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1

Simulation of puck flight to determine spectator safety for various ice hockey board heights  

Microsoft Academic Search

The boards of ice hockey rinks are equipped with protective glass to prevent the spectators from being hit by the puck. According\\u000a to international rules, the minimum height of the board with protective glass is 197 cm. This is not high enough to protect\\u000a the spectators from puck-related injuries, and severe accidents have occurred in the past. This study investigates

H. Böhm; C. Schwiewagner; V. Senner

2007-01-01

2

Modeling LX-17 Detonation Growth and Decay Using the Ignition and Growth Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The previously established Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive LX-17 is applied to recent experimental detonation propagation/failure experiments using unconfined, Lucite confined, and copper confined cylinders. The model also simulates two corner turning experiments in which steel and Lucite act as boundary materials. Finally, the model is used to calculate a one-inch diameter ``Hockey Puck'' test in which the booster explosive is HMX-based rather than TATB-based. Since the LX-17 Ignition and Growth model parameters are normalized to a great deal of one-, two- and three-dimensional detonation propagation data, they accurately predict all of this new experimental detonation velocity and arrival time data.

Tarver, Craig M.; Chidester, Steven K.

2009-12-01

3

The Impact of Puck Possession and Location on Ice Hockey Strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

I create a state space within the game of ice hockey by noting which team has possession, and in what location of the rink the puck is located. This space is used to model the game as a semi-Markov process, as data from a series of games in 2004-2005 NCAA play suggest that the system cannot be modeled as a

Andrew C. Thomas

2006-01-01

4

IN DIVISION I HOCKEY, DOES THE PUCK STOP JUNIOR YEAR?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 2004-2005 National Hockey League (NHL) lockout has had a twofold effect on men’s Division I college hockey programs. First, NHL entry-level contracts are now much less expensive than they were before the lockout. As a consequence, NHL teams are now more inclined to induce Division I hockey players to forego years of remaining eligibility. Second, the age of unrestricted

Paul M. Sommers; Justin R. Gaines

2010-01-01

5

The Puck Stops Here  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After learning about transfer of energy, specifically the loss of kinetic energy to friction, students get a chance to test friction. In groups they are given a wooden block, different fabrics, and weights and asked to design the "best" puck. The class first needs to define what makes the "best" puck. Each group should realize that the most desirable puck will travel the furthest, thus the puck with the least amount of friction. In the context of hockey the "best" puck is the one that travels farthest and loses the least kinetic energy to friction. Students then need to apply their knowledge of friction to design a new optimal puck for the National Hockey League. The friction is the transfer from kinetic energy to heat energy.

Engineering K-Ph.d. Program

6

Puck collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

Hauge, E. H.

2012-09-01

7

Air Gap Effects in LX-17  

SciTech Connect

Three experiments done over twenty years on gaps in LX-17 are reported. For the detonation front moving parallel to the gaps, jets of gas products were seen coming from the gaps at velocities greater than the detonation velocity. A case can be made that the jet velocity increased with gap thickness but the data is scattered. For the detonation front moving transverse to the gap, time delays were seen. The delays roughly increase with gap width, going from 0-70 ns at 'zero gap' to around 300 ns at 0.5-1 mm gap. Larger gaps of up to 6 mm width almost certainly stopped the detonation, but this was not proved. Real-time resolution of the parallel jets and determination of the actual re-detonation or failure in the transverse case needs to be done in future experiments.

Souers, P C; Ault, S; Avara, R; Bahl, K L; Boat, R; Cunningham, B; Gidding, D; Janzen, J; Kuklo, D; Lee, R; Lauderbach, L; Weingart, W C; Wu, B; Winer, K

2005-09-26

8

Temperature-dependent shock initiation of LX-17 explosive  

SciTech Connect

LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250 C, were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide, 50.8-mm-long strips of 0.13-mm-thick Kapton polyimide film at velocities up to 7.7 km/s. The Kapton strips were laminated onto a thin aluminum bridge foil and were launched to the desired velocity by discharging a capacitor bank through the foil, causing the foil to explode. The LX-17 samples were confined in a steel holder and heated in an oven to the desired temperature. After the capacitor bank was charged, the LX-17 sample in its steel holder was remotely drawn out of the oven on rails and positioned over the bridge-foil/Kapton-strip laminate. When the sample was in position, the bank was discharged, launching the Kapton strip against the LX-17 surface. The shock initiation threshold was measured for 3, 7, and 10-mm-wide strips at room temperature, 200 C and 250 C. The authors found a significant reduction in the velocity threshold and in the critical area for initiation when the samples were heated. The authors compare the results with the earlier data of Bloom, who measured the initiation threshold of LX-17 over the density range 1.8--1.91 g/cm{sup 3} at room temperature and {minus}54 C. LX-17 has a large coefficient of thermal expansion, as reported by Urtiew, et al., which reduces its density significantly t elevated temperatures. They find that the change of shock initiation threshold with temperature is consistent with the change in sample density, using the relation between threshold and density reported by Bloom.

Lee, R.S.; Chau, H.H.; Druce, R.L.; Moua, K.

1995-02-01

9

Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) Calibration for LX-17  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this report is to summarize the results of a Detonation shock dynamics (DSD) calibration for the explosive LX-17. Considering that LX-17 is very similar to PBX 9502 (LX-17 is 92.5% TATB with 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder, while PBX 9502 is 95% TATB with 5% Kel-F 800 binder), we proceed with the analysis assuming many of the DSD constants are the same. We only change the parameters D{sub CJ}, B and {bar C}{sub 6} ({bar C}{sub 6} controls the how D{sub CJ} changes with pressing density). The parameters D{sub CJ} and {bar C}{sub 6} were given by Josh Coe and Sam Shaw's EOS. So, only B was optimized in fitting all the calibration data. This report first discusses some general DSD background, followed by a presentation of the available dataset to perform the calibration, and finally gives the results of the calibration and draws some conclusions. A DSD calibration of LX-17 has been conducted using the existing diameter effect data and shock shape records. The new DSD fit is based off the current PBX 9502 calibration and takes into account the effect of pressing density. Utilizing the PBX 9502 calibration, the effects of initial temperature can also be taken into account.

Aslam, Tariq D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-24

10

Temperature-dependent shock initiation of LX17 explosive  

Microsoft Academic Search

LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250 C, were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide, 50.8-mm-long strips of 0.13-mm-thick Kapton polyimide film at velocities up to 7.7 km\\/s. The Kapton strips were laminated onto a thin aluminum bridge foil and were launched to the desired velocity by discharging a capacitor bank through the foil, causing the foil to explode. The

R. S. Lee; H. H. Chau; R. L. Druce; K. Moua

1995-01-01

11

LX17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the

P C Souers; H Andreski; C F Cook; R Garza; R Pastrone; D Phillips; F Roeske; P Vitello; J Molitoris

2004-01-01

12

Dead Zones in LX-17 and PBX 9502  

SciTech Connect

Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and detonation in different pressure regimes. A pressure cut-off must also be reached to initiate the burn. Corner-turning and failure are modeled using an intermediate pressure rate region, and detonation occurs at high pressure. The TATB booster is also modeled using reactive flow, and X-ray tomography is used to partition the ram-pressed hemisphere into five different density regions. The model reasonably fits the bare corner-turning experiment but predicts a smaller dead zone with steel confinement, in contradiction with experiment. The same model also calculates the confined and unconfined cylinder detonation velocities and predicts the failure of the unconfined cylinder at 3.75 mm radius. The PBX 9502 shows a smaller dead zone than LX-17. An old experiment that showed a large apparent dead zone in Comp B was repeated with X-ray transmission and no dead zone was seen. This confirms the idea that a variable burn rate is the key to modeling. The model also produces initiation delays, which are shorter than those found in time-to-detonation.

Souers, P C; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J; Bratton, B; Cabacungan, C; Cook, III, C F; Fletcher, S; Garza, R; Grimsley, D; Handly, J; Hernandez, A; McMaster, P; Molitoris, J D; Palmer, R; Prindiville, J; Rodriguez, J; Schneberk, D; Wong, B; Vitello, P

2005-09-06

13

LX-17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure  

SciTech Connect

We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the side and back edges is measured with streak cameras. Three high-resolution X-ray images were taken on each experiment to examine the details of the detonation. We have concluded that the detonation cannot turn the corner and subsequently fails, but the shock wave continues to propagate in the unreacted explosive, leaving behind a dead zone. The detonation front farther out from the corner slowly turns and eventually reaches the air well edge 180{sup o} from its original direction. The dead zone is stable and persists 7.7 {micro}s after the corner-turn, although it has drifted into the original air well area. Our regular reactive flow computer models sometimes show temporary failure but they recover quickly and are unable to model the dead zones. We present a failure model that cuts off the reaction rate below certain detonation velocities and reproduces the qualitative features of the corner-turning failure.

Souers, P C; Andreski, H; Cook III, C F; Garza, R; Pastrone, R; Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Molitoris, J

2004-03-11

14

Mesoscale Modeling of LX-17 Under Isentropic Compression  

SciTech Connect

Mesoscale simulations of LX-17 incorporating different equilibrium mixture models were used to investigate the unreacted equation-of-state (UEOS) of TATB. Candidate TATB UEOS were calculated using the equilibrium mixture models and benchmarked with mesoscale simulations of isentropic compression experiments (ICE). X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) data provided the basis for initializing the simulations with realistic microstructural details. Three equilibrium mixture models were used in this study. The single constituent with conservation equations (SCCE) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The single constituent equation-of-state (SCEOS) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the equation-of-state of the constituents. The kinetic energy averaging (KEA) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted particle velocity mixture rule and the conservation equations. The SCEOS model yielded the stiffest TATB EOS (0.121{micro} + 0.4958{micro}{sup 2} + 2.0473{micro}{sup 3}) and, when incorporated in mesoscale simulations of the ICE, demonstrated the best agreement with VISAR velocity data for both specimen thicknesses. The SCCE model yielded a relatively more compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2} + 4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) and the KEA model yielded the most compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2}+4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) of all the equilibrium mixture models. Mesoscale simulations with the lower density TATB adiabatic EOS data demonstrated the least agreement with VISAR velocity data.

Springer, H K; Willey, T M; Friedman, G; Fried, L E; Vandersall, K S; Baer, M R

2010-03-06

15

Electric Field Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Play hockey with electric charges. Place charges on the ice, then hit start to try to get the puck in the goal. View the electric field. Trace the puck's motion. Make the game harder by placing walls in front of the goal. This is a clone of the popular simulation of the same name marketed by Physics Academic Software and written by Prof. Ruth Chabay of the Dept of Physics at North Carolina State University.

Simulations, Phet I.; Dubson, Michael; Reid, Sam; Adams, Wendy; Harlow, Danielle

2004-07-01

16

Dynamic mechanical signatures of aged LX17-1 plastic bonded explosive  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complex shear modulus of the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-17-1 from stockpile returns, core tests and historical billets was measured over the temperature range from ?150 to 120°C at five frequencies from 0.1 to 10 Hz. LX-17-1 is composed of 92.5% insensitive high explosive triaminotrinitro-benzene (TATB) and 7.5% plastic binder, KF-800. Three relaxations were observed as peaks in the

D. Mark Hoffman

2001-01-01

17

Plutonium Immobilization Puck Handling  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize excess plutonium and store the plutonium in a high level waste radiation field. To accomplish these goals, the PIP will process various forms of plutonium into plutonium oxide, mix the oxide powder with ceramic precursors, press the mixture into pucks, sinter the pucks into a ceramic puck, load the pucks into metal cans, seal the cans, load the cans into magazines, and load the magazines into a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) canister. These canisters will be sent to the DWPF, an existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facility, where molten high level waste glass will be poured into the canisters encapsulating the ceramic pucks. Due to the plutonium radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the early design stages and the facility will begin operation in 2005. This paper will discuss the Plutonium Immobilization puck handling conceptual design and the puck handling equipment testing.

Kriikku, E.

1999-01-26

18

Increased shock sensitivity of the insensitive explosive LX-17 at high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Explosive formulations based on TATB (1.3.5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) have proven to be remarkably insensitive to shock and thermal stimuli. However, hazards to an insensitive high explosive (IHE) charge do not always confine themselves to a single stimulus. In the study reported here, we have investigated the response of the LLNL explosive LX-17 (92.5%/7.5% TATB/Kel-F 800) to shock when the explosive is at an elevated temperature. The motivation for the work was to learn the extent to which the shock initiation threshold and critical initiation area of LX-17 are lowered by exposure to elevated temperature.

Lee, R.S.; Chau, H.H.

1994-05-01

19

A Comparison of New TATBs, FK-800 binder and LX-17-like PBXs to Legacy Materials  

SciTech Connect

Two newly synthesized versions of the insensitive high explosive (IHE) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzenes (TATBs) were compared to two legacy explosives currently used by the Department of Energy. Except for thermal analysis, small scale safety tests could not distinguish between the different synthetic routes. Morphologies of new TATBs were less faceted and more spherical. The particle size distribution of one new material was similar to legacy TATBs, but the other was very fine. Densities and submicron structure of the new TATBs were also significantly different from the legacy explosives. Pressed pellets of the new explosives were less dense. New FK-800 binder was used to prepare LX-17-like plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) from new and wet aminated TATB. Some mechanical, thermal and performance characterization of the new binder and LX-17-like PBXs was done. Significant differences were found. The reason for a number of these differences is not well understood.

Willey, T M; DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

2009-05-01

20

CHARACTERIZING DETONATING LX-17 CHARGES CROSSING A TRANSVERSE AIR GAP WITH EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were performed using detonating LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F by weight) charges with various width transverse air gaps with manganin peizoresistive in-situ gauges present. The experiments, performed with 25 mm diameter by 25 mm long LX-17 pellets with the transverse air gap in between, showed that transverse gaps up to about 3 mm could be present without causing the detonation wave to fail to continue as a detonation. The Tarantula/JWL{sup ++} code was utilized to model the results and compare with the in-situ gauge records with some agreement to the experimental data with additional work needed for a better match to the data. This work will present the experimental details as well as comparison to the model results.

Lauderbach, L M; Souers, P C; Garcia, F; Vitello, P; Vandersall, K S

2009-06-26

21

Effect of confinement and thermal cycling on the shock initiation of LX17  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shock initiation of the insensitive high explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under two simulated accident conditions: initially confined charges were heated to 250°C and shocked; and unconfined charges were thermally cycled between 25° and 250°C and shocked. Previous research on unconfined TATB-based explosives heated to 250°C revealed increased shock sensitivity. This

P. A. Urtiew; C. M. Tarver; J. L. Maienschein; W. C. Tao

1996-01-01

22

Modeling LX17 Detonation Growth and Decay Using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameters for detonation waves in the TATB-based insensitive high explosive LX-17 are applied to two recent experiments. One experiment measures the slow increases in detonation velocity and pressure over several centimeters in confined charges as the steady state Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) values are approached. A second experiment measures the rate of detonation failure in

Craig Tarver; Steven Chidester

2009-01-01

23

Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX17  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones

P C Souers; A Hernandez; C Cabacungan; L Fried; R Garza; K Glaesemann; L Lauderbach; S Liao; P Vitello

2008-01-01

24

Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX17  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones

P C Souers; A Hernandez; C Cabacungen; L Fried; R Garza; K Glaesemann; L Lauderbach; S Liao; P Vitello

2007-01-01

25

The Science of Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is a Sports Science resource where users read about National Hockey League players, coaches from the San Jose Sharks, and physicists and chemists. Included is information about ice, the qualities that make it a unique playing surface, why ice is slippery, mechanics of ice skating, hockey equipment, NHL goals, how players can shoot the puck over one hundred miles an hour, checking using physical force, and physical fitness. Links to other sites and mathematics formulas that show how much energy is expended in an open ice hit can also be found.

Spadaccini, Jim

2004-01-01

26

Reactive flow modeling of recent embedded gauge and metal acceleration experiments on detonating PBX9404 and LX17  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ignition and growth model of the reactive flow during shock initiation and detonation wave propagation in the heterogeneous solid explosives PBX-9404 and LX-17 is compared to recent embedded particle velocity and stress gauge measurements in detonating PBX-9404 and Fabry-Perot free surface velocity measurements of thin metal plates accelerated by detonating PBX-9404 and LX-17. The overall agreement between the numerical

C. M. Tarver; N. L. Parker; H. G. Palmer; B. Hayes; L. M. Erickson

1983-01-01

27

Vulnerability of hot LX-17 to lightning strikes on exposed detonator and actuator cables  

SciTech Connect

Capacitor bank discharges with peak currents up to 700 kA were used to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch the dielectric material on top of the exploding conductor as a fast flyer plate. Velocity of the launched material, pressure profiles from the impact of the launched material and impact marks formed in aluminum witness plates were used to study the stimulus that could be transmitted to high explosive in the vicinity of the exploding cable. To quantify the risk of initiating the main charge or booster insensitive high explosive (IHE) in a weapon, one must know the threshold stimulus required for shock initiation. LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250C were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide stripes of 0.12-mm-thick Kapton to determine the initiation threshold velocity at ambient and elevated temperatures, The strips simulate the impact of the cover coat of a flat detonator cable which has been exploded by a lighting strike. The data allow us to assess the likelihood that a lightning strike on the cable would be able to initiate a detonation of the LX- 17 main charge.

Chau, H.H.; Osher, J.E.; Von Holle, W.G.; Lee, R.S.; Moua, K.

1993-12-01

28

Kick Dis Power Puck  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a new toy available that can be used to demonstrate many interesting physics principles. It is called the ``Kick Dis Power Puck'' and is basically a round plastic hovercraft with a soft cushion material around the perimeter (Fig. 1). It is a product of the Estes Company, which is well known for their model rockets, and is available

John E. Carlson

2004-01-01

29

Explosive Model Tarantula 4d/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17  

SciTech Connect

Tarantula is an explosive kinetic package intended to do detonation, shock initiation, failure, corner-turning with dead zones, gap tests and air gaps in reactive flow hydrocode models. The first, 2007-2008 version with monotonic Q is here run inside JWL++ with square zoning from 40 to 200 zones/cm on ambient LX-17. The model splits the rate behavior in every zone into sections set by the hydrocode pressure, P + Q. As the pressure rises, we pass through the no-reaction, initiation, ramp-up/failure and detonation sections sequentially. We find that the initiation and pure detonation rate constants are largely insensitive to zoning but that the ramp-up/failure rate constant is extremely sensitive. At no time does the model pass every test, but the pressure-based approach generally works. The best values for the ramp/failure region are listed here in Mb units.

Souers, P C; Vitello, P A

2008-09-30

30

Science of NHL Hockey: Projectile Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Unlike a slap shot, an NHL wrist shot isn�t about brute power. It�s about precision � putting the puck in the exact spot where the goalie can�t reach it. A wrist shot is also a perfect example of what�s known in physics as projectile motion. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Hockey League.

Learn, Nbc

2010-10-07

31

Science of NHL Hockey: Reflexes & Reaction Time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NHL goalies have lots of equipment designed to help stop pucks, but their most valuable tool is their brain. It's what sparks the nerve impulses that travel to the limbs, allowing the goalie to see and react quickly enough to make a save. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

Learn, Nbc

2010-10-07

32

Neural network-based state prediction for strategy planning of an air hockey robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyze a neural network implementation for puck state prediction in robotic air hockey. Unlike previous prediction schemes which used simple dynamic models and continuously updated an intercept state estimate, the neural network predictor uses a complex function, computed with data acquired from various puck trajectories, and makes a single, timely estimate of the final intercept state. Theoretically, the network

Jung Il Park; Chad B. Partridge; Mark W. Spong

2001-01-01

33

Hockey night in phase space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to explore the possibility of developing a statistical mechanics for dissipative ensembles, we have performed an experiment in which we track the translational and rotational velocities of pucks on an air hockey table. The pucks are driven by bumpers at the boundaries and are bidisperse to prevent crystallization. At packing fractions of 60% we find that the system distributes rotational and translation energy according to the equipartition theorem. However, as the packing fraction increases, the ratio of rotational energy to translational energy also increases to a value larger than predicted by equipartition. The translational and angular velocity distributions are approximately exponential and the distributions of the translational velocity are the same for both large and small particles. In contrast, the distribution of the angular velocities is broader for the small particles than for the large.

Nichol, Kiri; Daniels, Karen

2011-03-01

34

End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot  

SciTech Connect

It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck-handling operations. As an overall requirement, it was desired to keep the design of the robot end-effector as simple as possible. There were pros and cons for either type of actuation method (pneumatic or electric). But, pneumatic actuation was chosen for its simplicity and durability in a radioactive environment. It was determined early in the design process that at least two different types of end-effectors would be required for each of the operations. Therefore, a tool changer was incorporated into the end-effector design. The tool changer would also provide for simple end-effector maintenance when used in the PIP process.

Fowley, M.D.

2001-01-03

35

End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot  

SciTech Connect

It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck-handling operations. As an overall requirement, it was desired to keep the design of the robot end-effector as simple as possible. There were pros and cons for either type of actuation method (pneumatic or electric). But, pneumatic actuation was chosen for its simplicity and durability in a radioactive environment. It was determined early in the design process that at least two different types of end-effectors would be required for each of the operations. Therefore, a tool changer was incorporated into the end-effector design. The tool changer would also provide for simple end-effector maintenance when used in the PIP process.

Fowley, M.D.

2001-01-31

36

Embedded electromagnetic gauge measurements and modeling of shock initiation in the TATB based explosives PBX 9502 and LX-17  

SciTech Connect

We have completed a series of shock initiation experiments on PBX 9502 (95 weight % dry aminated TATB explosive, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) and LX-17 (92.% wet aminated TATB, 7.5 % Kel-F 800). These experiments were performed on the gas/gas two stage gun at Los Alamos. Samples were prepared with ten or eleven embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges to measure the evolution of the wave leading up to a detonation. Additionally, one to three shock tracker gauges were used to track the position of the shock front with time and determine the point where detonation was achieved. Wave profiles indicate little delay between formation of hot-spots in the shock front and release of hotspot energy. In other words, a great deal of the buildup occurs in the shock front, rather than behind it. Run distances and times to detonation as a function of initial pressure are consistent with published data. The Ignition and Growth model with published parameters for LX-17 replicate the data very well.

Gustavsen, R. L. (Richard L.); Sheffield, S. A. (Stephen A.); Alcon, R. R. (Robert R.); Forbes, J. W. (Jerry W.); Tarver, C. M. (Craig M.); Garcia, F.

2001-01-01

37

Recoil effect of the ice hockey stick during a slap shot.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the "recoil" effect of the ice hockey stick shaft during a stationary slap shot. Nine male adult subjects (four elite and five recreational) were tested. Their performances were evaluated by simultaneously recording stick movement and internal bending from high-speed digital video (1,000 Hz) and puck acceleration from a triaxial accelerometer positioned inside the puck. In addition, an electrical circuit measured blade-puck contact time. Data were analyzed with a one-way MANOVA for several dependent variables, including final puck velocity, puck acceleration, maximum stick shaft bending (angle and distance deflection), stick shaft angular velocities, blade-puck contact time, and corresponding time events. The results indicate the following. First, blade-puck contact time was greater for the elite than for recreational players (38 +/- 9 ms and 27 +/- 5 ms); however, measures for puck acceleration were essentially the same (63.8 g +/- 9.9 and 61.8 g +/- 19.5). Two, the elite players were able to generate greater puck velocities (120 +/- 18 km/h and 80.3 +/- 11.6 km/h). Three, the recoil timing was found to be reater for elite players (59.8% of blade-puck contact). PMID:17215552

Villaseñor, A; Turcotte, R A; Pearsall, D J

2006-08-01

38

Formulation and Characterization of LX-17-2 from new FK 800 binder and WA, ATK, and BAE TATBs  

SciTech Connect

Currently LLNL has no Kel-F 800 or wet-aminated TATB reserves for formulation. Although both materials are soon to be commercially available, their synthesis processes have changed and the explosive must be re-evaluated. In 2000 3M phased out the uses of perfluorooctanoyl (C8) derivatives due to environmental persistence and bioaccumulation issues. A C8 derivative was used as an emulsifier for making Kel F-800. In 2001 Kel F-800 was scheduled to be discontinued and the last Kel F-800 run was made in early 2002. LANL ordered 2M$ worth of Kel-F 800 for reserves and Pantex purchased several hundred pounds to satisfy mock needs. After four years, 3M has decided to introduce a Kel-F 800-like polymer based on a new emulsifier using the same chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride monomers and emulsion polymerization process. They have produced 3 batches and claim the 'new' FK-800 is indistinguishable from the 'old' Kel-F 800 in any of their testing parameters. In June-July 2006 3M scaled up a batch of about 800 pounds and have test quantities available. We have samples of the new FK-800 for evaluation. Neither wet nor dry-aminated TATB has been synthesized in the US in any significant quantity since about 1985 and significant quantities of LX-17-1 has not been formulated since about 1990. Over the last few years as part of a DOD MANTECH, ATK Thiokol and BAE Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP) have produced moderate quantities of TATB ({approx}5 kg batches) with plans to scale up for DOD applications. Thiokol TATB is polycrystalline with an average particle size of about 40 m (similar to WA TATB) but HAAP TATB is only 5-6 {micro}m (similar to ultrafine). We have obtained small quantities of these materials for evaluation. The project (1) compares new FK-800 with old Kel-F 800 and FK-800 lots currently available at LLNL, (2) compares and characterizes new TATB with old TATB, (3) formulates new FK-800 with wet-aminated TATB and new TATBs in according to HAAP slurry coating procedure into LX-17-2, and (4) evaluates the mechanical and detonation performance characteristics of this insensitive high explosive (IHE). Priorities are to prove that these new materials can be formulated, pressed to density and machined; and that they contain no impurities which might cause compatibility issues. Since 3M, LANL, Pantex and AWE are currently evaluating the new FK-800, we plan to share data rather than repeating their work. Our effort is described.

DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

2007-08-03

39

Hockey Injuries  

PubMed Central

Hockey, Canada's national sport, is probably the world's fastest team sport. The nature of the game makes injuries a common occurence. This article reviews the literature on hockey injuries and identifies some of the changing trends over the past 15 years. Severity and incidence of injuries increase with the age and skill level of the player. There are fewer lacerations, eye injuries, and head injuries since helmets and facial protectors have become mandatory in minor hockey. However, there has been an increase in spinal cord injuries. Physicians who provide medical coverage for older adolescent and adult competitive élite hockey players should be proficient at assessment and acute care of patients with life-threatening injuries.

Sproule, James R.

1988-01-01

40

Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project: Puck packaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans,

Kriikku

1999-01-01

41

Professional ice hockey injuries: a 4 years prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIce Hockey is the fastest team sport with players skating up to 60 km\\/h and a puck speeding up to 160 km\\/h. Aggressive contacts between players, rigid obstacles (boards, goalposts), and solid surface may result in high energy trauma and severe injuries despite protective equipments. Precise data at the professional level are lacking.ObjectiveTo determine on several seasons the epidemiology of

G Ornon; D Fritschy; J-L Ziltener; J Menetrey

2011-01-01

42

Injuries Sustained by Pediatric Ice Hockey, Lacrosse, and Field Hockey Athletes Presenting to United States Emergency Departments, 1990-2003  

PubMed Central

Context: Ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey are increasingly popular sports among US youth athletes, but no authors to date have compared injuries in male and female pediatric (ages 2 through 18 years) participants. Objective: To compare patterns of injury among pediatric ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey players. Design: A descriptive analysis of all pediatric (ages 2 through 18 years) ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey injuries captured by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. Setting: US Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. Patients or Other Participants: Children with ice hockey, lacrosse, or field hockey injuries presenting to emergency departments participating in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. Main Outcome Measure(s): We reviewed all ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey injuries captured by the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and categorized them by sex, age, injury site, and injury diagnosis. Results: An estimated 321?237 pediatric participants in ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey presented to US emergency departments from 1990 through 2003. The injured were primarily male (74.4%) and aged 10 through 18 years (95.4%). Ice hockey accounted for more injuries (53.6%) than lacrosse (26.5%) or field hockey (19.9%). Children aged 2 through 9 years sustained twice the proportion of head and face injuries (53.1%) as children aged 10 through 18 years (23.2%) (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 2.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.94 to 2.62). Males incurred a higher proportion of shoulder and upper arm injuries (14.1%) than females (3.1%) (IRR = 4.51, 95% CI = 3.07 to 6.62). The proportion of concussion was higher in ice hockey players (3.9%) than in field hockey players (1.4%) (IRR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.17 to 6.46). Females in lacrosse had twice the proportion of facial injuries (20.9%) as males (10.5%) (IRR = 1.95, 95% CI = 1.46 to 2.60). In all sports, the ball or puck caused a greater proportion of face injuries in females than in males (IRR = 2.48, 95% CI = 2.03 to 3.05). Facial injuries from falls occurred in higher proportions in ice hockey players (10.6%) than in lacrosse (2.4%) (IRR = 4.32, 95% CI = 1.53 to 12.18) and field hockey (0.4%) players (IRR = 28.38, 95% CI = 6.71 to 120.01). Conclusions: Pediatric ice hockey, lacrosse, and field hockey injuries differed by age and sport and, within each sport, by sex. An understanding of sport-specific patterns of injury should assist coaches and certified athletic trainers in developing targeted preventive interventions.

Yard, Ellen Elizabeth; Comstock, R. Dawn

2006-01-01

43

Hockey, iPads, and Projectile Motion in a Physics Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increased availability of modern technology and handheld probeware for classrooms, the iPad1 and the Video Physics2 application developed by Vernier are used to capture and analyze the motion of an ice hockey puck within secondary-level physics education. Students collect, analyze, and generate digital modes of representation of physics phenomena using modern technologies to complement theoretical plots. This activity acknowledges hockey players' implicit understanding of the launch angle and initial velocity of a saucer pass as basic projectile motion while engaging students in authentic physics-based problem solving.

Hechter, Richard P.

2013-09-01

44

Canada's Game : Hockey and Identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost every Canadian can hum the original Hockey Night in Canada theme - even those who don't think of themselves as hockey fans. For more than a century, Canadians have seen something of themselves in the sport of hockey. \\

Andrew C. Holman

2009-01-01

45

Science of NHL Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NBC Learn and NBC Sports, in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League, explore the science and math behind professional hockey. Featuring game footage and contributions from NHL players and scientists, the 10 part series uses hockey to demonstrate such key concepts as Newton's Laws, kinematics, collisions, projectile motion, vectors and basic geometry. Each video has related lesson plans that include classroom and extended activities.

2012-03-06

46

Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique  

SciTech Connect

The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

2008-01-16

47

Masculinity and hockey violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Qualitative research on the relationship between masculinity and hockey violence has suggested that players endorsing traditional masculine behavior were more likely to engage in violence than players who held weaker masculine beliefs. Data were collected from white, middle class players on five Toronto hockey teams representing two different age groups (14.3 and 17.7 years respectively) and skill levels (Bantam and

Marc D. Weinstein; Michael D. Smith; David L. Wiesenthal

1995-01-01

48

Slapshot Physics: Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following resource is fromLessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this particular lesson, students will learn about hockey, the slapshot, and techniques such as force, weight, and speed. Students will play a simulated game of hockey and try to make a slapshot. Students will also practice the scientific method by designing and conducting their own experiment with the materials used in the simulation.

2010-01-01

49

A Hockey Hero  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares the story of Will Poulos, a hockey player who has developmental and physical disabilities (mild mental retardation and left cerebral palsy). Will has overcome tremendous obstacles in his life. He was born at 28 weeks in 1986 at three pounds, one ounce, and 19 inches long. He was very sick; his odds for survival…

Bolduc, Matt

2009-01-01

50

A Hockey Hero  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author shares the story of Will Poulos, a hockey player who has developmental and physical disabilities (mild mental retardation and left cerebral palsy). Will has overcome tremendous obstacles in his life. He was born at 28 weeks in 1986 at three pounds, one ounce, and 19 inches long. He was very sick; his odds for survival…

Bolduc, Matt

2009-01-01

51

Polonium 210Po in the phytobenthos from Puck Bay.  

PubMed

The aim of the work was to determine the 210Po content in phytobenthos species (seaweeds and angiosperms) from Puck Bay (southern Baltic). Alpha spectrometry was used to measure and calculate the activities and concentrations of polonium 210Po in the phytobenthos. The activity of 210Po in Puck Bay waters was determined to estimate the bioconcentration factors (BCF) of these plants. The 210Po concentration in water was estimated at 0.25 mBq dm(-3). The lowest polonium concentration in the phytobenthos was found in Cladophora rupestris (0.12 Bq kg(-1) wet wt.), the highest in Chara crinita (1.12 Bq kg(-1) wet wt.). Polonium is accumulated in these phytobenthos species; the bioconcentration factors (BCF) ranged from 450 to 4400. PMID:12729273

Skwarzec, B; Ulatowski, J; Strumi?ska, D I; Falandysz, J

2003-04-01

52

Analysis of price diffusion in financial markets using PUCK model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Based on the new type of random walk process called the potentials of unbalanced complex kinetics (PUCK) model, we theoretically show that the price diffusion in large scales is amplified 2(2+b) times, where b is the coefficient of quadratic term of the potential. In short time scales the price diffusion depends on the size M of the super moving average. Both numerical simulations and real data analysis of Yen Dollar rates are consistent with theoretical analysis.

Mizuno, Takayuki; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

2007-08-01

53

Science of NHL Hockey: Kinematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NHL skaters can reach speeds in excess of 20 miles (32km) per hour, and during some short bursts approach 30 miles (48 km) per hour. Kinematics, the branch of classical mechanics, helps describe a player's movement across the ice by defining his position, velocity and acceleration. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

Learn, Nbc

2010-10-07

54

Whole-body predictors of wrist shot accuracy in ice hockey: a kinematic analysis.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify joint angular kinematics that corresponds to shooting accuracy in the stationary ice hockey wrist shot. Twenty-four subjects participated in this study, each performing 10 successful shots on four shooting targets. An eight-camera infra-red motion capture system (240 Hz), along with passive reflective markers, was used to record motion of the joints, hockey stick, and puck throughout the performance of the wrist shot. A multiple regression analysis was carried out to examine whole-body kinematic variables with accuracy scores as the dependent variable. Significant accuracy predictors were identified in the lower limbs, torso and upper limbs. Interpretation of the kinematics suggests that characteristics such as a better stability of the base of support, momentum cancellation, proper trunk orientation and a more dynamic control of the lead arm throughout the wrist shot movement are presented as predictors for the accuracy outcome. These findings are substantial as they not only provide a framework for further analysis of motor control strategies using tools for accurate projection of objects, but more tangibly they may provide a comprehensive evidence-based guide to coaches and athletes for planned training to improve performance. PMID:21560748

Michaud-Paquette, Yannick; Magee, Patrick; Pearsall, David; Turcotte, René

2011-03-01

55

Operative management of “hockey groin syndrome”: 12 years of experience in National Hockey League players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. At the elite level of hockey, groin injuries can threaten a player's career. The aim of this review is to describe the clinical presentation and evaluate our operative approach to “hockey groin syndrome” in National Hockey League (NHL) players. Methods. Between November 1989 and June 2000, 22 NHL players with debilitating groin pain underwent operative exploration. A repair, including

Kashif Irshad; Liane S. Feldman; Caroline Lavoie; Vincent J. Lacroix; David S. Mulder; Rea A. Brown

2001-01-01

56

Effect of heat exposure on thermoregulation and hockey-specific response time in field hockey goalkeepers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the thermoregulatory responses in field hockey goalkeepers during games (Part A), and assessed the effect of heat stress on hockey-specific response time (Part B). In Part A, core temperature (Tc), skin temperature (Tsk), body mass, fluid consumption and heart rate (HR) responses of six goalkeepers during two premier level club games in the Western Australian (winter) hockey

Marcelle Malan; Brian Dawson; Carmel Goodman; Peter Peeling

2010-01-01

57

Evaluation of cricket helmet performance and comparison with baseball and ice hockey helmets  

PubMed Central

Background: Protective helmets in sport are important for reducing the risk of head and facial injury. In cricket and other sports with projectiles, national test standards control the minimum helmet performance. However, there are few field data showing if helmets are effective in reducing head injury. Objectives: (a) To examine the performance of cricket helmets in laboratory tests; (b) to examine performance with regard to test standards, game hazards, and helmet construction; (c) to compare and contrast these findings with baseball and ice hockey helmets. Methods: Impact tests were conducted on a selection of helmet models: five cricket, two baseball, and two ice hockey. Ball to helmet impacts at speeds of 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s were produced using an air cannon and a Hybrid III dummy headform and neck unit. Free fall drop tests with a rigid headform on to a selection of anvils (flat rigid, flat deformable, and hemispherical rigid) were conducted. Resultant headform acceleration was measured and compared between tests. Results: At the lower speed impacts, all helmets produced a good reduction in headform acceleration, and thus injury risk. At the higher speed impacts, the effectiveness was less. For example, the mean maximum headform accelerations for all cricket helmets at each speed were: 67, 160, 316, and 438 g for 19, 27, 36, and 45 m/s ball speeds respectively. Drop tests on to a hemispherical anvil produced the highest accelerations. The variation in performance increased as the magnitude of the impact energy increased, in both types of testing. Conclusions: The test method used for baseball helmets in which the projectile is fired at the helmet may be superior to helmet drop tests. Cricket helmet performance is satisfactory for low speed impacts, but not for impacts at higher, more realistic, speeds. Baseball and ice hockey helmets offer slightly better relative and absolute performance at the 27 m/s ball and puck impacts.

McIntosh, A; Janda, D

2003-01-01

58

Injury patterns among female field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

MURTAUGH, K. Injury patterns among female field hockey players. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 33, No. 2, 2001, pp. 201-207. Purpose: To examine injury patterns among female field hockey players and to broaden the current base of knowledge by identifying the injury rates of different playing positions. It was hypothesized that goalkeepers would have the highest rate of injury, followed

KAREN MURTAUGH

2001-01-01

59

Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)|

Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

1997-01-01

60

Concussion among Swedish elite ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of concussion in Swedish ice hockey and to establish a uniform grading and treatment model for concussions of different severity. METHODS: Frequency of concussion was investigated in two studies, one retrospective and one prospective. In the retrospective study, all Swedish elite ice hockey players (n = 265) were asked to answer a questionnaire on the

Y Tegner; R Lorentzon

1996-01-01

61

Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)

Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

1997-01-01

62

Ice hockey shot event modeling with mixture hidden Markov model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a new event analysis framework based on mixture Hidden Markov Model(HMM) for ice hockey video. Hockey is a competitive sport, which is hard to model because of its frame color homogeneity. But it does posses many temporal regularities. With the mixture representation of local observations and Markov chain property of hockey event structure the hockey

Xiaofeng Wang; Xiao-Ping Zhang

2009-01-01

63

Ice hockey shooting event modeling with mixture hidden Markov model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a new event analysis framework based on mixture hidden Markov model (HMM) for ice hockey videos.\\u000a Hockey is a competitive sport and hockey videos are hard to analyze because of the homogeneity of its frame features. However,\\u000a the temporal dynamics of hockey videos is highly structured. Using the mixture representation of local observations and Markov

Xiaofeng Wang; Xiao-Ping Zhang

64

Penetrating chest trauma secondary to a composite hockey stick injury.  

