed by the pulmonary endothelium leading to a signaling cascade that has been termed "mechanotransduction." This paradigm has clinical relevance for conditions such as pulmonary embolism, lung bypass surgery, and organ procurement and storage during lung transplantation. On the basis of our findings with stop of flow, we postulate that normal blood flow is "sensed" by the endothelium by virtue of its location at the interface of the blood and vessel wall and that this signal is necessary to maintain the endothelial cell membrane potential. Stop of flow is sensed by a "mechanosome" consisting of PECAM-VEGF receptor-VE cadherin that is located in the endothelial cell caveolae. Activation of the mechanosome results in endothelial cell membrane depolarization that in turn leads to activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX2) to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Endothelial depolarization additionally results in opening of T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, increased intracellular Ca(2+), and activation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with resultant generation of NO. Increased NO causes vasodilatation whereas ROS provide a signal for neovascularization; however, with lung transplantation overproduction of ROS and NO can cause oxidative injury and/or activation of proteins that drive inflammation and cell death. Understanding the key events in the mechanosignaling cascade has important lessons for the design of strategies or interventions that may reduce injury during storage of donor lungs with the goal to increase the availability of lungs suitable for donation and thus improving access to lung transplantation. PMID:25239915

  9. Utilization of the Organ Care System Lung for the assessment of lungs from a donor after cardiac death (DCD) before bilateral transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohite, P N; Sabashnikov, A; García Sáez, D; Pates, B; Zeriouh, M; De Robertis, F; Simon, A R

    2015-07-01

    In this manuscript, we present the first experience of evaluating donation after circulatory death (DCD) lungs, using the normothermic preservation Organ Care System (OCS) and subsequent successful transplantation. The OCS could be a useful tool for the evaluation of marginal lungs from DCD donors as it allows a proper recruitment and bronchoscopy in such donations in addition to continuous ex-vivo perfusion and assessment and treatment during transport. The OCS could potentially be a standard of care in the evaluation of marginal lungs from DCD. PMID:25332197

  10. Lung transplantation in the rat. III. Functional studies in iso- and allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Marck, K.W.; Prop, J.; Wildevuur, C.R.

    1983-08-01

    Recently a microsurgical technique for orthotopic left lung transplantation in the rat was developed. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the operation itself and of an unmodified rejection reaction on the function of the transplanted rat lung. Orthotopic left lung transplantation was performed in 59 rats (34 isografts and 25 allografts). Isografts demonstrated a mean left lung perfusion of 23.1% in the first two postoperative weeks. Seven out of the 10 animals, subjected to a repeated scintigraphy 5-10 weeks later, had an increased graft perfusion, resulting in an almost normal mean left lung perfusion of 34.8%. At that time chest roentgenography revealed a good aeration of the grafts, that at autopsy had a normal aspect. Allografts showed an initial mean left lung perfusion (24.6%) similar to the isografts, which, however, declined sharply a few days later (4.3%). At that time chest roentgenography revealed totally opalescent grafts that at autopsy had the hepatized aspect characteristic of lung allograft rejection. These results of isogeneic and allogeneic lung transplantation in the rat were comparable with those of canine auto- and allotransplantation. For immunogenetic and economical reasons lung transplantation in the rat is a good alternative animal model in lung transplantation research.

  11. Long term complications following 54 consecutive lung transplants

    PubMed Central

    Tabarelli, Walther; Bonatti, Hugo; Tabarelli, Dominique; Eller, Miriam; Müller, Ludwig; Ruttmann, Elfriede; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Larcher, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the complex therapy and the required high level of immunosuppression, lung recipients are at high risk to develop many different long term complications. Methods From 1993–2000, a total of 54 lung transplantation (LuTx) were performed at our center. Complications, graft and patient survival of this cohort was retrospectively analyzed. Results One/five and ten-year patient survival was 71.4%, 41.2% and 25.4%; at last follow up (4/2010), twelve patients were alive. Of the 39 deceased patients, 26 died from infectious complications. Other causes of death were myocardial infarction (n=1), progressive graft failure (n=1), intracerebral bleeding (n=2), basilary vein thrombosis (n=1), pulmonary emboli (n=1), others (n=7). Surgical complication rate was 27.7% during the first year and 25% for the 12 long term survivors. Perioperative rejection rate was 35%, and 91.6% for the 12 patients currently alive. Infection incidence during first hospitalization was 79.6% (1.3 episodes per transplant) and 100% for long term survivors. Commonly isolated pathogens were cytomegalovirus (56.8%), Aspergillus (29.4%), RSV (13.7%). Other common complications were renal failure (56.8%), osteoporosis (54.9%), hypertension (45%), diabetes mellitus (19.6%). Conclusions Infection and rejection remain the most common complications following LuTx with many other events to be considered. PMID:27293842

  12. Lung Transplantation for Cystic Fibrosis: Results, Indications, Complications, and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Joseph P.; Sayah, David M.; Belperio, John A.; Weigt, S. Sam

    2016-01-01

    Survival in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has improved dramatically over the past 30 to 40 years, with mean survival now approximately 40 years. Nonetheless, progressive respiratory insufficiency remains the major cause of mortality in CF patients, and lung transplantation (LT) is eventually required. Timing of listing for LT is critical, because up to 25 to 41% of CF patients have died while awaiting LT. Globally, approximately 16.4% of lung transplants are performed in adults with CF. Survival rates for LT recipients with CF are superior to other indications, yet LT is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality (~50% at 5-year survival rates). Myriad complications of LT include allograft failure (acute or chronic), opportunistic infections, and complications of chronic immunosuppressive medications (including malignancy). Determining which patients are candidates for LT is difficult, and survival benefit remains uncertain. In this review, we discuss when LT should be considered, criteria for identifying candidates, contraindications to LT, results post-LT, and specific complications that may be associated with LT. Infectious complications that may complicate CF (particularly Burkholderia cepacia spp., opportunistic fungi, and nontuberculous mycobacteria) are discussed. PMID:25826595

  13. Disruption of the aortic anastomosis after heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dowling, R D; Baladi, N; Zenati, M; Dummer, J S; Kormos, R L; Armitage, J M; Yousem, S A; Hardesty, R L; Griffith, B P

    1990-01-01

    Disruption of the aorta at the anastomotic site occurred in 4 of 66 consecutive heart-lung transplant recipients and was associated with a 100% mortality. In 3 of these patients, Candida either was cultured from the suture line or was seen in the wall of the aorta at postmortem examination. In 2 of these 3 patients, cultures of material from the donor trachea taken at the time of explanation grew Candida species. Two patients were seen with sudden massive hemorrhage on postoperative day 26 and postoperative day 28. One patient experienced acute decompensation due to right ventricular outflow tract obstruction on postoperative day 30, and the remaining patient was seen 7 months postoperatively with obstruction of both the left main bronchus and the right pulmonary artery caused by extrinsic compression by an aortic pseudoaneurysm. A high index of suspicion should be maintained when transplanting lungs containing Candida species, as we believe there is substantial evidence of donor transmission of the fungal agents. We now include amphotericin B in our antibiotic prophylactic regimen in an attempt to prevent fungal infection because previous treatment has been uniformly unsuccessful. Furthermore, we wrap both the trachea and the aorta with omentum to lessen the likelihood of mediastinal spread of infection to the aortic suture line. PMID:2297258

  14. Lung Transplantation in Gaucher Disease: A Learning Lesson in Trying to Avoid Both Scylla and Charybdis.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Geertje M; van Dussen, Laura; van den Toorn, Leon M; den Bakker, Michael A; Hoek, Rogier A S; Hesselink, Dennis A; Hollak, Carla E M; van Hal, Peter Th W

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD), a lysosomal storage disorder, may result in end-stage lung disease. We report successful bilateral lung transplantation in a 49-year-old woman with GD complicated by severe pulmonary hypertension and fibrotic changes in the lungs. Before receiving the lung transplant, the patient was undergoing both enzyme replacement therapy (imiglucerase) and triple pulmonary hypertension treatment (epoprostenol, bosentan, and sildenafil). She had a history of splenectomy, severe bone disease, and renal involvement, all of which were related to GD and considered as relative contraindications for a lung transplantation. In the literature, lung transplantation has been suggested for severe pulmonary involvement in GD but has been reported only once in a child. To our knowledge, until now, no successful procedure has been reported in adults, and no reports deal with the severe potential posttransplantation complications specifically related to GD. PMID:26757299

  15. [Nocardia farcinica lung infection in a patient with cystic fibrosis and a lung transplant].

    PubMed

    Chacón, C F; Vicente, R; Ramos, F; Porta, J; Lopez Maldonado, A; Ansotegui, E

    2015-03-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis have a higher risk of developing chronic respiratory infectious diseases. The Nocardia farcinica lung infection is rare in this group of patients, and there are limited publications about this topic. Its diagnosis is complex, due to the clinical and the radiology signs being non-specific. Identification of the agent responsible in the sputum culture is occasionally negative. It is a slow growing organism and for this reason treatment is delayed, which can lead to an increase in complications, hospitable stays, and mortality. A case is reported on a 26 year-old woman with cystic fibrosis and chronic lung colonization by Nocardia farcinica and Aspergillus fumigatus, on long-term treatment with ciprofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and posaconazole, who was admitted to ICU after bilateral lung transplantation. The initial post-operative progress was satisfactory. After discharge, the patient showed a gradual respiratory insufficiency with new chest X-ray showing diffuse infiltrates. Initially, the agent was not seen in the sputum culture. Prompt and aggressive measures were taken, due to the high clinical suspicion of a Nocardia farcinica lung infection. Treatment with a combination of amikacin and meropenem, and later combined with linezolid, led to the disappearance of the lung infiltrates and a clinical improvement. In our case, we confirm the rapid introduction of Nocardia farcinica in the new lungs. The complex identification and the delay in treatment increased the morbimortality. There is a special need for its eradication in patients with lung transplant, due to the strong immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:25443661

  16. Lung size mismatch and primary graft dysfunction after bilateral lung transplantation *

    PubMed Central

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M.; Bolukbas, Servet; Wille, Keith M.; Orens, Jonathan B.; Brower, Roy G.; Christie, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Donor to recipient lung size matching at lung transplantation (LTx) can be estimated by the predicted total lung capacity (pTLC)ratio (donor pTLC/recipient pTLC). We aimed to determine whether the pTLC-ratio is associated with the risk of primary graft dysfunction (PGD) after bilateral LTx (BLT). METHODS We calculated the pTLC-ratio for 812 adult BLTs from the Lung Transplant Outcomes Group between 3/2002-12/2010. Patients were stratified by pTLC-ratio>1.0 (“oversized”) and pTLC-ratio≤1.0 (“undersized”). PGD was defined as any ISHLT grade 3 PGD within 72 hours of reperfusion (PGD 3). We analyzed the association between risk factors and PGD using multivariable conditional logistic regression. As transplant diagnoses can influence the size matching decisions and also modulate the risk for PGD, we performed pre-specified analyses by assessing the impact of lung size mismatch within diagnostic categories. RESULTS In univariate analyses oversizing was associated with a 39% lower odds of PGD3 (OR 0.61, 95% CI, p=0.003). In a multivariate model accounting for center effects and known PGD risks, oversizing remained independently associated with a decreased odds of PGD3 (OR 0.58, 95% CI 0.38-0.88, p=0.01). The risk adjusted point estimate was similar for the non-COPD diagnoses groups (OR 0.52, 95%CI 0.32-0.86, p=0.01); however there was no detected association within the COPD group (OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.29-1.78, p=0.5). CONCLUSION Oversized allografts are associated with a decreased risk of PGD3 after BLT; this effect appears most apparent in non-COPD patients. PMID:25447586

  17. Use of endobronchial valves for native lung hyperinflation associated with respiratory failure in a single-lung transplant recipient for emphysema.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Maria M; Johnson, Bruce A; McCurry, Kenneth R; Landreneau, Rodney J; Sciurba, Frank C

    2007-01-01

    Emphysema is a common indication for adult pulmonary transplantation. Double-lung transplantation is increasingly the preferred approach because severe posttransplant native lung hyperinflation (NLH) following single-lung transplantation may compromise allograft lung function. We describe successful emergency use of bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using endobronchial valves (EBVs) [Zephyr; Emphasys Medical; Redwood, CA] in a single-lung transplant recipient who was critically ill with ventilator dependence from complications of NLH and at excessive risk for lung volume reduction surgery or pneumonectomy. Following placement of 17 valves in all segments of the native lung, atelectasis of the native lung was accompanied by volume expansion of the allograft. Immediately following valve placement, peak airway pressure decreased and alveolar ventilation increased. The patient was subsequently weaned from mechanical ventilation. This report suggests the need for clinical trials to evaluate the effectiveness of EBVs in single-lung transplant recipients with less critical functional impairment associated with NLH. PMID:17218578

  18. Management of Scedosporium apiospermum in a pre- and post-lung transplant patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, Nancy E; Haddad, Tarik J; Wills, Todd S

    2013-01-24

    Although the predominant type of infection seen in the cystic fibrosis lung remains bacterial, fungal organisms are being isolated more frequently and are associated with a high mortality rate in lung transplant recipients. We present a case of a patient with CF with sputum cultures positive for Scedosporium apiospermum prior to a successful lung transplant. She remains without evidence of infection 18 months later following treatment with a combination of triazoles and terbinafine. PMID:24432212

  19. Monitoring of Nonsteroidal Immunosuppressive Drugs in Patients With Lung Disease and Lung Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Keith C; Nathanson, Ian; Angel, Luis; Bhorade, Sangeeta M; Chan, Kevin M; Culver, Daniel; Harrod, Christopher G; Hayney, Mary S; Highland, Kristen B; Limper, Andrew H; Patrick, Herbert; Strange, Charlie; Whelan, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Immunosuppressive pharmacologic agents prescribed to patients with diffuse interstitial and inflammatory lung disease and lung transplant recipients are associated with potential risks for adverse reactions. Strategies for minimizing such risks include administering these drugs according to established, safe protocols; monitoring to detect manifestations of toxicity; and patient education. Hence, an evidence-based guideline for physicians can improve safety and optimize the likelihood of a successful outcome. To maximize the likelihood that these agents will be used safely, the American College of Chest Physicians established a committee to examine the clinical evidence for the administration and monitoring of immunosuppressive drugs (with the exception of corticosteroids) to identify associated toxicities associated with each drug and appropriate protocols for monitoring these agents. Methods: Committee members developed and refined a series of questions about toxicities of immunosuppressives and current approaches to administration and monitoring. A systematic review was carried out by the American College of Chest Physicians. Committee members were supplied with this information and created this evidence-based guideline. Conclusions: It is hoped that these guidelines will improve patient safety when immunosuppressive drugs are given to lung transplant recipients and to patients with diffuse interstitial lung disease. PMID:23131960

  20. Psychological criteria for contraindication in lung transplant candidates: a five-year study*

    PubMed Central

    Hojaij, Elaine Marques; Romano, Bellkiss Wilma; Costa, André Nathan; Afonso, Jose Eduardo; de Camargo, Priscila Cilene Leon Bueno; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Campos, Silvia Vidal; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation presents a wide range of challenges for multidisciplinary teams that manage the care of the recipients. Transplant teams should perform a thorough evaluation of transplant candidates, in order to ensure the best possible post-transplant outcomes. That is especially true for the psychologist, because psychological issues can arise at any point during the perioperative period. The objective of our study was to evaluate the psychological causes of contraindication to waiting list inclusion in a referral program for lung transplantation. We retrospectively analyzed data on psychological issues presented by lung transplant candidates, in order to understand these matters in our population and to reflect upon ways to improve the selection process. PMID:26176522

  1. Role of Complement Activation in Obliterative Bronchiolitis Post Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Hidemi; Lasbury, Mark E.; Fan, Lin; Vittal, Ragini; Mickler, Elizabeth A.; Benson, Heather L.; Shilling, Rebecca; Wu, Qiang; Weber, Daniel J.; Wagner, Sarah R.; Lasaro, Melissa; Devore, Denise; Wang, Yi; Sandusky, George E.; Lipking, Kelsey; Pandya, Pankita; Reynolds, John; Love, Robert; Wozniak, Thomas; Gu, Hongmei; Brown, Krista M.; Wilkes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) post lung transplantation involves IL-17 regulated autoimmunity to type V collagen and alloimmunity, which could be enhanced by complement activation. However, the specific role of complement activation in lung allograft pathology, IL-17 production, and OB are unknown. The current study examines the role of complement activation in OB. Complement regulatory protein (CRP) (CD55, CD46, Crry/CD46) expression was down regulated in human and murine OB; and C3a, a marker of complement activation, was up regulated locally. IL-17 differentially suppressed Crry expression in airway epithelial cells in vitro. Neutralizing IL-17 recovered CRP expression in murine lung allografts and decreased local C3a production. Exogenous C3a enhanced IL-17 production from alloantigen or autoantigen (type V collagen) reactive lymphocytes. Systemically neutralizing C5 abrogated the development of OB, reduced acute rejection severity, lowered systemic and local levels of C3a and C5a, recovered CRP expression, and diminished systemic IL-17 and IL-6 levels. These data indicated that OB induction is in part complement dependent due to IL-17 mediated down regulation of CRPs on airway epithelium. C3a and IL-17 are part of a feed forward loop that may enhance CRP down regulation, suggesting that complement blockade could be a therapeutic strategy for OB. PMID:24043901

  2. Telephone-Based Coping Skills Training for Patients Awaiting Lung Transplantation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, James A.; Babyak, Michael A.; Keefe, Francis J.; Davis, R. Duane; LaCaille, Rick A.; Carney, Robert M.; Freedland, Kenneth E.; Trulock, Elbert; Palmer, Scott M.

    2006-01-01

    Impaired quality of life is associated with increased mortality in patients with advanced lung disease. Using a randomized controlled trial with allocation concealment and blinded outcome assessment at 2 tertiary care teaching hospitals, the authors randomly assigned 328 patients with end-stage lung disease awaiting lung transplantation to 12…

  3. Iatrogenic “buffalo chest” bilateral pneumothoraces following unilateral transbronchial lung biopsies in a bilateral lung transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Sawalha, Leith; Gibbons, William J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a 54 year old male patient who had a bilateral lung transplant sixteen years ago for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency-related emphysema. He was referred for flexible bronchoscopy with transbronchial biopsies to evaluate new mild exertional dyspnea and worsening of his FEV1. Eight transbronchial biopsies were done from the right middle lobe and the right lower lobe. Post procedure he developed bilateral pneumothoces that required emergent bilateral pleural ‘pigtail’ catheters. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral pneumothoraces that developed after a unilateral procedure in a bilateral lung transplant recipient relatively late after the transplant. PMID:26236604

  4. Lung transplantation: does oxidative stress contribute to the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome?

