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1

Ignition and Growth Modeling of LX-17 Hockey Puck Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Detonating solid plastic bonded explosives (PBX) formulated with the insensitive molecule triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) exhibit measurable reaction zone lengths, curved shock fronts, and regions of failing chemical reaction at abrupt changes in the charge geometry. A recent set of ''hockey puck'' experiments measured the breakout times of diverging detonation waves in ambient temperature LX-17 (92.5 % TATB plus 7.5% Kel-F binder) and the breakout times at the lower surfaces of 15 mm thick LX-17 discs placed below the detonator-booster plane. The LX-17 detonation waves in these discs grow outward from the initial wave leaving regions of unreacted or partially reacted TATB in the corners of these charges. This new experimental data is accurately simulated for the first time using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX-17, which is normalized to a great deal of detonation reaction zone, failure diameter and diverging detonation data. A pressure cubed dependence for the main growth of reaction rate yields excellent agreement with experiment, while a pressure squared rate diverges too quickly and a pressure quadrupled rate diverges too slowly in the LX-17 below the booster equatorial plane.

Tarver, C M

2004-04-19

2

The FoxTrax Hockey Puck Tracking System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Though we had our share of problems developing and deploying this puck-tracking system, it proved to be an overall success. It resulted in one patent (for the puck) and five patents pending for the system as a whole. Also, Fox Sports' NHL coverage enjoys significantly higher ratings-in large part, we think, because of the tracking system. While we certainly had

Rick Cavallaro

1997-01-01

3

Modeling LX-17 Detonation Growth and Decay Using the Ignition and Growth Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The previously established Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based plastic bonded explosive LX-17 is applied to recent experimental detonation propagation/failure experiments using unconfined, Lucite confined, and copper confined cylinders. The model also simulates two corner turning experiments in which steel and Lucite act as boundary materials. Finally, the model is used to calculate a one-inch diameter "Hockey Puck" test in which the booster explosive is HMX-based rather than TATB-based. Since the LX-17 Ignition and Growth model parameters are normalized to a great deal of one-, two- and three-dimensional detonation propagation data, they accurately predict all of this new experimental detonation velocity and arrival time data.

Tarver, Craig M.; Chidester, Steven K.

2009-12-01

4

Experimental Characterization of Ice Hockey Sticks and Pucks Rosanna L. Anderson, Lloyd V. Smith  

E-print Network

School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University P.O. Box 642920 Pullman, WA shot were concerned with the technical aspects of shooting regardless of the stick type [4, 3]. In 1978 and puck velocities up to 90 mph for high school hockey players and up to 120 mph for college

Smith, Lloyd V.

5

The Impact of Puck Possession and Location on Ice Hockey Strategy  

Microsoft Academic Search

I create a state space within the game of ice hockey by noting which team has possession, and in what location of the rink the puck is located. This space is used to model the game as a semi-Markov process, as data from a series of games in 2004-2005 NCAA play suggest that the system cannot be modeled as a

Andrew C. Thomas

2006-01-01

6

The Puck Stops Here  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

After learning about the concept of transfer of energy, specifically the loss of kinetic energy to friction, students get a chance to test friction. Student groups are each given a wooden block and different fabrics and weights and challenged to design the "best" puck. First the class defines what makes the "best" puck. They come to realize that the most desirable puck is the one that travels the farthest, thus the puck with the least amount of friction. In the context of hockey, the "best" puck is the one that travels farthest and loses the least kinetic energy to friction. Students then apply their knowledge of frictionâthe energy transfer from kinetic to heat energyâto design new, optimal pucks for the National Hockey League.

Engineering K-Phd Program

7

Puck collisions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Collisions between two ice hockey pucks sliding on frictionless ice are studied, with both inelasticity and frictional contact between the colliding surfaces of the two pucks taken into account. The latter couples translational and rotational motion. The full solution depends on the sign and magnitude of the initial mismatch between the surface velocities at the point of contact. The initial state defines two physically distinct regimes for the friction coefficient. To illustrate the complexities, we discuss at length the typical situation (well known from curling) when puck number 1 is initially at rest, and is hit by puck number 2 with an arbitrary impact parameter, velocity and angular velocity. We find that the total outgoing angle between the pucks exceeds \\frac{1}{2}\\pi if and only if the collision leads to a net increase in the translational part of the kinetic energy. The conditions for this to happen are scrutinized, and the results are presented both analytically and numerically by a set of representative curves. This paper is written with an ambitious undergraduate, and her teacher, in mind.

Hauge, E. H.

2012-09-01

8

Evaluation of LX-17 made from water-aminated TATB  

SciTech Connect

Water-aminated TATB was formulated into LX-17 at both Pantex and Holston. Mechanical properties, growth, pressed density, corner turning and gap sensitivity properties were compared. Mechanical properties, corner turning and gap sensitivity were similar to those of LX-17 made from dry-aminated TATB. Permanent expansion resulting from thermal aging may be slightly greater than that of LX-17 with dry-aminated TATB.

Osborn, A.G.

1982-10-01

9

Air Gap Effects in LX-17  

SciTech Connect

Three experiments done over twenty years on gaps in LX-17 are reported. For the detonation front moving parallel to the gaps, jets of gas products were seen coming from the gaps at velocities greater than the detonation velocity. A case can be made that the jet velocity increased with gap thickness but the data is scattered. For the detonation front moving transverse to the gap, time delays were seen. The delays roughly increase with gap width, going from 0-70 ns at 'zero gap' to around 300 ns at 0.5-1 mm gap. Larger gaps of up to 6 mm width almost certainly stopped the detonation, but this was not proved. Real-time resolution of the parallel jets and determination of the actual re-detonation or failure in the transverse case needs to be done in future experiments.

Souers, P C; Ault, S; Avara, R; Bahl, K L; Boat, R; Cunningham, B; Gidding, D; Janzen, J; Kuklo, D; Lee, R; Lauderbach, L; Weingart, W C; Wu, B; Winer, K

2005-09-26

10

Comment on "On the motion of an ice hockey puck," by K. Voyenli and E. Eriksen [Am. J. Phys. 53 (12), 1149-1153 (1985)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Voyenli and Eriksen [Am. J. Phys. 53, 1149-1153 (1985)] have derived some interesting and surprising results for a thin homogeneous disk (a hockey puck or a compact disk) and for a thin ring that is sliding and rotating over a flat but rough surface, assuming sliding friction with a constant coefficient. The properties that were observed and derived include the following: (a) When started with a pure translation, the disk will continue until it comes to rest in pure rectilinear translation without being set into rotation. (b) When started as a pure rotation around its center, the disk will continue to rotate while the center remains at rest until the disk stops. (c) In both cases the time it takes for the disk to come to rest increases with increasing values of the initial velocity. (d) When started with a combination of translation and rotation, the center will continue in a rectilinear motion until (e) the translation and rotation stop simultaneously, regardless of the initial velocity. The surprise is (e), which implies that there is a frictional coupling between the translation and rotation of the disk. This result was shown in Voyenli and Eriksen (1985) where it is established that for a thin ring of radius R, the final stage of the motion is rolling-like, meaning that the disk slides with an angular speed ? proportional to its linear speed v, so that w ??R=v.

Denny, Mark

2006-06-01

11

LX-17 Deflagration at High Pressures and Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

We measure the laminar deflagration rate of LX-17 (92.5 wt% TATB, 7.5 wt% Kel-F 800) at high pressure and temperature in a strand burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of thermal explosion violence. Simultaneous measurements of flame front time-of-arrival and temporal pressure history allow for the direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Additionally, deflagrating surface areas are calculated in order to provide quantitative insight into the dynamic surface structure during deflagration and its relationship to explosion violence. Deflagration rate data show that LX-17 burns in a smooth fashion at ambient temperature and is represented by the burn rate equation B = 0.2P{sup 0.9}. At 225 C, deflagration is more rapid and erratic. Dynamic deflagrating surface area calculations show that ambient temperature LX-17 deflagrating surface areas remain near unity over the pressure range studied.

Koerner, J; Maienschein, J; Black, K; DeHaven, M; Wardell, J

2006-10-23

12

Temperature-dependent shock initiation of LX-17 explosive  

SciTech Connect

LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250 C, were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide, 50.8-mm-long strips of 0.13-mm-thick Kapton polyimide film at velocities up to 7.7 km/s. The Kapton strips were laminated onto a thin aluminum bridge foil and were launched to the desired velocity by discharging a capacitor bank through the foil, causing the foil to explode. The LX-17 samples were confined in a steel holder and heated in an oven to the desired temperature. After the capacitor bank was charged, the LX-17 sample in its steel holder was remotely drawn out of the oven on rails and positioned over the bridge-foil/Kapton-strip laminate. When the sample was in position, the bank was discharged, launching the Kapton strip against the LX-17 surface. The shock initiation threshold was measured for 3, 7, and 10-mm-wide strips at room temperature, 200 C and 250 C. The authors found a significant reduction in the velocity threshold and in the critical area for initiation when the samples were heated. The authors compare the results with the earlier data of Bloom, who measured the initiation threshold of LX-17 over the density range 1.8--1.91 g/cm{sup 3} at room temperature and {minus}54 C. LX-17 has a large coefficient of thermal expansion, as reported by Urtiew, et al., which reduces its density significantly t elevated temperatures. They find that the change of shock initiation threshold with temperature is consistent with the change in sample density, using the relation between threshold and density reported by Bloom.

Lee, R.S.; Chau, H.H.; Druce, R.L.; Moua, K.

1995-02-01

13

Temperature-dependent shock initiation of LX17 explosive  

Microsoft Academic Search

LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250 C, were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide, 50.8-mm-long strips of 0.13-mm-thick Kapton polyimide film at velocities up to 7.7 km\\/s. The Kapton strips were laminated onto a thin aluminum bridge foil and were launched to the desired velocity by discharging a capacitor bank through the foil, causing the foil to explode. The

R. S. Lee; H. H. Chau; R. L. Druce; K. Moua

1995-01-01

14

Dead Zones in LX-17 and PBX 9502  

SciTech Connect

Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and detonation in different pressure regimes. A pressure cut-off must also be reached to initiate the burn. Corner-turning and failure are modeled using an intermediate pressure rate region, and detonation occurs at high pressure. The TATB booster is also modeled using reactive flow, and X-ray tomography is used to partition the ram-pressed hemisphere into five different density regions. The model reasonably fits the bare corner-turning experiment but predicts a smaller dead zone with steel confinement, in contradiction with experiment. The same model also calculates the confined and unconfined cylinder detonation velocities and predicts the failure of the unconfined cylinder at 3.75 mm radius. The PBX 9502 shows a smaller dead zone than LX-17. An old experiment that showed a large apparent dead zone in Comp B was repeated with X-ray transmission and no dead zone was seen. This confirms the idea that a variable burn rate is the key to modeling. The model also produces initiation delays, which are shorter than those found in time-to-detonation.