PubMed

Hockey is enjoyed by millions of people around the world and is a sport in which aggression is encouraged and injuries are common. Although body-checking is the most common cause of injury in hockey today, hockey sticks are associated with up to 14% of injuries. We report a case of chest trauma requiring surgical intervention secondary to the penetration of a composite hockey stick into a player's thoracic cavity. PMID:17209495

Kennedy, Joel; Green, Robert S; Henteleff, Harry

2006-11-01

65

Penetrating chest trauma secondary to a composite hockey stick injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hockey is enjoyed by millions of people around the world and is a sport in which aggression is en- couraged and injuries are common. Although body-checking is the most common cause of injury in hockey today, hockey sticks are associated with up to 14% of injuries. We report a case of chest trauma requiring surgical intervention secondary to the penetration

Joel Kennedy; Robert S. Green; Harry Henteleff

2006-01-01

66

Injuries in German professional ice hockey epidemiology and prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ice hockey differs in dynamic, allowed body contact and equipment from other team sports, probably leading to a higher injury risk. Thus, ice hockey captures the first place of the injury statistics in German professional team sports. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the epidemiology in German professional ice hockey and to elaborate appropriate prevention measures.The underlying

J Kelp; P Luig; C Klein; F Kantner; D Schulz; N Moser; T Henke

2010-01-01

67

Internet broadcast of hockey: a scale prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a system for the broadcast of hockey games over the internet. The system allows users to experience the hockey game while it is in progress. Our system uses generic content description servers that acquire information from an external source, process it, and serve the processed data to client systems. Dynamic configuration of the servers allows us to use them in a variety of roles. For example, video information servers, like an MPEG-7 camera, produce XML documents that describe the motion of objects in the scene in addition to unprocessed video. Unlike an MPEG-7 camera, our video information servers interact with client systems, and can change their behavior through dynamic configuration. In an alternate configuration, a content description server acts as a game server in our hockey broadcast system. The game server forms an environment model that encapsulates the state of the hockey game and serves data from the model to clients. We developed and tested our system using a 1/32-scale model of a hockey rink. Early results using data acquired at a real rink indicate that the system performs as expected.

Boyd, Jeffrey E.; Sayles, Maxwell; Olsen, Luke; Tarjan, Paul

2003-12-01

68

Ice hockey: a team physician's perspective.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is an exciting sport that is growing in popularity in the United States. Injuries are a common part of the sport, with more injuries occurring in games compared with practice. Higher levels of competition have been shown to correlate with increased frequency of injury. Most frequently, injuries occur to the face, head, and neck, including concussions, contusions, lacerations, and dental injury. Lower extremity injuries include medial collateral ligament injury, meniscus tear, and high ankle sprains. Upper extremity injuries include acromioclavicular joint injury, glenohumeral dislocation, and various contusions and sprains. Groin and lower abdominal strains also are common. Women's hockey participation is increasing, with data that suggest injuries similar to those seen in men's hockey. PMID:20463495

Moslener, Matthew D; Wadsworth, L Tyler

69

Theoretical Base of the PUCK-Model with Application to Foreign Exchange Markets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We analyze statistical properties of a random walker in a randomly changing potential function called the PUCK model both theoretically and numerically. In this model the center of the potential function moves with the moving average of the random walker's trace, and the potential function is given by a quadratic function with its curvature slowly changing around zero. By tuning several parameters the basic statistical properties fit nicely with those of real financial market prices, such as power law price change distribution, very short decay of autocorrelation of price changes, long tails in autocorrelation of the square of price changes and abnormal diffusion in short time scale.

Takayasu, Misako; Watanabe, Kota; Mizuno, Takayuki; Takayasu, Hideki

70

Aspects of traumatology in ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ice hockey is the fastest team game played and is also considered to be one of the roughest of all sports, with a high injury incidence. Injuries and their causes were recorded by the questioning of players in the first league of the Federal Republic of Germany. Eighty?eight out of a total of 207 first league players were included in

W. Pförringer; V. Smasal

1987-01-01

71

Hockey-stick steam generator for LMFBR  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the criteria and evaluation leading to the selection of the Hockey Stick Steam Generator Concept and subsequent development of that concept for LMFBR application. The selection process and development of the Modular Steam Generator (MSG) is discussed, including the extensive test programs that culminated in the manufacture and test of a 35 MW(t) Steam Generator. The design

G. J. Hallinan; P. E. Svedlund

1981-01-01

72

American Collegiate Men's Ice HockeyAn Analysis of Injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Reported rates and types of ice hockey injuries have been variable. Ice hockey combines tremendous speeds with aggressive physical play and therefore has great inherent potential for injury.Purpose: To identify rates and determinants of injury in American men's collegiate ice hockey.Study Design: Prospective cohort study.Methods: Data were collected from 8 teams in a Division I athletic conference for 1

Kyle Flik; Stephen Lyman; Robert G. Marx

2005-01-01

73

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HOCKEY SKATING SPEED AND SELECTED PERFORMANCE MEASURES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Behm, D.G., M.J. Wahl, D.C. Button, K.E. Power, and K.G. Anderson. Relationship between hockey skating speed and selected performance measures. J. Strength Cond. Res. 19(2):326-331. 2005.—The objective of this study was to deter- mine the relationship between specific performance measures and hockey skating speed. Thirty competitive secondary school and junior hockey players were timed for skating speed. Off-ice measures included

DAVID G. BEHM; J. WAHL; K EVIN D UANE C. BUTTON; KENNETH G. ANDERSON

74

Assessment of ice hockey performance in real-game conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to adapt a performance measurement tool, the Team Sport Assessment Procedure (TSAP), to ice hockey during match-play. In addition to the six categories included in the original observational procedure, the ice hockey TSAP contained four new categories. Twelve Pee-Wee ice hockey matches were video-recorded during a regional championship tournament. The game play of 103

Luc Nadeau; Paul Godbout; Jean-François Richard

2008-01-01

75

Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ``hockey stick'' shaped temperature reconstruction of Mann et al. (1998, 1999) has been widely applied. However it has not been previously noted in print that, prior to their principal components (PCs) analysis on tree ring networks, they carried out an unusual data transformation which strongly affects the resulting PCs. Their method, when tested on persistent red noise, nearly always produces a hockey stick shaped first principal component (PC1) and overstates the first eigenvalue. In the controversial 15th century period, the MBH98 method effectively selects only one species (bristlecone pine) into the critical North American PC1, making it implausible to describe it as the ``dominant pattern of variance''. Through Monte Carlo analysis, we show that MBH98 benchmarks for significance of the Reduction of Error (RE) statistic are substantially under-stated and, using a range of cross-validation statistics, we show that the MBH98 15th century reconstruction lacks statistical significance.

McIntyre, Stephen; McKitrick, Ross

2005-02-01

76

Seasonal Mood Disturbances in Collegiate Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

Objective: The purpose of this paper is to: 1) describe the seasonal affective disorder syndrome using a case illustration, 2) provide a simple and reliable method for identifying seasonal affective disorder, and 3) provide data as to the prevalence of the syndrome in a subset of collegiate hockey players. Design and Setting: Collegiate hockey players were selected, because their practices begin in the fall and play is completed in the spring. The teams selected for participation were from the far Northwest and the upper Midwest regions. Subjects: Sixty-eight Division I hockey players volunteered for the study. The three teams from which the subjects were chosen were located above latitude 42°/45' north. Subjects were from the northern latitudes. Measurements: The Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire was used to screen for seasonality. A sample of the athletes was also examined using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression together with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed) criteria for Seasonal Pattern Specifier. Results: Thirty-three (51%) were asymptomatic, 7 (11%) met the criteria for seasonal affective disorder, and 25 (39%) hockey players scored in the range that could classify them as candidates for subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder. Conclusions: The prevalence of seasonal affective disorder among our sample approximated the national norm for the northern latitudes. However, the prevalence of subsyndromal seasonal affective disorder in our population was 25% compared to 13% reported nationally. Light therapy has been shown to reverse the effects of the disorders; however, further research needs to be conducted to determine its acceptance and effectiveness by the athletic population.

Rosen, Lionel W.; Shafer, Christine L.; Smokler, Carol; Carrier, David; McKeag, Douglas B.

1996-01-01

77

The epidemiology of ice hockey injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the injury profylaxes in Denmark a questionnaire investigation was undertaken in 14 randomly chosen ice hockey teams--out of 266 players, 210 answered (79%). The injury incidence per player per 1000 hours was 4.7, i.e. 1.5 in training and 38.0 in match. Half of the injuries were localised to the head (28%) and lower extremities (27%), 19% to

U Jørgensen; S Schmidt-Olsen

1986-01-01

78

Concussion among Swedish elite ice hockey players.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of concussion in Swedish ice hockey and to establish a uniform grading and treatment model for concussions of different severity. METHODS: Frequency of concussion was investigated in two studies, one retrospective and one prospective. In the retrospective study, all Swedish elite ice hockey players (n = 265) were asked to answer a questionnaire on the number and treatment of previous concussions. Only concussions diagnosed by a doctor were recorded. The questionnaire was completed by 227 players (86%). In the prospective study, all injuries including concussions occurring during game and practice in the Swedish Elite League (n = 12 teams) were recorded during four years. The causes of injury, referees judgements, diagnosis, treatment, and time absent from ice hockey were registered on special cards. RESULTS: In the retrospective study, 51 out of 227 players (22%) in the Swedish Elite League reported at least one concussion. In the prospective study, 52 concussions were reported. The incidence of a concussion is at least one concussion every year/team or a yearly risk of about 5% for a player to sustain a concussion. Most concussions occurred during league play (81%). Body contact (checking or boarding) was the most common cause of concussions. The players were absent from full training and play on a mean of 6 d. CONCLUSIONS: As this injury is potentially dangerous it must be treated seriously according to a simple treatment model presented. In cases of repeated concussions during the same season, a longer period of time away from play is suggested. In players who have sustained several concussions over the years a thorough medical examination including EEG, CT/MRI, and neuropsychological tests should be performed. If any of these is pathological the player should be advised to give up ice hockey.

Tegner, Y; Lorentzon, R

1996-01-01

79

Miniature Videoprobe Hockey Stick Delivery System  

DOEpatents

The present invention is a miniature videoprobe system having a probe termination box, a strong back, and a videoprobe housing. The videoprobe system is able to obtain images from a restricted space at least as small as 0.125 inches while producing a high quality image. The strong back has a hockey stick shape with the probe termination box connecting to the top of the handle-like portion of the hockey stick and the videoprobe housing attaching to the opposite end or nose of the hockey stick shape. The videoprobe housing has a roughly arrowhead shape with two thin steel plates sandwiching the internal components there between. The internal components are connected in series to allow for a minor dimension of the videoprobe housing of 0.110 inches. The internal components include an optics train, a CCD chip, and an electronics package. An electrical signal is transmitted from the electronics package through wiring within an internal channel of the strong back to the probe termination box. The strong back has milled into it multiple internal channels for facilitating the transfer of information, items, or devices between the probe termination box and the videoprobe housing.

Hale, Lester R.; McMurry, Kyle M.

1998-06-18

80

Evaluation of knee braces in Swedish ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this retrospective investigation we have determined the rate and types of knee injuries among Swedish ice hockey players, and related these data to the use of knee braces. Thirty-seven of the originally selected 50 hockey teams (74%) of elite or first division calibre took part in the study, and 600 players answered a questionnaire. A total of 254 previous

Y Tegner; R Lorentzon

1991-01-01

81

The Ice Hockey Injury: A Case Study in Physiology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A high school hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough, and the star player is slammed against the boards. Injured, he is escorted off the ice. This case follows his health as it deteriorates over the next several hours. Students are presented with the hockey player's symptoms, and they use their knowledge of…

Stephens, Phil

2004-01-01

82

Science of NHL Hockey: Newton's Three Laws of Motion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether they are sprinting down the ice, smashing into the boards or stopping on a dime, NHL players display an amazing mix of speed and strength. These athletic moves also provide great examples of Newton�s Three Laws of Motion. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

Learn, Nbc

2010-10-07

83

11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, Detroit, Michigan). GROUNDBREAKING FOR ADDITION, JUNE 23, 1965. Left Sid Abel, Genral Manager of the Detroit Hockey Club Center - Jerome Cavanaugh, Mayor, City of Detroit Right - Nick Landis, General Manager of the Olympia Stadium - Olympia Arena, 5920 Grand River Avenue, Detroit, Wayne County, MI

84

Injury Rates and Profiles in Female Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Little data exist on injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players.Objective: To examine the incidence of injury in female ice hockey players and compare injury rates with those of male players. Study Design: Prospective cohort study.Methods: Six male and six female teams from the Canada West Universities Athletic Association were followed prospectively for one varsity season. Preseason

Deanna M. Schick; Willem H. Meeuwisse

2003-01-01

85

Dental and facial injuries in international field hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many respects international sportsmen are trendsetters for the behaviour of recreational sportsmen. For this reason the attitude of international hockey players towards mouth protectors was studied. The possession and use of mouth protectors vary markedly between different countries. The incidence of dental-facial traumas among international field hockey players is high; 54% had sustained injuries necessitating a visit to a

J H Bolhuis; J M Leurs; G E Flögel

1987-01-01

86

Floor Hockey---Is It a Safe Sport for Schools?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Guidelines under which floor hockey should be taught to prevent avoidable injuries are presented. Three court cases involving floor hockey related injuries are reviewed, and issues of responsibility and liability on the part of physical educators and schools are discussed. (IAH)|

Gray, Gary R.

1989-01-01

87

Arthroscopic Labral Repair and Treatment of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Professional Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Hip injuries are common among professional hockey players in the National Hockey League (NHL).Hypothesis: Professional hockey players will return to a high level of function and ice hockey after arthroscopic labral repair and treatment of femoroacetabular impingement.Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4.Methods: Twenty-eight professional hockey players (NHL) were unable to perform at the professional level due to

Marc J. Philippon; Douglass R. Weiss; David A. Kuppersmith; Karen K. Briggs; Connor J. Hay

2010-01-01

88

Bodychecking rules and concussion in elite hockey.  

PubMed

Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010-11 and 2011-12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009-10 to 2011-12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50). When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32). The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009-10 than in 2010-11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83), but did not increase from 2010-11 to 2011-12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38). 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries. PMID:23874888

Donaldson, Laura; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D

2013-07-17

89

Bodychecking Rules and Concussion in Elite Hockey  

PubMed Central

Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010–11 and 2011–12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009–10 to 2011–12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50). When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32). The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009–10 than in 2010–11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83), but did not increase from 2010–11 to 2011–12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38). 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries.

Donaldson, Laura; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D.

2013-01-01

90

Effect of heat exposure on thermoregulation and hockey-specific response time in field hockey goalkeepers.  

PubMed

This study examined the thermoregulatory responses in field hockey goalkeepers during games (Part A), and assessed the effect of heat stress on hockey-specific response time (Part B). In Part A, core temperature (T(c)), skin temperature (T(sk)), body mass, fluid consumption and heart rate (HR) responses of six goalkeepers during two premier level club games in the Western Australian (winter) hockey season were recorded. Part B assessed the same measures, plus a response time test on four goalkeepers playing a simulated game inside a climate chamber in cool (COOL: 20 degrees C, 40% RH) and hot (HOT: 35 degrees C, 40% RH) conditions. In Part A, the mean (+/-SD) T(c) and T(sk) measured in games was 38.49+/-0.20 degrees C and 34.99+/-0.99 degrees C, with increases from baseline of 1.34+/-0.19 degrees C and 1.08+/-0.30 degrees C, respectively. Most of the increase in T(c) resulted from the pre-game warm-up. In Part B, T(c) and T(sk) only increased significantly (p<0.05) from baseline in the HOT condition (0.62+/-0.18 degrees C and 1.61+/-0.82 degrees C, respectively). Response time was significantly slower (0.87+/-0.14s, p<0.01) after heat exposure, compared to COOL (0.75+/-0.15s), but the number of correct responses was not affected. For optimal performance, careful attention should be given to strategies to limit T(c) increases in field hockey goalkeepers during matches. PMID:19574100

Malan, Marcelle; Dawson, Brian; Goodman, Carmel; Peeling, Peter

2009-07-01

91

Hitting in amateur ice hockey: not worth the risk.  

PubMed

The "big hit" is glorified in professional ice hockey. But body checking is unnecessary for the quality of the game and demonstrably dangerous for most amateur players at the youth, high school, and college levels. PMID:20086683

Roberts, W O

1999-11-01

92

Force transducer system for measurement of ice hockey skating force  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to develop a portable force measurement system for ice hockey skating. The system consisted\\u000a of three strain gauge pairs affixed to an ice hockey skate’s blade holder with wire leads connected to a microprocessor controlled\\u000a data acquisition device carried in a backpack worn by the skater. The configuration of the strain gauges simultaneously determined

Tyler J. Stidwill; Rene Albert Turcotte; Phil Dixon; David J. Pearsall

2009-01-01

93

Injury Rates, Risk Factors, and Mechanisms of Injury in Minor Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Hockey is one of the top sports for participation in youth in Canada. There are limited data on the epidemiology of injury in youth hockey.Purpose: Through implementation and validation of an injury surveillance system, youth ice hockey injury rates, risk factors, and mechanisms of injury will be examined.Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study.Methods: During the 2004-2005 season in minor hockey

Carolyn A. Emery; Willem H. Meeuwisse

2006-01-01

94

Effect of a lockout of professional ice hockey players on injuries among minor league players  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveBased on the assumption that professional hockey is violent and that this influences the behaviour of children viewing it on TV, we investigated whether the absence of televised National Hockey League ice hockey games during a 1-year lockout reduced the rate of injuries of minor league hockey players in Canada.MethodsThis natural experiment enabled us to use a quasi-experimental design to

G Keays; I B Pless; C Goulet

2010-01-01

95

Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that are complex, dynamic, and challenging enough for computers to describe. These scenes include games of sports, air traffic, car traffic, street intersections, and cloud transformations. Our research is about the challenge of inventing a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact with each other on a constantly moving background due to camera motions. Ultimately, such a computer system should be able to acquire reliable data by extracting the players" motion as their trajectories, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey players based on the result of the query. Among these three major aspects of the system, we primarily focus on visual information of the scenes, that is, how to automatically acquire motion trajectories of hockey players from video. More accurately, we automatically analyze the hockey scenes by estimating parameters (i.e., pan, tilt, and zoom) of the broadcast cameras, tracking hockey players in those scenes, and constructing a visual description of the data by displaying trajectories of those players. Many technical problems in vision such as fast and unpredictable players" motions and rapid camera motions make our challenge worth tackling. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any automatic video annotation systems for hockey developed in the past. Although there are many obstacles to overcome, our efforts and accomplishments would hopefully establish the infrastructure of the automatic hockey annotation system and become a milestone for research in automatic video annotation in this domain.

Okuma, Kenji; Little, James J.; Lowe, David

2003-12-01

96

Field Hockey-Lacrosse Guide with Official Rules. June 1972 - June 1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Rules for women's field hockey and lacrosse from June 1972 to June 1974 are discussed. Standards in sports for girls and women are detailed as is the Division for Girls and Women's Sports (DGWS) statement of beliefs. Specific articles on field hockey techniques, skills, services available through the United States Field Hockey Association, rules,…

Thornburg, Mary Lou, Ed.; Pitts, Jackie, Ed.

97

Airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in elite ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is little information of lower respiratory symptoms, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in elite ice hockey players. A total of 88 highly trained ice hockey players and 47 control subjects were studied. All the subjects were subjected to skin-prick tests, resting spirometry examinations and histamine-challenge tests. Adequate induced sputum samples were obtained from 68 of the ice hockey players

A. Lumme; T. Haahtela; J. Ounap; P. Rytila; Y. Obase; M. Helenius; V. Remes; I. Helenius

2003-01-01

98

Review of typical ice hockey injuries. Survey of the North American NHL and Hockey Canada versus European leagues.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is considered to be one of the fastest and roughest of all sports. Prospective injury reports of the North American National Hockey League, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association and of several European teams (UdSSR, CSSR, Sweden and Switzerland) are reviewed to evaluate the patterns, anatomic locations, circumstances and sequelae of ice hockey-related injuries. Although different injury reporting systems are used in North America and Europe, knee injuries (sprains of the collateral ligaments) accounted for the majority of games missed (40%), followed by injuries to the shoulder (dislocation, acromio-clavicular joint separation, rotator cuff strain and tears, 20%), the groin (15%), and the back (10%). Mandatory helmets and face masks reduced the number of facial and eye injuries to a quarter from 1972 to 1983. The frequency of only concussion but also cervical spine lesions is increasing. The prevention of head, face, eye and neck injuries should mainly be accomplished by enforcement of current rules (mandatory helmets with face masks) and institution of new rules. Improvement in protective equipment would also have the effect of decreasing the frequency of injuries. Ice hockey is the fastest team sport and involves both finesse and controlled aggression. It is also considered to be one of the roughest of all sports. In recent years, ice hockey has grown tremendously in popularity, not only in the United States and in Canada but also in many European countries [1]. The number of both professional and amateur hockey players has increased with the expanding interest in the sport around the world [1].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7610390

Biasca, N; Simmen, H P; Bartolozzi, A R; Trentz, O

1995-05-01

99

Measurement of head impacts in youth ice hockey players.  

PubMed

Despite growing interest in the biomechanical mechanisms of sports-related concussion, ice hockey and the youth sport population has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this pilot study was: 1) to describe the biomechanical measures of head impacts in youth minor ice hockey players; and, 2) to investigate the influence of player and game characteristics on the number and magnitude of head impacts. Data was collected from 13 players from a single competitive Bantam boy's (ages 13-14 years) AAA ice hockey team using telemetric accelerometers implanted within the players' helmets at 27 ice hockey games. The average linear acceleration, rotational acceleration, Gadd Severity Index and Head Injury Criterion of head impacts were recorded. A significantly higher number of head impacts per player per game were found for wingers when compared to centre and defense player positions (df=355, t=3.087, p=0.00218) and for tournament games when compared to regular season and playoff games (df=355, t=2.641, p=0.086). A significant difference in rotational acceleration according to player position (F2,1812=4.9551, p=0.0071) was found. This study is an initial step towards a greater understanding of head impacts in youth ice hockey. PMID:20830655

Reed, N; Taha, T; Keightley, M; Duggan, C; McAuliffe, J; Cubos, J; Baker, J; Faught, B; McPherson, M; Montelpare, W

2010-09-09

100

Shock Separation and Dead-Zone Formation from Detonations in an Internal Air-Well Geometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we report on measurements of dead-zone formation due to shock separation from detonations attempting to corner-turn in an internal air-well geometry. This geometry is also known as a ``hockey-puck'' configuration. These measurements were performed on detonations in LX-17 and PBX9502 using time sequence radiography to image the event with surface contact timing pins as an additional diagnostic. In addition to an open corner in the high-explosive component we also examined the effects of steel defining the corner. In these experiments we find a long lived dead-zone consisting of shocked explosive that persists to very late times. Data and numerical modeling will be presented in addition to a comparison with previous work using an external air well. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

Molitoris, John; Andreski, Henry; Garza, Raul; Batteux, Jan; Vitello, Peter; Souers, Clark

2007-06-01

101

A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

Fogel, Curtis

2010-01-01

102

An Assessment of the Dietary Habits of College Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

While significant research exists on the nutritional patterns of football players, soccer players, bodybuilders, and runners there appears to be a gap in the literature regarding nutrition and hockey players. This descriptive study, with a 77% response rate, utilized a 3-day food record, eating and lifestyles patterns questionnaire, and height and weight measurements to assess the dietary habits of 30

N. L. Ferguson

1999-01-01

103

Parenting, achievement strategies and satisfaction in ice hockey.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to understand adolescent players' satisfaction as a function of parenting styles, players' achievement strategies, and their norm breaking behavior. Finnish 14- and 16-year-old ice-hockey players (n=1018) completed a questionnaire measuring their achievement strategies (SAQ; Nurmi, Salmela--Aro & Haavisto, 1995 b), as well as scales of norm breaking and satisfaction, prepared for the present study. The parents (n=979) filled in scales measuring their parenting styles (CRPR; Pulkkinen, 1996) and attitudes towards norm breaking. Results revealed that players from authoritative families who showed a high level of mastery-orientation expressed high satisfaction in playing ice hockey. Results also showed negative associations between authoritative parenting and both task irrelevant and norm breaking behavior. Parents with parental stress and those with authoritarian parenting styles showed positive attitudes to norm breaking behavior, and players from authoritarian and parental stress homes showed norm breaking behavior in ice hockey. There was no association between norm breaking behavior and player satisfaction. Our results contribute to the planning of a coaching system that serves more educational and developmental purposes, and that encourages the desire to play ice hockey as a hobby. PMID:16179023

Juntumaa, Birgitta; Keskivaara, Pertti; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

2005-10-01

104

Fundamental Field Hockey, Physical Education: 5551.21.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This course outline is a guide for teaching fundamental skills, rules, and strategies of field hockey in grades 7-12. The course format includes lectures, skills practice, audiovisual materials, demonstrations, and competitions that focus on mastery of skills, rules, game situations, and safety procedures. Course content includes the following:…

Lowe, Billye J.

105

Athlete Violence and Aggression in Hockey and Interpersonal Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because male athletes have exhibited aggressive tendencies in a variety of settings, they may be at risk for using violence both within and beyond their sports involvement. Five former college\\/professional hockey players were interviewed to determine their perspec- tives on the nature of aggression and violence in sports competition as well as in social relationships. The informants were asked about

NICK T. PAPPAS; PATRICK C. MCKENRY

106

Advanced Field Hockey; Physical Education: 5551.22.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

GRADES OR AGES: Grades 7-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Advanced field hockey. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE. Course guidelines, description, and a broad goal statement are presented and behavioral objectives listed. Course content and learning activities to meet the skill objectives are also presented. A 14-item bibliography is included. OBJECTIVES…

Lowe, Billye J.

107

Fundamental Field Hockey, Physical Education: 5551.21.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course outline is a guide for teaching fundamental skills, rules, and strategies of field hockey in grades 7-12. The course format includes lectures, skills practice, audiovisual materials, demonstrations, and competitions that focus on mastery of skills, rules, game situations, and safety procedures. Course content includes the following:…

Lowe, Billye J.

108

Occupational and recreational noise exposure from indoor arena hockey games.  

PubMed

Occupational and recreational noise exposures were evaluated at two sporting arenas hosting collegiate hockey games (Venue 1) and semi-professional hockey (Venue 2). A total of 54 personal noise dosimetry samples were taken over the course of seven home hockey games: 15 workers and 9 fans at Venue 1, and 19 workers and 11 fans at Venue 2. None of the sampled workers were overexposed to noise based on Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria. However, 40% and 57% of workers at Venue 1 and 33% and 91% of fans at Venue 2 were overexposed based on ACGIH noise exposure criteria. Noise exposures for fans were significantly different between venues, but worker noise exposures between venues were not significantly different. In addition, extensive area noise monitoring was conducted at each venue to further characterize the stadium noise on a location-by-location basis. Mean equivalent sound pressure levels ranged from 81 to 96 dBA at Venue 1 and from 85 to 97 dBA at Venue 2. Mean noise peak levels ranged from 105 to 124 dBA at Venue 1, and from 110 to 117 dBA at Venue 2. These data reflect the potential for overexposure at indoor hockey events and are useful in characterizing occupational noise exposure of indoor arena support staff and may also provide a foundation for future noise control research in indoor sports arenas. PMID:23145529

Cranston, Cory J; Brazile, William J; Sandfort, Delvin R; Gotshall, Robert W

2013-01-01

109

Concussions in Ice Hockey: Is it Time to Worry?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent events have highlighted the issue of concussions in sports, particularly in ice hockey. A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by acceleration forces imparted on the brain. Symptoms vary in severity from confusion and minor headaches to loss of consciousness and amnesia. Concussions are a common sports injury that have been associated with neurological and psychiatric impairment,

Khizer Amin

2012-01-01

110

Sports chiropractic management at the World Ice Hockey Championships  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Ice hockey is an international sport. Injuries occur in a full body fashion, to a number of tissues, commonly through body contact. There is a lack of literature documenting the scope of sports chiropractic practice. Thus, it was the aim to document the type, scope and severity of conditions presenting to, and the treatment provided by, the New Zealand

Chris Julian; Wayne Hoskins; Andrew L Vitiello

2010-01-01

111

Head, face and neck injuries in hockey: A descriptive analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients presenting to the emergency departments in Kingston, Ontario, between 1 October 1992 and 30 April 1993 with head, face, and neck injuries from playing ice hockey, regardless of the age of the player or whether the play was recreational or league, were enrolled in this prospective descriptive case series analysis to document the type and mechanism of injury in

Brian Deady; Robert J. Brison; Lise Chevrier

1996-01-01

112

A Simulation for Learning Strategy & Perceptual Skill in Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

An advanced learning system is described for developing intermediate level ice hockey skills. We focus on perceptual, cognitive and team-strategy using a combination of mixed representational media that emphasise translation between the representations. Use data is collected from trainee players and a prototype is developed and illustrated. Tutorial and analysis modes are described and followed by some indications of the

Desmond E. Mulligan; Michael W. Dobson; Janet Mccracken

2004-01-01

113

Heat transfer with hockey-stick steam generator. [LMFBR  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hockey-stick modular design concept is a good answer to future needs for reliable, economic LMFBR steam generators. The concept was successfully demonstrated in the 30 Mwt MSG test unit; scaled up versions are currently in fabrication for CRBRP usage, and further scaling has been accomplished for PLBR applications. Design and performance characteristics are presented for the three generations of

E. Moody; M. J. Gabler

1977-01-01

114

Hypothenar hammer syndrome from ice hockey stick-handling.  

PubMed

Ulnar artery thrombosis and hypothenar hammer syndrome are rare vascular complications that could potentially occur with repeated blows or trauma to the hand. Although initially reported as an occupational hazard among laborers and craftsmen, it has been observed more recently among recreationalists and athletes. Until now, it has never been reported as a complication in ice hockey players. In this case report, a 26-year-old Canadian professional ice hockey player presented with acute dominant right hand paleness, coolness, and pain with hand use. The patient used a wooden hockey stick with a large knob of tape at the end of the handle, which he regularly gripped in the palm of his right hand to help with face-offs and general stick-handling. Sonographic evaluation demonstrated no arterial flow in the distal right ulnar artery distribution, and ulnar artery occlusion with no aneurysmal degeneration was confirmed by magnetic resonance angiogram. Intraarterial thrombolytic therapy was initiated, and subsequent serial angiograms demonstrated significant improvement in distal ulnar artery flow as well as recanalization of right hand deep palmar arch and digital arteries. The patient's symptoms resolved, and he was maintained on therapeutic anticoagulation for 3 months prior to returning to playing ice hockey professionally, but with a padded glove and no tape knob at the handle tip. This case highlights a unique presentation of hockey stick-handling causing ulnar artery thrombosis that was likely from repeated palmar hypothenar trauma. Appropriate diagnostic imaging, early intraarterial thrombolysis, and postoperative surveillance and follow-up were crucial for the successful outcome in this patient. PMID:23988538

Zayed, Mohamed A; McDonald, Joey; Tittley, Jacques G

2013-08-26

115

Intragame blood-lactate values during ice hockey and their relationships to commonly used hockey testing protocols.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the on ice blood-lactate values during a division 1 ice hockey game in an attempt to demonstrate the highly variable nature of the game. Our hypothesis was that intragame blood-lactate (BLa) values would be highly variable and related to shift length. Six men (age = 20.4 + 1.8 years, body mass 81.3 +8.7 kg) agreed to have fingerstick BLa samples taken at the completion of selected shifts (n = 35 samples) during the first and third periods of a division 1 ice hockey game. Shift length including work and rest intervals were also recorded for each of these shifts. Blood-lactate values ranged from 4.4 to 13.7 mmol.L with a mean value of 8.15 (+2.72) mmol.L. Shift length ranged from 55 to 145 seconds with individual work intervals within the shifts ranging from 29 to 102 seconds in length. Most shifts had either 1 or no play stoppages and rest to work intervals ranged from 0-1.66 (+0.53). These results further support the intense and variable nature of ice hockey and should help coaches develop more specific training and testing regimens to prepare for these demands. They also highlight the need for a validated and reliable test of repeated sprint ability for ice hockey players. PMID:20683352

Noonan, Benjamin C

2010-09-01

116

Intentional versus unintentional contact as a mechanism of injury in youth ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundYouth ice hockey injury rates and mechanisms have been described by various classification systems. Intentional versus unintentional contact was used to classify mechanisms of injuries. All injuries (n=247) in one youth hockey programme over a 5-year period were recorded and included in the analysis.PurposeTo evaluate youth ice hockey injuries and compare programmes that allow body checking versus programmes that do

Scott R Darling; Douglas E Schaubel; John G Baker; John J Leddy; Leslie J Bisson; Barry Willer

2011-01-01

117

High-intensity intermittent running and field hockey skill performance in the heat  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nine well-trained, unacclimatized female hockey players performed the Loughborough Intermittent Shuttle Test (LIST) interspersed with three field hockey skill tests in hot (30°C, 38% relative humidity) and moderate (19°C, 51% relative humidity) environmental conditions. Field hockey skill performance declined in both the hot and moderate conditions following 30 and 60?min of the LIST compared with pre-LIST values (P ?

Caroline Sunderland; Mary E Nevill

2005-01-01

118

Determinants of Attendance in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League: Role of Winning, Scoring, and Fighting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attendance in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League was studied for the 2009 to 2010 season. This junior league, part of the\\u000a Canadian Hockey League system, serves as a development league for teenage players who attempt to parlay their participation\\u000a in this league into a professional career. Fan demand for this level of hockey is found to be sensitive to

Rodney J. Paul; Andrew P. Weinbach

2011-01-01

119

The Effect of Caffeine Ingestion on Field Hockey Skill Performance Following Physical Fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the impact of caffeine ingestion on field hockey skill performance following high-intensity fatigue. Thirteen male hockey players (mean age = 21.1 ± 1.2 years) performed hockey sprint dribble and ball handling tests at rest and after a bout of total body fatigue (90% maximal capacity) following caffeine (5mg kg) or placebo ingestion. Sprint dribble times were slower

Michael J. Duncan; Samantha Taylor; Mark Lyons

2012-01-01

120

Dental and facial injuries in international field hockey.  

PubMed Central

In many respects international sportsmen are trendsetters for the behaviour of recreational sportsmen. For this reason the attitude of international hockey players towards mouth protectors was studied. The possession and use of mouth protectors vary markedly between different countries. The incidence of dental-facial traumas among international field hockey players is high; 54% had sustained injuries necessitating a visit to a physician and/or a dentist. Of these victims 20% sustained serious dental damage at least once (women 16% and men 22%). Only 20% of the international players wear a mouth protector consistently during training and matches. Women use the apparatus almost twice as much as men. The main argument in rejecting a mouth protector is that it is not felt to be necessary.

Bolhuis, J H; Leurs, J M; Flogel, G E

1987-01-01

121

Dental and facial injuries in international field hockey.  

PubMed

In many respects international sportsmen are trendsetters for the behaviour of recreational sportsmen. For this reason the attitude of international hockey players towards mouth protectors was studied. The possession and use of mouth protectors vary markedly between different countries. The incidence of dental-facial traumas among international field hockey players is high; 54% had sustained injuries necessitating a visit to a physician and/or a dentist. Of these victims 20% sustained serious dental damage at least once (women 16% and men 22%). Only 20% of the international players wear a mouth protector consistently during training and matches. Women use the apparatus almost twice as much as men. The main argument in rejecting a mouth protector is that it is not felt to be necessary. PMID:2893649

Bolhuis, J H; Leurs, J M; Flögel, G E

1987-12-01

122

Effects of multiple concussions on retired national hockey league players.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions. PMID:23535975

Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Sabiston, Catherine M

2013-04-01

123

Personal food systems of male college hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to improve the understanding of processes involved in food choice and dietary change by examining how members of a college men's ice hockey team experienced the multiple factors influencing their food choices. The study employed a theory-guided, grounded-theory approach, participant observation, and open-ended interviews with ten team members. Field notes and transcripts were analysed using the constant

L. Ryan Smart; Carole A. Bisogni

2001-01-01

124

Energy expenditure and physical fitness of ice-hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  We examined the energy expenditure in ice-hockey players under conditions of a model training match. The results were obtained in a group of 13 players of the national representative team (age 24.4 years), and in 1 goaler. In the players we also followed the physical fitness by means of a loading experiment on bicycle ergometer in the middle of the

V. Seliger; V. Kostka; D. Grušová; J. Ková?; J. Machovcová; M. Pauer; A. P?ibylová; R. Urbánková

1972-01-01

125

TEMPLATE-BASED ACTION RECOGNITION: CLASSIFYING HOCKEY PLAYERS' MOVEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract Although action recognition is remarkably easy for people, it is a difficult task for computers. A moving,camera that takes broadcast-quality videos makes this even more difficult. This research focuses on actions at a medium distance. That is, a typical figure has a resolution of dozens of pixels in each dimension. The system is demonstrated,using videos of ice hockey sport.

XIAOJING WU

2005-01-01

126

A fuzzy based hierarchical coordination and control system for a robotic agent team in the robot Hockey competition  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the system used by the team of the German University in Cairo (GUC) within the FESTO Hockey Challenge league that took place within RoboCup 2009. The goal of the FESTO Hockey Challenge is to have a competition between robotic teams where each team consists of three robots to compete in an Ice Hockey game. All robots are

H. Hagras; R. Ramadan; M. Nawito; H. Gabr; M. Zaher; H. Fahmy

2010-01-01

127

Posterior approach for arthroscopic treatment of posterolateral impingement syndrome of the ankle in a top-level field hockey player  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case history of a 25-year-old field hockey player, a member of the German National Field Hockey Team, is presented. The patient could not remember any specific ankle injury, but since the World Indoor Championship in February 2003, he experienced significant but diffuse pain around the posterior ankle, especially while loading the forefoot in hockey training and competition. For 2

Heinz Lohrer; Sabine Arentz

2004-01-01

128

Site-specific bone mass differences of the lower extremities in 17-year-old ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bone mass in the pelvis and lower extremities in young ice hockey players, and especially to investigate whether any differences are related to the type and magnitude of weightbearing loading and muscle stress. The ice hockey group consisted of 22 boys (mean age 16.9±0.3) from three different ice hockey teams training

P. Nordström; R. Lorentzon

1996-01-01

129

An Examination of the Challenges Experienced by Canadian Ice-Hockey Players in the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

Semistructured interviews were used in this study to learn about the challenges experienced by four groups of National Hockey League (NHL) players (N=11): prospects (n=3), rookies (n=3), veterans (n=2), and retirees (n=3). The database is comprised of 757 meaning units grouped into 11 contextual challenges pertaining to scouting demands, training camp, increased athletic demands, team expectations, and earning team trust.

