Sample records for lx-17 hockey puck

  1. Ignition and Growth Modeling of LX17 Hockey Puck Experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tarver

    2004-01-01

    Detonating solid plastic bonded explosives (PBX) formulated with the insensitive molecule triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) exhibit measurable reaction zone lengths, curved shock fronts, and regions of failing chemical reaction at abrupt changes in the charge geometry. A recent set of ''hockey puck'' experiments measured the breakout times of diverging detonation waves in ambient temperature LX-17 (92.5 % TATB plus 7.5% Kel-F binder)

  2. Ignition and Growth Modeling of LX-17 Hockey Puck Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    2004-04-19

    Detonating solid plastic bonded explosives (PBX) formulated with the insensitive molecule triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) exhibit measurable reaction zone lengths, curved shock fronts, and regions of failing chemical reaction at abrupt changes in the charge geometry. A recent set of ''hockey puck'' experiments measured the breakout times of diverging detonation waves in ambient temperature LX-17 (92.5 % TATB plus 7.5% Kel-F binder) and the breakout times at the lower surfaces of 15 mm thick LX-17 discs placed below the detonator-booster plane. The LX-17 detonation waves in these discs grow outward from the initial wave leaving regions of unreacted or partially reacted TATB in the corners of these charges. This new experimental data is accurately simulated for the first time using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX-17, which is normalized to a great deal of detonation reaction zone, failure diameter and diverging detonation data. A pressure cubed dependence for the main growth of reaction rate yields excellent agreement with experiment, while a pressure squared rate diverges too quickly and a pressure quadrupled rate diverges too slowly in the LX-17 below the booster equatorial plane.

  3. Modeling LX-17 Detonation Growth and Decay Using the Ignition and Growth Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Chidester, Steven K.

    2009-12-01

    The previously established Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive LX-17 is applied to recent experimental detonation propagation/failure experiments using unconfined, Lucite confined, and copper confined cylinders. The model also simulates two corner turning experiments in which steel and Lucite act as boundary materials. Finally, the model is used to calculate a one-inch diameter "Hockey Puck" test in which the booster explosive is HMX-based rather than TATB-based. Since the LX-17 Ignition and Growth model parameters are normalized to a great deal of one-, two- and three-dimensional detonation propagation data, they accurately predict all of this new experimental detonation velocity and arrival time data.

  4. Multiple shock initiation of LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Cook, T.M.; Urtiew, P.A.; Tao, W.C.

    1993-07-01

    The response of the insensitive TATB-based high explosive LX-17 to multiple shock impacts is studied experimentally in a four inch gas gun using embedded manganin gauges and numerically using the ignition and growth reactive flow model of shock initiation and detonation. Pressure histories are reported for LX-17 cylinders which are subjected to sustained shock pulses followed by secondary compressions from shocks reflected from metal discs attached to the backs of the explosive targets. These measured and calculated pressure histories show that the threshold for hot spot growth in LX-17 is 7 GPa, that LX-17 can be dead pressed at slightly lower pressures, and that the reaction rates behind reflected shocks increase greatly as the impedance of the metal increases. A study of the response of LX-17 to the collision of two reacting, diverging shocks forming a Mach stem wave inside the LX-17 charge demonstrated that this interaction can result in a high pressure region of sufficient size and strength to cause detonation under certain conditions.

  5. Evaluation of LX-17 made from water-aminated TATB

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, A.G.

    1982-10-01

    Water-aminated TATB was formulated into LX-17 at both Pantex and Holston. Mechanical properties, growth, pressed density, corner turning and gap sensitivity properties were compared. Mechanical properties, corner turning and gap sensitivity were similar to those of LX-17 made from dry-aminated TATB. Permanent expansion resulting from thermal aging may be slightly greater than that of LX-17 with dry-aminated TATB.

  6. LX10 and LX17 moisture content and release

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. P. Rigdon; D. L. Seaton; A. J. Pane

    1984-01-01

    The results of four studies related to the moisture content, uptake, and release by two plastic-bonded explosives are reported. Formulations designated LX-10 and LX-17 were studied and are 95% HMX + 5% Viton A and 92.5% TATB + 7.5% Kel-F 800, respectively. Moisture content profiles for LX-17 following accelerated aging studies were obtained by analyzing dry machinings of pressed billets.

  7. LX-17 and ufTATB Data for Corner-Turning, Failure and Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Lauderbach, L; Garza, R; Vitello, P; Hare, D E

    2010-02-03

    Data is presented for the size (diameter) effect for ambient and cold confined LX-17, unconfined ambient LX-17, and confined ambient ultrafine TATB. Ambient, cold and hot double cylinder corner-turning data for LX-17, PBX 9502 and ufTATB is presented. Transverse air gap crossing in ambient LX-17 is studied with time delays given for detonations that cross.

  8. Temperature-dependent shock initiation of LX-17 explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.S.; Chau, H.H.; Druce, R.L.; Moua, K.

    1995-02-01

    LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250 C, were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide, 50.8-mm-long strips of 0.13-mm-thick Kapton polyimide film at velocities up to 7.7 km/s. The Kapton strips were laminated onto a thin aluminum bridge foil and were launched to the desired velocity by discharging a capacitor bank through the foil, causing the foil to explode. The LX-17 samples were confined in a steel holder and heated in an oven to the desired temperature. After the capacitor bank was charged, the LX-17 sample in its steel holder was remotely drawn out of the oven on rails and positioned over the bridge-foil/Kapton-strip laminate. When the sample was in position, the bank was discharged, launching the Kapton strip against the LX-17 surface. The shock initiation threshold was measured for 3, 7, and 10-mm-wide strips at room temperature, 200 C and 250 C. The authors found a significant reduction in the velocity threshold and in the critical area for initiation when the samples were heated. The authors compare the results with the earlier data of Bloom, who measured the initiation threshold of LX-17 over the density range 1.8--1.91 g/cm{sup 3} at room temperature and {minus}54 C. LX-17 has a large coefficient of thermal expansion, as reported by Urtiew, et al., which reduces its density significantly t elevated temperatures. They find that the change of shock initiation threshold with temperature is consistent with the change in sample density, using the relation between threshold and density reported by Bloom.

  9. Mechanical modeling of the plastic bonded explosive LX17

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Kyle Martin

    2001-01-01

    The current research attempts to develop a model for a polycrystalline, composite solid with viscoelastic matrix known as LX17. It is a highly-filled plastic bonded explosive with a shelf-life of up to 50 years. Experimentation is too costly...

  10. LX17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P C Souers; H Andreski; C F Cook; R Garza; R Pastrone; D Phillips; F Roeske; P Vitello; J Molitoris

    2004-01-01

    We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the

  11. Dead Zones in LX17 and PBX 9502

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P C Souers; H G Andreski; J Batteux; B Bratton; C Cabacungan; Cook; S Fletcher; R Garza; D Grimsley; J Handly; A Hernandez; P McMaster; J D Molitoris; R Palmer; J Prindiville; J Rodriguez; D Schneberk; B Wong; P Vitello

    2005-01-01

    Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones\\/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and

  12. Temperature-dependent shock initiation of LX17 explosive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. S. Lee; H. H. Chau; R. L. Druce; K. Moua

    1995-01-01

    LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250 C, were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide, 50.8-mm-long strips of 0.13-mm-thick Kapton polyimide film at velocities up to 7.7 km\\/s. The Kapton strips were laminated onto a thin aluminum bridge foil and were launched to the desired velocity by discharging a capacitor bank through the foil, causing the foil to explode. The

  13. Dead Zones in LX-17 and PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J; Bratton, B; Cabacungan, C; Cook, III, C F; Fletcher, S; Garza, R; Grimsley, D; Handly, J; Hernandez, A; McMaster, P; Molitoris, J D; Palmer, R; Prindiville, J; Rodriguez, J; Schneberk, D; Wong, B; Vitello, P

    2005-09-06

    Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and detonation in different pressure regimes. A pressure cut-off must also be reached to initiate the burn. Corner-turning and failure are modeled using an intermediate pressure rate region, and detonation occurs at high pressure. The TATB booster is also modeled using reactive flow, and X-ray tomography is used to partition the ram-pressed hemisphere into five different density regions. The model reasonably fits the bare corner-turning experiment but predicts a smaller dead zone with steel confinement, in contradiction with experiment. The same model also calculates the confined and unconfined cylinder detonation velocities and predicts the failure of the unconfined cylinder at 3.75 mm radius. The PBX 9502 shows a smaller dead zone than LX-17. An old experiment that showed a large apparent dead zone in Comp B was repeated with X-ray transmission and no dead zone was seen. This confirms the idea that a variable burn rate is the key to modeling. The model also produces initiation delays, which are shorter than those found in time-to-detonation.

  14. LX-17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H; Cook III, C F; Garza, R; Pastrone, R; Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Molitoris, J

    2004-03-11

    We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the side and back edges is measured with streak cameras. Three high-resolution X-ray images were taken on each experiment to examine the details of the detonation. We have concluded that the detonation cannot turn the corner and subsequently fails, but the shock wave continues to propagate in the unreacted explosive, leaving behind a dead zone. The detonation front farther out from the corner slowly turns and eventually reaches the air well edge 180{sup o} from its original direction. The dead zone is stable and persists 7.7 {micro}s after the corner-turn, although it has drifted into the original air well area. Our regular reactive flow computer models sometimes show temporary failure but they recover quickly and are unable to model the dead zones. We present a failure model that cuts off the reaction rate below certain detonation velocities and reproduces the qualitative features of the corner-turning failure.

  15. Effect of confinement and thermal cycling on the shock initiation of LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P.A.; Tarver, C.M.; Maienschein, J.L.; Tao, W.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Energetic Materials Center

    1996-04-01

    The shock initiation of the insensitive high explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under two simulated accident conditions: initially confined charges were heated to 250 C and shocked; and unconfined charges were thermally cycled between 25 and 250 C and shocked. Previous research on unconfined TATB-based explosives heated to 250 C revealed increased shock sensitivity. This increase was attributed to both the increased porosity caused by the unsymmetrical thermal expansion of TATB, which resulted in more hot spot ignition sites, and the faster growth of hot spot reactions due to the increased surrounding temperature. In this study, aluminum confinement was used to decrease the thermal expansion of LX-17. The shock sensitivity of confined LX-17 at 250 C was observed to be less than that of unconfined charges at 250 C but greater than that of unconfined, ambient temperature LX-17. The thermal cycling results showed that the LX-17 heated to 250 C and then shocked at 25 C was more sensitive than pristine LX-17, because irreversible growth had produced more ignition sites. LX-17 held at 250 C for an hour or fired at 250 C after two thermal cycles did not appear to be significantly more shock sensitive than LX-17 heated to 250 C and shocked immediately. Therefore, it is unlikely that TATB is thermally decomposing into less stable intermediate species at 250 C. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for shock initiation of LX-17 was normalized to these experimental results to provide a predictive capability for other accident scenarios that cannot be tested directly.

  16. Plutonium Immobilization Puck Handling

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-01-26

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) will immobilize excess plutonium and store the plutonium in a high level waste radiation field. To accomplish these goals, the PIP will process various forms of plutonium into plutonium oxide, mix the oxide powder with ceramic precursors, press the mixture into pucks, sinter the pucks into a ceramic puck, load the pucks into metal cans, seal the cans, load the cans into magazines, and load the magazines into a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DPWF) canister. These canisters will be sent to the DWPF, an existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facility, where molten high level waste glass will be poured into the canisters encapsulating the ceramic pucks. Due to the plutonium radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the early design stages and the facility will begin operation in 2005. This paper will discuss the Plutonium Immobilization puck handling conceptual design and the puck handling equipment testing.

  17. Mesoscale Modeling of LX-17 Under Isentropic Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, H K; Willey, T M; Friedman, G; Fried, L E; Vandersall, K S; Baer, M R

    2010-03-06

    Mesoscale simulations of LX-17 incorporating different equilibrium mixture models were used to investigate the unreacted equation-of-state (UEOS) of TATB. Candidate TATB UEOS were calculated using the equilibrium mixture models and benchmarked with mesoscale simulations of isentropic compression experiments (ICE). X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) data provided the basis for initializing the simulations with realistic microstructural details. Three equilibrium mixture models were used in this study. The single constituent with conservation equations (SCCE) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The single constituent equation-of-state (SCEOS) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the equation-of-state of the constituents. The kinetic energy averaging (KEA) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted particle velocity mixture rule and the conservation equations. The SCEOS model yielded the stiffest TATB EOS (0.121{micro} + 0.4958{micro}{sup 2} + 2.0473{micro}{sup 3}) and, when incorporated in mesoscale simulations of the ICE, demonstrated the best agreement with VISAR velocity data for both specimen thicknesses. The SCCE model yielded a relatively more compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2} + 4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) and the KEA model yielded the most compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2}+4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) of all the equilibrium mixture models. Mesoscale simulations with the lower density TATB adiabatic EOS data demonstrated the least agreement with VISAR velocity data.

  18. A model for predicting the evolution of damage in the plastic bonded explosive LX17 

    E-print Network

    Seidel, Gary Don

    2002-01-01

    , LX17, is noted to have a very large aggregate volume fraction and as such, Voronoi tessellation has been used to generate aggregate grain boundaries within finite element meshes along which viscoelastic cohesive zones have been embedded to model...

  19. Modeling Detonation Experiments on Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)Based Explosives LX17, PBX 9502, and Ultrafine TATB

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver

    2012-01-01

    Previously determined ignition and growth reactive flow model parameters for detonating LX-17 (92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], 7.5% Kel-F binder), PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F), and pure ultrafine TATB were used to calculate the results of two new experiments. Continuous detonation velocity measurements were made using embedded fiber optic (EFO) diagnostic probes in ambient temperature (25°C) LX-17 cylinders of various diameters.

  20. Dynamic mechanical signatures of aged LX17-1 plastic bonded explosive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Mark Hoffman

    2001-01-01

    The complex shear modulus of the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-17-1 from stockpile returns, core tests and historical billets was measured over the temperature range from ?150 to 120°C at five frequencies from 0.1 to 10 Hz. LX-17-1 is composed of 92.5% insensitive high explosive triaminotrinitro-benzene (TATB) and 7.5% plastic binder, KF-800. Three relaxations were observed as peaks in the

  1. First-Generation Jet Propulsion Laboratory "Hockey-Puck" Free-Flying Magnetometers for Distributed In-Situ Multiprobe Measurement of Current Density Filamentation in the Northern Auroral Zone: Enstrophy Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javadi, H.; Blaes, B.; Boehm, M.; Boykins, K.; Gibbs, J.; Goodman, W.; Lieneweg, U.; Lux, J.; Lynch, K.; Narvaez, P.

    2000-01-01

    The sub-orbital rocket mission was a collaborative project between the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to study filamentation phenomena in the northern Auroral zone. The Enstrophy mission test flies the JPL Free-Flying Magnetometer (FFM) concept. The FFM technology development task has been funded by NASA develop miniaturized, low-power, integrated "sensorcrafts". JPL's role was to design, integrate, test, and deliver four FFMs for deployment from the sounding rocket, allowing a unique determination of curl-B. This provides a direct measurement of magnetic-field-aligned current density along the rocket trajectory. A miniaturized three-axis fluxgate magnetometer was integrated with a 4-channel 22-bit sigma-delta Analog to Digital Converter (ADC), four temperature sensors, digital control electronics, seven (Li-SOCl2) batteries, two (4 deg x 170 deg field of view) sun-sensors, a fan-shaped-beam laser diode beacon, a (16 MHz) stable Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO) clock, Radio Frequency (RF) communication subsystem, and an antenna for approximately 15 minutes of operation where data was collected continuously and transmitted in three (3) bursts (approximately 26 seconds each) to ground station antennas at Poker Flat, Alaska. FFMs were stowed within two trays onboard the rocket during the rocket launch and were released simultaneously using the spinning action of the rocket at approximately 300 km altitude (approximately 100 sec. into the flight). FFMs were deployed with spin rate of approximately 17 Hz and approximately 3 m/sec linear velocity with respect to the rocket. For testing purposes while the rocket was in the launch pad and during flight prior to release of FFMs from the rocket, commands (such as "power on", "test", "flight", "power off', and clock "Reset" signal) were transmitted via a infrared Light Emitting Diode to an infrared detector in the FFM. Special attention was paid to low magnetic signature electronic design and choice of materials in packaging. The miniaturized fluxgate magnetometers had a range of 1-60000 nT with 0.1% full-scale linearity. The frequency range of interest for magnetic measurement was 10 mHz - 50 Hz. Digital data from the magnetometer's three axes were placed in a 4MB Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) in data packages (frames) formatted together with time tags and frame ID. After a specified time was elapsed, the data were Viterbi encoded and transmitted at a rate of 100 kbps (BPSK). Each of the four FFMs transmitted at different frequency. These carrier frequencies were in the range of 2200-2300 MHz. The antenna was a single patch on a high dielectric constant substrate covering one end-plate of the hockey-puck-sized unit. The local clocks aboard the FFMs were reset at the start of the mission and stayed synchronized within 3 msec during the mission. Position of each FFM with respect to the rocket is calculated by the knowledge of its release velocity (measured at exit point of the FFM launcher tract) providing an accuracy of 1 m over the maximum range of 3 km. Spatial and temporal nature of observants can be separated to within 3 m in space or 3 msec time interval.

  2. CTE and Ratchet Growth Measurements on LX17-1 and Constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, B; Weese, R; Lewis, P; Harwood, P; Tran, T

    2002-02-22

    Dimensional changes in PBX materials resulting from temperature change are of interest to engineers, designers and modelers. In this paper we present data from recent measurements made on LX17-1, as well as on the material's binder and its energetic constituent. LX17-1 is made from 7.5% KEL-F 800 binder combined with 92.5% wet aminated TATB energetic crystals. Due apparently to the anisotropic expansionary behavior of the TATB, the material exhibits irreversible growth, in addition to the usual reversible expansions and contractions associated with temperature change. In an effort understand reversible and irreversible growth behavior and to verify consistency between our measurements and those made historically, measurements were performed on billet pressed LX17-1, on die pressed TATB, and on KEL-F alone. It is important to realize that, for materials involving TATB, expansionary behavior results from the combined effects of reversible and irreversible (ratchet growth) phenomena.

  3. Increased shock sensitivity of the insensitive explosive LX-17 at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.S.; Chau, H.H.

    1994-05-01

    Explosive formulations based on TATB (1.3.5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) have proven to be remarkably insensitive to shock and thermal stimuli. However, hazards to an insensitive high explosive (IHE) charge do not always confine themselves to a single stimulus. In the study reported here, we have investigated the response of the LLNL explosive LX-17 (92.5%/7.5% TATB/Kel-F 800) to shock when the explosive is at an elevated temperature. The motivation for the work was to learn the extent to which the shock initiation threshold and critical initiation area of LX-17 are lowered by exposure to elevated temperature.

  4. MODELING LX17 DETONATION GROWTH AND DECAY USING THE IGNITION AND GROWTH MODEL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver; Steven K. Chidester

    2009-01-01

    The previously established Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive LX-17 is applied to recent experimental detonation propagation?failure experiments using unconfined, Lucite confined, and copper confined cylinders. The model also simulates two corner turning experiments in which steel and Lucite act as boundary materials. Finally, the model is used to calculate a

  5. Modeling LX17 Detonation Growth and Decay Using the Ignition and Growth Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver; Steven K. Chidester

    2009-01-01

    The previously established Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive LX-17 is applied to recent experimental detonation propagation\\/failure experiments using unconfined, Lucite confined, and copper confined cylinders. The model also simulates two corner turning experiments in which steel and Lucite act as boundary materials. Finally, the model is used to calculate a

  6. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  7. Characterization of Detonation Wave Propagation in LX17 Near the Critical Diameter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. D. Tran; C. M. Tarver; J. Maienschein; P. Lewis; R Pastrone; R. S. Lee; F. Roeske

    2002-01-01

    A new Detonation Profile Test (DPT) was developed to measure simultaneously the detonation wave breakout profile and the average detonation velocity at the breakout surface. The test evaluated small cylindrical samples with diameter up to 19.08 mm and length up to 33 mm. The experiment involved initiating a LX-17 cylindrical specimen and recording the wave breakout using a fast streaking

  8. Science of NHL Hockey: Reflexes & Reaction Time

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NBC Learn

    2010-10-07

    NHL goalies have lots of equipment designed to help stop pucks, but their most valuable tool is their brain. It's what sparks the nerve impulses that travel to the limbs, allowing the goalie to see and react quickly enough to make a save. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

  9. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  10. Characterizing Detonating LX-17 Charges Crossing a Transverse Air Gap with Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderbach, Lisa M.; Souers, P. Clark; Garcia, Frank; Vitello, Peter; Vandersall, Kevin S.

    2009-12-01

    Experiments were performed using detonating LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F by weight) charges with various width transverse air gaps with manganin peizoresistive in-situ gauges present. The experiments, performed with 25 mm diameter by 25 mm long LX-17 pellets with the transverse air gap in between, showed that transverse gaps up to about 3 mm could be present without causing the detonation wave to fail to continue as a detonation. The Tarantula/JWL++ code was utilized to model the results and compare with the in-situ gauge records with some agreement to the experimental data with additional work needed for a better match to the data. This work will present the experimental details as well as comparison to the model results.

  11. CHARACTERIZING DETONATING LX-17 CHARGES CROSSING A TRANSVERSE AIR GAP WITH EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Lauderbach, L M; Souers, P C; Garcia, F; Vitello, P; Vandersall, K S

    2009-06-26

    Experiments were performed using detonating LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F by weight) charges with various width transverse air gaps with manganin peizoresistive in-situ gauges present. The experiments, performed with 25 mm diameter by 25 mm long LX-17 pellets with the transverse air gap in between, showed that transverse gaps up to about 3 mm could be present without causing the detonation wave to fail to continue as a detonation. The Tarantula/JWL{sup ++} code was utilized to model the results and compare with the in-situ gauge records with some agreement to the experimental data with additional work needed for a better match to the data. This work will present the experimental details as well as comparison to the model results.

  12. A Comparison of New TATBs, FK-800 binder and LX-17-like PBXs to Legacy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

    2009-05-01

    Two newly synthesized versions of the insensitive high explosive (IHE) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzenes (TATBs) were compared to two legacy explosives currently used by the Department of Energy. Except for thermal analysis, small scale safety tests could not distinguish between the different synthetic routes. Morphologies of new TATBs were less faceted and more spherical. The particle size distribution of one new material was similar to legacy TATBs, but the other was very fine. Densities and submicron structure of the new TATBs were also significantly different from the legacy explosives. Pressed pellets of the new explosives were less dense. New FK-800 binder was used to prepare LX-17-like plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) from new and wet aminated TATB. Some mechanical, thermal and performance characterization of the new binder and LX-17-like PBXs was done. Significant differences were found. The reason for a number of these differences is not well understood.

  13. Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry Analysis of LX-17 and PBX-9502 High Explosive Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Castor, J I; Lane, M A; Overturf, G E

    2002-12-16

    As part of the Campaign 4 effort in A Division we have done an analysis of several high explosives that are used in the current nuclear stockpile. In particular we have looked at samples of LX-17 and PBX-9502. The analysis was done using the glow discharge mass spectrometer that is currently located in B132N and operated by Mark Lane of the Chemistry and Material Science (CMS) Directorate. George Overturf from CMS obtained small samples of high explosive for the measurements. From the analysis we wanted to verify the actual atomic composition of the high explosive, see how that compared with the nominal composition, and understand whether any significant impurities existed in the samples. We present the analysis of several LX-17 and PBX-9502 samples using the glow discharge mass spectrometer to measure both the main constituents of the high explosive as well as any trace materials that may be present.

  14. Effect of confinement and thermal cycling on the shock initiation of LX17

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Urtiew; C. M. Tarver; J. L. Maienschein; W. C. Tao

    1996-01-01

    The shock initiation of the insensitive high explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under two simulated accident conditions: initially confined charges were heated to 250°C and shocked; and unconfined charges were thermally cycled between 25° and 250°C and shocked. Previous research on unconfined TATB-based explosives heated to 250°C revealed increased shock sensitivity. This

  15. Characterization and Qualification of New TATB and Kel-F 800 for LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D M; DePiero, S C

    2007-02-16

    The project would (1) compare new FK-800 with old Kel-F 800 and KF-800 lots currently available at LLNL, (2) compare and characterize new TATB with old TATB, (3) formulate new FK-800 with wet-aminated TATB and new TATBs in according to HAAP slurry coating procedure into LX-17-2, and (4) evaluate the mechanical and detonation performance characteristics of this insensitive high explosive (IHE). Priorities will be to prove that these new materials can be formulated, pressed to density and machined; and that they contain no impurities which might cause compatibility issues. Since 3M [1, 2], LANL [7], Pantex [8] and AWE [9, 10] are currently evaluating the new FK-800, we plan to share data rather than repeating their work. Our effort is briefly described: Task 1--Evaluation of newer characterization methods to identify structural variations between old and new Kel-F 800 including: Rheological and mechanical properties, copolymer content, degree of crystallinity, and interfacial interactions with TATB. Task 2--Evaluate TATBs using scattering techniques to replace sieving operations called out in the specification [12] for particle size distribution measurements. Use SEM and OM for morphological differences between the old and new explosives. Evaluate the compaction characteristics of new TATB. Task 3--Formulation of new LX-17-2 (with new FK-800 and/or new TATB) Task 4--Evaluate mechanical and performance properties of LX-17-2. At a minimum, compressive strength, dynamic mechanical behavior and a 2-inch cylinder shot should be performed and compared with existing data for LX-17-1.

  16. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX17

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P C Souers; A Hernandez; C Cabacungen; L Fried; R Garza; K Glaesemann; L Lauderbach; S Liao; P Vitello

    2007-01-01

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones

  17. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX17

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P C Souers; A Hernandez; C Cabacungan; L Fried; R Garza; K Glaesemann; L Lauderbach; S Liao; P Vitello

    2008-01-01

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones

  18. Reacted Equation of State Experiments in LX-17 Using a Double Shock Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Tarver, Craig M.

    2011-06-01

    Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a double shock method. This method involves using 2 flyer materials on the projectile (of a known equation of state) that act to reflect a shock back into the detonated material after the initial shock. Thus, by measuring the parameters of this reflected wave, information on the reacted state can be obtained. The experiments were driven by a projectile at or above the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state ensuring a quick transition to detonation. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) was used to measure the velocity profile at the interface between the LX-17 and a backing lithium fluoride (LiF) window. A discussion of this work will include the experimental setup utilized, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, modeling, and future experiments. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Development of a Detonation Profile Test for Studying Aging Effects in LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T; Lewis, P; Tarver, C; Maienschein, J; Druce, R; Lee, R; Roeske, F

    2002-03-25

    A new small-scale Detonation Profile Test (DPT) is being developed to investigate aging effects on the detonation behavior of insensitive high explosives. The experiment involves initiating a small LX-17 cylindrical charge (12.7-19.1 mm diameter x 25.4-33 mm long) and measuring the velocity and curvature of the emerging detonation wave using a streak camera. Results for 12.7 mm diameter unconfined LX-17 charges show detonation velocity in the range between 6.79 and 7.06 km/s for parts up to 33 mm long. Since LX-17 can not sustain detonation at less than 7.3 km/s, these waves were definitely failing. Experiments with confined 12.7 mm diameter and unconfined 19.1 mm diameter samples showed wave velocities in the range of 7.4-7.6 km/s, values approaching steady state conditions at infinite diameter. Experiments with unconfined 19.1 mm diameter specimens are expected to provide reproducible and useful range of detonation parameters suitable for studying aging effects.

  20. E-puck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floreano, Dario; Mitri, Sara; Hubert, Julien

    In this appendix, we introduce the e-puck robot, a simple, robust and versatile robotic platform, which can be used to study animal-like communication in groups of embodied agents. In addition, we present two extension turrets to enable visual communication between the robots.

  1. Characterization of Detonation Wave Propagation in LX-17 Near the Critical Diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T D; Tarver, C M; Maienschein, J; Lewis, P; Pastrone, R; Lee, R S; Roeske, F

    2002-06-14

    A new Detonation Profile Test (DPT) was developed to measure simultaneously the detonation wave breakout profile and the average detonation velocity at the breakout surface. The test evaluated small cylindrical samples with diameter up to 19.08 mm and length up to 33 mm. The experiment involved initiating a LX-17 cylindrical specimen and recording the wave breakout using a fast streaking electronic camera. The initiation was done using a PBX-9407 pellet (1.630 g/cm{sup 3}), which has a Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure close to that of LX-17. The acceptor breakout surface had a 2 mm wide by 1 mm deep groove that provided a step in the recorded breakout profile for velocity determination. A 532-nm laser light illuminated the specimen surface. A streak camera looking perpendicular to the groove, recorded the extinction of the laser light as the detonation wave emerged from the surface. This technique provided a high-resolution spatial and temporal profile of the wave curvature as well as accurate timing of the propagating wave over the last millimeter of the sample. The measured groove depth and recorded travel time were then used to calculate the average detonation wave velocity. Results for 12.7 mm diameter unconfined LX-17 charges showed detonation velocity in the range between 6.79 and 7.06 km/s for parts up to 33 mm long. Since LX-17 can not sustain detonation at less than 7.3 km/s , these waves were definitely failing. Experiments with confined 12.7 mm diameter and unconfined 19.1 mm diameter samples showed wave velocities in the range of 7.4-7.6 km/s, values approaching steady state conditions at infinite diameter. Both unconfined and confined charges show no sensitivity to density variations in the range between 1.890-1.915 g/cm{sup 3}. Experiments with 15.88 mm and 19.08 mm diameters gave velocities in the range between 7.2-7.45 km/s, values close to that expected for failure. The velocity measurement has an estimated experimental error in the range of 2%, which is large enough to complicate data analysis. The Ignition and Growth model for LX-17 was compared to the results. The effects of density, confinement and charge diameter on wave breakout profiles and detonation wave velocity were accurately reproduced. A comparative analysis of the experimental breakout patterns and the calculated wave curvatures for the densities and dimensions was also determined.

  2. ALE3D Statistical Hot Spot Model Results for LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L III; Tarver, C M; McGuire, E M

    2003-07-11

    The Statistical Hot Spot shock initiation and detonation reactive flow model for solid explosives in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code provides physically realistic descriptions of: hot spot formation; ignition (or failure to ignite); growth of reaction (or failure to grow) into surrounding particles; coalescence of reacting hot spots; transition to detonation; and self-sustaining detonation. The model has already successfully modeled several processes in HMX-based explosives, such as shock desensitization, that can not predicted by other reactive flow models. In this paper, the Statistical Hot Spot model is applied to experimental embedded gauge data on the insensitive triaminotrintrobenzene (TATB) based explosive LX-17.

  3. Re-Shock Experiments in LX-17 to Investigate Reacted Equation of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Forbes, Jerry W.; Tarver, Craig M.; Urtiew, Paul A.; Garcia, Frank

    2001-06-01

    Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed utilizing a 101 mm gun to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a re-shock method. This method involves backing the energetic material with thin plates (of a known equation of state) that reflect a shock back into the detonated material. Thus, by measuring the parameters of this reflected wave information on the reacted state can be obtained. The experiments were driven by a projectile to near the CJ state ensuring a quick transition to detonation near the front of the sample. Embedded electromagnetic particle velocity (EMV) gauges were used to measure the particle velocity profiles at different Lagrange positions during the event. Calibration of this technique was accomplished by using an elastic material as the target where the known state could be measured and evaluated. A discussion of this work will include the experimental setup, particle velocity profiles, data interpretation, and future experiments. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. Explosive Model Tarantula 4d/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Vitello, P A

    2008-09-30

    Tarantula is an explosive kinetic package intended to do detonation, shock initiation, failure, corner-turning with dead zones, gap tests and air gaps in reactive flow hydrocode models. The first, 2007-2008 version with monotonic Q is here run inside JWL++ with square zoning from 40 to 200 zones/cm on ambient LX-17. The model splits the rate behavior in every zone into sections set by the hydrocode pressure, P + Q. As the pressure rises, we pass through the no-reaction, initiation, ramp-up/failure and detonation sections sequentially. We find that the initiation and pure detonation rate constants are largely insensitive to zoning but that the ramp-up/failure rate constant is extremely sensitive. At no time does the model pass every test, but the pressure-based approach generally works. The best values for the ramp/failure region are listed here in Mb units.

  5. End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot

    SciTech Connect

    Fowley, M.D.

    2001-01-03

    It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck-handling operations. As an overall requirement, it was desired to keep the design of the robot end-effector as simple as possible. There were pros and cons for either type of actuation method (pneumatic or electric). But, pneumatic actuation was chosen for its simplicity and durability in a radioactive environment. It was determined early in the design process that at least two different types of end-effectors would be required for each of the operations. Therefore, a tool changer was incorporated into the end-effector design. The tool changer would also provide for simple end-effector maintenance when used in the PIP process.

  6. End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot

    SciTech Connect

    Fowley, M.D.

    2001-01-31

    It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck-handling operations. As an overall requirement, it was desired to keep the design of the robot end-effector as simple as possible. There were pros and cons for either type of actuation method (pneumatic or electric). But, pneumatic actuation was chosen for its simplicity and durability in a radioactive environment. It was determined early in the design process that at least two different types of end-effectors would be required for each of the operations. Therefore, a tool changer was incorporated into the end-effector design. The tool changer would also provide for simple end-effector maintenance when used in the PIP process.

  7. Embedded Electromagnetic Gauge Measurements and Modeling of Shock Initiation in the TATB Based Explosives LX17 and PBX 9502

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. R. Alcon; F. Garcia; R. L. Gustavsen; S. A. Sheffield; J. W. Forbes; C. M. Tarver

    2002-01-01

    We have completed a series of shock initiation experiments on PBX 9502 (95 weight % dry aminated TATB explosive, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) and LX-17 (92.% wet aminated TATB, 7.5 % Kel-F 800). These experiments were performed on the gas\\/gas two stage gun at Los Alamos. Samples were prepared with ten or eleven embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges

  8. Embedded electromagnetic gauge measurements and modeling of shock initiation in the TATB based explosives PBX 9502 and LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, R. L. (Richard L.); Sheffield, S. A. (Stephen A.); Alcon, R. R. (Robert R.); Forbes, J. W. (Jerry W.); Tarver, C. M. (Craig M.); Garcia, F.

    2001-01-01

    We have completed a series of shock initiation experiments on PBX 9502 (95 weight % dry aminated TATB explosive, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) and LX-17 (92.% wet aminated TATB, 7.5 % Kel-F 800). These experiments were performed on the gas/gas two stage gun at Los Alamos. Samples were prepared with ten or eleven embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges to measure the evolution of the wave leading up to a detonation. Additionally, one to three shock tracker gauges were used to track the position of the shock front with time and determine the point where detonation was achieved. Wave profiles indicate little delay between formation of hot-spots in the shock front and release of hotspot energy. In other words, a great deal of the buildup occurs in the shock front, rather than behind it. Run distances and times to detonation as a function of initial pressure are consistent with published data. The Ignition and Growth model with published parameters for LX-17 replicate the data very well.

  9. Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project: Puck packaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kriikku

    1999-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans,

  10. Formulation and Characterization of LX-17-2 from new FK 800 binder and WA, ATK, and BAE TATBs

    SciTech Connect

    DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

    2007-08-03

    Currently LLNL has no Kel-F 800 or wet-aminated TATB reserves for formulation. Although both materials are soon to be commercially available, their synthesis processes have changed and the explosive must be re-evaluated. In 2000 3M phased out the uses of perfluorooctanoyl (C8) derivatives due to environmental persistence and bioaccumulation issues. A C8 derivative was used as an emulsifier for making Kel F-800. In 2001 Kel F-800 was scheduled to be discontinued and the last Kel F-800 run was made in early 2002. LANL ordered 2M$ worth of Kel-F 800 for reserves and Pantex purchased several hundred pounds to satisfy mock needs. After four years, 3M has decided to introduce a Kel-F 800-like polymer based on a new emulsifier using the same chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride monomers and emulsion polymerization process. They have produced 3 batches and claim the 'new' FK-800 is indistinguishable from the 'old' Kel-F 800 in any of their testing parameters. In June-July 2006 3M scaled up a batch of about 800 pounds and have test quantities available. We have samples of the new FK-800 for evaluation. Neither wet nor dry-aminated TATB has been synthesized in the US in any significant quantity since about 1985 and significant quantities of LX-17-1 has not been formulated since about 1990. Over the last few years as part of a DOD MANTECH, ATK Thiokol and BAE Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP) have produced moderate quantities of TATB ({approx}5 kg batches) with plans to scale up for DOD applications. Thiokol TATB is polycrystalline with an average particle size of about 40 m (similar to WA TATB) but HAAP TATB is only 5-6 {micro}m (similar to ultrafine). We have obtained small quantities of these materials for evaluation. The project (1) compares new FK-800 with old Kel-F 800 and FK-800 lots currently available at LLNL, (2) compares and characterizes new TATB with old TATB, (3) formulates new FK-800 with wet-aminated TATB and new TATBs in according to HAAP slurry coating procedure into LX-17-2, and (4) evaluates the mechanical and detonation performance characteristics of this insensitive high explosive (IHE). Priorities are to prove that these new materials can be formulated, pressed to density and machined; and that they contain no impurities which might cause compatibility issues. Since 3M, LANL, Pantex and AWE are currently evaluating the new FK-800, we plan to share data rather than repeating their work. Our effort is described.

  11. APPLICATION OF THE EMBEDDED FIBER OPTIC PROBE IN HIGH EXPLOSIVE DETONATION STUDIES: PBX-9502 AND LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D; Goosman, D; Lorenz, K; Lee, E

    2006-09-26

    The Embedded Fiber Optic probe directly measures detonation speed continuously in time, without the need to numerically differentiate data, and is a new tool for measuring time-dependent as well as steady detonation speed to high accuracy. It consists of a custom-design optical fiber probe embedded in high explosive. The explosive is detonated and a refractive index discontinuity is produced in the probe at the location of the detonation front by the compression of the detonation. Because this index-jump tracks the detonation front a measurement of the Doppler shift of laser light reflected from the jump makes it possible to continuously measure detonation velocity with high spatial and temporal resolution. We have employed this probe with a Fabry-Perot-type laser Doppler velocimetry system additionally equipped with a special filter for reducing the level of non-Doppler shifted light relative to the signal. This is necessary because the index-jump signal is relatively weak compared to the return expected from a well-prepared surface in the more traditional and familiar example of material interface velocimetry. Our observations were carried out on a number of explosives but this work is focused on our results on PBX-9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F) at varying initial charge density. Our measurements reveal a density dependence significantly lower than previous quoted values and lower than theoretical calculations. Our limited data on detonation speed dependence on wave curvature is in reasonable agreement with previous work using more standard methods and confirms deviation from the Wood-Kirkwood theoretical formula.

  12. Hockey Stick Power!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

    2005-01-01

    This activity (on page 2 of the pdf) is a full inquiry investigation into how a hockey stick’s flex affects shooting power and accuracy. Groups of learners will gather hockey sticks with three different flex ratings. Then, they design separate accuracy and speed tests to gather data and calculate average scores for each flex rating. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Hockey.

  13. Concussion in ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Bonfield, Christopher M; Wecht, Daniel A; Lunsford, L Dade

    2014-01-01

    Ice hockey is an aggressive and fast-paced sport which has a high risk of injury, concussions in particular. Although serious head injury has been recognized for nearly 50 years, an increase in mainstream media attention in recent years has led to unprecedented public awareness. As a result, the National Hockey League (NHL) and other professional leagues around the world have initiated concussion protocols in order to better prevent, recognize, and treat concussions. With over 1,000,000 youth hockey participants in Canada and the USA combined, concussion is an issue that reaches beyond the professional level. In this report we review the incidence, evaluation, treatment, return-to-play protocol, and prevention efforts related to concussion in ice hockey. PMID:24923401

  14. Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project: Puck packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF will fill the canister with a mixture of high-level waste and glass for permanent storage. Because of the radiation, remote equipment will perform PIP operations in a contained environment. The PIP puck packaging includes loading pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, and inspecting the cans. A magnetically coupled elevator will lower a tray of pucks onto a magnetically coupled transport cart. This cart will carry the tray through an air lock into the can-loading glove box. Inside the glove box, a magnetically coupled tray lifter will raise the tray off the cart. A three-axis Cartesian robot will use a vacuum cup on a long pipe to lift the 67.3-mm (2.65-in.)-diam, 25.4-mm (1.0-in.)-tall pucks from the transfer tray and place 20 pucks in a 76.2-mm (3.0-in.)-diam stainless steel can. The Cartesian robot will place a custom hood on the open metal can, and this hood will remove the air from the can, insert helium, and place a hollow plug in the can. The SRS-developed bagless transfer system will weld the plug to the can wall and cut the can in the weld area. The can stub and the upper plug half above the cut line will remain in the sphincter seal to maintain the glove-box seal. The puck can and the lower plug half below the cut line is lowered into the bagless transfer enclosure. A floor-mounted robot in this enclosure will swipe the can exterior for contamination and place the can in a leak-detection chamber. If the can passes the swipe and leak-detection tests, the robot will place it on a transfer cart and send it to a nondestructive assay station. If the can fails either test, it will be sent back to the can-loading glove box and opened, and the pucks will be reloaded into another can. The PIP is in the conceptual design stage, and the facility will begin operation in 2007.

  15. A Hockey Hero

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolduc, Matt

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author shares the story of Will Poulos, a hockey player who has developmental and physical disabilities (mild mental retardation and left cerebral palsy). Will has overcome tremendous obstacles in his life. He was born at 28 weeks in 1986 at three pounds, one ounce, and 19 inches long. He was very sick; his odds for survival…

  16. The Hockey/Art Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadeson, Harriet; Wirtz, Gail

    2005-01-01

    Ice hockey can be a violent sport as evidenced by the fighting among the members of an ice hockey team of 13-year-old boys from mixed racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Two series of eight art sessions were used to help the boys develop respect for themselves and others, to solve conflicts without combat, and to build more positive…

  17. Plutonium Immobilization Project Can Loading and Puck Handling Vision Software

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2001-09-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as part of a two track approach for the disposition of weapons-usable plutonium. The Department of Energy is funding the development and testing effort for the PIP being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The PIP will utilize the ceramic can-in-canister technology in a process that mixes plutonium and uranium with ceramic formers and neutron absorbers, presses the mixture into a ceramic puck-like form, and sinters the pucks in a furnace. Once sintered, the pucks are loaded into cans, then cans are placed into magazines, and magazines are inserted into large canisters. The canisters will subsequently be filled with high-level waste glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility for eventual disposal in a geologic repository. The PIP project is currently being suspended due to budget constraints. The suspension requires documenting the current status of all systems under development including the Can Loading Vision System and the Puck Handling Vision System. This report provides this documentation.

  18. WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS

    E-print Network

    Royer, Dana

    WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS CLINIC 1: Saturday & Sunday, October 27.wesleyan.edu/athletics/wihockey/index.html TO SIGN UP QUESTIONS? CALL 860-685-2904 OR EMAIL JAMCKENNA@WESLEYAN.EDU #12;WESLEYAN HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS ________________________ to participate in the WESLEYAN HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINIC offered by Wesleyan University beginning on or about

  19. A to Z Encyclopaedia of Ice Hockey

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Developed by the UK-based Stewart Roberts and Phil Stamp, this huge compendium of ice hockey information (over 14,000 entries) is all the more notable for its international scope. No NHL-centricity here. In fact, the only Americans and Canadians in the site's Hall of Fame are in the International Ice Hockey Federation section. A constant work-in-progress, this site is a seemingly bottomless well of hockey trivia and lore. Need to know the Attendance Averages for Finnish Division 1 hockey? The winner of the 1997 Croation hockey championship? What the "A" on players' jerseys means? Its all here and much, much more.

  20. Science of NHL Hockey: Mass, Volume & Density

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NBC Learn

    2010-10-07

    NHL fans might be surprised to learn that the ice surface at a hockey rink is only about one inch thick. Scientists and ice technicians explain the science and math that goes into building and maintaining this surface through the long NHL season. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

  1. Science of NHL Hockey: Statistics & Averages

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NBC Learn

    2010-10-07

    Being a top goalie in the NHL takes more than quick reflexes and nerves of steel, it also requires a firm grip on the numbers. Namely, the key averages and statistics of goaltending. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

  2. Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

    1997-01-01

    Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)

  3. The High School Players Field Hockey Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Bobbie

    This student's journal aims at helping to develop a successful and highly motivated high school girls field hockey team. General information about the sport and student involvement is presented. Definitions of terms used in field hockey are given as well as general considerations about play, defensive and offensive strategies, and penalties.…

  4. Concussion among Swedish elite ice hockey players

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Y Tegner; R Lorentzon

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of concussion in Swedish ice hockey and to establish a uniform grading and treatment model for concussions of different severity. METHODS: Frequency of concussion was investigated in two studies, one retrospective and one prospective. In the retrospective study, all Swedish elite ice hockey players (n = 265) were asked to answer a questionnaire on the

  5. Maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution improves performance, thermoregulation, and fatigue during an ice hockey scrimmage.