    PubMed

    Madill, Janet; Aghdassi, Ellie; Arendt, Bianca; Hartman-Craven, Brenda; Gutierrez, Carlos; Chow, Chung-Wai; Allard, Johane

    2009-04-01

    Lung transplantation is the ultimate treatment of end-stage lung disease. After transplantation, the 1-year survival rate is 80%. However, 5-year survival rates drop to 50% due to bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Ischemia/reperfusion injury, infections, and acute rejection are major risk factors contributing to the development of BOS. These risk factors are also associated with increased oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a condition whereby prooxidants overwhelm the antioxidant defense system and may contribute to the pathogenesis of BOS by inducing more tissue injury and inflammation. This article reviews the current state of knowledge on oxidative stress in lung transplantation and BOS. PMID:19298941

  5. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  6. Cognitive Function, Mental Health, and Health-related Quality of Life after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, David G.; Christie, Jason D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Diamond, Joshua M.; Judy, Ryan P.; Shah, Rupal J.; Cantu, Edward; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Blumenthal, Nancy P.; Demissie, Ejigayehu; Hopkins, Ramona O.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Cognitive and psychiatric impairments are threats to functional independence, general health, and quality of life. Evidence regarding these outcomes after lung transplantation is limited. Objectives: Determine the frequency of cognitive and psychiatric impairment after lung transplantation and identify potential factors associated with cognitive impairment after lung transplantation. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study, we assessed cognitive function, mental health, and health-related quality of life using a validated battery of standardized tests in 42 subjects post-transplantation. The battery assessed cognition, depression, anxiety, resilience, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cognitive function was assessed using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, a validated screening test with a range of 0 to 30. We hypothesized that cognitive function post-transplantation would be associated with type of transplant, cardiopulmonary bypass, primary graft dysfunction, allograft ischemic time, and physical therapy post-transplantation. We used multivariable linear regression to examine the relationship between candidate risk factors and cognitive function post-transplantation. Measurements and Main Results: Mild cognitive impairment (score, 18–25) was observed in 67% of post-transplant subjects (95% confidence interval [CI]: 50–80%) and moderate cognitive impairment (score, 10–17) was observed in 5% (95% CI, 1–16%) of post-transplant subjects. Symptoms of moderate to severe anxiety and depression were observed in 21 and 3% of post-transplant subjects, respectively. No transplant recipients reported symptoms of PTSD. Higher resilience correlated with less psychological distress in the domains of depression (P < 0.001) and PTSD (P = 0.02). Prolonged graft ischemic time was independently associated with worse cognitive performance after lung transplantation (P = 0.001). The functional gain in 6-minute-walk distance achieved at the end of post-transplant

  7. The First Successful Heart-Lung Transplant in a Korean Child with Humidifier Disinfectant-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Hee; Hong, Sang-Bum

    2016-01-01

    From 2006 to 2011, an outbreak of a particular type of childhood interstitial lung disease occurred in Korea. The condition was intractable and progressed to severe respiratory failure, with a high mortality rate. Moreover, in several familial cases, the disease affected young women and children simultaneously. Epidemiologic, animal, and post-interventional studies identified the cause as inhalation of humidifier disinfectants. Here, we report a 4-year-old girl who suffered from severe progressive respiratory failure. She could survive by 100 days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support and finally, underwent heart-lung transplantation. This is the first successful pediatric heart-lung transplantation carried out in Korea. PMID:27134508

  8. The First Successful Heart-Lung Transplant in a Korean Child with Humidifier Disinfectant-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Jhang, Won Kyoung; Park, Seong Jong; Lee, Eun; Yang, Song I; Hong, Soo Jong; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kim, Hyung-Young; Park, Jeong-Jun; Yun, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Seung-Il; Lee, Sang-Oh; Hong, Sang-Bum; Shim, Tae-Sun; Choi, In-Cheol; Yu, Jinho

    2016-05-01

    From 2006 to 2011, an outbreak of a particular type of childhood interstitial lung disease occurred in Korea. The condition was intractable and progressed to severe respiratory failure, with a high mortality rate. Moreover, in several familial cases, the disease affected young women and children simultaneously. Epidemiologic, animal, and post-interventional studies identified the cause as inhalation of humidifier disinfectants. Here, we report a 4-year-old girl who suffered from severe progressive respiratory failure. She could survive by 100 days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support and finally, underwent heart-lung transplantation. This is the first successful pediatric heart-lung transplantation carried out in Korea. PMID:27134508

  9. Lung transplantation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: patient selection and special considerations.

    PubMed

    Lane, C Randall; Tonelli, Adriano R

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity. Lung transplantation is one of the few treatments available for end-stage COPD with the potential to improve survival and quality of life. The selection of candidates and timing of listing present challenges, as COPD tends to progress fairly slowly, and survival after lung transplantation remains limited. Though the natural course of COPD is difficult to predict, the use of assessments of functional status and multivariable indices such as the BODE index can help identify which patients with COPD are at increased risk for mortality, and hence which are more likely to benefit from lung transplantation. Patients with COPD can undergo either single or bilateral lung transplantation. Although many studies suggest better long-term survival with bilateral lung transplant, especially in younger patients, this continues to be debated, and definitive recommendations about this cannot be made. Patients may be more susceptible to particular complications of transplant for COPD, including native lung hyperinflation, and development of lung cancer. PMID:26491282

  10. Outcomes of Lung Transplantation in Recipients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Doucette, K E; Halloran, K; Kapasi, A; Lien, D; Weinkauf, J G

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection negatively impacts patient and graft survival following nonhepatic solid organ transplantation. Most data, however, are in kidney transplant, where despite modest impact on outcomes, transplantation is recommended for those with mild to moderate hepatic fibrosis given overall benefit compared to remaining on dialysis. In lung transplantation (LuTx), there is little data on outcomes and international guidelines are vague on the criteria under which transplant should be considered. The University of Alberta Lung Transplant Program routinely considers patients with HCV for lung transplant based on criteria extrapolated from the kidney transplant literature. Here we describe the outcomes of 27 HCV-positive, compared to 443 HCV-negative LuTx recipients. Prior to transplant, five patients were treated for HCV and cured. At the time of transplant, 14 patients remained HCV RNA positive. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival were similar in HCV RNA-positive versus -negative recipients at 93%, 77%, and 77% versus 86%, 75%, and 66% (p = 0.93), respectively. Long-term follow-up in eight patients demonstrated no significant progression of fibrosis. In our cohort, HCV did not impact LuTx outcomes and in the era of interferon-free HCV therapies this should not be a barrier to LuTx. PMID:26998739

  11. A novel dual ex vivo lung perfusion technique improves immediate outcomes in an experimental model of lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Y; Noda, K; Isse, K; Tobita, K; Maniwa, Y; Bhama, J K; D'Cunha, J; Bermudez, C A; Luketich, J D; Shigemura, N

    2015-05-01

    The lungs are dually perfused by the pulmonary artery and the bronchial arteries. This study aimed to test the feasibility of dual-perfusion techniques with the bronchial artery circulation and pulmonary artery circulation synchronously perfused using ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and evaluate the effects of dual-perfusion on posttransplant lung graft function. Using rat heart-lung blocks, we developed a dual-perfusion EVLP circuit (dual-EVLP), and compared cellular metabolism, expression of inflammatory mediators, and posttransplant graft function in lung allografts maintained with dual-EVLP, standard-EVLP, or cold static preservation. The microvasculature in lung grafts after transplant was objectively evaluated using microcomputed tomography angiography. Lung grafts subjected to dual-EVLP exhibited significantly better lung graft function with reduced proinflammatory profiles and more mitochondrial biogenesis, leading to better posttransplant function and compliance, as compared with standard-EVLP or static cold preservation. Interestingly, lung grafts maintained on dual-EVLP exhibited remarkably increased microvasculature and perfusion as compared with lungs maintained on standard-EVLP. Our results suggest that lung grafts can be perfused and preserved using dual-perfusion EVLP techniques that contribute to better graft function by reducing proinflammatory profiles and activating mitochondrial respiration. Dual-EVLP also yields better posttransplant graft function through increased microvasculature and better perfusion of the lung grafts after transplantation. PMID:25777770

  12. Scintigraphy at 3 months after single lung transplantation and observations of primary graft dysfunction and lung function.

    PubMed

    Belmaati, Esther Okeke; Iversen, Martin; Kofoed, Klaus F; Nielsen, Michael B; Mortensen, Jann

    2012-06-01

    Scintigraphy has been used as a tool to detect dysfunction of the lung before and after transplantation. The aims of this study were to evaluate the development of the ventilation-perfusion relationships in single lung transplant recipients in the first year, at 3 months after transplantation, and to investigate whether scintigraphic findings at 3 months were predictive for the outcome at 12 months in relation to primary graft dysfunction (PGD) and lung function. A retrospective study was carried out on all patients who prospectively and consecutively were referred for a routine lung scintigraphy procedure 3 months after single lung transplantation (SLTX). A total of 41 patients were included in the study: 20 women and 21 men with the age span of patients at transplantation being 38-66 years (mean ± SD: 54.2 ± 6.0). Patient records also included lung function tests and chest X-ray images. We found no significant correlation between lung function distribution at 3 months and PGD at 72 h. There was also no significant correlation between PGD scores at 72 h and lung function at 6 and 12 months. The same applied to scintigraphic scores for heterogeneity at 3 months compared with lung function at 6 and 12 months. Fifty-five percent of all patients had decreased ventilation function measured in the period from 6 to 12 months. Forty-nine percent of the patients had normal perfusion evaluations, and 51% had abnormal perfusion evaluations at 3 months. For ventilation evaluations, 72% were normal and 28% were abnormal. There was a significant difference in the normal versus abnormal perfusion and ventilation scintigraphic images evaluated from the same patients. Ventilation was distributed more homogenously in the transplanted lung than perfusion in the same lung. The relative distribution of perfusion and ventilation to the transplanted lung of patients with and without a primary diagnosis of fibrosis did not differ significantly from each other. We conclude that PGD

  13. Lung transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis: special focus to infection and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Dorgan, Daniel J; Hadjiliadis, Denis

    2014-06-01

    Despite advances in medical care, patients with cystic fibrosis still face limited life expectancy. The most common cause of death remains respiratory failure. End-stage cystic fibrosis can be treated with lung transplantation and is the third most common reason for which the procedure is performed. Outcomes for cystic fibrosis are better than most other lung diseases, but remain limited (5-year survival 60%). For patients with advanced disease lung transplantation appears to improve survival. Outcomes for patients with Burkholderia cepacia remain poor, although they are better for patients with certain genomovars. Controversy exists about Mycobacterium abscessus infection and appropriateness for transplant. More information is also becoming available for comorbidities, including diabetes and pulmonary hypertension among others. Extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation is used more frequently for end-stage disease as a bridge to lung transplantation and will likely be used more in the future. PMID:24655065

  14. Single lung transplantation in a patient with retrospective positive cross-match

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Maria; Dec, Paweł; Wasilewski, Piotr; Kubisa, Anna; Pieróg, Jarosław; Wójcik, Norbert; Czarnecka, Michalina; Kubisa, Bartosz; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a method useful in such non-malignant end-stage parenchymal and vascular diseases as: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis, or primary pulmonary hypertension. The main aim of this procedure is to extend the patient's lifespan and quality of life. However, the availability of the operation is limited by organ access. In this paper we present the case of a 58-year-old female in the fourth stage of COPD, who was classified to have a single lung transplantation. Because of some technical problems it was decided to transplant a left donor lung in the right recipient lung locus. Positive cross match was demonstrated retrospectively, and we applied five courses of plasmapheresis. Human immunoglobulin and rituximab treatment were performed to decrease the impact of lymphocytotoxic antibodies. The patient survived 498 days after transplantation, 271 in the hospital. PMID:26855654

  15. Single-Lung Transplant Results in Position Dependent Changes in Regional Ventilation: An Observational Case Series Using Electrical Impedance Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Kollengode; Mohammed, Hend; Hopkins, Peter; Corley, Amanda; Caruana, Lawrence; Dunster, Kimble; Barnett, Adrian G.; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lung transplantation is the optimal treatment for end stage lung disease. Donor shortage necessitates single-lung transplants (SLT), yet minimal data exists regarding regional ventilation in diseased versus transplanted lung measured by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). Method. We aimed to determine regional ventilation in six SLT outpatients using EIT. We assessed end expiratory volume and tidal volumes. End expiratory lung impedance (EELI) and Global Tidal Variation of Impedance were assessed in supine, right lateral, left lateral, sitting, and standing positions in transplanted and diseased lungs. A mixed model with random intercept per subject was used for statistical analysis. Results. EELI was significantly altered between diseased and transplanted lungs whilst lying on right and left side. One patient demonstrated pendelluft between lungs and was therefore excluded for further comparison of tidal variation. Tidal variation was significantly higher in the transplanted lung for the remaining five patients in all positions, except when lying on the right side. Conclusion. Ventilation to transplanted lung is better than diseased lung, especially in lateral positions. Positioning in patients with active unilateral lung pathologies will be implicated. This is the first study demonstrating changes in regional ventilation, associated with changes of position between transplanted and diseased lung. PMID:27445522

  16. Single lung transplantation and fatal fat embolism acquired from the donor: management and literature review.

    PubMed

    López-Sánchez, Marta; Alvarez-Antoñán, Carlos; Arce-Mateos, Félix P; Gómez-Román, José; Quesada-Suescun, Antonio; Zurbano-Goñi, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    Fat embolism (FE) is a consequence of skeletal trauma that occurs in more than 90% of cases of severe trauma. However, most of these emboli are clinically insignificant. We report the case of a 59-yr-old man with massive progressive fibrosis who died from widespread FE after a single-lung transplantation (SLT). The lung donor was a 22-yr-old woman who died from traumatic cerebral injury. She had sustained a closed fracture of the tibia, fibula and pelvis. The PaO(2)/FiO(2) before procurement was 452 mmHg. A left SLT using cardiopulmonary bypass was performed. In the immediate postoperative period, profound pulmonary edema in the transplanted lung developed, with overinflation of the native lung and systemic hypotension. Severe Primary Graft Dysfunction (PGD) was suspected and nitric oxide (NO) and independent lung ventilation (ILV) initiated. Over the next 24 h the patient's condition deteriorated and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was initiated. The patient died 45 h after transplantation as cardiovascular and respiratory function continued to decline and massive thoracic bleeding secondary to coagulopathy appeared. Post-mortem examination revealed both massive FE in the non-transplanted donor lung and in the allograft lung. Only two previous cases of donor-acquired FE and PGD after lung transplantation (LT) have been reported. Occult pulmonary FE in a traumatized donor should be considered a cause of PGD. PMID:19888997

  17. A Review of Organ Transplantation: Heart, Lung, Kidney, Liver, and Simultaneous Liver-Kidney.

    PubMed

    Scheuher, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Heart, lung, kidney, liver, and simultaneous liver-kidney transplants share many features. They all follow the same 7-step process, the same 3 immunosuppressant medications, and the same reason for organ transplantation. Organs are transplanted because of organ failure. The similarities end there. Each organ has its unique causes for failure. Each organ also has its own set of criteria that must be met prior to transplantation. Simultaneous liver-kidney transplant criteria vary per transplant center but are similar in nature. Both the criteria required and the 7-step process are described by the United Network of Organ Sharing, which is a private, nonprofit organization, under contract with the US Department of Health and Human Services. Its function is to increase the number of transplants, improve survival rates after transplantation, promote safe transplant practices, and endorse efficiency. The purpose of this article is to review the reasons transplant is needed, specifically heart, lung, kidney, liver, and simultaneous liver-kidney, and a brief overview of the transplant process including criteria used, contraindications, and medications prescribed. PMID:27254636

  18. Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans in children: lessons from bronchiolitis obliterans after lung transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is an irreversible obstructive lung disease characterized by subepithelial inflammation and fibrotic narrowing of the bronchioles after lower respiratory tract infection during childhood, especially early childhood. Although diagnosis of PIBO should be confirmed by histopathology, it is generally based on history and clinical findings. Irreversible airway obstruction is demonstrated by decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 second with an absent bronchodilator response, and by mosaic perfusion, air trapping, and/or bronchiectasis on computed tomography images. However, lung function tests using spirometry are not feasible in young children, and most cases of PIBO develop during early childhood. Further studies focused on obtaining serial measurements of lung function in infants and toddlers with a risk of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) after lower respiratory tract infection are therefore needed. Although an optimal treatment for PIBO has not been established, corticosteroids have been used to target the inflammatory component. Other treatment modalities for BO after lung transplantation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been studied in clinical trials, and the results can be extrapolated for the treatment of PIBO. Lung transplantation remains the final option for children with PIBO who have progressed to end-stage lung disease. PMID:26770220

  19. Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans in children: lessons from bronchiolitis obliterans after lung transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinho

    2015-12-01

    Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is an irreversible obstructive lung disease characterized by subepithelial inflammation and fibrotic narrowing of the bronchioles after lower respiratory tract infection during childhood, especially early childhood. Although diagnosis of PIBO should be confirmed by histopathology, it is generally based on history and clinical findings. Irreversible airway obstruction is demonstrated by decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 second with an absent bronchodilator response, and by mosaic perfusion, air trapping, and/or bronchiectasis on computed tomography images. However, lung function tests using spirometry are not feasible in young children, and most cases of PIBO develop during early childhood. Further studies focused on obtaining serial measurements of lung function in infants and toddlers with a risk of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) after lower respiratory tract infection are therefore needed. Although an optimal treatment for PIBO has not been established, corticosteroids have been used to target the inflammatory component. Other treatment modalities for BO after lung transplantation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been studied in clinical trials, and the results can be extrapolated for the treatment of PIBO. Lung transplantation remains the final option for children with PIBO who have progressed to end-stage lung disease. PMID:26770220