Souers, P C; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J; Bratton, B; Cabacungan, C; Cook, III, C F; Fletcher, S; Garza, R; Grimsley, D; Handly, J; Hernandez, A; McMaster, P; Molitoris, J D; Palmer, R; Prindiville, J; Rodriguez, J; Schneberk, D; Wong, B; Vitello, P

2005-09-06

15

Mesoscale Modeling of LX-17 Under Isentropic Compression  

SciTech Connect

Mesoscale simulations of LX-17 incorporating different equilibrium mixture models were used to investigate the unreacted equation-of-state (UEOS) of TATB. Candidate TATB UEOS were calculated using the equilibrium mixture models and benchmarked with mesoscale simulations of isentropic compression experiments (ICE). X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) data provided the basis for initializing the simulations with realistic microstructural details. Three equilibrium mixture models were used in this study. The single constituent with conservation equations (SCCE) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. The single constituent equation-of-state (SCEOS) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted specific volume and the equation-of-state of the constituents. The kinetic energy averaging (KEA) model was based on a mass-fraction weighted particle velocity mixture rule and the conservation equations. The SCEOS model yielded the stiffest TATB EOS (0.121{micro} + 0.4958{micro}{sup 2} + 2.0473{micro}{sup 3}) and, when incorporated in mesoscale simulations of the ICE, demonstrated the best agreement with VISAR velocity data for both specimen thicknesses. The SCCE model yielded a relatively more compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2} + 4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) and the KEA model yielded the most compliant EOS (0.1999{micro}-0.6967{micro}{sup 2}+4.9546{micro}{sup 3}) of all the equilibrium mixture models. Mesoscale simulations with the lower density TATB adiabatic EOS data demonstrated the least agreement with VISAR velocity data.

Springer, H K; Willey, T M; Friedman, G; Fried, L E; Vandersall, K S; Baer, M R

2010-03-06

16

Dynamic mechanical signatures of aged LX17-1 plastic bonded explosive  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complex shear modulus of the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-17-1 from stockpile returns, core tests and historical billets was measured over the temperature range from ?150 to 120°C at five frequencies from 0.1 to 10 Hz. LX-17-1 is composed of 92.5% insensitive high explosive triaminotrinitro-benzene (TATB) and 7.5% plastic binder, KF-800. Three relaxations were observed as peaks in the

D. Mark Hoffman

2001-01-01

17

The Science of Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is a Sports Science resource where users read about National Hockey League players, coaches from the San Jose Sharks, and physicists and chemists. Included is information about ice, the qualities that make it a unique playing surface, why ice is slippery, mechanics of ice skating, hockey equipment, NHL goals, how players can shoot the puck over one hundred miles an hour, checking using physical force, and physical fitness. Links to other sites and mathematics formulas that show how much energy is expended in an open ice hit can also be found.

Spadaccini, Jim

2004-01-01

18

A Comparison of New TATBs, FK-800 binder and LX-17-like PBXs to Legacy Materials  

SciTech Connect

Two newly synthesized versions of the insensitive high explosive (IHE) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzenes (TATBs) were compared to two legacy explosives currently used by the Department of Energy. Except for thermal analysis, small scale safety tests could not distinguish between the different synthetic routes. Morphologies of new TATBs were less faceted and more spherical. The particle size distribution of one new material was similar to legacy TATBs, but the other was very fine. Densities and submicron structure of the new TATBs were also significantly different from the legacy explosives. Pressed pellets of the new explosives were less dense. New FK-800 binder was used to prepare LX-17-like plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) from new and wet aminated TATB. Some mechanical, thermal and performance characterization of the new binder and LX-17-like PBXs was done. Significant differences were found. The reason for a number of these differences is not well understood.

Willey, T M; DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

2009-05-01

19

Exploring evolutionary learning in a simulated hockey environment  

E-print Network

a fixed time period. Multiple players may participate -- one can be controlled by a human user, while, in which players attempt to shoot a puck into their enemy's goal during a fixed time period. Multiple play a simulated hockey game called Shock in which players at­ tempt to shoot a puck into their enemy's goal during

Pollack, Jordan B.

20

Exploring evolutionary learning in a simulated hockey environment  

E-print Network

a fixed time period. Multiple players may participate ­ one can be controlled by a human user, while, in which players attempt to shoot a puck into their enemy's goal during a fixed time period. Multiple play a simulated hockey game called Shock in which players at- tempt to shoot a puck into their enemy's goal during

Blair, Alan

21

Vulnerability of hot LX-17 to lightning strikes on exposed detonator and actuator cables  

SciTech Connect

Capacitor bank discharges with peak currents up to 700 kA were used to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch the dielectric material on top of the exploding conductor as a fast flyer plate. Velocity of the launched material, pressure profiles from the impact of the launched material and impact marks formed in aluminum witness plates were used to study the stimulus that could be transmitted to high explosive in the vicinity of the exploding cable. To quantify the risk of initiating the main charge or booster insensitive high explosive (IHE) in a weapon, one must know the threshold stimulus required for shock initiation. LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250C were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide stripes of 0.12-mm-thick Kapton to determine the initiation threshold velocity at ambient and elevated temperatures, The strips simulate the impact of the cover coat of a flat detonator cable which has been exploded by a lighting strike. The data allow us to assess the likelihood that a lightning strike on the cable would be able to initiate a detonation of the LX- 17 main charge.

Chau, H.H.; Osher, J.E.; Von Holle, W.G.; Lee, R.S.; Moua, K.

1993-12-01

22

1Athletic Training & Sports Health Care | Vol. 5 No. X 2013 Enhancing Ice Hockey Skills Through  

E-print Network

1Athletic Training & Sports Health Care | Vol. 5 No. X 2013 Enhancing Ice Hockey Skills Through in professional ice hockey players. Participants trained either with stroboscopic eyewear (strobe group of a competitor, and an ice hockey player must be able to precisely time and locate a constantly moving puck

Mitroff, Stephen

23

Science of NHL Hockey: Reflexes & Reaction Time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NHL goalies have lots of equipment designed to help stop pucks, but their most valuable tool is their brain. It's what sparks the nerve impulses that travel to the limbs, allowing the goalie to see and react quickly enough to make a save. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

Learn, Nbc

2010-10-07

24

The evolution of subtle manoeuvres in simulated hockey Alan D. Blair?  

E-print Network

with the aim of shooting a puck into the op- posing goal during an allocated time period. One player mayCup soccer (Kitano et al., 1995). Following in these traditions, we have developed a simulated hockey game called Shock which is rather like \\table-top" or \\air" hockey. One or more players engage in games

Pollack, Jordan B.

25

The evolution of subtle manoeuvres in simulated hockey Alan D. Blair ? & Elizabeth Sklar ??  

E-print Network

(Sims, 1995) and RoboCup soccer (Kitano et al., 1995). Following in these traditions, we have developed a simulated hockey game called Shock which is rather like ``table­top'' or ``air'' hockey. One or more players engage in games with the aim of shooting a puck into the op­ posing goal during an allocated time period

Pollack, Jordan B.

26

The evolution of subtle manoeuvres in simulated hockey Alan D. Blair?  

E-print Network

) and RoboCup soccer (Kitano et al., 1995). Following in these traditions, we have developed a simulated hockey game called Shock which is rather like \\table-top" or \\air" hockey. One or more players engage in games with the aim of shooting a puck into the op- posing goal during an allocated time period. One

Blair, Alan

27

Hockey night in phase space  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In order to explore the possibility of developing a statistical mechanics for dissipative ensembles, we have performed an experiment in which we track the translational and rotational velocities of pucks on an air hockey table. The pucks are driven by bumpers at the boundaries and are bidisperse to prevent crystallization. At packing fractions of 60% we find that the system distributes rotational and translation energy according to the equipartition theorem. However, as the packing fraction increases, the ratio of rotational energy to translational energy also increases to a value larger than predicted by equipartition. The translational and angular velocity distributions are approximately exponential and the distributions of the translational velocity are the same for both large and small particles. In contrast, the distribution of the angular velocities is broader for the small particles than for the large.

Nichol, Kiri; Daniels, Karen

2011-03-01

28

End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot  

SciTech Connect

It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck-handling operations. As an overall requirement, it was desired to keep the design of the robot end-effector as simple as possible. There were pros and cons for either type of actuation method (pneumatic or electric). But, pneumatic actuation was chosen for its simplicity and durability in a radioactive environment. It was determined early in the design process that at least two different types of end-effectors would be required for each of the operations. Therefore, a tool changer was incorporated into the end-effector design. The tool changer would also provide for simple end-effector maintenance when used in the PIP process.

Fowley, M.D.

2001-01-03

29

End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot  

SciTech Connect

It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further immobilize the plutonium. The Can-in-Canister method uses the existing design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister to house the plutonium pucks. the process begins with several pucks being stacked in a stainless steel can. Several of the stainless steel cans are stacked in a cage-like magazine. Several of the magazines are then placed in a DWPF canister. The DWPF canister is then filled with molten glass containing high-level, radioactive waste from the DWPF vitrification process. The Can-in-Canister method makes reclamation of plutonium from the pucks technically difficult and highly undesirable. The mechanical requirements of the Can-in-Canister process, in conjunction with the amount of time required to immobilize the vast quantities of weapons-grade plutonium, will expose personnel to unnecessarily high levels of radiation if the processes were completed manually, in glove boxes. Therefore, automated equipment is designed into the process to reduce or eliminate personnel exposure. Robots are used whenever the automated handling operations become complicated. There are two such operations in the initial stages of the Can-in-Canister process, which required a six-axis robot. The first operation is a press unloading process. The second operation is a tray transfer process. To successfully accomplish the operational tasks described in the two operations, the end-effector of the robot must be versatile, lightweight, and rugged. As a result of these demands, an extensive development process was undertaken to design the optimum end-effector for these puck-handling operations. As an overall requirement, it was desired to keep the design of the robot end-effector as simple as possible. There were pros and cons for either type of actuation method (pneumatic or electric). But, pneumatic actuation was chosen for its simplicity and durability in a radioactive environment. It was determined early in the design process that at least two different types of end-effectors would be required for each of the operations. Therefore, a tool changer was incorporated into the end-effector design. The tool changer would also provide for simple end-effector maintenance when used in the PIP process.

Fowley, M.D.