    PubMed

    Linseman, Mark E; Palmer, Matthew S; Sprenger, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Research in "stop-and-go" sports has demonstrated that carbohydrate ingestion improves performance and fatigue, and that dehydration of ?1.5%-2% body mass (BM) loss results in decreased performance, increased fatigue, and increased core temperature. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the physiological, performance, and fatigue-related effects of maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) versus dehydrating by ?2% BM (no fluid; NF) during a 70-min ice hockey scrimmage. Skilled male hockey players (n = 14; age, 21.3 ± 0.2 years; BM, 80.1 ± 2.5 kg; height, 182.0 ± 1.2 cm) volunteered for the study. Subjects lost 1.94% ± 0.1% BM in NF, and 0.12% ± 0.1% BM in CES. Core temperature (Tc) throughout the scrimmage (10-50 min) and peak Tc (CES: 38.69 ± 0.10 vs. NF: 38.92 ± 0.11 °C; p < 0.05) were significantly reduced in CES compared with NF. Players in CES had increased mean skating speed and time at high effort between 30-50 min of the scrimmage. They also committed fewer puck turnovers and completed a higher percentage of passes in the last 20 min of play compared with NF. Postscrimmage shuttle skating performance was improved in CES versus NF and fatigue was lower following the CES trial. The results indicated that ingesting a CES to maintain BM throughout a 70-min hockey scrimmage resulted in improved hockey performance and thermoregulation, and decreased fatigue as compared with drinking no fluid and dehydrating by ?2%. PMID:25061764

  6. The Open Geospatial Consortium PUCK Standard: Building Sensor Networks with Self-Describing Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, T. C.; Broering, A.; del Rio, J.; Headley, K. L.; Toma, D.; Bermudez, L. E.; Edgington, D.; Fredericks, J.; Manuel, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sensor technology is rapidly advancing, enabling smaller and cheaper instruments to monitor Earth's environment. It is expected that many more kinds and quantities of networked environmental sensors will be deployed in coming years. Knowledge of each instrument's command protocol is required to operate and acquire data from the network. Making sense of these data streams to create an integrated picture of environmental conditions requires that each instrument's data and metadata be accurately processed and that "suspect" data be flagged. Use of standards to operate an instrument and retrieve and describe its data generally simplifies instrument software development, integration, operation and data processing. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) PUCK protocol enables instruments that describe themselves in a standard way. OGC PUCK defines a small "data sheet" that describes key instrument characteristics, and a standard protocol to retrieve the data sheet from the device itself. Data sheet fields include a universal serial number that is unique across all PUCK-compliant instruments. Other fields identify the instrument manufacturer and model. In addition to the data sheet, the instrument may also provide a "PUCK payload" which can contain additional descriptive information (e.g. a SensorML document or IEEE 1451 TEDS), as well as actual instrument "driver" code. Computers on the sensor network can use PUCK protocol to retrieve this information from installed instruments and utilize it appropriately, e.g. to automatically identify, configure and operate the instruments, and acquire and process their data. The protocol is defined for instruments with an RS232 or Ethernet interface. OGC members recently voted to adopt PUCK as a component of the OGC's Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards. The protocol is also supported by a consortium of hydrographic instrument manufacturers and has been implemented by several of them (https://sites.google.com/site/soscsite/). Thus far PUCK has been deployed on oceanographic observatories in North America and Europe, and is generally applicable to environmental sensor networks. As an example we describe how PUCK can be used with other established and emerging OGC SWE standards to simplify configuration and operation of environmental sensor networks, and to automate assessment and processing of the sensor data. The PUCK specification is free of charge and can be downloaded along with tools to implement and use the standard from http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/puck.

  7. Hockey Greats Retire En Masse

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-01-01

    Mark of distinctionhttp://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/michael_farber/09/12/messier.retires/index.htmlCentre Ron Francis retires after 23 distinguished NHL seasonshttp://www.canada.com/edmonton/edmontonjournal/news/sports/story.html?id=cda782b9-2192-4783-8365-7acc1bc6b656Another NHL star quits; Francis retireshttp://msnbc.msn.com/id/9340488/ESPN.com: NHL Statisticshttp://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/statisticsHockey Hall of Famehttp://www.hhof.com/index.htmAfter a long strike, the National Hockey League is gearing up for the 2005-2006 season in earnest. Regrettably, the game will be without two of its standout players, as both Mark Messier of the New York Rangers and Ron Francis of the Toronto Maple Leafs announced their retirements this week. Messier began his 25-season career with his hometown Edmonton Oilers in 1979, and led the team to five Stanley Cup victories. Of course, many will also remember his many fine years of play with the Rangers, where he also led them to victory in the 1994 Stanley Cap as well. Messier made his announcement on a conference call because as he remarked, "no one wants to see a blubbering idiot at the podium".

  8. PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M.

    2014-01-01

    The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the “PUCK” prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed. PMID:25364323

  9. Injuries in women's ice hockey: special considerations.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Ice hockey is a popular collision sport with a growing number of female athletes participating each year. As participation among girls and women continues to increase, it will be important to recognize common injuries occurring during women's games. Despite difference in the rules that prohibit body checking in women's and girls' games, injury profiles are similar to those of their male counterparts. Concussions, contusions, acromioclavicular joint injuries, ligamentous knee injuries, and muscle strains occur during women's ice hockey games, with groin strains accounting for the most common practice injury. This article will review both injury rates and common injuries occurring in women's ice hockey, with a focus on the observed concussion rate and groin injuries. PMID:25391093

  10. NU Intramural Sports Ice Hockey Rules

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    NU Intramural Sports Ice Hockey Rules GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid identification card. 2. Jewelry is not allowed to be worn by any participant during an Intramural event. Any with a band-aid. 3. GAME TIME IS FORFEIT TIME! The minimum number of players must have their Husky Cards

  11. NU Intramural Sports Roller Hockey Rules

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    NU Intramural Sports Roller Hockey Rules GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid identification card. 2. Jewelry is not allowed to be worn by any participant during an Intramural event. Any with a band-aid. 3. GAME TIME IS FORFEIT TIME! The minimum number of players must have their Husky Cards

  12. NU Intramural Sports Floor Hockey Rules

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    NU Intramural Sports Floor Hockey Rules GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid identification card. 2. Jewelry is not allowed to be worn by any participant during an Intramural event. Any with a band-aid. 3. GAME TIME IS FORFEIT TIME! The minimum number of players must have their Husky Cards

  13. Body Checking in Pee Wee Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Michel-Andre; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The results of 2 studies determining the effects of body checking in Pee Wee hockey indicate variability in player size and strength is reason to avoid this practice. In leagues allowing body checking, 55 percent of all injuries and greater frequency of serious injury were a result of body contact. (SM)

  14. Pythagoras and the National Hockey League

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James J. Cochran; Rob Blackstock

    2009-01-01

    The nature of the relationship Bill James found between the win\\/loss percentage of a Major League Baseball team and the number of runs the team scores and allows over the course of a season is investigated for the National Hockey League (NHL). We find the optimal form of James' model for the NHL using the absolute error criterion and demonstrate

  15. Hockey-stick steam generator for LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Hallinan, G.J.; Svedlund, P.E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents the criteria and evaluation leading to the selection of the Hockey Stick Steam Generator Concept and subsequent development of that concept for LMFBR application. The selection process and development of the Modular Steam Generator (MSG) is discussed, including the extensive test programs that culminated in the manufacture and test of a 35 MW(t) Steam Generator. The design of the CRBRP Steam Generator is described, emphasizing the current status and a review of the critical structural areas. CRBRP steam generator development tests are evaluated, with a discussion of test objectives and rating of the usefulness of test results to the CRBRP prototype design. Manufacturing experience and status of the CRBRP prototype and plant units is covered. The scaleup of the Hockey Stick concept to large commercial plant application is presented, with an evaluation of scaleup limitations, transient effects, and system design implications.

  16. Home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Loignon, Andrew; Gayton, William F; Brown, Melissa; Steinroeder, William; Johnson, Carrie

    2007-06-01

    Occurrence of the home field disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing data on penalty shots from 1983-2004. This datum was used as it does not involve physical contact for only the player taking the penalty shot is involved in the outcome. As a result, inhibition of anxiety associated with physical contact should not occur, and diffusion of responsibility would not occur since only the shooter is involved. Analysis indicated the player who took the penalty shot did not make significantly fewer shots at home than in away games. The result did not support hypotheses about roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey. PMID:17879659

  17. Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Stephen; McKitrick, Ross

    2005-02-01

    The ``hockey stick'' shaped temperature reconstruction of Mann et al. (1998, 1999) has been widely applied. However it has not been previously noted in print that, prior to their principal components (PCs) analysis on tree ring networks, they carried out an unusual data transformation which strongly affects the resulting PCs. Their method, when tested on persistent red noise, nearly always produces a hockey stick shaped first principal component (PC1) and overstates the first eigenvalue. In the controversial 15th century period, the MBH98 method effectively selects only one species (bristlecone pine) into the critical North American PC1, making it implausible to describe it as the ``dominant pattern of variance''. Through Monte Carlo analysis, we show that MBH98 benchmarks for significance of the Reduction of Error (RE) statistic are substantially under-stated and, using a range of cross-validation statistics, we show that the MBH98 15th century reconstruction lacks statistical significance.

  18. Miniature Videoprobe Hockey Stick Delivery System

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, Lester R.; McMurry, Kyle M.

    1998-06-18

    The present invention is a miniature videoprobe system having a probe termination box, a strong back, and a videoprobe housing. The videoprobe system is able to obtain images from a restricted space at least as small as 0.125 inches while producing a high quality image. The strong back has a hockey stick shape with the probe termination box connecting to the top of the handle-like portion of the hockey stick and the videoprobe housing attaching to the opposite end or nose of the hockey stick shape. The videoprobe housing has a roughly arrowhead shape with two thin steel plates sandwiching the internal components there between. The internal components are connected in series to allow for a minor dimension of the videoprobe housing of 0.110 inches. The internal components include an optics train, a CCD chip, and an electronics package. An electrical signal is transmitted from the electronics package through wiring within an internal channel of the strong back to the probe termination box. The strong back has milled into it multiple internal channels for facilitating the transfer of information, items, or devices between the probe termination box and the videoprobe housing.

  19. BOSTONIA Summer 2013 wins in NCAA hockey his-

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    season ended on March 23, when the Terriers lost the Hockey East Championship to the University for Boston University, the University's first comprehensive fund- raising campaign. Retired hockey coach conference in March. Parker skating for the Terriers in 1967. Parker and players during a 2011 team practice

  20. BGSUICEARENA YouthHockeySpringClincsYouthHockeySpringClincswww.bgsu.edu/recwell/ice419.372.8686

    E-print Network

    Moore, Paul A.

    BGSUICEARENA YouthHockeySpringClincsYouthHockeySpringClincswww.bgsu.edu/recwell/ice·419_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Birthdate____________________________________________ _ Age____________________Male_or_Female Parent_charge_on_ALL_refunds._No_refunds_issued_after_2nd_class. Please_check_the_box(es)_for_the_class(es)_in_which_your_child_is_participating _IP_-_Mini

  1. Sport selection in under-17 male roller hockey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuel J. Coelho-E-Silva; Vasco Vaz; Filipe Simões; João Valente-Dos-Santos; António J. Figueiredo; Vanildo Pereira; Roel Vaeyens; Renaat Philippaerts; Marije T. Elferink-Gemser; Robert M. Malina

    2012-01-01

    Characteristics of 32 international and 41 local under-17 (U-17) (14.5–16.5 years) roller hockey players were considered in the context of discrimination by competitive level using training history, anthropometry, skeletal maturation, and several laboratory and field performance tests. More international (42%) than local (22%) players were advanced in maturity status. International players had slightly less hockey experience (years), but had more

  2. Re-examining the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Gayton, William F; Perry, Scott M; Loignon, Andrew C; Ricker, Angela

    2011-04-01

    Occurrence of the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey was examined by analyzing shootout data from 2005 through 2008. Results indicated that teams involved in shootouts playing at their home arenas did not lose significantly more games at home than on the road. Results did not support the hypotheses that emphasize the roles of physical contact and diffusion of responsibility in accounting for past failures to find the home disadvantage in professional ice hockey. PMID:21667767

  3. Nutrient fluxes via submarine groundwater discharge to the Bay of Puck, southern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Szymczycha, Beata; Vogler, Susanna; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2012-11-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been recognized as an important exchange pathway between hydrologic reservoirs due to its impact on biogeochemical cycles of the coastal ocean. This study reports nutrient concentrations and loads delivered by SGD into the Bay of Puck, the southern Baltic Sea. Measurements were carried out between September, 2009 and October, 2010 at groundwater seepage sites identified by low salinity of pore water. Groundwater fluxes, measured using seepage meters, ranged from 3 to 22 L m(-2)day(-1). Average concentrations of nutrients in groundwater samples collected were as follows: 0.4 ?mol L(-1) nitrate (NO(3)), 0.8 ?mol L(-1) nitrite (NO(2)), 18.2 ?mol L(-1) ammonium (NH(4)) and 60.6 ?mol L(-1) orthophosphate (PO(4)). Levels of NH(4) and PO(4) were significantly higher in samples from SGD sites than in seawater. Seawater and SGD samples showed similar NO(2) concentrations but SGD samples exhibited lower NO(3) levels than those observed in seawater samples. Measured seepage water fluxes and nutrient concentrations were used to calculate nutrient loads discharged into the study area while the literature groundwater flux and the measured nutrient concentrations were used to estimate nutrient loads discharged into the Bay of Puck. The estimates suggest that SGD delivers a dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) load of 49.9 ± 18.0 t yr(-1) and a PO(4)(-) load of 56.3 ± 5.5tyr(-1) into the Bay of Puck. The projected estimates are significant in comparison with loads delivered to the bay from other, well-recognized sources (705 ty r(-1) and 105 ty r(-1) respectively for DIN and PO(4)). Nutrient discharge input loads were projected to the entire Baltic Sea The extrapolated values indicate SGD contributes a significant proportion of phosphate load but only an insignificant proportion of DIN load. Further studies are necessary to better understand SGD contributions to the nutrient budget in the Baltic Sea. PMID:22975306

  4. For Immediate Release --Thursday, April 3, 2014 Pronghorns men's hockey program taps Red Wings

    E-print Network

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    For Immediate Release -- Thursday, April 3, 2014 Pronghorns men's hockey University of Lethbridge Pronghorns Athletics has named Spiros Anastas as the new's an exciting time for Pronghorns men's hockey, it's hard not to get excited

  5. "No Fear Comes": Adolescent Girls, Ice Hockey, and the Embodiment of Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theberge, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Examined the relationship between gender, physicality, and embodiment among Canadian adolescent girls who played ice hockey. Interview data indicated that the girls emphasized the importance of being aggressive (fearless in use of the body). Players understood that contrasts between men's hockey (more physical and aggressive) and women's hockey

  6. Congener-specific data on polychlorinated biphenyls in tissues of common porpoise from Puck Bay, Baltic Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Falandysz; N. Yamashita; S. Tanabe; R. Tatsukawa; L. Rucifiska; K. Skóra

    1994-01-01

    Individual congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), including the highly toxic non-ortho coplanar 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC No. 77), 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC No. 126), and 3,3',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (IUPAC No. 169), and their mono- and di-ortho analogs, have been identified and quantified in the blubber, liver, and muscles of three female common porpoise Phocoena phocoena collected from the Puck Bay (inner Gulf of Gdansk, Poland) in

  7. Visual skills and playing positions of Olympic field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Wimshurst, Z L; Sowden, P T; Cardinale, M

    2012-02-01

    Many sports require fine spatiotemporal resolution for optimal performance. Previous studies have compared anticipatory skills and the decision-making process in athletes; however, there is little information on visual skills of elite athletes, particularly hockey players. To assess visual skills of Olympic hockey players and analyze differences by playing position, and to analyze improvement of visual skills after training, 21 Olympic field hockey players were pre- and post-tested on 11 visual tasks following a 10-wk. visual training program consisting of computer-based visual exercises. There were no mean differences at pre-test between players of different positions, suggesting that performance on these visual skills was independent of playing position. However, after training, an improvement was seen in all players (when scores were averaged across all 11 visual tasks) with goalkeepers improving significantly more than any other position. This suggests the possibility of improving visual skills even in an elite population. PMID:22582689

  8. FY04-Q4 REPORT: LX-17 MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, R; Fried, L

    2004-11-30

    TATB containing explosives tend to permanently expand as their temperatures are increased or thermally cycled, a phenomenon known as ''ratchet-growth.'' Mesoscale simulations using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) have been carried out in order to study the geometric packing effects of TATB pressed powders under stress conditions. Further, our mesoscale simulations of polycrystalline TATB pressed powders have been used to predict hot-spot changes as a function of temperature (thermal cycling) and confinement. Our DPD simulations showed irreversible permanent growth in the mesoscale pressed powders only when crystal fracture induced by the anisotropic thermal expansion of TATB was incorporated into the model.

  9. Mechanical modeling of the plastic bonded explosive LX17 

    E-print Network

    Clayton, Kyle Martin

    2001-01-01

    , for the strain formulation, equation (17), when it goes through a Laplace transfomz, can be written as: le J1 ? ? ? 6 o. +2Jo // 3 3 // kk // (30) Since equations (28) and (30) are inverses of each other in Laplace space, the moduli and compliances... formulation of the constitutive relationship, equation (28), can be written in the following matrix form so that the given experimental relaxation data can be entered into SADISTIC for each term in the matrix: rrzz 033 crzz /r/3 o/z 4G K+ 3 2G 3 2G...

  10. PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments: Towards achieving automated prompting; Challenges involved.

    PubMed

    Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M

    2012-10-01

    The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the "PUCK" prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed. PMID:25364323

  11. Protecting the Market from ``Hockey Stick'' Pricing: How

    E-print Network

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Protecting the Market from ``Hockey Stick'' Pricing: How the Public Utility Commission of Texas is Dealing with Potential Price Gouging An automatic mitigation procedure called the Competitive Solution Method offers a way of guarding against price gouging while keeping the door open to appropriate scarcity

  12. Injuries in Youth Hockey. On-Ice Emergency Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Bradford M.; Castaldi, Cosmo R.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews the nature and frequency of injuries in youth hockey (which range from musculoskeletal injuries to life-threatening emergencies). Overall injury rates have decreased, but there is an increase in head, neck, and spine injuries. Those injuries that are serious demand prompt, skillful attention. A comprehensive format for on-ice management is…

  13. Advanced Field Hockey; Physical Education: 5551.22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Billye J.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grades 7-12. SUBJECT MATTER: Advanced field hockey. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE. Course guidelines, description, and a broad goal statement are presented and behavioral objectives listed. Course content and learning activities to meet the skill objectives are also presented. A 14-item bibliography is included. OBJECTIVES…

  14. Fundamental Field Hockey, Physical Education: 5551.21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Billye J.

    This course outline is a guide for teaching fundamental skills, rules, and strategies of field hockey in grades 7-12. The course format includes lectures, skills practice, audiovisual materials, demonstrations, and competitions that focus on mastery of skills, rules, game situations, and safety procedures. Course content includes the following:…

  15. Sport selection in under-17 male roller hockey.

    PubMed

    Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J; Vaz, Vasco; Simões, Filipe; Carvalho, Humberto M; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Figueiredo, António J; Pereira, Vanildo; Vaeyens, Roel; Philippaerts, Renaat; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Malina, Robert M

    2012-12-01

    Characteristics of 32 international and 41 local under-17 (U-17) (14.5-16.5 years) roller hockey players were considered in the context of discrimination by competitive level using training history, anthropometry, skeletal maturation, and several laboratory and field performance tests. More international (42%) than local (22%) players were advanced in maturity status. International players had slightly less hockey experience (years), but had more practice sessions and match time (minutes) during the season. Local players were shorter and attained better performance in the 25-m dash, while international players performed better in sit-ups, ball throw and 20-m shuttle run. The fatigue index derived from the Wingate anaerobic test was higher among local players, while peak torques of knee extension and flexion were greater in international players. Stepwise discriminant function correctly classified 85% of players by competitive level based on grip strength, ratio of eccentric and concentric knee extension, number of training sessions, playing time and fatigue index. The results suggested an interaction among strength, anaerobic fitness and training plus game time as factors in discriminating international from local level players and by inference in the selection and development of youth roller hockey players. PMID:22867426

  16. Spring Constants for Hockey Dan Russell and Linda Hunt, Kettering University, Flint, MI

    E-print Network

    Russell, Daniel A.

    of Static Bending Hockey sticks are rated according to weight, shaft flex, and the amount of curvature- ing the effective spring constant of a hockey stick. The butt end of the shaft is clamped to a rigid bench and masses are hung from a hook at the other end of the shaft where the blade and shaft meet. We

  17. Enhancing Competitive Performance of Ice Hockey Goaltenders Using Centering and Self-Talk

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa J. Rogerson; Dennis W. Hrycaiko

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of two mental skills on the performance of ice hockey goaltenders during league games. The mental skills utilized were relaxation, in the form of centering, and self-talk. The participants were five male junior A hockey goaltenders. A single-subject multiple baseline across individuals design was employed to evaluate the use of

  18. The competitive demands of elite male rink hockey.

    PubMed

    Yagüe, Pl; Del Valle, M E; Egocheaga, J; Linnamo, V; Fernández, A

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to simulate the activity pattern of rink hockey by designing a specific skate test (ST) to study the energy expenditure and metabolic responses to this intermittent high-intensity exercise and extrapolate the results from the test to competition. Six rink hockey players performed, in three phases, the 20-metre multi-stage shuttle roller skate test, a tournament match and the ST. Heart rate was monitored in all three phases. Blood lactate, oxygen consumption, ventilation and respiratory exchange ratio were also recorded during the ST. Peak HR was 190.7±7.2 beats · min(-1). There were no differences in peak HR between the three tests. Mean HR was similar between the ST and the match (86% and 87% of HRmax, respectively). Peak and mean ventilation averaged 111.0±8.8 L · min(-1) and 70.3±14.0 L (·) min(-1) (60% of VEmax), respectively. VO2max was 56.3±8.4 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), and mean oxygen consumption was 40.9±7.9 mL · kg(-1) (·) min(-1) (70% of VO2max). Maximum blood lactate concentration was 7.2±1.3 mmol · L-1. ST yielded an energy expenditure of 899.1±232.9 kJ, and energy power was 59.9±15.5 kJ · min(-1). These findings suggest that the ST is suitable for estimating the physiological demands of competitive rink hockey, which places a heavy demand on the aerobic and anaerobic systems, and requires high energy consumption. PMID:24744488

  19. Physical demands and physiological responses during elite field hockey.

    PubMed

    Lythe, J; Kilding, A E

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the physical demands of elite men's field hockey using modern time-motion analysis techniques. 18 elite male players (age: 24.4 ± 4.5 yrs) participated in 5 matches, during which physical outputs of players were quantified using GPS units and heart rate monitors. The mean total distance covered by each individual player was 6798 ± 2009 m. Mean total distance covered per position for 70 min (position (70)) was 8160 ± 428 m. Distance covered per position (70) decreased by 4.8% between the 1 (st )and 2 (nd) halves ( P < 0.05). Fullbacks covered significantly less total distance than all other positions ( P < 0.05). High-intensity running (>19 km.h (-1)) comprised 6.1% (479 ± 108 m) of the total distance covered and involved 34 ± 12 sprints per player, with an average duration of 3.3 s. Average HR was higher in the 1 (st) half (86.7% HR (max)) than the 2 (nd) half, (84.4% HR (max)), though this was not significant ( P = 0.06). The results suggest that modern day elite field hockey is a physically demanding team sport. Quantification of the demands and outputs of players at this level provides a useful framework on which to develop conditioning practices. The difference in physical outputs observed for some positions suggests position-specific conditioning is required at the elite level. PMID:21563026

  20. The effect of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players. PMID:24764628

  1. Reducing injury risk from body checking in boys' youth ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Alison; Loud, Keith J; Brenner, Joel S; Demorest, Rebecca A; Halstead, Mark E; Kelly, Amanda K Weiss; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; LaBotz, Michele; Martin, Stephanie S; Moffatt, Kody

    2014-06-01

    Ice hockey is an increasingly popular sport that allows intentional collision in the form of body checking for males but not for females. There is a two- to threefold increased risk of all injury, severe injury, and concussion related to body checking at all levels of boys' youth ice hockey. The American Academy of Pediatrics reinforces the importance of stringent enforcement of rules to protect player safety as well as educational interventions to decrease unsafe tactics. To promote ice hockey as a lifelong recreational pursuit for boys, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the expansion of nonchecking programs and the restriction of body checking to elite levels of boys' youth ice hockey, starting no earlier than 15 years of age. PMID:24864185

  2. Facial protection and head injuries in ice hockey: a systematic review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Asplund; S Bettcher; J Borchers

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To summarise the best available evidence to determine if facial protection reduces head injury in ice hockey.Data Sources:MEDLINE and Cochrane databases through January 2009.Review Methods:Utilising terms: “head injuries,” “craniocerebral trauma [MeSH]”, “head injuries, closed [MeSH]”, head injuries, penetrating [MeSH]”, “face mask”, “face shield”, “visor” and “hockey”, 24 articles were identified through our systematic literature search. Of these, six studies met

  3. Ice Hockey Summit II: zero tolerance for head hits and fighting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Stuart, Michael J; Dodick, David W; Roberts, William O; Alford, Patrick W; Ashare, Alan B; Aubrey, Mark; Benson, Brian W; Burke, Chip J; Dick, Randall; Eickhoff, Chad; Emery, Carolyn A; Flashman, Laura A; Gaz, Daniel V; Giza, Chris C; Greenwald, Richard M; Herring, Stanley A; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Hudziak, James J; Huston, John; Krause, David; LaVoi, Nicole; Leaf, Matt; Leddy, John J; MacPherson, Alison; McKee, Ann C; Mihalik, Jason P; Moessner, Anne M; Montelpare, William J; Putukian, Margot; Schneider, Kathryn J; Szalkowski, Ron; Tabrum, Mark; Whitehead, James R; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to present currently known basic science and on-ice influences of sport-related concussion (SRC) in hockey, building upon the Ice Hockey Summit I action plan (2011) to reduce SRC. The prior summit proceedings included an action plan intended to reduce SRC. As such, the proceedings from Summit I served as a point of departure for the science and discussion held during Summit II (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, October 2013). Summit II focused on (1) Basic Science of Concussions in Ice Hockey: Taking Science Forward, (2) Acute and Chronic Concussion Care: Making a Difference, (3) Preventing Concussions via Behavior, Rules, Education, and Measuring Effectiveness, (4) Updates in Equipment: Their Relationship to Industry Standards, and (5) Policies and Plans at State, National, and Federal Levels To Reduce SRC. Action strategies derived from the presentations and discussion described in these sectors were voted on subsequently for purposes of prioritization. The following proceedings include the knowledge and research shared by invited faculty, many of whom are health care providers and clinical investigators. The Summit II evidence-based action plan emphasizes the rapidly evolving scientific content of hockey SRC. It includes the most highly prioritized strategies voted on for implementation to decrease concussion. The highest-priority action items identified from the Summit include the following: (1) eliminate head hits from all levels of ice hockey, (2) change body checking policies, and (3) eliminate fighting in all amateur and professional hockey. PMID:25757010

  4. NHL.com: The National Hockey League Web Site

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The NHL's official site is a good place to start for anyone interested in the professional version of Canada's national pastime. Unfortunately, the site doesn't contain an archive of boxscores and/or recaps of all games. However, extensive boxes and recaps are provided for the latest games. Updated statistics are available on a wide variety of team and individual variables, and information is available on the various teams. But what really makes this site interesting are the "Cool Shots" section (8 multimedia highlights from the previous week's play--archived back to the beginning of the season), and "Feature Files," a potpourri of information including weekly reviews, instruction, and special features highlighted by "A Day in the Life of the National Hockey League," a photo essay of the NHL on March 23, 1996.

  5. Children's social relationships and motivation in sledge hockey.

    PubMed

    Wynnyk, Katrina; Spencer-Cavaliere, Nancy

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore children with disabilities' social relationships and motivation to take part in sledge hockey. Harter's (1978) theory of Competence Motivation was used as the conceptual framework. Ten children (1 girl and 9 boys) between ages 11-16 years, who experienced a range of disabilities, participated. Primary data were collected using semistructured interviews, participant observations, and field and reflective notes. The thematic analysis led to four themes: (a) coach feedback, (b) parental involvement, (c) skill and belonging, and (d) (dis)ability sport. The findings revealed that interactions with significant others contributed extensively to the participant's perceptions of competence and motivation to participate, as did the sport's competitive nature. The findings are discussed in the context of Harter's theory and the children's sport and adapted physical activity inclusion literature. PMID:24197621

  6. Beyond the hockey stick: indirect methods of paleoclimate

    E-print Network

    Nychka, Douglas

    data D. Nychka IMAGe/NCAR ­ Beyond the hockey stick 9 DegreeC q q qq q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q q qq q q q qqq q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q qq q q q q qq q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q qqqq q q q q q q q

  7. A comparison of the epidemiology of ice hockey injuries between male and female youth in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Forward, Karen E; Seabrook, Jamie A; Lynch, Tim; Lim, Rodrick; Poonai, Naveen; Sangha, Gurinder S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hockey is played by youth across Canada, and its popularity has increased dramatically among females in the past decade. Despite this, there has been little epidemiological research comparing the injury patterns of young female and male hockey players. OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare injuries sustained by female and male youth hockey players using the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program database. METHODS: In the present cross-sectional, retrospective comparison study, the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program database was used to identify all hockey-related injuries sustained by children seven to 17.5 years of age over a 15-year period (January 1995 to December 2009). Exclusion criteria included paid professional players and children with injuries sustained while playing road hockey. RESULTS: Inclusion criteria were met by 33,233 children (2637 [7.9%] females and 30,596 [92.1%] males). Compared with males, females reported proportionately more soft tissue injuries (39.8% versus 32.6%; P<0.01) and sprains/strains (21.1% versus 17.6%; P<0.01). Males experienced more fractures (27.1% versus 18.2%; P<0.01) and were most often injured through body checking (42.8% versus 25.7%; P<0.01). Females showed a trend toward increased concussion with age, and were most often injured through collisions (28.6% versus 24.6%; P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Compared with males, female hockey players sustained proportionately more soft tissue injures and sprains/strains, and showed a trend toward concussions in late adolecence. Males experienced more fractures, shoulder injuries and injuries due to body checking. Further research is required to identify risk factors for injury in female youth hockey players and to target injury prevention. PMID:25382998

  8. RoboCup leagues of the future: New ideas for future robotics competitions

    E-print Network

    silicon dioxide discs with the diameter of a human hair. Despite all this action, nano robots can only-hockey puck into the goal. The hard thing about it is getting a feel for the ball. The puck "glides" over

  9. Evaluation of anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests for talent identification in female field hockey.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Weber, Clare L; Dalton, Carl T

    2003-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an effective testing battery for female field hockey by using anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests to distinguish between regional representative (Rep, n = 35) and local club level (Club, n = 39) female field hockey players. Rep players were significantly leaner and recorded faster times for the 10-m and 40-m sprints as well as the Illinois Agility Run (with and without dribbling a hockey ball). Rep players also had greater aerobic and lower body muscular power and were more accurate in the shooting accuracy test, p < 0.05. No significant differences between groups were evident for height, body mass, speed decrement in 6 x 40-m repeated sprints, handgrip strength, or pushing speed. These results indicate that %BF, sprinting speed, agility, dribbling control, aerobic and muscular power, and shooting accuracy can distinguish between female field hockey players of varying standards. Therefore talent identification programs for female field hockey should include assessments of these physical parameters. PMID:12955867

  10. Testosterone, cortisol and anxiety in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Raúl; Jiménez, Manuel; Alvero-Cruz, José R

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol after victory and defeat in male field hockey players during an important tournament. In the beginning of the game series, the players were ranked very closely to achieve (for the first time) the championship rising to The Honor Division-A, the highest status national category. The first game resulted in a 7-4 victory, the second game resulted in a 6-1 victory, and the third game resulted in a 1-2 defeat. As expected, there were changes in testosterone levels after the competition, dropping in the game which ended in defeat, and rising slightly in the two games which ended in victory; there were also changes in cortisol levels, rising in the game which ended in defeat, and showing no variations in the games which ended in victory; correlational analyses congruently showed that defeat led to rises in cortisol whereas victory led to rises in testosterone; anticipatory somatic anxiety was related to cortisol levels prior to games, and physical exertion during competition was related to the change in testosterone levels (suggesting an inhibitory effect) but not to the change in cortisol levels. Hence, this pattern of hormonal responses to a real-life dominance challenge complied with Mazur's (1985) [16] biosocial model of status and dominance motivation, by showing that testosterone and cortisol are linked to victory and defeat in a theoretically predictable fashion. PMID:23743274

  11. The effect of caffeine ingestion on field hockey skill performance following physical fatigue.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Taylor, Samantha; Lyons, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of caffeine ingestion on field hockey skill performance following high-intensity fatigue. Thirteen male hockey players (mean age = 21.1 ± 1.2 years) performed hockey sprint dribble and ball handling tests at rest and after a bout of total body fatigue (90% maximal capacity) following caffeine (5 mg kg(-1)) or placebo ingestion. Sprint dribble times were slower postfatigue compared with rest but were significantly faster postfatigue with caffeine compared with postfatigue with placebo ingestion (P < 0.01). Ball handling scores were higher at rest compared with postfatigue, but scores postfatigue were higher following caffeine than placebo ingestion (P < 0.01). Rating of perceived exhaustion (RPE) was lower (P < 0.01) and readiness to invest physical (P < 0.01) and mental effort (P = 0.01) were significantly higher in the caffeine condition. Caffeine ingestion may therefore be effective in offsetting decrements in skilled performance associated with fatigue. PMID:22242735

  12. The past, present, and future of hockey-stick-shaped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.-Joon

    2014-02-01

    Recently, the liquid crystalline materials with a bent-core mesogen have attracted attentions because their interesting properties such as polarity and biaxiality of the mesophase. There are several types of bent-core mesogenic structures have been reported, for instance, banana-shaped, V-shaped molecules, boomerang-shaped, hockey stick-shaped, and Yshaped molecules. In this study, the liquid crystals and the reactive mesogens with the hockey-stick shaped mesogens will be described concerning with the structure-property relationship.

  13. Ice Hockey Players Using a Weighted Implement when Training on the Ice: A Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Timothy W.; Tvoric, Bojan; Walker, Bruce; Noonan, Dom; Sibla, Janeene

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for improving hockey players' performance using a weighted implement on the ice. Forty-eight players were tested using a grip strength dynamometer. They also were assessed on their abilities to stick-handle. The participants were randomly placed into a control or research group. The…

  14. Receiving Video-Based Feedback in Elite Ice-Hockey: A Player's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Lee J.; Potrac, Paul; Groom, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide some rich insights into how an elite ice-hockey player responded to his coaches' pedagogical delivery of video-based feedback sessions. Data for this study were gathered through a series of in-depth, semi-structured interviews and a reflective log relating to those interviews. The interviews were…

  15. Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

  16. Table Hockey: Attack or Linking? Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with an Autistic Boy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, May

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores some issues that might arise when one considers having a table hockey game in the therapy room, and describes how an autistic boy, aged four-and-a-half when starting treatment, used that game. The unfolding process from withdrawal to separateness, intersubjectivity and playfulness is illustrated by the progress of two years of…

  17. KINEMATICS OF THE FOOT AND ANKLE IN FORWARD ICE HOCKEY SKATING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Pearsall; Rene Turcotte; Richard Lefebvre; Hamid Bateni; Maria Nicolaou

    INTRODUCTION: Studies on the kinematics of ice hockey skating have focused mainly on the stride rate and stride length (Marino, 1977, 1979), and on the effectiveness of starts, turns and stops (Naud & Holt 1979, 1980). Hoshizaki et al. (1989) are among the few that have examined foot kinematics during skating using a two dimensional high-speed camera system. However, using

  18. Relative Age Effects and the PhD 1 Revisiting Gladwell's Hockey Players

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    , or conclusions contained in this report. #12;Relative Age Effects and the PhD 2 1. INTRODUCTION Parental involving Canadian hockey players to popularize the concept of "redshirting" kindergarten-aged children relatively younger. The implication from this Relative Age Effect (RAE) is that if parents can arrange

  19. Previous-day hypohydration impairs skill performance in elite female field hockey players.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, H; Sunderland, C

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of 2% hypohydration on skill performance in elite female field hockey players following intermittent exercise in the heat. Eight elite female field hockey players performed 50 min of a field hockey-specific intermittent treadmill running protocol (FHITP) in hot environmental conditions (33 °C, 60% relative humidity) in different hydration states: euhydrated (EUH) and hypohydrated by 2% body mass (HYPO). Hydration status was manipulated via a period (121±10 min) of passive hyperthermia (40 °C, 75% relative humidity) and controlled fluid intake 1 day preceding testing. Ad libitum fluid intake was permitted throughout both trials. Field hockey skill tests were performed pre- and post-FHITP. Skill performance time increased (P=0.029) in the HYPO trial compared with the EUH trial, which may be attributed to an increase in penalty time (P=0.024). Decision-making time increased (P=0.008) in the HYPO trial and was significantly impaired compared with EUH (P=0.016) pre-FHITP. Ad libitum drinking appeared to be sufficient to maintain decision-making performance as no interaction effects were evident post-FHITP. Players who commence match-play in a state of hypohydration may be susceptible to decrements in skill and decision-making performance. PMID:20973829

  20. Describing Strategies Used by Elite, Intermediate, and Novice Ice Hockey Referees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, David J.; Ste-Marie, Diane M.

    2014-01-01

    Much is known about sport officials' decisions (e.g., anticipation, visual search, and prior experience). Comprehension of the entire decision process, however, requires an ecologically valid examination. To address this, we implemented a 2-part study using an expertise paradigm with ice hockey referees. Purpose: Study 1 explored the…

  1. Planets and Pucks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brueningsen, Christopher; Krawiec, Wesley

    1993-01-01

    Presents a simple activity designed to allow students to experimentally verify Kepler's second law, sometimes called the law of equal areas. It states that areas swept out by a planet as it orbits the Sun are equal for equal time intervals. (PR)

  2. Effectiveness of interventions to reduce aggression and injuries among ice hockey players: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Cusimano, Michael D.; Nastis, Sofia; Zuccaro, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background: The increasing incidence of injuries related to playing ice hockey is an important public health issue. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce injuries related to aggressive acts in ice hockey. Methods: We identified relevant articles by searching electronic databases from their inception through July 2012, by using Internet search engines, and by manually searching sports medicine journals, the book series Safety in Ice Hockey and reference lists of included articles. We included studies that evaluated interventions to reduce aggression-related injuries and reported ratings of aggressive behaviour or rates of penalties or injuries. Results: We identified 18 eligible studies. Most involved players in minor hockey leagues. Of 13 studies that evaluated changes in mandatory rules intended to lessen aggression (most commonly the restriction of body-checking), 11 observed a reduction in penalty or injury rates associated with rule changes, and 9 of these showed a statistically significant decrease. The mean number of penalties decreased by 1.2–5.9 per game, and injury rates decreased 3- to 12-fold. All 3 studies of educational interventions showed a reduction in penalty rates, but they were not powered or designed to show a change in injury rates. In 2 studies of cognitive behavioural interventions, reductions in aggressive behaviours were observed. Interpretation: Changes to mandatory rules were associated with reductions in penalties for aggressive acts and in injuries related to aggression among ice hockey players. Effects of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions on injury rates are less clear. Well-designed studies of multifaceted strategies that combine such approaches are required. PMID:23209118

  3. Bone properties in child and adolescent male hockey and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Falk, Bareket; Braid, Sarah; Moore, Michael; Yao, Matthew; Sullivan, Phil; Klentrou, Nota

    2010-07-01

    Children and adolescents who train extensively in high-impact, weight-bearing activities have enhanced bone mineral density. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone strength, as reflected by quantitative ultrasound (QUS, Sunlight Omniscence), of child (10-12 yrs old) and adolescent (14-16 yrs old) male soccer and hockey players in comparison with age-matched controls. The groups included 30 child (CH) and 31 adolescent (AH) hockey players, 26 child (CS) and 30 adolescent (AS) soccer players, as well as 34 child (CC) and 31 adolescent (AC) healthy, non-athletic, age-matched controls. All athletes trained at an elite level year-round, with no difference in training volume between groups. Ultrasound speed of sound (SOS) was measured at the distal-radius and mid-tibia. In both age groups, hockey players were the heaviest and had the highest fat-free mass. No differences were found among groups in total energy intake, calcium or vitamin D intake. Radial and tibial SOS increased with age. Hockey players had higher radial SOS in both age groups (children: CH:3763+/-74, CS:3736+/-77, CC:3721+/-88 m/s; adolescents: AH:3809+/-105, AS:3767+/-85, AC:3760+/-94 m/s). Tibial SOS was higher in soccer players compared with controls. In spite of the higher body mass and fat-free mass in hockey players, their tibial SOS was similar to the non-athletes in both age groups. These findings support previous suggestions of sport-specific effects on bone strength. However, they need to be corroborated with longitudinal or prospective intervention studies. PMID:19574094

  4. The hockey-stick method to estimate evening dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in humans.

    PubMed

    Danilenko, Konstantin V; Verevkin, Evgeniy G; Antyufeev, Viktor S; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

    2014-04-01

    The onset of melatonin secretion in the evening is the most reliable and most widely used index of circadian timing in humans. Saliva (or plasma) is usually sampled every 0.5-1 hours under dim-light conditions in the evening 5-6 hours before usual bedtime to assess the dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO). For many years, attempts have been made to find a reliable objective determination of melatonin onset time either by fixed or dynamic threshold approaches. The here-developed hockey-stick algorithm, used as an interactive computer-based approach, fits the evening melatonin profile by a piecewise linear-parabolic function represented as a straight line switching to the branch of a parabola. The switch point is considered to reliably estimate melatonin rise time. We applied the hockey-stick method to 109 half-hourly melatonin profiles to assess the DLMOs and compared these estimates to visual ratings from three experts in the field. The DLMOs of 103 profiles were considered to be clearly quantifiable. The hockey-stick DLMO estimates were on average 4 minutes earlier than the experts' estimates, with a range of -27 to +13 minutes; in 47% of the cases the difference fell within ±5 minutes, in 98% within -20 to +13 minutes. The raters' and hockey-stick estimates showed poor accordance with DLMOs defined by threshold methods. Thus, the hockey-stick algorithm is a reliable objective method to estimate melatonin rise time, which does not depend on a threshold value and is free from errors arising from differences in subjective circadian phase estimates. The method is available as a computerized program that can be easily used in research settings and clinical practice either for salivary or plasma melatonin values. PMID:24224578

  5. Biomechanics of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussion in female collegiate ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Bethany J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Raukar, Neha P; Chu, Jeffrey J; McAllister, Thomas W; Flashman, Laura A; Maerlender, Arthur C; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J

    2015-07-16

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that female athletes may be at a greater risk of concussion than their male counterparts. The purpose of this study was to examine the biomechanics of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussions in a cohort of female collegiate ice hockey players. Instrumented helmets were worn by 58 female ice hockey players from 2 NCAA programs over a three year period. Kinematic measures of single impacts associated with diagnosed concussion and head impact exposure on days with and without diagnosed concussion were evaluated. Nine concussions were diagnosed. Head impact exposure was greater in frequency and magnitude on days of diagnosed concussions than on days without diagnosed concussion for individual athletes. Peak linear accelerations of head impacts associated with diagnosed concussion in this study are substantially lower than those previously reported in male athletes, while peak rotational accelerations are comparable. Further research is warranted to determine the extent to which female athletes' biomechanical tolerance to concussion injuries differs from males. PMID:25913243

  6. Improved shear wave hockey stick transducer measures liquid flow and liquid level

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. C. Lynnworth; L. Steingard; O. K. Khrakovsky; E. J. Machado; C. D. Smart; T. H. Nguyen

    1997-01-01

    A solid waveguide of simple construction, and resembling a thin hockey stick, has been developed as a high-temperature clamp-on buffer to convey shear waves to hot pipes without dispersion, multipath or mode conversion problems. Buffer length of ~250 mm is generally adequate to isolate the piezoelectric shear wave element, whose frequency is typically 0.5, 1 or 2 MHz, from the

  7. Trends in North American newspaper reporting of brain injury in ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Cusimano, Michael D; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

    2013-01-01

    The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998-2000 and 2009-2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to 'perception of risks' and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

  8. An on-ice aerobic maximal multistage shuttle skate test for elite adolescent hockey players.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Léger, L A; Larivière, G; Comtois, A S

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an on-ice test to predict V.O (2max) in ice hockey players. 30 elite hockey players (age 14.7 +/- 1.5 years) participated in this study. The oxygen uptake was assessed at submaximal and maximal velocities during an on-ice intermittent maximal multistage shuttle skate test with a 1-min/0.5-min work/rest ratio. The procedure consisted of skating back and forth on a distance of 45 m (stop and go) while following a pace fixed by an audible signal: initial velocity of 3.5 m . s (-1) with increments of 0.2 m . s (-1) every stage. The skating multistage aerobic test (SMAT) enabled the prediction of the V.O (2max) (ml . kg (-1) . min (-1)) from the maximal velocity (m . s (-1)) by means of the following regression equation: V.O (2max) = 18.07 x (maximal velocity) - 35.596 (r = 0.97, SEE = 3.01). The test-retest correlation was 0.92 and SEE = 0.56 stage (n = 23). Following the SMAT validation, an additional group of 112 elite male (age = 14.2 +/- 1.3 years) and 31 elite female (age = 14.0 +/- 1.2 years) ice hockey players performed both the 20-m shuttle run test and the SMAT, which was more specific and accurate to predict V.O (2max). The overall results suggest that the SMAT is highly specific, valid and reliable for the prediction of V.O (2max) of ice hockey players. PMID:17534782