  20. Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in Kidney Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Hiroki; Shimizu, Tomokazu; Unagami, Kohei; Hirai, Toshihito; Toki, Daisuke; Omoto, Kazuya; Okumi, Masayoshi; Imai, Yoichi; Ishida, Hideki; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder is a serious complication of solid organ transplantation; however, few large studies have been performed in Asian institutions. We review our single-center experience with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients in Japan. We retrospectively evaluated patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation between January 1985 and December 2013. The patients were divided into early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (<1 year) and late-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (≥1 year) groups. Thirteen patients had the disorder, an incidence rate of 0.75% (13/1730). Early-onset post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (N = 3) had not occurred for the last two decades. In the late-onset group (N = 10), the median time of onset was 108.7 months. The Kaplan-Meier 10-year overall survival rates were 76.9% and 95.4% in patients with and without the disorder, respectively (P = 0.0001). Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder significantly affected transplant recipients' mortality. Late-onset occurred even > 10 years after transplantation; therefore, long-term monitoring of patients is needed. PMID:26948427

  1. Can lungs be taken for transplantation from donors with a significant smoking history?

    PubMed

    Attaran, Saina; Chukwuemeka, Andrew; Anderson, Jon R

    2013-07-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiothoracic surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Can lungs be taken for transplantation from donors with a significant smoking history?’. Five papers were found using the reported search that represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. These studies compared the outcome and survival between patients who receive lungs from smokers with those receiving non-smoker lungs. None of these studies were randomized controlled trials. They retrospectively analysed a cohort of patients undergoing lung transplantation for the past 10 years. These studies showed worse outcomes in the early postoperative period, such as longer intensive care unit stay, longer ventilation time and higher early postoperative mortality, with lungs harvested from smokers. Two studies also demonstrated a worse long-term outcome in recipients of lungs from smokers, whereas the other two showed worse results during the early postoperative period only. These latter two studies reported similar survival rates after 3 months and up to 3 years in recipients receiving smoker vs non-smoker lungs. One study, however, showed a better 5-year survival with smoker lungs compared with non-smokers, although in this study, lungs from heavy smokers showed the worse outcome. Despite the difference in long-term results and outcome reported by these authors, all of these studies unanimously indicate that lungs from smokers should not be rejected, as survival in these patients receiving smoker lungs is still significantly higher in 3 and 5 years compared with that in those who remain on the transplant waiting list. In conclusion, the current evidence in the literature suggests that lungs from smokers can be used for transplantation. Patients should, however, be fully informed of

  2. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Are Pathogenic in Primary Graft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mallavia, Beñat; Liu, Fengchun; Ortiz-Muñoz, Guadalupe; Caudrillier, Axelle; DerHovanessian, Ariss; Ross, David J.; Lynch III, Joseph P.; Saggar, Rajan; Ardehali, Abbas; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christie, Jason D.; Belperio, John A.; Looney, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) causes early mortality after lung transplantation and may contribute to late graft failure. No effective treatments exist. The pathogenesis of PGD is unclear, although both neutrophils and activated platelets have been implicated. We hypothesized that neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contribute to lung injury in PGD in a platelet-dependent manner. Objectives: To study NETs in experimental models of PGD and in lung transplant patients. Methods: Two experimental murine PGD models were studied: hilar clamp and orthotopic lung transplantation after prolonged cold ischemia (OLT-PCI). NETs were assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and ELISA. Platelet activation was inhibited with aspirin, and NETs were disrupted with DNaseI. NETs were also measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma from lung transplant patients with and without PGD. Measurements and Main Results: NETs were increased after either hilar clamp or OLT-PCI compared with surgical control subjects. Activation and intrapulmonary accumulation of platelets were increased in OLT-PCI, and platelet inhibition reduced NETs and lung injury, and improved oxygenation. Disruption of NETs by intrabronchial administration of DNaseI also reduced lung injury and improved oxygenation. In bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from human lung transplant recipients, NETs were more abundant in patients with PGD. Conclusions: NETs accumulate in the lung in both experimental and clinical PGD. In experimental PGD, NET formation is platelet-dependent, and disruption of NETs with DNaseI reduces lung injury. These data are the first description of a pathogenic role for NETs in solid organ transplantation and suggest that NETs are a promising therapeutic target in PGD. PMID:25485813

  3. Increased Numbers of Circulating CD8 Effector Memory T Cells before Transplantation Enhance the Risk of Acute Rejection in Lung Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    San Segundo, David; Ballesteros, María Ángeles; Naranjo, Sara; Zurbano, Felipe; Miñambres, Eduardo; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The effector and regulatory T cell subpopulations involved in the development of acute rejection episodes in lung transplantation remain to be elucidated. Twenty-seven lung transplant candidates were prospectively monitored before transplantation and within the first year post-transplantation. Regulatory, Th17, memory and naïve T cells were measured in peripheral blood of lung transplant recipients by flow cytometry. No association of acute rejection with number of peripheral regulatory T cells and Th17 cells was found. However, effector memory subsets in acute rejection patients were increased during the first two months post-transplant. Interestingly, patients waiting for lung transplant with levels of CD8+ effector memory T cells over 185 cells/mm3 had a significant increased risk of rejection [OR: 5.62 (95% CI: 1.08-29.37), p=0.04]. In multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender the odds ratio for rejection was: OR: 5.89 (95% CI: 1.08-32.24), p=0.04. These data suggest a correlation between acute rejection and effector memory T cells in lung transplant recipients. The measurement of peripheral blood CD8+ effector memory T cells prior to lung transplant may define patients at high risk of acute lung rejection. PMID:24236187

  4. Comparison of Predicted Total Lung Capacity and Total Lung Capacity by Computed Tomography in Lung Transplantation Candidates

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sung Ho; Lee, Jin Gu; Kim, Tae Hoon; Paik, Hyo Chae; Park, Chul Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Lung size mismatch is a major cause of poor lung function and worse survival after lung transplantation (LTx). We compared predicted total lung capacity (pTLC) and TLC measured by chest computed tomography (TLCCT) in LTx candidates. Materials and Methods We reviewed the medical records of patients on waiting lists for LTx. According to the results of pulmonary function tests, patients were divided into an obstructive disease group and restrictive disease group. The differences between pTLC calculated using the equation of the European Respiratory Society and TLCCT were analyzed in each group. Results Ninety two patients met the criteria. Thirty five patients were included in the obstructive disease group, and 57 patients were included in the restrictive disease group. pTLC in the obstructive disease group (5.50±1.07 L) and restrictive disease group (5.57±1.03 L) had no statistical significance (p=0.747), while TLCCT in the restrictive disease group (3.17±1.15 L) was smaller than that I the obstructive disease group (4.21±1.38 L) (p<0.0001). TLCCT/pTLC was 0.770 in the obstructive disease group and 0.571 in the restrictive disease group. Conclusion Regardless of pulmonary disease pattern, TLCCT was smaller than pTLC, and it was more apparent in restrictive lung disease. Therefore, we should consider the difference between TLCCT and pTLC, as well as lung disease patterns of candidates, in lung size matching for LTx. PMID:27189292

  5. Donor age and early graft failure after lung transplantation: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Matthew R; Peterson, Eric R; Easthausen, Imaani; Quintanilla, Isaac; Colago, Eric; Sonett, Joshua R.; D’Ovidio, Frank; Costa, Joseph; Diamond, Joshua M; Christie, Jason D; Arcasoy, Selim M; Lederer, David J

    2014-01-01

    Lungs from older adult organ donors are often unused because of concerns for increased mortality. We examined associations between donor age and transplant outcomes among 8,860 adult lung transplant recipients using Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network and Lung Transplant Outcomes Group data. We used stratified Cox proportional hazard models and generalized linear mixed models to examine associations between donor age and both 1-year graft failure and primary graft dysfunction. The rate of 1-year graft failure was similar among recipients of lungs from donors age 18–64 years, but severely ill recipients (LAS > 47.7 or use of mechanical ventilation) of lungs from donors age 56–64 years had increased rates of 1-year graft failure (p-values for interaction = 0.04 and 0.02, respectively). Recipients of lungs from donors <18 and ≥65 years had increased rates of 1-year graft failure (adjusted hazard ratio 1.23, 95% CI 1.01–1.50 and adjusted hazard ratio 2.15, 95% CI 1.47–3.15, respectively). Donor age was not associated with the risk of primary graft dysfunction. In summary, the use of lungs from donors age 56–64 years may be safe for adult candidates without a high LAS, and the use of lungs from pediatric donors is associated with a small increase in early graft failure. PMID:24034167

  6. Lung transplantation in an intensive care patient with pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis - a case report

    PubMed Central

    Güçyetmez, Bülent; Ogan, Aylin; Çimet Ayyıldız, Aylin; Yalçın Güder, Berrin; Klepetko, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by the deposition of phosphate and calcium in the alveoli. The disease progresses asymptomatically until later stages. When it becomes symptomatic, lung transplantations performed before the onset of right heart failure may improve life expectancy and quality. Here we present a case report concerning the very first Turkish PAM patient to have undergone lung transplantation surgery. Patient information: A 52 year-old female, Caucasian patient, already diagnosed with PAM in infancy, was admitted to the intensive care unit, diagnosed with pneumonia and hospitalized for 20 days. We decided to refer the patient to a specialized center for lung transplantation. Bilateral lung transplantation was performed in Vienna 14 months later and no recurrence was observed during the first postoperative year. Conclusion: Bilateral lung transplantation may improve both the life expectancy and the quality of life of PAM diagnosed patients with severe respiratory failure who do not suffer from right heart failure. The risk of recurrence should not be considered as a justifying reason to avoid transplantation as a treatment method. PMID:25165536

  7. Substantial Increases Occur in Serum Activins and Follistatin during Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de Kretser, David M.; Bensley, Jonathan G.; Phillips, David J.; Levvey, Bronwyn J.; Snell, Greg I.; Lin, Enjarn; Hedger, Mark P.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation exposes the donated lung to a period of anoxia. Re-establishing the circulation after ischemia stimulates inflammation causing organ damage. Since our published data established that activin A is a key pro-inflammatory cytokine, we assessed the roles of activin A and B, and their binding protein, follistatin, in patients undergoing lung transplantation. Methods Sera from 46 patients participating in a published study of remote ischemia conditioning in lung transplantation were used. Serum activin A and B, follistatin and 11 other cytokines were measured in samples taken immediately after anaesthesia induction, after remote ischemia conditioning or sham treatment undertaken just prior to allograft reperfusion and during the subsequent 24 hours. Results Substantial increases in serum activin A, B and follistatin occurred after the baseline sample, taken before anaesthesia induction and peaked immediately after the remote ischemia conditioning/sham treatment. The levels remained elevated 15 minutes after lung transplantation declining thereafter reaching baseline 2 hours post-transplant. Activin B and follistatin concentrations were lower in patients receiving remote ischemia conditioning compared to sham treated patients but the magnitude of the decrease did not correlate with early transplant outcomes. Conclusions We propose that the increases in the serum activin A, B and follistatin result from a combination of factors; the acute phase response, the reperfusion response and the use of heparin-based anti-coagulants. PMID:26820896

  8. A case of acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia during early postoperative period after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Alici, I O; Yekeler, E; Yazicioglu, A; Turan, S; Tezer-Tekce, Y; Demirag, F; Karaoglanoglu, N

    2015-04-01

    Acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) is a distinct histologic pattern usually classified under the term chronic lung allograft dysfunction. We present a 48-year-old female patient who experienced AFOP during the 2nd week of double lung transplantation for pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis and secondary pulmonary hypertension. During the 8th day after transplantation, fever and neutrophilia developed together with bilateral consolidation. Infection markers were elevated. Despite coverage of a full antimicrobial spectrum, the situation progressed. The patient was diagnosed with AFOP with transbronchial biopsy. The infiltration resolved and the patient improved dramatically with the initiation of pulse corticosteroid treatment. AFOP should be suspected when there is a pulmonary consolidation after lung transplantation, even in the very early post-transplantation period. Several causes, such as alveolar damage and drug reactions, should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:25891742

  9. Respiratory Failure due to Possible Donor-Derived Sporothrix schenckii Infection in a Lung Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Bahr, Nathan C.; Janssen, Katherine; Billings, Joanne; Loor, Gabriel; Green, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. De novo and donor-derived invasive fungal infections (IFIs) contribute to morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Reporting of donor-derived IFIs (DDIFIs) to the Organ Procurement Transplant Network has been mandated since 2005. Prior to that time no systematic monitoring of DDIFIs occurred in the United States. Case Presentation. We report a case of primary graft dysfunction in a 49-year-old male lung transplant recipient with diffuse patchy bilateral infiltrates likely related to pulmonary Sporothrix schenckii infection. The organism was isolated from a bronchoalveolar lavage on the second day after transplantation. Clinical and radiographic responses occurred after initiation of amphotericin B lipid formulation. Conclusion. We believe that this was likely a donor-derived infection given the early timing of the Sporothrix isolation after transplant in a bilateral single lung transplant recipient. This is the first case report of sporotrichosis in a lung transplant recipient. Our patient responded well to amphotericin induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy with itraconazole. The implications of donor-derived fungal infections and Sporothrix in transplant recipients are reviewed. Early recognition and management of these fungi are essential in improving outcomes. PMID:26697244

  10. Respiratory Failure due to Possible Donor-Derived Sporothrix schenckii Infection in a Lung Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Bahr, Nathan C; Janssen, Katherine; Billings, Joanne; Loor, Gabriel; Green, Jaime S

    2015-01-01

    Background. De novo and donor-derived invasive fungal infections (IFIs) contribute to morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Reporting of donor-derived IFIs (DDIFIs) to the Organ Procurement Transplant Network has been mandated since 2005. Prior to that time no systematic monitoring of DDIFIs occurred in the United States. Case Presentation. We report a case of primary graft dysfunction in a 49-year-old male lung transplant recipient with diffuse patchy bilateral infiltrates likely related to pulmonary Sporothrix schenckii infection. The organism was isolated from a bronchoalveolar lavage on the second day after transplantation. Clinical and radiographic responses occurred after initiation of amphotericin B lipid formulation. Conclusion. We believe that this was likely a donor-derived infection given the early timing of the Sporothrix isolation after transplant in a bilateral single lung transplant recipient. This is the first case report of sporotrichosis in a lung transplant recipient. Our patient responded well to amphotericin induction therapy followed by maintenance therapy with itraconazole. The implications of donor-derived fungal infections and Sporothrix in transplant recipients are reviewed. Early recognition and management of these fungi are essential in improving outcomes. PMID:26697244

  11. Advances in Understanding Bronchiolitis Obliterans After Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Verleden, Stijn E; Sacreas, Annelore; Vos, Robin; Vanaudenaerde, Bart M; Verleden, Geert M

    2016-07-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) remains a major complication after lung transplantation, causing significant morbidity and mortality in a majority of recipients. BOS is believed to be the clinical correlate of chronic allograft dysfunction, and is defined as an obstructive pulmonary function defect in the absence of other identifiable causes, mostly not amenable to treatment. Recently, it has become clear that BOS is not the only form of chronic allograft dysfunction and that other clinical phenotypes exist; however, we focus exclusively on BOS. Radiologic findings typically demonstrate air trapping, mosaic attenuation, and hyperinflation. Pathologic examination reveals obliterative bronchiolitis lesions and a pure obliteration of the small airways (< 2 mm), with a relatively normal surrounding parenchyma. In this review, we highlight recent advances in diagnosis, pathologic examination, and risk factors, such as microbes, viruses, and antibodies. Although the pathophysiological mechanisms remain largely unknown, we review the role of the airway epithelium and inflammation and the various experimental animal models. We also clarify the clinical and therapeutic implications of these findings. Although significant progress has been made, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms and adequate therapy for posttransplantation BOS remain unknown, highlighting the need for further research to improve long-term posttransplantation BOS-free and overall survival. PMID:27212132

  12. Immunomodulatory Effects of Mixed Hematopoietic Chimerism: Immune Tolerance in Canine Model of Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nash;, Richard A.; Yunosov;, Murad; Abrams;, Kraig; Hwang;, Billanna; Castilla-Llorente;, Cristina; Chen;, Peter; Farivar;, Alexander S.; Georges;, George E.; Hackman;, Robert C.; Lamm;, Wayne J.E.; Lesnikova;, Marina; Ochs;, Hans D.; Randolph-Habecker;, Julie; Ziegler;, Stephen F.; Storb;, Rainer; Storer;, Barry; Madtes;, David K.; Glenny;, Robb; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term survival after lung transplantation is limited by acute and chronic graft rejection. Induction of immune tolerance by first establishing mixed hematopoietic chimerism (MC) is a promising strategy to improve outcomes. In a preclinical canine model, stable MC was established in recipients after reduced-intensity conditioning and hematopoietic cell transplantation from a DLA-identical donor. Delayed lung transplantation was performed from the stem cell donor without pharmacological immunosuppression. Lung graft survival without loss of function was prolonged in chimeric (n=5) vs. nonchimeric (n=7) recipients (p≤0.05, Fisher’s test). There were histological changes consistent with low grade rejection in 3/5 of the lung grafts in chimeric recipients at ≥1 year. Chimeric recipients after lung transplantation had a normal immune response to a T-dependent antigen. Compared to normal dogs, there were significant increases of CD4+INFγ+, CD4+IL-4+ and CD8+ INFγ+ T-cell subsets in the blood (p <0.0001 for each of the 3 T-cell subsets). Markers for regulatory T-cell subsets including foxP3, IL10 and TGFβ were also increased in CD3+ T cells from the blood and peripheral tissues of chimeric recipients after lung transplantation. Establishing MC is immunomodulatory and observed changes were consistent with activation of both the effector and regulatory immune response. PMID:19422333