Randy C. Battochio; Robert J. Schinke; Mark A. Eys; Danny L. Battochio; Wayne Halliwell; Gershon Tenenbaum

2009-01-01

130

Somatic and functional variables determining game efficiency of ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ice hockey is a sport discipline, in which championship performance is mainly determined by functional features and somatic variables. The main goal of this paper was the estimation of values of basic somatic features and selected fitness variables, as well as their relationships, in ice hockey players of different level. The research was carried out on members of national teams,

Teresa Socha; Tomasz Skowronek; Stanislaw Socha

2006-01-01

131

Kid Crosby or Golden Boy: Sidney Crosby, Canadian national identity, and the policing of hockey masculinity  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, I will explore how Canadian national identity is constructed with regard to ice hockey. National Hockey League (NHL) star, Sidney Crosby has been positioned as an important symbol of Canadian national identity. Given Crosby’s perceived importance, particularly within the Canadian media, I will examine how he is constructed as an appropriate model of Canadian masculinity and Canadian

Kristi A Allain

2011-01-01

132

In-Game Fatigue Influences Concussions in National Hockey League Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of concussions and other head injuries are increasing in the National Hockey League (NHL). The factors that may influence concussion risk in hockey remain largely unknown. In the current study, data on 787 NHL players from the 2001–2002 season were examined. It was found that a player's average ice time per game was a significant predictor of concussion.

Sean T. Stevens; Maryse Lassonde; Louis de Beaumont; Julian Paul Keenan

2008-01-01

133

The planarity of the stickface motion in the field hockey hit  

Microsoft Academic Search

The field hockey hit is an important but poorly understood stroke. In this study, we investigated the planarity of the stickface motion during the downswing to better characterize the kinematics and to assess the suitability of planar pendulum models for simulating the hit. Thirteen experienced female field hockey players were filmed executing hits with a single approach step, and the

Alexander P. Willmott; Jesús Dapena

2012-01-01

134

Do Youth Hockey Coaches Allow Players With a Known Concussion to Participate in a Game?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ice hockey is a high-risk sport for concussion. It is important that coaches have an understanding of concussion, although previous studies have demonstrated poor knowledge of concussion recognition and management by youth coaches. A cross-sectional survey with 7 case scenarios was completed by 314 youth hockey coaches. Each case scenario described a player with a concussion during a game, and

Harry Bramley; Christopher Kroft; David Polk; Ty Newberry; Matthew Silvis

2012-01-01

135

Sources of Stress in NCAA Division I Women Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of stress experienced by NCAA Division I women ice hockey players. Individual interviews consisting of open-ended questions were carried out with six elite athletes. The results of the qualitative analysis identified three main categories of stress: (a) hockey pressures, which included the transition to and the advantages of playing Division

Tracy L. Heller; Gordon A. Bloom; Graham I. Neil; John H. Salmela

2005-01-01

136

The Estimated Rents of a Top-Flight Men’s College Hockey Player  

Microsoft Academic Search

We employed a methodology similar to Brown (1993, 1994) to estimate the marginal revenue generated by a top-flight NCAA Division I college hockey player. We added to the extant literature in two ways. First, the previous research focused on college basketball and football players. This is the first attempt to consider the case of college hockey players. Second, previous research

Leo H. Kahane

2012-01-01

137

First-Generation Jet Propulsion Laboratory 'Hockey-Puck' Free-Flying Magnetometers for Distributed In-Situ Multiprobe Measurement of Current Density Filamentation in the Northern Auroral Zone: Enstrophy Mission.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The sub-orbital rocket mission was a collaborative project between the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to study filamentation phenomena in the northern Auroral zone. The Enstrophy mission test flies...

H. Javadi B. Blaes M. Boehm K. Boykins J. Gibbs W. Goodman U. Lieneweg J. Lux K. Lynch P. Narvaez

2000-01-01

138

Playing hockey, riding motorcycles, and the ethics of protection.  

PubMed

Ice hockey and motorcycle riding are increasingly popular activities in the United States that are associated with high risks of head and facial injuries. In both, effective head and facial protective equipment are available. Yet the debates about safety policies regarding the use of head protection in these activities have taken different forms, in terms of the influence of epidemiological data as well as of the ethical concerns raised. I examine these debates over injury prevention in the context of leisure activities, in which the public health duty to prevent avoidable harm must be balanced with the freedom to assume voluntary risks. PMID:23078472

Bachynski, Kathleen E

2012-10-18

139

Ice Hockey Injuries in a Japanese Elite Team: A 3-Year Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Context: As the Asian Ice Hockey League gradually expands and becomes more competitive, ice hockey-related injuries may increase. However, no reports have been published on ice hockey injuries in Japan, including the method of injury and the daily supervision of the players during the regular season. Objective: To prospectively study the incidence, types, and mechanisms of ice hockey injuries in an elite Japanese ice hockey team. Design: Prospective observational cohort study design. Setting: An elite ice hockey team, Tokyo, Japan. Patients or Other Participants: Ninety-four players during the 2002–2005 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): Data were collected for 3 consecutive seasons using an injury reporting form. Results: The overall game injury rate was 74.3 per 1000 player-game hours and 11.7 per 1000 player-game hours for injuries resulting in any time loss. The overall practice injury rates were 11.2 per 1000 player-practice hours and 1.1 per 1000 player-practice hours for injuries resulting in any time loss. Forwards had the highest rate of injury, followed by defensemen and then goalkeepers. Contusions were the most common injury, followed by strains, lacerations, and sprains. Conclusions: Most injuries among Japanese ice hockey players occurred during games. Game or play intensity may influence the injury rate during games.

Kuzuhara, Kenji; Shimamoto, Hideki; Mase, Yasuyoshi

2009-01-01

140

Checking in: an analysis of the (lack of) body checking in women's ice hockey.  

PubMed

Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not incorporate checking, female ice hockey players are not afforded the same opportunity to flourish as men and experience bodily agency, which results in continued male domination of the game, therefore, indirectly reinforcing a gender hierarchy in hockey and society. PMID:22978197

Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

2012-09-01

141

Age and competition level on injuries in female ice hockey.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to describe the number, types and locations of known injuries occurring across different age categories and levels of competition in female ice hockey within the Ontario Women's Hockey Association from 2004/05 to 2007/08. We further examined under which aforementioned factors and combination of factors an unusually high or low number of injuries was recorded. Secondary analysis of anonymized injury data was conducted. The most common known injury type was strain/sprain, followed by concussion while the most frequent injury location was head/face/mouth. Analysis of deviance indicated that a significantly higher than expected number of sprain/strain, concussion and laceration injuries were recorded compared to all other injury types. In addition, there were a higher number of injuries recorded at the AA level compared to all other levels of competition. Finally, the age categories of Peewee, Midget and Intermediate within the AA level of competition, as well as Senior/Adult within the Houseleague level of competition also recorded a significantly higher number of injuries compared to other combinations of descriptive factors. Further research with female youth is needed to better understand the high number of injuries, including concussions, reported overall. PMID:23516144

Keightley, M; Reed, N; Green, S; Taha, T

2013-03-20

142

Physical demands and physiological responses during elite field hockey.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of elite men's field hockey using modern time-motion analysis techniques. 18 elite male players (age: 24.4 ± 4.5 yrs) participated in 5 matches, during which physical outputs of players were quantified using GPS units and heart rate monitors. The mean total distance covered by each individual player was 6798 ± 2009 m. Mean total distance covered per position for 70 min (position (70)) was 8160 ± 428 m. Distance covered per position (70) decreased by 4.8% between the 1 (st )and 2 (nd) halves ( P < 0.05). Fullbacks covered significantly less total distance than all other positions ( P < 0.05). High-intensity running (>19 km.h (-1)) comprised 6.1% (479 ± 108 m) of the total distance covered and involved 34 ± 12 sprints per player, with an average duration of 3.3 s. Average HR was higher in the 1 (st) half (86.7% HR (max)) than the 2 (nd) half, (84.4% HR (max)), though this was not significant ( P = 0.06). The results suggest that modern day elite field hockey is a physically demanding team sport. Quantification of the demands and outputs of players at this level provides a useful framework on which to develop conditioning practices. The difference in physical outputs observed for some positions suggests position-specific conditioning is required at the elite level. PMID:21563026

Lythe, J; Kilding, A E

2011-05-11

143

Personality and Injury Risk Among Professional Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

Abstract: Background: Although much is known about risk for athletic injury, research on the roles of individual differences in personality and temperament on athletic injury has lagged. We hypothesized that professional athletes with high sensation-seeking and extraversion scores, and with low effortful control scores, would experience more injuries over the course of a season, would have more severe injuries, and would miss more total days of play. Methods: Prospective design with questionnaire report at time one and injury tracking throughout an 18-week athletic season. Setting: Professional hockey team in the United States. Participants: Eighteen professional hockey players (ages 21-33). Measurement: Players completed self-report personality (Sensation-Seeking Scale, Form V) and temperament (the Adult Temperament Questionnaire) measures. Quantity and severity of injury, as well as playing time missed, were tracked for 18 weeks. Results: On average, players experienced almost 6 injuries causing a loss of 10 playing days through the season. Those players scoring high on Boredom Susceptibility and Total Sensation-Seeking incurred more total injuries. Those scoring high on temperamental neutral perceptual sensitivity suffered more severe injuries. Conclusions: Athletes who suffered more injuries reported a preference for stimulating environments and boredom with non-stimulating environments. Injury severity was not correlated with sensation-seeking but was related to temperamental perceptual sensitivity. Implications for identification of injury-prone athletes, pre-injury training, and post-injury treatment are discussed.

Osborn, Zachary H; Blanton, Paul D; Schwebel, David C

2009-01-01

144

Injury Rates in House League, Select, and Representative Youth Ice Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

WILLER, B., B. KROETSCH, S. DARLING, A. HUTSON, and J. LEDDY. Injury Rates in House League, Select, and Representative Youth Ice Hockey. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 37, No. 10, pp. 1658-1663, 2005. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine injury rates in a youth ice hockey program over two seasons (2002-2004). Injury rates for age groups (4-18

BARRY WILLER; BETH KROETSCH; SCOTT DARLING; ALAN HUTSON; JOHN LEDDY

2005-01-01

145

Age-related changes in selected morphological, physiological and biochemical variables of Indian field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to find out the age-related changes in selected morphological, physiological and biochemical variables of Indian field hockey players. One hundred and twenty (N = 120) field hockey players volunteered for this study. The players were divided equally into four groups (n=30): under 16 years (U16); under 19 years (U19); under 23 years (U23)

Indranil Manna; Gulshan Lal Khanna; Prakash Chandra Dhara

2010-01-01

146

Facial protection and head injuries in ice hockey: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To summarise the best available evidence to determine if facial protection reduces head injury in ice hockey.Data Sources:MEDLINE and Cochrane databases through January 2009.Review Methods:Utilising terms: “head injuries,” “craniocerebral trauma [MeSH]”, “head injuries, closed [MeSH]”, head injuries, penetrating [MeSH]”, “face mask”, “face shield”, “visor” and “hockey”, 24 articles were identified through our systematic literature search. Of these, six studies met

C Asplund; S Bettcher; J Borchers

2009-01-01

147

High prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of asthma was studied in a ice hockey team compared with both a floor ball team and the Swiss population. Lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, asthma symptoms and exercise-induced asthma were measured in a cross-sectional prospective study. A positive response to the methacholine bronchial provocation test was found in 34.6% of the ice hockey players and 20.8%

J. D. Leuppi; M. Kuhn; C. Comminot; W. H. Reinhart

1998-01-01

148

Whole-body predictors of wrist shot accuracy in ice hockey: a kinematic analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to identify joint angular kinematics that corresponds to shooting accuracy in the stationary ice hockey wrist shot. Twenty-four subjects participated in this study, each performing 10 successful shots on four shooting targets. An eight-camera infra-red motion capture system (240 Hz), along with passive reflective markers, was used to record motion of the joints, hockey stick,

Yannick Michaud-Paquette; Patrick Magee; David Pearsall; René Turcotte

2011-01-01

149

GPS analysis of elite women's field hockey training and competition.  

PubMed

This study investigated the physiological demands of women's field hockey competition and compared these demands to those experienced during game-based training activities. Fourteen elite women field hockey players (mean +/- SD; age, 23.3 +/- 3.2 years; maximal oxygen consumption, 53.5 +/- 4.3 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) participated in this study. Global positioning satellite (GPS) system analysis was completed during 19 training appearances and 32 Australian Hockey League (AHL) appearances. All training sessions consisted of game-based activities (i.e., small-sided training games) that were played on a reduced-sized pitch. Movement was recorded by a global positioning satellite unit sampling at 5 Hz. Data were categorized into discreet movement velocity bands, corresponding to low-intensity (0-1 m.s(-1)), moderate-intensity (1-3 m.s(-1) and 3-5 m.s(-1)), and high-intensity (5-7 m.s(-1) and >7 m.s(-1)) activities. Players covered 6.6 km (range: 3.4-9.5 km) over the course of the match. Midfielders spent more time and covered greater distances in high-intensity running (i.e., >5 m.s(-1)) than strikers and defenders. The number of high-velocity and high-acceleration efforts over the course of a match was greater in midfielders. In comparison to competition, game-based training sessions resulted in more time spent in low-intensity (i.e., 0-1 m.s(-1)) activities and less time spent in moderate (i.e., 1-3 m.s(-1) and 3-5 m.s(-1)) and high-intensity (i.e., 5-7 m.s(-1) and >7 m.s(-1)) activities. Although game-based training is likely to be useful for improving the skill levels of players, the skill activities used in the present study did not reflect the physiological demands of competition, with players spending more time in low-intensity activities and less time in high-intensity activities than competition. Modifications in training group size and/or drill design and complexity may better simulate the physiological demands of competition. PMID:20386482

Gabbett, Tim J

2010-05-01

150

Sports chiropractic management at the World Ice Hockey Championships  

PubMed Central

Background Ice hockey is an international sport. Injuries occur in a full body fashion, to a number of tissues, commonly through body contact. There is a lack of literature documenting the scope of sports chiropractic practice. Thus, it was the aim to document the type, scope and severity of conditions presenting to, and the treatment provided by, the New Zealand team chiropractor acting as a primary health provider for the duration of the 2007 World Ice Hockey Championships. Methods All conditions presenting were recorded. Diagnosis was recorded along with clinical parameters of injury: injury type, severity, mechanism and whether referral or advanced imaging was required. All treatment provided was continuously recorded, including information on the number of treatments required and the reason, duration, type and location of treatment. Results Players presented for diagnosis of injury 50 times. Muscle (34%), joint (24%) and tendon injuries (18%) were most common. Players presented with a new injury 76% of the time. Most injuries had been present for less than one week (84%), with 53% occurring through a contact mechanism. Injuries were common at training and match locations. Only two injuries required the player to stop playing or training, both of which were referred for advanced imaging. During the study, 134 treatment consultations were rendered to 45 player injuries. Eighty per-cent of injuries were managed with four or less treatments. Three quarters of treatment was provided at training locations with treatment duration predominantly being between 11-15 minutes (71%) and 16-20 minutes (27%). Most treatment delivered was passive in nature (71%) although combination active and passive care was provided (27%). Treatment typically involved joint (81%) and soft tissue based therapies (81%) and was delivered in a full body manner. Conclusions This study documented the injury profile of ice hockey at an international level of competition. It documented the conditions presenting to a chiropractor for diagnosis and the treatment provided. Treatment was consistent with that recommended for chiropractic management of athletic injuries. This documentation of sports chiropractic scope of practice fills a void in the literature and assists in determining a role for sports chiropractors as primary health providers or in multidisciplinary sports management teams.

2010-01-01

151

Relationships to skating performance in competitive hockey players.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify off-ice variables that would correlate to on-ice skating sprint performance and cornering ability. Previous literature has not reported any off-ice testing variables that strongly correlate to on-ice cornering ability in ice hockey players. Thirty-six male hockey players aged 15-22 years (mean +/- SD: 16.3 +/- 1.7 years; weight = 70.8 +/- 10.4 kg; height = 175.6 +/- 4.1 cm) with an average of 10.3 +/- 3.0 years hockey playing experience (most at AA and AAA levels) participated in the study. The on-ice tests included a 35-m sprint and the cornering S test. The off-ice tests included the following: 30-m sprint, vertical jump, broad jump, 3 hop jump, Edgren side shuffle, Hexagon agility, side support, push-ups, and 15-second modified Wingate. The on-ice sprint test and cornering S test were strongly correlated (r = 0.70; p < 0.001). While many off-ice tests correlated with on-ice skating, measures of horizontal leg power (off-ice sprint and 3 hop jump) were the best predictors of on-ice skating performance, once weight and playing level were accounted for. These 4 variables accounted for a total of 78% (p < 0.0001) of the variance in on-ice sprint performance. No off-ice test accounted for unique variance in S-cornering performance beyond weight, playing level, and skating sprint performance. These data indicate that coaches should include horizontal power tests of off-ice sprint and 3 hop jump to adequately assess skating ability. To improve on-ice skating performance and cornering ability, coaches should also focus on the development of horizontal power through specific off-ice training, although future research will determine whether off-ice improvements in horizontal power directly transfer to improvements in on-ice skating. PMID:17685681

Farlinger, Chris M; Kruisselbrink, L Darren; Fowles, Jonathon R

2007-08-01

152

Evaluation of jump protocols to assess leg power and predict hockey playing potential.  

PubMed

The purposes of this study were (a) to determine the measurement device and jumping protocol most appropriate for testing the leg power of elite hockey players and (b) to assess the relationship of leg power measurements to hockey playing ability as indicated by draft selection order. Comparisons were made of leg power measurements from the top 95 players entering the National Hockey League Entry Draft using 2 devices (Vertec and Just Jump) and 2 jump protocols (countermovement and squat). Players' leg powers were ranked from highest to lowest power using each device and protocol and were correlated with draft selection order. Vertec leg power measurements were highest (5,511-5,631 W), but there were no significant differences in power between the 2 jumping protocols on either device. Vertec squat jump provided the highest correlation (0.47) between leg power ranking and selection order and was judged to most closely approximate the full-body coordinated movements involved in hockey. The Vertec device using a squat jump protocol is most appropriate for coaches and fitness specialists to use when evaluating hockey potential based on the off-ice leg power measurements of elite hockey players. PMID:18076264

Burr, Jamie F; Jamnik, Veronica K; Dogra, Shilpa; Gledhill, Norman

2007-11-01

153

Influence of footwear choice, velocity and surfaces on tibial accelerations experienced by field hockey participants during running  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field hockey is a physically demanding sport, exposing participants to potential overuse injuries linked to high levels of impact shock. This study evaluated the influence of footwear, surface and running velocity on impact shock in field hockey participants. Nine elite university male field hockey participants (age 21?±?1.69 years, height 175.75?±?6.56?cm and mass 78.13?±?12.11?kg) volunteered for this study. A skin-mounted accelerometer

Andrew Greenhalgh; Jonathan Sinclair; Andrew Leat; Nachiappan Chockalingam

2012-01-01

154

Site-Specific Bone Mass Differences of the Lower Extremities in 17YearOld Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bone mass in the pelvis and lower extremities in young ice hockey players, and especially to investigate whether any differences are related to the type and magnitude,of weight- bearing loading and muscle,stress. The ice hockey,group consisted of 22 boys (mean age 16.9 ± 0.3) from three different ice hockey,teams training

P. Nordström; R. Lorentzon

1996-01-01

155

Institutionalized rule violation and control in organized minor league hockey.  

PubMed

In minor league hockey, rule violation including the illegitimate use of force is institutionalized behaviour. Illegitimate tactics are among the minimal general criteria for the assessment and selection of players. No formal mechanism operates to socialize players to obey normative rules. The "official" control system is ineffective in preventing normative rule violation. However, it regulates the game according to constitutive rules preventing its disorganization, and creates the impression that players actually govern their conduct according to normative rules. An informal control system (combative and aggressive in orientation) legitimizes and regulates the amount and kinds of rule violation occurring, and highlights collective meanings of the occupation. A scheme is presented for reducing institutionalized rule violation. Team success (victory) and rule conformity are considered desirable and are rewarded. What value to assign these two "things" remains problematic. To avoid undermining motivation to win the contest, more value must be assigned team success than rule conformity. The question is how much more. PMID:498408

Vaz, E W

1979-03-01

156

The Ice Hockey Injury An Interrupted Case Study  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The high school ice hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough and Rick, the star player, is slammed against the boards. Injured, he has to be  escorted from the ice. This interrupted case study follows Ricks health as it deteriorates over the next few hours. Students are presented with Rick’s symptoms and use their knowledge of anatomy and physiology to diagnose the problem. The case was developed for a one-semester animal physiology course taken mostly by sophomore and junior biology or general science majors. It could also be used in a freshman general biology course, anatomy and physiology course, or human physiology course for non-science majors.

Stephens, Phil

2004-01-01

157

Explosive Model Tarantula V1/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17: No. 2.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Tarantula V1 is a kinetic package for reactive flow codes that seeks to describe initiation, failure, dead zones and detonation simultaneously. The most important parameter is P1, the pressure between the initiation and failure regions. Both dead zone for...

P. Vitello P. C. Souers

2009-01-01

158

Explosive Model Tarantula V1/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17: #2  

SciTech Connect

Tarantula V1 is a kinetic package for reactive flow codes that seeks to describe initiation, failure, dead zones and detonation simultaneously. The most important parameter is P1, the pressure between the initiation and failure regions. Both dead zone formation and failure can be largely controlled with this knob. However, V1 does failure with low settings and dead zones with higher settings, so that it cannot fulfill its purpose in the current format. To this end, V2 is under test. The derivation of the initiation threshold P0 is discussed. The derivation of the initiation pressure-tau curve as an output of Tarantula shows that the initiation package is sound. A desensitization package is also considered.

Souers, P C; Vitello, P

2009-05-01

159

Career/Life Transition Needs of National Hockey League Players and Career-Life Transition Needs of National Hockey League Players: Spouses Perspectives. Final Reports Prepared for the National Hockey League Players' Association.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two surveys were conducted regarding the career and life transition needs of National Hockey League (NHL) players and their spouses. The Professional Athletes' Career Transition Inventory was distributed to player representatives and members of eight NHL teams. Results revealed that 85 percent of players believed it important that help be provided…

Blann, Wayne; Zaichkowsky, Leonard

160

Proceedings from the Ice Hockey Summit on concussion: a call to action.  

PubMed

The objective of this proceedings is to integrate the concussion in sport literature and sport science research on safety in ice hockey to develop an action plan to reduce the risk, incidence, severity, and consequences of concussion in ice hockey. A rationale paper outlining a collaborative action plan to address concussions in hockey was posted for review two months prior to the Ice Hockey Summit: Action on Concussion. Focused presentations devoted specifically to concussion in ice hockey were presented during the Summit and breakout sessions were used to develop strategies to reduce concussion in the sport. This proceedings and a detailed scientific review (a matrix of solutions) were written to disseminate the evidence-based information and resulting concussion reduction strategies. The manuscripts were reviewed by the authors, advisors and contributors to ensure that the opinions and recommendations reflect the current level of knowledge on concussion in hockey. Six components of a potential solution were articulated in the Rationale paper and became the topics for breakout groups that followed the professional, scientific lectures. Topics that formed the core of the action plan were: metrics and databases; recognizing, managing and return to play; hockey equipment and ice arenas; prevention and education; rules and regulations; and expedient communication of the outcomes. The attendees in breakout sessions identified action items for each section. The most highly ranked action items were brought to a vote in the open assembly, using an Audience Response System (ARS). The strategic planning process was conducted to assess: Where are we at?; Where must we get to?; and What strategies are necessary to make progress on the prioritized action items? Three prioritized action items for each component of the solution and the percentage of the votes received are listed in the body of this proceedings. PMID:21756209

Smith, A; Stuart, M; Greenwald, R; Benson, B; Dodick, D; Emery, C; Finnoff, J; Mihalik, J; Roberts, W; Sullivan, C A; Meeuwisse, W

2011-07-01

161

“The More Things Change, the More They …”: Commentary During Women's Ice Hockey at the 2010 Olympic Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research uses textual analysis rooted in cultural studies to investigate how commentary constructed women hockey players during the 2010 Olympics, one of the biggest mediated sporting events in the world. Games were aired on NBC's cable affiliates during non-prime-time hours, a departure from previous Olympic studies. Hockey is a sport that is traditionally violent, and women are often viewed

Kelly Poniatowski; Marie Hardin

2012-01-01

162

Developmental contexts and sporting success: birth date and birthplace effects in national hockey league draftees 2000–2005  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To examine relative age and birth place effects in hockey players drafted to play in the National Hockey League (NHL) between 2000 and 2005 and determine whether these factors influenced when players were chosen in the draft.Methods: 1013 North American draftees were evaluated from the official NHL website, which provided birthplace, date of birth and selection order in the

Joseph Baker; A Jane Logan

2007-01-01

163

The Association of Hip Strength and Flexibility With the Incidence of Adductor Muscle Strains in Professional Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

This prospective study was conducted to determine whether hip muscle strength and flexibility play a role in the incidence of adductor and hip flexor strains in National Hockey League ice hockey team players. Hip flexion, abduction, and adduction strength were measured in 81 players before two consecutive seasons. Thirty-four players were cut, traded, or sent to the minor league before

Timothy F. Tyler; Stephen J. Nicholas; Richard J. Campbell; Malachy P. McHugh

2001-01-01

164

Proprioception of Foot and Ankle Complex in Young Regular Practitioners of Ice Hockey, Ballet Dancing and Running  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the proprioception of the foot and ankle complex in regular ice hockey practitioners, runners, and ballet dancers. A total of 45 young people with different exercise habits formed four groups: the ice hockey, ballet dancing, running, and sedentary groups. Kinesthesia of the foot and ankle complex was measured in plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), inversion (IV), and eversion

Jing Xian Li; Dong Qing Xu; Blaine Hoshizaki

2009-01-01

165

Airway inflammation, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in elite ice hockey players.  

PubMed

There is little information of lower respiratory symptoms, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation in elite ice hockey players. A total of 88 highly trained ice hockey players and 47 control subjects were studied. All the subjects were subjected to skin-prick tests, resting spirometry examinations and histamine-challenge tests. Adequate induced sputum samples were obtained from 68 of the ice hockey players and from 18 symptom-free control subjects on a separate day. Bronchial hyperresponsiveness in a histamine-challenge test was found in 21 (24%) of the athletes and in five (11%) of the controls. Current asthma (current asthmatic symptoms and increased bronchial responsiveness) was observed in 13 (15%) of the athletes and in one (2%) of the control subjects. Total asthma (current asthma or previously physician-diagnosed asthma) occurred in 19 (22%) of the athletes and in two (4%) of the controls. Atopy, according to skin-prick tests, was observed in 51 (58%) of the athletes and 17 (36%) of the control subjects. The differential cell counts of eosinophils (2.6 versus 0.2%) and neutrophils (80.9 versus 29.9%) in the sputum samples of the ice hockey players were significantly higher than in those of the control subjects. Asthma is common in elite ice hockey players and they show signs of a mixed type of neutrophilic and eosinophilic airway inflammation. Inhalation of cold air associated with exposure to indoor pollutants during intensive training is a possible causative factor. PMID:12882460

Lumme, A; Haahtela, T; Ounap, J; Rytilä, P; Obase, Y; Helenius, M; Remes, V; Helenius, I

2003-07-01

166

Lisfranc injury in a national hockey league player: a case report.  

PubMed

Tarsometatarsal joint dislocations and fracture-dislocations are uncommon injuries most frequently resulting from high-energy trauma as encountered in crush injuries, falls, and motor vehicle accidents. Although less common in athletes, this injury is being recognized with greater frequency and may carry a poor prognosis for return to high levels of competition. These injuries present a considerable challenge to orthopedic surgeons caring for athletes because of the prolonged period of recovery often required [ 1,2,5,6,12]. The literature contains descriptions of this injury in football players, gymnasts, tennis players, and track and field athletes [2,5,9]. To our knowledge, no report of such a Lisfranc injury to a hockey player has been described. This is a case report of a National Hockey League player that sustained a Lisfranc injury requiring surgical stabilization, but was able to return to elite hockey play. PMID:17455124

Patillo, D; Rudzki, J R; Johnson, J E; Matava, M J; Wright, R

2007-04-23

167

The effect of caffeine ingestion on field hockey skill performance following physical fatigue.  

PubMed

This study examined the impact of caffeine ingestion on field hockey skill performance following high-intensity fatigue. Thirteen male hockey players (mean age = 21.1 ± 1.2 years) performed hockey sprint dribble and ball handling tests at rest and after a bout of total body fatigue (90% maximal capacity) following caffeine (5 mg kg(-1)) or placebo ingestion. Sprint dribble times were slower postfatigue compared with rest but were significantly faster postfatigue with caffeine compared with postfatigue with placebo ingestion (P < 0.01). Ball handling scores were higher at rest compared with postfatigue, but scores postfatigue were higher following caffeine than placebo ingestion (P < 0.01). Rating of perceived exhaustion (RPE) was lower (P < 0.01) and readiness to invest physical (P < 0.01) and mental effort (P = 0.01) were significantly higher in the caffeine condition. Caffeine ingestion may therefore be effective in offsetting decrements in skilled performance associated with fatigue. PMID:22242735

Duncan, Michael J; Taylor, Samantha; Lyons, Mark

2012-01-01

168

Do youth hockey coaches allow players with a known concussion to participate in a game?  

PubMed

Ice hockey is a high-risk sport for concussion. It is important that coaches have an understanding of concussion, although previous studies have demonstrated poor knowledge of concussion recognition and management by youth coaches. A cross-sectional survey with 7 case scenarios was completed by 314 youth hockey coaches. Each case scenario described a player with a concussion during a game, and scores reflected how the coach would respond to each scenario. Although most coaches would not allow a player to continue participating in a game after suffering a concussion, there was a small percentage that would. Statistical analysis found an inverse relationship between the coaches' age and consideration of continued participation. This places athletes at significant risk for further injury and is not consistent with current concussion guidelines. USA Hockey should provide additional concussion training for their coaches as well as mandatory health care clearance following a concussion. PMID:21937746

Bramley, Harry; Kroft, Christopher; Polk, David; Newberry, Ty; Silvis, Matthew

2011-09-21

169

Ice hockey players using a weighted implement when training on the ice: a randomized control trial.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for improving hockey players'performance using a weighted implement on the ice. Forty-eight players were tested using a grip strength dynamometer They also were assessed on their abilities to stick-handle. The participants were randomly placed into a control or research group. The conditioning drills were performed for 10-15 min 3 days/week for 6 weeks. Use of the weighted implement resulted in a significantly enhanced grip strength endurance and stick-handling ability (p < .05). Using weighted implements prior to a regular ice hockey training session may be of benefit to young hockey players to enhance their grip strength endurance and stick-handling abilities. PMID:19408467

Stark, Timothy W; Tvoric, Bojan; Walker, Bruce; Noonan, Dom; Sibla, Janeene

2009-03-01

170

Use of computer based testing of youth hockey players with concussions.  

PubMed

Concussion is a potentially serious injury for athletes. Recent statistics suggest that approximately 300,000 sports-related traumatic brain injuries occur annually in the United States. Soccer, rugby, football, and ice hockey are all considered high-risk team sports for concussion. Hockey-related concussions are of particular concern in Canada, where over 500,000 players compete annually in ice hockey. The United States is now registering similar numbers of players. Return to play issues are one of the most difficult issues for physicians caring for concussed athletes. The advent of computerized neuropsychological testing adds another tool to assist in this process. It also appears to enhance the education process for players, coaches, and parents on the potential seriousness of concussion for these young athletes. PMID:17917167

Brooks, David A

2007-01-01

171

Gender Differences in Head Impacts Sustained by Collegiate Ice Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study aims to quantify the frequency, magnitude, and location of head impacts sustained by male and female collegiate ice hockey players over two seasons of play. Methods Over two seasons, 88 collegiate athletes (51 female, 37 male) on two female and male NCAA varsity ice hockey teams wore instrumented helmets. Each helmet was equipped with 6 single-axis accelerometers and a miniature data acquisition system to capture and record head impacts sustained during play. Data collected from the helmets were post-processed to compute linear and rotational acceleration of the head as well as impact location. The head impact exposure data (frequency, location, and magnitude) were then compared across gender. Results Female hockey players experienced a significantly lower (p < 0.001) number of impacts per athlete exposure than males (female: 1.7 ± 0.7; male: 2.9 ± 1.2). The frequency of impacts by location was the same between gender (p > 0.278) for all locations except the right side of the head, where males received fewer impacts than females (p = 0.031). Female hockey players were 1.1 times more likely than males to sustain an impact less than 50 g while males were 1.3 times more likely to sustain an impact greater than 100 g. Similarly, males were 1.9 times more likely to sustain an impact with peak rotational acceleration greater than 5,000 rad/s2 and 3.5 times more likely to sustain an impact greater than 10,000 rad/s2. Conclusions Although the incidence of concussion has typically been higher for female hockey players than male hockey players, female players sustain fewer impacts and impacts resulting in lower head acceleration than males. Further study is required to better understand the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that lead to higher rates of concussion for females that have been previously reported.

Brainard, Lindley L.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Crisco, Joseph J.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Maerlender, Arthur C.; Greenwald, Richard M.

2013-01-01

172

Reliability of a repeated-sprint test for field-hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a repeated-sprint test, specifically designed for field-hockey, as it was based directly on the time–motion analysis of elite level competition. The test consisted of 6×30-m over-ground sprints departing on 25s, with an active recovery (?3.1–3.3ms?1) between sprints. Ten highly trained, male, field-hockey players (mean±S.D.: age, 23±3 years; body mass,

M. Spencer; M. Fitzsimons; B. Dawson; D. Bishop; C. Goodman

2006-01-01

173

Lesbian erotics at women's hockey: fans, flashing, and the Booby Orrs.  

PubMed

This article analyzes a public breast flashing event that occurred during the women's ice hockey tournament at the OutGames/Western Cup Lesbigay athletic event in 2007. Employing a postfoundational perspective, I first contextualize the ice hockey subculture of the team called the Booby Orrs, outlining some of our history, norms, and context. I then tell the particular story that leads to our fans flashing their breasts as we finally scored some goals. I end with my analysis of this event: how a public nude display of sexualized women's breasts in a lesbian-coded public space prompted a resistant sporting moment, at least contingently. PMID:19598052

Davidson, Judy

2009-01-01

174

Teres major muscle tear in two professional ice hockey players: cases study and literature review.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is a sport renowned for its numerous injuries; different studies report between 13.8 and 20 lesions per 1000 athlete exposures. Exactly 65.5% of these injuries occur during games, compared to 34.5% during training sessions. And 35.1% of all injuries involve the lower extremity and 29.7% the upper extremity (results drawn from games and training combined). Determining whether muscle injuries are extrinsic (contusions) or intrinsic (tears) is of utmost importance since the former generally require simple follow-up, whereas the latter necessitates further investigations, appropriate treatment and often prolonged absence from sports for the injured athlete. To our knowledge, no publication to date has reported isolated damage of the teres major muscle in Ice Hockey players. Seven cases were reported amongst baseball pitchers. Two cases presented after a waterskiing traction accident and a further case has been described in a tennis player. In the present study, we report two cases of isolated teres major tear in ice hockey players. These two athletes were both professional players competing at the highest level in the Swiss Ice Hockey League. PMID:22197182

Grosclaude, M; Najihi, N; Lädermann, A; Menetrey, J; Ziltener, J-L

2011-12-24

175

Coordination profiles of the expert field hockey drive according to field roles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine coordination profiles for the field hockey drive. Nine elite female players performed five drives each. They were asked to primarily maximize ball placement accuracy, and secondly to drive with high velocity. An optical motion capture system recorded the displacement of six markers on the joints of the players' arms as they performed

P. Brétigny; D. Leroy; C. Button; D. Chollet; L. Seifert

2011-01-01

176

When Is the Honeymoon Over? National Hockey League Attendance, 1970­2003  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper uses a Tobit analysis to test for the presence of a honeymoon effect for National Hockey League (NHL) arenas using pooled cross-section time series samples from 1970 to 2003. No previous NHL attendance demand or attendance-related study has tested for such an effect. We estimate that the opening of a new arena increases attendance demand 15 to 20

John C. Leadley; Zenon X. Zygmont

2006-01-01

177

Table Hockey: Attack or Linking? Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with an Autistic Boy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper explores some issues that might arise when one considers having a table hockey game in the therapy room, and describes how an autistic boy, aged four-and-a-half when starting treatment, used that game. The unfolding process from withdrawal to separateness, intersubjectivity and playfulness is illustrated by the progress of two years of…

Nilsson, May

2009-01-01

178

Laterality differences in elite ice hockey: an investigation of shooting and catching orientations.  

PubMed

Little is known about the implications of motor asymmetries for skilled performers in dynamic, time-constrained, team-based activities such as ice hockey. Three studies were conducted to examine laterality differences in ice hockey. Study 1 investigated laterality distributions across three leagues of increasing calibre. Among skating players, skill level was related to changes in laterality patterns based on position, while a significant increase in the proportion of left-catching goaltenders was found across the levels of competition. Study 2 examined laterality differences through a 90-year retrospective analysis of player performance measures within an evolving system. Regression analysis indicated right shot preferences were associated with scoring more goals, while left shot preferences were related to assisting more goals. Among goaltenders, right-catching preferences were associated with an increased save percentage compared with left-catching goaltenders. In Study 3, player-goaltender shootout interactions revealed left shooters to be less successful against right-catching goaltenders. Results suggest ice hockey supports models of skilled perception, and provide new information in the area of laterality and strategic frequency-dependent effects in ice hockey. PMID:21058167

Puterman, Jared; Schorer, Jörg; Baker, Joseph

2010-12-01

179

The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on…

Carlton, Dennis W.; Frankel, Alan S.; Landes, Elisabeth M.

2004-01-01

180

Developing a Profitability Model for Professional Sport Leagues: The Case of the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

Escalating costs in professional sport, increased competition from entertainment alternatives, and a recent labor dispute in the National Hockey League (NHL) provide the impetus to study the underlying structure of team profitability. Thecurrent study takes advantage of this opportunity by developing and testing a profitability model for NHL teams based on the underlying premise that there are multiple determinants to

John Nadeau; Norm OReilly

2006-01-01

181

Experiential Learning in the Introductory Class: The Role of Minor League Hockey in Teaching Social Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|To convince my students they are surrounded by social psychology, we attended a minor league hockey game. During the next class period I asked students to write a brief paragraph about their experiences. From those paragraphs I chose four reoccurring themes to analyze from a social psychological perspective. My introductory classes and I…

Forrest, Krista D.