  9. Electrostimulation Training Effects on the Physical Performance of Ice Hockey Players

    Microsoft Academic Search

    FRANCK BROCHERIE; NICOLAS BABAULT; GILLES COMETTI; NICOLA MAFFIULETTI; JEAN-CLAUDE CHATARD

    2005-01-01

    BROCHERIE, F., N. BABAULT, G. COMETTI, N. MAFFIULETTI, and J.-C. CHATARD. Electrostimulation Training Effects on the Physical Performance of Ice Hockey Players. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 37, No. 3, pp. 455-460, 2005. Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the influence of a short-term electromyostimulation (EMS) training program on the strength of knee extensors, skating, and vertical

  10. An On-Ice Measurement Approach to Analyse the Biomechanics of Ice Hockey Skating

    PubMed Central

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C.; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R.; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice. PMID:25973775

  11. An on-ice measurement approach to analyse the biomechanics of ice hockey skating.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica; LeVangie, Marc C; Stetter, Bernd; Nigg, Sandro R; Nigg, Benno M

    2015-01-01

    Skating is a fundamental movement in ice hockey; however little research has been conducted within the field of hockey skating biomechanics due to the difficulties of on-ice data collection. In this study a novel on-ice measurement approach was tested for reliability, and subsequently implemented to investigate the forward skating technique, as well as technique differences across skill levels. Nine high caliber (High) and nine low caliber (Low) hockey players performed 30 m forward skating trials. A 3D accelerometer was mounted to the right skate for the purpose of stride detection, with the 2nd and 6th strides defined as acceleration and steady-state, respectively. The activity of five lower extremity muscles was recorded using surface electromyography. Biaxial electro-goniometers were used to quantify hip and knee angles, and in-skate plantar force was measured using instrumented insoles. Reliability was assessed with the coefficient of multiple correlation, which demonstrated moderate (r>0.65) to excellent (r>0.95) scores across selected measured variables. Greater plantar-flexor muscle activity and hip extension were evident during acceleration strides, while steady state strides exhibited greater knee extensor activity and hip abduction range of motion (p<0.05). High caliber exhibited greater hip range of motion and forefoot force application (p<0.05). The successful implementation of this on-ice mobile measurement approach offers potential for athlete monitoring, biofeedback and training advice. PMID:25973775

  12. Training-induced changes in drag-flick technique in female field hockey players.

    PubMed

    de Subijana, C L; Gómez, M; Martín-Casado, L; Navarro, E

    2012-12-01

    The penalty corner is one of the most important goal plays in field hockey. The drag-flick is used less by women than men in a penalty corner. The aim of this study was to describe training-induced changes in the drag-flick technique in female field hockey players. Four female players participated in the study. The VICON optoelectronic system (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, UK) measured the kinematic parameters of the drag-flick with six cameras sampling at 250 Hz, prior to and after training. Fifteen shots were captured for each subject. A Wilcoxon test assessed the differences between pre-training and post-training parameters. Two players received specific training twice a week for 8 weeks; the other two players did not train. The proposed drills improved the position of the stick at the beginning of the shot (p < 0.05), the total distance of the shot (p < 0.05) and the rotation radius at ball release (p < 0.01). It was noted that all players had lost speed of the previous run. Further studies should include a larger sample, in order to provide more information on field hockey performance. PMID:24868116

  13. Position of the cervical vertebrae during helmet removal and cervical collar application in football and hockey.

    PubMed

    Prinsen, R K; Syrotuik, D G; Reid, D C

    1995-07-01

    There is lack of consensus among prehospital personnel (athletic therapists, paramedics, sport physiotherapists) concerning specific aspects of initial care and assessment of injured athletes presenting signs and symptoms of a cervical spine injury (CSI). In instances of serious injury involving the head and/or spine, complicated by altered levels of consciousness, protective equipment such as helmets and shoulder pads may provide a hinderance to prompt, safe and efficient management. Specifically, there is disagreement concerning the need or advisability of removing protective head gear, as in the case of football and hockey athletes. Using the technique of fluoroscopy, the cervical spine displacement of 21 male football and hockey athletes was determined while wearing protective shoulder pads and protective head equipment at the following times (a) during helmet removal, (b) during cervical collar application, and (c) as the helmetless head was allowed to rest. Subsequent frame-by-frame video arthokinematic analysis, using computer-assisted digitization, showed significant alterations in the position of adjacent cervical vertebrae during helmet removal, cervical collar application, and head rest. Results suggest that stabilization and transportation of football and hockey athletes with suspected CSI in their respective protective equipment is recommended in order to reduce the risk of further trauma by unnecessary cervical spine motion. PMID:7670970

  14. Heirs to Tom Brown’s School Days: Ralph Henry Barbour, Arthur Stanwood Pier and the Elite School Hockey Story before World War I

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew C. Holman

    2010-01-01

    My CART Summer Grant application proposes to complete the research and writing of a c.35-page scholarly book chapter. This chapter is titled “Heirs to Tom Brown’s School Days: Ralph Henry Barbour, Arthur Stanwood Pier and the Elite School Hockey Story before World War I,” one of five chapters (plus introduction and epilogue) in my book manuscript called The Hockey Boys:

  15. Aerobic capacity is associated with improved repeated shift performance in hockey.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Benjamin J; Fitzgerald, John S; Dietz, Calvin C; Ziegler, Kevin S; Ingraham, Stacy J; Baker, Sarah E; Snyder, Eric M

    2015-06-01

    Peterson, BJ, Fitzgerald, JS, Dietz, CC, Ziegler, KS, Ingraham, SJ, Baker, SE, and Snyder, EM. Aerobic capacity is associated with improved repeated shift performance in hockey. J Strength Cond Res 29(6): 1465-1472, 2015-Current research has found conflicting results regarding the relationship between maximal oxygen uptake ((Equation is included in full-text article.)) and the repeated sprint ability (RSA) of hockey players. The purpose of this study was to use sport-specific testing methods to investigate this relationship. Forty-five (range, 18-24) college hockey players completed a graded exercise test on a skating treadmill to ascertain their (Equation is included in full-text article.). An on-ice repeated shift test was then conducted to evaluate each player's susceptibility to fatigue. First gate, second gate, and total test times were collected on the course and then used to calculate associated decrement scores. Second gate decrement was significantly correlated to (Equation is included in full-text article.)(r = -0.31, p = 0.04). Final stage completed during the graded exercise test was also significantly correlated to second gate and total decrement (r = -0.46, p = 0.001; r = -0.32, p = 0.03). No significant correlation was found between either first gate or total decrement score and (Equation is included in full-text article.)(r = -0.11, p = 0.46; r = -0.17, p = 0.26). The results of this study indicate that RSA is associated with (Equation is included in full-text article.)and final stage completed when using sport-specific testing methods. PMID:25756322

  16. The role of aerobic capacity in high-intensity intermittent efforts in ice-hockey.

    PubMed

    Stanula, A; Roczniok, R; Maszczyk, A; Pietraszewski, P; Zaj?c, A

    2014-08-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine a relationship between aerobic capacity ([Formula: see text]O2max) and fatigue from high-intensity skating in elite male hockey players. The subjects were twenty-four male members of the senior national ice hockey team of Poland who played the position of forward or defence. Each subject completed an on-ice Repeated-Skate Sprint test (RSS) consisting of 6 timed 89-m sprints, with 30 s of rest between subsequent efforts, and an incremental test on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory, the aim of which was to establish their maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2max). The analysis of variance showed that each next repetition in the 6x89 m test was significantly longer than the previous one (F5,138=53.33, p<0.001). An analysis of the fatigue index (FI) calculated from the times recorded for subsequent repetitions showed that the value of the FI increased with subsequent repetitions, reaching its maximum between repetitions 5 and 6 (3.10±1.16%). The total FI was 13.77±1.74%. The coefficient of correlation between [Formula: see text]O2max and the total FI for 6 sprints on the distance of 89 m (r =-0.584) was significant (p=0.003). The variance in the index of players' fatigue in the 6x89 m test accounted for 34% of the variance in [Formula: see text]O2max. The 6x89 m test proposed in this study offers a high test-retest correlation coefficient (r=0.78). Even though the test is criticized for being too exhaustive and thereby for producing highly variable results it still seems that it was well selected for repeated sprint ability testing in hockey players. PMID:25177097

  17. The Impact of a Sports Vision Training Program in Youth Field Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the “VisuLab” as DynamicEye® SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program. PMID:24150071

  18. The impact of a sports vision training program in youth field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the "VisuLab" as DynamicEye(®) SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program. PMID:24150071

  19. International field hockey players perform more high-speed running than national-level counterparts.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Denise H; Cormack, Stuart J; Coutts, Aaron J; Aughey, Robert J

    2012-04-01

    This study compared the activity profile of national and international male field hockey athletes. Sixteen players (mean (±SD) age, stature, and body mass: 22 ± 4 y, 178 ± 8 cm, and 78 ± 9 kg, respectively) competing in the national-level Australian Hockey League (AHL) and 16 players [mean (±SD) age, stature, and body mass: 27 ± 4 y, 179 ± 5 cm, and 77 ± 5 kg, respectively] competing in the international Champions Trophy (CT) tournament participated in this study. Global positioning systems assessed total distance (TD), meters per minute (m·min(-1)), and high-speed running distance (HSR; >4.17 m·s(-1)). Differences in multistage fitness test performance, movement between competition, positions, and halves were assessed using effect size and percent difference ±90% confidence intervals. The CT players had a 10.1% greater multistage fitness test, 13.9% and 42.0% more TD and HSR, respectively, than AHL. During CT, strikers performed 10.1 ± 7.4% less HSR than midfielders and 26.6 ± 8.2% more HSR than defenders. The AHL defenders covered less TD and HSR distance compared with strikers and midfielders (8.1 ± 3.6% and 8.4 ± 2.6%; 36.1 ± 11.1% and 51.5 ± 12.1%, respectively). The AHL strikers, midfielders, and defenders (19.9 ± 8.8%, 32.1 ± 7.9%, and 30.3 ± 10.7%, respectively), all performed less HSR distance than their CT counterparts. Finally, TD decreased from the first to second halves across all positions (6.1-7.5%) in both competitions. International competition increases the running profile of hockey players, with greater HSR at the elite level and positional differences including decreased running during the second half in both competitions. PMID:22446668

  20. Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

  1. Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision and Speeds

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wolfgang Christian

    The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

  2. “I Went to a Fight the Other Night and a Hockey Game Broke Out”

    PubMed Central

    Goldschmied, Nadav; Espindola, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    Background: The current study explored the relationship between fighting behavior and passage of time, across games and seasons, in an attempt to assess if violent behavior in hockey is impulsive or intentional. Hypothesis: Before engaging in fighting behavior, players assess the utility of their actions and thus will fight less when the game is on the line (third period) and when champions are crowned (postseason). Methods: An archival exploration utilizing open access databases from multiple Internet sources. Results: During the 2010-2011 National Hockey League (NHL) season, players were significantly less likely to be involved in a fight as the game was coming to a close than in its early stages. In addition, data from the past 10 NHL seasons showed that players were significantly more violent in preseason games than during the regular season. They were also least likely to be involved in a fight during the postseason. Conclusion: The converging evidence suggests that players take into account the penalties associated with fighting and are less likely to engage in violence when the stakes are high, such as at the end of a game or a season. This implies, in turn, that major acts of aggression in the league are more likely to be calculated rather than impulsive. The findings suggest that a more punitive system should diminish fighting behavior markedly. PMID:24427418

  3. 1 year test-retest reliability of ImPACT in professional ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared; Echemendia, Ruben; Meeuwisse, Willem; Comper, Paul; Sisco, Amber

    2014-01-01

    The Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) battery is widely used to assess neurocognitive outcomes following sports-related concussion. The purpose of this study was to examine the 1 year test-retest reliability of ImPACT in a multilingual sample of professional hockey players. A total of 305 professional hockey players were tested 1 year apart using ImPACT. Reliable change confidence intervals were calculated and test-retest reliability was measured using Pearson and Intraclass correlation coefficients. Results indicated that the 1-year test-retest reliabilities for the Visual Motor and Reaction Time Composites ranged from low to high (.52 to .81). In contrast, 1-year test-retest reliabilities for the Verbal and Visual Memory Composites were low (.22 to .58). The 1-year test-retest results provided mixed support for the use of Visual Motor and Reaction Time Composites in select samples; in contrast, the Verbal and Visual Memory Composites may not be sensitive to clinical change. PMID:24345194

  4. Skating mechanics of change-of-direction manoeuvres in ice hockey players.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Antoine; Turcotte, René A; Pearsall, David J

    2014-11-01

    Ice hockey requires rapid transitions between skating trajectories to effectively navigate about the ice surface. Player performance relates in large part to effective change-of-direction manoeuvres, but little is known about how those skills are performed mechanically and the effect of equipment design on them. The purpose of this study was to observe the kinetics involved in those manoeuvres as well as to compare whether kinetic differences may result between two skate models of varying ankle mobility. Eight subjects with competitive ice hockey playing experience performed rapid lateral (90°) left and right change-of-direction manoeuvres. Kinetic data were collected using force strain gauge transducers on the blade holders of the skates. Significantly greater forces were applied by the outside skate (50-70% body weight, %BW) in comparison to the inside skate (12-24%BW, p < 0.05). Skate model and turn direction had no main effect, though significant mixed interactions between leg side (inside/outside) with skate model or turn direction (p < 0.05) were observed, with a trend for left-turn dominance. This study demonstrates the asymmetric dynamic behaviour inherent in skating change-of-direction tasks. PMID:25419626

  5. The planarity of the stickface motion in the field hockey hit.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Alexander P; Dapena, Jesús

    2012-01-01

    The field hockey hit is an important but poorly understood stroke. In this study, we investigated the planarity of the stickface motion during the downswing to better characterize the kinematics and to assess the suitability of planar pendulum models for simulating the hit. Thirteen experienced female field hockey players were filmed executing hits with a single approach step, and the kinematics of the centre of the stickface were measured. A method was developed for identifying how far back from impact the stickface motion was planar. Orthogonal regression was used to fit least-squares planes to the stickface path during sections of the downswing of varying length, with each section ending at impact. A section was considered planar if the root mean square residual between the stickface path and the fitted plane was less than 0.25% of the distance travelled by the stickface during that period. On average, the stickface motion was planar for the last 83 ± 12% of its downswing path, with the length of the planar section ranging from 1.85 m to 2.70 m. The suitability of a planar model for the stickface motion was supported, but further investigation of the stick and arm kinematics is warranted. PMID:22221186

  6. Practicing field hockey skills along the contextual interference continuum: a comparison of five practice schedules.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Lay, Brendan; Grove, J Robert; Medic, Nikola; Razman, Rizal

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the weakness of the contextual interference (CI) effect within applied settings, Brady, 2008 recommended that the amount of interference be manipulated. This study investigated the effect of five practice schedules on the learning of three field hockey skills. Fifty-five pre-university students performed a total of 90 trials for each skill under blocked, mixed or random practice orders. Results showed a significant time effect with all five practice conditions leading to improvements in acquisition and learning of the skills. No significant differences were found between the groups. The findings of the present study did not support the CI effect and suggest that either blocked, mixed, or random practice schedules can be used effectively when structuring practice for beginners. Key pointsThe contextual interference effect did not surface when using sport skills.There appears to be no difference between blocked and random practice schedules in the learning of field hockey skills.Low (blocked), moderate (mixed) or high (random) interference practice schedules can be used effectively when conducting a multiple skill practice session for beginners. PMID:24149204

  7. Traumatic upper limb injuries during the Men's Field Hockey Junior World Cup 2009.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Swarup

    2013-01-01

    This study was a prospective epidemiological investigation of upper limb injuries during the Men's Field Hockey Junior World Cup 2009. Three hundred twenty-four players were observed in 58 matches of the tournament. Twenty-eight upper limb-related injuries were documented. The injury incidence was 0.48 per match and 19 per 1,000 match hours. Most injuries were due to contact with the ball, and the left hand was the most commonly injured part. Contusion was the most common type of injury. The odds ratio for hand and wrist injuries in players not wearing gloves was 4.01 (95% CI, 0.52-30.62), and the relative risk of hand and wrist injuries in players wearing gloves was 0.26 (95% CI, 0.03-1.92). Male youth hockey players are at a high risk of upper limb, especially hand and wrist, injuries during major international tournaments and that use of protective gloves can provide significant protection against hand and wrist injuries in the sport. PMID:24067118

  8. Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: Evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, B.; Dewailly, E.; Lavoie, R.; Prud'Homme, D.; Allaire, S. (Centre hospitalier de l'Universite Laval, Quebec City (Canada))

    1990-05-01

    We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.

  9. Short- and Long-Term Effects of Supervisory Feedback on the Interaction Patterns of an Intercollegiate Field Hockey Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mancini, Victor H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examination of short- and long-term effects of systematic supervisory feedback on the behaviors of a field hockey coach and her team demonstrated that the feedback model was effective in changing the behaviors of an experienced coach and sustaining those changes over time. (Author/CB)

  10. Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 1: Susceptibility-weighted imaging study in male and female ice hockey players over a single season

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, Karl G.; Pasternak, Ofer; Fredman, Eli; Preciado, Ronny I.; Koerte, Inga K.; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Johnson, Andrew M.; Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Forwell, Lorie; Skopelja, Elaine N.; Shenton, Martha E.; Echlin, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Object Concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), is a commonly occurring sports-related injury, especially in contact sports such as hockey. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), which are small, hypointense lesions on T2*-weighted images, can result from TBI. The authors use susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) to automatically detect small hypointensities that may be subtle signs of chronic and acute damage due to both subconcussive and concussive injury. The goal was to investigate how the burden of these hypointensities change over time, over a playing season, and postconcussion, compared with subjects who did not suffer a medically observed and diagnosed concussion. Methods Images were obtained in 45 university-level adult male and female ice hockey players before and after a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. In addition, 11 subjects (5 men and 6 women) underwent imaging at 72 hours, 2 weeks, and 2 months after concussion. To identify subtle changes in brain tissue and potential CMBs, nonvessel clusters of hypointensities on SWI were automatically identified and a hypointensity burden index was calculated for all subjects at the beginning of the season (BOS) and the end of the season (EOS), in addition to postconcussion time points (where applicable). Results A statistically significant increase in the hypointensity burden, relative to the BOS, was observed for male subjects at the 2-week postconcussion time point. A smaller, nonsignificant rise in the burden for all female subjects was also observed within the same time period. The difference in hypointensity burden was also statistically significant for men with concussions between the 2-week time point and the BOS. There were no significant changes in burden for nonconcussed subjects of either sex between the BOS and EOS time points. However, there was a statistically significant difference in the burden between male and female subjects in the nonconcussed group at both the BOS and EOS time points, with males having a higher burden. Conclusions This method extends the utility of SWI from the enhancement and detection of larger (> 5 mm) CMBs that are often observed in more severe TBI, to concussion in which visual detection of injury is difficult. The hypointensity burden metric proposed here shows statistically significant changes over time in the male subjects. A smaller, nonsignificant increase in the burden metric was observed in the female subjects. PMID:24490839

  11. With an urban renaissance underway, Hartford begins to think about their hockey heritage

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinnell, Max

    2009-05-08

    The Blowhole! Hartford Whalershttp://www.hartfordwhalers.org/Brass Bonanzahttp://www.brassbonanza.com/hcc/The Sports Economisthttp://www.thesportseconomist.com/Grateful Dead Live at Hartford Civic Center on October 10, 1984http://www.archive.org/details/gd1984-10-14.fob.beyerm88.suraci.77990.sbeok.flac16Mark Twain Househttp://www.marktwainhouse.org/Since 1997, the city of Hartford has been searching for some new whalers. Of course, they aren't looking for a few old salts to go out and hunt those gentle beasts of the deep (that's generally prohibited by international treaties and Hartford is more than a harpoon toss from the Atlantic Ocean), but rather an intrepid band of die-hard hockey fans are searching for the former NHL team known as the Hartford Whalers. This industrial town and noted insurance capital has been without major league hockey since the Hartford Whalers pulled up stakes and moved to the generally ice-free city of Raleigh. Interestingly enough, the Hartford Whalers Booster Club keeps the hockey home fires burning by hosting various events, and they have recently created an online petition to build support for a new NHL arena in Hartford. During the mid-1990s there was a spate of NHL team relocations as the Quebec Nordiques decamped to Colorado and the Winnipeg Jets became the Phoenix Coyotes. Whalers fans remain dedicated to the spirit and legacy of the team, and long-time fan Marty Evtushek said it best when he noted recently that, "They were more rooted in the community. In New York, they were in their high-rises and didn't bother with the average fans. The Whalers were our neighbors." The first link will take users to an article from the New York Times about the hockey lobbying efforts of the Hartford Whalers Boosters Club. Moving on, the second link leads to a site that provides users with a slew of information on the history of the Whalers, complete with rosters, uniform information, and so on. The third link is an audio trove of Whalers-related sounds, including the final outgoing message from the team store answering machine. Most people will also want to listen to "Brass Bonanza" here, the Whalers' Herb Alpert-like theme song. The fourth link will whisk users away to an excellent weblog on sports economics written by a team of economists from schools such as College of the Holy Cross and Clemson University. The fifth link leads to a much celebrated Grateful Dead concert (courtesy of the Internet Archive) that took place at the former home of the Whalers, the Hartford Civic Arena. Finally, the sixth link leads to the homepage of the Mark Twain House. Twain lived in Hartford for seventeen years, and this site provides a host of material on Twain's life and this rather impressive building.

  12. Physical and performance differences among forwards, defensemen, and goalies in elite women's ice hockey.

    PubMed

    Geithner, Christina A; Lee, Amanda M; Bracko, Michael R

    2006-08-01

    Positional differences have been examined in women's basketball, field hockey, netball, and volleyball, but not in elite women's ice hockey. Our purpose was to describe and compare physical, fitness, and skating performance characteristics of forwards (F), defensemen (D), and goalies (G). Subjects were 112 University of Alberta women players (21.4 +/- 2.9 years of age). A full anthropometric battery was conducted on each player. Heath-Carter anthropometric somatotypes were calculated. Percent body fat (%fat) was estimated from both general and population-specific equations. Subjects performed off-ice fitness tests (vertical jump, 40-yd dash, Leger test for predicting .V(O2)max) and on-ice fitness (Modified 3-Repeat Sprint Skate Test-MRSS, blood lactate after sprint test) and skating performance tests (6.10-m acceleration test, Cornering S-Turn Agility Test). Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses of variance were run using SPSS (Version 10.0) for the MacIntosh, with a significance level set a priori at p < 0.05. Significant positional differences were found for bicristal breadths (D > G, F > G); relaxed arm circumference (D > F, G > F); supraspinale and biceps skinfolds (G > D, G > F); and endomorphy (G > F). Significant differences among positions were also found for the MRSS (G > D > F) and agility tests (G > D, G > F). D tended to have the most robust build overall. F were leaner than D and G, and their smaller relaxed arm circumference measurements most likely reflect less subcutaneous fat on the upper arm. F had greater anaerobic power than D, followed by G, and they tended to have greater aerobic capacity. F and D were more agile than G. Performance demands appear to be position specific. F need to be the most versatile and fit because of a greater amount and variety of work performed both during practices and games; their required degrees of versatility and fitness are followed by those required of D and G. PMID:16977704

  13. Examining Sport Concussion Assessment Tool ratings for male and female youth hockey players with and without a history of concussion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kathryn J Schneider; Carolyn A Emery; Jian Kang; Geoff M Schneider; Willem H Meeuwisse

    2010-01-01

    BackgroundConcussion is one of the most commonly occurring injuries in sport today. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) is a commonly used paper neurocognitive tool. To date, little is known about SCAT baseline normative values in youth athletes.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to determine normative values on the SCAT for male and female youth hockey players.MethodsThis is a secondary

  14. A Comparison of Somatic Variables of Elite Ice Hockey Players from the Czech ELH and Russian KHL.

    PubMed

    Kutá?, Petr; Sigmund, Martin

    2015-03-29

    The goals of this study were to evaluate the basic morphological variables of contemporary elite ice hockey players, compare the parameters of players in the top Russian ice hockey league (KHL) with those of the top Czech ice hockey league (ELH), and to evaluate the parameters of players according to their position in the game. The research participants included 30 KHL players (mean age: 27.1 ± 5.1 years) and 25 ELH players (mean age: 26.4 ± 5.8 years). We determined body height, body mass, and body composition (body fat, fat-free mass, segmental fat analysis). All measurements were performed at the end of preseason training. The KHL players had the following anthropometric characteristics: body height 182.97 ± 5.61 cm (forward) and 185.72 ± 3.57 cm (defenseman), body mass 89.70 ± 5.28 kg (forward) and 92.52 ± 4.01 kg (defenseman), body fat 10.76 ± 0.63 kg (forward) and 11.10 ± 0.48 kg (defenseman), fat-free mass 78.94 ± 4.65 kg (forward) and 81.42 ± 3.52 kg (defenseman). The values for ELH players were as follows: body height 182.06 ± 5.93 cm (forward) and 185.88 ± 7.13 cm (defenseman), body mass 88.47 ± 7.06 kg (forward) and 89.36 ± 10.91 kg (defenseman), body fat 12.57 ± 2.89 kg (forward) and 11.91 ± 3.10 kg (defenseman), fat-free mass 75.93 ± 6.54 kg (forward) and 77.46 ± 7.89 kg (defenseman). The results indicate that it is beneficial to ice hockey players to have increased body mass and lower body fat, which leads to higher muscle mass, thus enabling a player to perform at the highest level and meet the specific challenges of the game. PMID:25949747

  15. Strength and conditioning practices of National Hockey League strength and conditioning coaches.

    PubMed

    Ebben, William P; Carroll, Ryan M; Simenz, Christopher J

    2004-11-01

    This study describes the results of a survey of the practices of National Hockey League strength and conditioning (NHL S&C) coaches. The response rate was 76.6% (23 of 30). This survey examines (a) background information, (b) physical testing, (c) flexibility development, (d) speed development, (e) plyometrics, (f) strength/power development, (g) unique aspects, and (h) comments. Results indicate, in part, that coaches assess an average of 7.2 parameters of fitness, with tests of strength and power being the most common. All coaches used a variety of flexibility-development strategies. Results reveal that 21 of 23 (91.3%) of NHL S&C coaches follow a periodization model (PM). Of the coaches who follow a PM, 21 of 21 (100%) indicated that their athletes used Olympic-style lifts, and 21 of 21 coaches (100%) trained athletes with plyometric exercises. For those who used plyometrics with their athletes, 17 of 21 (80.1%) reported no plyometric-related injuries in the past year. Coaches who report they did not follow a PM also did not use Olympic-style lifts, plyometrics, or speed development strategies, such as assisted, resisted, or interval training, with their athletes. Finally, coaches reported that the squat and their variations, as well at the Olympic-style lifts and its variations, were most frequently used with their athletes. The survey serves as a review, as well as a source of applied information and new ideas. PMID:15574099

  16. Coordination profiles of the expert field hockey drive according to field roles.

    PubMed

    Brétigny, P; Leroy, D; Button, C; Chollet, D; Seifert, L

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine coordination profiles for the field hockey drive. Nine elite female players performed five drives each. They were asked to primarily maximize ball placement accuracy, and secondly to drive with high velocity. An optical motion capture system recorded the displacement of six markers on the joints of the players' arms as they performed the drives, and a radar gun measured the ball velocity after impact. Spatial, temporal, and velocity variables were then established. Discrete relative phases were also established at ball impact to examine medio-lateral and proximo-distal upper-arms coordination. The high standard deviation values in joint kinematics were indicative of inter-individual variability, i.e. several drive solutions. Cluster analysis was thus used and two profiles among the players were identified. For the two profiles, the global coordination pattern of movement (upper-arm coordination) was in-phase for the right arm, and out-of-phase for the left lead arm, suggesting a segmental sequencing. However, differences were noted on local kinematic parameters which led to the following categorization: the 'strong group' for defenders and the 'temporal-effectiveness group' for midfielders and forwards. The results support the value of individual analysis to better interpret and contrast the distinct roles of expert players. PMID:22303785

  17. The measurement of bound and free moisture in organic materials by microwave methods. [Explosives TATB and LX17

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. W. Pyper; H. M. Buettner; C. J. Cerjan; J. S. Hallam; R. J. King

    1984-01-01

    Bound and free moisture can be classified by energetic, structural, or operational schemes. We discuss these schemes and consider four methods (dynamic dielectric thermal analysis, microwave attenuation analysis, near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy) that have been suggested for distinguishing between bound and free moisture in organic materials. This report describes the microwave attenuation method. The

  18. The measurement of bound and free moisture in organic materials by microwave methods. [Explosives TATB and LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Pyper, J.W.; Buettner, H.M.; Cerjan, C.J.; Hallam, J.S.; King, R.J.

    1984-11-01

    Bound and free moisture can be classified by energetic, structural, or operational schemes. We discuss these schemes and consider four methods (dynamic dielectric thermal analysis, microwave attenuation analysis, near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy) that have been suggested for distinguishing between bound and free moisture in organic materials. This report describes the microwave attenuation method. The theoretical basis for using microwaves for this purpose is developed. We show that microwave measurements can be used to measure the moisture in triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) using a microwave network analyzer down to 0.04% H/sub 2/O. The design of the apparatus necessary to extend these measurements to lower moisture content limits is mentioned. As part of this study, we measured the dielectric properties of TATB for the first time. We found that the dielectric constant epsilon' for TATB was 4.00 +- 0.01.

  19. Head Impact Exposure in Male and Female Collegiate Ice Hockey Players

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Bethany J.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Flashman, Laura A.; Maerlender, Arthur C.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify head impact exposure (frequency, location and magnitude of head impacts) for individual male and female collegiate ice hockey players and to investigate differences in exposure by sex, player position, session type, and team. Ninety-nine (41 male, 58 female) players were enrolled and 37,411 impacts were recorded over three seasons. Frequency of impacts varied significantly by sex (males: 287 per season, females: 170, p<0.001) and helmet impact location (p<0.001), but not by player position (p=0.088). Head impact frequency also varied by session type; both male and female players sustained more impacts in games than in practices (p<0.001), however the magnitude of impacts did not differ between session types. There was no difference in 95th percentile peak linear acceleration between sexes (males: 41.6g, females: 40.8g), but 95th percentile peak rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were greater for males than females (4424, 3409 rad/s2, and 25.6, 22.3, respectively). Impacts to the back of the helmet resulted in the greatest 95th percentile peak linear accelerations for males (45.2g) and females (50.4g), while impacts to the side and back of the head were associated with the greatest 95th percentile peak rotational accelerations (males: 4719, 4256 rad/sec2, females: 3567, 3784 rad/sec2 respectively). It has been proposed that reducing an individual’s head impact exposure is a practical approach for reducing the risk of brain injuries. Strategies to decrease an individual athlete’s exposure need to be sport and gender specific, with considerations for team and session type. PMID:24210478

  20. Muscle oxygen changes following Sprint Interval Cycling training in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ben; Hamilton, David K; Cooper, Chris E

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT) on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT). Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP) and a control group (CON). The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2), tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb), total tissue haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation (TSI %) were taken. In the EXP group (5.34 ± 0.14 to 5.50 ± 0.14 m.s(-1)) but not the CON group (pre = 5.37 ± 0.27 to 5.39 ± 0.30 m.s(-1)) significant changes were seen in the 30-15 IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ?TSI (-7.59 ± 0.91 to -12.16 ± 2.70%); ?HHb+HMb (35.68 ± 6.67 to 69.44 ± 26.48 ?M.cm); and ?HbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29 ± 13.82 to -109.36 ± 22.61 ?M.cm). No significant differences were seen in ?tHb (-45.81 ± 15.23 to -42.93 ± 16.24). NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes. PMID:25807517

  1. Analysis of international competition and training in men's field hockey by global positioning system and inertial sensor technology.

    PubMed

    White, Andrew D; MacFarlane, Niall G

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the relative demands of elite field hockey training and competition to determine whether familiar exercise prescription strategies provide an appropriate training stimulus. Sixteen elite male field hockey players (age, 25 ± 4 years; body mass, 70.9 ± 6.6 kg; and maximal oxygen consumption, 61.0 ± 2.1 ml·kg·min [mean ± SD]) participated in the study. Seventy-five elite level competition and 37 training analyses from 8 games and 4 training sessions were obtained. Training duration was longer than competition and covered a greater total distance (109 ± 2.5 vs. 74 ± 0.3 minutes and 7318 ± 221 vs. 5868 ± 75 m; p < 0.001 in both). The distance covered sprinting and running at high intensity was not different between training and competition (114 ± 6 vs. 116 ± 9 m when sprinting and 457 ± 6 vs. 448 ± 7 m for high-intensity running). More high-intensity accelerations were performed during training than in competition (37 ± 3 vs. 20 ± 2). Despite having lower predicted aerobic capacity and covering less distance in competition than in some previous studies, these data support the suggestion that it is high-intensity activity that differentiates international level competition and further suggests that international players can replicate the intensity of competition during small-sided games. PMID:24978837

  2. Kinematic adaptations in sprint acceleration performances without and with the constraint of holding a field hockey stick.

    PubMed

    Wdowski, Maximilian M; Gittoes, Marianne J R

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the technique adaptations made when performing sprint-based tasks without (free condition) and with (constrained condition) the constraints of carrying a field hockey stick. Three free and three constrained maximal sprint accelerations were performed by 18 experienced university male field hockey players (age = 20 +/- 1 years, body mass = 73.3 +/- 7.1 kg, and stature = 1.78 +/- 0.05 m). An automatic motion analysis system tracked sagittal plane active marker locations (200 Hz). M sprint velocity during the 18-22 m (free: 8.03 +/- 0.43 m/s; constrained: 7.93 +/- 0.36 m/s) interval was significantly (p = 0.03) different between free and constrained conditions. While the M stride length and stride frequency was similar between free and constrained conditions in the 2-13 m capture volume, the free condition elicited a 0.10 m/s faster (p = 0.03) stride velocity. Further significant differences were found between free and constrained kinematic profiles (p < or = 0.05) for the hip angular velocity at touchdown during the 2-12 m interval of the sprints and in the overall sprint technique coordination between free and constrained conditions. Performance and technique adaptations indicated that sprint-training protocols for field sports should integrate specific equipment constraints to ensure explicit replication of the mechanical demands of the skills underpinning superior performance. PMID:23898687

  3. Team Flag Football Golf Indoor Soccer Bowling Dodgeball FALL TOTAL Floor Hockey Basketball Outdoor Soccer Softball Kickball Spring Total Year End Total The Hot Mines Chicks 20 5 10 20 30 85 30 15 25 10 10 90 175

    E-print Network

    Team Flag Football Golf Indoor Soccer Bowling Dodgeball FALL TOTAL Floor Hockey Basketball Outdoor Soccer Softball Kickball Spring Total Year End Total The Hot Mines Chicks 20 5 10 20 30 85 30 15 25 10 10

  4. Relationship of off-ice and on-ice performance measures in high school male hockey players.

    PubMed

    Krause, David A; Smith, Aynsley M; Holmes, Laura C; Klebe, Corrine R; Lee, Jennifer B; Lundquist, Kimberly M; Eischen, Joseph J; Hollman, John H

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of off-ice performance measures with on-ice turning, crossover, and forward skating performance in high school male hockey players. Thirty-eight players aged 15-18 (mean age ± SD: 16.4 ± 1.1 years; height: 177.9 ± 6.8 cm; weight: 72.5 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this study. On-ice tests included a forward sprint, short radius turns, and crossover turns. Off-ice tests included a 40-yd sprint, vertical jumps, horizontal jumps, and a dynamic balance test using a Y balance testing device. Five off-ice variables correlated with all on-ice performance measures. These variables included the 40-yd sprint, lateral bound right to left limb, double limb horizontal hop, balance on right in posterolateral direction, and composite balance performance on the right. Hierachical regression demonstrated that off-ice sprint time was most predictive of on-ice skating performance, accounting for 65.4% of the variability in forward skate time, 45.0% of the variability in left short radius time, 21.8% of the variance in right short radius time, 36.2% of the variance in left crossover time, and 30.8% of the variability in right crossover time. When using off-ice tests to evaluate hockey players, the 40-yd sprint is the best predictor of skating performance. Based on our regression equation, for every 1-second difference in the 40-yd sprint time, there will be approximately a 0.6-second difference in the 34.5-m on-ice sprint. The 40-yd sprint predicts forward skating performance and to a lesser degree; it also predicts crossover and tuning performance. PMID:22395275

  5. Are pre-season reports of neck pain, dizziness and\\/or headaches risk factors for concussion in male youth ice hockey players?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K Schneider; C Emery; J Kang; G Schneider; W Meeuwisse

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundConcussion is a commonly encountered injury associated with potential long-term sequelae. No previous studies have evaluated dizziness, neck pain and headache as potential risk factors for concussion.ObjectiveThe objective of this study is to determine the risk of concussion in male youth hockey players with preseason reports of neck pain, headaches and dizziness.DesignThis study is a secondary data analysis of a

  6. The role of visual perception measures used in sports vision programmes in predicting actual game performance in Division I collegiate hockey players.

    PubMed

    Poltavski, Dmitri; Biberdorf, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the growing field of sports vision little is still known about unique attributes of visual processing in ice hockey and what role visual processing plays in the overall athlete's performance. In the present study we evaluated whether visual, perceptual and cognitive/motor variables collected using the Nike SPARQ Sensory Training Station have significant relevance to the real game statistics of 38 Division I collegiate male and female hockey players. The results demonstrated that 69% of variance in the goals made by forwards in 2011-2013 could be predicted by their faster reaction time to a visual stimulus, better visual memory, better visual discrimination and a faster ability to shift focus between near and far objects. Approximately 33% of variance in game points was significantly related to better discrimination among competing visual stimuli. In addition, reaction time to a visual stimulus as well as stereoptic quickness significantly accounted for 24% of variance in the mean duration of the player's penalty time. This is one of the first studies to show that some of the visual skills that state-of-the-art generalised sports vision programmes are purported to target may indeed be important for hockey players' actual performance on the ice. PMID:25142869

  7. Impact of maximum speed on sprint performance during high-level youth female field hockey matches: female athletes in motion (FAiM) study.

    PubMed

    Vescovi, Jason D

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of maximum sprint speed on peak and mean sprint speed during youth female field hockey matches. Two high-level female field hockey teams (U-17, n = 24, and U-21, n = 20) were monitored during a 4-game international test series using global position system technology and tested for maximum sprint speed. Dependent variables were compared using a 3-factor ANOVA (age group, position, and speed classification); effect sizes (Cohen d) and confidence limits were also calculated. Maximum sprint speed was similar between age groups and positions, with faster players having greater speed than slower players (29.3 ± 0.4 vs 27.2 ± 1.1 km/h). Overall, peak match speed in youth female field hockey players reaches approximately 90% of maximum sprint speed. Absolute peak match speed and mean sprint speed during matches were similar among the age groups (except match 1) and positions (except match 2); however, peak match speed was greater for faster players in matches 3 and 4. No differences were observed in the relative proportion for mean sprint speeds for age groups or positions, but slower players consistently displayed similar relative mean sprint speeds by using a greater proportion of their maximum sprint speed. PMID:24152425

  8. Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Women's Field Hockey Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988–1989 Through 2002–2003

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Randall; Hootman, Jennifer M; Agel, Julie; Vela, Luzita; Marshall, Stephen W; Messina, Renee

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review 15 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for women's field hockey and identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: Field hockey is one of the most popular sports worldwide and is growing in participation in the United States, particularly among women. From 1988–1989 to 2002–2003, participation in NCAA women's field hockey increased 12%, with the largest growth among Division III programs. In 2002– 2003, 253 colleges offered women's field hockey and 5385 women participated. Main Results: Game injury rates showed a significant average annual 2.5% decline over 15 years, most likely fueled by drops in ankle ligament sprain, knee internal derangement, and finger fracture injuries. Despite this, ankle ligament sprains were common (13.7% of game and 15.0% of practice injuries) and a frequent cause of severe injuries (resulting in 10+ days of time-loss activity). Concussion and head laceration injuries increased over this same time, and the risk of sustaining a concussion in a game was 6 times higher than the risk of sustaining one during practice. Overall, injury rates were twice as high in games as in practices (7.87 versus 3.70 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures, rate ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval = 2.0, 2.3). Most head/neck/face (71%) and hand/finger/thumb (68%) injuries occurred when the player was near the goal or within the 25-yd line and were caused by contact with the stick or ball (greater than 77% for both body sites); for 34% of head/neck/ face injuries, a penalty was called on the play. Recommendations: Equipment (requiring helmets and padded gloves) and rule changes (to decrease field congestion near the goal) as well as evidence-based injury prevention interventions (eg, prophylactic ankle taping/bracing, neuromuscular balance exercise programs) may be viable prevention initiatives for reducing injury rates in women's collegiate field hockey players. PMID:17710169

  9. Generic Hockey-Stick Model for Estimating Benchmark Dose and Potency: Performance Relative to BMDS and Application to Anthraquinone

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, Kenneth T.

    2010-01-01

    Benchmark Dose Model software (BMDS), developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, involves a growing suite of models and decision rules now widely applied to assess noncancer and cancer risk, yet its statistical performance has never been examined systematically. As typically applied, BMDS also ignores the possibility of reduced risk at low doses (“hormesis”). A simpler, proposed Generic Hockey-Stick (GHS) model also estimates benchmark dose and potency, and additionally characterizes and tests objectively for hormetic trend. Using 100 simulated dichotomous-data sets (5 dose groups, 50 animals/group), sampled from each of seven risk functions, GHS estimators performed about as well or better than BMDS estimators, and a surprising observation was that BMDS mis-specified all of six non-hormetic sampled risk functions most or all of the time. When applied to data on rodent tumors induced by the genotoxic chemical carcinogen anthraquinone (AQ), the GHS model yielded significantly negative estimates of net potency exhibited by the combined rodent data, suggesting that—consistent with the anti-leukemogenic properties of AQ and structurally similar quinones—environmental AQ exposures do not likely increase net cancer risk. In addition to its simplicity and flexibility, the GHS approach offers a unified, consistent approach to quantifying environmental chemical risk. PMID:21731536

  10. A simple video-based timing system for on-ice team testing in ice hockey: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Larson, David P; Noonan, Benjamin C

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate a newly developed on-ice timing system for team evaluation in the sport of ice hockey. We hypothesized that this new, simple, inexpensive, timing system would prove to be highly accurate and reliable. Six adult subjects (age 30.4 ± 6.2 years) performed on ice tests of acceleration and conditioning. The performance times of the subjects were recorded using a handheld stopwatch, photocell, and high-speed (240 frames per second) video. These results were then compared to allow for accuracy calculations of the stopwatch and video as compared with filtered photocell timing that was used as the "gold standard." Accuracy was evaluated using maximal differences, typical error/coefficient of variation (CV), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the timing methods. The reliability of the video method was evaluated using the same variables in a test-retest analysis both within and between evaluators. The video timing method proved to be both highly accurate (ICC: 0.96-0.99 and CV: 0.1-0.6% as compared with the photocell method) and reliable (ICC and CV within and between evaluators: 0.99 and 0.08%, respectively). This video-based timing method provides a very rapid means of collecting a high volume of very accurate and reliable on-ice measures of skating speed and conditioning, and can easily be adapted to other testing surfaces and parameters. PMID:24936905

  11. The social support experiences of major junior ice hockey players in a physically removed region of Canada.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Timothy V; Schinke, Robert J; Hancock, David J; Dubuc, Nicole G

    2007-01-01

    The present report from a larger project overviews the sources and types of social support resourced by 10 major junior athletes while they performed out of one physically removed Canadian region. Retrospective interviews and content analysis were conducted during three stages (3, 3, and 4 respondents). The data were segmented into meaning units, coded into a hierarchy of themes, and verified by each respondent and an expert panel (former athlete, coach, parent of former athlete). The respondents sought out three types of social support from four different sources (providers) that were adapted to their remote location, including teachers and general community support. Implications are considered in terms of applied research and practice with aspiring adolescent athletes located in removed locations. Key pointsThe study extends knowledge about the sources and types of social support resourced by elite major junior ice hockey players located in one physically removed Canadian region.From the respondents' views, three types of social support were sought from four different sources.Implications are considered in terms of sport psychology research and applied practice. PMID:24149469

  12. Sediment quality thresholds: Estimates from hockey stick regression of liver lesion prevalence in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus)

    SciTech Connect

    Horness, B.H.; Lomax, D.P.; Johnson, L.L.; Myers, M.S.; Pierce, S.M.; Collier, T.K. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Comprehensive, integrative assessments of coastal sediment quality are best effected by using large, diverse data sets that include measures of biological dysfunction observed in association with chronic exposure to sediment contaminants. Under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program, the National Benthic Surveillance Project accumulated a database of synoptic sediment contaminant concentrations and indices of biological effects that were measured in indigenous animals collected during field surveys conducted from 1984 to 1994. This compilation of data provided the opportunity to develop a new approach for determining sediment quality criteria to add to the current repertoire of environmental assessment tools. Using a two-segment hockey stick regression, statistically significant chemical thresholds of biological effects were estimated for hepatic lesion prevalences in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus, formerly Parophrys vetulus) in relation to sediment concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These threshold estimates are notably lower than many of those reported for other techniques. Application of this relatively simple dose-response model to subacute, chronic effects that are involved in pepatocarcinogenesis and associated with sediment toxicant content (1) reflects the link between toxicopathic disease progression and conditions observed in benthic fish exposed to contaminants and (2) provides endpoints for assessing sediment quality contaminant concentrations that are not necessarily acutely fatal but may have long-term health implications for populations that are chronically exposed.