  13. Body Composition and Mortality after Adult Lung Transplantation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric R.; Snyder, Mark E.; Katz, Patricia P.; Golden, Jeffrey A.; D’Ovidio, Frank; Bacchetta, Matthew; Sonett, Joshua R.; Kukreja, Jasleen; Shah, Lori; Robbins, Hilary; Van Horn, Kristin; Shah, Rupal J.; Diamond, Joshua M.; Wickersham, Nancy; Sun, Li; Hays, Steven; Arcasoy, Selim M.; Palmer, Scott M.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christie, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Obesity and underweight are contraindications to lung transplantation based on their associations with mortality in studies performed before implementation of the lung allocation score (LAS)–based organ allocation system in the United States Objectives: To determine the associations of body mass index (BMI) and plasma leptin levels with survival after lung transplantation. Methods: We used multivariable-adjusted regression models to examine associations between BMI and 1-year mortality in 9,073 adults who underwent lung transplantation in the United States between May 2005 and June 2011, and plasma leptin and mortality in 599 Lung Transplant Outcomes Group study participants. We measured body fat and skeletal muscle mass using whole-body dual X-ray absorptiometry in 142 adult lung transplant candidates. Measurements and Main Results: Adjusted mortality rates were similar among normal weight (BMI 18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25.0–29.9), and class I obese (BMI 30–34.9) transplant recipients. Underweight (BMI < 18.5) was associated with a 35% increased rate of death (95% confidence interval, 10–66%). Class II–III obesity (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2) was associated with a nearly twofold increase in mortality (hazard ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3–2.8). Higher leptin levels were associated with increased mortality after transplant surgery performed without cardiopulmonary bypass (P for interaction = 0.03). A BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 was 26% sensitive and 97% specific for total body fat–defined obesity. Conclusions: A BMI of 30.0–34.9 kg/m2 is not associated with 1-year mortality after lung transplantation in the LAS era, perhaps because of its low sensitivity for obesity. The association between leptin and mortality suggests the need to validate alternative methods to measure obesity in candidates for lung transplantation. A BMI greater than or equal to 30 kg/m2 may no longer contraindicate lung transplantation. PMID

  14. Development and characterization of a lung-protective method of bone marrow transplantation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Janssen, William J; Muldrow, Alaina; Kearns, Mark T; Barthel, Lea; Henson, Peter M

    2010-05-31

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is a common method used to study the contribution of myeloid and lymphoid cell populations in murine models of disease. The method requires lethal doses of radiation to ablate the bone marrow. Unintended consequences of radiation include organ injury and inflammatory cell activation. The goal of our study was to determine the degree to which bone marrow transplantation alters lungs and to develop a system to protect the lungs during radiation. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to total body irradiation with 900cGy and then transplanted with bone marrow from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing mice. Resultant chimeras exhibited a significant decline in alveolar macrophage numbers within 72h, modest influx of neutrophils in the lungs at 14days, and repopulation of the lungs by alveolar macrophages of bone marrow origin by 28days. Neutrophil influx and alveolar macrophage turnover were prevented when 1cm thick lead shields were used to protect the lungs during radiation, such that 8weeks after transplantation less than 30% of alveolar macrophages were of donor origin. Lung-shielded mice achieved a high level of bone marrow engraftment with greater than 95% of circulating leukocytes expressing GFP. In addition, their response to intratracheal lipopolysaccharide was similar to non-transplanted mice. We describe a model whereby lead shields protect resident cell populations in the lungs from radiation during bone marrow transplantation but permit full bone marrow engraftment. This system may be applicable to other organ systems in which protection from radiation during bone marrow transplantation is desired. PMID:20347833

  15. Functional improvement in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis undergoing single lung transplantation *

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Adalberto Sperb; Nascimento, Douglas Zaione; Sanchez, Letícia; Watte, Guilherme; Holand, Arthur Rodrigo Ronconi; Fassbind, Derrick Alexandre; Camargo, José Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the changes in lung function in the first year after single lung transplantation in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Methods: We retrospectively evaluated patients with IPF who underwent single lung transplantation between January of 2006 and December of 2012, reviewing the changes in the lung function occurring during the first year after the procedure. Results: Of the 218 patients undergoing lung transplantation during the study period, 79 (36.2%) had IPF. Of those 79 patients, 24 (30%) died, and 11 (14%) did not undergo spirometry at the end of the first year. Of the 44 patients included in the study, 29 (66%) were men. The mean age of the patients was 57 years. Before transplantation, mean FVC, FEV1, and FEV1/FVC ratio were 1.78 L (50% of predicted), 1.48 L (52% of predicted), and 83%, respectively. In the first month after transplantation, there was a mean increase of 12% in FVC (400 mL) and FEV1 (350 mL). In the third month after transplantation, there were additional increases, of 5% (170 mL) in FVC and 1% (50 mL) in FEV1. At the end of the first year, the functional improvement persisted, with a mean gain of 19% (620 mL) in FVC and 16% (430 mL) in FEV1. Conclusions: Single lung transplantation in IPF patients who survive for at least one year provides significant and progressive benefits in lung function during the first year. This procedure is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of IPF. PMID:26398749

  16. Perioperative management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation (a lesson for other anaesthesia settings).

    PubMed

    Rabanal, J M; Real, M I; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension are some of the most challenging for an anaesthesiologist to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing surgical procedures is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias and ischaemia leading to haemodynamic instability. Lung transplantation is the only therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease. Patients undergoing lung transplantation present a variety of challenges for anaesthesia team, but pulmonary hypertension remains the most important. The purpose of this article is to review the anaesthetic management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation, with particular emphasis on the choice of anaesthesia, pulmonary vasodilator therapy, inotropic and vasopressor therapy, and the most recent intraoperative monitoring recommendations to optimize patient care. PMID:25156939

  17. Reduction in Airway Complications After Lung Transplantation With Novel Anastomotic Technique

    PubMed Central

    FitzSullivan, Elizabeth; Gries, Cynthia J.; Phelan, Patrick; Farjah, Farhood; Gilbert, Erin; Keech, John C.; Wood, Douglas E.; Raghu, Ganesh; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bronchial anastomotic complications develop in 31% of lung transplant recipients, leading to additional operative procedures and increased morbidity. Advances in surgical technique have thus far resulted in only modestly improved outcomes. We hypothesized that creating the bronchial anastomosis at the secondary carina using a combination of running and figure-of-eight sutures would minimize donor bronchial ischemia and airway complications. Methods This retrospective review of a single surgeon’s operative experience from 2000 to 2007 compares a new bronchial anastomotic technique with the conventional technique. The primary outcome was the occurrence of bronchial anastomotic complications requiring invasive intervention. The secondary outcome was distal airway complications. Patients were monitored for 1 year after transplant. Recipient and donor demographic data as well as relevant variables from their preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative courses were collected for analysis. These data were compared using t tests for normally distributed continuous variables, Mann-Whitney tests for nonnormally distributed continuous variables, and χ2 tests or Fisher exact test for categoric variables. Logistic regression was used to control for covariates while comparing the primary outcome between the new and conventional bronchial anastomotic techniques. Results The analysis included 230 patients, representing 407 anastomoses. The occurrence of anastomotic complications requiring intervention and distal airway complications decreased from 18.1% to 2.3% of anastomoses and 12.2% to 4.4% of patients, respectively. After controlling for available risk factors, the new technique significantly reduced both anastomotic (p < 0.001) and distal (p = 0.03) airway complications. Conclusions This new anastomotic technique dramatically reduces anastomotic and distal airway complications after lung transplantation. PMID:21511248

  18. Effects of exogenous surfactant on the non-heart-beating donor lung graft in experimental lung transplantation - a stereological study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Gudrun; Knudsen, Lars; Madershahian, Navid; Mühlfeld, Christian; Frank, Konrad; Rahmanian, Parwis; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wittwer, Thorsten; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    The use of non-heart-beating donor (NHBD) lungs may help to overcome the shortage of lung grafts in clinical lung transplantation, but warm ischaemia and ischaemia/reperfusion injury (I/R injury) resulting in primary graft dysfunction represent a considerable threat. Thus, better strategies for optimized preservation of lung grafts are urgently needed. Surfactant dysfunction has been shown to contribute to I/R injury, and surfactant replacement therapy is effective in enhancing lung function and structural integrity in related rat models. In the present study we hypothesize that surfactant replacement therapy reduces oedema formation in a pig model of NHBD lung transplantation. Oedema formation was quantified with (SF) and without (non-SF) surfactant replacement therapy in interstitial and alveolar compartments by means of design-based stereology in NHBD lungs 7 h after cardiac arrest, reperfusion and transplantation. A sham-operated group served as control. In both NHBD groups, nearly all animals died within the first hours after transplantation due to right heart failure. Both SF and non-SF developed an interstitial oedema of similar degree, as shown by an increase in septal wall volume and arithmetic mean thickness as well as an increase in the volume of peribron-chovascular connective tissue. Regarding intra-alveolar oedema, no statistically significant difference could be found between SF and non-SF. In conclusion, surfactant replacement therapy cannot prevent poor outcome after prolonged warm ischaemia of 7 h in this model. While the beneficial effects of surfactant replacement therapy have been observed in several experimental and clinical studies related to heart-beating donor lungs and cold ischaemia, it is unlikely that surfactant replacement therapy will overcome the shortage of organs in the context of prolonged warm ischaemia, for example, 7 h. Moreover, our data demonstrate that right heart function and dysfunctions of the pulmonary vascular bed are

  19. The cough response to ultrasonically nebulized distilled water in heart-lung transplantation patients

    SciTech Connect

    Higenbottam, T.; Jackson, M.; Woolman, P.; Lowry, R.; Wallwork, J.

    1989-07-01

    As a result of clinical heart-lung transplantation, the lungs are denervated below the level of the tracheal anastomosis. It has been questioned whether afferent vagal reinnervation occurs after surgery. Here we report the cough frequency, during inhalation of ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, of 15 heart-lung transplant patients studied 6 wk to 36 months after surgery. They were compared with 15 normal subjects of a similar age and sex. The distribution of the aerosol was studied in five normal subjects using /sup 99m/technetium diethylene triamine pentaacetate (/sup 99m/Tc-DTPA) in saline. In seven patients, the sensitivity of the laryngeal mucosa to instilled distilled water (0.2 ml) was tested at the time of fiberoptic bronchoscopy by recording the cough response. Ten percent of the aerosol was deposited onto the larynx and trachea, 56% on the central airways, and 34% in the periphery of the lung. The cough response to the aerosol was strikingly diminished in the patients compared with normal subjects (p less than 0.001), but all seven patients coughed when distilled water was instilled onto the larynx. As expected, the laryngeal mucosa of heart-lung transplant patients remains sensitive to distilled water. However, the diminished coughing when the distilled water is distributed by aerosol to the central airways supports the view that vagal afferent nerves do not reinnervate the lungs after heart-lung transplantation, up to 36 months after surgery.

  20. Anti-reflux surgery in lung transplant recipients: outcomes and effects on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Robertson, A G N; Krishnan, A; Ward, C; Pearson, J P; Small, T; Corris, P A; Dark, J H; Karat, D; Shenfine, J; Griffin, S M

    2012-03-01

    Fundoplication may improve survival after lung transplantation. Little is known about the effects of fundoplication on quality of life in these patients. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of fundoplication in lung transplant recipients and its effects on quality of life. Between June 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010, a prospective study of lung transplant recipients undergoing fundoplication was undertaken. Quality of life was assessed before and after surgery. Body mass index (BMI) and pulmonary function were followed up. 16 patients, mean ± sd age 38 ± 11.9 yrs, underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. There was no peri-operative mortality or major complications. Mean ± SD hospital stay was 2.6 ± 0.9 days. 15 out of 16 patients were satisfied with the results of surgery post fundoplication. There was a significant improvement in reflux symptom index and DeMeester questionnaires and gastrointestinal quality of life index scores at 6 months. Mean BMI decreased significantly after fundoplication (p = 0.01). Patients operated on for deteriorating lung function had a statistically significant decrease in the rate of lung function decline after fundoplication (p = 0.008). Laparoscopic fundoplication is safe in selected lung transplant recipients. Patient benefit is suggested by improved symptoms and satisfaction. This procedure is acceptable, improves quality of life and may reduce deterioration of lung function. PMID:21778169

  1. Autoperfused working heart-lung preparation versus hypothermic cardiopulmonary preservation for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adachi, H; Fraser, C D; Kontos, G J; Borkon, A M; Hutchins, G M; Galloway, E; Brawn, J; Reitz, B A; Baumgartner, W A

    1987-01-01

    The effects of preserving the heart and lungs with an autoperfused working heart-lung preparation or simple hypothermia via cardiopulmonary bypass were studied in 18 dairy calves that had combined heart-lung transplantation. Group 1 (n = 6) served as the control group in which animals were cooled with cardiopulmonary bypass and immediately had allotransplantations. In group 2 (n = 6), cardiopulmonary function was maintained in the autoperfusion circuit for 4 hours, followed by transplantation. In group 3 (n = 6), the organs were harvested after cooling by cardiopulmonary bypass, stored in cold (4 degrees C) saline solution for 4 hours, and then transplanted. Cardiopulmonary function was compared between the three groups for 6 hours after implantation. Cardiac function was determined by the ratio of the end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension. Pulmonary function was evaluated by the measurement of extravascular lung water, arterial oxygenation on 100% inspired oxygen static lung compliance, and histologic lung injury score. All measurements in groups 2 and 3 were similar to those of the control group at 6 hours after implantation. One may use either the hypothermic cardiopulmonary preservation method after cardiopulmonary bypass or the autoperfused working heart-lung preparation for distant organ procurement and expect adequate cardiopulmonary function after transplantation. PMID:3119800

  2. Advanced therapies for COPD—What’s on the horizon? Progress in lung volume reduction and lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of morbidity. Treatment options beyond conventional medical therapies are limited to a minority of patients. Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) although effective in selected subgroups of patients is not commonly undertaken. Morbidity associated with the procedure has contributed to this low utilisation. In response to this, less invasive bronchoscopic lung volume techniques are being developed to attempt to mitigate some of the risks and costs associated with surgery. Of these, endobronchial valve therapy is the most comprehensively studied although the presence of collateral ventilation in a significant proportion of patients has compromised its widespread utility. Bronchial thermal vapour ablation and lung volume reduction (LVR) coils are not dependent on collateral ventilation. These techniques have shown promise in early clinical trials; ongoing work will establish whether they have a role in the management of advanced COPD. Lung transplantation, although effective in selected patients for palliation of symptoms and improving survival, is limited by donor organ availability and economic constraint. Reconditioning marginal organs previously declined for transplantation with ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is one potential strategy in improving the utilisation of donor organs. By increasing the donor pool, it is hoped lung transplantation might be more accessible for patients with advanced COPD into the future. PMID:25478204

  3. Advanced therapies for COPD-What's on the horizon? Progress in lung volume reduction and lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Michael A; Hopkins, Peter M

    2014-11-01

    Advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a significant cause of morbidity. Treatment options beyond conventional medical therapies are limited to a minority of patients. Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) although effective in selected subgroups of patients is not commonly undertaken. Morbidity associated with the procedure has contributed to this low utilisation. In response to this, less invasive bronchoscopic lung volume techniques are being developed to attempt to mitigate some of the risks and costs associated with surgery. Of these, endobronchial valve therapy is the most comprehensively studied although the presence of collateral ventilation in a significant proportion of patients has compromised its widespread utility. Bronchial thermal vapour ablation and lung volume reduction (LVR) coils are not dependent on collateral ventilation. These techniques have shown promise in early clinical trials; ongoing work will establish whether they have a role in the management of advanced COPD. Lung transplantation, although effective in selected patients for palliation of symptoms and improving survival, is limited by donor organ availability and economic constraint. Reconditioning marginal organs previously declined for transplantation with ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is one potential strategy in improving the utilisation of donor organs. By increasing the donor pool, it is hoped lung transplantation might be more accessible for patients with advanced COPD into the future. PMID:25478204

  4. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders and Epstein-Barr virus DNAemia in a cohort of lung transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are serious complications in lung transplant recipients. No consensus on EBV DNAemia levels predictive of PTLD has been reached. In addition, in many instances EBV DNAemia is determined in patients with suggestive symptoms only. Methods The characteristics of five patients with PTLD as well as the prevalence of EBV DNAmia in a cohort of 137 consecutive patients receiving lung transplantation are described. Results Twenty-six out of 137 patients (18.9%) were excluded from the analysis because lost at follow-up or dead from PTLD-independent reasons within three months of transplantation. EBV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was determined in 83/111 patients (74.8%) because of potential PTLD-related symptoms, while 28 patients (25.2%) showed no symptoms and were not examined. EBV DNAemia was positive in 53/83 patients (63.8%), and negative in 30/83 patients (36.2%). PTLD was diagnosed in five (4.5%) patients at a median time of 270 (range 120-870) days following transplantation. All five PTLD (three large B-cell lymphomas, one Hodgkin lymphoma and one possible pre-neoplastic lesion) were potentially associated with EBV infection. However, only 3/5 patients with PTLD had detectable EBV DNAemia: < 1,000 copies EBV DNA/1 × 105 PBMC in one patient and > 1,000 copies EBV DNA/1 × 105 PBMC in two patients. Conclusion A systematic multidisciplinary (clinical, radiologic, virologic and histologic) approach is mandatory for the diagnosis and management of PTLD in lung transplant recipients, while monitoring of symptomatic patients only may provide an incomplete or late picture of the clinical problem. In addition, staining for EBV antigens and quantification of EBV DNA in biopsy specimens should always be performed to understand the role of EBV infection in the pathogenesis of PTLD. PMID:21892950

  5. Factors related to health locus of control among lung transplant candidates.

    PubMed

    Burker, Eileen J; Phillips, Kristin M; Giza, Mallory

    2012-01-01

    As the number of individuals pursuing lung transplantation to treat lung disease increases, transplant team members have an opportunity to maximize patients' chances for post-transplant success through identifying and addressing psychosocial factors that have been previously associated with patients' post-transplant survival, such as health locus of control (HLC). The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to understand the factors associated with HLC in lung transplant candidates. The aims were to (i) identify the demographic factors associated with internal (IHLC), chance (CHLC), and powerful others (PHLC) HLC; (ii) examine the associations between HLC and anxiety, depression, and optimism; and (iii) determine whether these factors explain a significant proportion of variance in HLC. Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that age, education, trait anxiety, and optimism explained 20% of the variance in CHLC; gender, trait anxiety, and depression accounted for 9% of the variance in IHLC; and lower education accounted for 5% of the variance in PHLC. Helping transplant team members understand the factors that influence patients' perceptions that their own behaviors impact their health status is important for maximizing post-transplant success. PMID:22515175

  6. Lung transplant in end-staged chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients: a concise review

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Fahad; Penupolu, Sudheer; Xu, Xin; He, Jianxing