2001-01-31

30

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table By A. Baxter, J. Gemmer, K. Gerhart, S. Laverty, S. Weaver  

E-print Network

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table By A. Baxter, J. Gemmer, K. Gerhart, S. Laverty, S. Weaver Sponsored by Drs. Ron Umble and Zhoude Shao The Problem Examine periodic orbits on a triangular frictionless surface bounded by walls. · A triangular air hockey table with a bouncing puck. · Triangular

Umble, Ron

31

Le Hockey [Hockey]. Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A resource kit for the teaching of French at the intermediate level is represented by a teacher's guide and the duplicating master for a tape transcript. The aim of this module is to make the elementary or secondary school student of French familiar with basic hockey terms in French, and to enable the student to understand hockey games broadcast…

Balchunas, Martha; Ullmann, Rebecca

32

Formulation and Characterization of LX-17-2 from new FK 800 binder and WA, ATK, and BAE TATBs  

SciTech Connect

Currently LLNL has no Kel-F 800 or wet-aminated TATB reserves for formulation. Although both materials are soon to be commercially available, their synthesis processes have changed and the explosive must be re-evaluated. In 2000 3M phased out the uses of perfluorooctanoyl (C8) derivatives due to environmental persistence and bioaccumulation issues. A C8 derivative was used as an emulsifier for making Kel F-800. In 2001 Kel F-800 was scheduled to be discontinued and the last Kel F-800 run was made in early 2002. LANL ordered 2M$ worth of Kel-F 800 for reserves and Pantex purchased several hundred pounds to satisfy mock needs. After four years, 3M has decided to introduce a Kel-F 800-like polymer based on a new emulsifier using the same chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride monomers and emulsion polymerization process. They have produced 3 batches and claim the 'new' FK-800 is indistinguishable from the 'old' Kel-F 800 in any of their testing parameters. In June-July 2006 3M scaled up a batch of about 800 pounds and have test quantities available. We have samples of the new FK-800 for evaluation. Neither wet nor dry-aminated TATB has been synthesized in the US in any significant quantity since about 1985 and significant quantities of LX-17-1 has not been formulated since about 1990. Over the last few years as part of a DOD MANTECH, ATK Thiokol and BAE Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP) have produced moderate quantities of TATB ({approx}5 kg batches) with plans to scale up for DOD applications. Thiokol TATB is polycrystalline with an average particle size of about 40 m (similar to WA TATB) but HAAP TATB is only 5-6 {micro}m (similar to ultrafine). We have obtained small quantities of these materials for evaluation. The project (1) compares new FK-800 with old Kel-F 800 and FK-800 lots currently available at LLNL, (2) compares and characterizes new TATB with old TATB, (3) formulates new FK-800 with wet-aminated TATB and new TATBs in according to HAAP slurry coating procedure into LX-17-2, and (4) evaluates the mechanical and detonation performance characteristics of this insensitive high explosive (IHE). Priorities are to prove that these new materials can be formulated, pressed to density and machined; and that they contain no impurities which might cause compatibility issues. Since 3M, LANL, Pantex and AWE are currently evaluating the new FK-800, we plan to share data rather than repeating their work. Our effort is described.

DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

2007-08-03

33

Professional ice hockey injuries: a 4 years prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIce Hockey is the fastest team sport with players skating up to 60 km\\/h and a puck speeding up to 160 km\\/h. Aggressive contacts between players, rigid obstacles (boards, goalposts), and solid surface may result in high energy trauma and severe injuries despite protective equipments. Precise data at the professional level are lacking.ObjectiveTo determine on several seasons the epidemiology of

G Ornon; D Fritschy; J-L Ziltener; J Menetrey

2011-01-01

34

Hockey, iPads, and Projectile Motion in a Physics Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the increased availability of modern technology and handheld probeware for classrooms, the iPad and the Video Physics application developed by Vernier are used to capture and analyze the motion of an ice hockey puck within secondary-level physics education. Students collect, analyze, and generate digital modes of representation of physics…

Hechter, Richard P.

2013-01-01

35

Puck - A Visual Programming System for Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

There are many visual programming languages for educa- tion but they are poorly used in German schools as most do not fit the requirements of the various curricula. This pa- per introduces a new visual programming language called Puck, that has been developed at the Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, in accordance with the wishes of teachers in Thuringia (a federal

Lutz Kohl

36

Hockey, iPads, and Projectile Motion in a Physics Classroom  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With the increased availability of modern technology and handheld probeware for classrooms, the iPad and the Video Physics2 application developed by Vernier are used to capture and analyze the motion of an ice hockey puck within secondary-level physics education. Students collect, analyze, and generate digital modes of representation of physics phenomena using modern technologies to complement theoretical plots. This activity acknowledges hockey players' implicit understanding of the launch angle and initial velocity of a saucer pass as basic projectile motion while engaging students in authentic physics-based problem solving.

Hechter, Richard P.

2013-09-01

37

Huskie Hockey Camps Presented by  

E-print Network

Huskie Hockey Camps 48 Huskie Hockey Camps Presented by The Huskie Hockey School believes in providing top quality on-ice hockey instruction as well as a variety of other daily activities. Off shinny action, swimming (pack your bathing suit daily), core strength training and more! General Hockey

Patterson, William P.

38

Canada's Game : Hockey and Identity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost every Canadian can hum the original Hockey Night in Canada theme - even those who don't think of themselves as hockey fans. For more than a century, Canadians have seen something of themselves in the sport of hockey. \\

Andrew C. Holman

2009-01-01

39

Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique  

SciTech Connect

The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

2008-01-16

40

Ice hockey injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ice hockey is a team sport that has recently grown in popularity not only in the United States but also in Canada and Europe. With this increase in popularity has come a growing concern about the number and severity of injuries. The world literature on the biome chanics and physiology of ice hockey was reviewed in an attempt to evaluate

Franklin H. Sim; William T. Simonet; L. Joseph Melton; Tracy A. Lehn

1987-01-01

41

Masculinity and hockey violence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Qualitative research on the relationship between masculinity and hockey violence has suggested that players endorsing traditional masculine behavior were more likely to engage in violence than players who held weaker masculine beliefs. Data were collected from white, middle class players on five Toronto hockey teams representing two different age groups (14.3 and 17.7 years respectively) and skill levels (Bantam and

Marc D. Weinstein; Michael D. Smith; David L. Wiesenthal

1995-01-01

42

Huskie Hockey Camps Program Description  

E-print Network

Huskie Hockey Camps Program Description The Huskie Hockey School believes in providing top quality on-ice hockey instruction as well as a variety of other daily activities. Off-ice sessions may, swimming (pack your bathing suit daily), core strength training and more! General Hockey Camps (Full Day

Saskatchewan, University of

43

The Ice Hockey Injury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A high school hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough, and the star player is slammed against the boards. Injured, he is escorted off the ice. This case follows his health as it deteriorates over the next several hours. Students are presented with the hockey player's symptoms, and they use their knowledge of anatomy and physiology to diagnose the problem.

Stephens, Phil

2004-10-01

44

FIELD HOCKEY at Williams College  

E-print Network

2012 FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC at Williams College for rising Sophomore, Junior & Senior High School students Our goal is to expose participants to the Williams College's Field Hockey Program, how the team and instruction, lunch and a t-shirt. EQUIPMENT Please bring your field hockey stick, mouth guard, shinguards

Aalberts, Daniel P.

45

Backcheck: A Hockey Retrospective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In Canada, to grow up with ice in your veins is considered a terrifically good thing. For well over a hundred years, Canadians have lived -- almost symbiotically -- with ice hockey. While their American neighbors claim ownership over a multitude of cultural identities -- like baseball and basketball -- to varying degrees of seriousness, Canadians truly eat, sleep, and breath hockey as the sole definition of who they are. This site, produced by the National Library of Canada, does an exceptional job of providing visitors with very well arranged material reflecting on the history of hockey in Canada. In fact, while very few Web sites provide much of interest on their home pages, the letter of introduction by Roch Carrier truly makes you want to delve into Backcheck and take in some of this fascinating history. The site includes several historical articles, the gems of the site, that take you all the way back to the patent of the ice skate and the introduction of women in hockey -- including a picture of Lord Stanley's daughter playing hockey circa 1890 (thought to be the earliest photograph of women playing the sport). Also a part of the site is a small, but interesting, educational resources section including lessons for grades 4 through 12. Check it out.

46

The Science of Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Science of Hockey is the first in a series of "Sports Science" resources developed by the Exploratorium. This site takes you inside the game: you'll hear from NHL players and coaches from the San Jose Sharks, as well as leading physicists and chemists.

47

2-D Collision of Pucks -- Center of Mass Velocity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lab uses Tracker video analysis software to measure and analyze the center of mass of a system of two pucks during a two-dimensional collision. Students measure the initial and final velocity vector for each puck and calculate the center-of-mass velocity of the system before and after the collision and show that it is constant. Tracker can automatically calculate and mark the center of mass in each frame, so it is easy to see that the center of mass velocity is constant and calculate its value from graphs of center-of-mass variables. The zip file contains the lab handout, a video showing a 2-D collision of pucks, and the Tracker file. The video copyright is Flashmedia. To open the Tracker file, download and run Tracker from http://www.cabrillo.edu/~dbrown/tracker/. Tracker is free. The videos can be used with other video analysis software; however, the handout has screen captures from Tracker and instructions specifically written for Tracker.

Titus, Aaron

2011-01-16

48

The see-Puck: a platform for exploring human-robot relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the see-Puck, a round display module that extends an open robot platform, the e-Puck. It holds 148 LEDs (light emitting diodes) to enable the presentation of eye-catching visual animated patterns, while keeping hardware costs and energy consumption at a minimum. The see-Puck was a result of a study of future robot applications, where relationship and interaction qualities found

Mattias Jacobsson; Johan Bodin; Lars Erik Holmquist

2008-01-01

49

Hockey Despite Hitler: World War II and the Challenge to Hockey’s Global Divergence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This CART Summer Grant project (Summer I term 2008) will complete the research and writing of a 25-30 page book chapter entitled “Hockey Despite Hitler: World War II and the Challenge to Hockey’s Global Divergence.” This chapter is of central importance to Part Two of the book that I am co-authoring (with Dr. Stephen Hardy, University of New Hampshire) entitled

Andrew C. Holman

2008-01-01

50

Pendulum Collision  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animation shows a hockey puck (red) attached to a string and resting on an air hockey table. Another hockey puck (black), incident from the right, collides with the red puck. Consider both pucks as "the system."

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2008-02-19

51

Temperament Personality Athletes Hockey  

E-print Network

Background: Although much is known about risk for athletic injury, research on the roles of individual differences in personality and temperament on athletic injury has lagged. We hypothesized that professional athletes with high sensation-seeking and extraversion scores, and with low effortful control scores, would experience more injuries over the course of a season, would have more severe injuries, and would miss more total days of play. Methods: Prospective design with questionnaire report at time one and injury tracking throughout an 18-week athletic season. Setting: Professional hockey team in the United States. Participants: Eighteen professional hockey players (ages 21-33). Measurements: Players completed self-report personality (Sensation-Seeking Scale, Form V) and temperament (the Adult Temperament Questionnaire) measures. Quantity and severity of injury, as well as playing time missed, were tracked for 18 weeks. Results: On average, players experienced almost 6 injuries causing a loss of 10 playing days through the season. Those players scoring high on Boredom Susceptibility and Total Sensation-Seeking incurred more total injuries. Those scoring high on temperamental neutral perceptual sensitivity suffered more severe injuries. Conclusions: Athletes who suffered more injuries reported a preference for stimulating environments and boredom with non-stimulating environments. Injury severity was not correlated with sensation-seeking but was related to temperamental perceptual sensitivity. Implications for identification of injury-prone athletes, pre-injury training, and post-injury treatment are discussed.

P Paul; P David; Zachary H. Osborn P; C. Schwebelp

52

LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS OF ICE HOCKEY STICK PERFORMANCE  

E-print Network

LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS OF ICE HOCKEY STICK PERFORMANCE L. V. SMITH, R. L. BIGFORD Washington State of the broad popularity of ice hockey, little has been done to characterize the performance of sticks used was developed to measure the performance of hockey sticks. The performance of six wood and 11 composite sticks

Smith, Lloyd V.