  13. The effect of unilateral hockey bag carriage on the muscle activities of the trunk and lower limb of young healthy males during gait.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Liam Patrick; Li, Jing Xian

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the trunk and lower limb muscle activity of 15 males during unilateral hockey bag carriage of 10%, 20%, and 30% of one's body weight (BW) compared with without a load during walking. The electromyography (EMG) activities of the left and right erector spinae, rectus abdominis, gluteus maximus, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and the medial gastrocnemius were studied. A 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine the differences between the load weight and muscle side. Results showed significant increase in peak EMG and iEMG in the carrying side vastus medialis, rectus abdominis, semitendinosus, and gastrocnemii (p < 0.05) at the 30% BW load. The noncarrying side showed a greater peak EMG in the semitendinosus and rectus femoris at the 30% BW load when compared with the carrying side (p < 0.05). It was concluded that unilateral hockey bag carriage is similar to both backpack and side-pack carriage styles. PMID:24392769

  14. Effect of hockey-stick-shaped molecules on the critical behavior at the nematic to isotropic and smectic-A to nematic phase transitions in octylcyanobiphenyl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Das, Malay Kumar

    2015-03-01

    In the field of soft matter research, the characteristic behavior of both nematic-isotropic (N -I ) and smectic-A nematic (Sm -A N ) phase transitions has gained considerable attention due to their several attractive features. In this work, a high-resolution measurement of optical birefringence (? n ) has been performed to probe the critical behavior at the N -I and Sm -A N phase transitions in a binary system comprising the rodlike octylcyanobiphenyl and a laterally methyl substituted hockey-stick-shaped mesogen, 4-(3-n -decyloxy-2-methyl-phenyliminomethyl)phenyl 4-n -dodecyloxycinnamate. For the investigated mixtures, the critical exponent ? related to the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the N -I phase transition has come out to be in good conformity with the tricritical hypothesis. Moreover, the yielded effective critical exponents (?', ?', ?') characterizing the critical fluctuation near the Sm -A N phase transition have appeared to be nonuniversal in nature. With increasing hockey-stick-shaped dopant concentration, the Sm -A N phase transition demonstrates a strong tendency to be driven towards a first-order nature. Such a behavior has been accounted for by considering a modification of the effective intermolecular interactions and hence the related coupling between the nematic and smectic order parameters, caused by the introduction of the angular mesogenic molecules.

  15. Effect of hockey-stick-shaped molecules on the critical behavior at the nematic to isotropic and smectic-A to nematic phase transitions in octylcyanobiphenyl.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Das, Malay Kumar

    2015-03-01

    In the field of soft matter research, the characteristic behavior of both nematic-isotropic (N-I) and smectic-A nematic(Sm-A N) phase transitions has gained considerable attention due to their several attractive features. In this work, a high-resolution measurement of optical birefringence (?n) has been performed to probe the critical behavior at the N-I and Sm-A N phase transitions in a binary system comprising the rodlike octylcyanobiphenyl and a laterally methyl substituted hockey-stick-shaped mesogen, 4-(3-n-decyloxy-2-methyl-phenyliminomethyl)phenyl 4-n-dodecyloxycinnamate. For the investigated mixtures, the critical exponent ? related to the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the N-I phase transition has come out to be in good conformity with the tricritical hypothesis. Moreover, the yielded effective critical exponents (?', ?', ?') characterizing the critical fluctuation near the Sm-A N phase transition have appeared to be nonuniversal in nature. With increasing hockey-stick-shaped dopant concentration, the Sm-A N phase transition demonstrates a strong tendency to be driven towards a first-order nature. Such a behavior has been accounted for by considering a modification of the effective intermolecular interactions and hence the related coupling between the nematic and smectic order parameters, caused by the introduction of the angular mesogenic molecules. PMID:25871134

  16. The Experience Exchange n Ew vEnTu r E com p ETiTion wom En's f i Eld hockEy p l ay-of f r u n m ba i s l au dEd

    E-print Network

    Blais, Brian

    to the National Technical Information Service advisory board. 26 sPotlight on: athletics Women's field hockey consistently encouraged me to strive to better myself. As a Navy ensign and again as a U.S. Congressman, senior

  17. The Haptic Tabletop Puck: tactile feedback for interactive tabletops

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicolai Marquardt; Miguel A. Nacenta; James E. Young; Sheelagh Carpendale; Saul Greenberg; Ehud Sharlin

    2009-01-01

    In everyday life, our interactions with objects on real tables include how our fingertips feel those objects. In comparison, current digital interactive tables present a uniform touch surface that feels the same, regardless of what it presents visually. In this paper, we explore how tactile interaction can be used with digital tabletop surfaces. We present a simple and inexpensive device

  18. Case Study: Ice Hockey Injury

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Philip J Stephens (Villanova University Biology)

    2004-04-19

    This is a case study for high school and/or undergraduate students in anatomy and physiology. In particular this case study explores the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Users of the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science will be required to register (free) to gain access to the answer key (and must be of teaching status to receive the key). Included in the resource are the case overview, objectives, case study, teaching notes and answer key.

  19. Safety Tips: Hockey (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... flexors. Back Continue Keeping it Safe During a Game There's a reason why tripping, hooking, slashing, high- ... by theirs. Other penalties designed to keep the game safe involve roughing, boarding, and checking from behind. ...

  20. Response of human and anthropometric model skulls to impact loading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Townsend; D. McCammond; G. Lie

    1975-01-01

    Experimental strain\\/time results are presented for unprotected and protected human and anthropometric model skulls under impact\\u000a loading. Using a hockey puck as the projectile, the purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of helmet suspensions\\u000a and the likelihood of skull fractures with varying conditions of head protection. An experimental arrangement is described,\\u000a and the strain-gauge technique yields reliable,

  1. The 'Patient experience' revolution.

    PubMed

    Hooten, Doug; Zavadsky, Matt

    2014-02-01

    We're arguably at the most pivotal time in our young profession. The ACA has provided EMS an unprecedented opportunity to become a part of the healthcare system, a move that many of us have dreamed about for decades. We need to pay attention to the changing dynamics of the environment in which we operate. The factors that currently impact hospitals, doctors and other healthcare providers will also impact us sooner than we think. Take the time to help shape our future and how we participate in this new healthcare system. It's time to focus on the patient and the patient's experience with our service. Wayne Gretzky said two important things during an interview when he was asked what makes him such a great hockey player. One was, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." The other was, "A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been." Our advice to you is to go ahead, take the shot, get ahead of the other team and focus on improved customer satisfaction sooner rather than later. PMID:24660359

  2. The influence of impact object characteristics on impact force and force absorption by mouthguard material.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomotaka; Ishigami, Keiichi; Shintaro, Kawamura; Nakajima, Kazunori; Shimada, Atsushi; Regner, Connell Wayne

    2004-02-01

    Most impact force and impact energy absorption tests for mouthguards have used a steel ball in a drop-ball or the pendulum device. However, in reality most sports-related trauma is caused by objects other than the steel ball, e.g. various sized balls, hockey puck, or bat or stick. Also, the elasticity, the velocity and the mass of the object could change the degree and the extent of injuries. In this study, we attempted to measure the impact force from actual sports equipment in order to clarify the exact mechanism of dental-related sports injuries and the protective effects of mouthguards. The present study was conducted using the pendulum impact device and load cell. Impact objects were removable. Seven mobile impact objects were selected for testing: a steel ball, baseball, softball, field hockey ball, ice hockey puck, cricket ball, and wooden baseball bat. The mouthguard material used in this study was a 3-mm-thick Drufosoft (Dreve-Dentamid GmbH, Unna, Germany), and test samples were made of the one-layer type. The peak transmitted forces without mouthguard ranged from the smallest (ice hockey stick, 46.9 kgf) to the biggest (steel ball, 481.6 kgf). The peak transmitted forces were smaller when the mouthguard was attached than without it for all impact materials but the effect was significantly influenced by the object type. The steel ball showed the biggest (62.1%) absorption ability while the wooden bat showed the second biggest (38.3%). The other balls or the puck showed from 0.6 to 6.0% absorbency. These results show that it is important to test the effectiveness of mouthguards on specific types of sports equipment. In future, we may select different materials and mouthguard designs suitable for specific sports. PMID:14998410

  3. The uncertain hockey stick Douglas Nychka

    E-print Network

    Nychka, Douglas

    temperatures An ensemble member with 10 year running mean q q q q qq q q q q q q q q q q q q q q qq qq q q q q q q q q qq q q q qq q q q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q qq q qq qq q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q

  4. Ojibway Hockey CD ROM in the Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Shirley I.

    A shortage of instructional materials and activities is a continual problem for Native language courses, as is making the material relevant to students. The Native way of teaching and learning has always been to have fun. In response to these concerns, a group of language experts at Trent University (Ontario) are developing a CD-ROM for high…

  5. ReviewsGCSE Book Review: Modular Science for AQA GCSE Book Review: Modular Science for Edexcel GCSE Book Review: Revise for GCSE Science (Edexcel Modular Foundation and Higher) GCSE Book Review: AQA GCSE Physics, AQA GCSE Physics Additions Book Review: Studying Maths and its Applications Book Review: Medical Physics, 2nd edition Book Review: The Physics of Hockey Book Review: Nine Crazy Ideas In Science Book Review: Light and Dark Talking Point: The Skeptical Environmentalist Places To Visit: Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Powys Resources: Sources of Energy Web Watch: Terence, this is stupid stuff...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    GCSE BOOK REVIEWS (162) Modular Science for AQA Modular Science for Edexcel Revise for GCSE Science (Edexcel Modular Foundation and Higher) AQA GCSE Physics, AQA GCSE Physics Additions BOOK REVIEWS (166) Studying Maths and its Applications Medical Physics, 2nd edition The Physics of Hockey Nine Crazy Ideas In Science Light and Dark TALKING POINT (169) The Skeptical Environmentalist PLACES TO VISIT (170) Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Powys RESOURCES (172) Sources of Energy WEB WATCH (173) Terence, this is stupid stuff...

  6. In Proportion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COSI

    2009-01-01

    Through this nutrition activity (page 5 of the PDF), learners will understand—and probably be surprised by—how big serving sizes of various foods should be. This is accomplished in a very interesting way: learners will practice estimating by comparing various foods to everyday objects, like a hockey puck and a computer mouse. This activity was created as a pre-visit for a traveling science show, but makes a great stand-alone activity as well! It is an excellent visual representation for learners to remember.

  7. The e-puck, a Robot Designed for Education in Engineering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Mondada; Michael Bonani; Xavier Raemy; James Pugh; Christopher Cianci; Adam Klaptocz; Jean-Christophe Zufferey; Dario Floreano; Alcherio Martinoli

    Mobile robots have the potential to become the ideal tool to teach a broad range of engineering disciplines. Indeed, mobile robots are getting increasingly complex and accessible. They embed elements from diverse fields such as mechanics, digital electronics, automatic control, signal pro- cessing, embedded programming, and energy management. Moreover, they are attractive for students which increases their motivation to learn.

  8. A noodle, hockey stick, and spaghetti plate: a perspective on

    E-print Network

    Esper, Jan

    -scale temperature2 may be regarded as key goals to help predict consequences of anthropogenic activity. The former and efficacy of solar and volcanic activity,4 a large amplitude over the past millennium may equally well quantifies how global temperature will change due to shifts in external (e.g., solar, volcanic

  9. Human perceptions of artificial surfaces for field hockey

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R. Fleming; C. Young; J. R. Roberts; R. Jones; N. Dixon

    2005-01-01

    Measuring the performance of a sports surface is typically derived from a series of field and laboratory tests that assess\\u000a the playing properties under simulated game conditions. However, from a player’s perspective their own comfort and confidence\\u000a in the surface and its playing characteristics are equally if not more important. To date no comparative study to measure\\u000a playing preference tests

  10. The Congressional Hockey Caucus Staff Congressional Briefing: March 10, 2011

    E-print Network

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    , but they have higher levels of confidence and self-esteem, as well as higher grades than non-sport participants the choices children make and guide their journey through adolescence. The influence of coaches, parents

  11. Last Updated: 9/30/2013 FLOOR HOCKEY

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    goalie equipment to be used. All gear used must have a soft covering. II. Illegal and Required Equipment will assume their respective sides and play will begin with a face-off. SECTION 3. EQUIPMENT I. Equipment

  12. Reconstructions of paleoclimate: Beyond the hockey stick. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nychka, D. W.; Li, B.

    2010-12-01

    Our understanding of past climate before the instrumental record is based on a variety of indirect information gleaned from climate proxies. Some well studied proxies include tree ring width and density, lake sediments, pollen indices and temperatures from bore holes. Combining such observations and including physical constraints on the target climate processes is well suited to recent methods in Bayesian statistics and is in contrast to previous methods used for paleoclimate reconstruction. This talk gives an introduction to this new perspective. To reconstruct past temperatures a traditional approach views the proxies as imperfect "thermometers" and calibrates them with instrument observations during a period where both are present. With this calibration one uses the proxies to predict temperature in other periods. This direct approach has the disadvantage that is it difficult to quantify the uncertainty of the reconstruction and to account for proxies that respond to temperature at different temporal and spatial scales. In addition, when different subsets of proxies are available for different reconstruction periods it is problematic to produce a single consistent and continuous reconstruction. A Bayesian hierarchical method demands more assumptions on the target climate process but also produces a more consistent analysis that addresses these shortcomings. The basic idea is to divide the statistical model into three distinct levels: a data level where the proxy measurement is related to the climate process, a process level that asserts a statistical model for the climate process and finally a level that puts prior distributions on unknown statistical parameters. With these statistical models in place, the relationships are inverted using Bayes theorem to give a distribution of the climate process given the proxy data and instrumental record. In the past, this inversion has been difficult to carry out analytically but with more abundant computational resources these computations can now be done using Monte Carlo techniques (e.g. Markov Chain Monte Carlo). Although this hierarchy of statistical models may seem to require more assumptions some of these need to be tacitly assumed in more traditional approaches. Also, assumptions on the climate process can build in basic climate constraints, such as energy balances, that are both reasonable and can produce a more accurate reconstruction. As an example, a reconstruction for Northern Hemisphere annual temperatures will be presented. This reconstruction takes advantage of several forcing series (e.g CO2 concentrations) as covariates and also provides an ensemble of reconstructions to convey the uncertainty in the analysis. This framework is also suitable for reconstructions of spatial fields and of several climate variables, such as temperature and precipitation, simultaneously.

  13. Video Gaming Promotes Concussion Knowledge Acquisition in Youth Hockey Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, David; Bradley, Nori L.; Paras, Bradley, Williamson, Ian J.; Bizzochi, James

    2006-01-01

    While the positive uses for video games in an educational setting have also been established, the educational aim is usually made explicit. The goal of this research was to develop a video game wherein the educational aspect was implicitly embedded in the video game, such that the gameing activity remained interesting and relevant. Following a…

  14. The uncertain hockey stick: a statistical reconstruction of past stempera-

    E-print Network

    Nychka, Douglas

    ;Linear prediction of the expected temperature based on proxies. q qq q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q qq q q q q qq q q q q q q q qqq q q q q q q qq qq qqq q q q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q q qq q q q q q q q q qqq qq q q qq q qq q q q q q q qq q q q

  15. University of Minnesota Intramural Ice Hockey League Rules

    E-print Network

    Amin, S. Massoud

    will not be replaced on the game clock. C. If a player loses his helmet during play, the play will be stopped but not required: Shoulder pads Elbow pads Breezers Pelvic protection Shin pads Gloves Mouthguard E

  16. A former hockey player with knee and calf pain.

    PubMed

    Patel, K; D'Agostino, A M

    1996-09-15

    A 37-year-old man presented with severe pain in his left knee and calf. He had no other joint pain, fever, chills, or dysuria. He had previously gone to another hospital, where x-rays of the knees and legs reportedly showed inflammation and arthritis. He had been given oxycodone-acetaminophen, but the pain continued. PMID:8814117

  17. The Haptic Tabletop Puck: Tactile Feedback for Interactive Tabletops Nicolai Marquardt, Miguel A. Nacenta, James E. Young,

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    these through a servo motor that con- tinually adjusts the height of a rod atop the device. malleability: how paral- lel to the table plane. A servo in the HTP pushes a rubber plate through its bottom against

  18. Management: Global positioning and wireless dispatching

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, M. [ICC International, Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Over the last several years, my company has been supplying many service companies with wireless dispatching solutions. Recently the impact of the system has been greatly increased with the introduction of a GPS (Global Position Systems) interface. This adds visual recognition as to the whereabouts of each vehicle within the customer service area. The only equipment required in the field for GPS is a transmit/receive device and a wireless modem, one mounted out of the way in the vehicle (under the seat) and a {open_quotes}hockey puck{close_quotes} size unit on the roof of the vehicle. The GPS received unit and wireless modem are used to retrieve the longitude, latitude and ground speed coordinates and transmit them back to the host system.

  19. Insulin Delivery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

  20. CREST Modelling of PBX 9502 Corner Turning Experiments at Different Initial Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Nicholas

    2013-06-01

    Corner turning is an important problem in regard to detonation wave propagation in TATB-based explosives. Experimentally, a sudden change in direction of the propagating wave, such as turning a sharp corner, can result in dead-zones being left behind in the corner turn region, with the observed behaviour being particularly sensitive to the initial temperature of the explosive. In this paper, the entropy-dependent CREST reactive burn model is used to simulate corner turning experiments on the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502. Calculated results of double cylinder tests at three different initial temperatures (-54°C, 25°C, and 75°C), and a ``hockey puck'' experiment at ambient temperature, are compared to the corresponding test measurements. The results show that the model is able to: (i) calculate persistent dead-zones in PBX 9502 without recourse to any shock desensitisation treatment, and (ii) predict changes in corner turning behaviour with initial temperature using one set of coefficients.

  1. Particle-In-Cell Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    The BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft is planned to provide a first electric field measurement in Mercury's magnetosphere by mounting two types of the electric antennas: WPT and MEFISTO. The sophisticated calibration of such measurements should be performed based on precise knowledge of the antenna characteristics in space plasma. However, it is difficult to know prac-tical antenna characteristics considering the plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern antenna designing techniques such as a "hockey puck" principle is applied to MEFISTO, which introduces much complexity in its overall configuration. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a nu-merical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of the modern instrument. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have developed a particle simulation code named EMSES based on the particle-in-cell technique including a treatment antenna conductive sur-faces. In this paper, we mainly focus on electrostatic (ES) features and photoelectron distri-bution in the vicinity of MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technol-ogy for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called puck located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the entire spacecraft body. We report some numerical analyses on the influence of the guard electrode on the surrounding plasma environment by using the developed model.

  2. Atlantic University Field Hockey League Tournament #2 @ UPEI 2014 The Atlantic University Field Hockey League is comprised of teams from Acadia, Dalhousie, Saint

    E-print Network

    Brownstone, Rob

    vs SMU 1 2. STFX 4 vs MTA 0 3. ACA 0 vs UNB 0 4. DAL 1 vs UPEI 1 5. UNB 1 vs STFX 0 6. MTA 0 vs ACA 6 7. SMU 1 vs DAL 1 8. MTA 0 vs UPEI 8 9. UNB 0 vs DAL 4 10. STFX 0 vs SMU 7 11. UPEI 3 vs ACA 1 12. STFX 0 vs ACA 0 13. MTA 0 vs UNB 4 14. DAL 6 vs STFX 0 15. UNB 0 vs UPEI 3 16. ACA 0 vs SMU 2 17. MTA 0

  3. Particle-In-Cell Modeling and Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

    2010-05-01

    The sophisticated calibration of a space-based electric antenna should be performed based on precise knowledge of electric antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. However, it is often difficult to know practical antenna characteristics considering the effects of plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of only theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern electric field instruments, such as the Cluster EFW instrument and MEFISTO for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft, are designed based on a ``hockey puck'' principle, which introduces much complexity in their overall configurations. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a numerical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of such modern instruments. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have newly developed an electromagnetic (EM) particle simulation code named EMSES. The code is based on the particle-in-cell technique and also supports a treatment of inner boundaries describing spacecraft conductive surfaces. This enables us to naturally include the effects of the inhomogeneous plasma environment such as a plasma and photoelectron sheaths created around the antenna. The support of the full EM treatment is also important to apply our tool to antenna properties for not only electrostatic (ES) but also EM plasma waves. In the current study, we mainly focus on ES features and photoelectron distribution in the vicinity of the electric field instrument MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technology for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called "puck" located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling of the photoelectron guard electrode and the current biasing, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the entire spacecraft body. Our preliminary simulation run successfully showed an intended behavior of the above numerical models. By using the model, we started numerical analysis on an ES structure around MEFISTO and current-voltage characteristic of the instrument. We report some simulation results on the influence of the guard electrode on the surrounding plasma environment and the electric properties of MEFISTO.

  4. Ice Hockey vs. Ithaca College Sa 11/2 Women's Soccer Tournament Su 11/3

    E-print Network

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    's Volleyball Regional Tournament Sa 11/16 Swim Club Meet vs. Syracuse Sa 11/16 Water Polo Alumni Game Sa 11 Activities Cemetery History Hike II - $15 Sa 11/2 Pine Needle Basket Making - $45 Su 11/3 Canoe Wars II

  5. Even as Wits women's hockey coach Pietie Coetzee (extreme left, back row) heads off

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Stephan

    Academic flexibility sought for sports students New cricket head coach Boat club dinner 011 717 with the demands of their chosen sport and their academic commitments." The new policy will permit exceptional-incides with WitsSport's new recruitment drive that targets Grade 12's who excel at sport and academics, bringing

  6. Concussions in Ice Hockey: Baseline Testing, Reporting Accuracy, and Cervical Functioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig J. Coghlin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold: firstly, to demonstrate the utility of the SCAT2 as both a baseline measurement and a tool to aid in the decision making process following the occurrence of a concussion; secondly, to assess the accuracy of reporting and\\/or relaying a diagnosis of a concussion; and finally to attempt to measure a relationship between cervical

  7. Exploring Coaching Actions Based on Developed Values: A Case Study of a Female Hockey Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callary, Bettina; Werthner, Penny; Trudel, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    There are few empirical studies that demonstrate how values are developed and how they are linked to coaching actions. There can be a discrepancy between the statement of coaches' values and their actual coaching actions. In order to examine how coaching actions are influenced by values that are developed over a lifetime, the purpose of this…

  8. Experienced hockey coach and defense attorney with Machiaveliian leadership skills in

    E-print Network

    Ouhyoung, Ming

    DucatiOn CINDY J.H.YEN National Chengchi University B.A. in Public Finance Expected Graduate Date June 2012 / Taipei, Taiwan · Relevant Coursework: Corporate Finance, Public Finance, Financial Report Analysis

  9. A national hockey league franchise: The modified treshold concept in central place theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ronald L. Geddert; R. Keith Semple

    1987-01-01

    Traditional central place theory postulates that if a center has a hinterland population of a specified size, then it can support a good and a service provision concomitant with a prescribed fixed threshold. The order of the center is determined by the highest threshold good or service offered. Some central places, however, support activities larger than theory would suggest; hence,

  10. 1Athletic Training & Sports Health Care | Vol. 5 No. X 2013 Enhancing Ice Hockey Skills Through

    E-print Network

    Mitroff, Stephen

    performance. Recent research has suggested that a new sport train- ing tool, Nike SPARQ Vapor Strobe eyewear (Nike Inc, Beaverton, Oregon), can improve vision, atten- tion, and anticipatory timing.1-3 Those consultant to Nike Inc, Beaverton; and Dr Reichow is from Pacific University, Forest Grove, Oregon

  11. The uncertain hockey stick: a statistical perspective on the reconstruction of past temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nychka, D.; Li, B.

    2006-12-01

    Temperature reconstructions based on proxies is inherently a statistical process and a deliberate statistical model for the reconstruction can also provide companion measures of uncertainty. Although statistical error is acknowledged to be just one component of the total uncertainty in a reconstruction, it can provide a valuable yardstick for comparing different reconstructions or drawing inferences about features. In this talk we suggest a framework where the reconstruction is expressed as a conditional distribution of the temperatures given the proxies. Random draws from this distribution provide an ensemble of reconstructions where the spread among ensemble members is a valid statistical measure of uncertainty. This approach is illustrated for Northern Hemisphere temperatures and the multi-proxy data used by Mann, Bradley and Hughes (1999). Here we explore the scope of the statistical assumptions needed to carry through a rigorous analysis and use Monte Carlo sampling to determine the uncertainty in maxima or other complicated statistics in the reconstructed series. The principles behind this basic example for the Northern Hemisphere can be extended to regional reconstructions (e.g. climate field reconstructions),incorporation of additional types proxies and the use of statistics from numerical models.

  12. An Examination of the Relative Age Effect in Developmental Girls' Hockey in Ontario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kristy L.; Weir, Patricia L.

    2013-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) suggests that athletes may be provided with greater opportunities for success depending on the position of their birthdate in a sport's selection year. While the effect has been well established in men's sports, less is known about women's sports. This study examined the RAE in developmental girls'…

  13. The Validity and Reliability of a Performance Assessment Procedure in Ice Hockey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeau, Luc; Richard, Jean-Francois; Godbout, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Background: Coaches and physical educators must obtain valid data relating to the contribution of each of their players in order to assess their level of performance in team sport competition. This information must also be collected and used in real game situations to be more valid. Developed initially for a physical education class context, the…

  14. Protein carbonyl levels correlate with performance in elite field hockey players.

    PubMed

    Rosa-Lima, Frederico Luis; Lannes, Luiz; Viana-Gomes, Diego; Pierucci, Anna Paola T R; Salerno, Verônica P

    2015-07-01

    Excess and incorrectly selected exercise can degrade athletic performance from an imbalance in redox homeostasis and oxidative stress, but well-planned training and nutrition can improve antioxidant capacity. The aim of the study was to investigate how nutrient intake could influence oxidative stress and cell lesion biomarkers after 5 days of training followed by a game. Blood was collected from 10 athletes at the start of training (basal), after training (pre-game), and postgame. Their acceleration capacity also was measured pre- and postgame. Blood analysis showed an increase in lactate concentration postgame (13%) and total antioxidant capacity increased both pre-game (13.1%) and postgame (12.7%), all in comparison with basal levels. An oxidative stress marker, protein carbonyl (PC), increased 3-fold over the course of the game, which correlated with a decreased acceleration (r = 0.749). For biomarkers of tissue damage, creatine kinase and aspartate transaminase (AST) increased postgame by 150% and 75%, respectively. The AST variation had a high negative correlation with energy and carbohydrate consumption and a moderate correlation with lipid and vitamin C intake. Protein intake had a positive but moderate correlation with reduced glutathione. The observed correlations suggest that nutritional monitoring can improve exercise physiological homeostasis and that PC serves as a good biomarker for oxidative stress and performance loss. PMID:25962716

  15. The "Hockey Stick" and the 1990s: A Statistical Perspective on Reconstructing

    E-print Network

    Li, Bo

    . #12;Linear prediction of the expected temperature based on proxies. q q q q q q qqq q q q q q q qq q qqq q q q q q q q q qq qq q q q qqq q q q q q qq qq q q q q q q q q q q qqqq qq q q q q qq q q q qq q q qq q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q q qq q q q q qq q qq q q q qq q q q qq q q qqq qq q q q q q q q q

  16. Gaze characteristics of elite and near-elite athletes in ice hockey defensive tactics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen G. Martell; Joan N. Vickers

    2004-01-01

    Traditional visual search experiments, where the researcher pre-selects video-based scenes for the participant to respond to, shows that elite players make more efficient decisions than non-elites, but disagree on how they temporally regulate their gaze. Using the vision-in-action [J.N. Vickers, J. Exp. Psychol.: Human Percept. Perform. 22 (1996) 342] approach, we tested whether the significant gaze that differentiates elite and

  17. Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on the initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Urtiew, P.A.; Tao, W.C. [Energetic Materials Center L-282, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Energetic Materials Center L-282, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The shock initiation of the insensitive high-explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under simulated accident conditions in which two shock waves interact producing locally high pressures and temperatures. Two experimental geometries were studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges to measure the increases in pressure due to exothermic reaction at various locations as functions of time. These pressure histories were compared to ignition and growth reactive flow model calculations to determine whether a second shock compression of reacting LX-17 caused unusually rapid reaction rates and thus more extreme hazards. One experiment used a tandem flyer plate of aluminum and steel separated by a gap to shock the LX-17 charge, allow it to rarify, and then reshock the damaged charge to even higher pressures. These experiments revealed no significant enhancement of the LX-17 reaction rates under this shock, rarefaction, and reshock loading. The second experiment used a grooved flyer plate to produce a subcritical shock wave in LX-17, which then diverged and collided, producing a Mach stem interaction at the charge axis. The threshold conditions under which the Mach stem grew to detonation were measured. The standard LX-17 ignition and growth model yielded excellent agreement with the pressure gauge records in the Mach stem interaction region. The formation of Mach stem interactions by nearly simultaneous multiple high-velocity impacts was identified as a serious shock initiation hazard for heterogeneous solid explosives.

  18. Square lattice honeycomb tri-carbide fuels for 50 to 250 KN variable thrust NTP design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis; Gouw, Reza; Furman, Eric

    2001-02-01

    Ultrahigh temperature solid solution of tri-carbide fuels are used to design an ultracompact nuclear thermal rocket generating 950 seconds of specific impulse with scalable thrust level in range of 50 to 250 kilo Newtons. Solid solutions of tri-carbide nuclear fuels such as uranium-zirconium-niobium carbide. UZrNbC, are processed to contain certain mixing ratio between uranium carbide and two stabilizing carbides. Zirconium or niobium in the tri-carbide could be replaced by tantalum or hafnium to provide higher chemical stability in hot hydrogen environment or to provide different nuclear design characteristics. Recent studies have demonstrated the chemical compatibility of tri-carbide fuels with hydrogen propellant for a few to tens of hours of operation at temperatures ranging from 2800 K to 3300 K, respectively. Fuel elements are fabricated from thin tri-carbide wafers that are grooved and locked into a square-lattice honeycomb (SLHC) shape. The hockey puck shaped SLHC fuel elements are stacked up in a grooved graphite tube to form a SLHC fuel assembly. A total of 18 fuel assemblies are arranged circumferentially to form two concentric rings of fuel assemblies with zirconium hydride filling the space between assemblies. For 50 to 250 kilo Newtons thrust operations, the reactor diameter and length including reflectors are 57 cm and 60 cm, respectively. Results of the nuclear design and thermal fluid analyses of the SLHC nuclear thermal propulsion system are presented. .

  19. 2 pi-Steradian, Energetic-Ion Sensor

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Because energetic particles populate both planetary magnetospheres and interplanetary space in significant quantities, energetic-ion sensors have been flown since the beginning of the space age. Early sensors were solid-state detector (SSD) telescopes, with conical fields of view, often swept through a circle by virtue of the spin motion of the spacecraft (e.g., IMP 7 and 8, ISEE 1 and 2). In the 1980s and 1990s, foil/microchannel plate (MCP) time-of-flight (TOF) measurements were added to the energy measurement provided by the SSD (eg, AMPTE/CCE MEPA, Geotail EPIC/ICS, Galileo EPD). The resulting energy and velocity uniquely identified ion mass. More recently, we have developed a 2-D fan acceptance angle sensor that includes both energy and TOF. When mounted on a spinning spacecraft, this 160^\\circ x 12^\\circ FOV sweeps out nearly 4\\pi steradians in one spin. This sensor, dubbed the "hockey puck" for its shape, is currently in flight on MESSENGER (EPS) and New Horizons Pluto (PEPPSI).Increasingly, energetic-...

  20. Electron Beam Diagnostics in Plasmas Based on Electron Beam Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Darrin; Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Blackwell, David; Walton, Scott; Murphy, Donald; Fernsler, Richard; Meger, Robert

    2001-10-01

    Over the last few years, electron beam ionization has been shown to be a viable generator of high density plasmas with numerous applications in materials modification. To better understand these plasmas, we have fielded electron beam diagnostics to more clearly understand the propagation of the beam as it travels through the background gas and creates the plasma. These diagnostics vary greatly in sophistication, ranging from differentially pumped systems with energy selective elements to metal 'hockey pucks' covered with thin layers of insulation to electrically isolate the detector from the plasma but pass high energy beam electrons. Most importantly, absolute measurements of spatially resolved beam current densities are measured in a variety of pulsed and continuous beam sources. The energy distribution of the beam current(s) will be further discussed, through experiments incorporating various energy resolving elements such as simple grids and more sophisticated cylindrical lens geometries. The results are compared with other experiments of high energy electron beams through gases and appropriate disparities and caveats will be discussed. Finally, plasma parameters are correlated to the measured beam parameters for a more global picture of electron beam produced plasmas.

  1. Microstructure of nematic amorphous block copolymers: Dependence on the nematic volume fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, M.; Goldbeck-Wood, G.; Zvelindovsky, A. V.; Fraaije, J. G. E. M.

    2003-05-01

    We present a model for the structure formation in nematic amorphous copolymers and simulation results for a two-dimensional (2D) implementation. The model is based on a dynamic mean-field method, which allows one to specify the polymer system on two different levels of detail. On the detailed level the nematic amorphous block copolymer molecules are represented by a wormlike chain, characterized by three profiles defining its architecture. The first profile sets the sequence of different monomer types along the chain. The second distinguishes whether individual segments do or do not contribute to the nematic order. The third profile defines how the stiffness varies along the chain. On the coarsened level the system is described in terms of density distributions representing the different monomer species and an orientation distribution for the local alignment of the nematic segments. The simulations investigate how the volume fraction of the nematic component effects the resulting mesostructure. With increasing volume fraction of the nematic block 2D equivalents of "hockey puck" micelles and smectic-C and smectic-A-like structures are found.

  2. Secrets of Success In the fall of 1979, Bill Wenmark, a former ice hockey player from Deephaven, Minnesota,

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianyu

    runs go more smoothly if you don't have to tackle them alone. 4. Get smart. Marathoning is a mental, or even walking can help you recover on non-running days. Weight training provides the upper body strength. Beginners should avoid speedwork. Concentrate on finishing your first marathon, not finishing it fast. 15

  3. MONT 105N Analyzing Environmental Data Study/Discussion Questions on "The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars"

    E-print Network

    Little, John B.

    ? 9. Why do you think that Mann has persevered in trying to work on these scientific problems? (After for these and why? Mann, of course, has his own explanation for the attacks. What is that? Do you think he

  4. Unusual fracture of distal third of the clavicle in a hockey player: case report and a new approach to treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. López; C. Torrens; V. León; M. Marín

    1999-01-01

    Clavicle fractures represent 5% of all skeletal injuries, and the distal third of the clavicle is involved in approximately\\u000a 10%–15% of all these fractures. The incidence of delayed union or non-union in Neer type II fractures of the distal third\\u000a of the clavicle is high. The ideal treatment for Neer type II fractures of the distal third of the clavicle

  5. Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

    1998-09-30

    In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

  6. Thermal expansion of TATB-based explosives from 300 to 566 K

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon L. Maienschein; F. Garcia

    2002-01-01

    We report thermal expansion measurements and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) for LX-17-1 (92.5wt.% 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB), 7.5wt.% Kel-F 800) from 300 to 558K. Samples uniaxially-compressed at 300K show an axial CTE of (2.7+0.42T)×10?6K?1 and a radial CTE of (48+0.16T)×10?6K?1; the different axial and radial CTE indicate a small degree of alignment of the TATB molecules under uniaxial compression. LX-17-1 that

  7. Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Kury, John W.; Breithaupt, R. Don

    1997-10-01

    Fabry-Perot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% KelF binder) and pure ultrafine particle size TATB. The experimental records are compared to particle velocity histories calculated with the DYNA2D hydrodynamic code using the ignition and growth reactive flow model. The calculations yield excellent agreement with the experimental records for LX-17 using an unreacted von Neumann spike pressure of 33.7 GPa, a reaction rate law which releases 70% of the chemical energy within 100 ns, and the remaining 30% over 300 additional ns, and a reaction product equation of state fit to cylinder test and supracompression data with a Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure of 25 GPa. The late time energy release is attributed to diffusion controlled solid carbon particle formation. Ultrafine TATB, pressed to a lower density (1.80 g/cm3) than LX-17 (1.905 g/cm3), exhibits lower unreacted spike and C-J pressures than LX-17 but similar reaction rates.

  8. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonating TATB Cones and Arcs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig Tarver; Steven Chidester

    2007-01-01

    . The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based explosives LX-17 and PBX 9502 is applied to recent experimental data on converging conical charges plus confined and unconfined arc charges. The conical charges are at first overdriven by the converging flow and then fail to detonate as the radial rarefaction wave slows the reaction rate. Unconfined

  9. Reactive Flow Modeling of the Interaction of TATB Detonation Waves with Inert Materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver; Estella M. McGuire

    2002-01-01

    The Ignition & Growth model for the shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is applied to calculating the main features of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based high explosives LX-17, PBX 9502 and EDC-35. Under detonation conditions, TATB based explosives exhibit reaction zone lengths of 2 to 3 mm depending on the interactions between the detonation wave and

  10. Modeling Hemispheric Detonation Experiments in 2-Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Vitello, P A; Druce, R L; Phillips, D; Lee, R; Mudge, S; Roeske, F

    2006-06-22

    Experiments have been performed with LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder) to study scaling of detonation waves using a dimensional scaling in a hemispherical divergent geometry. We model these experiments using an arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) hydrodynamics code, with reactive flow models based on the thermo-chemical code, Cheetah. The thermo-chemical code Cheetah provides a pressure-dependent kinetic rate law, along with an equation of state based on exponential-6 fluid potentials for individual detonation product species, calibrated to high pressures ({approx} few Mbars) and high temperatures (20000K). The parameters for these potentials are fit to a wide variety of experimental data, including shock, compression and sound speed data. For the un-reacted high explosive equation of state we use a modified Murnaghan form. We model the detonator (including the flyer plate) and initiation system in detail. The detonator is composed of LX-16, for which we use a program burn model. Steinberg-Guinan models5 are used for the metal components of the detonator. The booster and high explosive are LX-10 and LX-17, respectively. For both the LX-10 and LX-17, we use a pressure dependent rate law, coupled with a chemical equilibrium equation of state based on Cheetah. For LX-17, the kinetic model includes carbon clustering on the nanometer size scale.

  11. Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Kury, J.W.; Breithaupt, R.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Fabry{endash}Perot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5{percent} TATB and 7.5{percent} KelF binder) and pure ultrafine particle size TATB. The experimental records are compared to particle velocity histories calculated with the DYNA2D hydrodynamic code using the ignition and growth reactive flow model. The calculations yield excellent agreement with the experimental records for LX-17 using an unreacted von Neumann spike pressure of 33.7 GPa, a reaction rate law which releases 70{percent} of the chemical energy within 100 ns, and the remaining 30{percent} over 300 additional ns, and a reaction product equation of state fit to cylinder test and supracompression data with a Chapman{endash}Jouguet (C{endash}J) pressure of 25 GPa. The late time energy release is attributed to diffusion controlled solid carbon particle formation. Ultrafine TATB, pressed to a lower density (1.80g/cm{sup 3}) than LX-17 (1.905g/cm{sup 3}), exhibits lower unreacted spike and C{endash}J pressures than LX-17 but similar reaction rates. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Physical model for shock-wave initiation of detonation of plastic-bounded TATB-based explosive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. F. Grebenkin; A. L. Zherebtsov; M. V. Taranik; S. K. Tsarenkova; A. S. Shnitko

    2006-01-01

    A physical model for the macrokinetics of shock-wave initiation of detonation in plastic-bounded TATB-based explosive is proposed\\u000a that is based on the assumption of electronic energy transfer from hot spots. Results of numerical modeling of experiments\\u000a on shock-wave initiation of detonation of LX-17 are presented.

  13. Updated On: 9/15/2014 19:58 Teams: The Iceholes points BMS Mountain Goats points

    E-print Network

    Sridhar, Srinivas

    Bryce Turner 0 Nick Berns 0 Cameron Tokarski 0 Cole Weppner 0 Nolan Rothwell 0 Conor Lyons 0 Connor Pokorney 0 Nick Craig 0 Nigel Slater 0 #12;Puck my Deke points Ahlstars points Puck Dynasty points Nicholas Carignan 0 Connor Nolan 0 Jeff Evans-Mongeon 0 Brayden Sparks 0 Matt Bentson #12;

  14. 78 FR 34156 - Hazardous Materials: Emergency Recall Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ...puck tests failed to meet the required hardness test limits; Failed to perform and...test conducted at service pressure in a water bath. During the leak pressure test...not manufactured in accordance with the hardness ``puck test'' requirements of...

  15. Establishing the Test-Retest Reliability & Concurrent Validity for the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST) in Adolescent Male Ice Hockey Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, Allan; Faught, Brent E.; Przysucha, Eryk; McPherson, Moira; Montelpare, William

    2012-01-01

    In this study the authors examine the test-retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST). This was an on-ice field anaerobic test that measured average peak power and was validated with 3 anaerobic lab tests: (a) vertical jump, (b) the Margaria-Kalamen stair test, and (c) the Wingate Anaerobic Test. The…

  16. Updated: 1/12/11 The Department of Recreational Sports maintains 15 different outdoor facilities which include basketball courts, cricket pitches, jogging paths, sand

    E-print Network

    Jones, Michelle

    which include basketball courts, cricket pitches, jogging paths, sand volleyball courts, roller hockey lighted basketball courts ·Lighted roller hockey rink ·Two lighted sand volleyball courts 11th Avenue: ·Three lighted basketball courts ·One lighted roller hockey rink ·One sand volleyball court Fred Beekman

  17. How to Fatigue ACT-R?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. M. G. Jongman

    In this paper, an ACT-R model of mental fatigue is presented. This model is loosely based on Hockey's state regulation model of compensatory effort (Hockey, 1997). It appears that when spreading of activation is reduced, the ACT-R model can predict the performance changes Hockey describes, and furthermore, show how these may depend on the motivation of the participant. In a

  18. The Annals of Applied Statistics 2013, Vol. 7, No. 3, 14971524

    E-print Network

    Jensen, Shane T.

    are relatively common, such as in basketball, but as neither of these condi- tions exists for hockey, we use of interest: full Bayesian hier- archical models that partially pool parameters according to player position observations. The study of goal-based team sports--ice hockey, field hockey, basketball, soc- cer and lacrosse

  19. Plutonium immobilization feed batching system concept report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.

    2000-07-19

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Feed batching is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. It will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization feed batching process preliminary concept, batch splitting concepts, and includes a process block diagram, concept descriptions, a preliminary equipment list, and feed batching development areas.

  20. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE TATB BASED EXPLOSIVE RX-03-GO WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  1. Shock Initiation Experiments on the Tatb Based Explosive RX-03-GO with Ignition and Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Tarver, Craig M.

    2009-12-01

    Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  2. Temperature-dependent shock initiation of TATB-based high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, J.C.; Wackerle, J.

    1993-10-01

    The effects of temperature on the shock sensitivity of two TATB formulations PBX 9502 and LX-17 are studied over the temperature range {minus}54{degrees}C to 252{degrees}C. The shock Hugoniot curves over this same temperature range are developed. Thermal expansion properties and porosities are used to help determine the mechanisms of thermal sensitization. Impact sensitivities over the range from ambient to 300{degrees}C are reported. Analyses of these results imply that thermal sensitization is the result of purely chemical kinetics enhancement and intracrystalline hot-spot growth. Additional results on the ambient shock sensitivity of PBX 9502 and LX-17 following thermal cycling to 252{degrees}C and back to ambient is presented.

  3. Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on the initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver; Paul A. Urtiew; William C. Tao

    1995-01-01

    The shock initiation of the insensitive high-explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under simulated accident conditions in which two shock waves interact producing locally high pressures and temperatures. Two experimental geometries were studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges to measure the increases in pressure due to exothermic reaction at various locations as functions of

  4. Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on the initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver; Paul A. Urtiew; William C. Tao

    1995-01-01

    The shock initiation of the insensitive high-explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under simulated accident conditions in which two shock waves interact producing locally high pressures and temperatures. Two experimental geometries were studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges to measure the increases in pressure due to exothermic reaction at various locations as functions of

  5. In-Situ Monitoring of the Microstructure of TATB-based Explosive Formulations During Temperature Cycling using Ultra-small Angle X-ray Scattering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T M Willey; D M Hoffman; T van Buuren; L Lauderbach; J Ilavsky; R H Gee; A Maiti; G Overturf; L Fried

    2008-01-01

    TATB (1,3,5 triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), an extremely insensitive explosive, is used both in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) and as an ultra-fine pressed powder (UFTATB). With both PBXs and UFTATB, an irreversible expansion occurs with temperature cycling known as ratchet growth. In TATB-based explosives using Kel-F 800 as binder (LX-17 and PBX-9502), additional voids, sizes hundreds of nanometers to a few microns account for

  6. Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver; John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt

    1997-01-01

    FabryâPerot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5%

  7. Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Craig M. Tarver; John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt

    1997-01-01

    Fabry–Perot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5%

  8. The effects of confinement and temperature on the shock sensitivity of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, Garcia, F

    1998-08-17

    The effects of heavy steel confinement on the shock sensitivity of pressed solid high explosives heated to temperatures close to thermal explosion conditions were quantitatively measured. Cylindrical flyer plates accelerated by a 101 mm diameter gas gun impacted preheated explosive charges containing multiple embedded manganin pressure gauges. The high explosive compositions tested were LX-04-01 (85 wt.% HMX and 15 wt.% Viton A) heated to 170 ° C and LX-17 (92.5 wt.% TATB and 7.5 wt.% Kel-F) heated to 250 ° C. Ignition and Growth reactive flow models for heated, heavily confined LX-04-01 and LX-17 were formulated based on the measured pressure histories. LX-17 at 250 ° C is considerably less shock sensitive when confined by steel than when confined by aluminum or unconfined. LX-04-01 at 170 ° C is only slightly less shock sensitive when confined by steel than when it is unconfined. The confinement effect is smaller in LX-04-01, because HMX particle growth i s much less than that of TATB.