2005-01-01

182

Savannah Hockey Classic: An Evaluation of Event Personality and Economic Impact  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2009, the Savannah Sports Council hosted its 11th annual Savannah Hockey Classic. In order to assist the future marketing of this event, a study was undertaken to assist the Savannah Sports Council in 3 major ways: (1) To obtain a consumer profile of spectators, (2) to explore the economic impact of the event on the city of Savannah, and

DeesWindy; HallTodd

2011-01-01

183

A PILOT SURVEY ON INJURY AND SAFETY CONCERNS IN INTERNATIONAL SLEDGE HOCKEY  

PubMed Central

Objective: To describe sledge hockey injury patterns, safety issues and to develop potential injury prevention strategies. Design: Pilot survey study of international sledge hockey professionals, including trainers, physiotherapists, physicians, coaches and/or general managers. Setting: Personal encounter or online correspondence. Respondents: Sledge hockey professionals; a total of 10 respondents from the 5 top-ranked international teams recruited by personal encounter or online correspondence. Main Outcome Measurements: Descriptive Data reports on sledge athlete injury characteristics, quality of rules and enforcement, player equipment, challenges in the medical management during competition, and overall safety. Results: Muscle strains and concussions were identified as common, and injuries were reported to affect the upper body more frequently than the lower body. Overuse and body checking were predominant injury mechanisms. Safety concerns included excessive elbowing, inexperienced refereeing and inadequate equipment standards. Conclusions: This paper is the first publication primarily focused on sledge hockey injury and safety. This information provides unique opportunity for the consideration of implementation and evaluation of safety strategies. Safety interventions could include improved hand protection, cut-resistant materials in high-risk areas, increased vigilance to reduce intentional head-contact, lowered rink boards and modified bathroom floor surfacing.

Finlayson, Heather; O'Connor, Russ; Anton, Hugh

2011-01-01

184

Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

2009-01-01

185

A Closer Look at the Relative Age Effect in the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

At young ages, a few extra months of development can make a big difference in size, strength, and athletic ability. A child who turns 5 years old in January will be nearly 20% older by the time a child born in December has their 5th birthday. In many sports, including hockey, children born in the early months of the calendar

Vittorio Addona; Philip A. Yates

2010-01-01

186

Combing Line and Point Correspondences to Calculate Homographies with Applications in Hockey Rink Registration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The goal of this project is to explore the use of a combination of line and point correspondences to improve the computation of homog- raphy transformations. The rink registration aspect of the UBC Hockey Tracking System currently uses only keypoint matches be- tween frames leaving the line information on the rink unutilized. The hypothesis is that use of line information

Elan Dubrofsky

187

Comparison of Oblique Versus Hockey-Stick Surgical Incision for Kidney Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hockey-stick surgical incision is becoming more popular than the oblique incision for kidney transplantations. Both incisions are convenient and comfortable. Both have some drawbacks, such as muscle denervation for the former, or section of lateral muscles for the latter. In this retrospective study, we compared these incisions with regard to the incidence of long-term complications, such as postincisional hernia,

G. Nanni; V. Tondolo; F. Citterio; J. Romagnoli; M. Borgetti; G. Boldrini; M. Castagneto

2005-01-01

188

Development of the interval endurance capacity in elite and sub-elite youth field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To gain more insight into the mechanisms that underlie the development of interval endurance capacity in talented youth field hockey players in the 12-19 age band. Methods: A total of 377 measurements were taken over three years. A longitudinal model for interval endurance capacity was developed using the multilevel modelling program MLwiN. With the model, scores on the interval

M. T. Elferink-Gemser; C. Visscher; M. A. J. van Duijn; K. A. P. M. Lemmink

2006-01-01

189

A numerical model to simulate micro-fracture of field hockey players due to jumping  

Microsoft Academic Search

A linear elastic fracture mechanics approach has been considered to understand the impact behavior of ankles and knees due to jumping. By using a crack increment model and a fatigue crack propagation model, simulation of the fracture due to repetitive jumps are evaluated. To aid the numerical calculation, an experimental study on standing jump by two Indian field hockey players

M. S. Hasan; H. Singh Ranu; J. E. Lander

1996-01-01

190

Tracking and recognizing actions of multiple hockey players using the boosted particle filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a system that can automatically track multiple hockey players and simultaneously recognize their actions given a single broadcast video sequence, where detection is complicated by a pan- ning, tilting, and zooming camera. There are three contributions. Firstly, we use the Histograms of Ori- ented Gradients (HOG) to represent the players, and introduce a probabilistic framework to model

Wei-lwun Lu; Kenji Okuma; James J. Little

2009-01-01

191

Coach Succession and Team Performance: The Impact of Ability and Timing -- Swedish Ice Hockey Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to identify a function for the team performance for professional ice hockey teams in Sweden. In order to understand how team performance relates to key variables such as coaching ability and coaching experience and succession, the OLS (Ordinary Least Squares) and the more robust quantile regression techniques are used to estimate team performance for

Khalik Salman; Leif Arnesson; Ghazi Shukur

2009-01-01

192

Methodological issues in qualitative sport research: Participant observation among hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although reflexive descriptions of field research experiences are well represented in the literature, there are very few explicit accounts of doing fieldwork among athletes. This paper is a natural history of a participant observation study conducted among a group of minor league hockey players. Its purpose is to provide future sport ethnographers with an account of some field strategies and

Charles P. Gallmeier

1988-01-01

193

Isokinetic muscular performance of the quadriceps in elite ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

On four occasions during a period of 17 months, iso kinetic maximum knee extensor output (peak torque and contractional work) and input (integrated electro myographic activity) during single and repetitive con tractions were measured in 10 male elite ice hockey players. The tests were performed in the middle and at the end of the competitive season, and after two off

Christer Johansson; Ronny Lorentzon; Axel R. Fugl-Meyer

1989-01-01

194

Ice Hockey Players Using a Weighted Implement when Training on the Ice: A Randomized Control Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for improving hockey players' performance using a weighted implement on the ice. Forty-eight players were tested using a grip strength dynamometer. They also were assessed on their abilities to stick-handle. The participants were randomly placed into a control or research group. The…

Stark, Timothy W.; Tvoric, Bojan; Walker, Bruce; Noonan, Dom; Sibla, Janeene

2009-01-01

195

Development of the left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation in adolescent ice hockey players evaluated with echocardiography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computerized echocardiography at rest was used to follow up the dynamics of left heart enlargement in adolescent ice hockey players aged 11 to 15 years. The first year of strength?endurance training did not lead to any remarkable change of echocardiographic parameters of the left heart ventricular size. A slight tendency to left ventricular hypertrophy appeared after 2 years of training,

Dušan Meško; Alexander Jurko; Mojmír Vrlík; Moniká Novomeská; Eugen Horniak; Dagmar Dzurenková

1993-01-01

196

“Isn't He a Good Guy?”: Constructions of Whiteness in the 2006 Olympic Hockey Tournament  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given sports’ valued cultural position, scholars argue that images of sports stars provide viewers with guidance about how “good” men should behave (Whannel, 2002). Drawing from cultural studies theories on race in sports, this study explores representations of White hockey players in the 2006 Winter Olympics television commentary. The authors suggest that the commentary provides lessons to viewers by way

Kelly Poniatowski; Erin Whiteside

2012-01-01

197

Checking in: An Analysis of the (Lack of) Body Checking in Women's Ice Hockey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper, we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not…

Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

2012-01-01

198

A 7-year review of men's and women's ice hockey injuries in the NCAA  

PubMed Central

Background Ice hockey is a high-speed collision sport with recognized injury potential. Body checking, identified as a primary cause of injury, is allowed in men’s hockey but is not allowed at any level for female players. The injury patterns in collegiate hockey should reflect this fundamental difference in how the game is played. In this study, we reviewed the injuries sustained by National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) hockey players over a 7-year period. Methods We conducted a retrospective database review of injuries and exposures reported to the Injury Surveillance System to determine rates of injury or differences in the pattern of injury between the sexes. Results The rate of injury during games for men (18.69/1000 athlete-exposures [AEs]) and women (12.10/1000 AEs) was significantly higher than the rate of injury during practice. The rate of concussion was 0.72/1000 AEs for men and 0.82/1000 AEs for women, and the rate remained stable over the study period. Player contact was the cause of concussions in game situations for 41% of women and 72% of men. Conclusion Both men and women had increased rates of practice-related injuries that resulted in time loss during the study period. In addition, there were high rates of concussions from player contact. The concussion rate in women was higher than expected. A more detailed examination with focused data collection may impact these findings.

Agel, Julie; Harvey, Edward J.

2010-01-01

199

Complex training in ice hockey: the effects of a heavy resisted sprint on subsequent ice-hockey sprint performance.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to investigate the acute effect of a heavy resisted sprint when used as a preload exercise to enhance subsequent 25-m on-ice sprint performance. Eleven competitive ice-hockey players (mean ± SD: Age = 22.09 ± 3.05 years; Body Mass = 83.47 ± 11.7 kg; Height = 1.794 ± 0.060 m) from the English National League participated in a same-subject repeated-measures design, involving 2 experimental conditions. During condition 1, participants performed a 10-second heavy resisted sprint on ice. Condition 2 was a control, where participants rested. An electronically timed 25-m sprint on ice was performed before and 4 minutes after each condition. The results indicated no significant difference (p = 0.176) between pre (3.940 + 0.258 seconds) and post (3.954 + 0.261 seconds) sprint times in the control condition. The intervention condition, however, demonstrated a significant 2.6% decrease in times (p = 0.02) between pre (3.950 + 0.251 seconds) and post (3.859 + 0.288 seconds) test sprints. There was also a significant change (p = 0.002) when compared to the times of the control condition. These findings appear to suggest that the intensity and duration of a single resisted sprint in this study are sufficient to induce an acute (after 4 minutes of rest) improvement in 25-m sprint performance on ice. For those athletes wishing to improve skating speed, heavy resisted sprints on ice may provide a biomechanically suitable exercise for inducing potentiation before speed training drills. PMID:20940636

Matthews, Martyn J; Comfort, Paul; Crebin, Robyn

2010-11-01

200

Telling Stories About Indigeneity and Canadian Sport: The Spectacular Cree & Ojibway Indian Hockey Barnstorming Tour of North America, 1928  

Microsoft Academic Search

In January and February 1928, 14 hockey-playing Natives from northeastern Ontario undertook a celebrated barnstorming tour of 17 cities and towns in the United States and Canada. Traveling by charter bus, the “Cree & Ojibway Indian Hockey Tour” was a well-promoted and cleverly-planned road trip that began in North Bay and swung through southwestern Ontario before it reached its real

Andrew C. Holman

2009-01-01

201

Risk factors for injury and severe injury in youth ice hockey: a systematic review of the literature  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo identify risk factors for injury in youth ice hockey (ie, body checking, age, player position, player experience and level of play).Study designSystematic review and meta-analysis.MethodsA systematic review of the literature, including a meta-analysis component was completed. Ten electronic databases and the American Society for Testing and Materials Safety in Ice Hockey series (volumes 1–4) were systematically searched with strict

Carolyn A Emery; Brent Hagel; Melissa Decloe; McKay Carly

2010-01-01

202

Changes in Homocysteine and 8-iso-PGF2a Levels in Football and Hockey Players After a Match  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels of homocysteine and 8-iso PGF2a in football and hockey players before and soon after a match, on the predisposition for development of atherosclerosis. We measured 8-iso-PGF2a and homocysteine in 21 football athletes aged 21.8 ± 3.7 years old and 18 hockey athletes 22.2 ± 3.3 years old, respectively. All

A. Papapanagiotou; I. Gissis; C. Papadopoulos; A. Souglis; G. C. Bogdanis; I. Giosos; A. Sotiropoulos

2011-01-01

203

Benefit of a Class-based Language Model for Real-time Closed -captioning of TV Ice-hockey Commentaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the real-time speech recognition sy stem for closed-captioning of TV ice-hockey commentaries. Automatic tran- scription of TV commentary accompanying an ice-hockey match is usually a hard task due to the spontaneous speech of a commentator put often into a very loud background noise created by the public, music, siren, drums, whistle, etc. Data for building th is

Jan Hoidekr; J. V. Psutka

204

Chronic Cough and Dyspnea in Ice Hockey Players After an Acute Exposure to Combustion Products of a Faulty Ice Resurfacer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to characterize pulmonary function and radiologic testing in ice hockey players after exposure to\\u000a combustion products of a faulty ice resurfacer. Our patients were 16 previously healthy hockey players who developed chronic\\u000a cough and dyspnea after exposure. Symptom questionnaires, pulmonary function tests (PFTs), bronchoprovocation testing, cardiopulmonary\\u000a exercise testing, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging, and

Erika S. Kahan; Ubaldo J. Martin; Steve Spungen; David Ciccolella; Gerard J. Criner

2007-01-01

205

Gender differences in hockey players during on-ice graded exercise.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine whether gender differences exist for ventilatory threshold (VT), lactate threshold (LT), and Vo2max during on-ice skating in college hockey players. Ten male and 10 female Division III college hockey players performed a graded exercise skating protocol until reaching volitional fatigue. The graded exercise test employed stages that were 80 seconds in duration, with 40 seconds of rest between each stage to obtain blood lactate samples. Ventilatory threshold occurred at a higher percentage of maximal heart rate (HRmax) in women than in men. The women's VT occurred at 77.3% +/- 1.6% HRmax, while the men's VT occurred at 72.6% +/- 2.0% HRmax (p < 0.02). Men and women had similar HRmax values: 191.3 +/- 2.5 b.min and 185.8 +/- 2.5 b.min, respectively. Vo2max was different between genders, with men at 52.7 +/- 1.3 mL.kg.min and women at 40.1 +/- 1.0 mL.kg.min (p < 0.01). In addition, VT was different between genders when measured as a percentage of Vo2max, with men at 52.7% +/- 3.2% and women at 67.3% +/- 4.0% (p < 0.02). In contrast, LT was similar between genders when expressed as a percentage of HRmax or Vo2max. For each gender, LT occurred at a significantly higher percentage of HRmax or Vo2max than VT did. It can be concluded that VT does not accurately predict LT in male or female hockey players. Additionally, competitive female hockey players have a lower Vo2max but a higher VT than their male counterparts. An increased VT may be a compensatory mechanism to offset the smaller Vo2max values measured in female hockey players. On-ice testing is a practical way to address specific aerobic training needs of hockey players. PMID:18545171

Durocher, John J; Jensen, Dennis D; Arredondo, Aaron G; Leetun, Darin T; Carter, Jason R

2008-07-01

206

Shoulder instability in ice hockey players: incidence, mechanism, and MRI findings.  

PubMed

High-level ice hockey players are prone to traumatic injuries. The most common cause of injury is from body checking or player contact, and the reported rate of injury to the shoulder ranges between 8.6% and 21.9%. The authors reviewed a consecutive series of 24 professional ice hockey players presenting between 2010 and 2013 with post-traumatic shoulder instability. Radiologist review of each player's magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/magnetic resonance angiography(MRA) scan demonstrated a high prevalence of Hill-Sachs lesions, which may contribute to increased failure rates of arthroscopic or open labral repairs. These may need to be addressed with alternative surgical procedures. PMID:24079436

Dwyer, Tim; Petrera, Massimo; Bleakney, Robert; Theodoropoulos, John S

2013-08-20

207

Synthesis and characterization of luminescent hockey stick?shaped liquid crystalline compounds  

Microsoft Academic Search

A general synthetic strategy, based on a convergent approach, allowed us to prepare a series of luminescent unsymmetrical bent?core compounds (2,5?(disubstituted)?1,3,4?oxadiazole derivatives), via the Sonogashira crosscoupling reaction, all possessing a similar hockey stick shape. Their mesophases were characterized using polarizing optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. The observed LC phases possess the classical textures of calamitic liquid crystals. Fluorescence in

Rodrigo Cristiano; André Alexandre Vieira; Fernando Ely; Hugo Gallardo

2006-01-01

208

Poor peak dorsiflexor torque associated with incidence of ankle injury in elite field female hockey players.  

PubMed

This study set out to determine the incidence of ankle injuries amongst provincial female field hockey players in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa, during the 2004 field hockey season and relate this to their injury and playing profile, proprioceptive ability and peak isokinetic torque of the ankle plantar and dorsiflexor muscles. Players participating in the senior, U21 and U19/high school provincial A teams (n=47) detailed their hockey playing and training history and injuries sustained during the 2004 season. A subsample of injured and matched, uninjured controls (n=18) underwent anthropometric, proprioceptive and isokinetic testing. Incidence of injury in the 2004 season was 0.98 per player or 6.32 injuries per 1000 player/h(-1), with 25.5% of players (n=12) reporting injuries to the ankle joint. All ankle injuries occurred on artificial turf and 75% occurred during a match. Forwards and links that had been playing for six to seven years presented with the highest incidence of ankle injuries. Injured players were able to maintain balance on a proprioceptive board for 10.31+/-8.2 s versus 23.9+/-15.3 s in matched, uninjured controls (p=0.078). Both mean (27.4+/-5.5 Nm versus 32.7+/-4.7 Nm) and median (27.0, 23.0-31.5 versus 31.8, 30.0-35.1 Nm) peak isokinetic torque of the dorsiflexors of injured legs was significantly lower than in uninjured, contralateral legs of the injured players (p=0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Poor peak dorsiflexion torque in the injured leg was identified as a factor associated with ankle injury in this sample of injured, elite field hockey players. PMID:17560829

Naicker, Marlene; McLean, Michelle; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Peters-Futre, Edith M

2007-06-08

209

Association between Short Sleeping Hours and Physical Activity in Boys Playing Ice Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To determine physical activity in healthy boys and how physical activity relates to training and daily awake hours. Study design In 66 boys (5 to 15 years) affiliated with an ice-hockey club, we measured total daily energy expenditure (TDEE, doubly-labeled water) and basal metabolic rate (ventilated-hood method). Physical activity energy expenditure for the whole day (DAEE), during training, and

URS EIHOLZER; UDO MEINHARDT; VALENTIN ROUSSON; MICHAEL SCHLUMPF; GERHARD FUSCH; CHRISTOPH FUSCH; THEO GASSER; FELIX GUTZWILLER

210

Use of Static Stiffness Behaviour to Characterise Field Hockey Sticks (P185)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper was to quantify the static stiffness behaviour of a variety of field hockey sticks, and to move towards\\u000a a standard for their characterisation. A range of stick designs were tested at two different sections of the stick for bending\\u000a stiffness. An Instron 8500 tensile and compressive testing apparatus was used to load the sticks in

Derek Covill; Joe Farr; Tim Katz; David White

211

Activity profile and physical demands of male field hockey umpires in international matches  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we investigated the physical demands and activity profiles of international field hockey umpires during match-play. We collected GPS data and heart rates from ten umpires over 16 international matches. Total mean distance covered in a full match was 6655±406 m. No differences were observed between mean distances covered in the first and second halves (3390±241 m and

Caroline Sunderland; Emily Taylor; Emily Pearce; Christopher Spice

2011-01-01

212

Relation between multidimensional performance characteristics and level of performance in talented youth field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine the relationship between multidimensional performance characteristics and level of performance in talented youth field hockey players, elite youth players (n??=??38, mean age 13.2 years, s??=??1.26) were compared with sub-elite youth players (n??=??88, mean age 14.2 years, s??=??1.26) on anthropometric, physiological, technical, tactical and psychological characteristics. Multivariate analyses with performance level and gender as factors, and age as the

Marije Elferink-Gemser; Chris Visscher; Koen Lemmink; Theo Mulder

2004-01-01

213

Multidimensional performance characteristics and standard of performance in talented youth field hockey players: A longitudinal study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To identify performance characteristics that could help predict future elite field hockey players, we measured the anthropometric, physiological, technical, tactical, and psychological characteristics of 30 elite and 35 sub-elite youth players at the end of three consecutive seasons. The mean age of the players at the end of the first season was 14.2 years (s = 1.1). Repeated-measures analyses of covariance, with

Marije T. Elferink-Gemser; Chris Visscher; Koen A. P. M. Lemmink; Theo Mulder

2007-01-01

214

Trends in North American Newspaper Reporting of Brain Injury in Ice Hockey  

PubMed Central

The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998–2000 and 2009–2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to ‘perception of risks’ and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media.

Cusimano, Michael D.; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W.; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

2013-01-01

215

Trends in North American newspaper reporting of brain injury in ice hockey.  

PubMed

The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998-2000 and 2009-2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to 'perception of risks' and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

Cusimano, Michael D; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

2013-04-17

216

Evaluation of impact attenuation of facial protectors in ice hockey helmets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which ice hockey facial protectors can decrease overall head acceleration\\u000a during blunt impacts, as well as to identify whether attenuation differences exist between visors and cages. Commercial models\\u000a of three cages and three visors were assessed. Blunt impacts were simulated, permitting the measurement of peak accelerations\\u000a (PA) within the

M. Lemair; D. J. Pearsall

2007-01-01

217

Scheduling for the National Hockey League Using a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that derives schedules for the National Hockey League according to three objectives: minimising the teams' total travel, promoting equity in rest time between games, and minimising long streaks of home or away games. Experiments show that the system is able to derive schedules that beat the 2008-9 NHL schedule in all objectives simultaneously, and that it returns a set of schedules that offer a range of trade-offs across the objectives.

Craig, Sam; While, Lyndon; Barone, Luigi

218

The incidence of behaviours associated with body checking among young ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

ContextIce hockey has one of the highest sport participation and injury rates in youth in Canada. Body checking (BC) is the predominant mechanism of injury in leagues where it is permitted.ObjectiveTo determine if the incidence of physical contacts differs for Pee Wee (PW) players (11–12 years) in leagues where BC is permitted (Alberta) versus players in leagues where BC is

C Goulet; L Nadeau; C A Emery; D Hamel; S Malenfant

2010-01-01

219

On the relationship between upper-body strength, power and sprint performance in ice sledge hockey.  

PubMed

Ice sledge hockey is a popular paralympic team sport where players rely entirely on their upper-body to propel themselves rapidly across the ice surface. The isolated and repetitive poling movements provide a good model for examining upper-body sprint ability and the related movement and strength characteristics. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between upper-body maximal strength, power and sprint performance in ice slegde hockey. Thirteen male ice sledge hockey players from the Norwegian national team performed three 30-m maximal sprint tests recorded by fixed light sensors. The best 30-m time for each subject was used for further analyses, and the sprint was analyzed more in detail for the first and last 10-m split-times and kinematics (cycle length and rate) using photocells and 2D video analysis. 1 repetition maximal (1RM) strength and peak power were assessed in the bench press, bench pull and pull-down exercises using a barbell and a linear encoder. Both 1RM strength and peak power for all three strength exercises correlated significantly with total sprint time (-0.75hockey. PMID:23478478

Skovereng, Knut; Ettema, Gertjan; Welde, Boye; Sandbakk, Oyvind

2013-03-01

220

Receiving video-based feedback in elite ice-hockey: a player's perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this paper was to provide some rich insights into how an elite ice-hockey player responded to his coaches’ pedagogical delivery of video-based feedback sessions. Data for this study were gathered through a series of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and a reflective log relating to those interviews. The interviews were transcribed verbatim with the text being subject to the

Lee J. Nelson; Paul Potrac; Ryan Groom

2011-01-01

221

Electrostimulation Training Effects on the Physical Performance of Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

BROCHERIE, F., N. BABAULT, G. COMETTI, N. MAFFIULETTI, and J.-C. CHATARD. Electrostimulation Training Effects on the Physical Performance of Ice Hockey Players. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 37, No. 3, pp. 455-460, 2005. Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the influence of a short-term electromyostimulation (EMS) training program on the strength of knee extensors, skating, and vertical

FRANCK BROCHERIE; NICOLAS BABAULT; GILLES COMETTI; NICOLA MAFFIULETTI; JEAN-CLAUDE CHATARD

2005-01-01

222

Sport-specific assessment of lactate threshold and aerobic capacity throughout a collegiate hockey season.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine lactate threshold (LT) and maximal aerobic capacity with a sport-specific skating protocol throughout a competitive season in collegiate hockey players. We hypothesized that maximal aerobic capacity and skating velocity at LT would increase as the season progressed. Sixteen Division I college hockey players performed a graded exercise skating protocol to fatigue at 3 different times (pre-, mid-, and postseason). Subjects skated for 80 s during each stage, followed by 40 s of rest to allow for blood lactate sampling. Velocity at LT was similar during preseason (4.44 +/- 0.08 m.s-1) and postseason (4.52 +/- 0.05 m.s-1) testing, but was significantly elevated at midseason (4.70 +/- 0.08 m.s-1; p < 0.01), compared with preseason. In contrast, LT as a percentage of maximal heart rate (HRmax) was unchanged throughout the season. HRmax remained constant throughout the season, at approximately 190 beats.min-1. Preseason maximal aerobic capacity (48.7 +/- 0.8 mL.kg-1.min-1) was significantly higher than that at postseason (45.0 +/- 1.1 mL.kg-1.min-1; p < 0.01). In conclusion, skating velocity at LT improved from pre- to midseason, but this adaptation was not maintained at postseason. Additionally, maximal aerobic capacity was reduced from pre- to postseason. These findings suggest a need for aerobic training throughout the college hockey season. PMID:19088774

Durocher, John J; Leetun, Darin T; Carter, Jason R

2008-12-01

223

Examination of birthplace and birthdate in World Junior ice hockey players.  

PubMed

The present study investigated birthdate (known as the Relative Age Effect; RAE) and birthplace as determinants of expertise in an international sample of elite ice hockey players. The sample included 566 World Junior (WJR) ice hockey players from four countries (Canada, n = 153; USA, n = 136; Sweden, n = 140; Finland, n = 137). Participants competed in the International Ice Hockey Federation World U20 Championship between 2001 and 2009. A series of Poisson regression models were conducted to examine the consistency of direct then interactive relationships between both birthdate and birthplace and WJR membership across the four countries (Canada, USA, Sweden, and Finland). Findings revealed a consistent RAE across the four countries for World Junior participation from 2000 to 2009. WJR players from the four countries were also less likely to be from major cities. In addition, there was no evidence in any of the four countries of an interaction between RAE and birthplace. Future research should explore the contextual and cultural factors that influence elite athlete development in smaller towns, cities and communities. PMID:21800970

Bruner, Mark W; Macdonald, Dany J; Pickett, William; Côté, Jean

2011-07-29

224

Sacral stress fracture in a professional hockey player: a case report.  

PubMed

Lumbosacral pain is common in the general population and among athletes. Many athletes are diagnosed with low back strain and treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, rest, and muscle relaxers. However, the differential for low back pain in athletes is broad and includes many potential etiologies such as: lumbar disk disease, facet arthropathy, spondylolysis, sacroiliitis, tendinopathies, ligament sprains, hip pathology, bursitis, intraabdominal processes, and neoplasm. Sacral stress fractures are included among the many possibilities. Stress fractures are rare in the general population, with a <1% incidence over a lifetime, but up to 20% of runners may experience a stress fracture while participating in their sport. Athletes are unique as they engage in prolonged strenuous activities, both in practice and competition. Sports activities have the potential of placing extreme amounts of repetitive loading on bones, articular surfaces, and soft tissues throughout the body, including the sacrum. Hockey players place considerable demands on their pelvis during training and competition given the physical demands of the sport. This article presents a case of a delayed diagnosis of a sacral stress fracture in a professional hockey player. This is the first known report of a hockey-related sacral stress fracture. PMID:21053880

Southam, Jodi D; Silvis, Matthew L; Black, Kevin P

2010-11-02

225

The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches From The Front Lines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A central figure in the controversy over human-caused climate change has been The Hockey Stick, a simple, easy-to-understand graph my colleagues and I constructed to depict changes in Earth's temperature back to 1000 AD. The graph was featured in the high-profile Summary for Policy Makers of the 2001 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and it quickly became an icon in the debate over human-caused (anthropogenic) climate change. I will tell the story behind the Hockey Stick, using it as a vehicle for exploring broader issues regarding the role of skepticism in science, the uneasy relationship between science and politics, and the dangers that arise when special economic interests and those who do their bidding attempt to skew the discourse over policy-relevant areas of science. In short, I attempt to use the Hockey Stick to cut through the fog of disinformation that has been generated by the campaign to deny the reality of climate change. It is my intent, in so doing, to reveal the very real threat to our future that lies behind it.

Mann, M. E.

2011-12-01

226

A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.  

PubMed

The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise. PMID:18641719

Quinney, H A; Dewart, Randy; Game, Alex; Snydmiller, Gary; Warburton, Darren; Bell, Gordon

2008-08-01

227

Development of the interval endurance capacity in elite and sub-elite youth field hockey players  

PubMed Central

Objectives To gain more insight into the mechanisms that underlie the development of interval endurance capacity in talented youth field hockey players in the 12–19 age band. Methods A total of 377 measurements were taken over three years. A longitudinal model for interval endurance capacity was developed using the multilevel modelling program MLwiN. With the model, scores on the interval shuttle run test can be predicted for elite and sub?elite male and female field hockey players aged 12–19 years. Results A polynomial model of order 2 adequately represents development of the test scores over time. The fixed part of the model contains a different intercept and linear age term for boys and girls, and a common quadratic term; the random part of the model has a common level 2 variance and sex specific level 1 variances. The model was significantly improved by including differential effects of performance level for age and sex. A negative effect was found for percentage body fat, and positive effects for additional training and motivation. Conclusions During adolescence, both male and female elite hockey players show a more promising development pattern of interval endurance capacity than sub?elite youth players. Percentage body fat, additional training hours, and motivation influence this development. However, differences between the individual players are still considerable.

Elferink-Gemser, M T; Visscher, C; van Duijn, M A J; Lemmink, K A P M

2006-01-01

228

Risk of injury associated with bodychecking experience among youth hockey players  

PubMed Central

Background: In a previous prospective study, the risk of concussion and all injury was more than threefold higher among Pee Wee ice hockey players (ages 11–12 years) in a league that allows bodychecking than among those in a league that does not. We examined whether two years of bodychecking experience in Pee Wee influenced the risk of concussion and other injury among players in a Bantam league (ages 13–14) compared with Bantam players introduced to bodychecking for the first time at age 13. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study involving hockey players aged 13–14 years in the top 30% of divisions of play in their leagues. Sixty-eight teams from the province of Alberta (n = 995), whose players had two years of bodychecking experience in Pee Wee, and 62 teams from the province of Quebec (n = 976), whose players had no bodychecking experience in Pee Wee, participated. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for injury and for concussion. Results: There were 272 injuries (51 concussions) among the Bantam hockey players who had bodychecking experience in Pee Wee and 244 injuries (49 concussions) among those without such experience. The adjusted IRRs for game-related injuries and concussion overall between players with bodychecking experience in Pee Wee and those without it were as follows: injury overall 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63 to 1.16); concussion overall 0.84 (95% CI 0.48 to 1.48); and injury resulting in more than seven days of time loss (i.e., time between injury and return to play) 0.67 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.99). The unadjusted IRR for concussion resulting in more than 10 days of time loss was 0.60 (95% CI 0.26 to 1.41). Interpretation: The risk of injury resulting in more than seven days of time loss from play was reduced by 33% among Bantam hockey players in a league where bodychecking was allowed two years earlier in Pee Wee compared with Bantam players introduced to bodychecking for the first time at age 13. In light of the increased risk of concussion and other injury among Pee Wee players in a league where bodychecking is permitted, policy regarding the age at which hockey players are introduced to bodychecking requires further consideration.

Emery, Carolyn; Kang, Jian; Shrier, Ian; Goulet, Claude; Hagel, Brent; Benson, Brian; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; McAllister, Jenelle; Meeuwisse, Willem

2011-01-01

229

Gastrointestinal temperature increases and hypohydration exists after collegiate men's ice hockey participation.  

PubMed

The cold environments in which ice hockey players participate are counterintuitive to the predisposing factors of heat- and hypohydration-related illnesses. This population has received little consideration in hypohydration-related illness risk assessments. Protective equipment, multiple clothing layers, and performance intensity may predispose these athletes to significant decreases in hydration and increases in core temperature. The purpose of this study was to measure hydration status and gastrointestinal temperature (T(GI)) in male ice hockey players during practice sessions that focused on pre-season skill development and cardiovascular conditioning. The study used a repeated measures design. Data were collected in a collegiate ice hockey rink (ambient temperature = 6.03 +/- 1.65 degrees C; relative humidity = 40.4 +/- 11.89%). Seventeen ice hockey players (age = 20.6 +/- 1.1, height = 180 +/- 5 cm, mass = 85.04 +/- 7.9 kg) volunteered for this study. Urine-specific gravity (USG) and body weight were measured before and after two 110-minute practice sessions. Urine reagent strips measured USG. Calibrated CorTemp (HQ, Inc., Palmetto, FL, USA) radiofrequency telemetered thermometers collected T(GI) before, during, and after two 110-minute practice sessions. Individual participant sweat rates were calculated. Data from both sessions were pooled. T(GI) (p < 0.0001), and USG (p < 0.0001) increased over the 110-minute session. Post-exercise body weight (83.9 +/- 7.6 kg) was statistically lower (p < 0.001) than the pre-exercise weight (85.0 +/- 7.9 kg). Sweat rates were calculated to be 0.83 +/- 0.50 L.h(-1). These male ice hockey players become hypohydrated during participation potentially predisposing them to dehydration-related illnesses. This change in hydration status resulted in a gastrointestinal temperature increase and significant weight loss during activity. Prevention and rehydration strategies such as those developed by the American College of Sports Medicine and National Athletic Trainers' Association should be implemented to reduce the possibility of heat-related illness for this population. PMID:20042926

Batchelder, Benson C; Krause, B Andrew; Seegmiller, Jeff G; Starkey, Chad A

2010-01-01

230

Comparison of on-ice and off-ice graded exercise testing in collegiate hockey players.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare lactate thresholds (LT) and maximal aerobic capacities (VO(2 max) during sport-specific skating (on ice) and cycle ergometry (off ice) in collegiate hockey players. We hypothesized that VO(2 max) and LT would be higher on ice. We also sought to determine if on-ice and off-ice VO(2 max) values were correlated. Twelve collegiate hockey players performed both graded exercise protocols in randomized order to fatigue. Both protocols included 80 s of work during each stage, followed by 40 s of rest to allow for blood lactate sampling. VO(2 max) was significantly higher on ice (46.9 +/- 1.0 mL*kg(-1)*min(-1)) than off ice (43.6 +/- 0.9 mL*kg(-1)*min(-1); p < 0.05). Maximal heart rate (HR(max)) was also higher on ice (192.2 +/- 1.8 beats*min(-1)) than off ice (186.0 +/- 1.5 beats*min(-1); p < 0.01). LT was drastically higher on ice than off ice as a percentage of VO(2 max) (85.9% +/- 1.9% vs. 69.7% +/- 1.3%; p < 0.01) and HR(max) (90.1% +/- 1.3% vs. 79.4% +/- 1.6%; p < 0.01). Finally, no correlation existed between VO(2 max) values off ice and on ice (r = -0.002; p = 0.99). Our results indicate that off-ice VO(2 max) and LT are not adequate predictors of on-ice VO(2 max) and LT in collegiate hockey players. These findings challenge the use of cycle ergometry to assess aerobic capacity at events such as the National Hockey League Entry Draft combine. We suggest that hockey players be tested in a sport-specific manner, regardless of whether those tests are performed on ice or off ice. PMID:20130664

Durocher, John J; Guisfredi, Angela J; Leetun, Darin T; Carter, Jason R

2010-02-01

231

Face-off in Minnesota. A Pilot Study of Girls' Ice Hockey Experience during the First Year of State High School League-Sanctioned Play.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports a study that analyzed high school girls' experiences as they established ice hockey as a competitive girls' sport. Surveys of the social, psychological, and skill aspects of their experiences indicated high enthusiasm and determination levels, with 80% of them definitely planning to continue playing ice hockey. (SM)

Ehlinger, Sally; Katz, Jennifer L.

1995-01-01

232

Using Revealed and Stated Preference Data to Estimate the Demand and Consumption Benefits of Sporting Events: An Application to National Hockey League Game Trips  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the demand for hockey game trips among metropolitan and non-metropolitan residents of Alberta, Canada. Using data on both revealed and stated preference game trip behaviour from a telephone survey conducted throughout Alberta, we estimate the effect of ticket prices, team quality, arena amenities, and capacity on the latent demand for NHL hockey. We find that lower ticket

John C. Whitehead; Bruce K. Johnson; Daniel S. Mason; Gordon J. Walker

2009-01-01

233

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collison and Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-13

234

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision and Speeds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-13

235

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-13

236

Field hockey players have different values of ulnar and tibial motor nerve conduction velocity than soccer and tennis players.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe motor nerve conduction velocity in upper and lower extremities in sportsmen. Fifteen high-level field hockey players, seventeen soccer players and ten tennis players were recruited from the Polish National Field Hockey League, Polish Soccer League Clubs, and Polish Tennis Association clubs,respectively. The control group comprised of seventeen healthy, non-active young men. Nerve conduction velocities of ulnar and tibial nerve were assessed with NeuroScreen electromyograph (Toennies, Germany) equipped with standard techniques of supramaximal percutaneus stimulation with constant current and surface electrodes. No significant differences in motor nerve conduction velocities were found between dominant and non-dominant limbs in each studied group. Ulnar nerve conduction velocity measured from above elbow to below elbow was significantly lower only in the field hockey players' dominant limb. Tibial conduction velocity of the field hockey players' non-dominant lower limb was higher in comparison to the tennis players and the control group. There was no significant correlation between body mass and NCV as well as between height of subjects and NCV in both athletes or non-athletes. A slight trend towards a lower TCV values in athletes with longer duration of practicing sport was found. It was most pronounced in the non-dominant lower extremity of field hockey players. PMID:21308651

Pawlak, Matthias; Kaczmarek, Dominik

2010-12-01

237

The Impact of a Sports Vision Training Program in Youth Field Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the “VisuLab” as DynamicEye® SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program.

Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

2012-01-01

238

Total hemoglobin mass, iron status, and endurance capacity in elite field hockey players.  