53

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS  

E-print Network

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS CLINIC 1: Saturday & Sunday, October 27.wesleyan.edu/athletics/wihockey/index.html TO SIGN UP QUESTIONS? CALL 860-685-2904 OR EMAIL JAMCKENNA@WESLEYAN.EDU #12;WESLEYAN HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS Women's Hockey Freeman Athletic Center Middletown CT, 06459 email: jamckenna@wesleyan.edu/call: 860

Royer, Dana

54

Communicating Uncertainty: The phantom hockey stick  

E-print Network

Communicating Uncertainty: The phantom hockey stick Douglas Nychka, www. · Predict temperature from proxies that are dated from earlier years #12;The Hockey Stick Northern · The grey area around the hockey stick does not give an idea about shape. At what point are the wiggles

Nychka, Douglas

55

EFFECTS OF MILD DEHYDRATION ON THERMOREGULATION, PERFORMANCE AND MENTAL FATIGUE DURING AN ICE HOCKEY SCRIMMAGE  

E-print Network

This study investigated the effects of progressive dehydration by 1.5-2.0 % body mass (BM) (NF) on core temperature (Tc), heart rate (HR), on-ice performance, and mental fatigue during a 70-min scrimmage, compared to maintaining BM with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES). Compared to CES, Tc was significantly higher throughout the scrimmage in NF. Players in NF had reduced mean skating speed and time at high effort between 30-50 min of the scrimmage. Players in NF committed more puck turnovers and completed a lower percentage of passes in the last 20 min of play. Post-scrimmage shuttle skating time was higher in NF. Hockey fatigue questionnaire total score and Profile of Mood States fatigue score was higher in NF. The results indicate that mild dehydration compared to maintaining BM with a CES resulted in increased Tc, decreased skating and puck handling performance, and increased mental fatigue during an ice hockey scrimmage. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Most importantly, I would like to thank my family and friends for supporting me throughout my academic career. Thank you to my parents for giving me the perfect balance of guidance and independence to allow me to pursue what I truly enjoy. Thank you to my older brother and sister for providing two great examples of how to be successful, and thank you to Angie for keeping me on the right track. Next, I would like to thank my advisor, Dr. Lawrence Spriet, who has provided a wealth of knowledge and experience, and given me a great amount of confidence in my own ability. I look to him for an example of an accomplished researcher, a dedicated family man, and a friend to what seems like everyone. Lastly, I would like to thank the students, volunteers and other academics who

Mark E. Linseman; Mark Edward Linseman

56

Eye injuries in Canadian hockey.  

PubMed Central

Increasing public concern led the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, in January 1974, to form a committee to study the incidence, types and causes of hockey eye injuries and to devise means of reducing such injuries. Retrospective and current studies were undertaken, and face protectors were tested. In both pilot studies, sticks were the commonest cause and the highest number of eye injuries was in players 11-15 years old. An average of 15% of all injured eyes were rendered legally blind. Cooperation with hockey authorities has resulted in changed rules and their sticter enforcement, and formulation of standards for face protection approved by the Canadian Standards Association. In this interim report the committee recommends that all amateur hockey players wear eye protectors and urges ophthalmologists to participate in efforts to improve the design of protective equipment. Images FIG. 1 PMID:1181024

Pashby, T. J.; Pashby, R. C.; Chisholm, L. D.; Crawford, J. S.

1975-01-01

57

A to Z Encyclopaedia of Ice Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed by the UK-based Stewart Roberts and Phil Stamp, this huge compendium of ice hockey information (over 14,000 entries) is all the more notable for its international scope. No NHL-centricity here. In fact, the only Americans and Canadians in the site's Hall of Fame are in the International Ice Hockey Federation section. A constant work-in-progress, this site is a seemingly bottomless well of hockey trivia and lore. Need to know the Attendance Averages for Finnish Division 1 hockey? The winner of the 1997 Croation hockey championship? What the "A" on players' jerseys means? Its all here and much, much more.

1998-01-01

58

Retinal detachment following hockey injury.  

PubMed Central

Thirty-three cases of retinal detachment following hockey injury were seen during a 15-year period at the retina clinic of Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal. Most injuries occurred in adolescents, the average age being 18 years. The mean interval between injury and preoperative examination was 3 years. Almost half of these young hockey players remained legally blind in the affected eye even after a successful operation. A helmet with a protective face visor is suggested as the best prevention against severe ocular damage such as retinal detachment. PMID:880527

Antaki, S.; Labelle, P.; Dumas, J.

1977-01-01

59

The Open Geospatial Consortium PUCK Standard: Building Sensor Networks with Self-Describing Instruments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sensor technology is rapidly advancing, enabling smaller and cheaper instruments to monitor Earth's environment. It is expected that many more kinds and quantities of networked environmental sensors will be deployed in coming years. Knowledge of each instrument's command protocol is required to operate and acquire data from the network. Making sense of these data streams to create an integrated picture of environmental conditions requires that each instrument's data and metadata be accurately processed and that "suspect" data be flagged. Use of standards to operate an instrument and retrieve and describe its data generally simplifies instrument software development, integration, operation and data processing. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) PUCK protocol enables instruments that describe themselves in a standard way. OGC PUCK defines a small "data sheet" that describes key instrument characteristics, and a standard protocol to retrieve the data sheet from the device itself. Data sheet fields include a universal serial number that is unique across all PUCK-compliant instruments. Other fields identify the instrument manufacturer and model. In addition to the data sheet, the instrument may also provide a "PUCK payload" which can contain additional descriptive information (e.g. a SensorML document or IEEE 1451 TEDS), as well as actual instrument "driver" code. Computers on the sensor network can use PUCK protocol to retrieve this information from installed instruments and utilize it appropriately, e.g. to automatically identify, configure and operate the instruments, and acquire and process their data. The protocol is defined for instruments with an RS232 or Ethernet interface. OGC members recently voted to adopt PUCK as a component of the OGC's Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) standards. The protocol is also supported by a consortium of hydrographic instrument manufacturers and has been implemented by several of them (https://sites.google.com/site/soscsite/). Thus far PUCK has been deployed on oceanographic observatories in North America and Europe, and is generally applicable to environmental sensor networks. As an example we describe how PUCK can be used with other established and emerging OGC SWE standards to simplify configuration and operation of environmental sensor networks, and to automate assessment and processing of the sensor data. The PUCK specification is free of charge and can be downloaded along with tools to implement and use the standard from http://www.opengeospatial.org/standards/puck.

O'Reilly, T. C.; Broering, A.; del Rio, J.; Headley, K. L.; Toma, D.; Bermudez, L. E.; Edgington, D.; Fredericks, J.; Manuel, A.

2012-12-01

60

University of Minnesota Intramural Floor Hockey League Rules  

E-print Network

University of Minnesota Intramural Floor Hockey League Rules Intramural floor hockey will be played or the Intramural Floor Hockey League Rules will be governed by the NIRSA Floor Hockey Rules and Officials' Manual 4. Mouth Guards 5. Eye protection 6. Helmets vi. Street hockey goalie equipment will be provided

Amin, S. Massoud

61

PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments  

PubMed Central

The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the “PUCK” prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed. PMID:25364323

Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M.

2014-01-01

62

Massachusetts Special Olympics Poly Hockey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Poly Hockey is featured in this manual of instructions for coaches and teachers to use with mentally retarded boys and girls of all ages and ability levels. It is noted that the sport has been supported by the Board of Directors of the Special Olympics and has been used in Massachusetts for over 7 years. Explained is use of the game indoors, and…

Morrissey, Jim

63

Hockey CampSummer Columbia Ice Field Arena  

E-print Network

Hockey CampSummer Columbia Ice Field Arena University of Waterloo CAMP REGISTRATION Last Name, shooting, or power skating fol- lowed by cross-ice 3on3 games > Gymnasium: Various games and hockey's Hockey Camp > Bria

Le Roy, Robert J.

64

Cardiac arrhythmia detection using combination of heart rate variability analyses and PUCK analysis.  

PubMed

This paper presents cardiac arrhythmia detection using the combination of a heart rate variability (HRV) analysis and a "potential of unbalanced complex kinetics" (PUCK) analysis. Detection performance was improved by adding features extracted from the PUCK analysis. Initially, R-R interval data were extracted from the original electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and were cut into small segments and marked as either normal or arrhythmia. HRV analyses then were conducted using the segmented R-R interval data, including a time-domain analysis, frequency-domain analysis, and nonlinear analysis. In addition to the HRV analysis, PUCK analysis, which has been implemented successfully in a foreign exchange market series to characterize change, was employed. A decision-tree algorithm was applied to all of the obtained features for classification. The proposed method was tested using the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database and had an overall classification accuracy of 91.73%. After combining features obtained from the PUCK analysis, the overall accuracy increased to 92.91%. Therefore, we suggest that the use of a PUCK analysis in conjunction with HRV analysis might improve performance accuracy for the detection of cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:24110032

Mahananto, Faizal; Igasaki, Tomohiko; Murayama, Nobuki

2013-01-01

65

Operative management of “hockey groin syndrome”: 12 years of experience in National Hockey League players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. At the elite level of hockey, groin injuries can threaten a player's career. The aim of this review is to describe the clinical presentation and evaluate our operative approach to “hockey groin syndrome” in National Hockey League (NHL) players. Methods. Between November 1989 and June 2000, 22 NHL players with debilitating groin pain underwent operative exploration. A repair, including

Kashif Irshad; Liane S. Feldman; Caroline Lavoie; Vincent J. Lacroix; David S. Mulder; Rea A. Brown

2001-01-01

66

Physiology applied to field hockey.  

PubMed

Field hockey is a sport with a long history that has undergone quite rapid and radical change within the past decade. The advent of the synthetic playing surface has changed the technical, tactical and physiological requirements of the game at all levels, but in particular at the elite level. In order to cope with the technical evolution within the game, the hockey player has also had to develop physiologically to meet the physical standards required at elite levels. Analysis of the physiological cost and energy expenditure of playing hockey has placed it in the category of 'heavy exercise', with reported VO2 values during a game of 2.26 L/min. Energy expenditure has been estimated to range from 36 to 50 kJ/min. Physiological profiling of female hockey players has shown that somatotype tends towards 3.5/4.0/2.5. Figures for percentage body fat in female players range from 16 to 26%. Anaerobic power output has been shown to compare favourably with other groups of sportswomen and has also been shown to be a discriminating factor between elite and county level female players. Aerobic power amongst female players has been shown to range from 45 to 59 ml/kg/min. The reported somatotypes of male hockey players have shown considerable variation but there seems to be a trend away from ectomorphy towards mesomorphy. Anaerobic power output in male players has been shown to be the same as that of soccer players and better than other sports, e.g. basketball and also higher than reference norms. The range of aerobic power reported in the literature is 48 to 65 ml/kg/min and it would appear that an aerobic power in excess of 60 ml/kg/min is required for elite level play. The physical strain of hockey play has been shown to be considerable, in particular with respect to spinal shrinkage. There is a greater injury risk inherent in playing on synthetic surfaces than on grass. PMID:1641540

Reilly, T; Borrie, A

1992-07-01

67

Maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution improves performance, thermoregulation, and fatigue during an ice hockey scrimmage.  