  9. www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/315/5812/620/DC1 Supporting Online Material for

    E-print Network

    Lakes, Roderic

    polycrystalline structure. Specimens for viscoelastic testing were sectioned from ingots using a low speed diamond for optical micrographs were potted in a two-part epoxy, and pucks were wet- ground using silica sandpaper

  10. S.BERETANIASTREET UNIVERSITY AVENUE

    E-print Network

    Hawaiian Bank Puck's Alley Varsity Building Varsity Place Lot S.KINGSTREET COYNESTREET YOUNGSTREET S Andrews Outdoor Theatre Law School Moore Hall VISITO R PARKING Founders' Gate LO W ER CAM PUS RO AD

  11. S.BERETANIASTREET UNIVERSITY AVENUE

    E-print Network

    Hawaiian Bank Puck's Alley Varsity Building Varsity Place Lot Dole Street Offices Multipurpose Building Andrews Outdoor Theatre Law School VISITO R PARKING Founders' Gate LO W ER CAM PUS RO AD Johnson Hall

  12. Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Can loading

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    2000-01-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in the proposed Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP). The PIP scope includes unloading transportation containers, preparing the feed streams, converting the metal feed to an oxide, adding the ceramic precursors, pressing the pucks, inspecting pucks, and sintering pucks. The PIP scope also includes loading the pucks into metal cans, sealing the cans, inspecting the cans, loading the cans into magazines, loading magazines into Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and transporting the canisters to the DWPF. The DWPF fills the canister with a mixture of high level radioactive waste and glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment must perform PIP operations in a contained environment.

  13. Control System for the Stacker Unstacker System for the Plutonium Immobilization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, T.

    2001-01-31

    The disposition of excess plutonium will incorporate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the picks in cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility canister.

  14. Control System for the Stacker Unstacker System for the Plutonium Immobilization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, T.

    2001-01-03

    The disposition of excess plutonium will incorporate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the picks in cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility canister.

  15. Inductive Principles for Restricted Boltzmann Machine Learning Benjamin M. Marlin, Kevin Swersky, Bo Chen and Nando de Freitas

    E-print Network

    Marlin, Benjamin

    question food msg water god jesus government jews power rights state war gun insurance medicine president program windows puck season shuttle technology bm w car dealer engine honda data disk drive m em ory

  16. Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    2001-07-10

    The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.

  17. Introduction Subsumption Architecture

    E-print Network

    Leeds, University of

    Introduction Subsumption Architecture Metabolic Architecture Comparison Conclusions A metabolic subsumption architecture for cooperative control of the e-puck Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham Verena Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham A metabolic subsumption architecture 1 #12;Introduction Subsumption

  18. boston college carroll school of management

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianyu

    boston college carroll school of management Eighth Annual Finance Conference Where's the Puck) Janet Kersnar (Knowledge@Wharton) Ramon Marimon (European University Institute) Wolfgang Munchau (Eurointelligence) Erik F. Nielsen (Formerly Goldman Sachs) Fabio Panetta (Bank of Italy) Helmut Siekmann

  19. Racial and Gender Report Card, 2003: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Hiring Practices of the National Basketball Association, National Football League, National Hockey League, Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, Women's National Basketball Association, and NCAA and Its Member Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapchick, Richard E.

    This is the 12th issue of the "Racial and Gender Report Card," which assesses hiring practices of women and people of color in U.S. professional and amateur sports and sporting organizations. It considers the composition of players, coaches, and front office/athletic department employees in the leading sports organizations. Each organization is…

  20. Detonator cable initiation system safety investigation: Consequences of energizing the detonator and actuator cables

    SciTech Connect

    Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Von Holle, W.

    1994-03-01

    This study was performed to explore and assess the worst-case response of a W89-type weapons system, damaged so as to expose detonator and/or detonator safing strong link (DSSL) cables to the most extreme, credible lightning-discharge, environment. The test program used extremely high-current-level, fast-rise-time (1- to 2-{mu}s) discharges to simulate lightning strikes to either the exposed detonator or DSSL cables. Discharges with peak currents above 700 kA were required to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch a flyer fast enough potentially to detonate weapon high explosive (HE). Detonator-safing-strong-link (DSSL) cables were exploded in direct contact with hot LX-17 and Ultrafine TATB (UFTATB). At maximum charging voltage, the discharge system associated with the HE firing chamber exploded the cables at more than 600-kA peak current; however, neither LX-17 nor UFTATB detonated at 250{degree}C. Tests showed that intense surface arc discharges of more than 700 kA/cm in width across the surface of hot UFTATB [generally the more sensitive of the two insensitive high explosives (IHE)] could not initiate this hot IHE. As an extension to this study, we applied the same technique to test sections of the much-narrower but thicker-cover-layer W87 detonator cable. These tests were performed at the same initial stored electrical energy as that used for the W89 study. Because of the narrower cable conductor in the W87 cables, discharges greater than 550-kA peak current were sufficient to explode the cable and launch a fast flyer. In summary, we found that lightning strikes to exposed DSSL cables cannot directly detonate LX-17 or UFTATB even at high temperatures, and they pose no HE safety threat.

  1. University of New Hampshire Office of Athletics Development

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    Apollo '86 (women's ice hockey), Robert Black '77 (men's soccer), Marcie Boyer '03 (field hockey), Lou D'Allesandro '61 (football, men's lacrosse, and baseball), Kimberly Foley '97 (women's soccer), Randy Hall '90 (men of Fame recognizes and honors the talented and dedicated individuals who challenged themselves to pursue

  2. Assessing the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes who participate in contact sports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chad Killam; Robin L. Cautin; Anthony C. Santucci

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Postconcussion Syndrome Checklist, and the Stroop task. Based on a brief self-report concussion history survey, male and female athletes who participated in ice hockey, field hockey, lacrosse, and\\/or soccer were assigned to one of

  3. Some counting questions Math 10120, Spring 2013

    E-print Network

    Galvin, David

    Some counting questions Math 10120, Spring 2013 January 30, 2013 Math 10120 (Spring 2013) Counting (Spring 2013) Counting questions January 30, 2013 2 / 9 #12;Poker hands A poker hand consists (Spring 2013) Counting questions January 30, 2013 3 / 9 #12;Notre Dame Hockey Notre dame hockey has a 26

  4. Score a Facilities Hat Trick: Strategic Goals for Successful Hiring, Training, and Team Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loy, Darcy

    2012-01-01

    Granted, it might be a bit of a stretch to find comparable attributes between an ice hockey team and facilities management organizations. However, if you are open-minded to the possibility and begin to analyze each of these entities, you will find there are some distinct similarities. Ice hockey is a fast-paced and ever-changing game, much like a…

  5. Public Broadcasting, Sport, and Cultural CitizenshipThe Future of Sport on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jay Scherer; David Whitson

    2009-01-01

    In this article we examine the recent debate over the continued role of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) in airing National Hockey League (NHL) games on its iconic television show, Hockey Night in Canada (HNIC) . Specifically, we outline the heightened competition between the CBC and private networks for the most desirable sports rights in the context of the explosive

  6. Skill Acquisition in Students with and without Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Margalit, Matan

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to examine skill acquisition in field hockey of seven junior-high school students with PDD, who attended an inclusive class; and (b) to compare the degree of skill acquisition in field hockey of junior-high school students without disabilities who attend an inclusive class and those who attend a regular class.…

  7. The Effect of Role Ambiguity on Competitive State Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauchamp, Mark R.; Bray, Steven R.; Eys, Mark A.; Carron, Albert V.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between role ambiguity and precompetition state anxiety among high school athletes playing field hockey. Surveys of male and female field hockey players in the United Kingdom indicated that ambiguity concerning the scope of one's offensive responsibilities was predictive cognitive state anxiety, while ambiguity…

  8. Boston University Alumni Council Hails

    E-print Network

    Spence, Harlan Ernest

    as president of the council and of the BU Alumni Association. Her position may be new, but the leadership role instructor at Metropolitan College, a longtime Terrier ice hockey and basketball season ticket holder, a Terrier ice hockey and basketball season ticket holder, and a donor. #12;

  9. Tracking Sports Players with Context-Conditioned Motion Models Jingchen Liu1

    E-print Network

    -target tracking algorithms on basketball and field hockey sequences several minutes in duration and containing 10 model for tracking players. The overhead views of basketball and field hockey show the input detections characteristics between teammates are primarily position and velocity; (2) pedestrians tend to move along straight

  10. Safety in Team Sports. Sports Safety Series, Monograph No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borozne, Joseph, Ed.; And Others

    This monograph examines methods of promoting safe practices in the conduct of selected team sports with the aim of reducing and eliminating the occurrance of injuries. The team sports discussed are baseball and softball, basketball, field hockey, tackle football, touch and flag football, ice hockey, lacrosse, and soccer. (MJB)

  11. Insensitive fuze train for high explosives

    DOEpatents

    Cutting, Jack L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

  12. Isentropic Compression of High Explosives with the Z Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Reisman, D B; Forbes, J; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Hayes, D; Furnish, M

    2002-07-03

    Isentropic compression experiments (ICE) were performed on a variety of high explosives. The samples were dynamically loaded by Sandia's Z-accelerator with a ramp compression wave of 300 ns rise time and peak stress of 100-350 kbar. Sample/window interface velocities were recorded with VISAR. Experiments were performed on LX04 to obtain the stress-strain relation using a backward integration technique. Experiments were similarly performed on LX17 and the results compared to hydrodynamics calculations that used a reactive flow equation of state. Recent experiments were also conducted on single crystal HMX with the aim of detecting the phase transition believed to occur at 270 kbar.

  13. Kinetic effects in shock compressed TATB-based explosives to over 100 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, N. C.; Viecelli, J. A.; Ree, F. H.; Hare, David E.

    1999-06-01

    We report on shock compression experiments on LX-17, a TATB-based insensitive high explosive. We measured the Hugoniot EOS using a novel optical method. In this method, we were able to measure both the first and reshock states on the same experiment using an optical streak camera to record shock transit times. Surprisingly, the effects of carbon nucleation are apparent at first shock pressures well above 100 GPa, while our lower pressure data are consistent with the previous data of Green.(L. Green, E. Lee, A. Mitchell, and C. Tarver, Proc. Eigth Symposium (International) on Detonation),NSWC MP 86-194 pp. 587--595.

  14. Plutonium immobilization ceramic feed batching component test report

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, S.A.

    1999-10-04

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with high level waste glass for permanent storage. Ceramic feed batching (CFB) is one of the first process steps involved with first stage plutonium immobilization. The CFB step will blend plutonium oxide powder before it is combined with other materials to make pucks. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization CFB process preliminary concept (including a process block diagram), batch splitting component test results, CFB development areas, and FY 1999 and 2000 CFB program milestones.

  15. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design for 13 MT Case

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.

    2001-01-31

    The Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading conceptual design for the 13 Metric Ton (MT) PIP throughput case. This report includes a process block diagram, process description, and preliminary equipment specifications and documents the changes to the original can loading concept documented in previous reports.

  16. Remote handling in the Plutonium Immobilization Project -- Second stage immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1999-12-21

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will immobilize excess plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Automated equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. Due to the radiation, remote equipment will perform these operations in a contained environment. The Plutonium Immobilization Project is in the conceptual design stage and the facility will begin operation in 2008. This paper discusses the Plutonium Immobilization Project phase 2 automation equipment conceptual design, equipment design, and work completed.

  17. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading FY98 Year End Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will immobilize plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report summarizes FY98 Can Loading work completed for the Plutonium Immobilization Project and it includes summaries of reports on Can Size, Equipment Review, Preliminary Concepts, Conceptual Design, and Preliminary Specification. Plant trip reports for the Greenville Automation and Manufacturing Exposition, Rocky Flats BNFL Pu repackaging glovebox line, and vendor trips are also included.

  18. Deep drawing of uranium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R J; Lundberg, M R

    1987-01-19

    A procedure was developed to fabricate uranium forming blanks with high ''draw-ability'' so that cup shapes could be easily and uniformly deep drawn. The overall procedure involved a posttreatment to develop optimum mechanical and structural properties in the deep-drawn cups. The fabrication sequence is casting high-purity logs, pucking cast logs, cross-rolling pucks to forming blanks, annealing and outgassing forming blanks, cold deep drawing to hemispherical shapes, and stress relieving, outgassing, and annealing deep-drawn parts to restore ductility and impart dimensional stability. The fabrication development and the resulting fabrication procedure are discussed in detail. The mechanical properties and microstructural properties are discussed.

  19. Radiation induced strand breakage analyzed by tunel technique

    E-print Network

    Reynolds, Marissa Dawn

    2003-01-01

    seen and scored according to the painted bands. The FISH method is most appropriately used to examine interchanges as opposed to simply breaks (Savage 1996). However, cryptic breaks are dilficult to identify with banding techniques and subsequently... with sitnilar protocols (Harvey and Savage 1997). The CHO cell line was initiated Irom a biopsy of an ovary Irom an adult Chinese hamster by T. T. Puck in 1957 (Puck et al, 1958). The cells were cultured in Ham's F12 medium supplemented with 10'/o fetal...

  20. Comprehensive Characterization of Voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives from 10 nm to 1 cm: Effects of Temperature Cycling and Compressive Creep

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Lauderbach, L; Gagliardi, F; Cunningham, B; Lorenz, K T; Lee, J I; van Buuren, T; Call, R; Landt, L; Overturf, G

    2010-02-26

    This paper outlines the characterization of voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives over several orders of magnitude, from sizes on the order of 10 nm to about 1 cm. This is accomplished using ultra small angle x-ray scattering to investigate voids from a few nm to a few microns, ultra small angle neutron scattering for voids from 100 nm to 10 microns, and x-ray computed microtomography to investigate microstructure from a few microns to a few centimeters. The void distributions of LX-17 are outlined, and the microstructure of LX-17 is presented. Temperature cycling and compressive creep cause drastically different damage to the microstructure. Temperature cycling leads to a volume expansion (ratchet growth) in TATB-based explosives, and x-ray scattering techniques that are sensitive to sizes up to a few microns indicated changes to the void volume distribution that had previously accounted for most, but not all of the change in density. This paper presents the microstructural damage larger than a few microns caused by ratchet growth. Temperature cycling leads to void creation in the binder poor regions associated with the interior portion of formulated prills. Conversely, compressive creep causes characteristically different changes to microstructure; fissures form at binder-rich prill boundaries prior to mechanical failure.

  1. Shock sensitivity of IHE at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P.A.; Cook, T.M.; Maienschein, J.L.; Tarver, C.M.

    1993-06-01

    Insensitive high explosives (IHE`s) based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) have been demonstrated to be very insensitive to shock, thermal, friction and other stimuli. Hazard scenarios can involve more than one stimulus, such as heating followed by fragment impact (shock). The shock sensitivity of the IHE`s LX-17 and PBX-9502 preheated to a temperature (250{degree}C) just below thermal runaway is quantitatively studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges. The thermal expansion of TATB to 250{degree}C is measured to determine the state of the explosive prior to shock initiation. LX-17 and PBX-9502 are found to be significantly more sensitive at 250{degree}C than at lower temperatures, but still less sensitive than ambient temperature HMX-based explosives. An ignition and growth reactive flow computer model of the shock initiation of hot IHE is developed to allow predictions of the response of hot IHE to impact scenarios which can not be tested directly.

  2. Towards Next Generation TATB-based Explosives by Understanding Voids and Microstructure from 10 nm to 1 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Overturf, G

    2009-03-26

    TATB-based explosives have been investigated on length scales spanning several orders of magnitude, from just under 10 nm to larger than 1 cm. This has been accomplished using a combination of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), ultra-small angle neutron scattering (USANS), and x-ray computed tomography (XRCT). USAXS determines distributions the smallest structures including hot-spot voids from hundreds of nanometers to a few microns, USANS extends this range to about 10 microns, and two variants of XRCT cover sizes from microns to centimeters. Several examples are presented for LX-17, a triaminotrinitrobenzene based plastic bonded explosive using Kel-F 800. As an extension of previous USAXS results, in these proceedings, an alternate binder results in a more uniform microstructure for the PBX, useful towards design of next-generation TATB-based explosives. These data are an important step to understanding microstructural mechanisms that affect the mechanical properties of TATB-based explosives, and provide complete a comprehensive characterization of the structure of LX-17 from nanometers to centimeters that can be used as empirical input to computational models of detonation, and in determining the relationship between voids and microstructure to detonation properties.

  3. Reviews

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-03-01

    WEB WATCH (204) Try unearthing some interesting information about archaeology BOOK REVIEWS (206) Teaching and assessing practical skills Book Review: Learn to drive with Sir Isaac Newton DVD REVIEW (207) Bring some sunshine into the classroom EQUIPMENT REVIEWS (208) Robust air puck takes a kicking Flowlog offers sensing options plus multimode datalogging Mastering Chladni figures takes practice but it offers surprises

  4. Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalajian, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

  5. Plutonium Immobilization Project comparison of bagless transfer and electrolytic decon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study requested for PIP to compare the baseline bagless transfer process with the electrolytic decontamination process, and recommend the process for the PIP application. Two different methods of packaging pucks in cans for the Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) were compared; the SRS bagless transfer and electrolytic decontamination. The SRS bagless transfer generates more waste, but it

  6. The HAPTICTOUCH Toolkit: Enabling Exploration of Haptic Interactions

    E-print Network

    Greenberg, Saul

    1 The HAPTICTOUCH Toolkit: Enabling Exploration of Haptic Interactions David Ledo1 , Miguel A interaction relies on haptic feedback (e.g., grasping objects, feeling textures). Unfortu- nately, such feedback is absent in current tabletop systems. The previously developed Haptic Tabletop Puck (HTP) aims

  7. GlideCursor: Pointing with an Inertial Cursor Michel Beaudouin-Lafon1,2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , with inertia and friction similar to a puck being pushed on a table. We analyze gliding from a practical and a theoretical perspective and report on two studies. The first con- trolled experiment establishes that gliding, without degrading performance. Keywords Pointing; Clutching; Gliding; Inertia; Friction; Cur- sor

  8. A hierarchy of models for type-II superconductors S. J. Chapman

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Jon

    , and Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs), which are instruments which measure a magnetic #12;eld very accurately, and which utilise the macroscopic quantum properties of superconductivity. With the advent at Oxford University 1 , is shown in Figure 1a. There a superconducting puck is magnetically levitated above

  9. PROTECTION OF TISSUE-CULTURE CELLS AGAINST IONIZING RADIATION. I. THE EFFECT OF BIOLOGICAL AMINES, DISULPHIDE COMPOUNDS AND THIOLS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Vos; L. Budke; A. J. Vergroesen

    1962-01-01

    The radioprotective activity of a number of biological amines, disulfide ; compounds and thiols at various concentrations was tested in an in vitro system, ; based on the cloning technique devised by Puck et al. It was found that none of ; the biological amines (histamine, adrenaline, noradrenaline, and serotonin) or ; disulfide compounds (cystamine and cystine) showed a protective

  10. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy with a Self-Calibrating Fiber Optic Probe Bing Yu*, Henry Fu, and Nimmi Ramanujam

    E-print Network

    Ramanujam, Nimmi

    University, Durham, NC, 27708 * Tel: 919-660-5033, Email: bing.yu@duke.edu 2. Motivation · UV-Visible DRS and with different instruments and probes. Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics 3. Experimental Setup · The UV-VIS DRS. Reference Phantom 14 Spectralon Puck Standard Self-Calibration Day 1 Day 2 Combined Day 1 Day 2 Combined

  11. A Robotic Platform for Studying the Evolution of Communication

    E-print Network

    Floreano, Dario

    ) capabilities, allowing for some powerful on-board calculations. For more complex processing, the e-puck can: A replicate of the experiment in Chapter ??. Robots explore the arena containing food (bottom left) and poison to create thousands of different colors, and are controlled by powerful integrated lighting management chips

  12. Principal's Report write to report on McGill's recent accomplishments and our plans for the

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    and autism to Canada's first cloned pigs,the Martlets'first national hockey championship, the launch--again the most nationally.This year, our outstanding McGill faculty again took home many prestigious

  13. AUTUMN PROGRAMME 2011 3RD OCT -18TH DECREINVENTYOUR FREETIME

    E-print Network

    Oakley, Jeremy

    entrance to Bar One at 13:00. The ice hockey will finish at 16:00. Tickets £7. JUDO Judo improves your, falls and techniques that make Judo the exciting and fast paced sport it is. Everybody is welcome

  14. ParentFall 2009 BOSTON UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Fall 2009Parent About This Magazine The Boston University Parents Program links parents and other of the Women's Resource Center and a member of our championship hockey team. We also want to highlight Parents

  15. The BosTon College Chronicle may 7, 2009-vol. 17 no. 17

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jianyu

    . "The architecture of the build- ings, the landscape architecture and the efforts of the crew are what Honors Program and on the BC women's ice hockey team. What she didn't know was how impor- tant the latter

  16. ERFAHRUNGSBERICHT AUSTAUSCHJAHR AN DER UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN,

    E-print Network

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    begeistert staunen. Die Stadtstruktur Wenn die Kanadier von etwas viel haben, dann ist es Platz. In Saskatoon's auf zur Winterwanderung! Freizeit und Kultur Die Kanadier lieben Live Musik in Bars, Bier und Hockey

  17. Company Name: Canadian Camp Staff Contact Name: Rob Hochberg (Director)

    E-print Network

    , Waterfront, Baseball, Soccer, In-Line Hockey, Outdoor Adventure, Lacrosse, Dance, Drama and Music the online application form #12;Company Goal: Canadian Camp Staff's goal is to recruit the most talented

  18. BRUCE BARTLETT PECKHAM October, 2008 Department of Mathematics and Statistics Birthdate: October 20, 1954

    E-print Network

    Peckham, Bruce B.

    Talented (High School)Youth Mathematics Program Teacher/Coach, Delbarton School, Morristown, N.J. Sept., 1979 - June,1982 - taught Math, Physics, Computer Science - coached soccer, hockey, lacrosse, the first

  19. BRUCE BARTLETT PECKHAM Curriculum Vitae March, 2011 Department of Mathematics and Statistics Birthdate: October 20, 1954

    E-print Network

    Peckham, Bruce B.

    of Minnesota Talented (High School)Youth Mathematics Program Teacher/Coach, Delbarton School, Morristown, N.J. Sept., 1979 - June,1982 - taught Math, Physics, Computer Science - coached soccer, hockey, lacrosse

  20. McGill Athletics seeks Production Crew! McGill Athletics & Recreation is looking for outgoing sports-enthusiasts interested in gaining

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    ://www.ssncanada.ca/ for last year's games). We are looking for camera people, as well as on air talent for play Operator Commentator I am highly confident in my knowledge of: Football Soccer Basketball Volleyball Hockey

  1. Concussions in the NHL: A narrative review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Izraelski, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Ice hockey has been identified as a sport with a high risk for concussions. Given the health sequelae associated with the injury, a great deal of attention has been placed on its diagnosis, management and return-to-play protocols. The highest level of ice hockey in North America is played in the National Hockey League (NHL), and concussions pose a serious threat to the health of the players and the game itself. Unfortunately, the scientific literature on concussions in ice hockey is derived mostly from research conducted on youth and amateur levels of play, leaving a gap in our knowledge at the professional level. This narrative review attempts to summarize what is known about concussion incidence, mechanisms of injury and risk factors in the NHL. PMID:25550658

  2. NO PLACE IS COMPLETE WITHOUT TREES. A HOME WITHOUT TREES IS CHARMLESS.

    E-print Network

    a position as a forester for the:: State of Wisconsin, being stationed at Tomahawk and, later, Waus has been an active booster of junior hockey, hdping [Q organize and assist the local leagues. Son Pete

  3. Chip Knight Professors Art and Dethier

    E-print Network

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    repairs, most recently to rectify drainage issues in 2006. The varsity baseball diamond was moved from the site in 2004 to make room for the Renzie Lamb synthetic turf lacrosse and field hockey facility (see

  4. April 6, 2010 15:30 Journal of Statistical Computation & Simulation pointspreadrev Journal of Statistical Computation & Simulation

    E-print Network

    Lengyel, Tamás

    , e.g., baseball, hockey, and soccer, independent Poisson random variables might be used. Point for betting purposes [see 1]. On the other hand, there are some infamous cases involving point-shaving to beat

  5. Aggression in Sport: Its Implications for Character Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanDyke, Roger R.

    1980-01-01

    The premise that "sports builds character" is scrutinized through a discussion of several contact sports--boxing, hockey, and football. The fine line between assertiveness and aggression is explored, and the interrelationship between society and sports is investigated. (JN)

  6. Lionel Charles Renwick (Rennick) Emmett (1913-96): physician and Olympian.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Tamoghna; Datta, Adrija; Chandra, Shivika

    2012-08-01

    Lionel Charles Renwick Emmett, a physician who trained in pre-independent India as a medical student, participated in the 1936 Berlin Summer Olympics as a part of the Indian field hockey team that won the Gold Medal. PMID:22892304

  7. TABLE OF CONTENTS General Information 1

    E-print Network

    Sharp, Kim

    Constitution 8-10 Procedures for Starting a Club 11 Club Responsibilities and Requirements 12 Club Position-ed Tennis · Roller Hockey · Badminton · Gymnastics · Ping Pong · Squash · Swimming · Women's Basketball

  8. SUMMER CAMPS APPLICATION 2014

    E-print Network

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    FOR POSITION (please circle): Counselor / Instructor / Supervisor / Leadership POSITION LAST YEAR (please: ______________________________________________ PLEASE DESCRIBE THE RESPONSITBILITIES AND DUTIES YOUR POSITIONS REQUIRED LAST YEAR: PLEASE LIST OTHER HANDBALL SOCCER ULTIMATE BADMINTON FENCING SOFTBALL VOLLEYBALL BASKETBALL FIELD HOCKEY SQUASH TENNIS CO

  9. TBI Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention

    MedlinePLUS

    ... direct pressure if you think there could be skull fracture Monitor breathing and alertness; if breathing or movement ... motorcycle Playing football, ice hockey or any contact sport Roller skating or skateboarding Playing baseball or softball ...

  10. EXPLORING THE COMMUNITY Throughout the year, many exciting events take place on the University of Michigan campus.

    E-print Network

    Eustice, Ryan

    , such as football, hockey, and men's basketball. Ann Arbor The University of Michigan is located right in the middle waiting room benches, baggage cart, and other memorabilia. #12;Entertainment and night life in Ann Arbor

  11. Bishop's College School -Residential Supervisor Position

    E-print Network

    it was a great time, coaching kids on how to play Football and Hockey, coaching them through the rough points looking for tutors capable of tutoring in Science. (Mostly Chemistry, Math and Physics) -Work in a private

  12. {jhchang, btzhang}@scai.snu.ac.kr . (sparseness)

    E-print Network

    .space Recreation (2000) Rec.autos, rec.motorcycles rec.sport.baseball, rec.sport.hockey #12;. 2 . Helmholtz machine dwn dwp dwn dwn wp m dp wp dwp dwpdpwI 2 ( %) `Recreation' 4 `autos' `motorcycle', `baseball' `hockey.2 (6) 32.1 (8). Recreation 9.7 (5) 11.6 (5) 29.2 (8) P(w|z) 10 1 bike, ride, good, riding, motorcycle

  13. `I wish there didn't have to be gay people' The logics of homophobia

    E-print Network

    Bontcheva, Kalina

    `I wish there didn't have to be gay people' The logics of homophobia Jodie Clark Sheffield Hallam;Homophobia in a hockey team I wish there didn't have to be gay people Oh! Everyone's gay! I'm told that I'll end up being gay because I'm a hockey player #12;Sullivan claims it's in the water in her house 'cause

  14. An investigation of service quality in municipal recreation setting

    E-print Network

    MacKay, Kelly Jo-Marie

    1987-01-01

    , gentlemen's hockey and senior trips. They were selected based on Lovelock's ( 1984) classification of services. A systematic random sample was used to select the programs from each of the four activities. A cluster sample of all participants in each... Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Significant Differences in Mean Scale Values For Hockey Respondents Segmented According to Variables Recommend and Problem 66 Previous Participation of Respondents by Program Area . . . . . . . . . ~ 67...

  15. Energetic materials destruction using molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

    1994-04-29

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. LLNL has built a small-scale unit to test the destruction of HE using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process. In addition to the high explosive HMX, destruction has been carried out on RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. Also destroyed was a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, destruction has been carried out on a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, and PBX-9404.

  16. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonating Tatb Cones and Arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Chidester, Steven K.

    2007-12-01

    Previously established Ignition and Growth reactive flow models for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosives LX-17 and PBX 9502 are applied to recent experimental detonation propagation/failure experiments using unconfined cones, confined arcs, and unconfined arcs. The conical experiments are initially overdriven by the convergent geometry and then fail to detonate at smaller diameters than do unconfined cylindrical charges when the radial rarefaction wave lowers the shock pressure and temperature and thus decreases the chemical energy release rate. Unconfined TATB arcs detonate more slowly than cylindrical charges on the inner surface and exhibit large phase velocities on the outer surface. Confinement reduces but does not eliminate these effects. The Ignition and Growth model calculations based on parameters normalized to a great deal of one-, two- and three-dimensional detonation propagation data reproduce these features and agree closely with experimental detonation velocity and arrival time data.

  17. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonating TATB Cones and Arcs*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2007-06-01

    . The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based explosives LX-17 and PBX 9502 is applied to recent experimental data on converging conical charges plus confined and unconfined arc charges. The conical charges are at first overdriven by the converging flow and then fail to detonate as the radial rarefaction wave slows the reaction rate. Unconfined TATB arcs detonate more slowly than cylindrical charges on the inner surface and exhibit large phase velocities on the outer surface. Confinement reduces but does not eliminate these effects. The model calculations reproduce these features and agree well with experimental detonation velocity and arrival time data. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  18. Summary of Shock Initiation Data for TATB-based Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S

    2010-04-03

    This short summary of previously published data was compiled to provide the actual in-situ gauge data to allow modeling of these experiments. Although the purpose here is to fulfill a deliverable for a JOWOG 9 Focused Exchange (09-006), it is just as applicable to other exchanges as well. The TATB materials described here are Ultra Fine (UF) TATB and LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), with the details of the experiments provided in the prior publications. The data is provided in the appendices of the document, but will be provided electronically as text files due to being amenable to importing into the code in that manner for comparison.

  19. Gauge Run-To Data and Failure/dead Zone Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souers, P. Clark; Vitello, Peter; Vandersall, Kevin S.

    2009-12-01

    Previous shock initiation run-to-detonation experiments on energetic materials were plotted with distance and time to get a single distance/time to detonation. Modern shots utilize enough gauges so that the distance-time data can be differentiated, which shows not only the usual inflection pressure point before detonation, referred to here as Pb, but also a second, low-pressure inflection, referred to here as Pa, that marks rapid ramp-up of the initiation. An analysis of the TATB based LX-17 and PBX 9502 in addition to the LLM-105 based RX-55 data shows that both Pa and Pb increase linearly with the initiation pressure created by the flyer plate. This contradicts the current method in the Tarantula failure/dead zone model, which uses constant pressure boundaries between reaction regions. Modeling changes required by the new data will be considered.

  20. Modelling detonation in ultrafine tatb hemispherical boosters using crest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Nicholas J.

    2012-03-01

    Hemispherical ultrafine TATB boosters can initiate detonation in the TATB-based explosive LX-17. For accurate hydrocode predictions of experiments using this combination of explosives, it is important to accurately model the detonation wave emerging from the booster material since this may influence the detonation behaviour in the main charge. Since ultrafine TATB exhibits non-ideal detonation behaviour, its response should be modelled using reactive flow. In this paper, the CREST reactive burn model, which uses entropy-dependent reaction rates to simulate explosive behaviour, is applied to LLNL experimental data obtained from ultrafine TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three initial temperatures (ambient, -20°C, and -54°C). The ambient temperature data is used to develop an initial CREST model for ultrafine TATB which is then subsequently applied to the cold data. A comparison of the experimental and modelling results is presented showing that the model gives good agreement to experiment at both ambient and cold temperatures

  1. Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT7 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 7 Section 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

    2008-06-25

    The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT7 experiment was fired on April 3, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT7, 160 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 20, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The PDV earliest signal extinction was 50.7 microseconds at 45 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 65.0 microseconds at 20 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 55 millimeters and at 15.2 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1447 meters per second. At 65 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2360 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.61. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 49 kilobars at 23.3 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 4.6 microseconds.

  2. Plutonium Immobilization Canister Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, E.L.

    1999-01-26

    This disposition of excess plutonium is determined by the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (SPD-EIS) being prepared by the Department of Energy. The disposition method (Known as ''can in canister'') combines cans of immobilized plutonium-ceramic disks (pucks) with vitrified high-level waste produced at the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This is intended to deter proliferation by making the plutonium unattractive for recovery or theft. The envisioned process remotely installs cans containing plutonium-ceramic pucks into storage magazines. Magazines are then remotely loaded into the DWPF canister through the canister neck with a robotic arm and locked into a storage rack inside the canister, which holds seven magazines. Finally, the canister is processed through DWPF and filled with high-level waste glass, thereby surrounding the product cans. This paper covers magazine and rack development and canister loading concepts.

  3. Petrographic composition and directional properties of tills on the NW surroundings of the Gda?sk Bay, Northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wo?niak, Piotr Pawe?; Czubla, Piotr; Wysiecka, Gra?yna; Drapella, Ma?gorzata

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, the authors focus on some selected lithological properties of tills: petrographic composition of the 5-10 mm fraction, petrographic composition of the coarse fraction (>20 mm, analysed by the indicator erratics method) and the long axis orientation of clasts. As the study area the authors chose a territory located in Northern Poland on the NW surroundings of the Gda?sk Bay - between Puck and Lake ?arnowieckie. It was found that during the Last Glaciation the study region was fed mainly from the territory of Sweden, middle and south-eastern Sweden in particular. There existed, in parallel with the dominant (in the study region) NNW ice-sheet advance direction, also another, local ice-sheet advance route manifested in the east, which deposited a till bed in the neighbourhood of Puck.

  4. Nine Planets: Planetary Picture List

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This section of The Nine Planets provides links to internet solar system images of the nine planets and their moons. Images include the Sun, Mercury, Venus, the Earth and Moon, Mars (Phobos, Deimos), Jupiter (Amalthea, Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto), Saturn (Pan, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Epimetheus, Janus, Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), Uranus (Puck, Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon), Neptune (Triton, Proteus), and Pluto with Charon. Miscellanous images include asteroids, comets, meteorites, and spacecraft.

  5. Moisture Outgassing Rates from TATB-Formulations: Experiments and Kinetic Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Dinh, L N; Small IV, W

    2009-07-29

    Moisture outgassing rates from materials are of interest and importance to a variety of different fields. Because water can attack and accelerate decomposition, aging, or rusting of various parts, the assembly of an apparatus with 'wet' materials can shorten the lifetime of the apparatus. Outgassing of moisture from materials can be quite slow and a material that is seemingly dry at the time of assembly may slowly release water over years. This slow release of water will compromise the other constituents of the apparatus (e.g. electrical components, metals, organic materials) and shorten the lifetime of the apparatus. For apparatuses that are expensive or laborious to construct, it is especially important to understand and be able to predict the mechanisms and rates of water release from various materials. Such an understanding can support the development of accurate estimates of the apparatus's serviceable age and may allow for mitigation strategies in order to protect other parts from water. Energetic materials such as TATB based PBX-9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F 800) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F) pose a particularly challenging problem because they are heterogeneous materials with potentially many different sources and mechanisms of water release. Water molecules could be adsorbed into the polymeric binder matrix, trapped in occlusions within the polymer and the TATB crystals/particles, or trapped within defect sites in the TATB crystal. Finally, many studies indicate that water is a decomposition product under rapid heating conditions, at high temperatures and/or high pressure. Previous studies have measured the water release rate(s) from LX-17 or PBX-9502 prill/powder in order to establish oven drying times prior to use. These studies limited their time frame to a few days or a week of drying. Other studies have looked at the rate of water release of large pressed parts contained in sealed containers. Finally, some studies have looked at the rate of water diffusion through pressed parts, or the effects of wet vs. dry machining, or the influence of the synthesis methods in the amount of water present. There are a few different models that have been developed to predict the rate of water release from LX-17 or PBX-9502. These models are, to some extent, limited by the limitations of the experiments. Because all these experiments looked at water release over a relatively short period of time and left the samples relatively undamaged, they serve as a lower bound. In this work, we perform experiments and develop models that can serve as an upper bound on the rate and amount of water that can be released. Our experimental approach is to use temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and monitor the rate and amount of water release as a function of temperature. We analyzed our experimental data using two different kinetic analysis methods (isoconversional analysis and nth-order Arrhenius kinetic fits) and used the results to make predictions. The suitability of these kinetic analysis methods as well as the applicability of these experiments to long term aging (e.g. years) issues are discussed. Using the kinetics from our experiments, we predict the water release at temperature and timescales relevant to the existing literature. Based on our analysis and comparison with older data, the kinetic model(s) developed in this work serve as a relatively accurate (i.e. order of magnitude) method for predicting the water release under a variety of thermal histories.

  6. Flexural vibration and the perception of sting in hand-held sports Daniel A. Russella)

    E-print Network

    Russell, Daniel A.

    between a ball and a baseball or softball bat occurs at the so-called "sweet spot" of the bat. However, for impacts away from the sweet spot, the resulting vibration can result in significant pain between ball and hockey stick almost always occur on the face of the head away from the "sweet spot

  7. Local Bone Mineral Density, Muscle Strength, and Exercise in Adolescent Boys: A Comparative Study of Two Groups with Different Muscle Strength and Exercise Levels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Nordström; G. Nordström; K. Thorsen; R. Lorentzon

    1996-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of physical activity and muscle strength on bone mineral density (BMD) of the tuberositas tibiae in adolescent boys. Two groups with different exer- cise levels were compared. The high activity group con- sisted of 20 subjects (age 15.9 ± 0.3) from a junior ice hockey team. The reference

  8. Determining the Number of Games Needed to Guarantee an NHL Playoff Spot

    E-print Network

    van Beek, Peter

    Determining the Number of Games Needed to Guarantee an NHL Playoff Spot Tyrel Russell and Peter van a playoff spot in the National Hockey League (NHL). Along with determining how many games need to be won is to earning a playoff position. The problem of determining how close a team is to clinching a playoff spot can

  9. UVM resources the community can use The UVM Communications webpage -http://www.uvm.edu/~uvmpr/

    E-print Network

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    ://uvmathletics.com/ · Tickets range from $5 for lacrosse and soccer ($3 for kids under 17) to $22 for men's ice hockey offers recreational, sports, and other activities to the community including · Youth camps, family activities, and fitness-related classes (Senior Fitness, swim lessons, Adventure Day Camp, CPR and First Aid

  10. Congratulations to the 2009 Student Organization Recognition Banquet Award Recipients!

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    Theta Fraternity, Inc Club Sport Awards Coach of the Year: Jose Bencosme, Judo Advisor Award: Kristin Appleton, Ice Hockey Alumni Award: Chuck Jefferson, Judo Player of the Year: Jeff Fong, Judo Play of the Year: Derek Marrero, Wrestling Soul Award: Yuzo Koga, Judo Team of the Year

  11. BOSTONIA WinterSpring 2013 freshman, but the 18-year-

    E-print Network

    Goldberg, Bennett

    EXTRA Watch a video about Terrier Matt Grzelcyk (SMG'16), who has been drafted by the Boston Bruins to becoming a hometown success story for hockey-crazed Boston. Grzelcyk (SMG'16) grew up a rink rat in Charlestown, Mass., the son of a longtime Zamboni driver at Boston's TD Garden. Two years ago, he committed

  12. Summer 2014 BOSTONIA 9 If the 2014 Winter

    E-print Network

    of Terrier Olympic hockey standouts, including the famous 1980 "Miracle on Ice" squad members, team captain taken a yearlong hiatus from Boston University to train for the 2014 Olympics and plans to return for her final year of Terrier eligibility in the fall. She set a program record for assists while leading

  13. Questionable Supervision by Physical Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, Thomas H.; Gimbert, Tonya L.

    2013-01-01

    According to Court records, student Pedro Godoy (Godoy) filed a suit against the school district (Central Islip Union Free School District) and teacher Otis R. Scerbo (Scerbo), seeking to recover damages for personal injuries allegedly sustained by Godoy while participating in a game of floor hockey during physical education class. Scerbo (the…

  14. Proposed Renovations for Lansing Chapman Rink Energy Efficiency Improvements

    E-print Network

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    an integral part of Williams College campus since 1961, serving as home ice for the men's and women's Varsity.8 Electric Zamboni and Edger $118,700 $7,433.12 23.9 Sale of Existing Zamboni -$10,000 (estimate) Total $285 of Williams College campus since 1961, serving as home ice for the men's and women's Varsity hockey teams

  15. CPW Midway 2012 6.270 Autonomous Robot Design

    E-print Network

    Williams, Brian C.

    Women in Physics 120 Vietnamese Students 99 VooDoo Magazine 133 WMBR Radio 18 Women's Ice Hockey Club Undergraduate Students Association 124 Black Students' Union 125 Black Women's Alliance 27 Brain Trust 29 Camp of Black Engineers 42 Natya 96 Network of Sloan Undergraduate Women 56 Ohms 69 OrigaMIT 143 Orthodox

  16. Construct-a-Glove. Science by Design Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulis, Lee

    This book is one of four books in the Science-by-Design Series created by TERC and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). It offers high school students a challenging, hands-on opportunity to compare the function and design of many types of handwear from a hockey mitt to a surgical glove, and design and test a glove to their own…

  17. The Role of Personal Experience in the Neural Processing of Action-Related Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ian M.; Mattarella-Micke, Andrew; Cieslak, Matthew; Nusbaum, Howard C.; Small, Steven L.; Beilock, Sian L.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated how auditory language processing is modified by a listener's previous experience with the specific activities mentioned in the speech. In particular, we asked whether neural responses related to language processing depend on one's experience with the action-based content of this language. Ice-hockey players and novices passively…

  18. Florida Atlantic How Will You

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    , baseball, basketball and hockey. We have the convenience of being within 30 miles of two airports -- Palm Beach International Airport to the north and the Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport to promote safe, healthy and sustainable communities by taking part in immersive internships with various

  19. Running performance after adaptation to acutely intermittent hypoxia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew R. Wood; Martin N. Dowson; Will G. Hopkins

    2006-01-01

    To quantify the effects of adaptation to acutely intermittent hypoxia on running performance, we randomized 29 trained male hockey and soccer players in double-blind fashion to altitude or placebo groups for 15 days of daily use of a functional or placebo hypoxic re-breathing device. Each day's exposure consisted of alternately breathing stale and fresh air for 6 and 4 min

  20. RTS Games as TestBed for RealTime AI Research Michael Buro and Timothy Furtak

    E-print Network

    Buro, Michael

    games sales and companies strive for large market penetration only about 15% of the CPU time and memory motivates AI research in the area of real­time strategy (RTS) games and de- scribes the road hockey, soccer, basketball teams, etc. -- and real­time strategy (RTS) games where players command armies

  1. The Lived Experience of a Doctoral Student: The Process of Learning and Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callary, Betina; Werthner, Penny; Trudel, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The PhD experience is often a transition from student to future faculty member, which involves considerable learning and development (Glaze, 2002; Hockey, 2004). Using a lifelong learning perspective (Jarvis, 2009), the purpose of this article is to explore, through a reflective self-study, my process of learning throughout the PhD degree. In this…

  2. Athletes, Doctors, and Lawyers with First Names Beginning with "D" Die Sooner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Ernest L.; Kruger, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    For many people, names have symbolic power that extends to their timing of death. This study examined the relationship between the symbolic significance of the first letters in the names of professional athletes (baseball, football, hockey, and basketball) and their longevity. A similar analysis was performed for doctors (radiologists,…

  3. Sport Clubs RECord Men's Soccer -Oct 9

    E-print Network

    Sport Clubs RECord Men's Soccer - Oct 9 Vs. Texas 7:30pm Penberthy 8 Baseball--Oct 10 Alumni Game 8pm Brazos Valley Bank Ballpark Men's Soccer B - Oct 11 Vs. UT Arlington 3pm Penberthy 8 Ice Hockey Rec Center Courts 5, 6, & 7 Women's Soccer--Oct 17 Vs. SFA 1pm Penberthy 7 Women's Water Polo - Oct 17

  4. SEEDS in Residence Activity Descriptions 2013 Activity 1: Capture the Flag and Haunted Walk

    E-print Network

    Ellis, Randy

    participants! Whether you can sing, dance, play an instrument or juggle, we want you to bring YOUR talent! You participants! Whether you can sing, dance, play an instrument or juggle, we want you to bring YOUR talent! You's University Fencing Team. Next up, play an ESU favourite: a soccer and hockey hybrid affectionately deemed

  5. Factors affecting the relative age effect in NHL athletes

    PubMed Central

    Parent-Harvey, Caroline I.; Desjardins, Christophe; Harvey, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The relative age effect (RAE) has been reported for a number of different activities. The RAE is the phenomena whereby players born in the first few months of a competition year are advantaged for selection to elite sports. Much of the literature has identified elite male athletics, such as the National Hockey League (NHL), as having consistently large RAEs. We propose that RAE may be lessened in the NHL since the last examination. Methods We examined demographic and selection factors to understand current NHL selection biases. Results We found that RAE was weak and was only evident when birth dates were broken into year halves. Players born in the first half of the year were relatively advantaged for entry into the NHL. We found that the RAE is smaller than reported in previous studies. Intraplayer comparisons for multiple factors, including place of birth, country of play, type of hockey played, height and weight, revealed no differences. Players who were not drafted (e.g., free agents) or who played university hockey in North America had no apparent RAE. Conclusion We found little evidence of an RAE in the current NHL player rosters. A larger study of all Canadian minor hockey intercity teams could help determine the existence of an RAE. PMID:24869606

  6. Case Based Game Play in the RoboCup Four-Legged League

    E-print Network

    Nebel, Bernhard

    -Ludwigs-Universitt Freiburg, Georges-Khler-Allee, Geb. 52, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany Abstract. Robot Soccer involves planning game plays. Game plays are widely used in many team sports e.g. soccer, hockey, polo, and rugby. One plays will prove useful in robot soccer. Our model supports game play selection in key game situations

  7. Perceptual Judgments of Sports Officials are Influenced by their Motor and Visual Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alexandra Pizzera; Markus Raab

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relation between previous motor and visual experience and current officiating experience of expert judges and referees and their judgments from an embodied cognition viewpoint. A total of 370 sports officials from soccer, handball, ice hockey, and trampoline took part in the study. Analyses revealed that cognitive judgments are related to motor, visual, and officiating experience to different

  8. 76 FR 43259 - Foreign-Trade Zone 109-Watertown, NY, Application for Manufacturing Authority, North American...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...Authority, North American Tapes, LLC, (Textile Athletic Tape), Watertown, NY A request...tape (e.g., trainers, hockey) with textile backing material for the U.S. market...are woven cotton and polyester/cotton textile fabrics (duty rates: 10.5,...