    2010-01-01

    Lung transplantation is commonly used for patients with end-stage lung disease. However, there is continuing debate on the optimal operation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and pulmonary fibrosis. Single-lung transplantation (SLT) provides equivalent short- and medium-term results compared with bilateral lung transplantation (BLT), but long-term survival appears slightly better in BLT recipients (especially in patients with COPD). The number of available organs for lung transplantation also influences the choice of operation. Recent developments suggest that the organ donor shortage is not as severe as previously thought, making BLT a possible alternative for more patients. Among the different complications, re-implantation edema, infection, rejection, and bronchial complications predominate. Chronic rejection, also called obliterative bronchiolitis syndrome, is a later complication which can be observed in about half of the patients. Improvement in graft survival depends greatly in improvement in prevention and management of complications. Despite such complications, graft survival in fibrosis patients is greater than spontaneous survival on the waiting list; idiopathic fibrosis is associated with the highest mortality on the waiting list. Patients should be referred early for the pre-transplantation work-up because individual prognosis is very difficult to predict. PMID:22263028

  7. Donor core-cooling provides improved static preservation for heart-lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fraser, C D; Tamura, F; Adachi, H; Kontos, G J; Brawn, J; Hutchins, G M; Borkon, A M; Reitz, B A; Baumgartner, W A

    1988-03-01

    Twenty-three dairy calves underwent heart-lung allotransplantation after donor organs were procured using either donor core-cooling through cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) or pulmonary artery flush (PAF) to assess which method provides optimal graft preservation. In Groups 1 (control) and 2, donors were cooled to 15 degrees C on CPB and organs were either immediately transplanted (Group 1) or stored in saline solution (4 degrees C) for 4 hours (Group 2) prior to transplantation. In Group 3, donors were pretreated with prostaglandin E1 prior to PAF with modified Euro-Collins solution. Organs were stored in saline solution (4 degrees C) for 4 hours and were then transplanted. Acute cardiopulmonary function following transplantation was assessed by the ratio of end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension, extravascular lung water (EVLW), lung compliance, arterial oxygenation, and lung biopsy. Cardiac function after the transplantation procedure was similar in all groups, but EVLW values and lung biopsy scores were worse after PAF. Arterial O2 tension appeared lower after PAF, but not significantly so. Core-cooling provides superior static preservation and thus improved graft function in the acute bovine model. PMID:3126721

  8. Starting a lung transplant program: a roadmap for long-term excellence.

    PubMed

    Klesney-Tait, Julia; Eberlein, Michael; Geist, Lois; Keech, John; Zabner, Joseph; Gruber, Peter J; Iannettoni, Mark D; Parekh, Kalpaj

    2015-05-01

    Lung transplantation is an effective therapy for many patients with end-stage lung disease. Few centers across the United States offer this therapy, as a successful lung transplant program requires significant institutional resources and specialized personnel. Analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing database reveals that the failure rate of new programs exceeds 40%. These data suggest that an accurate assessment of program viability as well as a strategy to continuously assess defined quality measures is needed. As part of strategic planning, regional availability of recipient and donors should be assessed. Additionally, analysis of institutional expertise at the physician, support staff, financial, and administrative levels is necessary. In May of 2007, we started a new lung transplant program at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and have performed 101 transplants with an average recipient 1-year survival of 91%, placing our program among the top in the country for the past 5 years. Herein, we review internal and external factors that impact the viability of a new lung transplant program. We discuss the use of four prospectively identified quality measures: volume, recipient outcomes, financial solvency, and academic contribution as one approach to achieve programmatic excellence. PMID:25940255

  9. Clinico-pathological Analysis of the Lungs from Patients with Lung Transplantation in a Single Institute in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojin; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Young Tae; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Recently, the numbers of lung transplantation (LT) has been increased in Korea. However, post-LT outcome has not been successful in all patients, which may be partially affected by the primary lung disease. Therefore comprehensive understanding in original pathological diagnosis of patients with LT would be needed for achieving better clinical outcome. To address this issue, we performed clinico-pathological analysis of the explanted lungs from 29 patients who underwent LT over a 9-yr period in Seoul National University Hospital. Among them, 26 patients received single (1/26) or double (25/26) LT, while heart-lung transplantation was performed in 3 patients. The final clinico-pathological diagnoses were idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) (n = 6), acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP)/diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) (n = 4), AIP/non-specific interstitial pneumonia with DAD (n = 1), collagen vascular disease-related interstitial lung disease (CVD-ILD)/DAD (n = 3), CVD-ILD/UIP (n = 1), lymphangioleiomyomatosis (n = 1), bronchiectasis (n = 4), pulmonary arterial hypertension (n = 2), tuberculosis (n = 1), bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) (n = 1), and lung cancer (n = 1). Moreover, 4 patients who had chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation due to hematologic malignancy showed unclassifiable interstitial pneumonia with extensive fibrosis in the lungs. Our study demonstrates that pathology of the explanted lungs from Korean patients with LT is different from that of other countries except for interstitial lung disease and bronchiectasis, which may be helpful for optimization of selecting LT candidates for Korean patients. PMID:26425040

  10. Five-year update on the mouse model of orthotopic lung transplantation: Scientific uses, tricks of the trade, and tips for success

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xue; Li, Wenjun; Lai, Jiaming; Okazaki, Mikio; Sugimoto, Seiichiro; Yamamoto, Sumiharu; Wang, Xingan; Gelman, Andrew E.; Kreisel, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    It has been 5 years since our team reported the first successful model of orthotopic single lung transplantation in the mouse. There has been great demand for this technique due to the obvious experimental advantages the mouse offers over other large and small animal models of lung transplantation. These include the availability of mouse-specific reagents as well as knockout and transgenic technology. Our laboratory has utilized this mouse model to study both immunological and non-immunological mechanisms of lung transplant physiology while others have focused on models of chronic rejection. It is surprising that despite our initial publication in 2007 only few other laboratories have published data using this model. This is likely due to the technical complexity of the surgical technique and perioperative complications, which can limit recipient survival. As two of the authors (XL and WL) have a combined experience of over 2500 left and right single lung transplants, this review will summarize their experience and delineate tips and tricks necessary for successful transplantation. We will also describe technical advances made since the original description of the model. PMID:22754663

  11. Transplant Trajectory and Relational Experience Within Living Kidney Dyads.

    PubMed

    Ummel, Deborah; Achille, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Living kidney donation is considered common practice across most Westernized countries. While extensive research has documented the experience of living donors, few studies have addressed the perspective of recipients, and even fewer have examined the experience of donor and recipient as an interactive dyad. In this study, our aim was to examine the reciprocal influence between donors and recipients across the transplantation process. We recruited a homogeneous sample of 10 donors and recipients, who were interviewed individually. Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The presentation of results follows the stages of the transplantation process: the disease experience, the experience of offering and accepting a kidney, the screening period, the surgery, and the post-transplantation period. Results are discussed within the framework of Mauss's gift exchange theory, social roles, and altruism. This comprehensive description of the dyadic experience provides a way to frame and understand psychosocial aspects and relational implications of living renal transplantation. PMID:25700284

  12. Transplantation of liver and kidney from donors with malignancy at the time of donation: an experience from a single centre.

    PubMed

    Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Longbotham, David; Hostert, Lutz; Attia, Magdy; Baker, Richard; Menon, Krishna; Ahmad, Niaz

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of organs from donors with malignancy poses clinical and ethical questions regarding outcome, informed consent, immunosuppression and follow-up. We review our experience of kidney and liver transplantation from such donors. Our database was complemented by data from National Health Service Blood and Transplant. All patients who received a renal or liver transplant in our institution between April 2003 and January 2014 were included. About 2546 liver and kidney transplants were performed: 71 recipients received 53 kidney and 18 liver transplants. These included 51 (36 kidney, 15 liver) CNS malignancy, and six kidneys, three ipsilateral and three contralateral with RCC. One kidney recipient developed donor-transmitted lung cancer in the transplant kidney, and one liver transplant recipient developed donor-transmitted lymphoma; both subsequently died. Seven recipients developed donor-unrelated cancer. No recipient developed cancer, whereas the donor had a CNS or RCC. The 1-, 3- and 5-year patient survival was 96%, 93.3% and 75%, respectively, for kidneys and 83.3%, 75% and 50%, respectively, for liver. Where donor malignancy was known and assessed before transplantation, judicious use of kidney and liver for transplant achieved satisfactory outcome. The risk of transmission from donors with CNS and low-grade renal malignancy remains extremely low. PMID:26402442

  13. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... 10 years. Alternative Names Cardiac transplant; Transplant - heart; Transplantation - heart Images Heart, section through the middle Heart, ... 28. Bernstein D. Pediatric heart and heart-lung transplantation. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  14. T cell immunohistochemistry refines lung transplant acute rejection diagnosis and grading

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Lung transplant volume has been increasing. However, inaccurate and uncertain diagnosis for lung transplant rejection hurdles long-term outcome due to, in part, interobserver variability in rejection grading. Therefore, a more reliable method to facilitate diagnosing and grading rejection is warranted. Method Rat lung grafts were harvested on day 3, 7, 14 and 28 post transplant for histological and immunohistochemical assessment. No immunosuppressive treatment was administered. We explored the value of interstitial T lymphocytes quantification by immunohistochemistry and compared the role of T cell immunohistochemistry with H&E staining in diagnosing and grading lung transplant rejection. Results Typical acute rejection from grade A1 to A4 was found. Rejection severity was heterogeneously distributed in one-third transplanted lungs (14/40): lesions in apex and center were more augmented than in the base and periphery of the grafts, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed profound difference in T lymphocyte infiltration among grade A1 to A4 rejections. The coincidence rate of H&E and immunohistochemistry was 77.5%. The amount of interstitial T lymphocyte infiltration increased gradually with the upgrading of rejection. The statistical analysis demonstrated that the difference in the amount of interstitial T lymphocytes between grade A2 and A3 was not obvious. However, T lymphocytes in lung tissue of grade A4 were significantly more abundant than in other grades. Conclusions Rejection severity was heterogeneously distributed within lung grafts. Immunohistochemistry improves the sensitivity and specificity of rejection diagnosis, and interstitial T lymphocyte quantitation has potential value in diagnosing and monitoring lung allograft rejection. Virtual slides The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1536075282108217. PMID:24330571

  15. Lung transplantation with donation after circulatory determination of death donors and the impact of ex vivo lung perfusion.

    PubMed

    Machuca, T N; Mercier, O; Collaud, S; Tikkanen, J; Krueger, T; Yeung, J C; Chen, M; Azad, S; Singer, L; Yasufuku, K; de Perrot, M; Pierre, A; Waddell, T K; Keshavjee, S; Cypel, M

    2015-04-01

    The growing demand for suitable lungs for transplantation drives the quest for alternative strategies to expand the donor pool. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of lung transplantation (LTx) with donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD) and the impact of selective ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP). From 2007 to 2013, 673 LTx were performed, with 62 (9.2%) of them using DCDDs (seven bridged cases). Cases bridged with mechanical ventilation/extracorporeal life support were excluded. From 55 DCDDs, 28 (51%) underwent EVLP. Outcomes for LTx using DCDDs and donation after neurological determination of death (DNDD) donors were similar, with 1 and 5-year survivals of 85% and 54% versus 86% and 62%, respectively (p = 0.43). Although comparison of survival curves between DCDD + EVLP versus DCDD-no EVLP showed no significant difference, DCDD + EVLP cases presented shorter hospital stay (median 18 vs. 23 days, p = 0.047) and a trend toward shorter length of mechanical ventilation (2 vs. 3 days, p = 0.059). DCDDs represent a valuable source of lungs for transplantation, providing similar results to DNDDs. EVLP seems an important technique in the armamentarium to safely increase lung utilization from DCDDs; however, further studies are necessary to better define the role of EVLP in this context. PMID:25772069

  16. Role of Th17 cells and IL-17 in lung transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Wilkes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, advances in immunology have led to the recognition that T cell differentiation is not simply Th1 or Th2 but involves differentiation to other subsets, such as T regulatory cells, T follicular helper cells, and Th17 cells. Th17 cells, characterized by production of IL-17, IL-22, and IL-21, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, but also play an important role in host defense and mucosal immunity. IL-17, with its pleiotropic effects on stromal cells, as well as hematopoietic cells, has long been recognized as a possible mediator of rejection after lung transplantation. Recent data have implicated IL-17 and Th17 cells in the development of autoimmunity and chronic rejection after lung transplantation in both animal models and humans. In this review, we will discuss the current data on Th17 and the prospects for the future for lung transplantation. PMID:21279808

  17. Anastomotic Airway Complications After Lung Transplant: Clinical, Bronchoscopic and CT Correlation.

    PubMed

    Luecke, Kyle; Trujillo, Camilo; Ford, Jonathan; Decker, Summer; Pelaez, Andres; Hazelton, Todd R; Rojas, Carlos A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the normal appearance and common complications of the airway anastomosis in lung transplant patients with emphasis on computed tomography images with bronchoscopic correlation. The spectrum of complications will be presented as early (<1 mo after transplant) or late (>1 mo). Variations in surgical technique as well as presentation and management options for airway complications will also be discussed. PMID:27428022

  18. Resident Rounds Part III: Case Report: Fatal Cryptococcal Panniculitis in a Lung Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bobby Y; Shaigany, Sheila; Schulman, Lawrence; Grossman, Marc E

    2015-05-01

    Cryptococcal panniculitis is a rare entity previously reported in only 13 solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Cutaneous cryptococcosis in SOT recipients warrants extensive systemic workup and treatment as if central nervous system (CNS) disease is present. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of panniculitis in the immunocompromised host, as early diagnosis and treatment are critical. We report a fatal case of cryptococcal panniculitis in a 44-year-old lung transplant recipient. PMID:25942673

  19. Risk of Post-Lung Transplant Renal Dysfunction in Adults With Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Aitken, Moira L.; Goss, Christopher H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the leading indications for lung transplantation. The incidence and pre-lung transplant risk factors for posttransplant renal dysfunction in the CF population remain undefined. Methods: We conducted a cohort study using adults (≥ 18 years old) in the CF Foundation Patient Registry from 2000 to 2008 to determine the incidence of post-lung transplant renal dysfunction, defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate of < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify independent pretransplant risk factors for post-lung transplant renal dysfunction. Results: The study cohort included 993 adult lung transplant recipients with CF, with a median follow-up of 2 years. During the study period, 311 individuals developed renal dysfunction, with a 2-year risk of 35% (95% CI, 32%-39%). Risk of posttransplant renal dysfunction increased substantially with increasing age (25 to < 35 years vs 18 to < 25 years: hazard ratio [HR], 1.60; 95% CI, 1.15-2.23; vs ≥ 35 years: HR, 2.45; 95% CI, 1.73-3.47) and female sex (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.22-1.99). CF-related diabetes requiring insulin therapy (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.02-1.67) and pretransplant renal function impairment (estimated glomerular filtration rate, 60-90 mL/min/m2 vs > 90 mL/min/m2: HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.19-2.12) also increased the risk of posttransplant renal dysfunction. Conclusions: Renal dysfunction is common following lung transplant in the adult CF population. Increased age, female sex, CF-related diabetes requiring insulin, and pretransplant renal impairment are significant risk factors. PMID:22222189

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Heart-Lung Transplantation: Review of 10 Single-Center Consecutive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae Kwang; Choi, Se Hoon; Park, Seung-Il

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart-lung transplantation (HLT) has provided hope to patients with end-stage lung disease and irreversible heart dysfunction. We reviewed the clinical outcomes of 10 patients who underwent heart-lung transplantation at Asan Medical Center. Methods Between July 2010 and August 2014, a total of 11 patients underwent HLT at Asan Medical Center. After excluding one patient who underwent concomitant liver transplantation, 10 patients were enrolled in our study. We reviewed the demographics of the donors and the recipients’ baseline information, survival rate, cause of death, and postoperative complications. All patients underwent follow-up, with a mean duration of 26.1±16.7 months. Results Early death occurred in two patients (20%) due to septic shock. Late death occurred in three patients (38%) due to bronchiolitis obliterans (n=2) and septic shock (n=1), although these patients survived for 22, 28, and 42 months, respectively. The actuarial survival rates at one year, two years, and three years after HLT were 80%, 67%, and 53%, respectively. Conclusion HLT is a procedure that is rarely performed in Korea, even in medical centers with large heart and lung transplant programs. In order to achieve acceptable clinical outcomes, it is critical to carefully choose the donor and the recipient and to be certain that all aspects of the transplant procedure are planned in advance with the greatest care. PMID:27298792

  1. A simple technique can reduce cardiopulmonary bypass use during lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Samano, Marcos N; Iuamoto, Leandro R; Fonseca, Hugo V S; Fernandes, Lucas M; Abdalla, Luis G; Jatene, Fabio B; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M

    2016-04-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass causes an inflammatory response and consumption of coagulation factors, increasing the risk of bleeding and neurological and renal complications. Its use during lung transplantation may be due to pulmonary hypertension or associated cardiac defects or just for better exposure of the pulmonary hilum. We describe a simple technique, or open pericardium retraction, to improve hilar exposure by lifting the heart by upward retraction of the pericardial sac. This technique permits lung transplantation without cardiopulmonary bypass when bypass use is recommended only for better exposure. PMID:27166775

  2. A simple technique can reduce cardiopulmonary bypass use during lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Samano, Marcos N; Iuamoto, Leandro R; Fonseca, Hugo V S; Fernandes, Lucas M; Abdalla, Luis G; Jatene, Fabio B; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass causes an inflammatory response and consumption of coagulation factors, increasing the risk of bleeding and neurological and renal complications. Its use during lung transplantation may be due to pulmonary hypertension or associated cardiac defects or just for better exposure of the pulmonary hilum. We describe a simple technique, or open pericardium retraction, to improve hilar exposure by lifting the heart by upward retraction of the pericardial sac. This technique permits lung transplantation without cardiopulmonary bypass when bypass use is recommended only for better exposure. PMID:27166775

  3. Relationship between trough plasma and epithelial lining fluid concentrations of voriconazole in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Heng, Siow-Chin; Snell, Gregory I; Levvey, Bronwyn; Keating, Dominic; Westall, Glen P; Williams, Trevor J; Whitford, Helen; Nation, Roger L; Slavin, Monica A; Morrissey, Orla; Kong, David C M

    2013-09-01

    Trough (predose) voriconazole concentrations in plasma and pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) of lung transplant recipients receiving oral voriconazole preemptive treatment were determined. The mean (± standard deviation [SD]) ELF/plasma ratio was 12.5 ± 6.3. A strong positive linear relationship was noted between trough plasma and ELF voriconazole concentrations (r(2) = 0.87), suggesting the feasibility of using trough plasma voriconazole concentration as a surrogate to estimate the corresponding concentration in ELF of lung transplant recipients. PMID:23817382

  4. Influence on ICU course, outcome and costs for lung transplantation after implementation of the new Swiss transplantation law

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Swiss organ allocation system for donor lungs was implemented on 1 July 2007. The effects of this implementation on patient selection, intensive care unit course, outcomes and intensive care costs are unknown. Methods The first 37 consecutive lung transplant recipients following the implementation of the new act were compared with the previous 42 lung transplant recipients. Results Following implementation of the new law, baseline characteristics and cumulative one-year patient survival were comparable in both groups (88.1% vs 83.8%, P = 0.58). The costs for each case increased by 35,000 euros after adoption of the new law. Stratifying patients after implementation of the law according to urgency status shows that urgent patients required longer mechanical ventilation (P = 0.04), a longer ICU stay (P = 0.045) and a longer hospital stay (P = 0.04) and ICU costs (median 64,050 euros) were higher compared to regular patients. Conclusion The new transplantation law has increased ICU costs with the implementation of the Swiss organ allocation system. Patients listed as ‘urgent’ contribute significantly to the increase in ICU costs. PMID:24690254

  5. Multifocal periostitis as a complication of chronic use of voriconazole in a lung transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Tedja, R; El-Sherief, A; Olbrych, T; Gordon, S

    2013-08-01

    Fungal infections are common in solid organ transplantation. An increasing number of transplant recipients receive antifungal therapy for prolonged duration owing to invasive fungal infections. Herein, we describe a diagnosis of periostitis as a complication of chronic use of voriconazole in a lung transplant recipient. The patient was diagnosed with probable pulmonary aspergillosis and was treated with oral voriconazole for a total of 9 months. Evidence of multifocal periostitis was observed in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Early recognition of this phenomenon is important to prevent unnecessary tests and procedures. Prompt discontinuation of voriconazole should result in improvement of symptoms. PMID:23663268

  6. Use of CT densitometry to predict lung toxicity in bone marrow transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    el-Khatib, E.E.; Freeman, C.R.; Rybka, W.B.; Lehnert, S.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1989-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is considered an integral part of the preparation of patients with hematological malignancies for marrow transplantation. One of the major causes of death following bone marrow transplantation is interstitial pneumonia. Its pathogenesis is complex but radiation may play a major role in its development. Computed tomography (CT) has been used in animal and human studies as a sensitive non-invasive method for detecting changes in the lung following radiotherapy. In the present study CT scans are studied before and up to 1 year after TBI. Average lung densities measured before TBI showed large variations among the individual patients. On follow-up scans, lung density decreases were measured for patients who did not develop lung complications. Significant lung density increases were measured in patients who subsequently had lung complications. These lung density increases were observed prior to the onset of respiratory complications and could be correlated with the clinical course of the patients, suggesting the possibility for the usage of CT lung densitometry to predict lung complications before the onset of clinical symptoms.