PubMed

The aims of this study were as follows: To evaluate total hemoglobin mass (tHbmass) in international field hockey players; to examine the correlation between tHbmass and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max); and to assess influences of iron status on tHbmass and on VO2max. The players of the German women's (N = 17, aged 24.8 +/- 3.0 [21-31] years) and men's (N = 17, aged 24.2 +/- 2.9 [19-32] years) national field hockey team were investigated. tHbmass was measured by an optimized carbon monoxide rebreathing method. The following parameters were measured in venous blood: Hemoglobin concentration (Hbconc), hematocrit (Hct), number and percentage of reticulocytes, reticulocyte hemoglobin content, serum iron, serum ferritin, serum transferrin, unsaturated iron-binding capacity, and serum soluble transferrin receptor concentration. VO2max was determined in a treadmill test. tHbmass (women: 10.6 +/- 1.1 g/kg; men: 12.5 +/- 0.9 g/kg) correlated to VO2max (women: 46.6 +/- 2.9 mL/min/kg; men: 55.8 +/- 4.0 mL/min/kg) in women (r = 0.56, p < 0.05) and in men (r = 0.57, p < 0.05), whereas Hbconc and Hct did not. The investigated parameters of iron status showed no association to tHbmass or to VO2max. In conclusion, tHbmass can be used as an indicator for endurance capacity in elite field hockey players, whereas Hbconc may not. tHbmass or VO2max were not influenced by the actual iron status of the investigated athletes. PMID:19704383

Hinrichs, Timo; Franke, Julia; Voss, Sven; Bloch, Wilhelm; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Platen, Petra

2010-03-01

239

The effects of undergarment composition worn beneath hockey protective equipment on high-intensity intermittent exercise.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of undergarment composition worn beneath ice hockey protective equipment on thermal homeostasis and power output, during a cycle ergometer exercise protocol designed to simulate the energy expenditure of a hockey game. We hypothesized that the layers of protective equipment would negate the potential thermoregulatory benefits from synthetic "wicking" undergarments but that subjects may feel more comfortable because of the inherent low moisture retention of these fabrics. Eight men (age, 25.4 ± 1.3 year) performed a repeated sprint test before and after a simulated game under typical hockey conditions (12°C; 82% relative humidity). This test was completed twice while wearing full protective equipment and either synthetic (SYN) or cotton (COT) full-length undergarments. During the simulated game, skin temperatures (34.22 ± 0.20°C vs. 34.46 ± 0.16°C) and core temperatures (37.50 ± 0.13°C vs. 37.59 ± 0.14°C) were similar between SYN and COT, respectively. There were also no significant differences found in sweat loss as a percent of body mass, heart rate, plasma lactate, sprint power, or ratings of perceived exertion between SYN and COT, respectively. The SYN retained less water than COT (140 ± 30 vs. 310 ± 30 g; p < 0.05); however, clothing and protective equipment weight gains as a whole were unaffected by the fabric worn (470 ± 110 vs. 590 ± 80 g) for SYN and COT, respectively. There were minimal differences in thermal sensation and undergarment wetness ratings during the simulated game. Thermoregulation and performance was driven more by properties of the layered protective equipment with minimal effects from undergarment composition. PMID:22706578

Noonan, Benjamin; Stachenfeld, Nina

2012-09-01

240

Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football  

PubMed Central

Objective: To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999. Methods: Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission were used to generate estimates for the total number of neck injuries and the more specific diagnoses of neck fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains, strains, and lacerations occurring nationally from 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injury presenting to emergency departments for each sport. Results: There were an estimated 5038 neck injuries from ice hockey, 19 341 from soccer, and 114 706 from American football. These could be broken down as follows: 4964 contusions, sprains, or strains from ice hockey, 17 927 from soccer, and 104 483 from football; 105 neck fractures or dislocations from ice hockey, 214 from soccer, and 1588 from football; 199 neck lacerations for ice hockey, 0 for soccer, and 621 for football. The rates for total neck injuries and combined neck contusions, sprains, or strains were higher for football than for ice hockey or soccer in all years for which data were available. Conclusion: The rate of neck injury in the United States was higher in football than in ice hockey or soccer in the time period studied.

Delaney, J; Al-Kashmiri, A

2005-01-01

241

Traumatic Upper Limb Injuries During the Men's Field Hockey Junior World Cup 2009.  

PubMed

This study was a prospective epidemiological investigation of upper limb injuries during the Men's Field Hockey Junior World Cup 2009. Three hundred twenty-four players were observed in 58 matches of the tournament. Twenty-eight upper limb-related injuries were documented. The injury incidence was 0.48 per match and 19 per 1,000 match hours. Most injuries were due to contact with the ball, and the left hand was the most commonly injured part. Contusion was the most common type of injury. The odds ratio for hand and wrist injuries in players not wearing gloves was 4.01 (95% CI, 0.52-30.62), and the relative risk of hand and wrist injuries in players wearing gloves was 0.26 (95% CI, 0.03-1.92). Male youth hockey players are at a high risk of upper limb, especially hand and wrist, injuries during major international tournaments and that use of protective gloves can provide significant protection against hand and wrist injuries in the sport. PMID:24067118

Mukherjee, Swarup

2013-01-01

242

The planarity of the stickface motion in the field hockey hit.  

PubMed

The field hockey hit is an important but poorly understood stroke. In this study, we investigated the planarity of the stickface motion during the downswing to better characterize the kinematics and to assess the suitability of planar pendulum models for simulating the hit. Thirteen experienced female field hockey players were filmed executing hits with a single approach step, and the kinematics of the centre of the stickface were measured. A method was developed for identifying how far back from impact the stickface motion was planar. Orthogonal regression was used to fit least-squares planes to the stickface path during sections of the downswing of varying length, with each section ending at impact. A section was considered planar if the root mean square residual between the stickface path and the fitted plane was less than 0.25% of the distance travelled by the stickface during that period. On average, the stickface motion was planar for the last 83 ± 12% of its downswing path, with the length of the planar section ranging from 1.85 m to 2.70 m. The suitability of a planar model for the stickface motion was supported, but further investigation of the stick and arm kinematics is warranted. PMID:22221186

Willmott, Alexander P; Dapena, Jesús

2012-01-05

243

Changes in physical fitness parameters during a competitive field hockey season.  

PubMed

Competitive field hockey requires a substantial amount of muscular strength, speed, and cardiovascular endurance. It is unknown how these parameters of physical fitness change between preseason conditioning to postseason recovery. Therefore, Division III female field hockey athletes (n = 13) completed tests of muscular strength, body composition, and maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) during each phase of their season. Muscular strength was assessed using 1 repetition maximum (RM) leg and bench press tests. Body composition was assessed by anthropometry (skinfolds [SKF]), circumferences ([CC]), and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). Incremental treadmill testing was administered to assess Vo(2)max. Vo(2)max was unchanged during the season, although a trend (p > 0.05) was shown for a higher Vo(2)max during and after the season vs. before the season. Upper- (10%) and lower-body strength (14%) decreased (p > 0.05) during the season. Percent body fat (%BF) from BIA, fat mass (FM) from CC, and body mass index (BMI) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in-season and postseason vs. preseason. In conclusion, preseason training was effective in decreasing %BF and increasing Vo(2)max, yet muscular strength was lost. Coaches should incorporate more rigorous in-season resistance training to prevent strength decrements. Moreover, these data support the superior levels of muscular strength and leanness in these athletes compared with age-matched peers. PMID:15574105

Astorino, Todd A; Tam, Peter A; Rietschel, Jeremy C; Johnson, Stephen M; Freedman, Thomas P

2004-11-01

244

lsokinetic Torque Outputs of Professional and Elite Amateur Ice Hockey Players.  

PubMed

Instrumentation advances have recently allowed the isokinetic evaluation of muscle function for purposes of injury diagnosis, rehabilitation, and training prescription. This type of evaluation has been particularly useful for athletes in preparing for performance or returning to training following injury. lsokinetic testing of specific muscle groups and at the approximate limb speeds required for performance of the sport has allowed more specific analysis of the functional strengths and weaknesses of athletes. Isokinetic testing allows comparison of agonist and antagonist muscle groups for balance across a joint, for right and left side muscle group comparison, and for joint angle at peak torque. Several athletic groups have already been characterized; alpine skiing, track and field (sprinting, jumping, and walking), and orienteering. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the function of important muscle groups for the performance of ice hockey. The data provided the basis for devising a training program for the athletes and also provided data for the characterization of professional (NHL) and elite amateur (Olympic) ice hockey players. Analysis also provided comparative information about the two groups.J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1981;3(2):42-47. PMID:18810138

Smith, D J; Quinney, H A; Wenger, H A; Steadward, R D; Sexsmith, J R

1981-01-01

245

Practicing Field Hockey Skills Along the Contextual Interference Continuum: A Comparison of Five Practice Schedules  

PubMed Central

Abstract To overcome the weakness of the contextual interference (CI) effect within applied settings, Brady, 2008 recommended that the amount of interference be manipulated. This study investigated the effect of five practice schedules on the learning of three field hockey skills. Fifty-five pre-university students performed a total of 90 trials for each skill under blocked, mixed or random practice orders. Results showed a significant time effect with all five practice conditions leading to improvements in acquisition and learning of the skills. No significant differences were found between the groups. The findings of the present study did not support the CI effect and suggest that either blocked, mixed, or random practice schedules can be used effectively when structuring practice for beginners. Key points The contextual interference effect did not surface when using sport skills. There appears to be no difference between blocked and random practice schedules in the learning of field hockey skills. Low (blocked), moderate (mixed) or high (random) interference practice schedules can be used effectively when conducting a multiple skill practice session for beginners.

Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Lay, Brendan; Grove, J. Robert; Medic, Nikola; Razman, Rizal

2012-01-01

246

Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy 7. The single particle phase function hockey stick relation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measured volume-average single particle angular scattering functions of a large number of types of particle of interest for planetary regoliths in the visible-near-IR wavelength region can be represented to a reasonable approximation by two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein functions. When the two parameters of this function are plotted against one another they are found to be inversely correlated and lie within a restricted zone shaped like a hockey stick within the parameter space. The centroid of the zone is a curve that can be represented by a simple empirical equation. The wide variety of types of particles used to construct the plot implies that this equation may represent most of the particles found in regoliths. This means that when modeling the bidirectional reflectance of a regolith it may be possible to reduce the number of parameters necessary to specify the reflectance, and also to characterize the entire single particle phase function from observations at phase angles less than 90°. Even if the hockey stick relation has a finite width, rather than being a line, it restricts the parameter space that must be searched when fitting data. The curve should also be useful for forward modeling particle phase functions.

Hapke, Bruce

2012-11-01

247

Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Investigated enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during one season. Surveys of athletic trainers indicated that the use of mouthguards in competition was not consistently enforced by athletic trainers, coaches,…

Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

248

Effects of Carbohydrate Intake Before and During An Ice Hockey Game on Blood and Muscle Energy Substrates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Study of the effect of a supplemental carbohydrate intake for seven elite ice hockey players before and during a game demonstrated that the supplement could result in less glycogen usage per distance skated, which had important implications for athletes who may participate in more than one game a day. (Author/CB)|

Simard, Clermont; And Others

1988-01-01

249

Effects of a rule change that eliminates body-checking on the relative age effect in Ontario minor ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relative age effects in sport reflect an over-representation of athletes born early in a selection year that lead to selection and performance advantages. These effects might be enhanced by rules that increase physicality. An opportunity to investigate these influences arose when Hockey Canada altered its body-checking rules. Two studies are described that investigate the possible influence of this rule change.

David J. Hancock; Bradley W. Young; Diane M. Ste-Marie

2011-01-01

250

The use of positively-worded performance reminders to reduce warm-up decrement in the field hockey penalty shot  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of performance reminders in reducing temporary posttest performance decrement, referred to as warm-up decrement (WUD), was examined. Advanced, male, held hockey players performed 21 baseline trials of the standard penalty shot and then rested for three 7-min periods, each of which was followed by 4 additional penalty shots. During the last 2 min of each rest period, control

Craig A. Wrisberg; Mark H. Anshel

1997-01-01

251

Short- and Long-Term Effects of Supervisory Feedback on the Interaction Patterns of an Intercollegiate Field Hockey Coach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examination of short- and long-term effects of systematic supervisory feedback on the behaviors of a field hockey coach and her team demonstrated that the feedback model was effective in changing the behaviors of an experienced coach and sustaining those changes over time. (Author/CB)

Mancini, Victor H.; And Others

1987-01-01

252

Examination of the relationship between peak linear and angular accelerations to brain deformation metrics in hockey helmet impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ice hockey is a contact sport which has a high incidence of brain injury. The current methods of evaluating protective devices use peak resultant linear acceleration as their pass\\/fail criteria, which are not fully representative of brain injuries as a whole. The purpose of this study was to examine how the linear and angular acceleration loading curves from a helmeted

Andrew Post; Anna Oeur; Blaine Hoshizaki; Michael D. Gilchrist

2011-01-01

253

Effects of Carbohydrate Intake Before and During An Ice Hockey Game on Blood and Muscle Energy Substrates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study of the effect of a supplemental carbohydrate intake for seven elite ice hockey players before and during a game demonstrated that the supplement could result in less glycogen usage per distance skated, which had important implications for athletes who may participate in more than one game a day. (Author/CB)

Simard, Clermont; And Others

1988-01-01

254

Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during one season. Surveys of athletic trainers indicated that the use of mouthguards in competition was not consistently enforced by athletic trainers, coaches,…

Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

255

Acute whole body vibration training increases vertical jump and flexibility performance in elite female field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To quantify the acute effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on arm countermovement vertical jump (ACMVJ), grip strength, and flexibility performance.Methods: Eighteen female elite field hockey players each completed three interventions of WBV, control, and cycling in a balanced random manner. WBV was performed on a Galileo machine (26 Hz) with six different exercises being performed. For the

D J Cochrane; S R Stannard

2005-01-01

256

A Cool Sport Full of Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just "hockey" as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and colliding…

Hache, Alain

2008-01-01

257

Effects of badminton and ice hockey on bone mass in young males: a 12-year follow-up.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of weight bearing physical activity on bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and evaluate any residual benefits after the active sports career. Beginning at 17 years of age, BMD was measured 5 times, during 12 years, in 19 badminton players, 48 ice hockey players, and 25 controls. During the active career, badminton players gained significantly more BMD compared to ice hockey players at all sites: in their femoral neck (mean difference (Delta) 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.04), humerus (Delta 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.01), lumbar spine (Delta 0.08 g/cm(2), p=0.01), and their legs (Delta 0.05 g/cm(2), p=0.003), after adjusting for age at baseline, changes in weight, height, and active years. BMD gains in badminton players were higher also compared to in controls at all sites (Delta 0.06-0.17 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all). Eleven badminton players and 37 ice hockey players stopped their active career a mean of 6 years before the final follow-up. Both these groups lost significantly more BMD at the femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to the control group (Delta 0.05-0.12 g/cm(2), p<0.05 for all). At the final follow-up, badminton players had significantly higher BMD of the femoral neck, humerus, lumbar spine, and legs (Delta 0.08-0.20 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all) than both ice hockey players and controls. In summary, the present study may suggest that badminton is a more osteogenic sport compared to ice hockey. The BMD benefits from previous training were partially sustained with reduced activity. PMID:20601297

Tervo, Taru; Nordström, Peter; Nordström, Anna

2010-06-25

258

With an urban renaissance underway, Hartford begins to think about their hockey heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Blowhole! Hartford Whalershttp://www.hartfordwhalers.org/Brass Bonanzahttp://www.brassbonanza.com/hcc/The Sports Economisthttp://www.thesportseconomist.com/Grateful Dead Live at Hartford Civic Center on October 10, 1984http://www.archive.org/details/gd1984-10-14.fob.beyerm88.suraci.77990.sbeok.flac16Mark Twain Househttp://www.marktwainhouse.org/Since 1997, the city of Hartford has been searching for some new whalers. Of course, they aren't looking for a few old salts to go out and hunt those gentle beasts of the deep (that's generally prohibited by international treaties and Hartford is more than a harpoon toss from the Atlantic Ocean), but rather an intrepid band of die-hard hockey fans are searching for the former NHL team known as the Hartford Whalers. This industrial town and noted insurance capital has been without major league hockey since the Hartford Whalers pulled up stakes and moved to the generally ice-free city of Raleigh. Interestingly enough, the Hartford Whalers Booster Club keeps the hockey home fires burning by hosting various events, and they have recently created an online petition to build support for a new NHL arena in Hartford. During the mid-1990s there was a spate of NHL team relocations as the Quebec Nordiques decamped to Colorado and the Winnipeg Jets became the Phoenix Coyotes. Whalers fans remain dedicated to the spirit and legacy of the team, and long-time fan Marty Evtushek said it best when he noted recently that, "They were more rooted in the community. In New York, they were in their high-rises and didn't bother with the average fans. The Whalers were our neighbors." The first link will take users to an article from the New York Times about the hockey lobbying efforts of the Hartford Whalers Boosters Club. Moving on, the second link leads to a site that provides users with a slew of information on the history of the Whalers, complete with rosters, uniform information, and so on. The third link is an audio trove of Whalers-related sounds, including the final outgoing message from the team store answering machine. Most people will also want to listen to "Brass Bonanza" here, the Whalers' Herb Alpert-like theme song. The fourth link will whisk users away to an excellent weblog on sports economics written by a team of economists from schools such as College of the Holy Cross and Clemson University. The fifth link leads to a much celebrated Grateful Dead concert (courtesy of the Internet Archive) that took place at the former home of the Whalers, the Hartford Civic Arena. Finally, the sixth link leads to the homepage of the Mark Twain House. Twain lived in Hartford for seventeen years, and this site provides a host of material on Twain's life and this rather impressive building.

Grinnell, Max

2009-05-08

259

Fluid balance and hydration habits of elite female field hockey players during consecutive international matches.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess sweat loss and hydration practices of elite female field hockey players during consecutive international matches. Eighteen England U21 field hockey players were assessed during 2 consecutive international matches. Sweat loss was assessed from changes in body mass after correction for the volume of fluid consumed and any urine loss. Players completed a questionnaire to assess hydration habits and practices. Mean (+/- SD) change in body mass after match 1 was -0.1 +/- 0.6 kg compared with -0.3 +/- 0.5 kg after match 2. This equates to a percentage level of body mass change of -0.2 +/- 1.1% after match 1 and -0.5 +/- 0.7% after match 2. Mean fluid intake was 1264 +/- 394 mL during match 1 and 1216 +/- 488 mL during match 2. Prematch urine osmolality was significantly higher before match 2 (425 +/- 206 mOsm x kg(-1)) compared with match 1 (197 +/- 110 mOsm x kg(-1); p = 0.008). There was no significant difference between morning body mass changes (p = 0.97); however, 14 players experienced reductions in body mass. There were large interindividual differences in sweat loss and drinking habits in players, ranging from levels of dehydration reaching 2% body mass loss to net body mass gains of 2.4%. Fluid loss was moderate, and players were aware of the impact that dehydration has on performance. With regular substitutions, moderate conditions, and a sound knowledge of correct hydration practice, hydration status was well maintained despite playing consecutive matches. PMID:19528861

MacLeod, Hannah; Sunderland, Caroline

2009-07-01

260

Muscle cellular properties in the ice hockey player: a model for investigating overtraining?  

PubMed

In this study, we hypothesized that athletes involved in 5-6 months of sprint-type training would display higher levels of proteins and processes involved in muscle energy supply and utilization. Tissue was sampled from the vastus lateralis of 13 elite ice hockey players (peak oxygen consumption = 51.8 ± 1.3 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1); mean ± standard error) at the end of a season (POST) and compared with samples from 8 controls (peak oxygen consumption = 45.5 ± 1.4 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) (CON). Compared with CON, higher activities were observed in POST (p < 0.05) only for succinic dehydrogenase (3.32 ± 0.16 mol·(mg protein)(-1)·min(-1) vs. 4.10 ± 0.11 mol·(mg protein)(-1)·min(-1)) and hexokinase (0.73 ± 0.05 mol·(mg protein)(-1)·min(-1) vs. 0.90 ± 0.05mol·(mg protein)(-1)·min(-1)) but not for phosphorylase, phosphofructokinase, and creatine phosphokinase. No differences were found in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase concentration (?(max): 262 ± 36 pmol·(g wet weight)(-1) vs. 275 ± 27 pmol·(g wet weight)(-1)) and the maximal activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (98.1 ± 6.1 µmol·(g protein)(-1)·min(-1) vs. 102 ± 3.3 µmol·(g protein)(-1)·min(-1)). Cross-sectional area was lower (p < 0.05) in POST but only for the type IIA fibres (6312 ± 684 ?m(2) vs. 5512 ± 335 ?m(2)), while the number of capillary counts per fibre and the capillary to fibre area ratio were generally higher (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that elite trained ice hockey players display elevations only in support of glucose-based aerobic metabolism that occur in the absence of alterations in excitation-contraction processes. PMID:22471993

Green, Howard J; Batada, Aziz; Cole, Bill; Burnett, Margaret E; Kollias, Helen; McKay, Scott; Roy, Brian; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Smith, Ian C; Tupling, Susan

2012-04-03

261

The relation between perceived parent-created sport climate and competitive male youth hockey players' good and poor sport behaviors.  

PubMed

The authors examined achievement goal orientation (J. L. Duda & J. G. Nicholls, 1992), parental influence (M. L. Babkes & M. R. Weiss, 1999), and the parent-initiated motivational climate (S. A. White, 1996, 1998) in combination to broaden understanding of competitive male youth hockey players' (N = 259) perceptions of the parent-created sport climate and its relation to their self-reported good and poor sport behaviors (GPSB). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a multidimensional measure of GPSB. Multiple regression analyses indicated that athletes' GPSB were significantly predicted by different forms of parental influence. Canonical correlations revealed a complex picture of the contributions of goal orientation and the parent-created sport climate on boys' GPSB in youth hockey. Results expand knowledge of the influence that parents have in youth sport and emphasize the importance of understanding how children's interpretations of parental beliefs and behaviors affect their choices to engage in good and poor sport behaviors. PMID:18959221

LaVoi, Nicole M; Stellino, Megan Babkes

2008-09-01

262

The performance of the ice hockey slap and wrist shots: the effects of stick construction and player skill  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction of players’ skill level, body strength, and sticks of various construction\\u000a and stiffness on the performance of the slap and wrist shots in ice hockey. Twenty male and twenty female subjects were tested.\\u000a Ten of each gender group were considered skilled and ten unskilled. In addition to general strength tests,

T.-C. Wu; D. Pearsall; A. Hodges; R. Turcotte; R. Lefebvre; D. Montgomery; H. Bateni

2003-01-01

263

Athlete Aggression on the Rink and off the IceAthlete Violence and Aggression in Hockey and Interpersonal Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because male athletes have exhibited aggressive tendencies in a variety of settings, they may be at risk for using violence both within and beyond their sports involvement. Five former college\\/professional hockey players were interviewed to determine their perspectives on the nature of aggression and violence in sports competition as well as in social relationships.The informants were asked aboutathletes’violence and aggression

Nick T. Pappas; Patrick C. McKenry; Beth Skilken Catlett

2004-01-01

264

Game outcome and elite Japanese women’s field hockey player’s experience of emotions and stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To measure the effects of game outcome on pleasant and unpleasant emotions and stress during elite-level competition.Design: Quasi-experimental repeated pre- and post-game measurement in a field setting.Methods: Participants were 16 members of the Japanese women’s field hockey team playing a world cup preliminary qualifying tournament in Trinidad. Players completed the Tension and Effort Stress Inventory (TESI), a measure of

John H. Kerr; George V. Wilson; Alison C Bowling; John P. Sheahan

2005-01-01

265

Examining Sport Concussion Assessment Tool ratings for male and female youth hockey players with and without a history of concussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundConcussion is one of the most commonly occurring injuries in sport today. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) is a commonly used paper neurocognitive tool. To date, little is known about SCAT baseline normative values in youth athletes.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to determine normative values on the SCAT for male and female youth hockey players.MethodsThis is a secondary

Kathryn J Schneider; Carolyn A Emery; Jian Kang; Geoff M Schneider; Willem H Meeuwisse

2010-01-01

266

Do hockey players need aerobic fitness? Relation between VO2max and fatigue during high-intensity intermittent ice skating.  

PubMed

The primary objective of this study was to assess the relationship between aerobic capacity, as measured by the VO(2)max test, and recovery from high-intensity intermittent exercise. Eleven female collegiate hockey players agreed to participate. Subjects skated 5 1-lap intervals around the hockey rink at maximal intensity with a 30-second recovery period between skates. The VO(2)max test was performed on a motor-driven treadmill after a modified Bruce protocol. A fatigue index was calculated by measuring the total increase in skate time from trial 1 to trial 5. This fatigue index was then correlated to VO(2)max. This correlation coefficient (-0.422) was not significant (p > 0.05) and indicated that only 17.8% of the variance in VO(2)max could be explained by the fatigue index. It was concluded that ability to recover from high-intensity intermittent exercise is not related to aerobic capacity. Coaches and trainers probably do not need to include aerobic training in their practices, because the high-intensity interval training commonly seen in hockey training also improves aerobic capacity, as reflected in the high VO(2)max values of these subjects. PMID:17685680

Carey, Daniel G; Drake, Melanie M; Pliego, German J; Raymond, Robert L

2007-08-01

267

Relation between multidimensional performance characteristics and level of performance in talented youth field hockey players.  

PubMed

To determine the relationship between multidimensional performance characteristics and level of performance in talented youth field hockey players, elite youth players (n = 38, mean age 13.2 years, s = 1.26) were compared with sub-elite youth players (n = 88, mean age 14.2 years, s = 1.26) on anthropometric, physiological, technical, tactical and psychological characteristics. Multivariate analyses with performance level and gender as factors, and age as the covariate, showed that the elite youth players scored better than the sub-elite youth players on technical (dribble performance in a peak and repeated shuttle run), tactical (general tactics; tactics for possession and non-possession of the ball) and psychological variables (motivation) (P < 0.05). The most discriminating variables were tactics for possession of the ball, motivation and performance in a slalom dribble. Age discriminated between the two groups, indicating that the elite youth players were younger than the sub-elite players. In the guidance of young talented players to the top as well as in the detection of talented players, more attention has to be paid to tactical qualities, motivation and specific technical skills. PMID:15801499

Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris; Lemmink, Koen A P M; Mulder, Theo W

268

Upper-limb kinematics and coordination of short grip and classic drives in field hockey.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to compare the upper-limb kinematics and coordination of the short grip and classic drives in field hockey. Ten elite female players participated in the experiment. The VICON system was used to record the displacement of markers placed on the stick and the players' joints during five short grip and five classic drives. Kinematic and coordination parameters were analyzed. The ball's velocity was recorded by a radar device that also served as the drive target. Kinematic differences were noted between the two drive conditions, with shorter duration and smaller overall amplitude in the short grip drive, explained by the shorter lever arm and the specific context in which it is used. No differences were noted for upper-limb coordination. In both types of stick holding, an interlimb dissociation was noted on the left side, whereas the right interlimb coordination was in phase. Moreover, the time lag increased in the disto-proximal direction, suggesting wrist uncocking before impact and the initiation of descent motion by the left shoulder. Mediolateral analysis confirmed these results: coordination of left-right limbs converged at the wrist but dissociated with more proximal joints (elbows and shoulders). PMID:18843151

Bretigny, Perrine; Seifert, Ludovic; Leory, David; Chollet, Didier

2008-08-01

269

Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during a single competitive season. Design and Setting: We developed a questionnaire and sent it to certified athletic trainers (ATCs) directly responsible for men's varsity collegiate ice hockey at 127 NCAA-affiliated institutions. Then ?2 analyses were conducted to determine whether significant differences existed in the pattern of responses by division of play (Division I, II, or III or independent). Subjects: A total of 104 ATCs responded. We obtained data from 94 questionnaires with complete answers to primary questions addressing program enforcement of the rule and mouthguard use. Measurements: Our questionnaire asked about types of mouthguards used, attitudes of the sports medicine and coaching staffs regarding the role of mouthguards in prevention of injury, enforcement of mouthguard use, and actual numbers of athletes wearing mouthguards in competition. Respondents also provided an estimate of the number of penalties assessed against their team for mouthguard violations during the previous season. Results: Most ATCs (93%) reported that they believed mouthguards play a role in injury prevention. Respondents indicated someone on the coaching or sports medicine staff enforced the rule at 74% of the institutions, with a trend toward greater enforcement at the Division II and III levels. Overall, ATCs reported 63% of athletes consistently wore mouthguards in competition, with significantly higher compliance at the Division II and III levels. A total of 19 penalties were reportedly assessed for violation of the mouthguard rule the previous season. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the use of mouthguards in competition is not consistently enforced by ATCs, coaches, or game officials and that mouthguards are not routinely worn by athletes. These results raise legitimate concerns for all physicians, athletic trainers, coaches, and governing bodies involved with men's collegiate ice hockey.

Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

270

Relationship between body composition, leg strength, anaerobic power, and on-ice skating performance in division I men's hockey athletes.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between laboratory tests and on-ice skating performance in division I men's hockey athletes. Twenty-one men (age 20.7 +/- 1.6 years) were assessed for body composition, isokinetic force production in the quadriceps and hamstring muscles, and anaerobic muscle power via the Wingate 30-second cycle ergometer test. Air displacement plethysmography was used to determine % body fat (%FAT), fat-free mass (FFM), and fat mass. Peak torque and total work during 10 maximal effort repetitions at 120 degrees .s were measured during concentric muscle actions using an isokinetic dynamometer. Muscle power was measured using a Monark cycle ergometer with resistance set at 7.5% of body mass. On-ice skating performance was measured during 6 timed 89-m sprints with subjects wearing full hockey equipment. First length skate (FLS) was 54 m, and total length skate (TLS) was 89 m with fastest and average skating times used in the analysis. Correlation coefficients were used to determine relationships between laboratory testing and on-ice performance. Subjects had a body mass of 88.8 +/- 7.8 kg and %FAT of 11.9 +/- 4.6. First length skate-Average and TLS-Average skating times were moderately correlated to %FAT ([r = 0.53; p = 0.013] and [r = 0.57; p = 0.007]) such that a greater %FAT was related to slower skating speeds. First length skate-Fastest was correlated to Wingate percent fatigue index (r = -0.48; p = 0.027) and FLS-Average was correlated to Wingate peak power per kilogram body mass (r = -0.43; p = 0.05). Laboratory testing of select variables can predict skating performance in ice hockey athletes. This information can be used to develop targeted and effective strength and conditioning programs that will improve on-ice skating speed. PMID:20543730

Potteiger, Jeffrey A; Smith, Dean L; Maier, Mark L; Foster, Timothy S

2010-07-01

271

Allometric scaling of peak oxygen uptake in male roller hockey players under 17 years old.  

PubMed

Peak oxygen uptake (V?O2peak) is routinely expressed in litres per minute and by unit of body mass (mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) despite the theoretical and statistical limitations of using ratios. Allometric modeling is an effective approach for partitioning body-size effects in a performance variable. The current study examined the relationships among chronological age (CA), skeletal age (SA), total body and appendicular size descriptors, and V?O2peak in male adolescent roller hockey players. Seventy-three Portuguese, highly trained male athletes (CA, 15.4 ± 0.6 years; SA, 16.4 ± 1.5 years; stature, 169.9 ± 6.9 cm; body mass, 63.7 ± 10.7 kg; thigh volume, 4.8 ± 1.0 L) performed an incremental maximal test on a motorized treadmill. Exponents for body size descriptors were 2.15 for stature (R(2) = 0.30, p < 0.01) and 0.55 for thigh volume (R(2) = 0.46, p < 0.01). The combination of stature or thigh volume and CA or SA, and CA(2) or SA(2), increased the explained variance in V?O2peak (R(2) ranged from 0.30 to 0.55). The findings of the allometric model combining more than 1 body size descriptor (i.e., stature and thigh volume) in addition to SA and CA(2) were not significant. Results suggest that thigh volume and SA are the main contributors to interindividual variability in aerobic fitness. PMID:23713531

Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Sherar, Lauren; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J; Pereira, João R; Vaz, Vasco; Cupido-Dos-Santos, Amândio; Baxter-Jones, Adam; Visscher, Chris; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Malina, Robert M

2013-04-01

272

The use of GPS to evaluate activity profiles of elite women hockey players during match-play.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to assess the match-play activity patterns of elite women field-hockey players using a global positioning system (SPI Elite, GPSports, Fyshwick, Australia). The activity of 25 players was analysed for 13 international matches, totalling 158 player-match analyses. Overall mean playing time was 48 ± 4 min but this varied according to playing position (defenders: 56 ± 11 min; midfielders: 50 ± 10 min; forwards: 38 ± 7 min; P < 0.001, d = 0.57-1.92). In total, 55.5 ± 6.3% of match time was spent performing low-intensity exercise (standing: 5.8 ± 2.7%; walking: 49.7 ± 5.6%). Moderate-intensity exercise accounted for 38.1 ± 5.0% (jogging: 25.8 ± 3.5%; running: 12.3 ± 2.9%) of player match-time, with the remainder made up of high-intensity exercise (fast running: 4.9 ± 1.4%; sprinting: 1.5 ± 0.6%). Forwards spent more time performing moderate- (41.4%) and high-intensity (7.7%) exercise than defenders and midfield players (P < 0.001). This is the first study to use a global positioning system to assess the activity characteristics of elite female hockey players and demonstrate that these characteristics differ according to playing position. These differences are probably attributable to the ways in which substitution of players occurs. PMID:21604228

Macutkiewicz, David; Sunderland, Caroline

2011-06-01

273

The influence of social variables and moral disengagement on prosocial and antisocial behaviours in field hockey and netball.  

PubMed

In this study, we examined: (a) the effects of perceived motivational climate and coaching character-building competency on prosocial and antisocial behaviours towards team-mates and opponents in field hockey and netball; (b) whether the effects of perceived character-building competency on sport behaviours are mediated by moral disengagement; and (c) whether these relationships are invariant across sport. Field hockey (n = 200) and netball (n = 179) players completed questionnaires assessing the aforementioned variables. Structural equation modelling indicated that mastery climate had positive effects on prosocial and negative effects on antisocial behaviour towards team-mates, while performance climate had a positive effect on antisocial behaviour towards team-mates. Perceived character-building competency had a positive effect on prosocial behaviour towards opponents and negative effects on the two antisocial behaviours; all of these effects were mediated by moral disengagement. No effect was found for prosocial behaviour towards team-mates. The model was largely invariant across sport. The findings aid our understanding of social influences on prosocial and antisocial behaviours in sport. PMID:19449250

Boardley, Ian D; Kavussanu, Maria

2009-06-01

274

The incidence of concussion in professional and collegiate ice hockey: are we making progress? A systematic review of the literature.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: The fast, random nature and characteristics of ice hockey make injury prevention a challenge as high-velocity impacts with players, sticks and boards occur and may result in a variety of injuries, including concussion. METHODS: Five online databases (January 1970 and May 2012) were systematically searched followed by a manual search of retrieved papers. RESULTS: Seventeen studies met the inclusion criteria. The heterogeneous diagnostic procedures and criteria for concussion prevented a pooling of data. When comparing the injury data of European and North American or Canadian leagues, the latter show a higher percentage of concussions in relation to the overall number of injuries (2-7% compared with 5.3-18.6%). The incidence ranged from 0.2/1000 to 6.5/1000 game-hours, 0.72/1000 to 1.81/1000 athlete-exposures and was estimated at 0.1/1000 practice-hours. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: The included studies indicate a high incidence of concussion in professional and collegiate ice hockey. Despite all efforts there is no conclusive evidence that rule changes or other measures lead to a decrease in the actual incidence of concussions over the last few decades. This review supports the need for standardisation of the diagnostic criteria and reporting protocols for concussion to allow interstudy comparisons in the future. PMID:23645831

Ruhe, Alexander; Gänsslen, Axel; Klein, Wolfgang

2013-05-01

275

Kinematic adaptations in sprint acceleration performances without and with the constraint of holding a field hockey stick.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the technique adaptations made when performing sprint-based tasks without (free condition) and with (constrained condition) the constraints of carrying a field hockey stick. Three free and three constrained maximal sprint accelerations were performed by 18 experienced university male field hockey players (age = 20 +/- 1 years, body mass = 73.3 +/- 7.1 kg, and stature = 1.78 +/- 0.05 m). An automatic motion analysis system tracked sagittal plane active marker locations (200 Hz). M sprint velocity during the 18-22 m (free: 8.03 +/- 0.43 m/s; constrained: 7.93 +/- 0.36 m/s) interval was significantly (p = 0.03) different between free and constrained conditions. While the M stride length and stride frequency was similar between free and constrained conditions in the 2-13 m capture volume, the free condition elicited a 0.10 m/s faster (p = 0.03) stride velocity. Further significant differences were found between free and constrained kinematic profiles (p < or = 0.05) for the hip angular velocity at touchdown during the 2-12 m interval of the sprints and in the overall sprint technique coordination between free and constrained conditions. Performance and technique adaptations indicated that sprint-training protocols for field sports should integrate specific equipment constraints to ensure explicit replication of the mechanical demands of the skills underpinning superior performance. PMID:23898687

Wdowski, Maximilian M; Gittoes, Marianne J R

2013-06-01

276

Physiological characteristics of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I ice hockey players and their relation to game performance.  

PubMed

Previous ice hockey research has focused on physiological profiles and determinants of skating speed, but few studies have examined the association of preseason player evaluations with a measure of season-long performance. Understanding which tests are most predictive of player performance could help coaches organize practice and training more effectively. The purpose of this study was to describe physical characteristics and skill levels of 24 members of an NCAA Division I men's ice hockey team and relate them to game performance over the course of a season as measured by plus/minus (+/-) score. Subjects performed a battery of preseason tests including treadmill maximal aerobic capacity, body fat, leg press, push-ups, bench press, chin-ups, and sprinting ability both on and off ice. Pearson and Spearman correlations were used to examine correlations between preseason measures and +/- score. One coach also subjectively grouped the top and bottom 6 players, and analysis of variance was used to examine any differences in preseason measures and +/- score between these 2 groups. Leg press, chin-ups, bench press, and repeat sprint performance were significantly correlated with +/- score (r = 0.554, 0.462, 0.499, and -0.568, respectively). Teams with limited time and resources may choose to perform these tests to evaluate player potential efficiently. Only +/- score differed between top and bottom players suggesting that +/- accurately reflected the coach's perception of player success in this sample. PMID:21478763

Peyer, Karissa L; Pivarnik, James M; Eisenmann, Joey C; Vorkapich, Michael

2011-05-01

277

The Effects of Coworker Heterogeneity on Firm-Level Output: Assessing the Impacts of Cultural and Language Diversity in the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

We use a publicly available data set drawn from the professional sport industry to test for the impacts of coworker heterogeneity on firm performance. We focus particularly on the National Hockey League (NHL). NHL teams are truly global firms - they employ workers (players) from a variety of non-English-speaking countries, all of whom are integrated into a single work group

L H Kahane; N Longley; Robert Simmons

2009-01-01

278

A Comparison of Facial Protection and the Incidence of Head, Neck, and Facial Injuries in Junior A Hockey PlayersA Function of Individual Playing Time  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cohort of 282 elite amateur ice hockey players were analyzed to 1) record the number, type, location, and severity of head, neck, and facial injuries sustained during games; 2) examine the relationship between injuries and the type of facial protection (none, partial, or full) according to individual playing time; and 3) determine whether full or partial facial protection is

Michael J. Stuart; Aynsley M. Smith; Susan A. Malo-Ortiguera; Tracy L. Fischer; Dirk R. Larson

2002-01-01

279

Imagine Life without Friction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the concept of inertia and its application to a world without the force of friction acting on moving objects. When an object is in motion, friction tends to be the force that acts on this object to slow it down and eventually come to a stop. By severely limiting friction through the use of the hover pucks, students learn that the energy of one moving puck is transferred directly to another puck at rest when they collide. Students learn the concept of the conservation of energy via a "collision," and will realize that with friction, energy is converted primarily to heat to slow and stop an object in motion. In the associated activity, "The Puck Stops Here," students will investigate the frictional force of an object when different materials are placed between the object and the ground. This understanding will be used to design a new hockey puck for the National Hockey League.