  9. A Battle over a Name in the Land of the Sioux: A Controversy over a Mascot at the U. of North Dakota Turned Surreal When a Benefactor Threatened To Withdraw $100 Million.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownstein, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the controversy that erupted when the University of North Dakota planned to drop its "Fighting Sioux" nickname and mascot, a benefactor announced his intention of withdrawing a $100 million gift and halting construction of an ice hockey arena. Describes the implications of the university's decision to retain the name for its athletic…

  10. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  11. giving.umn.edu determination overcame distance. Because the unsolvable was invitation enough. Because we can change the course of history. Because tomorrow's visionaries

    E-print Network

    Weiblen, George D

    TITUTIons." --Nadine and William McGuire, donors to the McGuire Scholarship Program and the McGuire Translational Research Building WaltEr loW, professor, Department of Neurosurgery By moving my lab to the Mcguire helping to save lives. Patti Hamilton, '11, hockey pep band and marching band color guard member, McGuire

  12. Fit by Five.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Maureen

    1978-01-01

    Describes a preschool program in which all skills, including academic and social skills, are taught through movement. Children are introduced to over 300 physical activities and sports in a year's time including: balance beam, parallel bars, trampoline, swimming, hockey, basketball, golf, archery, track, and volleyball. (JMB)

  13. Knowledge Representation and Reasoning for MixedInitiative Planning

    E-print Network

    Stefankovic, Daniel

    and a good friend ever since; Marc Light, Polly Pook, and Mark Crovella, my co­conspirators from 1989 (from Backstreets to here---what a trip); Graham Katz for helping me pace myself; Tom Leblanc for the hockey; Nat Hwang, Peter Heeman, Brad Miller, Marc, Nat, Len, and James. Finally, the people who make the department

  14. A Training System for the Japanese Art of Flower Arrangement

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Takara; M. Kosugi

    Computer Graphics (CG) and Virtual Reality (VR) technologies have rapidly improved in recent years. It enabled us to develop some useful systems such as air hockey, catch ball, tennis and horseback riding for sports field, surgical simulations and support systems for medical field, calligraphy and flower arrangement for educational field. The good training systems have force feedback for users to

  15. A Survey to Determine to What Extent Ohlone College Is Meeting the Needs of Student Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, John

    A questionnaire was administered to all 1978 fall quarter student athletes at Ohlone College (California) to assess their goals and needs, and to find out to what degree student experience matched expectation. There was an 86% (N=85) response rate from the varsity men and women teams (volleyball, field hockey, soccer, water polo, and football).…

  16. What are the benefits of hosting a major league sports franchise?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jordan Rappaport; Chad Wilkerson

    2001-01-01

    Over the last few decades the number of U.S. metropolitan areas large enough to host a franchise from one of the four major professional sports leagues has soared. Even as major league baseball, football, basketball and hockey have expanded to include more franchises, demand by metro areas continues to exceed supply. Metro areas have thus been forced to compete with

  17. University Communications & Marketing P.O Box 1002

    E-print Network

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    of Varsity Sports Women's Basketball Cross Country Field Hockey Lacrosse Soccer Softball Swimming Tennis.redzonemedia.com) and on ESPN radio Renovations Recent athletics facilities renovations include the installation of synthetic.The scoreboard was replaced and permanent visitor seating was installed on the north side of the field. Corporate

  18. Sports, Youth and Character: A Critical Survey. CIRCLE Working Paper 44

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullinwider, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    Roughly forty million boys and girls between the ages of 5 and 18 take part in organized athletic activities, most of which are not school-based. Boys and girls play in sports as varied as swimming, baseball, soccer, wrestling, and field hockey. The great majority participate in "recreational" leagues in which teams enroll all-comers, compete…

  19. Concussion in Sports

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward M. Wojtys; David Hovda; Greg Landry; Arthur Boland; Mark Lovell; Michael McCrea; Jeffrey Minkoff

    1999-01-01

    This is a special report of the findings of the Concussion Workshop, sponsored by the AOSSM in Chicago in December 1997. Here follows a listing of the members of the workshop: Julian Bailes, MD, American Association of Neurological Surgeons; Arthur Boland, MD, AOSSM; Charles Burke III, MD, National Hockey League; Robert Cantu, MD, American College of Sports Medicine; Letha “Etty”

  20. Learning from Human-Generated Lists Kwang-Sung Jun (deltakam@cs.wisc.edu)

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Xiaojin "Jerry"

    lion 8 tiger 9 bear ... ... 11 armadillo #12;Example 1: Verbal Fluency "List examples of animals ... ... 11 armadillo #12;Example 2: Feature Volunteering 4 · Simple rules: e.g. skates hockey bear ... ... 11 armadillo Order Item 1 baseball bat Baseball ... ... 7 quarterback Football 8

  1. Winthrop House Has a new pair of

    E-print Network

    morning's headlines, every day's con- versationsremindusthatweremaininthemidst of an economic downturn, and where PresidentlaysoutchangeofpaceinAllston I Need-based aid jumps 18 percent, page 5 I Science programs contest, played amid the strains of the rockin' Harvard band (above), women's hockey bat- tle

  2. Spinal Column and Spinal Cord Injuries in Mountain BikersA 13Year Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily R. Dodwell; Brian K. Kwon; Barbara Hughes; David Koo; Andrea Townson; Allan Aludino; Richard K. Simons; Charles G. Fisher; Marcel F. Dvorak; Vanessa K. Noonan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Multiple studies have described in general the injuries associated with mountain biking, and detailed accounts of spine injuries sustained in hockey, gymnastics, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and paragliding have previously been published. However, no large-scale detailed assessment of mountain biking associated spinal fractures and spinal cord injuries has previously been published.Purpose: This study was undertaken to describe the patient demographics,

  3. Motion Capture Technologies Jessica Hodgins

    E-print Network

    Treuille, Adrien

    Control #12;What games use motion capture? · NBA live · PGA tour · NHL hockey · Legends of Wrestling 2 angles to drive an articulated model · Motion paths can then be combined to give greater control #12;What are hard ­ Complicated motion of clothing ­ Explosions #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Technology

  4. Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet The Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet 2009, the most anticipated sports event of the year,

    E-print Network

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet 11 - 18th The Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet 2009, the most anticipated sports event of the year, was inaugurated on 11 December 2009 th Every year the sports meet. In the main Inter-IIT Sports Meet IITK reached the semi finals of 7 out of 8 games. The Hockey and Football

  5. APPROVED 3/11/13 Minutes of the Meeting of the Committee on Graduate Studies

    E-print Network

    Hockey game. Grad student ability to pay in a payment plan has been taken away and replaced approved. 3. Remarks from the Chairperson 4. Remarks from the Dean of the Graduate School 183 Nominations. Looking for faculty members to be judges at the conference. Took 200 Grad and Prof students to MSU UM

  6. On Probabilistic Excitement of Sports Games Jan Vecer, Tomoyuki Ichiba, Mladen Laudanovic,

    E-print Network

    Vecer, Jan

    at soccer games for which the theoretical win expectancy can be well approximated from a Poisson model was independently estimated by betting markets. Thus it was possible to compute the expected and the realized evolution could be approximated well by Markov models include baseball, tennis, soccer, or hockey. Win

  7. Modifying Intramural Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    1981-01-01

    Standard sports rules can be altered to improve the game for intramural participants. These changes may improve players' attitudes, simplify rules for officials, and add safety features to a game. Specific rule modifications are given for volleyball, football, softball, floor hockey, basketball, and soccer. (JN)

  8. A Case Study Objectively Assessing Female Physical Activity Levels within the National Curriculum for Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Matthew; Daly-Smith, Andrew; Morley, David; McKenna, James

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the National Curriculum for Physical Education (NCPE) lesson themes and contexts on the profile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Fifteen, Year 9 Physical Education (PE) lessons were assessed within the lesson themes of Outwitting Opponents (OO) (delivered through field hockey

  9. Violence in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Donald L.

    Increasing violence in sports is deplored, and a warning is issued on an apparent trend toward antisocial behavior. Contact sports such as hockey and football are cited as typically engendering aggression among athletes, but spectator sports (boxing, car racing, basketball, and baseball) are also singled out as eliciting increasing violence on the…

  10. COORDINATED AVIFAUNAL ROADCOUNTS (CAR) INFORMATION SHEET No. 3 September 2013

    E-print Network

    de Villiers, Marienne

    of southern Africa and some useful tips to distinguish between them. All three bustards, Kori Bustard-rainfall isohyets in southern Africa. It is widespread in the semi-arid regions in the western half of southern maps from Roberts birds of southern Africa. 2005. 7th ed. Hockey, P.A.R., Dean, W.R.J. & Ryan, P

  11. Going with the Flow of Nosebleeds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... often, injuries to the outside of the nose, face, or head can cause nosebleeds. If this happens, you need to see a doctor right away. You can help prevent these types of nosebleeds by wearing protective gear, such as helmets for hockey, football, and baseball ...

  12. Speed-A-Way, Physical Education: 5551.14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Katheryn

    This course outline is a guide (grades 7-12) for teaching speed-a-way, a game combining soccer, basketball, speedball, and field hockey skills. The course format includes discussions, demonstrations, skills practice, films, and tests that focus on mastery of skills, understanding of rules and officiating, testing skill performance and rules…

  13. A Descriptive-Analytic Study of the Practice Field Behavior of a Winning Female Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Patt; Rife, Frank

    A winning collegiate field hockey coach was observed across seventeen practice sessions through one complete competitive season. A category system for the event recording of verbal and nonverbal behaviors delivered to the team and to the sixteen individual players produced descriptive-analytic information about relative behavior frequencies for…

  14. Beyond Women's Collegiate Athletics. Opportunities to Play for Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehr, Carolyn A.; Washington, Martha A.

    1987-01-01

    Despite the increased emphasis on women's sports and rising participation rates, women are still severely limited in careers as competitors or in sports-related occupations. Opportunities in basketball, volleyball, tennis, cross-country and track, softball, golf, soccer and field hockey, aquatic sports, and a few other sports are examined. (MT)

  15. An examination of nondestructive evaluation techniques for polymer matrix composite sandwich materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Roberts, Gary D.; Averbeck, Timothy; Jeanneau, Philippe; Quddus, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Structural sandwich materials composed of triaxially braided polymer matrix composite material face sheets sandwiching a foam core are being utilized for applications including aerospace components and recreational equipment. Since full scale components are being made from these sandwich materials, it is necessary to develop proper inspection practices for their manufacture and in field use. Specifically, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques need to be investigated for analysis of components made from these materials. Hockey blades made from sandwich materials were examined with multiple NDE techniques including thermographic, radiographic, and laser based methods to investigate the manufactured condition of blades and damage induced from play. Hockey blades in an as received condition and damaged blades used in play were investigated with each technique. NDE images from the blades were presented and discussed. Structural elements within each blade were observed with radiographic imaging. Damaged regions and some structural elements of the hockey blades were identified with thermographic imaging. With shearography, structural elements, damaged regions, and other material variations were detected in the hockey blades. Each technique's advantages and disadvantages were considered in making recommendations for inspection of components made from these types of materials.

  16. An Analysis of Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Polymer Matrix Composite Sandwich Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgriff, Laura M.; Roberts, Gary D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Zheng, Diahua; Averbeck, Timothy; Roth, Donald J.; Jeanneau, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Structural sandwich materials composed of triaxially braided polymer matrix composite material face sheets sandwiching a foam core are being utilized for applications including aerospace components and recreational equipment. Since full scale components are being made from these sandwich materials, it is necessary to develop proper inspection practices for their manufacture and in-field use. Specifically, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques need to be investigated for analysis of components made from these materials. Hockey blades made from sandwich materials and a flat sandwich sample were examined with multiple NDE techniques including thermographic, radiographic, and shearographic methods to investigate damage induced in the blades and flat panel components. Hockey blades used during actual play and a flat polymer matrix composite sandwich sample with damage inserted into the foam core were investigated with each technique. NDE images from the samples were presented and discussed. Structural elements within each blade were observed with radiographic imaging. Damaged regions and some structural elements of the hockey blades were identified with thermographic imaging. Structural elements, damaged regions, and other material variations were detected in the hockey blades with shearography. Each technique s advantages and disadvantages were considered in making recommendations for inspection of components made from these types of materials.

  17. Teaching Methods Effectiveness and the Acquisition of Psycho-Motor Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikulayo, Philomena Bolaji

    An experimental study was conducted to discover the relative effectiveness of five different instructional strategies on the acquisition of four psycho-motor skills associated with four physical sports (continuous volleying in volleyball, zig-zag dribbling in field hockey, headstand in gymnastics, and sail long jump in athletics). The subjects…

  18. Revenue Shares and Monopsonistic Behavior in Intercollegiate Athletics James Monks

    E-print Network

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    Collegiate Athletics Association. This paper examines the degree to which it is able to exploit this position. The major professional sports leagues in the United States (baseball, basketball, football, and hockey) all) alone generated $162.5 million in television revenue, while the men's NCAA basketball tournament

  19. Whom Will an Intrinsically Motivated Robot Learner Choose to Imitate from? Sao Mai Nguyen, Pierre-Yves Oudeyer

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -RIAC algorithm [9], to reach goals in a continuous task space, in the case of a complex, high-dimensional and con; and an active choice of goals in autonomous exploration. We illustrate through an air hockey game that SGIM socially guided exploration as de- fined in[1, 2, 3, 4] and intrinsic motivation [5, 6, 7, 8] based on SAGG

  20. History of Computer Games John E. Laird

    E-print Network

    Evett, Matthew

    ­ "Hockey" · First home TV game ­ analog not digital · 100,000 sold - $100/console ­ · 1973: ­ Pong · Fake spinoff from Atari · First game to use ROM ­ Atari: · First racing game (Trak 10) & maze chase: Bushnell sells Atari to Warner for $26 Million ­ Warner markets Pong to home as a single game ­ Breakout

  1. The Development of Ojibway Language Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pheasant-Williams, Shirley

    2003-01-01

    Revitalization of the Nishinaabeg language started in 1998 with the development of language materials. A committee on Nishinaabemwin orthography advised on the development of the text and writing system. Teaching methods follow the four parts of Medicine Wheel teachings: spiritual, emotional, physical, and mental. An interactive hockey game and a…

  2. The Pasternak Case and American Gender Equity Policy: Implications for Canadian High School Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaubier, Dean M.; Gadbois, Shannon A.; Stick, Sheldon L.

    2011-01-01

    In 2004 twin sisters Amy and Jesse Pasternak competed for the prospect of playing high school hockey, vying for the boys' team rather than the girls'. The sisters' opportunities were negated by the Manitoba High School Athletic Association (MHSAA). This paper examines the 2006 decision by the Manitoba Human Rights Commission and a 2008 judgment by…

  3. Social Cognitive Correlates of Young Adult Sport Competitors' Sunscreen Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berndt, Nadine C.; O'Riordan, David L.; Winkler, Elisabeth; McDermott, Liane; Spathonis, Kym; Owen, Neville

    2011-01-01

    Young adults participating in outdoor sports represent a high-risk group for excessive sun exposure. The purpose of this study was to identify modifiable social cognitive correlates of sunscreen use among young adult competitors. Participants aged 18 to 30 years who competed in soccer (n = 65), surf-lifesaving (n = 63), hockey (n = 61), and tennis…

  4. Hooliganism in the Shadow of the 9\\/11 Terrorist Attack and the Tsunami: Do Police Reduce Group Violence?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Panu Poutvaara; Mikael Priks

    2006-01-01

    This paper isolates the causal effect of policing on group violence, using unique panel data on self-reported crime by soccer and ice hockey hooligans. The problem of reverse causality from violence to policing is solved by two drastic reallocations of the Stockholm Supporter Police unit to other activities following the 9\\/11 terrorist attack in September 2001 and the Tsunami catastrophe

  5. Transition into College Sports: The Freshman Student-Athlete.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Dean; And Others

    Changes in attitude, motivation, and values take place in the academic, athletic, and social areas of student-athletes' lives during their freshman year of college. Twenty incoming college freshman athletes involved in "revenue" sports (football, basketball, and ice hockey) participated in this study and were interviewed in the fall and again in…

  6. Five Year Overview of Sport Injuries: The NAIRS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, William E.

    1982-01-01

    Data from a survey of institutional members of the National Athletic Injury/Illness Reporting System (NAIRS) are presented and discussed. Included are tables showing injuries reported in high schools and colleges and universities for male and female athletes in baseball, basketball, football, gymnastics, soccer, wrestling, field hockey, track and…

  7. Sports Penalties: An Alternative Means of Measuring Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Russell, Audrey M.

    1984-01-01

    Used the official records of all games played in the Western Hockey League (N=432) during a season for a Principal Components analysis of 19 aggressive penalties. Results suggested that inter-personal aggression in the sport is multiply determined and can arise for eight different sets of conditions or antecedents. (Author/LLL)

  8. Studies of Television and Youth Sports: Laboratory/Field Research on the Effects of Pro-Social and Anti-Social TV Models on Children/Youth in Sport/Athletics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Dick; And Others

    This study investigates the question of whether or not exposure to televised professional sports affects the social behavior of young people who themselves actively engage in those sports. Lacrosse, hockey, baseball were monitored on television, with students questioned about the impact the behavior of the players (pro-social and anti-social) has…

  9. York University Grants -Fiscal Year 2006-2007 Researcher Project Title Funder Total Funding Start Date End Date

    E-print Network

    of the cell cycle in skeletal muscle development and disease Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) $365 to measuring the effects of introducing body checking at the atom age level Lakehead University (Ontario Hockey, Samuel Anti-apoptotic signalling pathways in mammalian cells National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC

  10. Enhancing Semi-Supervised Document Clustering with Feature Supervision

    E-print Network

    Milios, Evangelos E.

    , Feature Supervision, Feature Reweight- ing, Text Cloud 1. INTRODUCTION Traditional document clustering-1-4503-0857-1/12/03 ...$10.00. (a) Text Cloud of Document A about Canadian Basketball (b) Text Cloud of Document B about Canadian Hockey Figure 1: Text Clouds of Two Documents in their own point of view instead of a universal

  11. Leadership Development of Team Captains in Collegiate Varsity Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grandzol, Christian; Perlis, Susan; Draina, Lois

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the leadership development of team captains and student-athletes engaged in NCAA Division III intercollegiate athletics at 6 private institutions of higher education. Student-athletes in the sports of men's and women's soccer, women's field hockey, men's and women's cross country, and women's tennis completed the 2nd edition of…

  12. UMassLowellM A G A Z I N E F O R A L U M N I A N D F R I E N D S WINTER 2011-2012

    E-print Network

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    and see all the activity for yourself. Civil War Book Club Alumni are invited to participate in "Let's Talk About It: Making Sense of the American Civil War" --a five-part discussion series led by History Skate @ Fenway Park Jan. 28: Delta Kappa Phi Reunion @ River Hawks vs. UMass Amherst hockey game

  13. The Analysis of the Thinking Styles and Creativity of the Sports Students Studying in the Different Fields of University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eraslan, Meric

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes the creativity and thinking levels of athletes studying at the different college departments; 61 female and 75 male athletes, a total of 136 ice-hockey players have participated in the research. As data collection tools, Thinking Styles Inventory and The Creativity Scale have been used in the study. SPSS 15.0 for Windows…

  14. Shock-wave initiation of heated plastified TATB detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmitsky, Igor; Rudenko, Vladimir; Gatilov, Leonid; Koshelev, Alexandr

    1999-06-01

    Explosive, plastified TATB, attracts attention with its weak sensitivity to shock loads and high temperature stability ( Pthreshold ? 6.5 GPa and Tcrit ? 250 0Q). However, at its cooling to T 250 0Q plastified TATB becomes as sensitive to shock load as octogen base HE: the excitation threshold reduces down to Pthreshold 2.0 GPa. The main physical reason for the HE sensitivity change is reduction in density at heating and, hence, higher porosity of the product (approximately from 2Moreover, increasing temperature increases the growth rate of uhotf spots which additionally increases the shock sensitivity [1]. Heated TATB experiments are also conducted at VNIIEF. The detonation excitation was computed within 1D program system MAG using EOS JWL for HE and EP and LLNL kinetics [1,2,3]. Early successful results of using this kinetics to predict detonation excitation in heated plastified TATB in VNIIEF experiments with short and long loading pulses are presented. Parameters of the chemical zone of the stationary detonation wave in plastified TATB (LX-17) were computed with the data from [1]. Parameters Heated In shell Cooled Unheated ?0 , g/cm3 1.70 1.81 1.84 1.905 D , km/s 7.982 7.764 7.686 7.517 PN, GPa 45.4 45.8 35.7 32.9 PJ, GPa 27.0 27.3 27.2 26.4 ?x , mm 0.504 0.843 1.041 2.912 ?t , ns 63.1 108.6 135.5 387.4 [1] Effect of Confinement and Thermal Cycling on the Shock Initiation of LX-17 P.A. Urtiew, C.M. Tarver, J.L. Maienschein, and W.C. Tao. LLNL. Combustion and Flame 105: 43-53 (1996) [2] C.M. Tarver, P.A. Urtiew and W.C. Tao (LLNL) Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene. J.Appl. Phys. 78(5), September 1995 [3] Craig M. Tarver, John W. Kury and R. Don Breithaupt Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene J. Appl. Phys. 82(8) , 15 October 1997.

  15. Skating crossovers on a motorized flywheel: a preliminary experimental design to test effect on speed and on crossovers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aynsley M; Krause, David A; Stuart, Michael J; Montelpare, William J; Sorenson, Matthew C; Link, Andrew A; Gaz, Daniel V; Twardowski, Casey P; Larson, Dirk R; Stuart, Michael B

    2013-12-01

    Ice hockey requires frequent skater crossovers to execute turns. Our investigation aimed to determine the effectiveness of training crossovers on a motorized, polyethylene high-resistance flywheel. We hypothesized that high school hockey players training on the flywheel would perform as well as their peers training on ice. Participants were 23 male high-school hockey players (age 15-19 years). The study used an experimental prospective design to compare players who trained for 9 sessions on the 22-foot flywheel with players who trained for 9 sessions on a similarly sized on-ice circle. Both groups were compared with control subjects who were randomly selected from the same participant pool as those training on ice. All players were tested before and after their 3-week training regimens, and control subjects were asked to not practice crossovers between testing. Group 1 trained in a hockey training facility housing the flywheel, and group 2 trained in the ice hockey arena where testing occurred. Primary outcome measures tested in both directions were: (a) speed (time in seconds) required to skate crossovers for 3 laps of a marked face-off circle, (b) cadence of skating crossovers on the similarly sized circles, and (c) a repeat interval speed test, which measures anaerobic power. No significant changes were found between groups in on-ice testing before and after training. Among the group 1 players, 7 of 8 believed they benefited from flywheel training. Group 2 players, who trained on ice, did not improve performance significantly over group 1 players. Despite the fact that no significant on-ice changes in performance were observed in objective measures, players who trained on the flywheel subjectively reported that the flywheel is an effective cost-effective alternative to training on ice. This is a relevant finding when placed in context with limited availability of on-ice training. PMID:23539081

  16. Eccentric utilization ratio: effect of sport and phase of training.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Michael R; Doyle, Timothy L A; Newton, Michael; Edwards, Dylan J; Nimphius, Sophia; Newton, Robert U

    2006-11-01

    The eccentric utilization ratio (EUR), which is the ratio of countermovement jump (CMJ) to static jump (SJ) performance, has been suggested as a useful indicator of power performance in athletes. The purpose of the study was to compare the EUR of athletes from a variety of different sports and during different phases of training. A total of 142 athletes from rugby union, Australian Rules Football, soccer, softball, and field hockey were tested. Subjects performed both CMJ and SJ on a force plate integrated with a position transducer. The EUR was measured as the ratio of CMJ to SJ for jump height and peak power. The rugby union, Australian Rules Football, and hockey athletes were tested during off-season and preseason to provide EUR data during different phases of training. For men, EUR for soccer, Australian Rules Football, and rugby was greater than softball (effect size range, 0.83-0.92). For women, EUR for soccer was greater than field hockey and softball (0.86- 1.0). There was a significant difference between the jump height and peak power method for the Australian Rules Football, rugby, and field hockey tests conducted preseason (p < 0.05). For field hockey, there was a significant increase in EUR from off-season to preseason. Athletes in sports such as soccer, rugby union, and Australian Rules Football appear to have higher EUR values, which reflects the greater reliance on stretch shortening activities in these sports. It does appear that EUR can be used to track changes in training with the values significantly increasing from off-season to preseason. The EUR provides the practitioner with information about the performance of athletes and appears to be sensitive to changes in the type of training being undertaken. PMID:17194252

  17. Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests

    SciTech Connect

    Hovis, G.L.; Stokes, M.W.; Smith, M.E.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-07-01

    The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing the cans in long cylindrical magazines, latching the magazines to racks inside Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canisters, and filling the DWPF canisters with high-level waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it attractive for reuse. At present, the DWPF pours glass into empty canisters. In the CIC approach, the addition of a stainless steel rack, magazines, cans, and ceramic pucks to the canisters introduces a new set of design and operational challenges: All of the hardware installed in the canisters must maintain structural integrity at elevated (molten-glass) temperatures. This suggests that a robust design is needed. However, the amount of material added to the DWPF canister must be minimized to prevent premature glass cooling and excessive voiding caused by a large internal thermal mass. High metal temperatures, minimizing thermal mass, and glass flow paths are examples of the types of technical considerations of the equipment design process. To determine the effectiveness of the design in terms of structural integrity and glass-flow characteristics, full-scale testing will be conducted. A cold (nonradioactive) pour test program is planned to assist in the development and verification of a baseline design for the immobilization canister to be used in the PIP process. The baseline design resulting from the cold pour test program and CIC equipment development program will provide input to Title 1 design for second-stage immobilization. The cold pour tests will be conducted in two major phases during fiscal years 1999 and 2000.

  18. Upgrade of the CATS sample changer on FIP-BM30A at the ESRF: towards a commercialized standard.

    PubMed

    Jacquamet, L; Joly, J; Bertoni, A; Charrault, P; Pirocchi, M; Vernede, X; Bouis, F; Borel, F; Périn, J P; Denis, T; Rechatin, J L; Ferrer, J L

    2009-01-01

    An upgraded version of the sample changer ;CATS' (Cryogenic Automated Transfer System) that was developed on the FIP-BM30A beamline at the ESRF is presented. At present, CATS is installed at SLS (three systems), BESSY (one system), DLS (two systems) and APS (four systems for the LSCAT beamline). It consists mainly of an automated Dewar with an assortment of specific grippers designed to obtain a fast and reliable mounting/dismounting rate without jeopardizing the flexibility of the system. The upgraded system has the ability to manage any sample standard stored in any kind of puck. PMID:19096169

  19. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Can-In-Canister Hardware Development/Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-02-15

    This paper covers the design, development and testing of the magazines (cylinders containing cans of plutonium-ceramic pucks) and the rack that holds them in place inside the waste glass canister. Several magazine and rack concepts were evaluated to produce a design that gives the optimal balance between resistance to thermal degradation and facilitation of remote handling. This paper also reviews the effort to develop a jointed robotic arm that can remotely load seven magazines into defined locations inside a stationary canister working only through the 4 inch (102mm) diameter canister throat.

  20. Plutonium immobilization program - Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-04-28

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results.

  1. Plutonium Immobilization Program -- Cold pour Phase 1 test results

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2000-01-18

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project will disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. It uses the can-in-canister approach that involves placing plutonium-ceramic pucks in sealed cans that are then placed into Defense Waste Processing Facility canisters. These canisters are subsequently filled with high-level radioactive waste glass. This process puts the plutonium in a stable form and makes it unattractive for reuse. A cold (non-radioactive) glass pour program was performed to develop and verify the baseline design for the canister and internal hardware. This paper describes the Phase 1 scoping test results.

  2. System-level design of an RFID sweat electrolyte sensor patch.

    PubMed

    Rose, Daniel P; Ratterman, M; Griffin, Daniel K; Hou, Linlin; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Naik, Rajesh K; Hagen, Joshua A; Papautsky, I; Heikenfeld, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Wearable digital health devices are dominantly found in rigid form factors such as bracelets and pucks. An adhesive RFID sensor bandage (patch) is reported, which can be made completely intimate with human skin, a distinct advantage for chronological monitoring of biomarkers in sweat. In this demonstration, a commercial RFID chip is adapted with minimum components to allow potentiometric sensing of mM ionic solutes in sweat, and surface temperature, as read by an Android smart-phone app (in-vitro tests). PMID:25570878

  3. Voltammetric method for the determination of Zn, Cd, Pb, Cu and Ni in interstitial water.

    PubMed

    Golimowski, J; Szczepa?ska, T

    1996-03-01

    To determine heavy metals in interstitial water from Baltic sea sediments a sampling method with subsequent voltammetric determination is described. Copper, lead, zinc and cadmium are determined in the UV-digested samples of interstitial water by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry while nickel is determined by adsorption voltammetry. The determination of five metals in one sample in a wide concentrations range is possible using a low cost apparatus. The profiles of the metal concentrations in interstitial water of subsequent layers of sediments, sampled from Puck Bay, Gda?sk Bay, the Bornholm area and the S?upsk area are presented. PMID:15067482

  4. Newton's Laws

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Willey, David

    This page consists of a lists of activities relating to Newton's Laws. Created by David Willey at the University of Pittsburgh, these activities include a bowling ball pendulum, human air puck, a table cloth and crockery, a sewing hoop, an egg and a sheet and bicycle wheel gyroscope. This is a nice set on interactive lesson plans for physics instructors. Willey provides a brief description of each. Additional links are provided to more interactive lessons for those interested in physics. Instructors should be able to implement many of these ideas into their curriculum.

  5. Materials and Sensor R&D to Transform the Nuclear Stockpile: Livermore?s Transformational Materials Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Fried, L; Campbell, G; Saab, A; Kotovsky, J; Carter, C; Chang, J

    2009-10-11

    As the nation's nuclear weapons age and the demands placed on them change, significant challenges face the nuclear stockpile. Risks include material supply issues, ever-increasing lifecycle costs, and loss of technical expertise across the weapons complex. For example, non-nuclear materials are becoming increasingly difficult to replace because manufacturing methods and formulations have evolved in such a way as to render formerly available materials unprofitable, unsafe, or otherwise obsolete. Subtle formulation changes in available materials that occur without the knowledge of the weapons community for proprietary reasons have frequently affected the long-term performance of materials in the nuclear weapon environment. Significant improvements in performance, lifetime, or production cost can be realized with modern synthesis, modeling, and manufacturing methods. For example, there are currently supply and aging issues associated with the insensitive high explosive formulations LX-17 and PBX 9502 that are based on triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and Kel-F, neither of which are commercially available today. Assuring the reliability of the stockpile through surveillance and regularly scheduled Life Extension Programs is an increasingly expensive endeavor. Transforming our current stockpile surveillance--a system based on destructive testing of increasingly valuable assets--to a system based on embedded sensors has a number of potential advantages that include long-term cost savings, reduced risk associated with asset transportation, state-of-health assessments in the field, and active management of the stockpile.

  6. On the Nature of Variations in Density and Composition within TATB-based Plastic Bonded Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J H; Willey, T M; Overturf, G

    2006-06-27

    Initiation of insensitive high explosives is affected by porosity in the 100 nm to micron size range. It is also recognized that as-pressed plastic bonded explosives (PBX) are heterogeneous in composition and density at much coarser length scale (10 microns-100 microns). However, variations in density and composition of these explosives have been poorly characterized. Here, we characterize the natural variations in composition and density of TATB-based PBX LX-17 with synchrotron radiation tomography and ultra small angle x-ray scattering. Large scale variations in composition occur as a result of binder enrichment at the prill particle boundaries. The pore fraction is twice as high in the prill particle as in the boundary. The pore distribution is bimodal, with small pores of 50-100 nm in radius and a broader distribution of pores in the 0.5-1.5 micron size range. The higher pore density within the prill particle is attributed to contact asperities between the crystallites that might inhibit complete consolidation and binder infiltration.

  7. Shock Initiation of Energetic Materials at Different Initial Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Tarver, C M

    2005-01-14

    Shock initiation is one of the most important properties of energetic materials, which must transition to detonation exactly as intended when intentionally shocked and not detonate when accidentally shocked. The development of manganin pressure gauges that are placed inside the explosive charge and record the buildup of pressure upon shock impact has greatly increased the knowledge of these reactive flows. This experimental data, together with similar data from electromagnetic particle velocity gauges, has allowed us to formulate the Ignition and Growth model of shock initiation and detonation in hydrodynamic computer codes for predictions of shock initiation scenarios that cannot be tested experimentally. An important problem in shock initiation of solid explosives is the change in sensitivity that occurs upon heating (or cooling). Experimental manganin pressure gauge records and the corresponding Ignition and Growth model calculations are presented for two solid explosives, LX-17 (92.5 % triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) with 7.5 % Kel-F binder) and LX-04 (85 % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX) with 15 % Viton binder) at several initial temperatures.

  8. Modeling Detonation in Ultrafine TATB Hemispherical Boosters Using CREST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitworth, Nicholas

    2011-06-01

    Hemispherical ultrafine TATB boosters are often used to initiate detonation in the TATB-based explosive LX-17. For accurate hydrocode predictions of experiments using this combination of explosives, it is important to accurately model the detonation wave emerging from the booster material since this may influence the detonation behaviour in the main charge. Since ultrafine TATB exhibits non-ideal detonation behaviour, it's response should be modeled using reactive flow. In this paper, the CREST reactive burn model, which uses entropy-dependent reaction rates to simulate explosive behaviour, is applied to experimental data obtained from ultrafine TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three initial temperatures (ambient, -20 degC and -54 degC). The ambient temperature data is used to develop an initial CREST model for ultrafine TATB which is then subsequently applied to the cold data. A comparison of the experimental and modeling results is presented showing that the model gives good agreement to experiment at both ambient and cold temperatures.

  9. A frictional work predictive method for the initiation of solid high explosives from low-pressure impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S.K.; Green, L.G.; Lee, C.G.

    1993-07-01

    The goal of these tests was to provide information that would aid in the prediction of HE response in accident situations where the initiating stimulus was less than that required for direct shock initiation. Before these tests were run, a prediction of threshold impact velocity was made (70m/s) using a rough average of previously reported threshold factional work from skid tests (1 cal/cm{sub 2}) and the experimental value for coefficient of friction of 0.5({plus_minus}) measured in the same tests for PBX-9404. The actual testing proved the threshold impact velocity to be much less, and the pretest prediction was not only wrong, it was not conservative. This work presents a methodology for more accurately predicting the reaction threshold for HE involved in an accident such as an airplane crash or a severe land transportation accident. The main focus of this work is on LX-10-1 (94.5% 5.5% Viton A binder, density 1.86g/cm{sup 3}). Additional work was done on LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% KelF binder, density 1.90g/cm{sub 3}), a very insensitive explosive. The explicit two-dimensional finite element code, DYNA2D, was used to model the tests and predict the HE response. The finite element mesh of the projectile and target were generated using MAZE. The post-processing of the DYNA2D analysis was done with ORION.

  10. Creep Testing Plastic-Bonded Explosives in Uni-axial Compression

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J

    2008-03-13

    High fidelity measurements of time-dependent strain in the plastic-bonded explosives LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 have been performed under constant, uni-axial, compressive load using a custom designed apparatus. The apparatus uses a combination of extensometers and linear variable differential transformers coupled with a data acquisition system, thermal controls, and gravitational loading. The materials being tested consist of a crystalline explosive material mixed with a polymeric binder. The behavior of each material is related to the type of explosive and to the percentage and type of binder. For any given plastic-bonded explosive, the creep behavior is also dependent on the stress level and test temperature. Experiments were conducted using a 3 x 3 stress-temperature matrix with a temperature range of 24 C to 70 C and with stresses ranging from 250-psi to 780-psi. Analysis of the data has shown that logarithmic curve fits provide an accurate means of quantification and facilitate a long-term predictive capability. This paper will discuss the design of the apparatus, experimental results, and analyses.

  11. Equations of State of Binders and Related Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Stevens, Lewis L.

    The union of high-explosive molecules (HEs) with polymeric binders to form plastic-bonded (PBXs) explosives was an important advancement in high-explosives science, offering improved safety and reliability, while maintaining performance [1]. The development of PBXs would not have been possible without several timely improvements in explosives technology, including an ability to produce decreased sensitivity materials, improved chemical stabilities, and greater manufacturing re-producibility. From a practical standpoint, the development of PBXs also brought improved machinability, improved engineering properties, and enhanced chemical resistance and long-term chemical stability. Eventually, insensitive high-explosive (IHEs) molecules were incorporated into PBXs. The development of IHE-based PBXs allowed for even greater flexibility in the choice of polymeric binders, permitting the use of higher-density binders such as fluorinated polymers. Examples of modern IHE-containing PBXs used by the Department of Energy are PBX 9502 (Figs. 4.1 and 4.2) (95% TATB/5% Kel-F 800) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB/7.5% Kel-F 800), which use the copolymer poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene-co-vinylidene fluoride) or Kel-F 800, as the polymeric binder. The structures of TATB and Kel-F 800 are shown below.

  12. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kersten, J.K.

    1998-02-19

    The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

  13. The Plutonium Transition from Nuclear Weapons to Crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.W.

    2000-03-14

    With the end of the ''Cold War'' thousands of nuclear warheads are being dismantled. The National Academy of Sciences termed this growing stockpile of plutonium and highly enriched uranium ''a clear and present danger'' to international security. DOE/MD selected a duel approach to plutonium disposition--burning MOX fuel in existing reactors and immobilization in a ceramic matrix surrounded by HLW glass. MOX material will be pits and clean metal. The challenges come with materials that will be transferred to Immobilization--these range from engineered materials to residues containing < 30% Pu. Impurity knowledge range from guesses to actual data. During packaging, sites will flag ''out of the ordinary'' containers for characterized. If the process history is lost, characterization cost will escalate rapidly. After two step blending and ceramic precursor addition, cold press and sintering will form 0.5-kg ceramic pucks containing {le}50 g Pu. Pucks will be sealed in cans, placed into magazines, then into HLW canisters; these canisters will be filled with HLW glass prior to being transported to the HLW repository. The Immobilization Program must interface with DP, EM, RW, and NN. Overlaid on top of these interfaces are the negotiations with the Russians.

  14. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Can-In-Canister Hardware Development/Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-01-05

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology to disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. Since there are significant radiation, contamination and security concerns, the project team is developing unique technologies to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. This paper covers the design, development and testing of the magazines (cylinders containing cans of ceramic pucks) and the rack that holds them in place inside the waste glass canister. Several magazine and rack concepts were evaluated to produce a design that gives the optimal balance between resistance to thermal degradation and facilitation of remote handling. This paper also reviews the effort to develop a join ted arm robot that can remotely load seven magazines into defined locations inside a stationary canister working only through the 4 inch (102 mm) diameter canister throat.

  15. Plutonium Immobilization Project - Can-In-Canister Hardware Development/Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, L.

    2001-01-10

    The Plutonium Immobilization Project (PIP) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop technology to disposition excess weapons grade plutonium. This program introduces the ''Can-in-Canister'' (CIC) technology that immobilizes the plutonium by encapsulating it in ceramic forms (or pucks) and ultimately surrounding it with high-level waste glass to provide a deterrent to recovery. Since there are significant radiation, contamination and security concerns, the project team is developing unique technologies to remotely perform plutonium immobilization tasks. This paper covers the design, development and testing of the magazines (cylinders containing cans of ceramic pucks) and the rack that holds them in place inside the waste glass canister. Several magazine and rack concepts were evaluated to produce a design that gives the optimal balance between resistance to thermal degradation and facilitation of remote handling. This paper also reviews the effort to develop a jointed arm robot that can remotely load seven magazines into defined locations inside a stationary canister working only through the 4 inch (102 mm) diameter canister throat.

  16. Analysis of trophic networks and carbon flows in south-eastern Baltic coastal ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczak, Maciej T.; Müller-Karulis, Bärbel; Järv, Leili; Kotta, Jonne; Martin, Georg; Minde, Atis; Põllumäe, Arno; Razinkovas, Arturas; Strake, Solvita; Bucas, Martynas; Blenckner, Thorsten

    2009-04-01

    Carbon flows in five south-eastern Baltic coastal ecosystems (Puck Bay, Curonian Lagoon, Lithuanian coast, Gulf of Riga coast and Pärnu Bay) were compared on the basis of ECOPATH models using 12 common functional groups. The studied systems ranged from the hypertrophic Curonian Lagoon to the mesotrophic Gulf of Riga coast. Interestingly, we found that macrophytes were not consumed by grazers, but rather channelled into the detritus food chain. In all ecosystems fisheries had far reaching impacts on their target species and on the food-web in general. In particular, benthic food-webs were partly affected by indirect fisheries effects. For example, fisheries tend to change the biomass of piscivorous fish, causing a cascading effect on benthivorous fish and macrozoobenthos. These cascades are ecosystem specific and need to be considered when using benthic invertebrates as productivity and eutrophication indicators. Odum’s maturity attributes allowed a ranking of costal ecosystems according to their maturity. Namely, the community development decreased in the following order: Pärnu Bay > Gulf of Riga coast > Lithuanian coast > Puck Bay > Curonian Lagoon.

  17. OGC standards for end-to-end sensor network integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, K. L.; Broering, A.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Toma, D.; Del Rio, J.; Bermudez, L. E.; Zedlitz, J.; Johnson, G.; Edgington, D.

    2010-12-01

    Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth's environment, and more are planned for the future. Environmental sensors have continuously improved by becoming smaller, cheaper, more intelligent, and more reliable. But due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observing systems is not straightforward, requiring development of driver software and manual tedious configuration. Use of standard protocols and formats can improve and automate the process of sensor installation, operation, and data processing. The Open Geospatial Consortium's Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) initiative defines standards which make sensors available over the Web through standardized formats and Web Service interfaces by hiding the heterogeneity of sensor protocols from the application layer. Current SWE standards do not deal with actual sensor protocols, and the connection between sensors and SWE services is usually established by manually adapting the internals of the SWE service implementation to the specific sensor interface. Such sensor "drivers" have to be built for each kind of sensor interface, which leads to extensive efforts in developing large-scale systems. To tackle this issue we have developed a model for Sensor Interface Descriptors (SID) which enables the declarative description of sensor interfaces, including the definition of the communication protocol, sensor commands, processing steps and metadata association. The model is designed as a profile and extension of OGC SWE's Sensor Model Language standard. In this model, a SID is defined in XML for each kind of sensor protocol. SID instances for particular sensor types can be reused in different scenarios and can be shared among user communities. A SID interpreter can be built which translates between various sensor protocols and SWE protocols, hence closing the described interoperability gap. The SID interpreter is independent of any particular sensor technology, and can communicate with any sensor whose protocol can be described by a SID. The SID interpreter transfers retrieved sensor data to a Sensor Observation Service, and transforms tasks submitted to a Sensor Planning Service to actual sensor commands. The proposed SWE PUCK protocol complements SID by providing a standard way to associate a sensor with a SID, thereby completely automating the sensor integration process. PUCK protocol is implemented in sensor firmware, and provides a means to retrieve a universally unique identifer, metadata and other information from the device itself through its communication interface. Thus the SID interpreter can retrieve a SID directly from the sensor through PUCK protocol. Alternatively the interpreter can retrieve the sensor’s SID from an external source, based on the unique sensor ID provided by PUCK protocol. In this presentation, we describe the end-to-end integration of several commercial oceanographic instruments into a sensor network using PUCK, SID and SWE services. We also present a user-friendly, graphical tool to generate SIDs and tools to visualize sensor data.