PubMed

Research in "stop-and-go" sports has demonstrated that carbohydrate ingestion improves performance and fatigue, and that dehydration of ?1.5%-2% body mass (BM) loss results in decreased performance, increased fatigue, and increased core temperature. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the physiological, performance, and fatigue-related effects of maintaining hydration with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) versus dehydrating by ?2% BM (no fluid; NF) during a 70-min ice hockey scrimmage. Skilled male hockey players (n = 14; age, 21.3 ± 0.2 years; BM, 80.1 ± 2.5 kg; height, 182.0 ± 1.2 cm) volunteered for the study. Subjects lost 1.94% ± 0.1% BM in NF, and 0.12% ± 0.1% BM in CES. Core temperature (Tc) throughout the scrimmage (10-50 min) and peak Tc (CES: 38.69 ± 0.10 vs. NF: 38.92 ± 0.11 °C; p < 0.05) were significantly reduced in CES compared with NF. Players in CES had increased mean skating speed and time at high effort between 30-50 min of the scrimmage. They also committed fewer puck turnovers and completed a higher percentage of passes in the last 20 min of play compared with NF. Postscrimmage shuttle skating performance was improved in CES versus NF and fatigue was lower following the CES trial. The results indicated that ingesting a CES to maintain BM throughout a 70-min hockey scrimmage resulted in improved hockey performance and thermoregulation, and decreased fatigue as compared with drinking no fluid and dehydrating by ?2%. PMID:25061764

Linseman, Mark E; Palmer, Matthew S; Sprenger, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

2014-11-01

68

The High School Players Field Hockey Journal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student's journal aims at helping to develop a successful and highly motivated high school girls field hockey team. General information about the sport and student involvement is presented. Definitions of terms used in field hockey are given as well as general considerations about play, defensive and offensive strategies, and penalties.…

Schultz, Bobbie

69

Injury patterns among female field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

MURTAUGH, K. Injury patterns among female field hockey players. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 33, No. 2, 2001, pp. 201-207. Purpose: To examine injury patterns among female field hockey players and to broaden the current base of knowledge by identifying the injury rates of different playing positions. It was hypothesized that goalkeepers would have the highest rate of injury, followed

KAREN MURTAUGH

2001-01-01

70

Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Covert visual orienting was measured in hockey players at two ages (12 and 15 years) and two skill levels (low and high), and in college students with no hockey training. Two types of cues were tested at five cue-target intervals (100–850 ms): digits that informed of likely target locations, and abrupt luminance changes that occurred randomly at possible target locations.

James T. Enns; James C. Richards

1997-01-01

71

Concussion among Swedish elite ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of concussion in Swedish ice hockey and to establish a uniform grading and treatment model for concussions of different severity. METHODS: Frequency of concussion was investigated in two studies, one retrospective and one prospective. In the retrospective study, all Swedish elite ice hockey players (n = 265) were asked to answer a questionnaire on the

Y Tegner; R Lorentzon

1996-01-01

72

Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)

Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

1997-01-01

73

Still more spawnerrecruitment curves: the hockey stick and its generalizations  

E-print Network

Still more spawner­recruitment curves: the hockey stick and its generalizations Nicholas J as the hockey stick. We compare the fit of the Beverton­Holt with the hockey stick for 246 spawner and a larger maximum reproductive rate than the hockey stick. We propose two families of generalizations

Myers, Ransom A.

74

University of Minnesota Intramural Ice Hockey League Rules  

E-print Network

University of Minnesota Intramural Ice Hockey League Rules Intramural hockey will be played Hockey League Rules will be taken from the 2008-09 MSHSL Rules Book (a copy will be available for review, that player may not skate as a regular player. All goalie restrictions apply. D. Equipment Hockey skates must

Amin, S. Massoud

75

Field Hockey-Lacrosse Guide. June 1974-June 1976.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is a collection of essays by various authors on field hockey and lacrosse. There is a separate section for each sport. The topics covered in the field hockey section include half-time coaching, visual aids, umpiring techniques and ratings, goalkeeper training, experimental field hockey rules, and the code of rules for the game of hockey

Ramser, Frances, Ed.; Bixler, Agnes, Ed.

76

Support based measures applied to ice hockey scoring summaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present the hockey line extraction (HLE) algorithm, which examines ice hockey scoring summaries in an attempt to determine a team's lines. The players on a hockey team are divided into units called “lines” that appear together on the ice. The HLE algorithm uses single link clustering, support based measures and positional information to identify lines of players. The hockey

Bradley P. Kram; James A. Hall; Howard J. Hamilton

2000-01-01

77

Hockey Greats Retire En Masse  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mark of distinctionhttp://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2005/writers/michael_farber/09/12/messier.retires/index.htmlCentre Ron Francis retires after 23 distinguished NHL seasonshttp://www.canada.com/edmonton/edmontonjournal/news/sports/story.html?id=cda782b9-2192-4783-8365-7acc1bc6b656Another NHL star quits; Francis retireshttp://msnbc.msn.com/id/9340488/ESPN.com: NHL Statisticshttp://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/statisticsHockey Hall of Famehttp://www.hhof.com/index.htmAfter a long strike, the National Hockey League is gearing up for the 2005-2006 season in earnest. Regrettably, the game will be without two of its standout players, as both Mark Messier of the New York Rangers and Ron Francis of the Toronto Maple Leafs announced their retirements this week. Messier began his 25-season career with his hometown Edmonton Oilers in 1979, and led the team to five Stanley Cup victories. Of course, many will also remember his many fine years of play with the Rangers, where he also led them to victory in the 1994 Stanley Cap as well. Messier made his announcement on a conference call because as he remarked, "no one wants to see a blubbering idiot at the podium".

2005-01-01

78

Hockey Stats: Data Collection on Ice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Part of a series exploring how mathematics is used in the workplace. Software developers and statisticians record data of hockey games and players using statistics accessible to middle school students. (MM)

Harris, Joanne

2002-01-01

79

Thunderbird Youth Hockey League 604-827-3900  

E-print Network

Thunderbird Youth Hockey League 604-827-3900 www.mitchellcentre.com 1 2013 TYHL SPRING LEAGUE RULES #12;Thunderbird Youth Hockey League 604-827-3900 www.mitchellcentre.com 2 TEAM & PLAYER INFORMATION Youth Hockey League 604-827-3900 www.mitchellcentre.com 3 GENERAL RULES of the GAME WARM-UP Teams

Pulfrey, David L.

80

CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CAMP/CLINIC Team Challenge Boot Camp  

E-print Network

CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CAMP/CLINIC Team Challenge Boot Camp August 13-16, 2012 Smith Turf Field at Wesleyan University www.wesleyan.edu/athletics Typical Evening Schedule - Sessions from 5:00-8:00pm Hockey Technical Skills Training Hockey Tactical Training Strength Workout Conditioning with running tests

Royer, Dana

81

An Exponential Approximation to the Hockey Stick Function  

E-print Network

An Exponential Approximation to the Hockey Stick Function Ian Iscoe Ken Jackson Alex Kreinin§ Xiaofang Ma¶ March 19, 2010 Abstract The hockey stick (HS) function plays an important role in pricing and Monz´on is used to determine the parameters of the exponential approximation to the hockey stick

Toronto, University of

82

On Exponential Approximation to the Hockey Stick Ken Jackson  

E-print Network

On Exponential Approximation to the Hockey Stick Function Ian Iscoe Ken Jackson Alex Kreinin§ Xiaofang Ma¶ January 24, 2007 Abstract The hockey stick function is a basic function in pricing and risk management of many financial derivatives. This paper considers approximating the hockey stick function

Toronto, University of

83

Automatic Acquisition of Motion Trajectories: Tracking Hockey Players  

E-print Network

Automatic Acquisition of Motion Trajectories: Tracking Hockey Players Kenji Okuma James J. Little a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey

Little, Jim

84

Internet broadcast of hockey: a scale prototype  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a system for the broadcast of hockey games over the internet. The system allows users to experience the hockey game while it is in progress. Our system uses generic content description servers that acquire information from an external source, process it, and serve the processed data to client systems. Dynamic configuration of the servers allows us to use them in a variety of roles. For example, video information servers, like an MPEG-7 camera, produce XML documents that describe the motion of objects in the scene in addition to unprocessed video. Unlike an MPEG-7 camera, our video information servers interact with client systems, and can change their behavior through dynamic configuration. In an alternate configuration, a content description server acts as a game server in our hockey broadcast system. The game server forms an environment model that encapsulates the state of the hockey game and serves data from the model to clients. We developed and tested our system using a 1/32-scale model of a hockey rink. Early results using data acquired at a real rink indicate that the system performs as expected.

Boyd, Jeffrey E.; Sayles, Maxwell; Olsen, Luke; Tarjan, Paul

2003-12-01

85

Injuries in Women's Ice Hockey: Special Considerations.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is a popular collision sport with a growing number of female athletes participating each year. As participation among girls and women continues to increase, it will be important to recognize common injuries occurring during women's games. Despite difference in the rules that prohibit body checking in women's and girls' games, injury profiles are similar to those of their male counterparts. Concussions, contusions, acromioclavicular joint injuries, ligamentous knee injuries, and muscle strains occur during women's ice hockey games, with groin strains accounting for the most common practice injury. This article will review both injury rates and common injuries occurring in women's ice hockey, with a focus on the observed concussion rate and groin injuries. PMID:25391093

Abbott, Kristin

2014-01-01

86

Explanatory style among elite ice hockey athletes.  

PubMed

Mentally tough' athletes show resilience and an ability to compete during adverse conditions. The present study investigated mental toughness and assessed causal explanations for positive and negative reactions to imagined events using Seligman's Attributional Style Questionnaire. Pessimistic Explanatory style on this scale is a risk factor for negative affect and behavior following negative events. 38 elite athletes in ice hockey were rated for mental toughness by the National Hockey League's scouts on consensually derived criteria. The comparison of players above and below the median split on mental toughness showed composite explanations for negative events that were more internal, stable and global for players above the median. Contrary to predictions, these results suggest that a Pessimistic Explanatory style may benefit hockey performance. PMID:9885080

Davis, H; Zaichkowsky, L

1998-12-01

87

Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ``hockey stick'' shaped temperature reconstruction of Mann et al. (1998, 1999) has been widely applied. However it has not been previously noted in print that, prior to their principal components (PCs) analysis on tree ring networks, they carried out an unusual data transformation which strongly affects the resulting PCs. Their method, when tested on persistent red noise, nearly always

Stephen McIntyre; Ross McKitrick

2005-01-01

88

NU Intramural Sports Floor Hockey Rules  

E-print Network

NU Intramural Sports Floor Hockey Rules GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid be responsible for collecting his team's IDs and registering their uniform numbers with the IM staff. 4. 3 Unsportsmanlike Penalties will result in the player leaving the game. Only a team's designated Captain is allowed

Sridhar, Srinivas

89

NU Intramural Sports Roller Hockey Rules  

E-print Network

NU Intramural Sports Roller Hockey Rules GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid be responsible for collecting his team's IDs and registering their uniform numbers with the IM staff. 4. 3 Unsportsmanlike Penalties will result in the player leaving the game. Only a team's designated Captain is allowed

Sridhar, Srinivas

90

NU Intramural Sports Ice Hockey Rules  

E-print Network

NU Intramural Sports Ice Hockey Rules GENERAL RULES: 1. All players must present their valid be responsible for collecting his team' IDs and handing them into the Intramurals staff. 4. 3 Unsportsmanlike Penalties will result in the player leaving the game. Only a team's designated Captain is allowed to confer

Sridhar, Srinivas

91

For Immediate Release --Thursday, April 3, 2014 Pronghorns men's hockey program taps Red Wings  

E-print Network

head coach of the men's hockey program, the eighth in team history. "It of the British Columbia Junior Hockey League (BCJHL). A former player with Lebanon ValleyFor Immediate Release -- Thursday, April 3, 2014 Pronghorns men's hockey

Seldin, Jonathan P.