  7. Obliterative airway remodeling: molecular evidence for shared pathways in transplanted and native lungs.

    PubMed

    Jonigk, Danny; Merk, Marlene; Hussein, Kais; Maegel, Lavinia; Theophile, Katharina; Muth, Michaela; Lehmann, Ulrich; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Mengel, Michael; Gottlieb, Jens; Welte, Tobias; Haverich, Axel; Golpon, Heiko; Kreipe, Hans; Laenger, Florian

    2011-02-01

    Obliteration of the small airways is a largely unresolved challenge in pulmonary medicine. It represents either the irreversible cause of functional impairment or a morphologic disorder of limited importance in a multitude of diseases. Bronchiolitis obliterans is a key complication of lung transplantation. No predictive markers for the onset of obliterative remodeling are currently available. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of airway remodeling, compartment-specific expression patterns were analyzed in patients. For this purpose, remodeled and nonremodeled bronchioli were isolated from transplanted and nontransplanted lung explants using laser-assisted microdissection (n = 24). mRNA expression of 45 fibrosis-associated genes was measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. For 20 genes, protein expression was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Infiltrating cells were characterized at conventional histology and immunohistochemistry. Obliterative remodeling of the small airways in transplanted and nontransplanted lungs shared similar grades of chronic inflammation and pivotal fibrotic pathways such as transforming growth factor β signaling and increased collagen expression. Bone morphogenetic protein and thrombospondin signaling, and also matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases, were primarily up-regulated in obliterative airway remodeling in nontransplanted lungs. In transplanted lungs, clinical remodeled bone morphogenetic protein but nonremodeled bronchioli were characterized by a concordant up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9, RANTES, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. These distinct expression patterns warrant further investigation as potential markers of impending airway remodeling, especially for prospective longitudinal molecular profiling. PMID:21281792

  8. THREE YEARS CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Elmagd, Kareem; Todo, Satoru; Tzakis, Andreas; Reyes, Jorge; Nour, Bakr; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Fung, John J.; Demetris, Anthony; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND After the successful evolution of hepatic transplantation during the last decade, small bowel and multivisceral transplantation remains the sole elusive achievement for the next era of transplant surgeons. Until recently, and for the last thirty years, the results of the sporadic attempts of intestinal transplantation worldwide were discouraging because of unsatisfactory graft and patient survival. The experimental and clinical demonstration of the superior therapeutic efficacy of FK 506, a new immunosuppressive drug, ushered in the current era of small bowel and multivisceral transplantation with initial promising results. STUDY DESIGN Forty-three consecutive patients with short bowel syndrome, intestinal insufficiency, or malignant tumors with or without associated liver disease, were given intestinal (n=15), hepatic and intestinal (n=21), or multivisceral allografts that contained four or more organs (n=7). Treatment was with FK 506 based immunosuppression. The ascending and right transverse colon were included with the small intestine in 13 of the 43 grafts, almost evenly distributed between the three groups. RESULTS After six to 39 months, 30 of the 43 patients are alive, 29 bearing grafts. The most rapid convalescence and resumption of diet, as well as the highest three month patient survival (100 percent) and graft survival (88 percent) were with the isolated intestinal procedure. However, this advantage was slowly eroded during the first two postoperative years, in part because the isolated intestine was more prone to rejection. By the end of this time, the best survival rate (86 percent) was with the multivisceral procedure. With all three operations, most of the patients were able to resume diet and discontinue parenteral alimentation, and in the best instances, the quality of life approached normal. However, the surveillance and intensity of care required for these patients for the first year, and in most instances thereafter, was very high

  9. Pediatric renal transplantation: a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Kavaz, A; Özçakar, Z B; Bulum, B; Tüzüner, A; Keven, K; Şengül, Ş; Ekim, M; Yalçınkaya, F

    2013-04-01

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for children with end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively of our 37 pediatric renal allograft recipients, including 20 boys and 17 girls from July 2007 to August 2012. The overall mean age at transplantation was 12.16 ± 4.25 years. Three patients (8.1%) were transplanted preemptively; two were ABO-incompatible transplantations. The majority of recipients received living donor grafts (81%). The mean duration of follow-up was 25.10 ± 14.95 months. Seven acute rejection episodes were observed in 6 patients (16.2%). Eleven recipients developed serious viral infections: cytomegalovirus (n = 8), parvovirus (n = 2), BK virus (polyoma hominis 1) (n = 2), or Ebstein-Barr virus (n = 1). Three patients died; one from posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease, one from primary disease recurrence with infection, and one from sepsis. In conclusion, kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for end-stage renal disease. Infection was the major concern after this procedure. PMID:23622586

  10. Basal segmental auto-transplantation after pneumonectomy for advanced central lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Oto, Takahiro; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Toyooka, Shinichi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2012-09-01

    In patients with central lung cancer that extensively involves the bronchus/pulmonary artery, a double-sleeve lobectomy is often difficult to perform. We describe a case of post-pneumonectomy basal segmental auto-transplantation using a lung preservation technique that uses cold low-potassium dextran glucose solution to protect the lung graft from ischaemia-reperfusion injury during the ex situ division of the segmental graft and the pathological investigations for the clearance of the surgical margins. A right basal segmental auto-transplantation procedure was performed in a patient with stage-IIIA squamous cell lung cancer. This technique could allow extensive pulmonary resection while minimizing the loss of pulmonary reserve. PMID:22544868

  11. Three-dimensional x-ray imaging of the anatomy and function of the lungs and pulmonary arteries in dogs following single lung transplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing-Hua; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wu, Xue-Si; Rinaldi, Mauro; Nilsson, Folke N.; Tazelaar, Henry D.; Ritman, Erik L.

    1996-04-01

    It was the goal of this study to see if relatively noninvasive CT studies could provide a quantitative index of acute lung rejection in single lung transplantation. Using volume scanning fast CT, the change in cross-sectional area of the major pulmonary arteries from systole to diastole, regional lung perfusion and ventilation was measured in 12 dogs with left lung allotransplantation before and during rejection and four dogs with left lung autotransplantation. All dogs were anesthetized and scanned in a fast computed tomography scanner (dynamic spatial reconstructor--DSR) during several ventilatory cycles and again during injection of contrast medium into the right atrium. There was significant reduction of regional air content, ventilation, perfusion and pulmonary artery compliance during rejection of the transplanted lung. The severity of these changes related linearly with the histological indices of rejection. It is concluded that minimally invasive dynamic CT imaging of transplanted lung can be used to detect acute rejection and its severity.

  12. Early Lung Computed Tomography Scan after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cornetto, Marie Alice; Chevret, Sylvie; Abbes, Sarah; de Margerie-Mellon, Constance; Hussenet, Claire; Sicre de Fontbrune, Flore; Tazi, Abdellatif; Ribaud, Patricia; Bergeron, Anne

    2016-08-01

    A lung computed tomography (CT) scan is essential for diagnosing lung diseases in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients. As a result, lung CT scans are increasingly prescribed in the early phase after allogeneic HSCT, with no assessment of the added value for global patient management. Among 250 patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT in our center over a 2-year period, we evaluated 68 patients who had at least 1 lung CT scan within the first 30 days post-transplantation. The median interval between allogeneic HSCT and lung CT scan was 8.5 days. Patients who underwent an early lung CT scan were more immunocompromised and had a more severe course. Fever was the main indication for the CT scan (78%). The lung CT scan was abnormal in 52 patients, including 17 patients who had an abnormal pre-HSCT CT scan. A therapeutic change was noted in 37 patients (54%) within 24 hours after the lung CT scan. The main changes included the introduction of corticosteroids (n = 23; 62%), especially in patients with a normal CT scan (89%). In univariate models, we found that a normal pretransplantation CT scan (P = .002), the absence of either dyspnea (P = .029) or hypoxemia (P = .015), and a serum C-reactive protein level <10 mg/L (P = .004) were associated with a normal post-HSCT lung CT scan. We found that the association of these variables could predict the normality of early post-HSCT lung CT scans. Pretransplantation lung CT scans are useful for the interpretation of subsequent lung CT scans following allogeneic HSCT, which are frequently abnormal. Early post-HSCT lung CT scans are helpful in patient management, but prescriptions could be more targeted. PMID:27189110

  13. Liver transplantation: fifty years of experience.

    PubMed

    Song, Alice Tung Wan; Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Pecora, Rafael Antonio Arruda; Pugliese, Vincenzo; D'Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2014-05-14

    Since 1963, when the first human liver transplantation (LT) was performed by Thomas Starzl, the world has witnessed 50 years of development in surgical techniques, immunosuppression, organ allocation, donor selection, and the indications and contraindications for LT. This has led to the mainstream, well-established procedure that has saved innumerable lives worldwide. Today, there are hundreds of liver transplant centres in over 80 countries. This review aims to describe the main aspects of LT regarding the progressive changes that have occurred over the years. We herein review historical aspects since the first experimental studies and the first attempts at human transplantation. We also provide an overview of immunosuppressive agents and their potential side effects, the evolution of the indications and contraindications of LT, the evolution of survival according to different time periods, and the evolution of methods of organ allocation. PMID:24833866

  14. Liver transplantation: Fifty years of experience

    PubMed Central

    Song, Alice Tung Wan; Avelino-Silva, Vivian Iida; Pecora, Rafael Antonio Arruda; Pugliese, Vincenzo; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto Carneiro; Abdala, Edson

    2014-01-01

    Since 1963, when the first human liver transplantation (LT) was performed by Thomas Starzl, the world has witnessed 50 years of development in surgical techniques, immunosuppression, organ allocation, donor selection, and the indications and contraindications for LT. This has led to the mainstream, well-established procedure that has saved innumerable lives worldwide. Today, there are hundreds of liver transplant centres in over 80 countries. This review aims to describe the main aspects of LT regarding the progressive changes that have occurred over the years. We herein review historical aspects since the first experimental studies and the first attempts at human transplantation. We also provide an overview of immunosuppressive agents and their potential side effects, the evolution of the indications and contraindications of LT, the evolution of survival according to different time periods, and the evolution of methods of organ allocation. PMID:24833866

  15. Single-lung transplantation in emphysema: Retrospective study analyzing survival and waiting list mortality

    PubMed Central

    Borro, José M; Delgado, María; Coll, Elisabeth; Pita, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To performed remains a subject of debate and is the principal aim of the study. METHODS: This retrospective analysis included 73 patients with emphysema (2000-2012). The outcomes of patients undergoing single-lung transplantation (SL) (n = 40) or double-lung transplant (DL) (n = 33) were compared in a Cox multivariate analysis to study the impact of the technique, postoperative complications and acute and chronic rejection on survival rates. Patients were selected for inclusion in the waiting list according to the International Society of Heart Lung Transplantation criteria. Pre and postoperative rehabilitation and prophylaxis, surgical technique and immunosuppressive treatment were similar in every patients. Lung transplantation waiting list information on a national level and retrospective data on emphysema patient survival transplanted in Spain during the study period, was obtained from the lung transplantation registry managed by the National Transplant Organization (ONT). RESULTS: Both groups were comparable in terms of gender and clinical characteristics. We found significant differences in the mean age between the groups, the DL patients being younger as expected from the inclusion criteria. Perioperative complications occurred in 27.6% SL vs 54% DL (P = 0.032). Excluding perioperative mortality, median survival was 65.3 mo for SL and 59.4 mo for DL (P = 0.96). Bronchiolitis obliterans and overall 5-year survival were similar in both groups. Bacterial respiratory infection, cytomegalovirus and fungal infection rates were higher but not significant in SL. No differences were found between type of transplant and survival (P = 0.48). To support our results, national data on all patients with emphysema in waiting list were obtained (n = 1001). Mortality on the waiting list was 2.4% for SL vs 6.2% for DL. There was no difference in 5 year survival between 235 SL and 430 DL patients transplanted (P = 0.875). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that SL

  16. Deguelin Attenuates Reperfusion Injury and Improves Outcome after Orthotopic Lung Transplantation in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Patrick; Ockelmann, Pia; Tacke, Sabine; Karnowski, Nora; Ellinghaus, Peter; Scheller, Bertram; Holfeld, Johannes; Urbschat, Anja; Zacharowski, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of adequate organ preservation is to avoid further cellular metabolism during the phase of ischemia. However, modern preservation solutions do rarely achieve this target. In donor organs hypoxia and ischemia induce a broad spectrum of pathologic molecular mechanisms favoring primary graft dysfunction (PGD) after transplantation. Increased hypoxia-induced transcriptional activity leads to increased vascular permeability which in turn is the soil of a reperfusion edema and the enhancement of a pro-inflammatory response in the graft after reperfusion. We hypothesize that inhibition of the respiration chain in mitochondria and thus inhibition of the hypoxia induced mechanisms might reduce reperfusion edema and consecutively improve survival in vivo. In this study we demonstrate that the rotenoid Deguelin reduces the expression of hypoxia induced target genes, and especially VEGF-A, dose-dependently in hypoxic human lung derived cells. Furthermore, Deguelin significantly suppresses the mRNA expression of the HIF target genes VEGF-A, the pro-inflammatory CXCR4 and ICAM-1 in ischemic lungs vs. control lungs. After lung transplantation, the VEGF-A induced reperfusion-edema is significantly lower in Deguelin-treated animals than in controls. Deguelin-treated rats exhibit a significantly increased survival-rate after transplantation. Additionally, a downregulation of the pro-inflammatory molecules ICAM-1 and CXCR4 and an increase in the recruitment of immunomodulatory monocytes (CD163+ and CD68+) to the transplanted organ involving the IL4 pathway was observed. Therefore, we conclude that ischemic periods preceding reperfusion are mainly responsible for the increased vascular permeability via upregulation of VEGF. Together with this, the resulting endothelial dysfunction also enhances inflammation and consequently lung dysfunction. Deguelin significantly decreases a VEGF-A induced reperfusion edema, induces the recruitment of immunomodulatory monocytes and thus

  17. Rehabilitation after heart transplantation: the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Harvison, A; Jones, B M; McBride, M; Taylor, F; Wright, O; Chang, V P

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to assess aspects of the quality of life and rehabilitation of heart transplant recipients who had transplantations at St. Vincent's Hospital, New South Wales, Australia, between February 1984 and March 1987. Factors determining return to full-time employment were delineated. A questionnaire was sent to 51 recipients. The response rate was 92%. The questionnaire measured employment status and satisfaction with family, social, marital, and sexual life. Financial status, exercise ability, and participation in daily activities were also assessed. Analysis showed that 53% of recipients had returned to either full-time or part-time employment, home duties, or full-time study. A further 28% were receiving a pension, 9% had chosen voluntary retirement, 6% were receiving unemployment benefits, and 4% were getting paid leave. Ability to exercise was improved for 77% of recipients and remained the same for another 14%. Financial status was unchanged for 45% and improved for 17%. Thirty-eight percent believed that they were worse off financially. Ratings of social, family, and marital life showed nearly complete or complete satisfaction in most cases. Satisfaction with sex life was less favorable. Comparison of the group who had returned to full-time employment with the group receiving a pension identified two variables of work status--length of time since transplantation and employment status before transplantation. There were also some differences between the two groups on quality of life ratings. PMID:3058902

  18. EBNA1 expression in a lung transplant recipient with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Malin A M; Heinlen, Latisha; Isaksson, Asa; Nyström, Ulla; Ricksten, Anne