Engineering K-Ph.d. Program

280

Estimated fluid and sodium balance and drink preferences in elite male junior players during an ice hockey game.  

PubMed

Research in many sports suggests that losing ~2% of body mass (BM) through sweating impairs athletic performance, although this has not been tested in ice hockey players. This study investigated pregame hydration, and on-ice sweat loss, fluid intake, and sodium (Na+) balance of elite male junior players during an ice hockey game. Twenty-four players (2 goalies, 7 defensemen, 15 forwards) volunteered to participate in the study (age, 18.3 ± 0.3 years; weight, 86.5 ±1.6 kg; height, 184.1 ± 1.3 cm). Players were weighed pre- and postgame, fluid and sodium intake were monitored throughout the game, and fluid and Na+ balance were determined within the time between BM measurements. Sweat Na+ loss was calculated based on sweat loss and sweat [Na+] determined from sweat-patch analysis on the same players during an intense practice. Players arrived at the rink in a euhydrated state and drank 0.6 ± 0.1 L of fluid before the game. Mean playing time for the forwards was 18:85 ± 1:15 min:s and playing time for the defense was 24:00 ± 2:46 min:s. Sweat loss was 3.2 ± 0.2 L and exceeded net fluid intake (2.1 ± 0.1 L). Mean BM loss was 1.3% ± 0.3%, with 8/24 players losing between 1.8% to 4.3% BM. Players preferred to drink water and a carbohydrate electrolyte solution before the game and during intermissions, while only water was consumed during each period. Practice mean forehead sweat [Na+] was 74 mmol·L-1. Estimated sweat Na+ losses of 3.1 ± 0.4 g (~8 g NaCl) coupled with low Na+ intake of 0.8 ± 0.2 g (~2 g NaCl) resulted in a significant Na+ deficit by the end of the game. This study demonstrated that despite abundant opportunities to hydrate during a hockey game, one-third of the players did not drink enough fluid to prevent sweat losses of 2% BM or higher. Losing 2% BM has been associated with decreases in athletic performance. PMID:21326389

Logan-Sprenger, Heather M; Palmer, Matthew S; Spriet, Lawrence L

2011-02-01

281

Chronic cough and dyspnea in ice hockey players after an acute exposure to combustion products of a faulty ice resurfacer.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to characterize pulmonary function and radiologic testing in ice hockey players after exposure to combustion products of a faulty ice resurfacer. Our patients were 16 previously healthy hockey players who developed chronic cough and dyspnea after exposure. Symptom questionnaires, pulmonary function tests (PFTs), bronchoprovocation testing, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging, and impulse oscillometry (IOS) were all used. A normal group was used for PFTs and IOS controls. Patients had onset of cough within 72 h of exposure. Ninety-two percent complained of dyspnea, 75% chest pain, and 33% hemoptysis. Eight percent were initially hospitalized for their symptoms. Eighty-five percent were treated with systemic steroids and 39% with inhaled bronchodilators. Six months postexposure, 54% complained of cough and 46% complained of dyspnea on exertion. All patients had normal PFTs; 8.3% had a significant bronchodilator response. All had normal exercise tests (mean VO2max = 90 +/- 3% predicted) and chest CTs. With IOS, 80% had a significant bronchodilator response (decreased resistance > 12% and SD score > 1; mean change = 21.1 +/- 9.9%, mean SD score = 3.1 +/- 2.5). No correlation existed between changes in resistance or reactance and spirometric values. Patient symptoms correlated significantly with bronchodilator response on IOS resistance (R=0.61, p=0.03). More than 50% of patients exposed to the combustion products of a faulty ice resurfacer remained symptomatic six months after exposure. Despite persistence of symptoms, conventional pulmonary function tests and radiologic evaluation did not reveal airway abnormalities. IOS showed evidence of increased airway resistance and small-airway disease, which correlated with patient symptoms. PMID:17294334

Kahan, Erika S; Martin, Ubaldo J; Spungen, Steve; Ciccolella, David; Criner, Gerard J

2007-02-09

282

An observational method to code concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL): the heads-up checklist.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Development of effective strategies for preventing concussions is a priority in all sports, including ice hockey. Digital video records of sports events contain a rich source of valuable information, and are therefore a promising resource for analysing situational factors and injury mechanisms related to concussion. AIM: To determine whether independent raters reliably agreed on the antecedent events and mechanisms of injury when using a standardised observational tool known as the heads-up checklist (HUC) to code digital video records of concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL). METHODS: The study occurred in two phases. In phase 1, four raters (2 naïve and 2 expert) independently viewed and completed HUCs for 25 video records of NHL concussions randomly chosen from the pool of concussion events from the 2006-2007 regular season. Following initial analysis, three additional factors were added to the HUC, resulting in a total of 17 factors of interest. Two expert raters then viewed the remaining concussion events from the 2006-2007 season, as well as all digital video records of concussion events up to 31 December 2009 (n=174). RESULTS: For phase 1, the majority of the factors had a ? value of 0.6 or higher (8 of 15 factors for naïve raters; 11 of 15 factors for expert raters). For phase 2, all the factors had a total percent agreement value greater than 0.8 and ? values of >0.65 for the expert raters. CONCLUSIONS: HUC is an objective, reliable tool for coding the antecedent events and mechanisms of concussions in the NHL. PMID:23766437

Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

2013-06-13

283

Skin conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: part I - mechanical dermatoses.  

PubMed

Figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters experience a range of dermatologic conditions and tissue-related injuries on account of mechanical trauma, infectious pathogens, inflammatory processes and environmental factors related to these competitive pursuits. Sports medicine practitioners, family physicians, dermatologists and coaches should be familiar with these skin conditions to ensure timely and accurate diagnosis and management of affected athletes. This review is Part I of a subsequent companion review and provides a comprehensive review of mechanical dermatoses experienced by ice-skating athletes, including skater's nodules and its variants, pump bumps, piezogenic pedal papules, talon noir, skate/lace bite, friction bullae, corns and calluses, onychocryptosis, skater's toe and skate blade-induced lacerations. These injuries result from friction, shear forces, chronic pressure and collisions with surfaces that occur when athletes endure repetitive jump landings, accelerated starts and stops and other manoeuvres during rigorous training and competition. Ill-fitting skates, improper lacing techniques and insufficient lubrication or protective padding of the foot and ankle often contribute to the development of skin conditions that result from these physical and mechanical stresses. As we will explain, simple measures can frequently prevent the development of these conditions. The treatment of skater's nodules involves reduction in chronic stimulation of the malleoli, and the use of keratolytics and intralesional steroid injections; if malleolar bursitis develops, bursa aspirations may be required. Pump bumps, which result from repetitive friction posteriorly, can be prevented by wearing skates that fit correctly at the heel. Piezogenic pedal papules may be treated conservatively by using heel cups, compressive stockings and by reducing prolonged standing. Talon noir usually resolves without intervention within several weeks. The treatment of skate bite is centred on reducing compression by the skate tongue of the extensor tendons of the anterior ankle, which can be accomplished by use of proper lacing techniques, increasing pliability of the skate tongue and using protective padding, such as Bunga Pads™. Anti-inflammatory medications and cold compresses can also help reduce inflammation. Friction bullae are best managed by careful lancing of painful blisters and application of petrolatum or protective dressings to accelerate healing; preventative measures include the use of well fitting skates, proper lacing techniques and moisture-wicking socks. Corns and calluses are similarly best prevented by the use of well fitted skates and orthotic devices. Symptomatic, debridement reduces the irritant effect of the thick epidermis, and can be accomplished by soaking the area in warm water followed by paring. Application of creams with high concentrations of urea or salicylic acid can also soften callosities. Cases of onychocryptosis benefit from warm soaks, antibiotic ointments and topical steroids to reduce inflammation, but sometimes chemical or surgical matricectomies are required. Preventative measures of both onychocryptosis and skater's toe include cutting toenails straight across to allow for a more equal distribution of forces within the toe box. Finally, the prevention and treatment of lacerations, which constitute a potentially fatal type of mechanical injury, require special protective gear and acute surgical intervention with appropriate suturing. The subsequent companion review of skin conditions in ice skaters will discuss infectious, inflammatory and cold-induced dermatoses, with continued emphasis on clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:21846161

Tlougan, Brook E; Mancini, Anthony J; Mandell, Jenny A; Cohen, David E; Sanchez, Miguel R

2011-09-01

284

Knowing what to do and doing it: Differences in self-assessed tactical skills of regional, sub-elite, and elite youth field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine whether youth athletes with an “average” (regional), “high” (sub-elite), and “very high” (elite) level of performance differ with respect to their self-assessed tactical skills, 191 youth field hockey players (mean age 15.5 years, s = 1.6) completed the Tactical Skills Inventory for Sports (TACSIS) with scales for declarative (“knowing what to do”) and procedural (“doing it”) knowledge. Multivariate analyses of

Marije T. Elferink-Gemser; Rianne Kannekens; Jim Lyons; Yvonne Tromp; Chris Visscher

2010-01-01

285

Are pre-season reports of neck pain, dizziness and\\/or headaches risk factors for concussion in male youth ice hockey players?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundConcussion is a commonly encountered injury associated with potential long-term sequelae. No previous studies have evaluated dizziness, neck pain and headache as potential risk factors for concussion.ObjectiveThe objective of this study is to determine the risk of concussion in male youth hockey players with preseason reports of neck pain, headaches and dizziness.DesignThis study is a secondary data analysis of a

K Schneider; C Emery; J Kang; G Schneider; W Meeuwisse

2011-01-01

286

Pressure mapping to assess seated pressure distributions and the potential risk for skin ulceration in a population of sledge hockey players and control subjects.  

PubMed

Abstract Purpose: Ice sledge (or sled) hockey is a fast-paced sport that enables individuals with physical disabilities to play ice hockey. As the attraction to the sport continues to rise, the need for developing better equipment and installing preventative measures for injury will become increasingly important. One such injury includes skin pressure ulceration. Method: A total of 26 subjects including active controls and those with spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, limb amputation and traumatic brain injury were studied using a pressure mapping device at the 2012 National Disabled Veterans Winter Sports Clinic to determine the risk for skin pressure ulceration and the impact of cushioning and knee angle positioning on seated pressure distributions. Results: Sledge hockey athletes may be at increased risk for skin pressure ulceration based on seated pressure distribution data. This experiment failed to demonstrate a benefit for specialty cushioning in either group. Interestingly, knee angle positioning, particularly, knee extension significantly lowered the average seated pressures. Conclusions: When considering the risk for skin pressure ulceration, knee angle positioning is of particular clinical importance. More research is warranted, specifically targeting novel cushion and sledge designs and larger groups of individuals with sensory loss and severe spinal deformities. Implications for Rehabilitation Ice sledge (or sled) hockey is a fast-paced and growing adaptive sport played at the Paralympic level. Rehabilitation professionals should consider the potential for skin ulceration in this population of athletes. The effects of cushioning used in the sledge design warrants further investigation. Knee angle positioning; particularly, knee extension significantly lowers seated pressures and may reduce the potential for skin ulceration. PMID:23992457

Berthold, Justin; Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rory A

2013-04-23

287

The Social Support Experiences of Major Junior Ice Hockey Players in a Physically Removed Region of Canada  

PubMed Central

The present report from a larger project overviews the sources and types of social support resourced by 10 major junior athletes while they performed out of one physically removed Canadian region. Retrospective interviews and content analysis were conducted during three stages (3, 3, and 4 respondents). The data were segmented into meaning units, coded into a hierarchy of themes, and verified by each respondent and an expert panel (former athlete, coach, parent of former athlete). The respondents sought out three types of social support from four different sources (providers) that were adapted to their remote location, including teachers and general community support. Implications are considered in terms of applied research and practice with aspiring adolescent athletes located in removed locations. Key pointsThe study extends knowledge about the sources and types of social support resourced by elite major junior ice hockey players located in one physically removed Canadian region.From the respondents’ views, three types of social support were sought from four different sources.Implications are considered in terms of sport psychology research and applied practice.

Dube, Timothy V.; Schinke, Robert J.; Hancock, David J.; Dubuc, Nicole G.

2007-01-01

288

Sediment quality thresholds: Estimates from hockey stick regression of liver lesion prevalence in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus)  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive, integrative assessments of coastal sediment quality are best effected by using large, diverse data sets that include measures of biological dysfunction observed in association with chronic exposure to sediment contaminants. Under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program, the National Benthic Surveillance Project accumulated a database of synoptic sediment contaminant concentrations and indices of biological effects that were measured in indigenous animals collected during field surveys conducted from 1984 to 1994. This compilation of data provided the opportunity to develop a new approach for determining sediment quality criteria to add to the current repertoire of environmental assessment tools. Using a two-segment hockey stick regression, statistically significant chemical thresholds of biological effects were estimated for hepatic lesion prevalences in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus, formerly Parophrys vetulus) in relation to sediment concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These threshold estimates are notably lower than many of those reported for other techniques. Application of this relatively simple dose-response model to subacute, chronic effects that are involved in pepatocarcinogenesis and associated with sediment toxicant content (1) reflects the link between toxicopathic disease progression and conditions observed in benthic fish exposed to contaminants and (2) provides endpoints for assessing sediment quality contaminant concentrations that are not necessarily acutely fatal but may have long-term health implications for populations that are chronically exposed.

Horness, B.H.; Lomax, D.P.; Johnson, L.L.; Myers, M.S.; Pierce, S.M.; Collier, T.K. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (United States)

1998-01-01

289

Dosimetry of a single ''hockey stick'' portal for treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis  

SciTech Connect

Conventional treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis portal usually involves multiple-field, moving junction treatments to avoid overlapping fields over the spinal cord. To avoid these problems, we irradiate the cranio-spinal axis using a single ''hockey stick'' portal and the 25-MV x-ray beam from a Varian Clinac-35/sup X/ linear accelerator. Patients are positioned prone on the floor 229 cm from the radiation source and the collimators are rotated 45/sup 0/ so the maximum diagonal dimension of the field 116 cm at 229 cm is coincident with the cranio-spinal axis. The head is alternately rotated to treat the right-hand side one day and the left-hand side the next day. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in an anatomical phantom reveals that, relative to the 100% dose delivered at 4-cm depth on the central axis of the blocked field, the midline posterior fossa dose is about 100%, with a maximum dose of about 105% to the extreme posterior portion of the skull. The midline neck dose is about 95% and the dose to the inferior portion of the spinal cord is about 105%. The doses to other critical organs are also presented.

Glasgow, G.P.; Marks, J.E.

1983-09-01

290

Generic Hockey-Stick Model for Estimating Benchmark Dose and Potency: Performance Relative to BMDS and Application to Anthraquinone  

PubMed Central

Benchmark Dose Model software (BMDS), developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, involves a growing suite of models and decision rules now widely applied to assess noncancer and cancer risk, yet its statistical performance has never been examined systematically. As typically applied, BMDS also ignores the possibility of reduced risk at low doses (“hormesis”). A simpler, proposed Generic Hockey-Stick (GHS) model also estimates benchmark dose and potency, and additionally characterizes and tests objectively for hormetic trend. Using 100 simulated dichotomous-data sets (5 dose groups, 50 animals/group), sampled from each of seven risk functions, GHS estimators performed about as well or better than BMDS estimators, and a surprising observation was that BMDS mis-specified all of six non-hormetic sampled risk functions most or all of the time. When applied to data on rodent tumors induced by the genotoxic chemical carcinogen anthraquinone (AQ), the GHS model yielded significantly negative estimates of net potency exhibited by the combined rodent data, suggesting that—consistent with the anti-leukemogenic properties of AQ and structurally similar quinones—environmental AQ exposures do not likely increase net cancer risk. In addition to its simplicity and flexibility, the GHS approach offers a unified, consistent approach to quantifying environmental chemical risk.

Bogen, Kenneth T.

2010-01-01

291

Acute whole body vibration training increases vertical jump and flexibility performance in elite female field hockey players  

PubMed Central

Objective: To quantify the acute effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on arm countermovement vertical jump (ACMVJ), grip strength, and flexibility performance. Methods: Eighteen female elite field hockey players each completed three interventions of WBV, control, and cycling in a balanced random manner. WBV was performed on a Galileo machine (26 Hz) with six different exercises being performed. For the control, the same six exercises were performed at 0 Hz, whilst cycling was performed at 50 W. Each intervention was 5 min in duration with ACMVJ, grip strength, and flexibility measurements being conducted pre and post intervention. Results: There was a positive interaction effect (interventionxpre-post) of enhanced ACMVJ (p<0.001) and flexibility (p<0.05) parameters following WBV; however no changes were observed after the control and cycling interventions. There was no interaction effect for grip strength following the three interventions. Conclusions: Acute WBV causes neural potentiation of the stretch reflex loop as shown by the improved ACMVJ and flexibility performance. Additionally, muscle groups less proportionally exposed to vibration do not exhibit physiological changes that potentiate muscular performance.

Cochrane, D; Stannard, S

2005-01-01

292

On-ice sweat rate, voluntary fluid intake, and sodium balance during practice in male junior ice hockey players drinking water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the repeatability of hydration and sweat measurements taken during on-ice hockey practices with players drinking only water, and determined whether having only a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) to drink during practices decreased fluid intake or affected other hydration and (or) sweat measures. All testing was conducted on elite players of an Ontario Hockey League team (+/-SE; mean age, 17.6 +/- 0.3 years; mean height, 182.9 +/- 1.4 cm; mean body mass, 83.0 +/- 1.7 kg). Players were studied 3 times over the course of 6 weekly on-ice practices (+/-SE; mean playing time, 1.58 +/- 0.07 h; mean temperature, 11.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C; mean relative humidity, 52% +/- 3%). There was strong repeatability of the measured hydration and sweat parameters between 2 similar on-ice practices when players drank only water. Limiting the players to drinking only a CES (as opposed to water) did not decrease fluid intake during practice (+/-SE; mean CES intake, 0.72 +/- 0.07 L.h-1 vs. mean water intake, 0.82 +/- 0.08 L.h-1) or affect sweat rate (1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1), sweat sodium concentration (72.4 +/- 5.6 mmol.L-1 vs. 73.0 +/- 4.4 mmol.L-1), or percent body mass loss (1.1% +/- 0.2% vs. 0.9% +/- 0.2%). Drinking a CES also improved sodium balance (-2.1 +/- 0.2 g.h-1 vs. -2.6 +/- 0.3 g.h-1) and provided the players with a significant carbohydrate (43 +/- 4 g.h-1 vs. 0 +/- 0 g.h-1) during practice. In summary, a single field sweat test during similar on-ice hockey practices in male junior hockey players is sufficient to evaluate fluid and electrolyte balance. Also, a CES does not affect voluntary fluid intake during practice, compared with water, in these players. The CES provided some salt to offset the salt lost in sweat, and carbohydrate, which may help maintain physical and mental performance in the later stages of practice. PMID:20555377

Palmer, Matthew S; Logan, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

2010-06-01

293

The validity of a non-differential global positioning system for assessing player movement patterns in field hockey.  

PubMed

Nine games players (mean age 23.3 years, s=2.8; height 1.73 m, s=0.08; body mass 70.0 kg, s=12.7) completed 14 laps of a measured circuit that incorporated intermittent running and directional changes, representative of the movements made by field hockey players during match-play. The distances and speeds recorded by a global positioning satellite (GPS) system (Spi Elitetrade mark) were compared statistically with speed measurements made using timing gates and distances measured using a calibrated trundle wheel, to establish the criterion validity of the GPS system. A validation of the speed of movement of each participant separately was also made, using data from each timing gate, over a range of speeds. The mean distance recorded by the GPS system was 6821 m (s=7) and the mean speed was 7.0 km . h(-1) (s=1.9), compared with the actual distance of 6818 m and recorded mean speed of 7.0 km . h(-1) (s=1.9). Pearson correlations (r) among timing gate speed and GPS speed were > or =0.99 (P < 0.001) and the mean difference and 95% limits of agreement were 0.0 +/- 0.9 km . h(-1). These results suggest that a GPS system (Spi Elitetrade mark) offers a valid tool for measuring speed and distance during match-play, and can quickly provide the scientist, coach, and player with objective information about certain movement patterns during competitive games. PMID:19058089

MacLeod, Hannah; Morris, John; Nevill, Alan; Sunderland, Caroline

2009-01-15

294

Overlap of internal models in motor cortex for mechanical loads during reaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hallmark of the human motor system is its ability to adapt motor patterns for different environmental conditions, such as when a skilled ice-hockey player accurately shoots a puck with or without protective equipment. Each object (stick, shoulder pad, elbow pad) imparts a distinct load upon the limb, and a key problem in motor neuroscience is to understand how the

Paul L. Gribble; Stephen H. Scott

2002-01-01

295

Knowing what to do and doing it: differences in self-assessed tactical skills of regional, sub-elite, and elite youth field hockey players.  

PubMed

To determine whether youth athletes with an "average" (regional), "high" (sub-elite), and "very high" (elite) level of performance differ with respect to their self-assessed tactical skills, 191 youth field hockey players (mean age 15.5 years, s = 1.6) completed the Tactical Skills Inventory for Sports (TACSIS) with scales for declarative ("knowing what to do") and procedural ("doing it") knowledge. Multivariate analyses of covariance with age as covariate showed that elite and sub-elite players outscored regional players on all tactical skills (P < 0.05), whereas elite players had better scores than sub-elite players on "positioning and deciding" (P < 0.05) only. The sex of the athletes had no influence on the scores (P > 0.05). With increasing level of performance, scores on declarative and procedural knowledge were higher. Close to expert performance, declarative knowledge no longer differentiated between elite and sub-elite players (P > 0.05), in contrast to an aspect of procedural knowledge (i.e. positioning and deciding), where elite players outscored sub-elite players (P < 0.05). These results may have implications for the development of talented athletes. PMID:20419593

Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Kannekens, Rianne; Lyons, Jim; Tromp, Yvonne; Visscher, Chris

2010-03-01

296

Campus Computing Looks Ahead: Tracking the Digital Puck.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Examines data from the 2002 Campus Computing Survey to determine trends in information technology in higher education and future possibilities. Discusses Web portals; electronic commerce capabilities, including use of credit cards; budget challenges, including budget cuts; and mobile technology and wireless networks. (LRW)|

Green, Kenneth C.

2002-01-01

297

Hur Farlig aer en Ishall med Ammoniak: Beraekningar av Riskavstand vid Vadautslaepp av Ammoniak Samt hur Stora Byggnader Paverkar Spridningen av Gaser (How Hazardous Is an Ice-Hockey Arena with Ammonia: Calculations of Risk Distances and the Influence of Large Buildings on Dispersion during Accidental Releases of Ammonia).  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report deals with the influence of large buildings on the consequences of accidental releases of ammonia from ice-hockey arenas. Calculations show than an indoor release is not hazardous to people outside the building. When a release occurs outdoors, ...

H. Eriksson J. Burman T. Thaning S. Winter

1998-01-01

298

Particle-hole intruder levels in 67Cu, collectivity, monopole shifts, and the hockey-stick behaviour of ell - 1/2 5/2- levels in neutron-rich odd-mass Cu nuclei  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new sequence of gamma rays with energies of 572, 499, 585, and 674 keV has been identified in 67Cu populating the 7/2- level at 2362 keV. Owing to the strong population of the 2362-keV level via an ell = 3 proton pickup reaction, that level is assigned to be an f7/2-1 2-particle-1-hole "intruder" proton configuration, and the new levels are found to form a sequence consistent with intruder sequences in the adjacent odd-mass Cu isotopes and in the odd-mass Sb isotopes. The changing position of the intruder sequence in the odd-mass Cu isotopes is discussed and related to the onset of collectivity associated with the presence of g9/2 neutrons beyond N = 40. The increase in collectivity is also discussed for a number of isotonic and isotopic chains as more protons or neutrons, respectively, are added beyond an oscillator shell boundary. For most of these systems, the ell -1/2 levels show a systematic "hockey-stick-like" behaviour with a sharp decrease in energy with the addition of the first protons or neutrons, owing to both the added collectivity and the tensor interaction, and then a lower slope when collectivity changes are diminished and only the tensor interaction is influencing the changes in level positions.

Walters, W. B.; Chiara, C. J.

2011-01-01

299

Managing sensor network configuration and metadata in ocean observatories using instrument pucks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cabled observatories, such as MARS or the regional scale cabled observatory system planned for in the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), consist of many deployed instruments that communicate with human operators and shore-side data repositories. In addition, these deployed devices may actually communicate with one another, facilitating capabilities such as autonomous event response. These potentially complex interactions between multiple entities

Kent L. HEADLEY; D. Davis; D. Edgington; L. McBride; T. C. O'Reilly; M. Risi

2003-01-01

300

Marine pollution in Gdansk Bay, Puck Bay and the Vistula Lagoon, Poland: An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

The highest concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and Ag in marine sediments from Gdansk Bay, Poland, occur near the mouth of the Vistula River. These elements are probably scavenged at the hydrological front by Mn and Fe oxyhydroxides where mixing of Vistula river water with brackish Baltic Sea water takes place. Vistula Lagoon sediments are much less polluted with

G. P Glasby; P Szefer

1998-01-01

301

A Cool Sport Full of Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just ``hockey'' as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and colliding against each other. The interaction between the skate blade and the ice is a problem of great physical complexity. The question ``Why is ice so slippery?'' has puzzled generations of scientists and, surprisingly, clear answers have come relatively recently. There is even some optics involved in hockey: how many sports are watched behind tempered glass (or Plexiglas) windows? The optical and mechanical properties of these materials are worth a physics classroom discussion. In this paper, I will review a few topics discussed at length in my book The Physics of Hockey.1,2 Interested readers may also find additional articles on our website.3

Haché, Alain

2008-10-01

302

ReviewsGCSE Book Review: Modular Science for AQA GCSE Book Review: Modular Science for Edexcel GCSE Book Review: Revise for GCSE Science (Edexcel Modular Foundation and Higher) GCSE Book Review: AQA GCSE Physics, AQA GCSE Physics Additions Book Review: Studying Maths and its Applications Book Review: Medical Physics, 2nd edition Book Review: The Physics of Hockey Book Review: Nine Crazy Ideas In Science Book Review: Light and Dark Talking Point: The Skeptical Environmentalist Places To Visit: Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Powys Resources: Sources of Energy Web Watch: Terence, this is stupid stuff...  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GCSE BOOK REVIEWS (162) Modular Science for AQA Modular Science for Edexcel Revise for GCSE Science (Edexcel Modular Foundation and Higher) AQA GCSE Physics, AQA GCSE Physics Additions BOOK REVIEWS (166) Studying Maths and its Applications Medical Physics, 2nd edition The Physics of Hockey Nine Crazy Ideas In Science Light and Dark TALKING POINT (169) The Skeptical Environmentalist PLACES TO VISIT (170) Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Powys RESOURCES (172) Sources of Energy WEB WATCH (173) Terence, this is stupid stuff...

2003-03-01

303

Augmented Reality Comes to Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer.1 Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

2013-04-01

304

In Proportion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through this nutrition activity (page 5 of the PDF), learners will understandâand probably be surprised byâhow big serving sizes of various foods should be. This is accomplished in a very interesting way: learners will practice estimating by comparing various foods to everyday objects, like a hockey puck and a computer mouse. This activity was created as a pre-visit for a traveling science show, but makes a great stand-alone activity as well! It is an excellent visual representation for learners to remember.

Cosi

2009-01-01

305

Skating to where the puck is going to be: a plan for clinical trials and translation research in mood disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

As part of the National Institute of Mental Health Strategic Plan for Mood Disorders Research effort, the Clinical Trials and Translation Workgroup was asked to define priorities for clinical trials in mood disorders and for research on how best to translate the results of such research to clinical practice settings.Through two face-to-face meetings and a series of conference calls, we

Ellen Frank; A. John Rush; Mary Blehar; Susan Essock; William Hargreaves; Michael Hogan; Robin Jarrett; Robert L Johnson; Wayne J Katon; Phillip Lavori; James P McNulty; George Niederehe; Neal Ryan; Gail Stuart; Stephen B Thomas; Gary D Tollefson; Benedetto Vitiello

2002-01-01

306

The Puck theory of failure in laminates in the context of the new guideline VDI 2014 Part 3  

Microsoft Academic Search

The new guideline VDI 2014 Part 3 has been released for printin g in September 2006. In addition to a condensed presentation of general topics w hich are essential for the calculation of fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) components such as the modelling of various lamina types, the laminate analysis by means of netting theory and Cl assical Laminate Theory, elastic

Günther Lutz

307

Communication in a Swarm of Miniature Robots: The e-Puck as an Educational Tool for Swarm Robotics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Swarm intelligence, and swarm robotics in particular, are reaching a point where leveraging the potential of communication within an artificial system promises to uncover new and varied directions for inter- esting research without compromising the key properties of swarm- intelligent systems such as self-organization, scalability, and robustness. However, the physical constraints of using radios in a robotic swarm are hardly

Christopher M. Cianci; Xavier Raemy; Jim Pugh; Alcherio Martinoli

2006-01-01

308

Pilot study to test effectiveness of video game on reaching performance in stroke  

PubMed Central

Robotic systems currently used in upper-limb rehabilitation following stroke rely on some form of visual feedback as part of the intervention program. We evaluated the effect of a video game environment (air hockey) on reaching in stroke with various levels of arm support. We used the Arm Coordination Training 3D system to provide variable arm support and to control the hockey stick. We instructed seven subjects to reach to one of three targets covering the workspace of the impaired arm during the reaching task and to reach as far as possible while playing the video game. The results from this study showed that across subjects, support levels, and targets, the reaching distances achieved with the reaching task were greater than those covered with the video game. This held even after further restricting the mapped workspace of the arm to the area most affected by the flexion synergy (effectively forcing subjects to fight the synergy to reach the hockey puck). The results from this study highlight the importance of designing video games that include specific reaching targets in the workspace compromised by the expression of the flexion synergy. Such video games would also adapt the target location online as a subject’s success rate increases.

Acosta, Ana Maria; Dewald, Hendrik A.; Dewald, Jules P. A.

2012-01-01

309

PROPRIOCEPTION OF ANKLE JOINT IN YOUNG HOCKEY PLAYERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

factors that leads to progressive degeneration of the joint and continued deficits in joint dynamics, balance, and coordination. Much clinical research has demonstrated that individuals with proprioception and neuromuscular response deficits as a result of injury, lesions, and joint degeneration are less capable of maintaining postural stability and equilibrium. However, no normal reference data on ankle proprioception represented by kinesthesia

Jing Xian Li; Blaine Hoshizaki

310

Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that

Kenji Okuma; James J. Little; David Lowe

2003-01-01

311

Kinematics of the field hockey penalty corner push?in  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of the study were to determine those variables that significantly affect push?in execution and thereby formulate coaching recommendations specific to the push?in. Two 50 Hz video cameras recorded transverse and longitudinal views of push?in trials performed by eight experienced and nine inexperienced male push?in performers. Video footage was digitized for data analysis of ball speed, stance width, drag

Rebecca Kerr; Kevin Ness

2006-01-01

312

An Experiment in Vision Driven Robotic Table Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Technology in the field of robotics has grown and continues to grow in leaps and bounds. As this technology becomes outdated there becomes a need for advancements and technological breakthroughs in many different robotic industries. One such industry is automated bin picking. The solution to the challenge of bin picking in a static atmosphere has been adopted by many in

Johnathan Rankin; Trevor Robinson; Doug Vorhees; Jason Kinney; Haley Frank

2008-01-01

313

A Study of Minor League Hockey Kids' Clubs  

Microsoft Academic Search

With sports teams today competing for the attention and loyalty of fans, each organization must find a way to differentiate itself in a crowded entertainment marketplace. One way to accomplish this has been to establish Kids' Clubs for younger fans. If a Kids' Club is creatively designed and operated effectively, the club can bring lifetime customer value to the organization.

Melissa K. Peckham

2004-01-01

314

Human perceptions of artificial surfaces for field hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measuring the performance of a sports surface is typically derived from a series of field and laboratory tests that assess\\u000a the playing properties under simulated game conditions. However, from a player’s perspective their own comfort and confidence\\u000a in the surface and its playing characteristics are equally if not more important. To date no comparative study to measure\\u000a playing preference tests

P. R. Fleming; C. Young; J. R. Roberts; R. Jones; N. Dixon

2005-01-01

315

Reconstructions of paleoclimate: Beyond the hockey stick. (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our understanding of past climate before the instrumental record is based on a variety of indirect information gleaned from climate proxies. Some well studied proxies include tree ring width and density, lake sediments, pollen indices and temperatures from bore holes. Combining such observations and including physical constraints on the target climate processes is well suited to recent methods in Bayesian statistics and is in contrast to previous methods used for paleoclimate reconstruction. This talk gives an introduction to this new perspective. To reconstruct past temperatures a traditional approach views the proxies as imperfect "thermometers" and calibrates them with instrument observations during a period where both are present. With this calibration one uses the proxies to predict temperature in other periods. This direct approach has the disadvantage that is it difficult to quantify the uncertainty of the reconstruction and to account for proxies that respond to temperature at different temporal and spatial scales. In addition, when different subsets of proxies are available for different reconstruction periods it is problematic to produce a single consistent and continuous reconstruction. A Bayesian hierarchical method demands more assumptions on the target climate process but also produces a more consistent analysis that addresses these shortcomings. The basic idea is to divide the statistical model into three distinct levels: a data level where the proxy measurement is related to the climate process, a process level that asserts a statistical model for the climate process and finally a level that puts prior distributions on unknown statistical parameters. With these statistical models in place, the relationships are inverted using Bayes theorem to give a distribution of the climate process given the proxy data and instrumental record. In the past, this inversion has been difficult to carry out analytically but with more abundant computational resources these computations can now be done using Monte Carlo techniques (e.g. Markov Chain Monte Carlo). Although this hierarchy of statistical models may seem to require more assumptions some of these need to be tacitly assumed in more traditional approaches. Also, assumptions on the climate process can build in basic climate constraints, such as energy balances, that are both reasonable and can produce a more accurate reconstruction. As an example, a reconstruction for Northern Hemisphere annual temperatures will be presented. This reconstruction takes advantage of several forcing series (e.g CO2 concentrations) as covariates and also provides an ensemble of reconstructions to convey the uncertainty in the analysis. This framework is also suitable for reconstructions of spatial fields and of several climate variables, such as temperature and precipitation, simultaneously.

Nychka, D. W.; Li, B.

2010-12-01

316

Video Gaming Promotes Concussion Knowledge Acquisition in Youth Hockey Players  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|While the positive uses for video games in an educational setting have also been established, the educational aim is usually made explicit. The goal of this research was to develop a video game wherein the educational aspect was implicitly embedded in the video game, such that the gameing activity remained interesting and relevant. Following a…

Goodman, David; Bradley, Nori L.; Paras, Bradley, Williamson, Ian J.; Bizzochi, James

2006-01-01

317

Management: Global positioning and wireless dispatching  

SciTech Connect

Over the last several years, my company has been supplying many service companies with wireless dispatching solutions. Recently the impact of the system has been greatly increased with the introduction of a GPS (Global Position Systems) interface. This adds visual recognition as to the whereabouts of each vehicle within the customer service area. The only equipment required in the field for GPS is a transmit/receive device and a wireless modem, one mounted out of the way in the vehicle (under the seat) and a {open_quotes}hockey puck{close_quotes} size unit on the roof of the vehicle. The GPS received unit and wireless modem are used to retrieve the longitude, latitude and ground speed coordinates and transmit them back to the host system.

Wood, M. [ICC International, Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States)

1996-02-01

318

Non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical experiments are performed investigating the non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502 in two setups. In the first setup we consider a three-dimensional rate stick experiment. A booster charge initiates a reaction front leading to a curved detonation wave. The numerical results are compared to theory and experimental evidence. The effects of weak and strong confinement are discussed. The second setup considers the so called ``hockey puck experiment.'' Experimental results show the appearance of a dead zone due to the effect of the geometry. This is captured by the numerical results, which also reveal that the initially spherical detonation is diffracted leading to local detonation failure. The numerical simulations are performed by solving a mathematical model for a three-phase medium based on the Euler equations. The numerical results are obtained using high-resolution shock-capturing methods combined with adaptive mesh refinement.

Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikos

2009-06-01

319

Imaging and detection of mines from acoustic measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A laboratory-scale acoustic experiment is described where a buried target, a hockey puck cut in half, is shallowly buried in a sand box. To avoid the need for source and receiver coupling to the host sand, an acoustic wave is generated in the subsurface by a pulsed laser suspended above the air-sand interface. Similarly, an airborne microphone is suspended above this interface and moved in unison with the laser. After some pre-processing of the data, reflections for the target, although weak, could clearly be identified. While the existence and location of the target can be determined by inspection of the data, its unique shape can not. Since target discrimination is important in mine detection, a 3D imaging algorithm was applied to the acquired acoustic data. This algorithm yielded a reconstructed image where the shape of the target was resolved.

Witten, Alan J.; Dimarzio, Charles A.; Li, Wen; McKnight, Stephen W.

1999-08-01

320

Particle-In-Cell Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft is planned to provide a first electric field measurement in Mercury's magnetosphere by mounting two types of the electric antennas: WPT and MEFISTO. The sophisticated calibration of such measurements should be performed based on precise knowledge of the antenna characteristics in space plasma. However, it is difficult to know prac-tical antenna characteristics considering the plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern antenna designing techniques such as a "hockey puck" principle is applied to MEFISTO, which introduces much complexity in its overall configuration. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a nu-merical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of the modern instrument. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have developed a particle simulation code named EMSES based on the particle-in-cell technique including a treatment antenna conductive sur-faces. In this paper, we mainly focus on electrostatic (ES) features and photoelectron distri-bution in the vicinity of MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technol-ogy for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called puck located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the entire spacecraft body. We report some numerical analyses on the influence of the guard electrode on the surrounding plasma environment by using the developed model.

Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

321

Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Can loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans,

Kriikku

2000-01-01

322

Particle-In-Cell Modeling and Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sophisticated calibration of a space-based electric antenna should be performed based on precise knowledge of electric antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. However, it is often difficult to know practical antenna characteristics considering the effects of plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of only theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern electric field instruments, such as the Cluster EFW instrument and MEFISTO for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft, are designed based on a ``hockey puck'' principle, which introduces much complexity in their overall configurations. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a numerical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of such modern instruments. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have newly developed an electromagnetic (EM) particle simulation code named EMSES. The code is based on the particle-in-cell technique and also supports a treatment of inner boundaries describing spacecraft conductive surfaces. This enables us to naturally include the effects of the inhomogeneous plasma environment such as a plasma and photoelectron sheaths created around the antenna. The support of the full EM treatment is also important to apply our tool to antenna properties for not only electrostatic (ES) but also EM plasma waves. In the current study, we mainly focus on ES features and photoelectron distribution in the vicinity of the electric field instrument MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technology for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called "puck" located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling of the photoelectron guard electrode and the current biasing, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the entire spacecraft body. Our preliminary simulation run successfully showed an intended behavior of the above numerical models. By using the model, we started numerical analysis on an ES structure around MEFISTO and current-voltage characteristic of the instrument. We report some simulation results on the influence of the guard electrode on the surrounding plasma environment and the electric properties of MEFISTO.

Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

2010-05-01

323

An Experimental Investigation of Detonation Corner-Turning Using High Resolution Radiography  

SciTech Connect

We have performed experiments investigating detonation corner turning over a range of high-explosives including LX-17, Composition B, LX-04 and Tritonal. The primary diagnostic utilized here was a new high-resolution x-ray system that was capable of recording a time sequence of the detonation process as it negotiated the corner of interest and propagated. For LX-17 our data detail the formation of a significant dead-zone. Although the detonation eventually turned the corner in LX-17, the dead zone persisted to late times and evidence exists that it never was consumed by either detonation or fast combustion processes. In LX-17 the detonations ability to corner-turn increases as the density is reduced. Furthermore, lowering the density decreases the size of the dead-zone and alters its shape. The other high-explosives investigated were able to turn the corner immediately with no indication of any dead-zone formation.

Molitoris, J D; Andreski, H G; Garza, R G; Batteux, J D; Souers, P C

2006-07-19

324

Mechanisms of Injury for Concussions in University Football, Ice Hockey, and Soccer A Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results: There were 69 concussions in 60 athletes over a 3-year period. Being hit in the head or helmet was the most common mechanism of injury for all 3 sports. The side\\/temporal area of the head or helmet was the most probable area to be struck, resulting in concussion for both football and soccer. When examining the body part or

J. Scott Delaney; Fabrice Rouah

325

Seasonal variation in fitness in a women's National League hockey squad  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regular fitness assessments are crucial in monitoring the efficacy of a training programme, judging return to play after injury and motivating athletes. The data can be used by practitioners to track differences in fitness at specific time points in the season or between playing positions. This study presents three seasons of test data in an elite women's squad, covering their

E Jones; A McGregor

2010-01-01

326

Learning how to coach: the different learning situations reported by youth ice hockey coaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Large-scale coach education programs have been developed in many countries around the world to help prepare coaches for their important role. Coaches have said that they also learn to coach from experience, starting from when they were young athletes until their current coaching positions. Finally, in the last decade, Internet resources have begun to be promoted as valuable tools

Trevor Wright; Pierre Trudel; Diane Culver

2007-01-01

327

Minor Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) in Ice Hockey and Other Contact Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Minor Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is caused by the inertial effect of a mechanical impact to the head with sudden rotational acceleration forces. MTBI produces, in the less severe cases, only transient disturbances of ionic homeostasis with temporary disturbances of brain function. Depending on the severity of the trauma, animal and human studies have demonstrated focal intraaxonal alterations in neurofilamentous\\/cytoskeletal

Nicola Biasca; Stephan Wirth; William Maxwell; Hans-Peter Simmen

2005-01-01

328

Specific strength training of the flick in Field Hockey through overweighted balls  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to discover the effect of the spe- cific strength training, using over - weighted balls, on the start speed of the ball, and to verify that the increase is higher when technique and strength training are combined. A specific strength training cycle was carried out for four weeks using dif- ferent resistance devices (standard,

F. J. Vizcaya Pérez

329

The Validity and Reliability of a Performance Assessment Procedure in Ice Hockey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Coaches and physical educators must obtain valid data relating to the contribution of each of their players in order to assess their level of performance in team sport competition. This information must also be collected and used in real game situations to be more valid. Developed initially for a physical education class context, the…

Nadeau, Luc; Richard, Jean-Francois; Godbout, Paul

2008-01-01

330

Adductor tendinopathy in a hockey player with persistent groin pain: a case report  

PubMed Central

Groin pain may stem from a variety of different causes. Adductor tendinopathy is a common but infrequently recognised cause of chronic groin pain especially in athletes. This case report describes a case of clinically suspected adductor tendinopathy in an amateur athlete confirmed by MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Relevant literature on musculotendinous injuries of the groin along with differential diagnosis for groin pain is discussed. There are several differential diagnoses for athletes that present with groin pain. Therefore, it is important to accurately diagnose the origin of groin pain as the plan of management is dependent of the specificity of the diagnosis. The diagnosis of adductor tendinopathy is made with a history of chronic groin pain along with pain/weakness during isometric adduction of the hip muscles. It is confirmed by MR imaging.

Avrahami, Daniel; Choudur, Hema N.

2010-01-01

331

Owners incentives during the 2004–05 National Hockey League lockout  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study shows that firm owners can indirectly benefit from work stoppages if they own other firms in substitute industries and gain market power for those other firms. The incentives of the owners are examined with a model of cross-ownership cartels and data from professional sports. Assuming that various professional sport events are substitutes, owners may increase profits by eliminating

Jason A. Winfree

2009-01-01

332

The uncertain hockey stick: a statistical perspective on the reconstruction of past temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A reconstruction of past temperatures based on proxies is inherently a statistical process and a deliberate statistical model for the reconstruction can also provide companion measures of uncertainty. This view is often missed in the heat of debating the merits of different analyses and interpretations of paleoclimate data. Although statistical error is acknowledged to be just one component of the total uncertainty in a reconstruction, it can provide a valuable yardstick for comparing different reconstructions or drawing inferences about features. In this talk we suggest a framework where the reconstruction is expressed as a conditional distribution of the temperatures given the proxies. Random draws from this distribution provide an ensemble of reconstructions where the spread among ensemble members is a valid statistical measure of uncertainty. This approach is illustrated for Northern Hemisphere temperatures and the multi-proxy data used by Mann, Bradley and Hughes (1999). Here we explore the scope of the statistical assumptions needed to carry through a rigorous analysis and use Monte Carlo sampling to determine the uncertainty in maxima or other complicated statistics in the reconstructed series. The principles behind this simple example for the Northern Hemisphere can be extended to regional reconstructions, incorporation of additional types proxies and the use of statistics from numerical models.

Nychka, Douglas

2007-03-01

333

The `hockey stick' and the 1990s: a statistical perspective on reconstructing hemispheric temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The short instrumental record of about 100-150 yr forces us to use proxy indicators to study climate over long timescales. The climate information in these indirect data is embedded in considerable noise, and the past temperature reconstructions are therefore full of uncertainty, which blurs the understanding of the temperature evolution. To date, the characterization and quantification of uncertainty have not been a high priority in reconstruction procedures. Here we propose a new statistical methodology to explicitly account for three types of uncertainties in the reconstruction process. Via ensemble reconstruction, we directly obtain the distribution of decadal maximum as well as annual maximum. Our method is an integration of linear regression, bootstrapping and cross-validation techniques, and it (1) accounts for the effects of temporal correlation of temperature; (2) identifies the variability of the estimated statistical model and (3) adjusts the effects of potential overfitting. We apply our method to the Northern Hemisphere (NH) average temperature reconstruction. Our results indicate that the recent decadal temperature increase is rapidly overwhelming previous maxima, even with uncertainty taken into account, and the last decade is highly likely to be the warmest in the last millennium.

Li, Bo; Nychka, Douglas W.; Ammann, Caspar M.

2007-10-01

334

The uncertain hockey stick: a statistical perspective on the reconstruction of past temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperature reconstructions based on proxies is inherently a statistical process and a deliberate statistical model for the reconstruction can also provide companion measures of uncertainty. Although statistical error is acknowledged to be just one component of the total uncertainty in a reconstruction, it can provide a valuable yardstick for comparing different reconstructions or drawing inferences about features. In this talk we suggest a framework where the reconstruction is expressed as a conditional distribution of the temperatures given the proxies. Random draws from this distribution provide an ensemble of reconstructions where the spread among ensemble members is a valid statistical measure of uncertainty. This approach is illustrated for Northern Hemisphere temperatures and the multi-proxy data used by Mann, Bradley and Hughes (1999). Here we explore the scope of the statistical assumptions needed to carry through a rigorous analysis and use Monte Carlo sampling to determine the uncertainty in maxima or other complicated statistics in the reconstructed series. The principles behind this basic example for the Northern Hemisphere can be extended to regional reconstructions (e.g. climate field reconstructions),incorporation of additional types proxies and the use of statistics from numerical models.

Nychka, D.; Li, B.

2006-12-01

335

The validity and reliability of a performance assessment procedure in ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Coaches and physical educators must obtain valid data relating to the contribution of each of their players in order to assess their level of performance in team sport competition. This information must also be collected and used in real game situations to be more valid. Developed initially for a physical education class context, the Team Sport Assessment Procedure (TSAP)

Luc Nadeau; Jean-François Richard; Paul Godbout

2008-01-01

336

Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps  

SciTech Connect

We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order l allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a 'finger' or of a 'hockey puck' in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

Jaouadi, A. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Gaaloul, N. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Welfengarten 1, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Pruvost, L. [CNRS, Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC), F-91405 Orsay (France); Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Telmini, M. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Charron, E. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 (France)

2010-08-15

337

Microstructure of nematic amorphous block copolymers: Dependence on the nematic volume fraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a model for the structure formation in nematic amorphous copolymers and simulation results for a two-dimensional (2D) implementation. The model is based on a dynamic mean-field method, which allows one to specify the polymer system on two different levels of detail. On the detailed level the nematic amorphous block copolymer molecules are represented by a wormlike chain, characterized by three profiles defining its architecture. The first profile sets the sequence of different monomer types along the chain. The second distinguishes whether individual segments do or do not contribute to the nematic order. The third profile defines how the stiffness varies along the chain. On the coarsened level the system is described in terms of density distributions representing the different monomer species and an orientation distribution for the local alignment of the nematic segments. The simulations investigate how the volume fraction of the nematic component effects the resulting mesostructure. With increasing volume fraction of the nematic block 2D equivalents of ``hockey puck'' micelles and smectic-C and smectic-A-like structures are found.

Hamm, M.; Goldbeck-Wood, G.; Zvelindovsky, A. V.; Fraaije, J. G. E. M.

2003-05-01

338

The Energetic Particles Spectrometers (EPS) on MESSENGER and New Horizons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the course of this decade, two NASA deep space mission to the inner and outer heliosphere, MESSENGER to the planet Mercury and New Horizons to the planet Pluto, will carry onboard energetic particle spectrometers. The combination of measurements near the Sun (0.3 AU), and from the outer heliosphere (up to almost 40 AU), will ideally complement the information available from Ulysses and from near-Earth orbiting spacecraft, yielding boundary conditions on the processes that accelerate energetic particles. EPS is a hockey-puck-size Time-of-Flight (ToF) spectrometer that measures ions and electrons over a broad range of energies and pitch angles. Particle composition and energy spectra will be measured for H to Fe from 15 keV/nucleon to 3 MeV/nucleon and for electrons from 15 keV to 1 MeV. The ion section of EPS is a compact ToF telescope with two main components: a ToF section and a Solid State Detector (SSD) array to measure separately velocity and total energy of the incoming particles. Electrons are identified in EPS by the presence of an energy signal and by the absence of start or stop pulses, since energetic electrons have low efficiency for production of secondary electrons when passing through thin foils. For both ions and electrons the angle of arrival is determined by the position of the solid-state detector that collects the particle.

Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R.; Andrews, G. B.; Keath, E.; Mitchell, D.; Ho, G.

2003-09-01

339

Using Fiber Optics to Measure Carrier Drift Velocity of Germanium at 40mK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses ultrapure germanium detectors at milliKelvin temperatures to attempt to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a candidate for dark matter. When some particle interacts with the crystal structure, ionization and phonon signals are produced. Each particle interaction gives off a unique ratio of ionization signal to phonon signal. In this way, background noise can be separated from events that may involve WIMPs. Current germanium detectors are about the size of a hockey puck. If detectors can be made larger, there would be a greater probability of having a WIMP interaction. To make larger detectors, we need to better understand carrier transport processes in the germanium detectors. So, we measured the carrier drift velocity at 40milliKelvin, the temperature at which detectors operate. The carrier drift velocity gives us insight into how much impurity is present in the germanium detectors. We made this measurement using a fiber optics line. The fiber optics line allowed us to carry light from a 780nm laser diode at room temperature, into our dilution refrigerator and onto a germanium detector at 40milliKelvin. A laser diode allowed us to create electron-hole pairs on the surface of a germanium detector in a much more precise way than a radiation source.

Lam, Albert

2010-11-01

340

Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order ? allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a “finger” or of a “hockey puck” in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

Jaouadi, A.; Gaaloul, N.; Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Telmini, M.; Pruvost, L.; Charron, E.

2010-08-01

341

Electron Beam Diagnostics in Plasmas Based on Electron Beam Ionization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last few years, electron beam ionization has been shown to be a viable generator of high density plasmas with numerous applications in materials modification. To better understand these plasmas, we have fielded electron beam diagnostics to more clearly understand the propagation of the beam as it travels through the background gas and creates the plasma. These diagnostics vary greatly in sophistication, ranging from differentially pumped systems with energy selective elements to metal 'hockey pucks' covered with thin layers of insulation to electrically isolate the detector from the plasma but pass high energy beam electrons. Most importantly, absolute measurements of spatially resolved beam current densities are measured in a variety of pulsed and continuous beam sources. The energy distribution of the beam current(s) will be further discussed, through experiments incorporating various energy resolving elements such as simple grids and more sophisticated cylindrical lens geometries. The results are compared with other experiments of high energy electron beams through gases and appropriate disparities and caveats will be discussed. Finally, plasma parameters are correlated to the measured beam parameters for a more global picture of electron beam produced plasmas.

Leonhardt, Darrin; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

2001-10-01

342

What's the Difference Between a Hockey Mom and a Pit Bull? Perceptions of Charisma in the 2008 Election  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many previous studies, gender roles have been shown to play a significant part in voters? opinions about candidates. Researchers have shown that women, on the whole, have been viewed as less capable of managing certain leadership roles (Eagly and Karau, 2002; Eagly and Carli, 2007). While research has explored bias against women seeking political office generally, this question took

Lindsay Eberhardt; Jennifer Merolla

343

Perfectionism and achievement goals in young Finnish ice-hockey players aspiring to make the Under16 national team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on perfectionism suggests that is it useful to differentiate between perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns. Regarding the 2 × 2 achievement goal framework, the usefulness of this differentiation was recently demonstrated in a study with university student athletes (Stoeber, Stoll, Pescheck, & Otto, 2008, Study 2), in which it was found that perfectionistic strivings were associated with mastery-approach and performance-approach goals

Joachim Stoeber; Oliver Stoll; Olli Salmi; Jukka Tiikkaja

2009-01-01

344

Sediment quality thresholds: Estimates from hockey stick regression of liver lesion prevalence in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Comprehensive, integrative assessments of coastal sediment quality are best effected by using large, diverse data sets that include measures of biological dysfunction observed in association with chronic exposure to sediment contaminants. Under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program, the National Benthic Surveillance Project accumulated a database of synoptic sediment contaminant concentrations and

Beth H. Horness; Daniel P. Lomax; Lyndal L. Johnson; Mark S. Myers; Susan M. Pierce; Tracy K. Collier

1998-01-01

345

Employment Law, Negotiation, and the Business Environment: A Cooperative Collective Bargaining Negotiation of the National Hockey League Lockout of 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Employment law is a "must-cover" subject in business environment courses. Comparing the plethora of topics requiring coverage with the limited time devoted to employment law during a typical academic term, other important employment subjects--such as negotiation and collective bargaining--commonly receive short shrift. This article offers a…

Ciocchetti, Corey A.

2008-01-01

346

Cheering as an indicator of social identity and self-regulation in Swedish ice hockey supporter groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to explore whether cheering could be a sign of the social identity of a supporter group, and further to investigate if cheers could serve a self-policing purpose. The matches included in this study were classified as ‘high risk matches’. The observational data made it possible to construct a ‘taxonomy of cheering’ based on the

Kjell Granström

2012-01-01

347

Where did National Hockey League Fans go During the 2004-2005 Lockout?: An Analysis of Economic Competition Between Leagues  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying and evaluating competitors is a critical aspect of operating a sport organisation. However, North American sports franchises have a limited understanding of competitors in their geographic market – particularly when calculating the degree of competition from other sport teams. Increasing the understanding of local sport competitors, whether in the same or different professional leagues, is critical not only to

Daniel A. Rascher; Matthew T. Brown; Mark S. Nagel; Chad D. McEvoy

2009-01-01

348

The National Hockey League and Salary Determination:Are NHL player's salaries discriminated against based on country of origin?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the earliest research was conducted on professional sports leagues and their respective labor demands and supply factors, much emphasis has been given to the study of discrimination and its effect on equilibrium salaries. Within the NHL in particular, since the publication of player earnings beginning in 1990, much research has been conducted regarding discrimination based on country of origin

Christopher Kunnen

2012-01-01

349

Self-assembled microstructures of confined rod-coil diblock copolymers by self-consistent field theory.  

PubMed

We employ the self-consistent field theory (SCFT) incorporating Maier-Saupe orientational interactions between rods to investigate the self-assembly of rod-coil diblock copolymers (RC DBC) in bulk and especially confined into two flat surfaces in 2D space. A unit vector defined on a spherical surface for describing the orientation of rigid blocks in 3D Euclidean space is discretized with an icosahedron triangular mesh to numerically integrate over rod orientation, which is confirmed to have numerical accuracy and stability higher than that of the normal Gaussian quadrature. For the hockey puck-shaped phases in bulk, geometrical confinement, i.e., the film thickness, plays an important role in the self-assembled structures' transitions for the neutral walls. However, for the lamellar phase (monolayer smectic-C) in bulk, the perpendicular lamellae are always stable, less dependent on the film thicknesses because they can relax to the bulk spacing with less-paid coil-stretching in thin films. In particular, a very thin rod layer near the surfaces is formed even in a very thin film. When the walls prefer rods, parallel lamellae are obtained, strongly dependent on the competition between the degree of the surface fields and film geometrical confinement, and the effect of surface field on lamellar structure as a function of film thickness is investigated. Our simulation results provide a guide to understanding the self-assembly of the rod-coil films with desirable application prospects in the fabrication of organic light emitting devices. PMID:21047107

Yang, Guang; Tang, Ping; Yang, Yuliang; Wang, Qiang

2010-11-03

350

Reactive Flow Modeling of the Interaction of TATB Detonation Waves with Inert Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ignition & Growth model for the shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is applied to calculating the main features of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based high explosives LX-17, PBX 9502 and EDC-35. Under detonation conditions, TATB based explosives exhibit reaction zone lengths of 2 to 3 mm depending on the interactions between the detonation wave and

Craig M. Tarver; Estella M. McGuire

2002-01-01

351

Experimental Investigation of Detonation Corner-Turning Using High Resolution Radiography.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We have performed experiments investigating detonation corner turning over a range of high-explosives including LX-17, Composition B, LX-04 and Tritonal. The primary diagnostic utilized here was a new high-resolution x-ray system that was capable of recor...

J. D. Molitoris H. G. Andreski R. G. Garza J. D. Batteux P. C. Souers

2006-01-01

352

The effect of metal particle size on blast performance of RDX and TATB based explosives  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the role that particle size of aluminum has on the internal blast performance of explosives. Tests were performed using a small sealed chamber and a larger open-ended shock tube. Two sets of explosive formulations were tested. One is TATB based and the other RDX. The TATB was an aluminized LX-17 formulation while the RDX was based on

Jeffery Davis; Phillip Miller

2001-01-01

353

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages

E. Kriikku; C. Ward; M. Stokes; B. Randall; J. Steed; R. Jones; L. Rogers; J. Fiscus; G. Dyches

1998-01-01

354

Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading. Revision 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed.

Kriikku

2000-01-01

355

Plutonium immobilization -- Can loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP adds the excess plutonium to ceramic pucks, loads the pucks into cans, and places the cans into DWPF canisters. This paper discusses the PIP process steps, the can loading conceptual design, can loading equipment design, and can loading work completed.

Kriikku

2000-01-01

356

Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Second stage immobilization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Automated equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in

Kriikku

1999-01-01

357

NOTE: Red, Gray, and Blue: Near Infrared Spectrophotometry of Faint Moons of Uranus and Neptune  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the CoCo Cold Coronagraph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, we observed the uranian satellites Miranda, Puck, Portia, and Rosalind and the neptunian satellite Proteus in the near infrared (JHK) to determine the albedos of those faint satellites. In V-J, all of Puck, Portia, Rosalind, and Proteus are very blue, similar to the colors of many icy

David E. Trilling; Robert H. Brown

2000-01-01

358

Red, Gray, and Blue: Near Infrared Spectrophotometry of Faint Moons of Uranus and Neptune  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the CoCo Cold Coronagraph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, we observed the uranian satellites Miranda, Puck, Portia, and Rosalind and the neptunian satellite Proteus in the near infrared (JHK) to determine the albedos of those faint satellites. In V-J, all of Puck, Portia, Rosalind, and Proteus are very blue, similar to the colors of many icy

David E. Trilling; Robert H. Brown

2000-01-01

359

Establishing the Test-Retest Reliability & Concurrent Validity for the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST) in Adolescent Male Ice Hockey Players  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this study the authors examine the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST). This was an on-ice field anaerobic test that measured average peak power and was validated with 3 anaerobic lab tests: (a) vertical jump, (b) the Margaria-Kalamen stair test, and (c) the Wingate Anaerobic Test. The…

Power, Allan; Faught, Brent E.; Przysucha, Eryk; McPherson, Moira; Montelpare, William

2012-01-01

360

The Impact of International Competitions on Competitive Balance in Domestic Leagues: The Case of the National Hockey League’s Participation in the Winter Olympics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper analyzes the impact of the NHL’s participation in the Winter Olympics on competitive balance outcomes within the NHL. It finds that the post-Olympic performance of NHL teams is negatively related to the number of players that the team supplied to the various Olympic rosters. This is consistent with a notion that participating in the Olympics can induce greater

Neil Longley

2012-01-01

361

Establishing the Test–Retest Reliability & Concurrent Validity for the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST) in Adolescent Male Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the authors examine the test–retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST). This was an on-ice field anaerobic test that measured average peak power and was validated with 3 anaerobic lab tests: (a) vertical jump, (b) the Margaria–Kalamen stair test, and (c) the Wingate Anaerobic Test. The participants (n?=?14) were 11- to 12-year-old

Allan Power; Brent E. Faught; Eryk Przysucha; Moira McPherson; William Montelpare

2012-01-01

362

Plutonism at Different Crustal Levels of an Arc: Insights From the 5 to 40 km (Paleodepth) North Cascades Crustal Section, Washington  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crystalline core of the North Cascades preserves a Cretaceous crustal section that facilitates evaluation of pluton construction, emplacement, geometry, composition, and deformation at widely variable crustal levels (~5 to 40 km paleodepth) in a thick (> 55 km) continental magmatic arc. The oldest and largest pulse of plutonism was focused between 96-89 Ma when fluxes were a minimum of 3.9x10-6km3/yr/km of arc length, but the coincidence with regional crustal thickening and underthrusting of a cool outboard terrane resulted in relatively low mid- to deep-crustal temperatures for an arc. A second, smaller peak of magmatism at 78-71 Ma (minimum of 8.2x10-7km3/yr/km of arc length) occurred during regional transpression. Tonalite dominates at all levels of the section. Intrusions range from large plutons to thin (< 50 m) dispersed sheets encased in metamorphic rocks that record less focused magmatism. The percentage of igneous rocks increases systematically from shallow to middle to deep levels; from approximately 37% to 55% to 65% of the total rock volume. Unfocused magmas comprise much higher percentages (approximately 19%) of the total plutonic rock at deep- and mid-crustal depths, but only 1% at shallower levels, whereas the largest intrusions were emplaced into shallow crust. Plutons have a range of shapes, including: asymmetric wedges to funnels; subhorizontal tabular sheets; steep-sided, blade-shaped bodies with high aspect ratios in map view; and steep-sided, vertically extensive (> 8 km) bodies shaped like thick disks and/or hockey pucks. Sheeted intrusions and gently dipping tabular bodies are more common with depth. Some of these plutons fit the model that most intrusions are subhorizontal and tabular, but many do not, reflecting the complex changes in lithology and rheology in arc crust undergoing regional shortening. The steep sheeted plutons partly represent magma transfer zones that fed the large shallow plutons, which were sites of intermittent magma accumulation for up to 5.5 m.y. Downward movement of host rocks by multiple processes occurred at all crustal levels during pluton emplacement. Ductile flow and accompanying rigid rotation were the dominant processes; stoping played an important secondary role, and magma wedging and regional deformation also aided emplacement. Overall, there are some striking changes with increasing depth, but many features and processes in the arc are similar throughout the crustal section, probably reflecting the relatively small differences in peak temperatures between the mid- and deep crust. Such patterns may be representative of thick continental magmatic arcs constructed during regional shortening.

Miller, R. B.; Paterson, S. R.; Matzel, J. P.

2008-12-01

363

Miniature Free-Flying Magnetometer Utilizing System-On-A-Chip Technology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Four Free-Flying Magnetometers (FFMs), developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy mission, were successfully deployed from the payload of a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. The FFMs functioned successfully by synchronously measuring the vector magnetic field at 4 points separate from the payload and at relative distances up to 3 km, and communicated their data, in bursts, to the ground. This is the first time synchronized in-situ multipoint measurements of the Earth's magnetic field utilizing miniature spin-stabilized "sensorcraft" have been performed. The data they provided have enabled, for the first time, the direct measure of field-aligned current density and are enabling new science by determining the fine-scale structure of the currents in the Earth's ionosphere involved in the production of aurora. These proof-of-concept "hockey puck" (80 mm diameter, 38 mm height, 250 gram mass) FFMs were built using off-the-shelf commercial, industrial, and military grade surface-mount electronic components. Radiation-hard electronics was not required for the Enstrophy mission's short sub-orbital flight. The successful design, implementation, and flight demonstration of this 1st generation FFM design has provided a solid base for further development of a 2nd generation FFM design for planetary science applications. A reliable ultra-miniature radiation-hard 2nd-generation FFM utilizing System-On-A-Chip (SOAC) technologies is proposed. This design would be targeted for long-term planetary missions to investigate magnetospheric field configurations in regions having small-scale structure and to separate spatial and temporal variations. A fleet of short-lived (expendable) FFMs would be deployed into a targeted region to gather multiprobe vector magnetic field data. The FFMs would be ejected from a parent spacecraft at a speed of a few m/sec and would cover spatial volumes of order tens of kilometers for times of order one hour. The parent spacecraft would carry a sufficient number of FFMs for multiple deployments. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Blaes, B. R.; Eyre, F. B.

2001-01-01

364

SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE TATB BASED EXPLOSIVE RX-03-GO WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M

2009-06-23

365

Plutonium immobilization feed batching system concept report  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Feed batching is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. It will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization feed batching process preliminary concept, batch splitting concepts, and includes a process block diagram, concept descriptions, a preliminary equipment list, and feed batching development areas.

Erickson, S.

2000-07-19

366

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design  

SciTech Connect

'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

Kriikku, E.

1999-05-13

367

Creep Testing Plastic-Bonded Explosives in Uniaxial Compression  

Microsoft Academic Search

High fidelity measurements of time-dependent strain in the plastic-bonded explosives LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 have been performed under constant, uni-axial, compressive load using a custom designed apparatus. The apparatus uses a combination of extensometers and linear variable differential transformers coupled with a data acquisition system, thermal controls, and gravitational loading. The materials being tested consist of a crystalline explosive material

F J Gagliardi; B J Cunningham

2008-01-01

368

Kinetic Modeling of Slow Energy Release in Non-Ideal Carbon Rich Explosives  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present here the first self-consistent kinetic based model for long time-scale energy release in detonation waves in the non-ideal explosive LX-17. Non-ideal, insensitive carbon rich explosives, such as those based on TATB, are believed to have significant late-time slow release in energy. One proposed source of this energy is diffusion-limited growth of carbon clusters. In this paper we consider

P Vitello; L Fried; K Glaesemann; C Souers

2006-01-01

369

Reactive Flow Modeling of the Interaction of TATB Detonation Waves with Inert Materials  

SciTech Connect

The Ignition & Growth model for the shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is applied to calculating the main features of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based high explosives LX-17, PBX 9502 and EDC-35. Under detonation conditions, TATB based explosives exhibit reaction zone lengths of 2 to 3 mm depending on the interactions between the detonation wave and the surrounding inert materials. This paper describes comparisons of Ignition & Growth calculations with data from several two- and three-dimensional experiments in which various materials are used to confine the TATB based explosives. The calculated unconfined failure diameters of PBX 9502 are normalized to the measured values at five initial temperatures. Failure diameters for LX-17 are then estimated by changing only the fraction ignited near the shock front. Fabry-Perot data on spherically divergent LX-17 snowball experiments is also compared to calculations. Calculated detonation velocities, wave front curvatures, and metal acceleration velocities are compared to experimental detonation data for TATB-based high explosives in tantalum, copper, PMMA, brass, and beryllium confinement. Three-dimensional prism failure test results on PBX 9502 are also stimulated using the ALE3D code.

Tarver, C M; McGuire, E M

2002-07-01

370

Lightning-resistant, low-inductance detonator cables  

SciTech Connect

A lightning strike on a flat detonator cable in close proximity to a high explosive (HE) main charge poses a possible detonation hazard if the electrical explosion of the cable launches the dielectric cover coat of the cable at a high enough velocity to shock-initiate the HE. The detonator cable for the W87 system has been demonstrated to be incapable of initiating LX-17 main-charge explosive even for a 99 percentile negative lightning strike (1). The W87 cable is a relatively high inductance cable, unsuitable for use with low-inductance firesets. We have performed tests on a low-inductance cable designed for the W89 program, which show it to be marginal in its ability to withstand a lightning strike without the possibility of initiating a heated LX-17 main charge HE. A new cable design, proposed by R.E. Lee of LLNL has been tested and shown to be capable of withstanding a 99 percentile negative lightning strike without initiating LX-17 heated to 250{degree}C.

Druce, R.L.; Lee, R.S.; Moua, K.

1994-04-01

371

Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.

Congdon, J.W.

2001-07-10

372

Detonator cable initiation system safety investigation: Consequences of energizing the detonator and actuator cables  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to explore and assess the worst-case response of a W89-type weapons system, damaged so as to expose detonator and/or detonator safing strong link (DSSL) cables to the most extreme, credible lightning-discharge, environment. The test program used extremely high-current-level, fast-rise-time (1- to 2-{mu}s) discharges to simulate lightning strikes to either the exposed detonator or DSSL cables. Discharges with peak currents above 700 kA were required to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch a flyer fast enough potentially to detonate weapon high explosive (HE). Detonator-safing-strong-link (DSSL) cables were exploded in direct contact with hot LX-17 and Ultrafine TATB (UFTATB). At maximum charging voltage, the discharge system associated with the HE firing chamber exploded the cables at more than 600-kA peak current; however, neither LX-17 nor UFTATB detonated at 250{degree}C. Tests showed that intense surface arc discharges of more than 700 kA/cm in width across the surface of hot UFTATB [generally the more sensitive of the two insensitive high explosives (IHE)] could not initiate this hot IHE. As an extension to this study, we applied the same technique to test sections of the much-narrower but thicker-cover-layer W87 detonator cable. These tests were performed at the same initial stored electrical energy as that used for the W89 study. Because of the narrower cable conductor in the W87 cables, discharges greater than 550-kA peak current were sufficient to explode the cable and launch a fast flyer. In summary, we found that lightning strikes to exposed DSSL cables cannot directly detonate LX-17 or UFTATB even at high temperatures, and they pose no HE safety threat.

Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Von Holle, W.

1994-03-01

373

Racial and Gender Report Card, 2003: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Hiring Practices of the National Basketball Association, National Football League, National Hockey League, Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, Women's National Basketball Association, and NCAA and Its Member Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is the 12th issue of the "Racial and Gender Report Card," which assesses hiring practices of women and people of color in U.S. professional and amateur sports and sporting organizations. It considers the composition of players, coaches, and front office/athletic department employees in the leading sports organizations. Each organization is…

Lapchick, Richard E.

374

Molten salt destruction of energetic materials: Emission and absorption measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spectroscopic aspects of decomposition behaviors of the high explosives LX-17 (92.5 wt % 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) plus 1.5 wt % Kel-F 800 plastic binder), LX-04 (85 wt % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) plus 15 wt % Viton A plastic binder), and 2,6-Dinitrotoluene (DNT) were investigated when 0.3 or 1.0 g samples were immersed into molten salt baths (700 °C molten LiC1-NaC1-KC1 eutectics). UV-VIS

Michelle L. Pantoya; Benjamin D. Shaw

2002-01-01

375

The Effect of Variation of Aluminum Particle Size and Polymer on the Performance of Explosives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ballistic Impact Chamber (BIC) test was used to measure the effect of particle size upon performance of the energetic material. Two different particle sizes of aluminum, 20 micron (mum) and 150 nanometer (nm), were added to LX-17 to measure their effect upon hazard sensitivity and energy/gram output. Also, the effect of the binder on the performance of the mixtures was explored. For this paper, Viton and Kel-F were compared. The Ballistic Impact Chamber test measures the initial rate of reaction, time of reaction, the burning reaction, and the energy output during the impact of the energetic material.

Woody, Diana; Davis, Jeffery J.

2002-07-01

376

Insensitive fuze train for high explosives  

DOEpatents

A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

Cutting, Jack L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01

377

Plutonium immobilization ceramic feed batching component test report  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Ceramic feed batching (CFB) is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. The CFB step will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization CFB process preliminary concept (including a process block diagram), batch splitting component test results, CFB development areas, and FY 1999 and 2000 CFB program milestones.

Erickson, S.A.

1999-10-04

378

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

Kriikku, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

1998-05-01

379

When “where” is more important than “when”: Birthplace and birthdate effects on the achievement of sporting expertise  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we assessed whether contextual factors related to where or when an athlete is born influence their likelihood of playing professional sport. The birthplace and birth month of all American players in the National Hockey League, National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, and Professional Golfer's Association, and all Canadian players in the National Hockey League were collected from

JEAN COTE ´; Dany J. Macdonald; Joseph Baker; Bruce Abernethy

2006-01-01

380

Assessing the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes who participate in contact sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Postconcussion Syndrome Checklist, and the Stroop task. Based on a brief self-report concussion history survey, male and female athletes who participated in ice hockey, field hockey, lacrosse, and\\/or soccer were assigned to one of

Chad Killam; Robin L. Cautin; Anthony C. Santucci

2005-01-01

381

The use of Video Game Technology for Investigating Perceptual and Cognitive Awareness in Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a framework for investigating and manipulating the attentional components of video game play in order to affect learning transfer across different task environments. Several groups of video game players (VGP) and non video game players - both hockey and non-hockey groups (NVGPH, NVGP) will be tested at baseline on several aspects of visual processing skill. The NVGP

Desmond E. Mulligan; Michael W. Dobson; Janet Mccracken

2005-01-01

382

Noise and Attentional Selectivity: A Reproducible Phenomenon?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Four pursuit-tracking experiments were conducted in an attempt to replicate with adults, Hockey's findings that loud noise increases attentional selectivity. Neither attentional selectivity nor masking of auditory feedback was found to be significant. For Hockey's reply and the authors' rejoinder, see p499-506 of this issue. (SJL)|

Forster, Peter M.; Grierson, Arthur T.

1978-01-01

383

Nontraditional Games in a Foreign Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study investigated students' reactions to the addition of nontraditional games (played in and traditional to another country) to the physical education curriculum. Seventh grade students in Australia were introduced to game development, skills, and present status of two sports, 'Midget' Hockey, a modified version of Canadian ice hockey, and…

Cross, Thomas S.

384

Hydratation dans les sports de glace. Étude du jeune hockeyeur  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives – To study the water balance of the young ice hockey players (12 to 13 years old) during their training sessions and one match.Methods – Twenty one players of an ice hockey club  are weighed before and after two training sessions and one match in order to evaluate their water balance in these different conditions. The exact amount of water ingested

E Marchal; C Chauvin; G Cazalbou; M. J Arnaud

2002-01-01

385

Score a Facilities Hat Trick: Strategic Goals for Successful Hiring, Training, and Team Commitment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Granted, it might be a bit of a stretch to find comparable attributes between an ice hockey team and facilities management organizations. However, if you are open-minded to the possibility and begin to analyze each of these entities, you will find there are some distinct similarities. Ice hockey is a fast-paced and ever-changing game, much like a…

Loy, Darcy

2012-01-01

386

Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Second stage immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Automated equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the conceptual design stage and the facility will begin operation in 2008. This paper discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Project phase 2 automation equipment conceptual design, equipment design, and work completed.

Kriikku, E.

1999-12-21

387

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design for 13 MT Case  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading conceptual design for the 13 Metric Ton (MT) PIP throughput case. This report includes a process block diagram, process description, and preliminary equipment specifications and documents the changes to the original can loading concept documented in previous reports.

Peterson, K.D.

2001-01-31

388

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading FY98 Year End Design Report  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will immobilize plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report summarizes FY98 Can Loading work completed for the Plutonium Immobilization Project and it includes summaries of reports on Can Size, Equipment Review, Preliminary Concepts, Conceptual Design, and Preliminary Specification. Plant trip reports for the Greenville Automation and Manufacturing Exposition, Rocky Flats BNFL Pu repackaging glovebox line, and vendor trips are also included.

Kriikku, E.

1998-11-25

389

Probabilistic Threshold Criterion  

SciTech Connect

The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

2010-03-09

390

Comprehensive Characterization of Voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives from 10 nm to 1 cm: Effects of Temperature Cycling and Compressive Creep  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the characterization of voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives over several orders of magnitude, from sizes on the order of 10 nm to about 1 cm. This is accomplished using ultra small angle x-ray scattering to investigate voids from a few nm to a few microns, ultra small angle neutron scattering for voids from 100 nm to 10 microns, and x-ray computed microtomography to investigate microstructure from a few microns to a few centimeters. The void distributions of LX-17 are outlined, and the microstructure of LX-17 is presented. Temperature cycling and compressive creep cause drastically different damage to the microstructure. Temperature cycling leads to a volume expansion (ratchet growth) in TATB-based explosives, and x-ray scattering techniques that are sensitive to sizes up to a few microns indicated changes to the void volume distribution that had previously accounted for most, but not all of the change in density. This paper presents the microstructural damage larger than a few microns caused by ratchet growth. Temperature cycling leads to void creation in the binder poor regions associated with the interior portion of formulated prills. Conversely, compressive creep causes characteristically different changes to microstructure; fissures form at binder-rich prill boundaries prior to mechanical failure.