92

CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC & 7 v 7 PLAY Hosted by the Wesleyan University Women's Field Hockey Team at the Freeman Athletic Center  

E-print Network

CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC & 7 v 7 PLAY Hosted by the Wesleyan University Women's Field Hockey University Women's Field Hockey team. What to Bring: Mouth guards and goggles are mandatory Cross trainers/indoor shoes, sticks, goalie equipment, water bottle CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC & 7 v 7 PLAY - Application

Royer, Dana

93

CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC & 7 v 7 PLAY Hosted by the Wesleyan University Women's Field Hockey Team at Freeman Athletic Center  

E-print Network

CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC & 7 v 7 PLAY Hosted by the Wesleyan University Women's Field Hockey: $100 (no discounts available) All money benefits the Wesleyan University Women's Field Hockey team Equipment, Water bottle CARDINAL FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC & 7 v 7 PLAY --Application Form-- Name: Check One

Royer, Dana

94

Helminth communities of European eels Anguilla anguilla (Linnaeus, 1758) from the Vistula Lagoon and Puck Bay, Poland.  

PubMed

Within 2001-2002 a total of 621 eel Anguilla anguilla (L., 1758) (488 from the Vistula Lagoon and 133 from the Puck Bay) were examined. Fifteen parasite taxa were recovered: Pseudodactylogyrus anguillae (Yin et Sproston, 1948), Brachyphallus crenatus (Rudolphi, 1802), Deropristis inflata (Molin, 1859), Diplostomum spp., Bothriocephalus claviceps (Goeze, 1782), Proteocephalus macrocephalus (Creplin, 1825), Anguillicola crassus (Kuwahara, Niimi et Itagaki, 1974), Camallanus lacustris (Zoega, 1776), Cystidicola farionis Fischer, 1798, Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802), Raphidascaris acus (Bloch, 1779), Acanthocephalus anguillae (Müller, 1780), A. lucii (Müller, 1776), Echinorhynchus gadi Müller, 1776, and Pomphorhynchus laevis (Müller, 1776), representing Monogenea, Digenea, Cestoda, Nematoda, and Acanthocephala, respectively. Ten of these taxa occurred in the Vistula Lagoon, while fourteen were noted in the Puck Bay. P. anguillae, Diplostomum spp., C. lacustris, C. farionis and P. laevis were not found in the lagoon eels, while B. crenatus did not occur in the bay. Anguillicola crassus was the most frequently found parasite (Vistula Lagoon: prevalence 75%, mean intensity 6.9 specimens; Puck Bay: 74.4%, and 8.3 specimens, respectively). Pseudodactylogyrus anguillae was recorded for the first time in the Puck Bay. PMID:16838624

Bystydzie?iska, Zofia; Rolbiecki, Leszek; Rokicki, Jerzy

2005-01-01

95

American Collegiate Men's Ice HockeyAn Analysis of Injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Reported rates and types of ice hockey injuries have been variable. Ice hockey combines tremendous speeds with aggressive physical play and therefore has great inherent potential for injury.Purpose: To identify rates and determinants of injury in American men's collegiate ice hockey.Study Design: Prospective cohort study.Methods: Data were collected from 8 teams in a Division I athletic conference for 1

Kyle Flik; Stephen Lyman; Robert G. Marx

2005-01-01

96

Beyond the hockey stick: indirect methods of paleoclimate  

E-print Network

Beyond the hockey stick: indirect methods of paleoclimate reconstruction Douglas Nychka National Wahl (NOAA) National Science Foundation October 2010, NCAR #12;The Paleoclimate problem D. Nychka IMAGe

Nychka, Douglas

97

Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ``hockey stick'' shaped temperature reconstruction of Mann et al. (1998, 1999) has been widely applied. However it has not been previously noted in print that, prior to their principal components (PCs) analysis on tree ring networks, they carried out an unusual data transformation which strongly affects the resulting PCs. Their method, when tested on persistent red noise, nearly always produces a hockey stick shaped first principal component (PC1) and overstates the first eigenvalue. In the controversial 15th century period, the MBH98 method effectively selects only one species (bristlecone pine) into the critical North American PC1, making it implausible to describe it as the ``dominant pattern of variance''. Through Monte Carlo analysis, we show that MBH98 benchmarks for significance of the Reduction of Error (RE) statistic are substantially under-stated and, using a range of cross-validation statistics, we show that the MBH98 15th century reconstruction lacks statistical significance.

McIntyre, Stephen; McKitrick, Ross

2005-02-01

98

Hockey-stick steam generator for LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the criteria and evaluation leading to the selection of the Hockey Stick Steam Generator Concept and subsequent development of that concept for LMFBR application. The selection process and development of the Modular Steam Generator (MSG) is discussed, including the extensive test programs that culminated in the manufacture and test of a 35 MW(t) Steam Generator. The design of the CRBRP Steam Generator is described, emphasizing the current status and a review of the critical structural areas. CRBRP steam generator development tests are evaluated, with a discussion of test objectives and rating of the usefulness of test results to the CRBRP prototype design. Manufacturing experience and status of the CRBRP prototype and plant units is covered. The scaleup of the Hockey Stick concept to large commercial plant application is presented, with an evaluation of scaleup limitations, transient effects, and system design implications.

Hallinan, G.J.; Svedlund, P.E.

1981-01-01

99

Miniature Videoprobe Hockey Stick Delivery System  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is a miniature videoprobe system having a probe termination box, a strong back, and a videoprobe housing. The videoprobe system is able to obtain images from a restricted space at least as small as 0.125 inches while producing a high quality image. The strong back has a hockey stick shape with the probe termination box connecting to the top of the handle-like portion of the hockey stick and the videoprobe housing attaching to the opposite end or nose of the hockey stick shape. The videoprobe housing has a roughly arrowhead shape with two thin steel plates sandwiching the internal components there between. The internal components are connected in series to allow for a minor dimension of the videoprobe housing of 0.110 inches. The internal components include an optics train, a CCD chip, and an electronics package. An electrical signal is transmitted from the electronics package through wiring within an internal channel of the strong back to the probe termination box. The strong back has milled into it multiple internal channels for facilitating the transfer of information, items, or devices between the probe termination box and the videoprobe housing.

Hale, Lester R.; McMurry, Kyle M.

1998-06-18

100

Mechanical modeling of the plastic bonded explosive LX17  

E-print Network

/or sliding along grain boundaries. Microcracking along the grain boundary is a phenomenon that takes place in many polycrystalline solids, causing their reliability and life to degrade. Experimental evidence has shown this to be the case in metals... (Hertzberg, 1976; Suresh, 1991; Majumdar and Newaz, 1991), argillaceous salt (Chan et al. , 1997a; Chan et al. , 1997b), and sea ice (Schapery, 1997). This microcracking is qualitatively similar when examined in the macroscale, however the mechanisms...

Clayton, Kyle Martin

2012-06-07

101

An epidemiological study of high school ice hockey injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between 1976 and 1983, 42 spinal cord injuries among ice hockey participants were documented in Canada; within a recent 3-week period, three cases involving fractured necks were reported in a metropolitan area of Minnesota. The purpose of this comprehensive epidemiological study was to document rates, types, and severities of injuries incurred among high school varsity hockey players in Minnesota, as

Susan Goodwin Gerberich; Robert Finke; Marcia Madden; James D. Priest; Gordon Aamoth; Kevin Murray

1987-01-01

102

11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, Detroit, Michigan). GROUNDBREAKING FOR ADDITION, JUNE 23, 1965. Left Sid Abel, Genral Manager of the Detroit Hockey Club Center - Jerome Cavanaugh, Mayor, City of Detroit Right - Nick Landis, General Manager of the Olympia Stadium - Olympia Arena, 5920 Grand River Avenue, Detroit, Wayne County, MI

103

Luck in the vocabulary of motives of professional ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines an important aspect of professional ice hockey. While the game has become increasingly commodified and rationalized, and so organized on scien- tific and economic grounds, the notion of luck still finds a place in interpretations of action and outcomes in the sport. As one feature of the vocabulary of motives present in hockey, the use of luck

Philip Moore

104

Blood Money: Incentives for Violence in NHL Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The level of violence in the National Hockey League (NHL) reached its highest point in 1987 and has reduced somewhat since then, although to levels much larger than before the first team expansions in 1967. Using publicly available information from several databases 1996–2007, the incentives for violence in North American ice hockey are analyzed.We examine the role of penalty minutes

John P. Haisken-DeNew; Matthias Vorell

2008-01-01

105

Injury Rates and Profiles in Female Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Little data exist on injury rates and profiles in female ice hockey players.Objective: To examine the incidence of injury in female ice hockey players and compare injury rates with those of male players. Study Design: Prospective cohort study.Methods: Six male and six female teams from the Canada West Universities Athletic Association were followed prospectively for one varsity season. Preseason

Deanna M. Schick; Willem H. Meeuwisse

2003-01-01

106

BOSTONIA Summer 2013 wins in NCAA hockey his-  

E-print Network

research collaboration and a university's research reputation among peers, and its teaching reputation season ended on March 23, when the Terriers lost the Hockey East Championship to the University for Boston University, the University's first comprehensive fund- raising campaign. Retired hockey coach

Spence, Harlan Ernest

107

Holy Acceptable Violence? Violence in Hockey and Christian Atonement Theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hockey and Christianity are described as ways of being spiritual for followers and participants. This essay is written from a feminist ethical perspective and examines violence characterizing professional Canadian hockey including: economic justice, and commodification and sexualization of athletes; self-sacrifice and heroism; on-ice bodily harms; sexual abuse; and a dualistic mentality that alienates and negates the other. Parallels between this

Tracy Trothen

108

The Ice Hockey Injury: A Case Study in Physiology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A high school hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough, and the star player is slammed against the boards. Injured, he is escorted off the ice. This case follows his health as it deteriorates over the next several hours. Students are presented with the hockey player's symptoms, and they use their knowledge of…

Stephens, Phil

2004-01-01

109

The Congressional Hockey Caucus Staff Congressional Briefing: March 10, 2011  

E-print Network

, and teammates not only promote positive performance in sport but in academics as well as other life domains University Hockey, Sports, and Academic Achievement First, I want to thank Congressman Quigley for inviting of Hockey and Organized Youth Sports ­ A Call to Action Michael A. Kanters, Ph.D. North Carolina State

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

110

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WOMEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN WOMEN'S ICE HOCKEY  

E-print Network

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WOMEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN WOMEN'S ICE HOCKEY #12........................Phil Carney Women's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

111

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY  

E-print Network

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEYWESLEYAN MEN'S ICE HOCKEY #12........................Phil Carney Women's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

112

Birthdate and success in minor hockey: The key to the NHL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous research (Barnsley, Thompson, & Barnsley, 1985) demonstrated an extremely strong linear relationship between the mouth of birth (from January to December) and the likelihood of playing in the National Hockey League and two major developmental Junior hockey leagues. The present study analyzes the birthdates of 7313 hockey players participating in the Edmonton Minor Hockey Association in the 1983–1984 season.

ROGER H. BARNSLEY; A. H. THOMPSON

1988-01-01

113

Bodychecking Rules and Concussion in Elite Hockey  

PubMed Central

Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010–11 and 2011–12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009–10 to 2011–12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50). When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32). The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009–10 than in 2010–11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83), but did not increase from 2010–11 to 2011–12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38). 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries. PMID:23874888

Donaldson, Laura; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D.