    2007-07-01

    This article describes a transplant recipient with underlying hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome who expressed persistently Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) in peripheral blood. The patient received a bilateral lung transplant and was subsequently followed with monitoring of EBV expression in peripheral blood. Evaluation of viral expression in peripheral blood, serum, and graft tissue was performed with RT-PCR, Q-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence, anti-peptide assays, and in situ hybridization; samples were collected at various time-points up to 91 days post-transplantation. The patient expressed EBNA1 in 8/10 (80%) of the peripheral blood samples tested during the post-transplantation period, and interestingly, even including the day of transplantation. After analyses of indicative EBV mRNA, EBNA1 expression was found mainly to be Qp-initiated EBNA1, known to be important for EBV maintenance. Anti-EBNA1 epitope mapping showed significantly higher and broader antibody responses to EBNA1 epitopes pre-transplantation when compared to normal controls and a matched lung transplant control. Post-transplantation this response was largely diminished but there were still epitopes significantly higher than controls. Our results show the presence of EBV-positive proliferating cells before onset of intensive immunosuppressive treatment. Although no previous connection between EBV and hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis syndrome has been reported, it is tempting to speculate that the continuous EBNA1 expression is not caused by immunosuppression or post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, but may be a factor involved in the etiology of the autoimmune disease. PMID:17516536

  19. Induction Therapy for Lung Transplantation in COPD: Analysis of the UNOS Registry.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Joseph S; Tumin, Dmitry; Pope-Harman, Amy; Whitson, Bryan A; Higgins, Robert S D; Hayes, Don

    2016-10-01

    Although studies demonstrate that induction therapy improves outcomes after lung transplantation, its influence on survival in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not clear. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was queried to obtain data regarding adult patients with COPD receiving lung transplant between May 2005 and June 2014. Therapies evaluated include anti-thymocyte globulin, anti-lymphocyte globulin, thymoglobulin, basiliximab, and alemtuzumab. Data were categorized based on receiving induction (INDUCED) and no induction (NONE). Kaplan-Meier plots, Cox proportional hazards models of patient survival, and competing-risks regression models for secondary endpoints were utilized. A total of 3,405 patients who underwent lung transplantation for COPD were enrolled with 1,761 (52%) receiving induction therapy. Of INDUCED, 1,146 (65%) received basiliximab, 380 (22%) received alemtuzumab, and 235 (13%) received a polyclonal preparation. The hazard ratio for INDUCED vs. NONE was 0.793 (95% CI = 0.693, 0.909; p = 0.001) in the fully adjusted Cox model. A multivariable competing-risks model also found a protective influence of induction therapy with respect to delayed onset of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after transplantation (SHR = 0.801; 95% CI = 0.694, 0.925; p = 0.003). In a cohort of recently transplanted patients with COPD, there appears to be a benefit from contemporary induction agents with no concurrent increase in the risk of death due to infection. PMID:26829054

  20. Fractal circuit sensors enable rapid quantification of biomarkers for donor lung assessment for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Andrew T.; Besant, Justin D.; Mahmoudian, Laili; Poudineh, Mahla; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Hsin, Michael; Sargent, Edward H.; Cypel, Marcelo; Liu, Mingyao; Keshavjee, Shaf; Kelley, Shana O.

    2015-01-01

    Biomarker profiling is being rapidly incorporated in many areas of modern medical practice to improve the precision of clinical decision-making. This potential improvement, however, has not been transferred to the practice of organ assessment and transplantation because previously developed gene-profiling techniques require an extended period of time to perform, making them unsuitable in the time-sensitive organ assessment process. We sought to develop a novel class of chip-based sensors that would enable rapid analysis of tissue levels of preimplantation mRNA markers that correlate with the development of primary graft dysfunction (PGD) in recipients after transplant. Using fractal circuit sensors (FraCS), three-dimensional metal structures with large surface areas, we were able to rapidly (<20 min) and reproducibly quantify small differences in the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-10, and ATP11B mRNA in donor lung biopsies. A proof-of-concept study using 52 human donor lungs was performed to develop a model that was used to predict, with excellent sensitivity (74%) and specificity (91%), the incidence of PGD for a donor lung. Thus, the FraCS-based approach delivers a key predictive value test that could be applied to enhance transplant patient outcomes. This work provides an important step toward bringing rapid diagnostic mRNA profiling to clinical application in lung transplantation. PMID:26601233

  1. The immediate post-operative period following lung transplantation: mapping of nursing interventions

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Rayssa Thompson; Linch, Graciele Fernanda da Costa; Caregnato, Rita Catalina Aquino

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to investigate the principle nursing interventions/actions, prescribed in the immediate post-operative period for patients who receive lung transplantation, recorded in the medical records, and to map these using the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) taxonomy. METHOD: retrospective documental research using 183 medical records of patients who received lung transplantation (2007/2012). The data of the patients' profile were grouped in accordance with the variables investigated, and submitted to descriptive analysis. The nursing interventions prescribed were analyzed using the method of cross-mapping with the related interventions in the NIC. Medical records which did not contain nursing prescriptions were excluded. RESULTS: the majority of the patients were male, with medical diagnoses of pulmonary fibrosis, and underwent lung transplantation from a deceased donor. A total of 26 most frequently-cited interventions/actions were found. The majority (91.6%) were in the complex and basic physiological domains of the NIC. It was not possible to map two actions prescribed by the nurses. CONCLUSIONS: it was identified that the main prescriptions contained general care for the postoperative period of major surgery, rather than prescriptions individualized to the patient in the postoperative period following lung transplantation. Care measures related to pain were underestimated in the prescriptions. The mapping with the taxonomy can contribute to the elaboration of the care plan and to the use of computerized systems in this complex mode of therapy. PMID:25493673

  2. Epstein-Barr virus associated graft failure following heart/lung transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, J J; Stewart, J P; Hasleton, P S; Yonan, N; Bishop, P; Arrand, J R; Rahman, A N; Carroll, K B; Woodcock, A A

    1996-01-01

    A case is described of late pulmonary graft failure in a heart/lung transplant recipient. The major characteristics were alveolar fibrosis and a restrictive physiological deficit. Epstein-Barr virus was implicated as an aetiological agent using immunohistochemical analysis and by a response to treatment with ganciclovir. Images PMID:8958903

  3. Refractory Pulmonary Edema Caused by Late Pulmonary Vein Thrombosis After Lung Transplantation: A Rare Adverse Event.

    PubMed

    Denton, Eve J; Rischin, Adam; McGiffin, David; Williams, Trevor J; Paraskeva, Miranda A; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Greg

    2016-09-01

    After lung transplantation, pulmonary vein thrombosis is a rare, potentially life-threatening adverse event arising at the pulmonary venous anastomosis that typically occurs early and presents as graft failure and hemodynamic compromise with an associated mortality of up to 40%. The incidence, presentation, outcomes, and treatment of late pulmonary vein thrombosis remain poorly defined. Management options include anticoagulant agents for asymptomatic clots, and thrombolytic agents or surgical thrombectomy for hemodynamically significant clots. We present a rare case highlighting a delayed presentation of pulmonary vein thrombosis occurring longer than 2 weeks after lung transplantation and manifesting clinically as graft failure secondary to refractory pulmonary edema. The patient was treated successfully with surgical thrombectomy and remains well. We recommend a high index of suspicion of pulmonary vein thrombosis when graft failure after lung transplantation occurs and is not responsive to conventional therapy, and consideration of investigation with transesophageal echocardiography or computed tomography with venous phase contrast in such patients even more than 2 weeks after lung transplantation. PMID:27549541

  4. The Nitric Oxide/Cyclic GMP Pathway in Organ Transplantation: Critical Role in Successful Lung Preservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, David J.; Naka, Yoshifumi; Chowdhury, Nepal C.; Liao, Hui; Oz, Mehmet C.; Michler, Robert E.; Kubaszewski, Eugeniusz; Malinski, Tadeusz; Stern, David M.

    1994-12-01

    Reestablishment of vascular homeostasis following ex vivo preservation is a critical determinant of successful organ transplantation. Because the nitric oxide (NO) pathway modulates pulmonary vascular tone and leukocyte/endothelial interactions, we hypothesized that reactive oxygen intermediates would lead to decreased NO (and hence cGMP) levels following pulmonary reperfusion, leading to increased pulmonary vascular resistance and leukostasis. Using an orthotopic rat model of lung transplantation, a porphyrinic microsensor was used to make direct in vivo measurements of pulmonary NO. NO levels measured at the surface of the transplanted lung plummeted immediately upon reperfusion, with levels moderately increased by topical application of superoxide dismutase. Because cGMP levels declined in preserved lungs after reperfusion, this led us to buttress the NO pathway by adding a membrane-permeant cGMP analog to the preservation solution. Compared with grafts stored in its absence, grafts stored with supplemental 8-Br-cGMP and evaluated 30 min after reperfusion demonstrated lower pulmonary vascular resistances with increased graft blood flow, improved arterial oxygenation, decreased neutrophil infiltration, and improved recipient survival. These beneficial effects were dose dependent, mimicked by the type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor 2-o-propoxyphenyl-8-azapurin-6-one, and inhibited by a cGMP-dependent protein kinase antagonist, the R isomer of 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate. Augmenting the NO pathway at the level of cGMP improves graft function and recipient survival following lung transplantation.

  5. Invasive Fungal Sinusitis Caused by Scytalidium dimidiatum in a Lung Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, James J.; Wolfe, Michael J.; Trachtenberg, Joel; Kriesel, John D.; Orlandi, Richard R.; Carroll, Karen C.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a case of invasive fungal sinusitis caused by Scytalidium dimidiatum in a lung transplant recipient. Treatment was complicated by renal failure with amphotericin B therapies. Following 6 months of voriconazole treatment, the patient remained radiographically and clinically stable for a short time before dying of respiratory failure precipitated by graft rejection. PMID:14662991

  6. Extended cardiopulmonary preservation for heart-lung transplantation: a comparative study of superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Bando, K; Tago, M; Teraoka, H; Seno, S; Senoo, Y; Teramoto, S

    1989-01-01

    We examined an 8-hour cardiopulmonary preservation technique and the role of free radical-induced injury during cardiopulmonary preservation and transplantation. Hence, donor dogs were placed on cardiopulmonary bypass, rapidly cooled to 15 degrees C, and heterotopic heart-unilateral left lung transplantations were performed. In group 1 (n = 5), hearts and lungs were transplanted immediately after core-cooling and cardioplegic arrest. In groups 2 to 5 (n = 5 in each group), heart-lung blocks were excised and stored at 4 degrees C for 8 hours before transplantation. During preservation hearts were perfused (20 mm Hg) with oxygenated extracellular solution (pH 7.4, 410 m0sm/L) and the lungs immersed in the same solution. In groups 3 through 5 recombinant human superoxide distumase (r,h-SOD, total 40 mg/kg) was administered during either donor cooling, donor preservation, or just before and during reperfusion, respectively. Load independent analysis of myocardial function was assessed by determining the ratio of the end-systolic pressure to end-systolic dimension. Pulmonary preservation was evaluated by determination of extravascular lung water of the implanted left lung, arterial oxygenation on 40% inspired oxygen, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Although arterial oxygenation was similar in each group, pulmonary vascular resistance was increased in groups 2 through 4 after implantation. Furthermore, in groups 2 and 4 impaired myocardial function and increased extravascular lung water were observed. Administration of r,h-SOD, however, just before and during reperfusion significantly enhanced cardiopulmonary preservation. These results indicate that free radical-induced injury is primarily the result of reperfusion. Thus the best time for administration of r,h-SOD is before and during reperfusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2494311

  7. Patients' experiences in hospital following a liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nåden, Dagfinn; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2012-03-01

    Research is scarce regarding patients' experiences, feelings and thoughts the first 4 weeks after liver transplantation. Most research involving patients with a liver transplant are conducted several months, or even years, after the transplantation. The aim of this study is to present results from research interviews that took place post-transplant while patients still were in hospital. The design is explorative and hermeneutic. Fifteen patients were interviewed 3-5 weeks after transplantation. The results are presented in the following themes: (i) general contentment with the hospital stay, (ii) physical discomfort, (iii) dreams, nightmares and hallucinations, (iv) Comedowns experienced during rejection of the transplant and (v) Other psychological/mental reactions. A major result from our study is patients' own descriptions of comedowns experienced during rejection of the transplant, and the seemingly little consolation and support the patients received. Another major result is patients' own descriptions of dreams, nightmares and hallucinations, which are not fully described from the patients' own perspective while still in hospital. PMID:21812799

  8. HLA-E⁎01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Basire, Agnès; Gomez, Carine; Chiaroni, Jacques; Thomas, Pascal; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E⁎01:01 and HLA-E⁎01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD). HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, HLA-E⁎01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E⁎01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016–12), p = 0.047). HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort. PMID:27493971

  9. HLA-E(⁎)01:03 Allele in Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Higher Chronic Lung Allograft Dysfunction Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Pelardy, Mathieu; Loundou, Anderson; Basire, Agnès; Gomez, Carine; Chiaroni, Jacques; Thomas, Pascal; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Picard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Lung transplantation (LTx) is a valid therapeutic option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease. HLA-E seems to play a major role in the immune response to different viral infections and to affect transplantation outcome, in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, for example. Two nonsynonymous alleles, HLA-E(⁎)01:01 and HLA-E(⁎)01:03, have functional differences, involving relative peptide affinity, cell surface expression, and potential lytic activity of NK cells. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the impact of these two alleles for LTx recipients on anti-HLA alloimmunization risk, overall survival, and chronic rejection (CLAD). HLA-E was genotyped in 119 recipients who underwent LTx from 1998 to 2010 in a single transplantation center. In univariate analysis, both HLA-E homozygous states were associated with impaired overall survival compared to heterozygous HLA-E alleles (p = 0.01). In multivariate analysis, HLA-E(⁎)01:03 allele showed increased CLAD occurrence when compared to homozygous HLA-E(⁎)01:01 status (HR: 3.563 (CI 95%, 1.016-12), p = 0.047). HLA-E allele did not affect pathogen infection or the production of de novo DSA. This retrospective study shows an uninvestigated, deleterious association of HLA-E alleles with LTx and requires verification using a larger cohort. PMID:27493971

  10. Lung Transplantation Is Increasingly Common Among Patients With Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis

    PubMed Central

    Blackley, David J.; Halldin, Cara N.; Cummings, Kristin J.; Laney, A. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) in U.S. coal miners has increased, and severe presentations are increasingly common. Methods We describe trends in lung transplantation during 1996–2014 for recipients with a primary diagnosis of CWP or pneumoconiosis unspecified, and we summarize recipient characteristics and estimate survival. Results A total of 47 transplants were included; nearly three-quarters were performed during 2008–2014. All recipients were male, 96% were white, and the mean age was 56 years. Mean FEV1% was 35%; mean FVC% was 53%. Mean time on a waitlist was 155 days, and 60% of transplants were bilateral. Median survival was 3.7 years. Conclusions These transplants reflect the use of a scarce resource for an entirely preventable disease, and highlight the need for enhanced efforts to reduce coal mine dust exposures. PMID:26725917

  11. Role of interleukin-17A in early graft rejection after orthotopic lung transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi-Rui; Wang, Li-Feng; Xia, Si-Si; Zhang, Ya-Mei; Xu, Jiang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Background The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying lung allograft rejection remain poorly understood. We investigated the potential role of interleukin (IL)-17A in lung transplant rejection in a mouse model, because previous studies in clinical and rodent models have implicated IL-17A in both acute and chronic rejection. Methods To generate an orthotopic lung transplantation model, lungs from C57BL/6 or BALB/c mice were transplanted into C57BL/6 mice (isograft and allograft models, respectively). The effects of anti-IL-17A treatment in allograft recipients were investigated. The histological features and rejection status of isografts and allografts were assessed at 3, 7, and 28 days after transplantation, and differences in graft infiltrating cells and mRNA expression of relevant cytokines were quantified at 3 and 7 days after transplantation. Results As expected, isografts showed no obvious signs of rejection, whereas allografts exhibited minimal-to-mild rejection (grade A1–A2) by day 3 and moderate-to-severe rejection (grade A3–A4) by day 7, without evidence of obliterative bronchiolitis (OB). However, by 28 days, evidence of OB was observed in 67% (2/3) of allografts and severe rejection (grade A4) was observed in all. IL-17 mRNA expression in allografts was increased with rejection, and interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-6 mRNA expression levels followed a similar pattern. In contrast, IL-22 expression in allografts was only slightly increased. Antibody (Ab) neutralization of IL-17A diminished the signs of acute rejection at 7 days after transplantation in allografts, and this early protection was accompanied by a decrease in cellular stress according to histological evaluation, suggesting the involvement of IL-17A in the development of early post-transplantation lesions. Conclusions Our data indicate that IL-17A is important in the pathophysiology of allograft rejection, and neutralization of IL-17A is a potential therapeutic strategy to preventing lung

  12. Dendritic Cell Depletion and Repopulation in the Lung after Irradiation and Bone Marrow Transplantation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Ines; Klaus, Anna; Maus, Regina; Christman, John W.; Welte, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for innate and adaptive immunity, but are purported to exhibit variable radiosensitivity in response to irradiation in various bone marrow transplantation (BMT) protocols. To address this controversy, we analyzed the magnitude of depletion and repopulation of both lung CD11bpos DC and CD103pos DC subsets in response to irradiation and BMT in a murine model. In our study, CD45.2pos donor bone marrow cells were transplanted into irradiated CD45.1pos recipient mice to examine the depletion of recipient DC subsets and the repopulation of donor DC subsets. We observed an apoptosis-mediated and necrosis-mediated depletion (> 90%) of the recipient CD103pos DC subset, and only a 50–60% depletion of recipient CD11bpos DCs from lung parenchymal tissue on Days 3 and 5, whereas recipient alveolar and lung macrophages were much less radiosensitive, showing an approximately 50% depletion by Days 14–21 after treatment. A repopulation of lung tissue with donor DC subsets had occurred by Days 10 and 28 for CD11bpos DCs and CD103pos DCs, whereas alveolar and lung macrophages were repopulated by 6 and 10 weeks after treatment. Furthermore, the infection of mice with Streptococcus pneumoniae further accelerated the turnover of lung DCs and lung macrophage subsets. Our data illustrate the vulnerability of lung CD103pos DCs and CD11bpos DCs to irradiation, and indicate that an accelerated turnover of lung DC subsets occurs, relative to pulmonary and lung macrophages. Our findings may have important implications in the development of adjuvant immune-stimulatory protocols that could reduce the risk of opportunistic infections in patients undergoing BMT. PMID:21177980