  18. Only A Game

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Littlefield, Bill

    Whether it's hockey, baseball, or volleyball, it's just a game, right? To some it might be, and that's actually the title ("Only a Game") of this compelling radio program produced by NPR and WBUR in Boston. The show is hosted by commentator Bill Littlefield, and the witty and interesting program covers topics like "the explosion of interest in women's sports, competitive opportunities for the disabled, and the business of sports." Past guests on the show have included Robert Pinsky, Roger Angell, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Muhammad Ali. Visitors to the site should start by listening to the most recent show, and then move on to the "Archives" area. Here they will find book reviews, links to past shows, and photo galleries. The show's topics as of late have been far ranging, and they have included exploration of the art of hockey mask making and bull racing in Indonesia.

  19. Sport Days/Times Location League Options Sun: 7-11pm

    E-print Network

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    Sport Days/Times Location League Options 3on3 Basketball Sun: 7-11pm Tue/Thu: 7-11pm Dillon Gym Courts 2 & 3 Mens, CoRec Ice Hockey Mon-Wed: 9:30-11:30pm Baker Rink Open Indoor Soccer Sun: 7-11pm Mon/Wed: 7-11pm Dillon Gym Courts 2 & 3 Mens, CoRec Wallyball Sun-Thu: 7-11pm Dillon Squash Cts Mens, Co

  20. Children and spinal manipulation therapy: Ask your patients about all the therapies they seek

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sunita Vohra

    wo days before his school hockey league finals, a previ- ously healthy eight-year-old boy had a runny nose and low-grade fever. He performed well during the first game with two goals. Afterwards, he complained of difficulties in moving his neck because of pain. To prepare him for the next game, his grandfather, who previously had significant improvement of his back

  1. Sports-related mild traumatic brain injury in female youths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michelle L Keightley; Ashley Yule; Kimberley Garland; Nicholas Reed; Jim McAuliffe; Janice Garton; Stephanie Green; Tim Taha

    2010-01-01

    Sports-related concussion or mild-traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in children who participate in organised sports. We describe two case studies involving 14-year-old girls who each sustained a mTBI during ice hockey competition. Neurocognitive functioning post-injury is compared to baseline pre-injury assessment on the same measures. Results from Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT), Conners' Continuous Performance Test II

  2. Thermal storage HVAC system retrofit provides economical air conditioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1993-01-01

    This article describes an EMS-controlled HVAC system that meets the ventilation and cooling needs of an 18,000-seat indoor ice hockey arena. The Buffalo Memorial Auditorium (affectionately referred to as the Aud) was built in 1937 under the Works Project Administration of the federal government. Its original configuration included a 12,000-seat arena with an ice skating rink. By the late 1980s,

  3. The Human-Information Workspace (HI-Space): Ambient Table Top Entertainment

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; May, Richard A.; Cramer, Nick O.; Matthias Rauterberg

    2004-09-01

    This paper introduces the Human Information Workspace (HISpace) as a test-bed for evaluating new information exploration mechanisms. In moving from dated interaction devices and small computer monitors, we aim to utilize more natural surfaces such as tables and walls as our interaction space. In testing our theories, we have produced a number of gaming applications as test cases. Here, we report on our most popular application, Virtual Hockey.

  4. Sport concussion assessment tool: baseline values for varsity collision sport athletes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Shehata; J P Wiley; S Richea; B W Benson; L Duits; W H Meeuwisse

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To determine baseline symptom and neurocognitive norms for non-concussed and previously concussed varsity athletes using the sport concussion assessment tool (SCAT).Study Design:Descriptive cohort study.Setting:University of Calgary.Subjects:260 male and female university football, ice hockey and wrestling athletes over three seasons (2005–7).Methods:A baseline SCAT was completed during preseason medical evaluation. Subjects were grouped as follows: all participants, men, women, never concussed (NC)

  5. Subject-Specific Changes in Brain White Matter on Diffusion Tensor Imaging After Sports-Related Concussion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey Bazarian; Tong Zhu; Brian Blyth; Allyson Borrino; Jianhui Zhong

    Background and Purpose: Current approaches to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis do not permit identification of individual-level changes in DTI indices. We investigated the ability of wild bootstrapping analysis to detect subject-specific changes in brain white matter (WM) before and after sports-related concussion. Materials and Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed in 9 high school athletes engaged in hockey

  6. Nutrition Science and the Winter Olympics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science is a powerful asset for athletes who want to use nutrition to their advantage. Whether an Olympic medal is won by tenths of a second in a ski race, decimal points in a figure skating competition, or goals in an ice hockey game, an athlete's nutritional status makes a critical difference in reaching peak performance.This course explores the science of sports nutrition and shows how to apply nutrition principles to benefit an athlete's training and performance.

  7. THE USE OF ACETIC ACID IONTOPHORESIS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF A SOFT TISSUE INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Ebaugh, David

    2010-01-01

    Background: Contusions are common injuries that occur in athletics. If repeated, complications like myositis ossificans can occur. This case describes the examination and treatment of an athlete with an acute soft tissue injury. Objective: To describe the treatment approach used with a hockey player who sustained a soft tissue injury in his upper extremity. Case Description: A 19 year old male sustained a soft tissue injury to his upper arm while playing hockey. The athlete complained of pain rated a 2-3 out of 10. He had a well circumscribed, firm, 8 by 5 centimeter palpable mass present along the lateral arm, and was able to passively flex his elbow from 56° to 135°, demonstrating a 56° loss of elbow extension. Functionally, he was able to perform most activities of daily living, but he was unable to play hockey. Over 29 days, the athlete was treated one time with pulsed ultrasound and ice and nine times with iontophoresis using a 2% acetic acid solution. Additionally, the athlete performed pain-free active range of motion exercises for the elbow. Outcome: Following treatment, the athlete's pain resolved, the palpable mass disappeared, and his passive range of motion at the elbow was 0° to 135°. Most importantly, the athlete was able to resume playing hockey. Discussion: Acetic acid iontophoresis may be a successful intervention for soft tissue injuries of the upper extremity. In this case, it appeared helpful in decreasing the athlete's impairments and contributed to quicker resumption of all functional activities in less time than previously reported in the literature using traditional treatment interventions. PMID:21655380

  8. Largeur : 25,6 m ou 84,1 pi Longueur : 36 m ou 118,2 pi

    E-print Network

    Québec, Université du

    Dimensions Largeur : 25,6 m ou 84,1 pi Longueur : 36 m ou 118,2 pi Hauteur : 8 m ou 26,4 pi Superficie : 924 m2 ou 9942,2 pi2 Locations (tarification horaire) 5 plages horaires et plus : 124 $ / hre terrains Hockey cosom 1 ou 2 5 contre 5 ou 6 contre 6 (incluant le gardien) 14 26 25,6 m x 36 m ou 84,1 pi

  9. Exploratorium: Sport Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Looking at the processes and actions embedded within various team and individual sports is a great way to get exposed to concepts and ideas from physics, engineering, and any other number of basic and applied sciences. The Exploratorium Museum in San Francisco has developed this remarkable site that brings together interactive exhibits, activities, and video clips on the world of sport science. The materials here are organized primarily by sport. The site includes areas on skateboarding, baseball, hockey and other activities.

  10. Variation in fibular robusticity reflects variation in mobility patterns.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Damiano; Shaw, Colin N

    2011-11-01

    During hominin plantigrade locomotion, the weight-bearing function of the fibula has been considered negligible. Nevertheless, studies conducted on human samples have demonstrated that, even if less than that of the tibia, the load-bearing function of the fibula still represents a considerable portion of the entire load borne by the leg. The present study assesses whether variation in habitual lower limb loading influences fibular morphology in a predictable manner. To achieve this, both fibular and tibial morphology were compared amongst modern human athletes (field hockey players and cross-country runners) and matched sedentary controls. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to capture two-dimensional, cross-sectional bone images. Geometric properties were measured at the midshaft for each bone. Results show a trend of increased fibular rigidity from control to runners through to field hockey players. Moreover, relative fibular robusticity (fibula/tibia) is significantly greater in hockey players compared with runners. These results are likely the consequence of habitual loading patterns performed by these athletes. Specifically, the repeated directional changes associated with field hockey increase the mediolateral loading on the lower leg in a manner that would not necessarily be expected during cross-country running. The present study validates the use of the fibula in association with the tibia as a mean to provide a more complete picture of leg bone functional adaptations. Therefore, the fibula can be added to the list of bones generally used (tibia and femur) to assess the correspondence between mobility patterns and skeletal morphology for past human populations. PMID:21937082

  11. Did Cassini (late 17th century) observe a comet impact site on Jupiter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Débarbat, S.

    1997-08-01

    Astronomical archives have in the past contributed to the development of several fields of research. The discovery of a new phenomenon can lead to a new examination of such documents. At the end of the 17th century, Cassini made observations of Jupiter features and determinations of the differential rotation of this body. Recent studies by Hockey (1996), as well as those by Tabe et al. (1997) confirm the importance of keeping documents from the past.

  12. Neutron Screening Measurements of 110 gallon drums at T Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Hilliard, James R.; Berg, Randal K.

    2011-01-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Nondestructive Assay (NDA) Service Center was contracted to develop and demonstrate a simple and inexpensive method of assaying 110 gallon drums at the Hanford Site’s T-Plant. The drums contained pucks of crushed old drums used for storage of transuranic (TRU) waste. The drums were to be assayed to determine if they meet the criteria for TRU or Low Level Waste (LLW). Because of the dense matrix (crushed steel drums) gamma measurement techniques were excluded and a mobile, configurable neutron system, consisting of four sequentially connected slab detectors was chosen to be used for this application. An optimum measurement configuration was determined through multiple test measurements with californium source. Based on these measurements the initial calibration of the system was performed applying the isotopic composition for aged weapon-grade plutonium. A series of background and blank puck drum measurements allowed estimating detection limits for both total (singles) and coincidence (doubles) counting techniques. It was found that even conservative estimates for minimum detection concentration using singles count rate were lower than the essential threshold of 100 nCi/g. Whereas the detection limit of coincidence counting appeared to be about as twice as high of the threshold. A series of measurements intended to verify the technique and revise the initial calibration obtained were performed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility with plutonium standards. Standards with a total mass of 0.3 g of plutonium (which is estimated to be equivalent of 100 nCi/g for net waste weight of 300 kg) loaded in the test puck drum were clearly detected. The following measurements of higher plutonium loadings verified the calibration factors obtained in the initial exercise. The revised and established calibration factors were also confirmed within established uncertainties by additional measurements of plutonium standards in various locations in the test drum. Due to necessity to dispense the blank test drum an alternative method of baseline determination was established during field measurements. Count rates of ambient background were corrected by the differences between observed background and blank test drum count rates which were previously determined over a series of measurements. Only 31 drums out of 352 counted during the intensive measurement campaign at T-Plant were determined to be Suspect TRU. 25 of these drums were re-measured at the WRAP facility using the SuperHENC. Of the 25 drums measured, 21 were confirmed to be TRU and the remaining four LLW.

  13. Kinetic Modeling of Slow Energy Release in Non-Ideal Carbon Rich Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P; Fried, L; Glaesemann, K; Souers, C

    2006-06-20

    We present here the first self-consistent kinetic based model for long time-scale energy release in detonation waves in the non-ideal explosive LX-17. Non-ideal, insensitive carbon rich explosives, such as those based on TATB, are believed to have significant late-time slow release in energy. One proposed source of this energy is diffusion-limited growth of carbon clusters. In this paper we consider the late-time energy release problem in detonation waves using the thermochemical code CHEETAH linked to a multidimensional ALE hydrodynamics model. The linked CHEETAH-ALE model dimensional treats slowly reacting chemical species using kinetic rate laws, with chemical equilibrium assumed for species coupled via fast time-scale reactions. In the model presented here we include separate rate equations for the transformation of the un-reacted explosive to product gases and for the growth of a small particulate form of condensed graphite to a large particulate form. The small particulate graphite is assumed to be in chemical equilibrium with the gaseous species allowing for coupling between the instantaneous thermodynamic state and the production of graphite clusters. For the explosive burn rate a pressure dependent rate law was used. Low pressure freezing of the gas species mass fractions was also included to account for regions where the kinetic coupling rates become longer than the hydrodynamic time-scales. The model rate parameters were calibrated using cylinder and rate-stick experimental data. Excellent long time agreement and size effect results were achieved.

  14. Fatigue of LX-14 and LX-19 plastic bonded explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D. M., LLNL

    1998-04-23

    The DOD uses the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-14 in a wide variety of applications including shaped charges and explosively forged projectiles. LX- 19 is a higher energy explosive, which could be easily substituted for LX-14 because it contains the identical Estane 5703p binder and more energetic CL-20 explosive. Delivery systems for large shaped charges, such as TOW-2, include the Apache helicopter. Loads associated with vibrations and expansion from thermal excursions in field operations may, even at low levels over long time periods, cause flaws, already present in the PBX to grow. Flaws near the explosive/liner interface of a shaped charge can reduce performance. Small flaws in explosives are one mechanism (the hot spot mechanism) proposed for initiation and growth to detonation of PBXs like LX-14, PBXN 5, LX-04 and LX-17 among others. Unlike cast-cured explosives and propellants, PBXs cannot usually be compression molded to full density. Generally, the amount of explosive ignited by a shock wave is approximately equal to the original void volume. Whether or not these flaws or cracks grow during field operations to an extent sufficient to adversely affect the shaped charge performance or increase the vulnerability of the PBX is the ultimate question this effort could address. Currently the fatigue life of LX-14 under controlled conditions is being studied in order to generate its failure stress as a function of the number of fatigue cycles (S- N curve). Proposed future work will address flaw and crack growth and their relationship to hot-spot concentration and explosive vulnerability to shock and/or fragment initiation.

  15. Indirect blue light does not suppress nocturnal salivary melatonin in humans in an automobile setting.

    PubMed

    Lerchl, Alexander; Schindler, Carina; Eichhorn, Karsten; Kley, Franziska; Erren, Thomas C

    2009-09-01

    In 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified shift work that involves circadian disruption as being probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A). In this context, light exposure during the night plays a key role because it can suppress nocturnal melatonin levels when exposures exceed a certain threshold. Blue light around 464 nm is most effective in suppressing melatonin because of the spectral sensitivity of melanopsin, a recently discovered photopigment in retinal ganglion cells; the axons of these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, a circadian master clock in the brain. Due to advances in light technologies, normal tungsten light bulbs are being replaced by light-emitting diodes which produce quasi-monochromatic or white light. The objective of this study was to assess whether the light-melanopsin-melatonin axis might be affected in automobiles at night which employ the new generation diodes. To this end, we have tested in an experimental automobile setting whether indirect blue light (lambda(max) = 465 nm) at an intensity of 0.22 or 1.25 lx can suppress salivary melatonin levels in 12 male volunteers (age range 17-27 years) who served as their own controls. Daytime levels were low (2.7 +/- 0.5 pg/mL), and night-time levels without light exposure were high (14.5 +/- 1.1 pg/mL), as expected. Low-intensity light exposures had no significant effect on melatonin levels (0.22 lx: 17.2 +/- 2.8 pg/mL; P > 0.05; 1.25 lx: 12.6 +/- 2.0 pg/mL; P > 0.05). It is concluded that indirect blue light exposures in automobiles up to 1.25 lx do not cause unintentional chronodisruption via melatonin suppression. PMID:19555449

  16. Perioperative registered nurse excellence. Raising the bar at the point of care--star performance.

    PubMed

    Shewchuk, Muriel

    2014-06-01

    As described, the responsibilities of the Perioperative RN are extensive, complex, time-sensitive, can impact a large number of patients and multi-professionals. In a time of tremendous pressures in health care, with patient safety as a focus, there is an expectation of practice excellence throughout. Registered Nurses need to determine if they can, or are willing to, achieve excellence of practice in the OR. Our reason for being is "THE PATIENT". Strategize how you will achieve the bar of excellence and in the words of Wayne Gretzky--"skate to where the puck will be." Shower your environment with positive sprinklings of star performance--the return professional profits are immeasurable. PMID:25080781

  17. Evaluation of distributed smart sensor interfaces to improve traditional data acquisition systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayes, D. N.

    2005-12-01

    The snowballing effort to establish environmental observing systems will (is already?) overwhelming our ability to maintain accurate instrument metadata from acquisition through archiving and delivery to end users. Traditionally this issue has been addressed by labor intensive and sometimes relatively ad hoc approaches typified by custom, proprietary, poorly documented data systems based on simple asynchronous point to point protocols such as RS-232. While there is a broad range of "standards", many of which have demonstrated effective use such as the Serial Ascii Instrumentation Loop (SAIL), NMEA0183, and SDI-12 to name a few, but none that have been widely implemented across disciplnes due to a not well characterized collection of barriers. Currently evolving efforts including IEEE-1451 and the MBARI-led PUCK effort show signficant promise. In the context enhancing the reliability of an evolving shipboard data acquistion system a number of options are being explored in order to clarify these barriers with the intent of removing at least some.

  18. Presidential Elections, 1860-1884

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Harpweek (last reviewed in the April 8, 2000 Scout Report for Social Sciences) recently launched two new sites featuring nineteenth-century political cartoons and prints. The first offers close to 200 political cartoons and prints commenting on US presidential elections between 1860 and 1876 (1880 and 1884 will be added in October). The images are drawn from periodicals such as Harper's Weekly, Vanity Fair, and Puck, as well as the Library of Congress political print collection, and feature famous cartoonists and artists such as Thomas Nast, Matt Morgan, A.B. Frost, and Joseph Keppler. The cartoons and prints are organized by election and candidate, and are displayed with captions and links to additional information such as a timeline, campaign issues, political tactics, and biographies. Combined, these two sites are an outstanding resource for researchers and students of American political history and the history of political prints and cartoons.

  19. Children's Perception and Interpretation of Robots and Robot Behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhamjee, Sajida; Griffiths, Frances; Palmer, Julie

    Technology is advancing rapidly; especially in the field of robotics. The purpose of this study was to examine children's perception and interpretation of robots and robot behaviour. The study was divided into two phases: phase one involved 144 children (aged 7-8) from two primary schools drawing a picture of a robot and then writing a story about the robot that they had drawn. In phase two, in small groups, 90 children observed four e-puck robots interacting within an arena. The children were asked three questions during the observation: 'What do you think the robots are doing?', 'Why are they doing these things?' and 'What is going on inside the robot?' The results indicated that children can hold multiple understandings of robots simultaneously. Children tend to attribute animate characteristics to robots. Although this may be explained by their stage of development, it may also influence how their generation integrates robots into society.

  20. Voyager's Eleventh Discovery of a Satellite of Uranus and Photometry and the First Size Measurements of Nine Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2001-05-01

    The discovery of S/1986 U 10 is presented including photometry and orbital elements. The new satellite orbits only 1200 km outside Belinda's orbit and very close to the 44:43 eccentric resonance with Belinda. Its radius of about 15 km is much smaller than that expected from the trend seen for the other 15 regular uranian satellites. The 10 uranian satellites previously discovered by Voyager 2 are about 20% brighter than determined previously. One of these satellites, Puck, had a measured size which was slightly revised to 81±2 km. The first size measurements for the other nine satellites yielded sizes 40% larger on average and up to 60% larger than previously estimated. Most of these satellites are nonspherical. Juliet and Belinda may be the most oblong satellites in the Solar System among satellites with measured shapes.

  1. Development and testing of molecular adsorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulas that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  2. Effects of atmospheric circulation on ice conditions in the southern Baltic coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girjatowicz, Józef Piotr

    2001-11-01

    Relationships between atmospheric circulation patterns and ice conditions in the southern Baltic coastal lagoons were explored. Ice data consisted of number of ice days (L) and duration of ice season (S) in the Szczecin Lagoon (off Karnin), the Puck Bay (off Puck) and the Vistula Lagoon (off Krasnoflotskoye) from 1950/1951 to 1989/1990.Atmospheric circulation patterns for the period studied were extracted from Lityski's Calendar of atmospheric circulation types developed at the Institute of Meteorology and Water Management (IMWM). A circulation pattern was identified by three numerical parameters: the zonal circulation index, the meridional circulation index, both pertaining to a zone delimited by coordinates 40-60°N, 0-35°E, and the surface pressure index for Warsaw.The number of days with individual atmospheric circulation patterns occurring from October to March was calculated. Subsequently, the selected patterns were combined by wind direction sectors and several month-long periods that most closely correlated with ice conditions. The highest linear correlation coefficients (r>0.8) were obtained for the relationship between the number of days with winds from the east from December to February and December to March and the winter number of ice days (L). Somewhat higher were multiple correlation coefficients with winds from the east and west as circulation type predictors. Slightly lower correlation coefficients for the sectors and circulation periods mentioned were obtained for the duration of the ice season (S), although some of the coefficients were significant even at the probability level of ?=0.01. Higher correlation coefficients were obtained for correlations involving cold circulation patterns (sector NE+E+SE winds) and ice conditions than for those involving warm patterns (sector SW+W+NW).

  3. RIMPAC 08: Naval Oceanographic Office glider operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Kevin L.; Grembowicz, Ken; Bricker, Bruce; Crossland, Steve; Bryant, Danielle; Torres, Marc; Giddings, Tom

    2009-05-01

    The Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) Glider Operations Center (GOC) supported its first joint-mission exercise during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 08, a multi-national naval exercise conducted during July 2008 near the Hawaiian Islands. NAVOCEANO personnel deployed four Seagliders from USNS SUMNER for Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) operations and four Slocum gliders for Mine Warfare (MIW) operations. Each Seaglider was equipped with a Sea-Bird Electronics (SBE) 41cp CTD and Wet Labs, Inc. bb2fl ECO-puck optical sensor. The instrumentation suite on the Slocum gliders varied, but each Slocum glider had an SBE 41cp CTD combined with one of the following optical sensors: a Wet Labs, Inc. AUVb scattering sensor, a Wet Labs, Inc. bb3slo ECO-puck backscattering sensor, or a Satlantic, Inc. OCR radiometer. Using Iridium communications, the GOC had command and control of all eight gliders, with Department of Defense (DoD) personnel and DoD contractors serving as glider pilots. Raw glider data were transmitted each time a glider surfaced, and the subsequent data flow included processing, quality-control procedures, and the generation of operational and tactical products. The raw glider data were also sent to the Naval Research Laboratory at Stennis Space Center (NRLSSC) for fusion with satellite data and modeled data (currents, tides, etc.) to create optical forecasting, optical volume, and electro-optical identification (EOID) performance surface products. The glider-based products were delivered to the ASW and MIW Reach Back Cells for incorporation into METOC products and for dissemination to the Fleet. Based on the metrics presented in this paper, the inaugural joint-mission operation was a success.

  4. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  5. Comparison of Recent Modeled and Observed Trends in Total Column Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, S. B.; Weatherhead, E. C.; Stevermer, A.; Austin, J.; Bruehl, C.; Fleming, E. L.; deGrandpre, J.; Grewe, V.; Isaksen, I.; Pitari, G.; Portmann, R. W.; Rognerud, B.; Rosenfield, J. E.; Smyshlyaev, S.; Nagashima, T.; Velders, G. J. M.; Weisenstein, D. K.; Xia, J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a comparison of trends in total column ozone from 10 two-dimensional and 4 three-dimensional models and solar backscatter ultraviolet-2 (SBUV/2) satellite observations from the period 1979-2003. Trends for the past (1979-2000), the recent 7 years (1996-2003), and the future (2000-2050) are compared. We have analyzed the data using both simple linear trends and linear trends derived with a hockey stick method including a turnaround point in 1996. If the last 7 years, 1996-2003, are analyzed in isolation, the SBUV/2 observations show no increase in ozone, and most of the models predict continued depletion, although at a lesser rate. In sharp contrast to this, the recent data show positive trends for the Northern and the Southern Hemispheres if the hockey stick method with a turnaround point in 1996 is employed for the models and observations. The analysis shows that the observed positive trends in both hemispheres in the recent 7-year period are much larger than what is predicted by the models. The trends derived with the hockey stick method are very dependent on the values just before the turnaround point. The analysis of the recent data therefore depends greatly on these years being representative of the overall trend. Most models underestimate the past trends at middle and high latitudes. This is particularly pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere. Quantitatively, there is much disagreement among the models concerning future trends. However, the models agree that future trends are expected to be positive and less than half the magnitude of the past downward trends. Examination of the model projections shows that there is virtually no correlation between the past and future trends from the individual models.

  6. Effects of bright light treatment on psychomotor speed in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Tulppo, Mikko P.; Jurvelin, Heidi; Roivainen, Eka; Nissilä, Juuso; Hautala, Arto J.; Kiviniemi, Antti M.; Kiviniemi, Vesa J.; Takala, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north) when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days). A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both) treatment was given every morning between 8 and 12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time × group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024) but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308). Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year. PMID:24860513

  7. Athletic Identity, Vocational Identity, and Occupational Engagement in College Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes

    E-print Network

    Hook, Lacole Lea

    2012-05-31

    for use of their time, on average only 3% of National Collegiate Athletic Association student-athletes in men‘s and women‘s basketball, football, baseball, men‘s ice hockey, and men‘s soccer will play professional sports (National Collegiate Athletic... and stable a picture an individual possesses of his or her goals, interests, personality, and talents. Occupational engagement refers to how devoted, concerned, or involved an individual is in engaging in a variety of life experiences that may help them...

  8. Momentum And The Physics Of A Slapshot

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    The following resource is fromLessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this particular lesson, students will begin this lesson by investigating a fun and memorable elastic collision. After watching the NBC Learn Video, Slap Shot Physics: Hockey, they will use dynamics carts (or skateboards) to investigate and develop a conceptual understanding of the conservation of momentum.

  9. Slapshot Science!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    The following resource is fromLessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this particular lesson, students will learn about the slapshot, which is the fastest, hardest shot in ice hockey. Students will investigate elastic collisions, energy transfer and momentum exchange and will conduct an experiment which simulates making a slapshot.

  10. Pure Maple Syrup Issue 8 

    E-print Network

    Multiple Contributors

    1999-01-01

    . 10 They lay there quietly for a while, Benton revelling in the feeling of being crushed by Mark's weight. This is where I belong, Benton thought, fierce and true. This is where I belong. 'Oh God, Ben,' Mark mumbled after a while, his face hidden... both was if you'd put hockey first, like 1did. But you didn't, eh? ?No,' Ben whispered. 'You're not gay, are you, Ben? 'No. Bisexual.' Mark nodded; he'd guessed as much when they were thirteen. 'I've been gay all my life, or at least as long as I...

  11. Ferroelectric Smectic Phase Formed by Achiral Straight Core Mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Li, Jianjun; Weissflog, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    We report electro-optic experiments in liquid crystalline freestanding films of achiral hockey stick shaped mesogens with a straight aromatic core. The material forms two smectic mesophases. In the higher temperature phase, a spontaneous polarization exists in the smectic layer plane and the films show polar switching in electric fields. It is the first example of a ferroelectric phase formed by nearly rodlike achiral mesogens. Mirror symmetry of the phase is spontaneously broken. We propose a molecular configuration similar to a synclinic ferroelectric (CSPF) high temperature phase and an anticlinic, probably antiferroelectric (CAPA) low temperature phase.

  12. Fabrication and properties of CNTs reinforced polymeric matrix nanocomposites for sports applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, A.; Khalid, F. A.

    2014-06-01

    The polymeric matrix composites have found extensive applications in sports because of high strength to weight ratio, ease of processing, and longer life. This work was carried out to study the properties of different sections of composite field hockey sticks and the influence of carbon nanotubes on their properties. The samples were fabricated by compression molding process. The increase in mechanical properties by the incorporation of carbon nanotubes is correlated with the process parameters to consider enhancement in the overall performance of the stick sections.

  13. Syndesmosis injuries of the ankle.

    PubMed

    Del Buono, Angelo; Florio, Antonietta; Boccanera, Michele Simone; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-12-01

    Ankle syndesmosis injuries are relatively frequent in sports, especially skiing, ice hockey, and soccer, accounting for 1 %-18 % of all ankle sprains. The evolution is unpredictable: When missed, repeated episodes of ankle instability may predispose to early degenerative changes, and frank osteoarthritis may ensue. Diagnosis is clinical and radiological, but arthroscopy may provide a definitive response, allowing one to address secondary injuries to bone and cartilage. Obvious diastasis needs to be reduced and fixed operatively, whereas less severe injuries are controversial. Nonoperative treatment may be beneficial, but it entails long rehabilitation. In professional athletes, more aggressive surgical treatment is warranted. PMID:23943273

  14. Seismic refraction and GPR measurements of depth to bedrock: A case study from Randolph College, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, A.; Pokharel, R.; Toteva, T.

    2007-12-01

    Randolph College is located in Lynchburg, VA, in the eastern edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Lynchburg city lies in the James River Synclinorium and consists of metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks. As part of College's plan to expand, a new soccer field will be build. For that purpose, part of a hill has to be excavated. Information was needed on the depth to the bedrock at the site. We conducted a seismic refraction experiment as part of an eight week summer research program for undergraduate students. We used 24 vertical geophones, spaced at 1.5 m interval. Our recording device was a 12 channel Geometrics geode (ES 3000). The source was an 8 pound sledge hummer. Source positions were chosen to be at 5, 10, 15 and 20 m on both sides of the array. We collected data along a tree line (in two segments) and across a hockey field. The data collected from the hockey field had very low signal to noise ratio and clear refraction arrivals. The other two acquisition lines were much noisier and difficult to interpret. Our results are consistent with data from seven bore holes in close proximity to the field site. We interpreted depth to bedrock to be between 4 and 12 m. The bedrock velocities are consistent with weathered gneiss. To improve the interpretation of the tree line records, we conducted a GPR survey. The preliminary radar images are showing highly heterogeneous subsurface with multiple point reflectors.

  15. Meeting People Where They Are: Connecting Climate Change Impacts with the Interests of Particular Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, C. P.; Rogers, W. C.

    2011-12-01

    Several recent surveys (e.g., Brookings, Pew, Yale Project on Climate Change) have shown that a significant portion of Americans do not believe that human's are causing our climate to change, and that this portion has increased over the past 3 years. While there are a variety of reasons for this increase, it is clear that we need to develop new approaches that translate into more effective outreach activities on the issue of climate change for individuals and groups who are either "on the fence" or do not believe in global warming. One proven method to improve the effectiveness and develop new approaches to outreach efforts is for scientists to partner with external organizations who have expertise in communications. As an example, we describe a long-standing partnership that developed a video aimed at a particular community (people who play pond hockey) that connected their particular passion for pond hockey with the broader issue of regional climate change, warmer winters, earlier ice-out dates, and what it means to be from New England. We suggest that framing outreach efforts around what people and communities are interested in, as opposed to what scientists want to talk about, will be more effective at generating interest in the climate change issue among those non-believers.

  16. Diminished acquired equivalence yet good discrimination performance in older participants

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jasper; Owens, Emma

    2013-01-01

    We asked younger and older human participants to perform computer-based configural discriminations that were designed to detect acquired equivalence. Both groups solved the discriminations but only the younger participants demonstrated acquired equivalence. The discriminations involved learning the preferences [“like” (+) or “dislike” (?)] for sports [e.g., tennis (t) and hockey (h)] of four fictitious people [e.g., Alice (A), Beth (B), Charlotte (C), and Dorothy (D)]. In one experiment, the discrimination had the form: At+, Bt?, Ct+, Dt?, Ah?, Bh+, Ch?, Dh+. Notice that, e.g., Alice and Charlotte are “equivalent” in liking tennis but disliking hockey. Acquired equivalence was assessed in ancillary components of the discrimination (e.g., by looking at the subsequent rate of “whole” versus “partial” reversal learning). Acquired equivalence is anticipated by a network whose hidden units are shared when inputs (e.g., A and C) signal the same outcome (e.g., +) when accompanied by the same input (t). One interpretation of these results is that there are age-related differences in the mechanisms of configural acquired equivalence. PMID:24130542

  17. Diminished acquired equivalence yet good discrimination performance in older participants.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jasper; Owens, Emma

    2013-01-01

    We asked younger and older human participants to perform computer-based configural discriminations that were designed to detect acquired equivalence. Both groups solved the discriminations but only the younger participants demonstrated acquired equivalence. The discriminations involved learning the preferences ["like" (+) or "dislike" (-)] for sports [e.g., tennis (t) and hockey (h)] of four fictitious people [e.g., Alice (A), Beth (B), Charlotte (C), and Dorothy (D)]. In one experiment, the discrimination had the form: At+, Bt-, Ct+, Dt-, Ah-, Bh+, Ch-, Dh+. Notice that, e.g., Alice and Charlotte are "equivalent" in liking tennis but disliking hockey. Acquired equivalence was assessed in ancillary components of the discrimination (e.g., by looking at the subsequent rate of "whole" versus "partial" reversal learning). Acquired equivalence is anticipated by a network whose hidden units are shared when inputs (e.g., A and C) signal the same outcome (e.g., +) when accompanied by the same input (t). One interpretation of these results is that there are age-related differences in the mechanisms of configural acquired equivalence. PMID:24130542

  18. Threshold effect in lead-induced peripheral neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, J.; Landrigan, P.J.; Feldman, R.G.; Silbergeld, E.K.; Baker, E.L. Jr.; von Lindern, I.H.

    1988-01-01

    We previously demonstrated a negative correlation between blood lead level and motor nerve conduction velocity in 202 asymptomatic 5 to 9-year-old children living near a lead smelter in Idaho. Blood lead levels ranged from 13 to 97 micrograms/dL. To determine whether a threshold exists between blood lead level and maximal motor nerve conduction velocity, we conducted three regression analyses on these data: a ''hockey stick'' regression, a logistic regression, and a quadratic regression. We found evidence for a threshold in all three analyses: at a blood level of 30 micrograms/dL in the ''hockey stick'' regression, at 20 micrograms/dL in the logistic, and at 25 to 30 micrograms/dL in the quadratic. Neither age, sex, socioeconomic status, nor duration of residence near the smelter significantly modified the relationship. These analyses confirm that asymptomatic increased lead absorption causes slowing of nerve conduction, but they also indicate that measurement of maximal motor nerve conduction velocity is an insensitive screen for low-level lead toxicity.

  19. The effect of leg preference on postural stability in healthy athletes.

    PubMed

    Huurnink, Arnold; Fransz, Duncan P; Kingma, Idsart; Hupperets, Maarten D W; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2014-01-01

    In research regarding postural stability, leg preference is often tested and controlled for. However, leg preference may vary between tasks. As athletes are a group of interest for postural stability testing, we evaluated the effect of five leg preference tasks categorization (step up, hop, ball kick, balance, pick up) on single-leg postural stability of 16 field hockey athletes. The 'center of pressure speed' was calculated as the primary outcome variable of single-leg postural stability. Secondary variables were 'mean length of the GRF vector in the horizontal plane', 'mean length of the ankle angular velocity vector', and 'mean length of the hip angular velocity vector', as well as the separate outcomes per degree of freedom. Results showed that leg preference was inconsistent between leg preference tasks. Moreover, the primary and secondary variables yielded no significant difference between the preferred and non-preferred legs, regardless of the applied leg preference task categorization (p>0.05). The present findings do not support the usability of leg preference tasks in controlling for bias of postural stability. In conclusion, none of the applied leg preference tasks revealed a significant effect on postural stability in healthy field hockey athletes. PMID:24239407

  20. Trunk bend and twist coordination is affected by low back pain status during running.

    PubMed

    Seay, Joseph F; Van Emmerik, Richard E A; Hamill, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Recent literature has related differences in pelvis-trunk coordination to low back pain (LBP) status. In addition, repetitive motions involving bending and twisting have been linked to high incidence of LBP. The purpose of this study was to examine trunk sagittal motion - axial rotation ('bend and twist') coordination during locomotion in three groups of runners classified by LBP status (LBP: current low back pain; RES: resolved low back pain and CTR: control group with no history of LBP). Trunk kinematic data were collected as running speed was systematically increased on a treadmill. Within-segment coordination between trunk sagittal and transverse planes of motion (trunk lean and axial rotation, respectively) was calculated using continuous relative phase (CRP), and coordination variability was defined as the between stride cycle standard deviation of CRP (CRPvar). Bend-twist coordination was more in-phase for the LBP group than CTR (p = 0.010) regardless of running speed. No differences in CRPvar were found between the groups. The results from our coordination (CRP) analysis were sensitive to LBP status and suggest that multi-plane interactions of the trunk should be considered in the assessment of LBP. This analysis also has potential for athletically oriented tasks that involve multi-plane interactions of the trunk, particularly ones that contain asymmetric action, such as sweep rowing or a shot on goal in field hockey or ice hockey. PMID:24313829

  1. Harnessing sloshing as a passive dampener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killian, Taylor; Klaus, Robert; Truscott, Tadd

    2011-11-01

    This study investigates the impact dynamics of hollow elastic spheres partially filled with fluid, similar to roller hockey balls. Unlike an empty elastic ball, the fluid mitigates some of the rebound through an impulse driven exchange of energy wherein the fluid is forced into a jet inside the ball. Images gathered through experimentation show that the fluid reacts more quickly to the impact than the ball, which decouples the two masses (fluid and ball), imparts energy to the fluid, and removes rebound energy from the ball. The experimental results are compared to an energy method where energy is transferred from the external motion of the ball, to the internal flow of the fluid. Results suggest that while the internal liquid affects the fluid motion, the rebound characteristics of the ball are uniform for a given amount of fluid. Implications of this work on an analog to the roller hockey ball is a potential use of similar passive dampening systems in sports technology and marine engineering. BYU ORCA.

  2. Recent advances in the molten salt destruction of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pruneda, C. O., LLNL

    1996-09-01

    We have demonstrated the use of the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for destroying explosives, liquid gun propellant, and explosives-contaminated materials on a 1.5 kg of explosive/hr bench- scale unit (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). In our recently constructed 5 kg/hr pilot- scale unit we have also demonstrated the destruction of a liquid gun propellant and simulated wastes containing HMX (octogen). MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic materials waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a vessel containing molten salt (a eutectic mixture of sodium, potassium, and lithium carbonates). The following pure explosives have been destroyed in our bench-scale experimental unit located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K- 6 (keto-RDX), NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following compositions were also destroyed: Comp B, LX- IO, LX- 1 6, LX- 17, PBX-9404, and XM46 (liquid gun propellant). In this 1.5 kg/hr bench-scale unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NO{sub x} were found to be well below 1%. In addition to destroying explosive powders and compositions we have also destroyed materials that are typical of residues which result from explosives operations. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic-bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the process data obtained on the bench-scale unit we designed and constructed a next-generation 5 kg/hr pilot-scale unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. The pilot unit has completed process implementation operations and explosives safety reviews. To date, in this pilot unit we have successfully destroyed liquid gun propellant and dimethylsulfoxide containing HMX in continuous, long-duration runs.

  3. A Study of Detonation Diffraction in the Ignition-and-Growth Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kapila, A K; Schwendeman, D W; Bdzil, J B; Henshaw, W D

    2006-04-14

    Heterogeneous high-energy explosives are morphologically, mechanically and chemically complex. As such, their ab-initio modeling, in which well-characterized phenomena at the scale of the microstructure lead to a rationally homogenized description at the scale of observation, is a subject of active research but not yet a reality. An alternative approach is to construct phenomenological models, in which forms of constitutive behavior are postulated with an eye on the perceived picture of the micro-scale phenomena, and which are strongly linked to experimental calibration. Most prominent among these is the ignition-and-growth model conceived by Lee and Tarver. The model treats the explosive as a homogeneous mixture of two distinct constituents, the unreacted explosive and the products of reaction. To each constituent is assigned an equation of state, and a single reaction-rate law is prescribed for the conversion of the explosive to products. It is assumed that the two constituents are always in pressure and temperature equilibrium. The purpose of this paper is to investigate in detail the behavior of the model in situations where a detonation turns a corner and undergoes diffraction. A set of parameters appropriate for the explosive LX-17 is selected. The model is first examined analytically for steady, planar, 1-D solutions and the reaction-zone structure of Chapman-Jouguet detonations is determined. A computational study of two classes of problems is then undertaken. The first class corresponds to planar, 1-D initiation by an impact, and the second to corner turning and diffraction in planar and axisymmetric geometries. The 1-D initiation, although interesting in its own right, is utilized here as a means for interpretation of the 2-D results. It is found that there are two generic ways in which 1-D detonations are initiated in the model, and that these scenarios play a part in the post-diffraction evolution as well. For the parameter set under study the model shows detonation failure, but only locally and temporarily, and does not generate sustained dead zones. The computations employ adaptive mesh refinement and are finely resolved. Results are obtained for a rigid confinement of the explosive. Compliant confinement represents its own computational challenges and is currently under study. Also under development is an extended ignition-and-growth model which takes into account observed desensitization of heterogeneous explosives by weak shocks.

  4. Final Report on Initial Samples Supplied by LLNL for Task 3.3 Binder Burnout and Sintering Schedule Optimisation

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, P

    1999-01-04

    Sixteen of the twenty-one samples have been investigated using the scanning laser dilatometer. This includes all three types of samples with different preparation routes and organic content. Cracks were observed in all samples, even those only heated to 300 C. It was concluded that the cracking was occurring in the early part of the heat treatment before the samples reached 300 C. Increase in the rate of dilation of the samples occurred above 170 C which coincided with the decomposition of the binder/wax additives as determined by differential thermal analysis. A comparison was made with SYNROC C material (Powder Run 143), samples of which had been CIPed and green machined to a similar diameter and thickness as the 089mm SRTC pucks. These samples contained neither binder nor other organic processing aids and had been kept in the same desiccator as the SRTC samples. The CIPed Synroc C samples sintered to high density with zero cracks. As the cracks made up only a small contribution to the change in diameter of the sample compared to the sintering shrinkage, useful information could still be gained from the runs. The sintering curves showed that there was much greater shrinkage of the Type III samples containing only the 5% PEG binder compared to the Type I which contained polyolefin wax as processing aid. Slight changes in gradient of the sintering curve were observed, however, due to the masking effect of the cracking, full analysis of the sintering kinetics cannot be conducted. Even heating the samples to 300 C at 1.0 or 0.5 C/min could not prevent crack formation. This indicated that heating rate was not the critical parameter causing cracking of the samples. Sectioning of green bodies revealed the inhomogeneous nature of the binder/lubricant distribution in the samples. Increased homogeneity would reduce the amount of binder/lubricant required, which should in turn, reduce the degree of cracking observed during heating to the binder burnout temperature. A combination of: (1) use of a higher forming pressure, (2) reduction of organics content, (3) improvement in the distribution of the organic wax and binder components throughout the green body, could possibly alleviate cracking. Ultrasonic emulsification of the binder and wax with a small quantity of water prior to adding to the ball or attrition mill is advised to ensure more even distribution of the wax/binder system. This would also reduce the proportion of organic additives required. The binder burnout stage of the operation must first be optimized (i.e. production of pucks with no cracks) prior to optimization of the sintering stage.

  5. AUV Measured Variability in Phytoplankton Fluorescence within the ETM of the Columbia River during Summer 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, C. L.; Shcherbina, A.; Litchendorf, T. M.; Sanford, T. B.; Martin, D.; Baptista, A. M.; Lopez, J.; Crump, B. C.; Peterson, T. D.; Prahl, F. G.; Cravo, A.

    2014-12-01

    We present highly resolved observations of fluorescence and optical backscatter taken in the estuarine turbidity maxima (ETM) of the North Channel of the Columbia River estuary (USA) during summer 2013. Measurements were made using two REMUS-100 autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with ECO Puck triplets. Concentrations of three phytoplankton pigments were measured by fluorescence emission at wavelengths of 695 nm for chlorophyll, 570 nm for phycoerythrin, and 680 nm for phycocyanin. We use phycocyanin to indicate the presence of freshwater phytoplankton. Optical backscatter at wavelengths of 700 nm and 880 nm are used to characterize turbidity. During flood tide, high phycocyanin concentrations were associated with a strong ETM event which had relatively low salinity waters of approximately 6 psu. These data indicate that this low salinity ETM event contained large concentrations of freshwater phytoplankton. Since freshwater phytoplankton are known to lyse in saltwater, the brackish ETM event may have formed by the accumulation of lysed freshwater phytoplankton that settled out from the river as it mixed in the lower estuary. As the flood tide proceeded, it brought high concentrations of marine phytoplankton into the north channel at mid-depth as indicated by high chlorophyll levels with significantly lower phycoerythrin concentrations in high salinity waters of approximately 30 psu. The data set highlights the potential for large variability in phytoplankton species composition and concentrations within the ETM depending on mixing rates and phytoplankton bloom dynamics. Visualization of the 4-D data is aided by generating interpolated data movies.