2013-01-01

114

Bodychecking rules and concussion in elite hockey.  

PubMed

Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010-11 and 2011-12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009-10 to 2011-12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50). When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32). The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009-10 than in 2010-11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83), but did not increase from 2010-11 to 2011-12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38). 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries. PMID:23874888

Donaldson, Laura; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D

2013-01-01

115

Academic achievement and involvement in hockey: a post-hoc longitudinal study.  

PubMed

Academic achievement, absenteeism, and athletic involvement (hockey) data were collected on 484 boys throughout British Columbia. School and minor hockey records were used to obtain longitudinal data for each boy from Grade 1 until high school graduation or school withdrawal. Results indicated that hockey players exhibit less school absenteeism than non hockey players, but are not different with respect to grade point averages. Hockey players, at the juvenile level or lower, tend to attain a slightly higher grade point average during the years they are playing hockey in comparison with their academic achievement during the years they are not playing hockey. Of the hockey players with lower than average I.Q.'s, those who exhibit poor achievement tend to drop out of hockey earlier than those who have average or above average grades. PMID:498405

Schutz, R W

1979-03-01

116

12. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

12. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, Detroit, Michigan). CONSTRUCTION OF BUILDING ADDITION, 1965, LOOKING WEST. - Olympia Arena, 5920 Grand River Avenue, Detroit, Wayne County, MI

117

14. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

14. Photocopy of Photograph (Courtesy of the Detroit Hockey Club, Detroit, Michigan). AERIAL VIEW OF OLYMPIA ARENA, LOOKING NORTH, FEBRUARY 9, 1969. - Olympia Arena, 5920 Grand River Avenue, Detroit, Wayne County, MI

118

Development of an autonomous robotic air hockey player  

E-print Network

Air hockey is a widely played sport in the United States and is expanding to other countries. It is usually played on a frictionless table between two or more people. The dependency of another individual makes it impossible ...

Vang, Bee, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01

119

Sacral stress fracture in a female field hockey player.  

PubMed

We report a collegiate field hockey player who sustained a sacral fatigue-type stress fracture that manifested as persistent low back and leg pain. The diagnosis of sacral stress fracture was suggested by history and physical examination and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Our patient experienced complete resolution of symptoms after a 3-mo interval of activity restriction. This article describes the first reported case of a sacral stress fracture in a field hockey player. PMID:14566158

Slipman, Curtis W; Gilchrist, Russell V; Isaac, Zacharia; Lenrow, David A; Chou, Larry H

2003-11-01

120

Crime, Punishment, and Recidivism: Lessons from the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among the fundamental elements of the sport of ice hockey are the on-ice rules violations occasionally committed by players and the penalties assessed for those violations. During the 1998-99 season, the National Hockey League (NHL) for the first time experimented with the deployment of two on-ice referees for a selection of games instead of the customary single referee, significant in

W. David Allen

2002-01-01

121

Sport selection in under-17 male roller hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Characteristics of 32 international and 41 local under-17 (U-17) (14.5–16.5 years) roller hockey players were considered in the context of discrimination by competitive level using training history, anthropometry, skeletal maturation, and several laboratory and field performance tests. More international (42%) than local (22%) players were advanced in maturity status. International players had slightly less hockey experience (years), but had more

Manuel J. Coelho-E-Silva; Vasco Vaz; Filipe Simões; João Valente-Dos-Santos; António J. Figueiredo; Vanildo Pereira; Roel Vaeyens; Renaat Philippaerts; Marije T. Elferink-Gemser; Robert M. Malina

2012-01-01

122

Characteristics of the elite minor hockey player.  

PubMed

Few studies have been reported which evaluate the cardiorespiratory responses of young athletes and fewer still which are concerned with the young elite hockey player. The problems of measurement were outlined and described. These included the selection of appropriate samples for study, the identification of those variables to be measured which will yield the most important factors and the appropriate methods for use with these subjects. Comparisons between young athletes and normative data on less active boys were described. In the athletic population the maximal aerobic power increased across ages 10 to 14, whereas, the values for the less active norms decreased with age. Values for age related changes in blood lactate were also reported. PMID:533625

Cunningham, D A

1979-06-01

123

NBC Learn: Science of NHL Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the portal for a collection of short videos that explore the science behind professional hockey. Funded by the National Science Foundation, the videos aim to provide engaging real-world examples of key concepts in physics: Newton's Laws, momentum and its conservation, conservation of energy, vectors, impulse and collision, and projectile motion. NHL players are featured in each video, with motion displayed in archived game clips and newly-created video captured with a super high-speed Phantom Cam. Physicists appear in each video to explain the concepts being demonstrated and clarify the connections to physics. Included are 20 lesson plans for middle school and high school, developed for use specifically with the videos.

2012-04-30

124

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES-FLOOR HOCKEY INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS,  

E-print Network

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES-FLOOR HOCKEY INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS #:______________________ TO: THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (THE "UOFL"), THE ACTIVITY: The UofL hosts Floor Hockey Intramurals

Seldin, Jonathan P.

125

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES-ICE HOCKEY INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS,  

E-print Network

SPORT & RECREATION SERVICES-ICE HOCKEY INTRAMURALS RELEASE OF LIABILITY, WAIVER OF CLAIMS #:______________________ TO: THE UNIVERSITY OF LETHBRIDGE (THE "UOFL"), THE ACTIVITY: The UofL plays host to Ice Hockey

Seldin, Jonathan P.

126

Politics on Ice: The United States, the Soviet Union, and a Hockey Game in Lake Placid  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the intersection of sport and politics by examining how and to what extent the 1980 US Men's Hockey Team's gold medal victory in Lake Placid was catapulted from the hockey arena to the political arena.

Donald E. Abelson

2010-01-01

127

Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that are complex, dynamic, and challenging enough for computers to describe. These scenes include games of sports, air traffic, car traffic, street intersections, and cloud transformations. Our research is about the challenge of inventing a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact with each other on a constantly moving background due to camera motions. Ultimately, such a computer system should be able to acquire reliable data by extracting the players" motion as their trajectories, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey players based on the result of the query. Among these three major aspects of the system, we primarily focus on visual information of the scenes, that is, how to automatically acquire motion trajectories of hockey players from video. More accurately, we automatically analyze the hockey scenes by estimating parameters (i.e., pan, tilt, and zoom) of the broadcast cameras, tracking hockey players in those scenes, and constructing a visual description of the data by displaying trajectories of those players. Many technical problems in vision such as fast and unpredictable players' motions and rapid camera motions make our challenge worth tackling. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any automatic video annotation systems for hockey developed in the past. Although there are many obstacles to overcome, our efforts and accomplishments would hopefully establish the infrastructure of the automatic hockey annotation system and become a milestone for research in automatic video annotation in this domain.

Okuma, Kenji; Little, James J.; Lowe, David

2003-12-01

128

2011 FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC at Williams College for rising Sophomore, Junior & Senior High School students  

E-print Network

2011 FIELD HOCKEY CLINIC at Williams College for rising Sophomore, Junior & Senior High School students Our goal is to expose participants to the Williams College's Field Hockey Program, how the team and instruction, lunch and a t-shirt. EQUIPMENT Please bring your field hockey stick, mouth guard, shinguards

Aalberts, Daniel P.

129

"No Fear Comes": Adolescent Girls, Ice Hockey, and the Embodiment of Gender.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the relationship between gender, physicality, and embodiment among Canadian adolescent girls who played ice hockey. Interview data indicated that the girls emphasized the importance of being aggressive (fearless in use of the body). Players understood that contrasts between men's hockey (more physical and aggressive) and women's hockey

Theberge, Nancy

2003-01-01

130

Using Line and Ellipse Features for Rectification of Broadcast Hockey Video  

E-print Network

Using Line and Ellipse Features for Rectification of Broadcast Hockey Video Ankur Gupta, James J Columbia Vancouver, Canada Email: ankgupta@cs.ubc.ca Abstract--To use hockey broadcast videos for automatic time. We test this system #12;on a hockey video sequence. However, it can be easily generalized

131

Relative Age Effects and the PhD 1 Revisiting Gladwell's Hockey Players  

E-print Network

Relative Age Effects and the PhD 1 Revisiting Gladwell's Hockey Players: Influence of Relative Age involving Canadian hockey players to popularize the concept of "redshirting" kindergarten-aged children by the order of their selection in the National Hockey League (NHL) draft � than children who were always

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

132

Field Hockey-Lacrosse Guide with Official Rules. June 1972 - June 1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Rules for women's field hockey and lacrosse from June 1972 to June 1974 are discussed. Standards in sports for girls and women are detailed as is the Division for Girls and Women's Sports (DGWS) statement of beliefs. Specific articles on field hockey techniques, skills, services available through the United States Field Hockey Association, rules,…

Thornburg, Mary Lou, Ed.; Pitts, Jackie, Ed.

133

Feb. 15, 2012 The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars one-off Vancouver lecture  

E-print Network

MEDIA TIP Feb. 15, 2012 The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars ­ one-off Vancouver lecture The lead author of the "Hockey Stick" chart will be based on his soon-to- be-released book, The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars

Pedersen, Tom

134

Regional Differences in Fan Preferences for Minor League Hockey: The AHL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regional differences in fan preferences for minor league hockey in the United States are explored using simple linear regression models. The top-level minor league for the NHL, the American Hockey League (AHL), was studied for the 2008-09 season. Key attributes with respect to attendance are studied for hockey including population, income per capita, promotions, scoring, and winning percentage. In addition,

Rodney J. Paul; Robert Chatt

2011-01-01

135

Tracking and recognizing actions of multiple hockey players using the boosted particle filter  

E-print Network

Tracking and recognizing actions of multiple hockey players using the boosted particle filter Wei track multiple hockey players and simultaneously recognize their actions given a single broadcast video in the challenge of inventing a system that tracks multiple hockey players in a video sequence and simul- taneously

Little, Jim

136

Gender, Sport, and the Construction of Community: A Case Study from Women's Ice Hockey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the construction of community on a women's ice hockey team, using data from fieldwork and interviews with one Canadian team. Results indicated that the locker room provided a space where players came together as hockey players and women. A common focus on hockey united the diverse group. (SM)

Theberge, Nancy

1995-01-01

137

The Collision of Trans-Experience and the Politics of Women's Ice Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transgender identified athletes have competed at all levels in sports, though most remain hidden and silenced. In the Spring of 2003, USA Hockey banned a transsexual male-to-female (MTF) athlete from participating in the Women's National Ice Hockey Tournament. By deeming her ineligible, USA Hockey demonstrated how tightly they aim to control sex and gender in women's sport. A series of

Jodi H. Cohen; Tamar Z. Semerjian

2008-01-01

138

Media Coverage of Boys' and Girls' High School Ice Hockey in Minnesota.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports a study that compared the newspaper coverage of girls' and boys' high school hockey teams in Minnesota from November 1994 to March 1995. Researchers coded each newspaper article for sex, length, and photo types. Results indicated that boys' high school hockey received much more newspaper coverage than girls' high school hockey. (SM)