  13. A pharmacokinetic analysis of posaconazole oral suspension in the serum and alveolar compartment of lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Thakuria, L; Packwood, K; Firouzi, A; Rogers, P; Soresi, S; Habibi-Parker, K; Lyster, H; Zych, B; Garcia-Saez, D; Mohite, P; Patil, N; Sabashnikov, A; Capoccia, M; Chibvuri, M; Lamba, H; Tate, H; Carby, M; Simon, A; Leaver, N; Reed, A

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections cause significant morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Fungal prophylaxis following lung transplantation is not standardised, with transplant centres utilising a variety of regimens. Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal triazole that requires further investigation within the setting of lung transplantation. This prospective, single-centre, observational study explored the pharmacokinetics of posaconazole oral suspension (POS) in the early perioperative period following lung transplantation in 26 patients. Organ recipients were scheduled to receive 400mg POS twice daily for 6 weeks as primary antifungal prophylaxis. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of serum posaconazole levels was performed in accordance with local clinical protocols. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was sampled during routine bronchoscopies. Posaconazole levels were measured both in serum and BALF using mass spectrometry. Posaconazole levels were highly variable within lung transplant recipients during the perioperative period and did not achieve 'steady-state'. Serum posaconazole concentrations positively correlated with levels within the BALF (r=0.5527; P=0.0105). Of the 26 patients, 10 failed to complete the study for multiple reasons and so the trial was terminated early. Unlike study findings in stable recipients, serum posaconazole levels rarely achieved steady-state in the perioperative period; however, they do reflect the concentrations within the airways of newly transplanted lungs. The role of POS as primary prophylaxis in the perioperative period is uncertain, but if used TDM may be helpful for determining attainment of therapeutic levels. PMID:26607341

  14. Pharmacokinetics and Toxicity of Tacrolimus Early After Heart and Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sikma, M A; van Maarseveen, E M; van de Graaf, E A; Kirkels, J H; Verhaar, M C; Donker, D W; Kesecioglu, J; Meulenbelt, J

    2015-09-01

    Annually, about 8000 heart and lung transplantations are successfully performed worldwide. However, morbidity and mortality still pose a major concern. Renal failure in heart and lung transplant recipients is an essential adverse cause of morbidity and mortality, often originating in the early postoperative phase. At this time of clinical instability, the kidneys are exposed to numerous nephrotoxic stimuli. Among these, tacrolimus toxicity plays an important role, and its pharmacokinetics may be significantly altered in this critical phase by fluctuating drug absorption, changed protein metabolism, anemia and (multi-) organ failure. Limited understanding of tacrolimus pharmacokinetics in these circumstances is hampering daily practice. Tacrolimus dose adjustments are generally based on whole blood trough levels, which widely vary early after transplantation. Moreover, whole blood trough levels are difficult to predict and are poorly related to the area under the concentration-time curve. Even within the therapeutic range, toxicity may occur. These shortcomings of tacrolimus monitoring may not hold for the unbound tacrolimus plasma concentrations, which may better reflect tacrolimus toxicity. This review focuses on posttransplant tacrolimus pharmacokinetics, discusses relevant factors influencing the unbound tacrolimus concentrations and tacrolimus (nephro-) toxicity in heart and lung transplantation patients. PMID:26053114

  15. Elevated Plasma Angiopoietin-2 Levels and Primary Graft Dysfunction after Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, Edward; Meyer, Nuala J.; Shah, Rupal J.; Lederer, David J.; Kawut, Steven M.; Lee, James; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Palmer, Scott M.; Lama, Vibha N.; Bhorade, Sangeeta M.; Crespo, Maria; Demissie, Ejigayehu; Wille, Keith; Orens, Jonathan; Shah, Pali D.; Weinacker, Ann; Weill, David; Arcasoy, Selim; Wilkes, David S.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Christie, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a significant contributor to early morbidity and mortality after lung transplantation. Increased vascular permeability in the allograft has been identified as a possible mechanism leading to PGD. Angiopoietin-2 serves as a partial antagonist to the Tie-2 receptor and induces increased endothelial permeability. We hypothesized that elevated Ang2 levels would be associated with development of PGD. Methods We performed a case-control study, nested within the multi-center Lung Transplant Outcomes Group cohort. Plasma angiopoietin-2 levels were measured pre-transplant and 6 and 24 hours post-reperfusion. The primary outcome was development of grade 3 PGD in the first 72 hours. The association of angiopoietin-2 plasma levels and PGD was evaluated using generalized estimating equations (GEE). Results There were 40 PGD subjects and 79 non-PGD subjects included for analysis. Twenty-four PGD subjects (40%) and 47 non-PGD subjects (59%) received a transplant for the diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Among all subjects, GEE modeling identified a significant change in angiopoietin-2 level over time in cases compared to controls (p = 0.03). The association between change in angiopoietin-2 level over the perioperative time period was most significant in patients with a pre-operative diagnosis of IPF (p = 0.02); there was no statistically significant correlation between angiopoietin-2 plasma levels and the development of PGD in the subset of patients transplanted for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (p = 0.9). Conclusions Angiopoietin-2 levels were significantly associated with the development of PGD after lung transplantation. Further studies examining the regulation of endothelial cell permeability in the pathogenesis of PGD are indicated. PMID:23284823

  16. Abnormal skeletal muscle oxidative capacity after lung transplantation by 31P-MRS.

    PubMed

    Evans, A B; Al-Himyary, A J; Hrovat, M I; Pappagianopoulos, P; Wain, J C; Ginns, L C; Systrom, D M

    1997-02-01

    Although lung transplantation improves exercise capacity by removal of a ventilatory limitation, recipients' postoperative maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) remains markedly abnormal. To determine if abnormal skeletal muscle oxidative capacity contributes to this impaired aerobic capacity, nine lung transplant recipients and eight healthy volunteers performed incremental quadriceps exercise to exhaustion with simultaneous measurements of pulmonary gas exchange, minute ventilation, blood lactate, and quadriceps muscle pH and phosphorylation potential by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). Five to 38 mo after lung transplantation, peak VO2 was decreased compared with that of normal control subjects (6.7 +/- 0.4 versus 12.3 +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg, p < 0.001), even after accounting for differences in age and lean body weight. Neither ventilation, arterial O2 saturation nor mild anemia could account for the decrease in aerobic capacity. Quadriceps muscle intracellular pH (pH(i)) was more acidic at rest (7.07 +/- 0.01 versus 7.12 +/- 0.01 units, p < 0.05) and fell during exercise from baseline values at a lower metabolic rate (282 +/- 21 versus 577 +/- 52 ml/min, p < 0.001). Regressions for pH(i) versus VO2, phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate ratio (PCr/Pi) versus VO2, and blood lactate versus pH(i) were not different. Among transplant recipients, the metabolic rate at which pH(i) fell correlated closely with VO2max (r = 0.87, p < 0.01). The persistent decrease in VO2max after lung transplantation may be related to abnormalities of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity. PMID:9032203

  17. Interstitial Pneumonitis and the Risk of Chronic Allograft Rejection in Lung Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Mihalek, Andrew D.; Rosas, Ivan O.; Padera, Robert F.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Hunninghake, Gary M.; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Camp, Phillip C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The presence of interstitial pneumonitis (IP) on surveillance lung biopsy specimens in lung transplant recipients is poorly described, and its impact on posttransplant outcomes is not established. The following study assessed the association of posttransplant IP with the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Methods: We examined all recipients of primary cadaveric lung transplants at our institution between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2007 (N = 145). Patients had bronchoscopies with BAL, and transbronchial biopsies performed for surveillance during posttransplant months 1, 3, 6, and 12 as well as when clinically indicated. Patients were given a diagnosis of IP if, in the absence of active infection and organizing pneumonia, they showed evidence of interstitial inflammation and fibrosis on two or more biopsy specimens. Results: IP was a significant predictor of BOS (OR, 7.84; 95% CI, 2.84-21.67; P < .0001) and was significantly associated with time to development of BOS (hazard ratio, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.93-7.39; P = .0001) within the first 6 years posttransplant. The presence of IP did not correlate with a significantly higher risk of mortality or time to death. There was no association between the presence of IP and the development of or time to acute rejection. Conclusions: The presence of IP on lung transplant biopsy specimens suggests an increased risk for BOS, which is independent of the presence of acute cellular rejection. PMID:23715594

  18. Acute liver failure due to Varicella zoster virus infection after lung transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Verleden, G M; Vos, R; Van Raemdonck, D E; Laleman, W; Vanaudenaerde, B M

    2012-06-01

    Most adults are Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-positive at the age of 20 years. Some, however, remain antibody-negative and may develop primary chicken pox during adulthood. We report a patient with Williams-Campbell syndrome who underwent double-lung transplantation while being VZV-negative. One year after the successful procedure, he was admitted with fulminant hepatic failure and some cutaneous vesicles in his face. Despite a rapid diagnosis of VZV infection and treatment with acyclovir, his situation deteriorated within 24 hours and while awaiting an urgent liver transplantation, he developed multiple organ failure and died. PMID:22664036

  19. Successful management of bilateral refractory chylothorax after double lung transplantation for lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Mohammed; Aljehani, Yasser M.; Nizami, Imran; Saleh, Waleed

    2014-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare disease that leads to airways and lymphatic channels obstruction due to abnormal smooth muscle proliferation. It presents with dyspnea, pneumothorax or chylothorax. Lung transplantation (LT) has emerged as a valuable therapeutic option with limited reports. We report a case of LAM that underwent double LT and complicated by refractory bilateral chylothorax which was managed successfully by povidone-iodine pleurodesis and the addition of sirolimus to the post-transplantation immunosuppressive therapy. The patient has no recurrence with 24 months follow-up. PMID:24791177

  20. Subcutaneous IgG replacement therapy is safe and well tolerated in lung transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Shankar, T; Gribowicz, J; Crespo, M; Silveira, F P; Pilewski, J; Petrov, A A

    2013-04-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) replacement has been shown to decrease the risk of post-transplant infections secondary to hypogammaglobulinemia, however the use of subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) in this population has not been reported. A retrospective analysis of the efficacy and tolerability of subcutaneous immunoglobulin replacement on 10 lung-transplant recipients was performed. All 10 patients demonstrated an increase in IgG levels at three months that was sustained at 6-12 months with SCIG replacement therapy, with the majority (70%) tolerating infusion without complications. The results of this study suggest that subcutaneous IgG replacement therapy is a well tolerated alternative to IVIG. PMID:23499641

  1. Clinical grade allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells restore alveolar fluid clearance in human lungs rejected for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Curley, G. F.; Hamid, U. I.; Laffey, J. G.; Abbott, J.; McKenna, D. H.; Fang, X.; Matthay, M. A.; Lee, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    The lack of suitable donors for all solid-organ transplant programs is exacerbated in lung transplantation by the low utilization of potential donor lungs, due primarily to donor lung injury and dysfunction, including pulmonary edema. The current studies were designed to determine if intravenous clinical-grade human mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (hMSCs) would be effective in restoring alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) in the human ex vivo lung perfusion model, using lungs that had been deemed unsuitable for transplantation and had been subjected to prolonged ischemic time. The human lungs were perfused with 5% albumin in a balanced electrolyte solution and oxygenated with continuous positive airway pressure. Baseline AFC was measured in the control lobe and if AFC was impaired (defined as <10%/h), the lungs received either hMSC (5 × 106 cells) added to the perfusate or perfusion only as a control. AFC was measured in a different lung lobe at 4 h. Intravenous hMSC restored AFC in the injured lungs to a normal level. In contrast, perfusion only did not increase AFC. This positive effect on AFC was reduced by intrabronchial administration of a neutralizing antibody to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF). Thus, intravenous allogeneic hMSCs are effective in restoring the capacity of the alveolar epithelium to remove alveolar fluid at a normal rate, suggesting that this therapy may be effective in enhancing the resolution of pulmonary edema in human lungs deemed clinically unsuitable for transplantation. PMID:24532289

  2. Stem cells--potential for repairing damaged lungs and growing human lungs for transplant.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Anne E; Rippon, Helen J

    2006-08-01

    Repair or regeneration of defective lung epithelium would be of great therapeutic potential. It is estimated by the British Lung Foundation that 1 in 7 people in the UK is affected by a lung disease and that 1 in 4 admissions to children's wards are as a result of respiratory problems. Potential cellular sources for the regeneration of lung tissue in vivo or lung tissue engineering in vitro include endogenous pulmonary epithelial stem cells, extrapulmonary circulating stem cells and embryonic stem cells. This article discusses the potential role of each of these stem cell types in future approaches to the treatment of lung injury and disease. PMID:16856797

  3. Video fluoroscopy swallow study and nutritional support during ambulatory venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a bridge to lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Galantowicz, Mark; Preston, Thomas J; Tzemos, Kallirroe K; McConnell, Patrick I

    2014-01-01

    We present the successful completion of a video fluoroscopy swallow study and subsequent nutritional plan of a child bridged to lung transplantation with ambulatory venovenous (VV) extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). With a limited number of programs bridging pediatric patients to lung transplantation with VV ECMO, a better understanding of nutritional support is needed to provide optimal care to this patient population awaiting organ donation. PMID:24403362

  4. Lung transplantation from the non-heart beating donor.

    PubMed

    Dark, John H

    2008-07-27

    The inflated lung, with its unique tolerance of the absence of a circulation, is particularly suited to retrieval from the non-heart beating donor. Absence of some of the squeal of brain death may be a further potential advantage. This concept has been embraced by several centers around the world, with promising early results. PMID:18645477

  5. Should We Reconsider Lung Transplantation Through Uncontrolled Donation After Circulatory Death?

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Y.; Tiwari, J. L.; Lee, J.; Diamond, J.M.; Blumenthal, N. P.; Carney, K.; Borders, C.; Strain, J.; Alburger, G.W.; Jackson, D.; Timar, J.; Berg, J.; Hasz, R.D.; Cantu, E.

    2014-01-01

    Lung transplantation through controlled donation after circulatory death (cDCD) has slowly gained universal acceptance with reports of equivalent outcomes to those through donation after brain death. In contrast, uncontrolled DCD (uDCD) lung use is controversial and requires ethical, legal and medical complexities to be addressed in a limited time. Consequently, uDCD lung use has not previously been reported in the United States. Despite these potential barriers, we present a case of a patient with multiple gunshot wounds to the head and the body who was unsuccessfully resuscitated and ultimately became an uDCD donor. A cytomegalovirus positive recipient who had previously consented for CDC high-risk, DCD and participation in the NOVEL trial was transplanted from this uDCD donor, following 3 hours of ex vivo lung perfusion. The postoperative course was uneventful and the recipient was discharged home on day 9. While this case represents a “best-case scenario,” it illustrates a method for potential expansion of the lung allograft pool through uDCD after unsuccessful resuscitation in hospitalized patients. PMID:24712333

  6. Recurrence of Liver Transplantation Combined With Lung and Diaphragm Resection for Alveolar Echinococcosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Pang, C; Chu, Y K

    2015-09-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) for alveolar echinococcosis (AE) with multiple-organ involvement is controversial. We report on a 31-year-old female patient suffering from AE with liver, lung, and diaphragm involvement. After an "extended" resection (liver, lung, and diaphragm were performed) combined with LT, recurrence still occurred after 6 years and the patient presented with hemoptysis. Puncture, aspiration, injection, reaspiration, and drainage (PAIRD) were performed and the effect was instantaneous. To our knowledge, no such surgical strategy for AE has previously been reported. In spite of the high risk of recurrence, choosing this surgical method is acceptable for a fatal AE and the recurrence could be controlled. PMID:26361699

  7. Interdisciplinary collaboration applied to clinical research: an example of remote monitoring in lung transplantation

    PubMed Central

    VanWormer, Arin; Robiner, William; Finkelstein, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration across disciplines is vital in clinical practice. It is also needed to generate high-quality actionable research, yet few frameworks for interdisciplinary collaboration exit to promote effective communications among researchers with common boals, but varied backgrounds. A review of that has been learned about collaboration was undertaken to determine attributes of effective interdisciplinary collaboration and barriers to its realization in patients undergoing lung transplantation. PMID:22475710

  8. Interdisciplinary collaboration applied to clinical research: an example of remote monitoring in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    VanWormer, Arin; Lindquist, Ruth; Robiner, William; Finkelstein, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration across disciplines is vital in clinical practice. It is also needed to generate high-quality actionable research, yet few frameworks for interdisciplinary collaboration exit to promote effective communications among researchers with common goals, but varied backgrounds. A review of what has been learned about collaboration was undertaken to determine attributes of effective interdisciplinary collaboration and barriers to its realization in patients undergoing lung transplantation. PMID:22475710

  9. Early cardiac tamponade due to tension pneumopericardium after bilateral lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lasocki, Sigismond; Castier, Yves; Geffroy, Arnaud; Mal, Hervé; Brugière, Olivier; Lesèche, Guy; Montravers, Philippe

    2007-10-01

    We report the case of a 42-year-old woman who developed severe hemodynamic instability with marked arterial pulsed pressure variation in the early course of bilateral lung transplantation. The diagnosis of tension pneumopericardium was made on Day 2 post-operatively based on chest X-ray and echocardiography. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed both a cardiac tamponade and a right-to-left shunt via a patent foramen ovale. The treatment and mechanisms of these two rare complications are discussed. PMID:17919630

  10. Treatment Experience of Severe Abdominal Infection after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y-G; Wu, J-S; Jiang, B; Wang, J-H; Liu, C-P; Peng, C; Tian, B-Z

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aims to investigate the causes and treatment experience of severe abdominal infection after orthotopic liver transplantation. Clinical data were retrospectively analysed in perioperative severe abdominal infection of 186 orthotopic liver transplantation cases from March 2004 to November 2011. Among the 186 patients, 16 cases had severe abdominal infection: five cases had bile duct anastomotic leakage-inducing massive hydrops and infection under liver interstice, 10 cases had extensive bleeding of surgical wound leading to massive haematocele and infection around the liver, and one case had postoperative lower oesophageal fistula leakage causing massive hydrops and infection under the left diaphragm. After definite diagnosis, 12 cases underwent surgery within three days, with no death. Among the four cases that underwent surgery three days after diagnosis, one case died of multiple-organ failure five days after abdominal cavity exploration, which was performed 21 days after liver transplantation. Severe abdominal infections after liver transplantation were the most common causes of death in perioperative liver transplantation. Comprehensive treatment with efficacious antibiotics, multiple-organ support, controlled surgical removal of the lesion, and adequate drainage establishment was the key to the entire treatment. PMID:26426173