Willey, T M; Lauderbach, L; Gagliardi, F; Cunningham, B; Lorenz, K T; Lee, J I; van Buuren, T; Call, R; Landt, L; Overturf, G

2010-02-26

391

Shock sensitivity of IHE at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Insensitive high explosives (IHE`s) based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) have been demonstrated to be very insensitive to shock, thermal, friction and other stimuli. Hazard scenarios can involve more than one stimulus, such as heating followed by fragment impact (shock). The shock sensitivity of the IHE`s LX-17 and PBX-9502 preheated to a temperature (250{degree}C) just below thermal runaway is quantitatively studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges. The thermal expansion of TATB to 250{degree}C is measured to determine the state of the explosive prior to shock initiation. LX-17 and PBX-9502 are found to be significantly more sensitive at 250{degree}C than at lower temperatures, but still less sensitive than ambient temperature HMX-based explosives. An ignition and growth reactive flow computer model of the shock initiation of hot IHE is developed to allow predictions of the response of hot IHE to impact scenarios which can not be tested directly.

Urtiew, P.A.; Cook, T.M.; Maienschein, J.L.; Tarver, C.M.

1993-06-01

392

Anaplasma marginale field challenge: Protection by an inactivated immunogen that shares partial sequence of msp1? variable region with the challenge strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty four Hereford heifers free of anaplasmosis were allotted into three groups of eight animals each and inoculated three times with adjuvant in Puck saline as control or 50?g and 100?g of total protein of Anaplasma marginale initial bodies from three Mexican strains which share the same variable region of msp1? and msp4. Inoculation with the adjuvant or the immunogen

Laura E. Orozco Vega; Sergio D. Rodríguez; Germinal J. Cantó Alarcón; Rafael López Flores; Rafael Jiménez Ocampo; Miguel Ángel García Ortiz; Jesús Francisco Preciado de la Torre; Edmundo E. Rojas Ramírez

2007-01-01

393

Feminizing Presidents: Joseph Keppler and Gender in Gilded Age Political Cartoons  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amid the crowded newsstands of American cities in the late nineteenth century, the average reader flipping through a copy of Puck, a weekly humor magazine devoted to political and social issues, may have been surprised to see an unusual print: that of the President of the United States depicted in women’s clothing, with feminine features, performing a womanly task! These

Jerome Gonzalez

2011-01-01

394

PLUTONIUM RECYCLE PROGRAM ANNUAL REPORT, FISCAL YEAR 1961  

Microsoft Academic Search

7 6 4 9 ; : 9 7 8 5 9 6 3 7B 8 8 5 ; 8 5 9 ; ? : < 6 A 8 tinued on updating, revising, and ; debugging the RBU, MELEAGER, PUCK, and LOLA codes. Three new codes, PROTEUS, ; PUVE, and QUICK, were developed to assist analytical studies. The PROTEUS code, ;

S. ed

1961-01-01

395

Apparatus for Teaching Physics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Summarizes the advantages in using the Daedalon Air Table, which supplies compressed air to the pucks instead of the table surface itself. Describes methods for constructing an electronic null detector using a Weston type galvanometer and an integrated circuit operational amplifier. Also describes a redesigned and improved sound-level meter. (CS)|

Gottlieb, Herbert H., Ed.

1980-01-01

396

Reviews  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

WEB WATCH (204) Try unearthing some interesting information about archaeology BOOK REVIEWS (206) Teaching and assessing practical skills Book Review: Learn to drive with Sir Isaac Newton DVD REVIEW (207) Bring some sunshine into the classroom EQUIPMENT REVIEWS (208) Robust air puck takes a kicking Flowlog offers sensing options plus multimode datalogging Mastering Chladni figures takes practice but it offers surprises

2004-03-01

397

Techniques for Teachers Section  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Includes a simple technique to demonstrate Millikan's oil drop experiment, an environmental studies experiment to measure dissolved oxygen in water samples, and a technique to demonstrate action-reaction. Science materials described are the Pol-A-Star Tomiscope, Nuffield chemistry film loops, air pucks and pH meters. (JR)|

Tait, A., Ed.

1973-01-01

398

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Preliminary Specifications  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading preliminary equipment specifications and includes a process block diagram, process description, equipment list, preliminary equipment specifications, plan and elevation sketches, and some commercial catalogs. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.

Kriikku, E.

1998-11-25

399

Shakespeare  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Helping students to see that themes repeat themselves throughout time allows them to see inside their own hearts more clearly. Use these sites to learn more about William Shakespeare and his time. Shakespeare for Kids Queen Elizabeth Puck s Place You can add your own sonnets or pictures Go inside the Globe Theatre ...

Steele, Karen

2007-01-16

400

Techniques for Teachers Section  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes a simple technique to demonstrate Millikan's oil drop experiment, an environmental studies experiment to measure dissolved oxygen in water samples, and a technique to demonstrate action-reaction. Science materials described are the Pol-A-Star Tomiscope, Nuffield chemistry film loops, air pucks and pH meters. (JR)

Tait, A., Ed.

1973-01-01

401

40 CFR 63.9565 - What definitions apply to this subpart?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...facility that manufactures friction materials using a solvent-based process. Friction materials are used in...objects. Products that use friction materials include, but...brake pucks, disc brake pads, brake linings, brake...blocks, brake discs, clutch facings, and...

2010-07-01

402

40 CFR 63.9565 - What definitions apply to this subpart?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...facility that manufactures friction materials using a solvent-based process. Friction materials are used in...objects. Products that use friction materials include, but...brake pucks, disc brake pads, brake linings, brake...blocks, brake discs, clutch facings, and...

2009-07-01

403

A Preponderance of Elastic Properties of Alpha Plutonium Measured Via Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Samples of {alpha} plutonium were fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility. Cylindrical samples were machined from cast pucks. Precision immersion density and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements were completed on 27 new samples, yielding elastic moduli measurements. Mechanical tests were performed in compression yielding stress-strain curves as a function of rate, temperature and phase.

Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrow, Adam M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-06

404

Shopping for Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Describes inexpensive science materials for doing science activities using the steps in the learning cycle: engage, explore, explain, extend, and evaluate. The hands-on activities help students construct knowledge of dissolving and filtering, chemical reactions, conductivity of metals, heat absorption, motion (frictionless puck), sound production…

Ward, John; And Others

1992-01-01

405

Lionel Charles Renwick (Rennick) Emmett (1913-96): physician and Olympian.  

PubMed

Lionel Charles Renwick Emmett, a physician who trained in pre-independent India as a medical student, participated in the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics as a part of the Indian field hockey team that won the Gold Medal. PMID:22892304

Biswas, Tamoghna; Datta, Adrija; Chandra, Shivika

2012-08-01

406

What Are Sprains and Strains?  

MedlinePLUS

... strain are the back and the hamstring muscle in the back of the thigh. Sports such as soccer, football, hockey, boxing, and wrestling put people at risk for strains in the back or legs. People who play some ...

407

Preventing head injuries in children  

MedlinePLUS

... Playing contact sports, such as lacrosse, ice hockey, football Riding a skateboard or in-line skates Batting ... avoid riding on these vehicles. After having a concussion or mild head injury , your child may need ...

408

Aggression in Sport: Its Implications for Character Building.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The premise that "sports builds character" is scrutinized through a discussion of several contact sports--boxing, hockey, and football. The fine line between assertiveness and aggression is explored, and the interrelationship between society and sports is investigated. (JN)

VanDyke, Roger R.

1980-01-01

409

40 CFR 5.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2010-07-01

410

21 CFR 1140.16 - Conditions of manufacture, sale, and distribution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...distributed any free samples of smokeless tobacco: (i) To a sports team or entertainment group; or (ii) At any football, basketball, baseball, soccer, or hockey event or any other sporting or entertainment event determined by the Secretary to be...

2013-04-01

411

45 CFR 618.415 - Access to course offerings.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION...boxing, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily...

2009-10-01

412

Bruise  

MedlinePLUS

... bruised (thigh pads, hip guards, and elbow pads in football and hockey; shin guards and knee pads in soccer and basketball). ... to Musculoskeletal Structures: 1. Muscle and Tendon Injury. In: ... Medicine. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2009:chap ...

413

Sleep Problems, Health Symptoms, and Tension/Anxiety and Fatigue During Wartime Cruising in a Moderately High Heat/Humidity Naval Environment.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Previous laboratory and field studies have determined that prolonged stress and fatigue can lead to human performance decrements (Hockey, 1983). However, there is a dearth of research examining the combined effects of multiple environmental stressors (e.g...

T. P. Steele D. A. Kobus G. R. Banta C. G. Armstrong

1989-01-01

414

Separated Shoulder  

MedlinePLUS

... contact sports, such as football and hockey, and in sports that may involve falls, such as downhill skiing, ... instance, have you experienced a fall or participated in contact sports recently? Have you ever injured your shoulder in ...

415

When to Tell Your Child About Adoption  

MedlinePLUS

... Obese Children: Suggestions for Parents How Do Antibiotics Work? Body Checking in Hockey (Audio) Bottles and Formula Safety (Audio) Speak Up For Kids at the Ballot Box Healthy Children Radio: Indoor Tanning (Audio) Healthy Children Radio: Sensory-Based ...

416

16 CFR 1203.4 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...promotion to be, a device intended to provide protection from head injuries while riding a bicycle. 2 2 Helmets specifically marketed...designated activity, such as skateboarding, rollerblading, baseball, roller hockey, etc., would be excluded...

2010-01-01

417

16 CFR 1203.4 - Definitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...promotion to be, a device intended to provide protection from head injuries while riding a bicycle.2 2 Helmets specifically marketed...designated activity, such as skateboarding, rollerblading, baseball, roller hockey, etc., would be excluded...

2009-01-01

418

29 CFR 36.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity...

2010-07-01

419

40 CFR 5.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity...

2009-07-01

420

15 CFR 8a.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity...

2010-01-01

421

18 CFR 1317.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity...

2010-04-01

422

38 CFR 23.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity...

2009-07-01

423

43 CFR 41.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity...

2010-10-01

424

6 CFR 17.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity...

2010-01-01

425

7 CFR 15a.41 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...unless the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of this part, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of...

2010-01-01

426

45 CFR 86.41 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...unless the sport involved is a contact sport. For the purposes of this part, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball and other sports the purpose of major activity of...

2009-10-01

427

Quadriceps Contusion  

MedlinePLUS

... it both tear. Quadriceps contusions are common in sports that involve a lot of direct contact, such ... and hockey. They're also a risk in sports where there's a chance of collisions, like soccer ...

428

BAM: Staphylococcus aureus  

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)

... Sterile bent glass streaking rods, hockey stick or hoe-shaped, with fire-polished ends, 3-4 mm diameter, 15-20 cm long, with an angled spreading ... More results from www.fda.gov/food/foodscienceresearch/laboratorymethods

429

Analysis of Air Force Academy Nonrevenue Intercollegiate Athletic Program.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Air Force Academy sponsors 28 varsity intercollegiate sports, 18 men and 10 women. This study analyzes the 25 nonrevenue sports, which excludes football, men's basketball, and ice hockey, to determine if these sports should continue to be offered. Thr...

1986-01-01

430

Effects of emotional excitement on heart rate and blood pressure dynamics in patients with coronary artery disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The incidence of adverse cardiovascular events is higher among spectators of exciting sports events, but the mechanistic link between the events is not known. We assessed the heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) dynamics of enthusiastic male ice hockey spectators (60±9years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) during Finnish national league ice hockey play-off final matches. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory ECG (n=55)

Olli-Pekka Piira; Heikki V. Huikuri; Mikko P. Tulppo

2011-01-01

431

Effects of observing competitive and violent versions of a sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Males were randomly assigned to view either (1) a film clip featuring hockey fights or (2) a film of nonaggressive hockey\\u000a action or (3) a no-film control condition after having first been angered or treated politely by an experimental confederate.\\u000a The dependent variable was represented by a measure of aggressive mood and a behavioral measure of retaliatory aggression.\\u000a Analyses revealed

Gordon W. Russell; Sherry L. Di Lullo; Dany Di Lullo

1988-01-01

432

Cricket\\/Mica2 Based Discrete Event Simulator for WiHoc Ver.1.0 Localization Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The deployment of wireless sensor networks (WSN) has enabled applications to operate at its optimum and maximum potential. This paper presents the enhancement of the wireless hockey (WiHoc) system ver.1.0. The sensors are utilized to acquire the movement of field hockey players on a coaching strategy board. These are denoted and executed by the Cricket \\/Mica-2 sensors which have been

S. Shamala; T. Sangeetha; A. Moqry

2009-01-01

433

Opening the “Black Box” of Climate Change Science: Actor-Network Theory and Rhetorical Practice in Scientific Controversies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this essay, Joseph Barton's controversial congressional investigation of the well-known “hockey-stick” study of climate change, produced by Michael Mann, Raymond Bradley, and Malcolm Hughes, is analyzed though the critical lens of actor-network theory. Turning to the works of Bruno Latour, Michel Callon, and John Law, this essay illustrates how the hockey-stick node of this rhetorical climate change actor-network was

Richard D. Besel

2011-01-01

434

Skill acquisition in students with and without Pervasive Developmental Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purposes of this study were (a) to examine skill acquisition in field hockey of seven junior-high school students with PDD, who attended an inclusive class; and (b) to compare the degree of skill acquisition in field hockey of junior-high school students without disabilities who attend an inclusive class and those who attend a regular class.The motor performance of the

Yeshayahu Hutzler; Matan Margalit

2009-01-01

435

Predicting the Effect of Porosity on the Shock Sensitivity of Explosives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CREST is a reactive-burn model that uses entropy-dependent reaction rates to model shock initiation and detonation behaviour in plastic bonded explosives. A CREST model for the TATB-based high explosive PBX 9502 was published previously at this conference. It is well known that changing the porosity of an explosive, like PBX 9502, can dramatically influence its sensitivity. The equation of state used in CREST incorporates the snow-plough model, allowing the porosity of the explosive to be selected at will, while keeping the reaction model constant. In this paper, it will be shown that CREST can predict the change in explosive sensitivity with porosity, as demonstrated by the experimentally determined Pop-plots for a similar explosive, LX-17. In contrast, it will be shown that pressure-dependent reactive-burn models are unable to predict this porosity effect without changing the reaction rate.

Handley, C. A.; Lambourn, B. D.

2009-12-01

436

TARANTULA 2011 in JWL++  

SciTech Connect

Using square zoning, the 2011 version of the kinetic package Tarantula matches cylinder data, cylinder dead zones, and cylinder failure with the same settings for the first time. The key is the use of maximum pressure rather than instantaneous pressure. Runs are at 40, 200 and 360 z/cm using JWL++ as the host model. The model also does run-to-detonation, thin-pulse initiation with a P-t curve and air gap crossing, all in cylindrical geometry. Two sizes of MSAD/LX-10/LX-17 snowballs work somewhat with these settings, but are too weak, so that divergent detonation is a challenge for the future. Butterfly meshes are considered but do not appear to solve the issue.

Souers, P C; Haylett, D; Vitello, P

2011-10-27

437

Energetic materials destruction using molten salt  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. LLNL has built a small-scale unit to test the destruction of HE using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process. In addition to the high explosive HMX, destruction has been carried out on RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. Also destroyed was a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, destruction has been carried out on a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, and PBX-9404.

Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

1994-04-29

438

Modelling detonation in ultrafine tatb hemispherical boosters using crest  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hemispherical ultrafine TATB boosters can initiate detonation in the TATB-based explosive LX-17. For accurate hydrocode predictions of experiments using this combination of explosives, it is important to accurately model the detonation wave emerging from the booster material since this may influence the detonation behaviour in the main charge. Since ultrafine TATB exhibits non-ideal detonation behaviour, its response should be modelled using reactive flow. In this paper, the CREST reactive burn model, which uses entropy-dependent reaction rates to simulate explosive behaviour, is applied to LLNL experimental data obtained from ultrafine TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three initial temperatures (ambient, -20°C, and -54°C). The ambient temperature data is used to develop an initial CREST model for ultrafine TATB which is then subsequently applied to the cold data. A comparison of the experimental and modelling results is presented showing that the model gives good agreement to experiment at both ambient and cold temperatures

Whitworth, Nicholas J.

2012-03-01

439

The unusual stability of TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene): A review of the scientific literature  

SciTech Connect

This review is intended as an up-to-date review of the scientific literature on TATB since its discovery as a high explosive. In particular, it focuses on clarifying our current understanding of the relationship between the structure of TATB and its unique thermal stability. We review a large number of different publications by many authors. A small portion of the work on TATB'' presented actually consists of experimental studies on TATB formulated as PBX-9502 or as LX-17. Where relevant, this distinction is indicated. However, inasmuch as this review focuses on thermal response and the relationship of chemical reactivity to the molecular and lattice structure of TATB as a pure material, results from these other formulations may not be directly applicable, and in general we have omitted them. 4 refs.

Rice, S.F.; Simpson, R.L.

1990-07-04

440

GAUGE RUN-TO-DETONATION DATA AND FAILURE/DEAD ZONE MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Previous shock initiation run-to-detonation experiments on energetic materials were plotted with distance and time to get a single distance/time to detonation. Modern shots utilize enough gauges so that the distance-time data can be differentiated, which shows not only the usual inflection pressure point before detonation, referred to here as P{sub b}, but also a second, low-pressure inflection, referred to here as P{sub a}, that marks rapid ramp-up of the initiation. An analysis of the TATB based LX-17 and PBX 9502 in addition to the LLM-105 based RX-55 data shows that both P{sub a} and P{sub b} increase linearly with the initiation pressure created by the flyer plate. This contradicts the current method in the Tarantula failure/dead zone model, which uses constant pressure boundaries between reaction regions. Modeling changes required by the new data will be considered.

Souers, P C; Vitello, P; Vandersall, K S

2009-06-26

441

Cook-off resistant initiation trains  

SciTech Connect

We have developed and tested initiation trains which are designed to withstand abnormal thermal environments. The design philosophy is to use a slapper detonator to initiate a small quantity of initiating explosive, whose mass is too small to permit a transition to detonation in a cook-off environment. We have successfully used PETN and HNS as the initiating explosive. The detonation of the initiating explosive drives a thin metal flyer plate onto an ultrafine-particle-size TATB booster which, in turn, initiates a main charge. The booster can be scaled to almost any size without compromising the cook-off resistance by using the ultrafine TATB to initiate a larger charge of LX-17 insensitive explosive as a secondary booster.

Cutting, J.L.; Nichols, A.L. III; von Holle, W.G.; Lee, R.S.

1992-03-26

442

On the violence of thermal explosion in solid explosives  

SciTech Connect

Heavily confined cylinders of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) and triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) were heated at rates varying from 2 C/min to 3.3 C/h. Fourteen of the cylinders were hollow, and inner metallic liners with small heaters attached were used to produce uniform temperatures just prior to explosion. A complex thermocouple pattern was used to measure the temperature history throughout the charge and to determine the approximate location where the runaway exothermic reaction first occurred. The violence of the resulting explosion was measured using velocity pin arrays placed inside and outside of the metal confinement cylinders, flash x-rays, overpressure gauges, and fragment collection techniques. Five cylinders were intentionally detonated for violence comparisons. The measured temperature histories, times to explosion, and the locations of first reaction agreed closely with those calculated by a two-dimensional heat transfer code using multistep chemical decomposition models. The acceleration of the confining metal cylinders by the explosion process was accurately simulated using a two-dimensional pressure dependent deflagration reactive flow hydrodynamic mode. The most violent HMX thermal explosions gradually accelerated their outer cases to velocities approaching those of intentional detonations approximately 120 {micro}m after the onset of explosion. The measured inner cylinder collapse velocities from thermal explosions were considerably lower than those produced by detonations. In contrast to the HMX thermal reactions, no violent thermal explosions were produced by the TATB-based explosive LX-17. A heavily confined, slowly heated LX-17 test produced sufficient pressure to cause a 0.1 cm bend in a 2 cm thick steel plate.

Chidester, S.K.; Tarver, C.M.; Green, L.G.; Urtiew, P.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Defense Technologies Engineering Div.

1997-07-01

443

In-Situ Monitoring of the Microstructure of TATB-based Explosive Formulations During Temperature Cycling using Ultra-small Angle X-ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect

TATB (1,3,5 triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), an extremely insensitive explosive, is used both in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) and as an ultra-fine pressed powder (UFTATB). With both PBXs and UFTATB, an irreversible expansion occurs with temperature cycling known as ratchet growth. In TATB-based explosives using Kel-F 800 as binder (LX-17 and PBX-9502), additional voids, sizes hundreds of nanometers to a few microns account for much of the volume expansion caused by temperature cycling. These voids are in the predicted size regime for hot-spot formation during ignition and detonation, and thus an experimental measure of these voids is important feedback for hot-spot theory and for determining the relationship between void size distributions and detonation properties. Also, understanding the mechanism of ratchet growth allows future choice of explosive/binder mixtures to minimize these types of changes to explosives, further extending PBX shelf life. This paper presents the void size distributions of LX-17, UFTATB, and PBXs using commercially available Cytop M, Cytop A, and Hyflon AD60 binders during temperature cycling between -55 C and 70 C. These void size distributions are derived from ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), a technique sensitive to structures from about 10 nm to about 2 mm. Structures with these sizes do not appreciably change in UFTATB, indicating voids or cracks larger than a few microns appear in UFTATB during temperature cycling. Compared to Kel-F 800 binders, Cytop M and Cytop A show relatively small increases in void volume from 0.9% to 1.3% and 0.6% to 1.1%, respectively, while Hyflon fails to prevent irreversible volume expansion (1.2% to 4.6%). Computational mesoscale models of ratchet growth and binder wetting and adhesion properties point to mechanisms of ratchet growth, and are discussed in combination with the experimental results.

Willey, T M; Hoffman, D M; van Buuren, T; Lauderbach, L; Ilavsky, J; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Overturf, G; Fried, L

2008-02-06

444

ARROW-PAK Macroencapsulation. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

An ARROW-PAK is a high density polyethylene (HDPE) tube, about 21 feet long and 30 inches wide. Each ARROW-PAK can hold the equivalent of 21 55-gallon drums of mixed waste debris. Each tube is fused to HDPE endcaps using localized heating and high pressure contact. The sleeves and encaps form a tube for macroencapsulating mixed waste debris. The ARROW-PAK may achieve a mixed waste debris volume one-fourth that of the conventional macroencapsulation approach. The mixed waste debris is loaded into 55-gallon drums. Once filled a 'supercompactor' crushes the drums into 12-inch thick pucks. Three pucks can be loaded into a standard 85-gallon metal drum known as an 'overpack'. Seven overpacks fit into each ARROW-PAK.

None

2002-04-01

445

Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many schools. Substituting marbles on a table for air pucks introduces angular momentum and sliding friction so that simple video analysis will demonstrate that linear momentum is not conserved.1,2 Nevertheless, these labs offer students insights into the real-world application of physics. During a recent classroom trial, an unexpected result forced my students to think creatively and critically about what happened in the experiment.

Kalajian, Peter

2013-03-01

446

Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading  

SciTech Connect

This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

Hamilton, E.L.

1999-01-26

447

Effects of the guard electrode on the photoelectron distribution around an electric field sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed a numerical model of a double-probe electric field sensor equipped with a photoelectron guard electrode for the particle-in-cell simulation. The model includes typical elements of modern double-probe sensors on, e.g., BepiColombo/MMO, Cluster, and THEMIS spacecraft, such as a conducting boom and a preamplifier housing called a puck. The puck is also used for the guard electrode, and its potential is negatively biased by reference to the floating spacecraft potential. We apply the proposed model to an analysis of an equilibrium plasma environment around the sensor by assuming that the sun illuminates the spacecraft from the direction perpendicular to the sensor deployment axis. As a simulation result, it is confirmed that a substantial number of spacecraft-originating photoelectrons are once emitted sunward and then fall onto the puck and sensing element positions. In order to effectively repel such photoelectrons coming from the sun direction, a potential hump for electrons, i.e., a negative potential region, should be created in a plasma region around the sunlit side of the guard electrode surface. The simulation results reveal the significance of the guard electrode potential being not only lower than the spacecraft body but also lower than the background plasma potential of the region surrounding the puck and the sensing element. One solution for realizing such an operational condition is to bias the guard potential negatively by reference to the sensor potential because the sensor is usually operated nearly at the background plasma potential.

Miyake, Y.; Usui, H.; Kojima, H.

2011-05-01

448

Living history biography  

SciTech Connect

A living history biography is presented of Theodore T. Puck. This history is intimately involved with the progress towards mapping of the human genome through research at the forefront of molecular cytogenetics. A review of historical research aims such as human genetics studies based on somatic cells, isolation of mutants as genetic markers, complementation analysis, gene mapping and the measurement of mutation is presented. 37 refs., 4 figs.

Puck, T.T. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-11-15

449

Changes in X-ray Sensitivity of HeLa Cells during the Division Cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

MEASUREMENT by Puck and Marcus of the reproductive survival of randomly dividing cultures of HeLa S3 cells after X-irradiation revealed an exponential response to dose following a shoulder1. However, the possibility was not excluded that these populations are in fact heterogeneous, the cells undergoing small, or large but brief, fluctuations in sensitivity during the division cycle. We have examined this

Toyozo Terasima; L. J. Tolmach

1961-01-01

450

Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading  

Microsoft Academic Search

This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the

1999-01-01

451

Soft tissue impact characterisation kit (STICK) for ex situ investigation of heart rhythm responses to acute mechanical stimulation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both mechanical induction and mechanical termination of arrhythmias have been reported in man. Examples include pre-cordial impacts by sports implements (baseballs, pucks) that can trigger arrhythmias, including ventricular fibrillation, or via the so-called pre-cordial thump, used as an emergency resuscitation measure to convert arrhythmias to normal sinus node rhythm. These interventions have been partially reproduced in experimental studies on whole

Patricia J. Cooper; Avi Epstein; Iain A. MacLeod; Sarah T. M. Schaaf; Judith Sheldon; Christian Boulin; Peter Kohl

2006-01-01

452

Nine Planets: Planetary Picture List  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of The Nine Planets provides links to internet solar system images of the nine planets and their moons. Images include the Sun, Mercury, Venus, the Earth and Moon, Mars (Phobos, Deimos), Jupiter (Amalthea, Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto), Saturn (Pan, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Epimetheus, Janus, Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), Uranus (Puck, Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon), Neptune (Triton, Proteus), and Pluto with Charon. Miscellanous images include asteroids, comets, meteorites, and spacecraft.

453

Graspables revisited: multi-touch vs. tangible input for tabletop displays in acquisition and manipulation tasks  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an experimental comparison of multi-touch and tangible user interfaces for basic interface actions. Twelve participants completed manipulation and acquisition tasks on an interactive surface in each of three conditions: tangible user interface; multi-touch; and mouse and puck. We found that interface control objects in the tangible condition were easiest to acquire and, once acquired, were easier\\/more accurate to

Philip Tuddenham; David Kirk; Shahram Izadi

2010-01-01

454

Chiropractic management of a patient with postoperative lateral retinacular release using a multimodal approach: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a chiropractic rehabilitation program for a patient with postsurgical lateral retinaculum release. Clinical Features A 26-year-old male ice hockey goalie presented 1 month after having lateral retinaculum release surgery for his left knee with residual mild discomfort and edema in his left knee. Intervention and Outcome The patient was treated using a multimodal approach of both passive and active chiropractic care focusing on the restoration of full range of motion, increased proprioception, balance, strength, and endurance to return the patient to competitive ice hockey. Conclusion This case study demonstrated that, after 14 weeks of care, the patient was able to return to ice hockey training with no residual symptoms.

Solecki, Thomas J.; Hostnik, Kurt D.

2012-01-01

455

Bone gained from physical activity and lost through detraining: a longitudinal study in young males  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of training and detraining on bone mineral density of both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing bone in a cohort of young males who participated in ice hockey training. Forty-three healthy adolescent ice hockey players (16.7±0.6 years) training for a mean of 9.7±2.4 h\\/week and 25 control subjects (16.8±0.3 years) training for 2.1±2.7 h\\/week, were

Anna Nordström; Tommy Olsson; Peter Nordström

2005-01-01

456

Winter Olympic Sports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Exploring Winter Olympic Sports Let's take a look at some of the different winter olympic sports Alpine Skiing Biathalon Bobsleigh Cross country Curling Figure Skating Freestyle skiing Ice Hockey Luge Nordic Combined Short track speed skating Skeleton Ski Jumping Snowboard Speed Skating ...

Keller, Mrs.

2010-01-23

457

The Impact of Athletic Facilities on the Recruitment of Potential Student-Athletes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study examined the impact that athletic facilities and other college choice factors have on the recruitment of student-athletes to play Division I college hockey compared to the influence of other college choice factors. Although athletic facilities and their seeming importance in the recruitment of top level student-athletes are…

Schneider, Ray; Messenger, Steve

2012-01-01

458

Ending the debate: crisis communication analysis of one university’s American Indian athletic identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of Native American team identities is at the heart of a growing debate within our culture. More than 600 high schools and colleges have abandoned such identities. The controversy came to national prominence at the University of North Dakota when a wealthy donor threatened to let the North Dakota winter destroy his gift of a $100 million hockey

David Wahlberg

2004-01-01

459

Safety Tips: Basketball (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... game, it will also increase the likelihood of injury, not to mention embarrassment. With all this in mind, kids can get out there on the court ... Off Sports Competition Safety Tips: Hockey Repetitive Stress Injuries Sports and Exercise ... Note: Clicking these links will take you to a site outside of KidsHealth's control.

460

RANKINGS OF PREDICTORS OF ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE BY TOP LEVEL COACHES  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies are reported in which coaches of Dutch top level athletes ranked 10 general factors recognized as predictors of athletic performance. In the first study, the coaching staff of the national teams in judo, speed skating, swimming, and table tennis were involved (n=50), and in the second coaches in field hockey, golf, and track and field (n=65); in track

Jacques H. A. van Rossum; Françoys Gagné

1994-01-01

461

Studies of Television and Youth Sports: Laboratory/Field Research on the Effects of Pro-Social and Anti-Social TV Models on Children/Youth in Sport/Athletics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study investigates the question of whether or not exposure to televised professional sports affects the social behavior of young people who themselves actively engage in those sports. Lacrosse, hockey, baseball were monitored on television, with students questioned about the impact the behavior of the players (pro-social and anti-social) has…

Moriarty, Dick; And Others

462

A Laboratory/Field Study of Television Violence and Aggression in Children's Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A study on the effect of viewing violence on television on childrens' behavior was conducted within the context of sport activity. Three sports--baseball, hockey, and lacrosse--were chosen. Teams of children from three different age groups were the subjects. Within each of the age levels in each sport, teams were selected and assigned to…

McCabe, Ann E.; Moriarty, Richard J.

463

Construct-a-Glove. Science by Design Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book is one of four books in the Science-by-Design Series created by TERC and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). It offers high school students a challenging, hands-on opportunity to compare the function and design of many types of handwear from a hockey mitt to a surgical glove, and design and test a glove to their own…

Pulis, Lee

464

Hooliganism in the Shadow of the 9\\/11 Terrorist Attack and the Tsunami: Do Police Reduce Group Violence?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper isolates the causal effect of policing on group violence, using unique panel data on self-reported crime by soccer and ice hockey hooligans. The problem of reverse causality from violence to policing is solved by two drastic reallocations of the Stockholm Supporter Police unit to other activities following the 9\\/11 terrorist attack in September 2001 and the Tsunami catastrophe

Panu Poutvaara; Mikael Priks

2006-01-01

465

The Combination of Competitive Evolution and an Interactive Environment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ecological psychology teaches us that intelligence exists in an envi- ronment. We explore the combination of competitive evolution, and an interactive environment. A population of network controller weights are evolved, and robots using those weights compete in a hockey-like game. The behavior produced is neither as consistent nor as complex as hoped for, and a variety of causes, and potential

Julie Corder; Ross Messing

2003-01-01

466

Skating Injuries and Their Treatment  

PubMed Central

There are approximately 682 figure skating clubs in Canada (not including hockey or general recreational figure skating), with anywhere up to 600 or more members. This means that there are probably over 200,000 figure skaters in Canada today. This article deals with the general and specific medical problems that face these skaters, and what a physician should know about treating them.

Lemasters, George S.

1972-01-01

467

The Impact of Athletic Facilities on the Recruitment of Potential Student-Athletes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: This study examined the impact that athletic facilities and other college choice factors have on the recruitment of student-athletes to play Division I college hockey compared to the influence of other college choice factors. Although athletic facilities and their seeming importance in the recruitment of top level student-athletes are…

Schneider, Ray; Messenger, Steve

2012-01-01

468

Injuries in Eleven Selected Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

All the clubs for 10 sports in the four northern counties were surveyed for injuries for a whole playing season and a 50% sample of the badminton clubs were surveyed in the same way. After the two types of football, hockey comes third in the injury league with women getting injured mostly in the legs, but men in the upper

Doris Weightman; R. C. Browne

1975-01-01

469

The importance of sports medicine for the Vancouver Olympic Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

Federation (IAAF), the International Swimming Federation (FINA), the International Ice Hockey Federation (IHF) and the International Football Federation (FIFA). However, there are still many major federations which have elected not to play a role in this field. The role of the IOC will be to establish evidence-based knowledge, support research and disseminate the knowledge throughout the world of sports in

Lars Engebretsen; Kathrin Steffen

470

What are the benefits of hosting a major league sports franchise?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last few decades the number of U.S. metropolitan areas large enough to host a franchise from one of the four major professional sports leagues has soared. Even as major league baseball, football, basketball and hockey have expanded to include more franchises, demand by metro areas continues to exceed supply. Metro areas have thus been forced to compete with

Jordan Rappaport; Chad Wilkerson

2001-01-01

471

Sports Penalties: An Alternative Means of Measuring Aggression.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used the official records of all games played in the Western Hockey League (N=432) during a season for a Principal Components analysis of 19 aggressive penalties. Results suggested that inter-personal aggression in the sport is multiply determined and can arise for eight different sets of conditions or antecedents. (Author/LLL)

Russell, Gordon W.; Russell, Audrey M.

1984-01-01

472

Understanding Sexual Aggression Against WomenAn Examination of the Role of Men's Athletic Participation and Related Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from 139 college men who participated in and viewed contact (e.g., ice hockey) and noncontact (e.g., tennis) sports at different rates of frequency were examined to determine if there was a relationship between these variables and level of sexual aggression against women. The authors also examined whether attitudes toward women, fraternity membership, and sports ideology were related to sexual

Theresa J. Brown; Kenneth E. Sumner; Romy Nocera

2002-01-01

473

A Laboratory/Field Study of Television Violence and Aggression in Children's Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study on the effect of viewing violence on television on childrens' behavior was conducted within the context of sport activity. Three sports--baseball, hockey, and lacrosse--were chosen. Teams of children from three different age groups were the subjects. Within each of the age levels in each sport, teams were selected and assigned to…

McCabe, Ann E.; Moriarty, Richard J.

474

Personality characteristics of male and female participants in team sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Males members of two college teams, baseball and football, and female members of two teams, field hockey and lacrosse (combined) and equestrians, were compared on the five scales of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ). All teams were significantly higher on the Activity and lower on the Neuroticism-Anxiety scales than the general college population of the University of Delaware. Lacrosse and

Dennis M. O'Sullivan; Marvin Zuckerman; Michael Kraft

1998-01-01

475

Anger and perceived legitimacy of aggression in male Hong Kong Chinese athletes: Effects of type of sport and level of competition  

Microsoft Academic Search

ProblemThe vast majority of research examining the interplay between aggressive emotions, beliefs, behaviors, cognitions, and situational contingencies in competitive athletes has focused on Western populations and only select sports (e.g., ice hockey). Research involving Eastern, particularly Chinese, athletes is surprisingly sparse given the sheer size of these populations. Thus, this study examines the aggressive emotions, beliefs, behaviors, and cognitions, of

J. P. Maxwell; A. J. Visek; E. Moores

2009-01-01

476

Studies of Television and Youth Sports: Laboratory/Field Research on the Effects of Pro-Social and Anti-Social TV Models on Children/Youth in Sport/Athletics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the question of whether or not exposure to televised professional sports affects the social behavior of young people who themselves actively engage in those sports. Lacrosse, hockey, baseball were monitored on television, with students questioned about the impact the behavior of the players (pro-social and anti-social) has…

Moriarty, Dick; And Others

477

Spinal injury in sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nowadays, the scene of sports has changed as it involves not only money but prestige for self and country. Hence, sports has become aggressive. Any sport which involves movement and momentum can cause spinal injury, like football, water sports, wrestling, rugby, transpoling and ice hockey.Spinal injury can be simple to serious leading to paralysis or death.The team physician should: Identify

R C Mishra

2010-01-01

478

Sports for Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|When Saul Lerner became director of physical education, athletics, and health for the Bellmore-Merrick (New York) School District 14 years ago, football, soccer, basketball, and floor hockey were staples of most physical education classes on Long Island and around the rest of the country. The mindset of physical educators was to emphasize sports…

Schachter, Ron

2010-01-01

479

Teaching Methods Effectiveness and the Acquisition of Psycho-Motor Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental study was conducted to discover the relative effectiveness of five different instructional strategies on the acquisition of four psycho-motor skills associated with four physical sports (continuous volleying in volleyball, zig-zag dribbling in field hockey, headstand in gymnastics, and sail long jump in athletics). The subjects…

Ikulayo, Philomena Bolaji

480

Falling in love with a wheelchair: enabling\\/disabling technologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this article was to explore how young women with physical impairments make use of technology in their identity construction, drawing on the metaphor of the cyborg as well as on science and technology studies and disability research. In addition to participant observation, semi-structural interviews were conducted and video diaries were kept of the women playing sledge hockey,

Elisabet Apelmo

2012-01-01

481

Influence of growth and athletic training on heart and lung functions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies were performed at rest and during exercise of varied intensity on 52 boys of pre- and post-pubescent age. Each age group consisted of boys who were engaged in a strenuous prolonged hockey training program; this group was compared with a matched control group who did not participate in a regular training program. Any differences observed in the measured lung

G. M. Andrew

1976-01-01

482

Collision Lab  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Use an air hockey table to investigate simple collisions in 1D and more complex collisions in 2D. Experiment with the number of discs, masses, and initial conditions. Vary the elasticity and see how the total momentum and kinetic energy changes during collisions.

Simulations, Phet I.; Dubson, Mike; Loeblein, Trish; Perkins, Kathy; Gratny, Mindy; Olson, Jon

2010-10-01

483

A case study of wikis and student?designed games in physical education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the incorporation of wiki technology within physical education. Boys fro