  6. Lingual force detection system.

    PubMed

    Sangave, Amit; Manuccia, Thomas; Kay, Matthew; Zderic, Vesna

    2008-01-01

    The tongue is an organ of great significance in the processes of both swallowing and speech. Any disorder of the tongue's function (dysphagia, lateral sclerosis), with regard especially to the forces it produces, can drastically impair an individual by leaving them unable to swallow or talk. Up to this point, few systems have been created to quantitatively measure tongue force. Here we describe development of a new device that measures and outputs tongue force and endurance at six strategically positioned points in the mouth. Two mouth guards were fitted with six (three per guard) thin, highly sensitive sensors that independently output tongue force at each location. To ensure proper sensor readings, that is, reliable contact between the tongue and the sensor, each sensor was placed between a hard backing plate of stainless steel and a pliable puck constructed from silicone rubber. Forces were output to a computer using National Instruments' ELVIS system and a novel user friendly interface created using NI's LabVIEW. The proposed system can be utilized as a first step in diagnosis and treatment planning for speech rehabilitation and therapy. In future studies, collected data will be compared with control data (obtained previously from healthy volunteers) to diagnose potential tongue weakness and pinpoint its location in the mouth (whether unilateral or diffuse). PMID:19163801

  7. Combining Environment-Driven Adaptation and Task-Driven Optimisation in Evolutionary Robotics

    PubMed Central

    Haasdijk, Evert; Bredeche, Nicolas; Eiben, A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Embodied evolutionary robotics is a sub-field of evolutionary robotics that employs evolutionary algorithms on the robotic hardware itself, during the operational period, i.e., in an on-line fashion. This enables robotic systems that continuously adapt, and are therefore capable of (re-)adjusting themselves to previously unknown or dynamically changing conditions autonomously, without human oversight. This paper addresses one of the major challenges that such systems face, viz. that the robots must satisfy two sets of requirements. Firstly, they must continue to operate reliably in their environment (viability), and secondly they must competently perform user-specified tasks (usefulness). The solution we propose exploits the fact that evolutionary methods have two basic selection mechanisms–survivor selection and parent selection. This allows evolution to tackle the two sets of requirements separately: survivor selection is driven by the environment and parent selection is based on task-performance. This idea is elaborated in the Multi-Objective aNd open-Ended Evolution (monee) framework, which we experimentally validate. Experiments with robotic swarms of 100 simulated e-pucks show that monee does indeed promote task-driven behaviour without compromising environmental adaptation. We also investigate an extension of the parent selection process with a ‘market mechanism’ that can ensure equitable distribution of effort over multiple tasks, a particularly pressing issue if the environment promotes specialisation in single tasks. PMID:24901702

  8. Development of molecular adsorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred

    2010-08-01

    As mission, satellite, and instrument performance requirements become more advanced, the need to control adverse onorbit molecular contamination is more critical. Outgassed materials within the spacecraft have the potential to degrade performance of optical surfaces, thermal control surfaces, solar arrays, electronics, and detectors. One method for addressing the outgassing of materials is the use of molecular adsorbers. On Goddard Space Flight Center missions such as Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), and SWIFT, Zeolite-coated cordierite molecular adsorbers were successfully used to collect and retain outgassed molecular effluent emanating from spacecraft materials, protecting critical contamination sensitive surfaces. However, the major drawbacks of these puck type adsorbers are weight, size, and mounting hardware requirements, making them difficult to incorporate into spacecraft designs. To address these concerns, a novel molecular adsorber coating was developed to alleviate the size and weight issues while providing a configuration that more projects can utilize, particularly contamination sensitive instruments. This successful sprayable molecular adsorber coating system demonstrated five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was refined and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. The tested formulation passes coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests between +140 and -115C. Thermal radiative properties are very promising. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate coatings.

  9. EPICS controlled sample mounting robots at the GM/CA CAT.

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, O. A.; Benn, R.; Corcoran, S.; Devarapalli, S.; Fischetti, R.; Hilgart, M.; Smith, W. W.; Stepanov, S.; Xu, S.; Biosciences Division

    2007-11-11

    GM/CA CAT at Sector 23 of the advanced photon source (APS) is an NIH funded facility for crystallographic structure determination of biological macromolecules by X-ray diffraction [R.F. Fischetti, et al., GM/CA canted undulator beamlines for protein crystallography, Acta Crystallogr. A 61 (2005) C139]. The facility consists of three beamlines; two based on canted undulators and one on a bending magnet. The scientific and technical goals of the CAT emphasize streamlined, efficient throughput for a variety of sample types, sizes and qualities, representing the cutting edge of structural biology research. For this purpose all three beamlines are equipped with the ALS-style robots [C.W.Cork, et al. Status of the BCSB automated sample mounting and alignment system for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Light Source, SRI-2003, San-Francisco, CA, USA, August 25-29, 2003] for an automated mounting of cryo-protected macromolecular crystals. This report summarizes software and technical solutions implemented with the first of the three operational robots at beamline 23-ID-B. The automounter's Dewar can hold up to 72 or 96 samples residing in six Rigaku ACTOR magazines or ALS-style pucks, respectively. Mounting of a crystal takes approximately 2 s, during which time the temperature of the crystal is maintained near that of liquid nitrogen.

  10. A microfabricated gecko-inspired controllable and reusable dry adhesive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Sathya; Tamelier, John; Turner, Kimberly

    2013-02-01

    Geckos utilize a robust reversible adhesive to repeatedly attach and detach from a variety of vertical and inverted surfaces, using structurally anisotropic micro- and nano-scale fibrillar structures. These fibers, when suitably articulated, are able to control the real area of contact and thereby generate high-to-low van der Waals forces. Key characteristics of the natural system include highly anisotropic adhesion and shear forces for controllable attachment, a high adhesion to initial preload force ratio (??) of 8-16, lack of inter-fiber self-adhesion, and operation over more than 30?000 cycles without loss of adhesion performance. A highly reusable synthetic adhesive has been developed using tilted polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) half-cylinder micron-scale fibers, retaining up to 77% of the initial value over 10?000 repeated test cycles against a flat glass puck. In comparison with other gecko-inspired adhesives tested over 10?000 cycles or more thus far, this paper reports the highest value of ??, along with a large shear force of ˜78 kPa, approaching the 88-226 kPa range of gecko toes. The anisotropic adhesion forces are close to theoretical estimates from the Kendall peel model, quantitatively showing how lateral shearing articulation in a manner similar to the gecko may be used to obtain adhesion anisotropy with synthetic fibers using a combination of tilt angle and anisotropic fiber geometry.

  11. Submarine groundwater discharge to the Baltic coastal zone: Impacts on the meiofaunal community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotwicki, L.; Grzelak, K.; Czub, M.; Dellwig, O.; Gentz, T.; Szymczycha, B.; Böttcher, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The discharge of groundwater into the sea affects surrounding environments by changing the salinity, temperature and nutrient regimes. This work reports the spatial effects of a submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) on the abundance and structure of the meiofaunal community in the shallow area of Puck Bay (Baltic Sea). Several field expeditions in the years 2009 and 2010 found that low-saline groundwater escapes into the bay from permeable, sandy, near-shore sediments. The SGD literature has grown rapidly during the current decade; however, the effects of this type of disturbance on the shallow sandy bottom fauna have thus far been little studied. We provide evidence that the discharge of groundwater has a clear effect on meiofaunal assemblages in the research area. This effect was reflected in a significant decline of certain meiofaunal taxa, mainly nematodes and harpacticoids, as well as in altered patterns of temporal distribution and small-scale (vertical) zonation of meiofaunal assemblages. Overlooking submarine groundwater discharge processes may lead to serious misinterpretations of ecological data. It is clear that groundwater discharge phenomena should be considered in future scientific studies.

  12. Measurement of areal density in the ablators of inertial-confinement-fusion capsules via detection of ablator (n, n'?) gamma-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, N. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Hsu, H. H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Miller, E. K.; Grafil, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Church, J. A.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Duffy, T.

    2013-04-01

    We report the first gamma-ray-based measurements of the areal density of ablators in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions. The measurements, made at the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], used observations of gamma rays arising from inelastic scattering of 14.1-MeV deuterium-tritium (DT) neutrons on 12C nuclei in the compressed plastic ablators. The emission of 12C(n,n'?) gamma rays from the capsules is detected using the Gamma Reaction History instrument [H. W. Herrmann et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 244, 032047 (2010)] operating at OMEGA. From the ratio of a capsule's 12C(n,n'?) emission to the emission from the same processes in an in situ reference graphite "puck" of known mass and geometry [N. M. Hoffman et al., in IFSA 2011 proceedings (submitted)], we determine the time-averaged areal density of 12C in the capsule's compressed ablator. Measured values of total ablator areal density for thirteen imploded capsules, in the range 23 ± 10 to 58 ± 14 mg/cm2, are comparable to values calculated in 1D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, and measured by charged-particle techniques.

  13. Preparation and characterization of the extracellular domain of human Sid-1.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Ashley J; Rambo, Robert P; Lau, Pick-Wei; MacRae, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    In C. elegans, the cell surface protein Sid-1 imports extracellular dsRNA into the cytosol of most non-neuronal cells, enabling systemic spread of RNA interference (RNAi) throughout the worm. Sid-1 homologs are found in many other animals, although for most a function for the protein has not yet been established. Sid-1 proteins are composed of an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) followed by 9-12 predicted transmembrane regions. We developed a baculovirus system to express and purify the ECD of the human Sid-1 protein SidT1. Recombinant SidT1 ECD is glycosylated and spontaneously assembles into a stable and discrete tetrameric structure. Electron microscopy (EM) and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies reveal that the SidT1 ECD tetramer is a compact, puck-shaped globular particle, which we hypothesize may control access of dsRNA to the transmembrane pore. These characterizations provide inroads towards understanding the mechanism of this unique RNA transport system from structural prospective. PMID:22509261

  14. Combining environment-driven adaptation and task-driven optimisation in evolutionary robotics.

    PubMed

    Haasdijk, Evert; Bredeche, Nicolas; Eiben, A E

    2014-01-01

    Embodied evolutionary robotics is a sub-field of evolutionary robotics that employs evolutionary algorithms on the robotic hardware itself, during the operational period, i.e., in an on-line fashion. This enables robotic systems that continuously adapt, and are therefore capable of (re-)adjusting themselves to previously unknown or dynamically changing conditions autonomously, without human oversight. This paper addresses one of the major challenges that such systems face, viz. that the robots must satisfy two sets of requirements. Firstly, they must continue to operate reliably in their environment (viability), and secondly they must competently perform user-specified tasks (usefulness). The solution we propose exploits the fact that evolutionary methods have two basic selection mechanisms-survivor selection and parent selection. This allows evolution to tackle the two sets of requirements separately: survivor selection is driven by the environment and parent selection is based on task-performance. This idea is elaborated in the Multi-Objective aNd open-Ended Evolution (monee) framework, which we experimentally validate. Experiments with robotic swarms of 100 simulated e-pucks show that monee does indeed promote task-driven behaviour without compromising environmental adaptation. We also investigate an extension of the parent selection process with a 'market mechanism' that can ensure equitable distribution of effort over multiple tasks, a particularly pressing issue if the environment promotes specialisation in single tasks. PMID:24901702

  15. Planetary nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strobell, M. E.; Masursky, Harold

    1987-01-01

    In fiscal 1986, names were chosen for prominent features on the five previously known Uranian satellites and for features on the largest of the 10 satellites discovered by Voyager 2. The names of the five large satellites are taken mostly from Shakespeare, and most are spirits; therefore, Shakespearean and spirit themes were used to choose names for topographic features on the satellites. Crater names and most other feature names on Miranda, Oberon, and Titania are from Shakespeare; features on Ariel are named for bright spirits and those on Umbriel for dark, all taken from universal mythology. Preliminary coordinates for these features are derived from shaded relief maps of the satellites to be published in 1987. Orbital elements have been established for the 10 new satellites, and a paper describing this work is in progress; satellite positions are under review by Commission 16 of the IAU. The moon 1985 U1 is informally designated Puck. The nine small satellites discovered in 1986 are to be named for Shakespearean heroines; these names are to be listed in the 1987 edition of the Annual Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature.

  16. Comprehensive Photometry of the Rings and 16 Satellites of Uranus with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkoschka, Erich

    2001-05-01

    Photometric properties of 4 rings and 16 satellites of Uranus are presented, based on 41 Hubble Space Telescope images taken in 1997. Up to 25 filters per object covered the wavelength range 0.27-2 ?m. The whole range of phase angles observable from Earth (0.03-3°) was probed. Reflectivities were calibrated on an absolute scale to typically 4% accuracy. Below 1 ?m, derived geometric albedos of major satellites are typically 30% higher than previously reported due to previously unobserved steep upturns of the phase curve shortward of 0.2° phase angle, possibly caused by coherent backscatter. Portia is slightly oblong and Juliet and Belinda are very oblong based on their rotational lightcurves. Puck displays a weak spectral feature indicative of water ice absorption. Cordelia and Ophelia were recovered very close to the positions predicted from their gravitational influence on the ? ring. They have not been observed since 1986. Subtle color variations within the satellite system were confirmed. Throughout the uranian system, the slope of phase curves below 1° phase angle displays a strong correlation with the albedo and a strong anticorrelation with the slope at higher phase angles. Similar correlations were found for Hapke parameters. The brightness of 20 members of the uranian system is presented in functional form for a wide range of wavelengths, phase angles, and orbital longitudes.

  17. The first photon shutter development for APS insertion device beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Deming; Nian, H.L.T.; Wang, Zhibi; Collins, J.T.; Ryding, D.G.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-09-01

    One of the most critical components on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) beamline front ends is the first photon shutter. It operates in two modes to fully intercept the high total power and high-heat flux ID photon beam in seconds (normal mode) or in less than 100 ms (emergency fast mode). It is designed to operate in ultra high vacuum (UHV). The design incorporates a multi-channel rectangular bar, bent in a ``hockey stick`` configuration, with two-point suspension. The flanged end is an articulated bellows with rolling hinges. The actuation end is a spring-assisted, pneumatic fail-safe flexural pivot type. The coolant (water) channels incorporate brazed copper foam to enhance the heat transfer, a tube technology particular to the APS. The design development, and material aspects, as well as the extensive thermal and vibrational analyses in support of the design, are presented in this paper.

  18. The first photon shutter development for APS insertion device beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Deming; Nian, H.L.T.; Wang, Zhibi; Collins, J.T.; Ryding, D.G.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    One of the most critical components on the Advanced Photon Source (APS) insertion device (ID) beamline front ends is the first photon shutter. It operates in two modes to fully intercept the high total power and high-heat flux ID photon beam in seconds (normal mode) or in less than 100 ms (emergency fast mode). It is designed to operate in ultra high vacuum (UHV). The design incorporates a multi-channel rectangular bar, bent in a hockey stick'' configuration, with two-point suspension. The flanged end is an articulated bellows with rolling hinges. The actuation end is a spring-assisted, pneumatic fail-safe flexural pivot type. The coolant (water) channels incorporate brazed copper foam to enhance the heat transfer, a tube technology particular to the APS. The design development, and material aspects, as well as the extensive thermal and vibrational analyses in support of the design, are presented in this paper.

  19. Relative age effect revisited: findings from the dance domain.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Jacques H A

    2006-04-01

    The relative age effect is a worldwide phenomenon. While there is solid empirical evidence for the existence in sports like soccer and ice hockey, there are also some findings indicating the absence of the phenomenon. In an earlier study, no support was found with Dutch top-level athletes in table tennis and in volleyball. The explanation was that in athletic tasks which depend heavily on the technical ability (or motor skill) of the participant, a relative age effect will not be observed. In the present study this supposition was tested again with three samples of Dutch preprofessional dance students (overall number of subjects: 546). Again no support was obtained for the relative age effect. Therefore, a case is being built that the relative age effect is not an omnipresent phenomenon. PMID:16826648

  20. Home advantage in speed skating: evidence from individual data.

    PubMed

    Koning, Ruud H

    2005-04-01

    Home advantage is a well-documented phenomenon in many sports. Home advantage has been shown to exist for team sports (soccer, hockey, football, baseball, basketball) and for countries organizing sports tournaments like the Olympics and World Cup Soccer. There is also some evidence for home advantage in some individual sports, but there is a much more limited literature. This paper addresses the issue of home advantage in speed skating. From a methodological point of view, it is difficult to identify home advantage, because skaters vary in their abilities and the conditions of tournaments vary. There is a small but significant home advantage using a generalized linear mixed model, with random effects for skaters and fixed effects for skating rinks and seasons. Even though the home advantage effect exists, it is very small when compared to variation in skating times due to differences of rinks and individual abilities. PMID:16089186

  1. Air levels and mutagenicity of PM-10 in an indoor ice arena

    SciTech Connect

    Georghiou, P.E.; Blagden, P.A. (Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. Johns (Canada)); Snow, D.A.; Winsor, L. (Geortec Ltd., St. Johns, Newfoundland (Canada)); Williams, D.T. (Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-12-01

    The authors report here their results from a preliminary study to evaluate a methodology for surveying air quality by measuring concentrations of PM-10 and the corresponding concentrations of mutagenic activity. The PM-10 was collected, during several hockey games at an ice arena using an Indoor Air Sampling Impactor (IASI) developed by Marple et al. During the course of the study, smoking restrictions were imposed in the stadium and the impact of these restrictions on PM-10 levels was also evaluated. The mutagenic activities of solvent extracts of the PM-10 were determined using the microsuspension modification of the Samonella typhimurium/microsome test. Mutagenic activity has often been used as a rough index of exposure to potential carcinogens and mutagens and to help define their sources.

  2. Sports and health: equivalence or contrariety.

    PubMed

    Radi?, Borislav; Radi?, Petra; Durakovi?, Din

    2014-12-01

    Playing sports is a widely known method of health promotion. Balanced exercise and diet are keys to healthy life. However, sports activities can cause different injuries, from joint to head injuries. Although head injuries cause a variety of acute and chronic disorders, they are often undertreated. There are 1.6 million injured people examined at emergency departments throughout Europe every year. In sports like boxing, football, soccer, hockey, handball, basketball and bicycling, head injuries occur at a frequency of 4% to 22%. Particularly significant are chronic difficulties that occur after recurrent head injuries, i.e. cognitive deficits and changes in electroencephalogram. Qualifications of professional personnel are insufficient for professional evaluation and treatment of head injuries. The best way for sports to become an important link in health and disease prevention is to go back to sports basics while using acquired scientific knowledge. PMID:25868311

  3. Non-Operative Treatment of a Fracture to the Coracoid Process with Acromioclavicular Dislocation in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Vera; Prall, Wolf Christian; Ockert, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Coracoid process fractures are rare and often associated with dislocations of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. There is little evidence about the treatment of these injuries in adolescents, but the few case reports published recommend surgery. We report a case of a dislocated epiphyseal fracture to the base of the coracoid process with AC joint dislocation in a 14-year-old ice-hockey player following direct impact to his left shoulder. Since magnetic resonance tomography revealed intact AC and coracoclavicular ligaments, we initiated non-operative treatment with immobilization and unloading of the shoulder by an abduction brace allowing limited rotation for 6 weeks. This treatment resulted in complete recovery after 8 weeks and return to full sports on first league level after 3 month. In conclusion, non-operative treatment of coracoid base fractures with concomitant AC-joint injury in the adolescent can result in excellent functional results and early recovery. PMID:25317314

  4. Thin wide-field-of-view HMD with free-form-surface prism and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Shoichi; Inoguchi, Kazutaka; Saito, Yoshihiro; Morishima, Hideki; Taniguchi, Naosato

    1999-05-01

    The HMD optical system composed of 'free form surface prism' (FFS prism) was presented by Canon Inc. at the 1996 SPIE conference. This prism was consists of aspherical surfaces without rotational symmetry. This HMD was suitable for compact HMD and was the 180,000 pixels display which has 34 degrees horizontal FOV and less than 15mm prism thickness. We have developed a new see-through 3D HMD with high resolution, wide field of view (FOV) by improving this FFS prism technique. The new HMD with 51 degrees horizontal FOV and large viewing eyebox shows clear full color image with 920,000 pixels. In spite of the wide FOV, the thickness of this new FFS prism is very thin, 17.9 mm. In this paper, we report this new HMD and 'the AR2 hockey system' as an example of this HMD application.

  5. Self-presentation origins of choking: evidence from separate pressure manipulations.

    PubMed

    Mesagno, Christopher; Harvey, Jack T; Janelle, Christopher M

    2011-06-01

    Whether self-presentation is involved in the choking process remains unknown. The purpose of the current study was to determine the role of self-presentation concerns on the frequency of choking within the context of a recently proposed self-presentation model. Experienced field hockey players (N = 45) were randomly assigned to one of five groups (i.e., performance-contingent monetary incentive, video camera placebo, video camera self-presentation, audience, or combined pressure), before taking penalty strokes in low- and high-pressure phases. Results indicated that groups exposed to self-presentation manipulations experienced choking, whereas those receiving motivational pressure treatments decreased anxiety and increased performance under pressure. Furthermore, cognitive state anxiety mediated the relationship between the self-presentation group and performance. These findings provide quantitative support for the proposed self-presentation model of choking, while also holding implications for anxiety manipulations in future sport psychology research. PMID:21659672

  6. Understanding the petrochemical cycle: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, W. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The manager of a petrochemical enterprise, to survive the competitive 1990s, must have a good understanding of the industry's cyclicality, and a good grasp of coping alternatives. To select the best strategies and tactics calls for a familiarity with such concepts as the hockey-stick profile for profitability and the experience curve for cost reductions at both ends of the supply curve. The manager must carefully weigh advantages of build-and-scrap policies and differentiation vs. diversification and recognize the pitfalls associated with the prisoner's dilemma. With these elements well understood, the manager is in an improved position to cope with the industry's boom-and-bust characteristics. The paper discusses practicalities, the prisoner's dilemma in game theory, individual company actions, leveraging cyclicability, differentiation and diversification/integration, improvement of competitiveness, and structure as part of the problem.

  7. Surfing on a herringbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Dan; Lagubeau, Guillaume; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2013-11-01

    Liquids in the Leidenfrost state levitate on hot solids, owing to the formation of a cushion of vapor. Without contact, drops glide with negligible friction on their substrate. The conjunction of vapor production and frictionless motion can be exploited to self-propel liquids when placed on hot horizontal ratchets. It was proposed to understand the effect as follows: the asymmetric teeth of the ratchet rectify the vapor flow below the levitating liquid, which is entrained by the viscous vapor. In our presentation, we propose to induce similar effects by geometrical means, hence achieving new designs for self-propelling Leidenfrost liquids. We force a directional flow of vapor by etching a herringbone pattern in the hot substrate. We show how this design can be tuned to optimize the propelling force and the drop speed, which is quantitatively analyzed. We eventually extend these principles to self-propel plastic levitating cards at room temperature, using patterned hockey tables.

  8. The influence of the sensor type on the measured impact absorption of mouthguard material.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Tomotaka; Ishigami, Keiichi; Jun, Handa; Nakajima, Kazunori; Shimada, Atsushi; Ogawa, Toru

    2004-02-01

    Mouthguards have been tested for impact energy absorption using drop-ball and/or pendulum devices. While all reports show efficiency of the mouthguard, the impact absorption abilities reported differ considerably. This difference has been attributed to differences of mouthguard material, design, and the impact force used. However, it is also possibly because of the difference in the sensors used in the experiments. The purpose of this study was to test three types of sensors and to assess which type was most appropriate for measurement of the impact absorption ability of mouthguards. A pendulum-type testing equipment and steel ball, wooden bat, baseball, field-hockey ball were used as the impact object. For all sensors or impact objects, the mouthguard decreased the impact forces. However, the absorption ability of the mouthguard varied according to the sensor or impact object. The absorbency values became smaller with the strain gauge, the accelerometer, and the load cell, respectively. With the steel ball as the impact object, 80.3% of impact absorption was measured with the strain gauge and the accelerometer but, only 62.1% with the load cell sensor. With the wooden bat, impact absorption was 76.3% with the strain gauge and 38.8% for the load cell. For the baseball ball, the absorption measurement decreased from 46.3% with the strain gauge to 4.36 with the load cell and for the field-hockey ball, the decrease in measurement values were similar (23.6% with the strain gauge and 2.43% with the load cell). It is clear that the sensor plays an important role in the measurement values reported for absorbency of mouthguard materials and a standard sensor should be used for all experiments. PMID:14998412

  9. Unrecognized pediatric partial Achilles tendon injury followed by traumatic completion: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Vasileff, William Kelton; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are a relatively common athletic injury but are exceedingly rare in the pediatric population. We describe the case of a 10-year-old ice hockey player who experienced an Achilles tendon injury from a laceration to the posterior leg from a skate blade that led to a partial tendon laceration. This tendon injury was initially unrecognized despite an emergency department evaluation. The patient continued to complain of weakness and paresthesia after the skin laceration had healed. A traumatic dorsiflexion injury while running several weeks later led to a traumatic complete tendon rupture. The clinical, operative, and physical therapy records were reviewed to complete the history, treatment, and rehabilitation progress. The initial laceration injury had occurred 6 weeks before presentation, and the traumatic dorsiflexion injury had occurred 2 days before referral to an acute orthopedics clinic. Open repair was performed several days after the traumatic completion of the laceration, and the patient was immobilized in a cast for 5 weeks. The patient had weaned off crutches by 10 weeks postoperatively and had returned to some activities and light skating at 5.5 months. A full return to running and ice hockey had been achieved by 8 months postoperatively. The optimal repair for this injury has not been well established in published studies. We have concluded that laceration injuries have the potential to mask tendon injuries and that prolonged symptoms after a laceration should suggest occult pathologic features. Open tendon repair is a viable treatment option in the pediatric patient with Achilles tendon ruptures. A return to activities within a reasonable period can be expected with robust physical therapy. PMID:24713492

  10. Health risk assessment of indoor air pollution in Finnish ice arenas.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Raimo O; Pennanen, Arto S; Vahteristo, Mikko; Korkeila, Petri; Alm, Sari; Randell, Jukka T

    2008-01-01

    Poor indoor air quality and epidemic carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) poisonings due to exhaust emissions from ice resurfacers have been continuously reported from enclosed ice arenas for over 30 years. The health risks in users of Finnish ice arenas were analysed in three ways: (1) evaluation of four cases of epidemic CO poisonings, (2) modelling the association between NO(2) exposure and respiratory symptoms among junior ice hockey players, and (3) estimation of the number of arena users at risk of breathing poor quality air due to non-compliance of ice arenas with recommended abatement measures. The common causes for the CO poisonings involving over 300 subjects were large emissions from propane-fuelled ice resurfacer, small arena volume, negligible ventilation, and very recent opening of the arena. Rhinitis (prevalence 18.3%) and cough (13.7%) during or after training or game were significantly associated with the estimated personal NO(2) exposure of young hockey players (n=793) to average concentrations ranging from 21 to 1176 microg/m(3) in their home arena. During a 6-year follow-up of an intensive information campaign the portion of electric resurfacers increased from 9% to 27%, and that of emission control technology on propane-fuelled resurfacers increased from 13% to 84%. The portion of inadequately ventilated arenas decreased from 34% to 25%. However, 48% of the investigated Finnish ice arenas (n=125) did not fully comply with the non-regulatory recommendations. Consequently, 20000 daily users of ice arenas were estimated to remain in 2001 at risk of breathing poor quality air. Modern small and inadequately ventilated ice arenas pose their users (mostly children and young adults) at risk of breathing poor quality air and suffering from acute adverse health effects. Governmental regulations are needed worldwide to ensure safe sports in enclosed ice arenas. PMID:17716732

  11. PPARA Intron Polymorphism Associated with Power Performance in 30-s Anaerobic Wingate Test

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Miroslav; Št‘astný, Petr; Pecha, Ond?ej; Šteffl, Michal; Šeda, Ond?ej; Kohlíková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To date, polymorphisms in several genes have been associated with a strength/power performance including alpha 3 actinin, ciliary neurotrophic factor, vitamin D receptor, or angiotensin I converting enzyme, underlining the importance of genetic component of the multifactorial strength/power-related phenotypes. The single nucleotide variation in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha gene (PPARA) intron 7 G/C (rs4253778; g.46630634G>C) has been repeatedly found to play a significant role in response to different types of physical activity. We investigated the effect of PPARA intron 7 G/C polymorphism specifically on anaerobic power output in a group of 77 elite male Czech ice hockey players (18–36 y). We determined the relative peak power per body weight (Pmax.kg?1) and relative peak power per fat free mass (W.kg?1FFM) during the 30-second Wingate Test (WT30) on bicycle ergometer (Monark 894E Peak bike, MONARK, Sweden). All WT30s were performed during the hockey season. Overall genotype frequencies were 50.6% GG homozygotes, 40.3% CG heterozygotes, and 9.1% CC homozygotes. We found statistically significant differences in Pmax.kg?1 and marginally significant differences in Pmax.kg?1FFM values in WT30 between carriers and non-carriers for C allele (14.6±0.2 vs. 13.9±0.3 W.kg?1 and 15.8±0.2 vs. 15.2±0.3 W.kg?1FFM, P?=?0.036 and 0.12, respectively). Furthermore, Pmax.kg?1FFM strongly positively correlated with the body weight only in individuals with GG genotypes (R?=?0.55; p<0.001). Our results indicate that PPARA 7C carriers exhibited higher speed strength measures in WT30. We hypothesize that C allele carriers within the cohort of trained individuals may possess a metabolic advantage towards anaerobic metabolism. PMID:25198533

  12. Jack Rabbit Pretest Shadowplate Drawings For TATB IHE Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M M; McDaniel, D W

    2009-07-10

    The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) series consisted of 5 focused hydrodynamic experiments 2021E PT3, PT4, PT5, PT6, and PT7. They were fired in March and April of 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California. These experiments measured deadzone formation and impulse gradients created during the detonation of TATB based insensitive high explosive. When setting up computer simulations of the Jack Rabbit Pretest series, the modeler or code developer can execute simulations with increasing degrees of refinement using detail found in the shadowplate design. The easiest way to get started is by treating the shadowplate in each experiment as a monolithic homogeneous piece of stainless steel. The simulation of detonation would begin as a point initiation below the center, bottom surface of the shadowplate. The detonation running through the ultrafine TATB booster can be simulated using program burn and then switched over to a reactive flow detonation model as the detonation front crosses the boundary into the main charge LX-17 IHE. A modeler wanting to further refine the simulation and progression of shock through the shadowplate can use the more detailed shadowplate design information presented in this document. The source drawings are included in Appendix A of this document. Their titles and drawing numbers are listed. Each experiment's shadowplate consists of two major components. A 303 stainless steel shape that defines the outer dimensions of shadowplate and a cylindrical 303 stainless steel detonator housing that is located in a closely machined pocket in the shape. The SIMPLE ASSY drawing accurately represents the dimensions of the outer shape, it's machined cylindrical pocket, and detonator body which is treated as a monolithic, homogeneous piece of stainless steel. The detonator body cross section shows an accurately dimensioned void where the slapper flyer barrel, LX-16 (pressed PETN) pellet, and pellet can flyer barrel are located. The FULL ASSY drawing accurately represents the dimensions of the outer shadowplate shape and it's machined pocket. The detonator dimensions and materials are detailed in cross section and exploded view. All diameters, thicknesses, and materials are called out in the drawing. You will notice that the detonator includes a multilayer slapper assembly with two layers of electrically insulating Kapton sandwiching the copper foil bridge circuit. The Kapton insulated circuit is sandwiched between two thin stainless steel sheets. This slapper assembly is secured to the detonator body with two screws. There is a 0.25 mm gap between the slapper assembly and the outer shadowplate shape. The stainless steel detonator body contains an off-center titanium wheel. This titanium wheel is secured to the detonator body with one screw and two pins to maintain position and orientation of the pellet can assembly in the center of the detonator body. The titanium wheel contains a tantalum/tungsten washer and pellet can assembly. The pellet can assembly consists of a pressed LX-16 initiator pellet contained in an extruded aluminum foil can. It may be useful for the modeler to include some of the details of the shadowplate and detonator design to further refine simulations of the Jack Rabbit Pretest experiments. These details may be relevant to the progression of shock originating from the PETN initiation pellet and ultrafine TATB booster that propagates through the shadowplate.

  13. Links between detonation wave propagation and reactive flow models.

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D. C. (Damian C.); White, S. J. (Stephen J.)

    2002-01-01

    An accurate reactive flow model is necessary to be able to predict the initiation properties of explosives by complicated shock structures, but a very fine the spatial resolution is needed in reactive flow to reproduce the detailed dynamics of a detonation wave. However, it is not often necessary to use a reactive flow model to simulate the motion of a fully-developed detonation wave. In many situations the same results can be obtained with a coarse computational mesh using programmed burn techniques. In the WBL model [Lambourn89,Swift93], an eikonal detonation wave propagates through a body of explosive at a speed which depends on the curvature of the wave. The model describes the motion of the leading shock of the detonation wave. Here we use the level set method for integrating the WBL equations in time [Collyer98,Bdzil93,Osher88,Aslam98]. This method is attractive because complicated detonation wave shapes can be represented simply. It was found possible to initialize the level set field by a set of source points derived from a reactive flow simulation, by taking 'trigger states' from the reactive flow. The level set scheme was generalized further to take account of motion of the material behind the detonation wave, allowing it to be used for simulations coupled with reactive flow, where detonation may propagate through preshocked and moving material. The modified level set scheme was implemented in 1D and 2D Lagrangian hydrocodes. Trial calculations were performed of initiation and detonation in the TATB-based explosive LX-17, using the Lee - Tarver model. A CJ detonation was simulated in order to verify that the modified level set algorithm operated correctly. The detonation speed was in very good agreement with the expected value. Single-shock initiation was simulated. The position - time history of the leading shock from the coupled model was in excellent agreement with full reactive flow; the pressure profiles were similar but not identical, because of the difference in material properties behind the WBL wave and the omission of the von Neumann spike from the WBL profiles. As a more interesting test, we simulated the shock-to-detonation transition on reflection of a weak shock from a rigid boundary. The position - time history of the leading shock was in good agreement. The pressure profiles varied much more than in the single-shock case, because the WBL calculation used the same propagation parameters and for simplicity imposed the same state at the end of the detonation zone as was used in the single-shock simulation. We have previously used quasisteady flow analysis to derive a reaction rate from experimental measurements of the relation between detonation speed and wave curvature, or vice versa [Swift93]. Reactive flow models have been developed for HMX-based explosives based on mesoscale representations of the components of the explosive [Mulford01], and using a temperature-dependent reaction rate which should be valid over a wide range of loading conditions. The quasisteady analysis scheme was extended to allow arbitrary reaction models to be investigated.

  14. Enzymatic production of pyrimidine nucleotides using Corynebacterium ammoniagenes cells and recombinant Escherichia coli cells: enzymatic production of CDP-choline from orotic acid and choline chloride (Part I).

    PubMed

    Fujio, T; Maruyama, A

    1997-06-01

    Enzymatic production of cytidine diphosphate choline (CDP-choline) using orotic acid and choline chloride as substrates was investigated using a 200-ml beaker as a reaction vessel. When Cornybacterium ammoniagenes KY13505 cells were used as the enzyme source, UMP was accumulated up to 28.6 g/liter (77.6 mM) from orotic acid after 26 h of reaction. In this reaction, UDP and UTP were also accumulated, but CTP, a direct precursor of CDP-choline, was not accumulated sufficiently. Escherichia coli JF646/pMW6 cells, which overproduce CTP synthetase by selfcloning of the pyrG gene, were used together with cells of KY12505 for the enzymatic reaction using orotic acid as a substrate. CTP was produced at 8.95 g/liter (15.1 mM) after 23 h of this reaction. To produce CDP-choline, two additional enzyme activities were needed. E. coli MM294/pUCK3 and MM294/pCC41 cells, which express a choline kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CKIase; encoded by the CKI gene) and a cholinephosphate cytidylyltransferase from S. cerevisiae (CCTase; encoded by the CCT gene) respectively, were added to this CTP-producing reaction system. After 23 h of the reaction using orotic acid and choline chloride as substrates, 7.7 g/liter (15.1 mM) of CDP-choline was accumulated without addition of ATP or phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). ATP and PRPP required in the CDP-choline forming reaction system are biosynthesized by those cells using glucose as a substrate. PMID:9214753

  15. Observations of the Columbia River salt wedge and estuarine turbidity maximum using AUVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, C. L.; Shcherbina, A.; Litchendorf, T.; Sanford, T. B.; Martin, D.; Baptista, A. M.; Lopez, J.; Crump, B.

    2012-12-01

    We present detailed observations of the salt wedge and estuarine turbidity maxima (ETM) in the North Channel of the Columbia River estuary (OR, USA) under conditions of high river discharge during May 2012. Measurements were made using two REMUS-100 autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs; Hydroid, Inc.) equipped with SBE-49 CTDs (Seabird-Electronics, Inc.) for water temperature and salinity, upward/downward looking ADCPs (Teledyne RDI, Inc.) for currents, and ECO Puck triplets (WET Labs, Inc.) for optical backscatter measurement of turbidity. The acoustic backscatter intensity from the ADCP was also used as a proxy measurement for suspended sediments and was found to correlate quite well with the optical backscatter measurements. Daily forecasts of tidal currents in the estuary were used to simulate the AUV path in advance of deployment to aid data collection. Repeat AUV sections were made along and across the channel during flood tide. The turbidity and height above riverbed of the bottom boundary layer was observed to increase toward the deeper waters at the center of the channel. An ETM-like feature was observed ahead of the advancing salt wedge front with locally higher turbidity levels, presumably the result of flocculation and resuspension. To visualize better the repeat section measurements we made data movies. Each frame of the movie is our best estimate of a synoptic snapshot of along-section tracer distribution at a given point in time. These snapshots were created by re-location of non-synoptic AUV measurements to account for the advection of water parcels. An example data movie showing the intrusion of the salt wedge during the flood tide will be presented.

  16. Photo-regulation in microphytobenthos from intertidal mudflats and non-tidal coastal shallows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pniewski, Filip F.; Biskup, Paulina; Bubak, Iwona; Richard, Pierre; Lata?a, Adam; Blanchard, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated seasonal changes in the photo-regulatory mechanisms of microphytobenthos found in intertidal mudflats (Aiguillon Bay, the Atlantic, France) and non-tidal sandy coastal shallows (Puck Bay, the Baltic, Poland) based on photosynthetic pigment characteristics and the estimates of photosynthetic parameters obtained through oxygen evolution measurements. The intertidal communities consisted of motile diatom species typical of epipelon. The non-tidal microphytobenthos was composed of epipsammic species mostly belonging to four taxonomic groups chiefly contributing to the assemblage biomass, namely cyanobacteria, euglenophytes, green algae and diatoms (comprising mainly small-sized species). The epipelon was low light acclimated as shown by the lower values of photoprotective/photosynthetic (PPC/PSC) carotenoids and diatoxanthin/diadinoxanthin (Dt/Dd) ratios. In contrast, the epipsammon exhibited features of high light acclimation (high PPC/PSC and Dt/Dd ratios). In both microphytobenthos types, the photosynthetic capacity (Pm) showed the same seasonal variation pattern and there were no statistically significant differences between the investigated sites in corresponding seasons (P > 0.05). In both assemblage types, the photosynthetic efficiency at limiting irradiance (?) decreased over time. The epipelon had higher ? compared to the epipsammon. Seasonal changes of the photoacclimation index (Ek) estimated for the epipelic communities reflected variations observed in Pm, whereas in the epipsammon an increasing trend in Ek values was observed. Ek was always higher for the epipsammon when comparing analogous seasons, which further corroborated low and high light acclimation in the epipelic and epipsammic communities, respectively. The presence of the photoinhibition parameter (?) in the epipelon and the lack of it in the epipsammon suggested that the latter was resistant to high irradiance and the physiological mechanisms were sufficient to protect it from photoinhibition. In the epipelon, a downturn in photosynthetic rates showed that it was susceptible to high light intensities, suggesting that physiological photoprotective mechanisms must be supported by behavioural photoacclimation in order to avoid damaging light influence.

  17. Outer Rings and Chaotic Orbits in the Uranian System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Lissauer, J. J.; de Pater, I.

    2006-09-01

    Hubble observations of the Uranian system, spanning 2003 to the present, have revealed two small regular satellites and two faint, outer rings. The satellite Mab (U XXVI) is 12 km in radius and orbits 97,735 km from the center of Uranus, between the orbits of Puck and Miranda. It shows a significant, unexplained orbital libration; its mean longitude in 2004 fell 1° behind that in 2003 and 2005. Cupid (U XXVII) is 9 km in radius and orbits at 74,392 km, just 863 km interior to the orbit of Belinda. These moons are locked in 44:43 resonance. Most of the other inner moons Belinda through Portia show measurable orbital changes in the last 20 years, suggesting subtle, possibly chaotic interactions. Both newly-discovered rings have been recovered from high-phase Voyager images, and photometry indicates that they are composed primarily of dust. Peak normal optical depths are 10-5. Ring R/2003 U 1 peaks at the orbit of Mab and is almost certainly produced by dust ejected from Mab's surface. It has a triangular profile with a full width of 20,000 km. R/2003 U 2 orbits at 67,300 km, and is bounded by the orbits of nearby Portia and Rosalind. No known moons fall within this region; we hypothesize that a belt of embedded, sub-km bodies serve as the unseen source of this dust. Recent Keck observations reveal that the inner ring is red but the outer ring is blue. Blue indicates that particle sizes are primarily sub-µm in size; the dynamical implications of this result are not currently understood. Support for this publication was provided by NASA through proposals GO-9823, GO-10102, and GO-10274 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  18. Uranian Rings, Arcs, and Moons: New Results from HST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Lissauer, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    We have obtained a series of very deep exposures of the Uranian ring-moon system using the High Resolution Channel (HRC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. Exposures are very long (240 seconds) and use the broad clear filter to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio obtained. The planet is vastly over-exposed but the camera is oriented so that saturated pixels bloom parallel to Uranus's pole and so do not interfere with the rings and moons to each side. In August 2003 we obtained 24 images during three consecutive orbits of HST, spanning a period of ˜ 4 hours. In August 2004 we carried out two repeat visits, each consisting of 40 images (five orbits of HST, ˜ 7 hours duration) and separated by 6.8 days. Initial observations resulted in the recovery of two satellites, Ophelia and S/1986 U 10 (IAU Circular #8192), and the discovery of two more, S/2003 U 1 and S/2003 U 2 (IAU Circular #8209). S/2003 U 1 orbits near semimajor axis 97,730 km, between Puck and Miranda. S/2003 U 2 orbits near 74,800 km, just interior to Belinda. We will report on the combined analysis of all these observations, which will enable us to further refine the orbits of the inner Uranian moons. Images of the inner ring system have been processed by subtracting a median frame from each individual image; this eliminates the strong gradient of scattered light from the planet. Subtracted frames show a host of arc-like features orbiting within the ring system. Most of these are located in Ring ? and represent subtle variations in reflectivity or width. The dynamics of these features will also be discussed.

  19. Outer Rings and Chaotic Orbits in the Uranian System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, Mark R.; Lissauer, J. J.; de Pater, I.

    2006-06-01

    Hubble observations of the Uranian system, spanning 2003 to the present, have revealed two small regular satellites and two faint, outer rings. The satellite Mab (U XXVI) is 12 km in radius and orbits 97,735 km from the center of Uranus, between the orbits of Puck and Miranda. It shows a significant, unexplained orbital libration; its mean longitude in 2004 fell 1° behind that in 2003 and 2005. Cupid (U XXVII) is 9 km in radius and orbits at 74,392 km, just 863 km interior to the orbit of Belinda. These moons are locked in 44:43 resonance. Most of the other inner moons Belinda through Portia show measurable orbital changes in the last 20 years, suggesting subtle, possibly chaotic interactions. Both newly-discovered rings have been recovered from high-phase Voyager images, and photometry indicates that they are composed primarily of dust. Peak normal optical depths are 10-5. Ring R/2003 U 1 peaks at the orbit of Mab and is almost certainly produced by dust ejected from Mab's surface. It has a triangular profile with a full width of 20,000 km. R/2003 U 2 orbits at 67,300 km, and is bounded by the orbits of nearby Portia and Rosalind. No known moons fall within this region; we hypothesize that a belt of embedded, sub-km bodies serve as the unseen source of this dust. Recent Keck observations reveal that the inner ring is red but the outer ring is blue. Blue indicates that particle sizes are primarily sub-µm in size; the dynamical implications of this result are not currently understood. Support for this publication was provided by NASA through proposals GO-9823, GO-10102, and GO-10274 from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  20. PPARA intron polymorphism associated with power performance in 30-s anaerobic Wingate Test.

    PubMed

    Petr, Miroslav; Št'astný, Petr; Pecha, Ond?ej; Šteffl, Michal; Šeda, Ond?ej; Kohlíková, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To date, polymorphisms in several genes have been associated with a strength/power performance including alpha 3 actinin, ciliary neurotrophic factor, vitamin D receptor, or angiotensin I converting enzyme, underlining the importance of genetic component of the multifactorial strength/power-related phenotypes. The single nucleotide variation in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha gene (PPARA) intron 7 G/C (rs4253778; g.46630634G>C) has been repeatedly found to play a significant role in response to different types of physical activity. We investigated the effect of PPARA intron 7 G/C polymorphism specifically on anaerobic power output in a group of 77 elite male Czech ice hockey players (18-36 y). We determined the relative peak power per body weight (Pmax.kg(-1)) and relative peak power per fat free mass (W.kg(-1)FFM) during the 30-second Wingate Test (WT30) on bicycle ergometer (Monark 894E Peak bike, MONARK, Sweden). All WT30s were performed during the hockey season. Overall genotype frequencies were 50.6% GG homozygotes, 40.3% CG heterozygotes, and 9.1% CC homozygotes. We found statistically significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1) and marginally significant differences in Pmax.kg(-1)FFM values in WT30 between carriers and non-carriers for C allele (14.6 ± 0.2 vs. 13.9 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1) and 15.8 ± 0.2 vs. 15.2 ± 0.3 W.kg(-1)FFM, P = 0.036 and 0.12, respectively). Furthermore, Pmax.kg(-1)FFM strongly positively correlated with the body weight only in individuals with GG genotypes (R = 0.55; p<0.001). Our results indicate that PPARA 7C carriers exhibited higher speed strength measures in WT30. We hypothesize that C allele carriers within the cohort of trained individuals may possess a metabolic advantage towards anaerobic metabolism. PMID:25198533