Woodcock, Amy Terhaar

1995-01-01

139

Support Based Measures Applied to Ice Hockey Scoring Summaries: Extended Version  

E-print Network

Hockey League (NHL), accurately identifying current lines for a team is difficult. The HLE algorithm uses fans with a tremendous amount of information and statistics about National Hockey League (NHL) players and teams. The demand for statistics about NHL hockey players has prompted web sites to provide detailed

Regina, University of

140

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table A Senior Thesis Submitted to the Department of  

E-print Network

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table A Senior Thesis Submitted to the Department 2 #12;Abstract We explore the existence of periodic orbits on a triangular air hockey table, also concerning more general triangles in section 3. 3 #12;Periodic Orbits in a Triangular Air Hockey Table

Umble, Ron

141

Review of typical ice hockey injuries. Survey of the North American NHL and Hockey Canada versus European leagues.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is considered to be one of the fastest and roughest of all sports. Prospective injury reports of the North American National Hockey League, the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association and of several European teams (UdSSR, CSSR, Sweden and Switzerland) are reviewed to evaluate the patterns, anatomic locations, circumstances and sequelae of ice hockey-related injuries. Although different injury reporting systems are used in North America and Europe, knee injuries (sprains of the collateral ligaments) accounted for the majority of games missed (40%), followed by injuries to the shoulder (dislocation, acromio-clavicular joint separation, rotator cuff strain and tears, 20%), the groin (15%), and the back (10%). Mandatory helmets and face masks reduced the number of facial and eye injuries to a quarter from 1972 to 1983. The frequency of only concussion but also cervical spine lesions is increasing. The prevention of head, face, eye and neck injuries should mainly be accomplished by enforcement of current rules (mandatory helmets with face masks) and institution of new rules. Improvement in protective equipment would also have the effect of decreasing the frequency of injuries. Ice hockey is the fastest team sport and involves both finesse and controlled aggression. It is also considered to be one of the roughest of all sports. In recent years, ice hockey has grown tremendously in popularity, not only in the United States and in Canada but also in many European countries [1]. The number of both professional and amateur hockey players has increased with the expanding interest in the sport around the world [1].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7610390

Biasca, N; Simmen, H P; Bartolozzi, A R; Trentz, O

1995-05-01

142

Shock Separation and Dead-Zone Formation from Detonations in an Internal Air-Well Geometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we report on measurements of dead-zone formation due to shock separation from detonations attempting to corner-turn in an internal air-well geometry. This geometry is also known as a ``hockey-puck'' configuration. These measurements were performed on detonations in LX-17 and PBX9502 using time sequence radiography to image the event with surface contact timing pins as an additional diagnostic. In addition to an open corner in the high-explosive component we also examined the effects of steel defining the corner. In these experiments we find a long lived dead-zone consisting of shocked explosive that persists to very late times. Data and numerical modeling will be presented in addition to a comparison with previous work using an external air well. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

Molitoris, John; Andreski, Henry; Garza, Raul; Batteux, Jan; Vitello, Peter; Souers, Clark

2007-06-01

143

Fundamental Field Hockey, Physical Education: 5551.21.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course outline is a guide for teaching fundamental skills, rules, and strategies of field hockey in grades 7-12. The course format includes lectures, skills practice, audiovisual materials, demonstrations, and competitions that focus on mastery of skills, rules, game situations, and safety procedures. Course content includes the following:…

Lowe, Billye J.

144

Athlete Violence and Aggression in Hockey and Interpersonal Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because male athletes have exhibited aggressive tendencies in a variety of settings, they may be at risk for using violence both within and beyond their sports involvement. Five former college\\/professional hockey players were interviewed to determine their perspec- tives on the nature of aggression and violence in sports competition as well as in social relationships. The informants were asked about

NICK T. PAPPAS; PATRICK C. MCKENRY

145

Gender in ice hockey: women in a male territory.  

PubMed

This study investigates how female ice hockey players describe and explain their situation within as well as outside their sport. Information was obtained by semi-structured interviews with female ice hockey players. The results were analyzed in a gender perspective where the main starting point was the concepts of different levels of power relations in society developed by Harding and applied to sports by Kolnes (the symbolic, structural, and individual level). The study shows that the players appeared to share the traditional views of men and women. They also described gender differences in terms of financial and structural conditions as well as differences in ice hockey history. Even though the players described structural inequalities, they were quite content with their situation and the differences in conditions were not considered when they explained the gender differences in ice hockey performance. At the individual level, the players considered themselves different from other women and appeared to share the traditional views of femininity and masculinity. It has been suggested that performance of a sport traditionally associated with the other sex might alter the traditional view of men and women; however, our results lend little support to this suggestion. PMID:17490454

Gilenstam, K; Karp, S; Henriksson-Larsén, K

2008-04-01

146

Protecting the Market from ``Hockey Stick'' Pricing: How  

E-print Network

Protecting the Market from ``Hockey Stick'' Pricing: How the Public Utility Commission of Texas Method offers a way of guarding against price gouging while keeping the door open to appropriate scarcity at the Market Oversight Division of the Public Utility Commission of Texas in Austin. His duties involve

Oren, Shmuel S.

147

A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

Fogel, Curtis

2010-01-01

148

Concussions in Ice Hockey: Is it Time to Worry?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent events have highlighted the issue of concussions in sports, particularly in ice hockey. A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by acceleration forces imparted on the brain. Symptoms vary in severity from confusion and minor headaches to loss of consciousness and amnesia. Concussions are a common sports injury that have been associated with neurological and psychiatric impairment,

Khizer Amin

2012-01-01

149

Parenting, achievement strategies and satisfaction in ice hockey.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to understand adolescent players' satisfaction as a function of parenting styles, players' achievement strategies, and their norm breaking behavior. Finnish 14- and 16-year-old ice-hockey players (n=1018) completed a questionnaire measuring their achievement strategies (SAQ; Nurmi, Salmela--Aro & Haavisto, 1995 b), as well as scales of norm breaking and satisfaction, prepared for the present study. The parents (n=979) filled in scales measuring their parenting styles (CRPR; Pulkkinen, 1996) and attitudes towards norm breaking. Results revealed that players from authoritative families who showed a high level of mastery-orientation expressed high satisfaction in playing ice hockey. Results also showed negative associations between authoritative parenting and both task irrelevant and norm breaking behavior. Parents with parental stress and those with authoritarian parenting styles showed positive attitudes to norm breaking behavior, and players from authoritarian and parental stress homes showed norm breaking behavior in ice hockey. There was no association between norm breaking behavior and player satisfaction. Our results contribute to the planning of a coaching system that serves more educational and developmental purposes, and that encourages the desire to play ice hockey as a hobby. PMID:16179023

Juntumaa, Birgitta; Keskivaara, Pertti; Punamäki, Raija-Leena

2005-10-01

150

Injuries in Youth Hockey. On-Ice Emergency Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the nature and frequency of injuries in youth hockey (which range from musculoskeletal injuries to life-threatening emergencies). Overall injury rates have decreased, but there is an increase in head, neck, and spine injuries. Those injuries that are serious demand prompt, skillful attention. A comprehensive format for on-ice management is…

Blanchard, Bradford M.; Castaldi, Cosmo R.

1991-01-01

151

Time–motion analysis of elite field hockey, with special reference to repeated-sprint activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Limited information exists about the movement patterns of field-hockey players, especially during elite competition. Time–motion analysis was used to document the movement patterns during an international field-hockey game. In addition, the movement patterns of repeated-sprint activity were investigated, as repeated-sprint ability is considered to be an important fitness component of team-sport performance. Fourteen members of the Australian men's field-hockey team

Matt Spencer; Steven Lawrence; Claire Rechichi; David Bishop; Brian Dawson; Carmel Goodman

2004-01-01

152

The Effect of Caffeine Ingestion on Field Hockey Skill Performance Following Physical Fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the impact of caffeine ingestion on field hockey skill performance following high-intensity fatigue. Thirteen male hockey players (mean age = 21.1 ± 1.2 years) performed hockey sprint dribble and ball handling tests at rest and after a bout of total body fatigue (90% maximal capacity) following caffeine (5mg kg) or placebo ingestion. Sprint dribble times were slower

Michael J. Duncan; Samantha Taylor; Mark Lyons

2012-01-01

153

Personal risk factors for injury in recreational and old?timer ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this research was to determine factors related to injury for adult recreational and old?timer hockey players. Four hundred and thirty?one players from 5 hockey leagues were followed during an entire hockey season. Risk factor regression equations for facial injury, body contact injury, sprain\\/strain injury, and all injuries were determined using multiple logistic regression analysis. A total of

Donald C. Voaklander; L. Duncan Saunders; H. Arthur Quinney

1998-01-01

154

Intentional versus unintentional contact as a mechanism of injury in youth ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundYouth ice hockey injury rates and mechanisms have been described by various classification systems. Intentional versus unintentional contact was used to classify mechanisms of injuries. All injuries (n=247) in one youth hockey programme over a 5-year period were recorded and included in the analysis.PurposeTo evaluate youth ice hockey injuries and compare programmes that allow body checking versus programmes that do

Scott R Darling; Douglas E Schaubel; John G Baker; John J Leddy; Leslie J Bisson; Barry Willer

2011-01-01

155

Rink-side management of ice hockey related injuries to the face, neck, and chest.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is a fast paced sport with unique injury potential. A covering physician must be prepared to acutely manage injuries to the face, neck, and chest that are not common in orthopedic practice. Injuries about the face seen in ice hockey include facial fractures, lacerations, and eye and dental injuries. Neck trauma can result in lacerations and neurologic injury. Commotio cordis and sudden cardiac death are potentially fatal conditions seen in ice hockey. This review details the appropriate acute management of these conditions for the physician covering an ice hockey game. Knowledge of these conditions and appropriate rink-side management can be potentially life-saving. PMID:24344616

Cohn, Randy M; Alaia, Michael J; Strauss, Eric J; Feldman, Andrew F

2013-01-01

156

National survey of spinal injuries in hockey players.  

PubMed Central

There has been an alarming increase in the number of spinal injuries in hockey players. Between 1976 and 1983, 42 were reported to the Committee on Prevention of Spinal Injuries due to Hockey. The median age of the injured players was 17 years. Of the 42 players 28 had spinal cord injuries, and 17 of them had complete paralysis below the vertebral level of the injury. Strikes from behind and collisions with the boards were common mechanisms of injury. Many of the players had suffered a burst fracture of the cervical spine following a blow to the top of the helmet when the neck was slightly flexed. The committee studied a number of possible etiologic factors and made several recommendations regarding prevention. League officials, coaches, players and equipment manufacturers can all play a role in prevention. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6704840

Tator, C. H.; Edmonds, V. E.

1984-01-01

157

Effects of multiple concussions on retired national hockey league players.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to understand the meanings and lived experiences of multiple concussions in professional hockey players using hermeneutic, idiographic, and inductive approaches within an interpretative phenomenological analysis. The interviewer was an athlete who had suffered multiple concussions, and the interviewees were five former National Hockey League athletes who had retired due to medically diagnosed concussions suffered during their careers. The men discussed the physical and psychological symptoms they experienced as a result of their concussions and how the symptoms affected their professional careers, personal relationships, and quality of life. The former professional athletes related these symptoms to the turmoil that is ever present in their lives. These findings are of interest to athletes, coaches, sport administrators, family members, sport psychology practitioners, and medical professionals, as they highlight the severity of short- and long-term effects of concussions. PMID:23535975

Caron, Jeffrey G; Bloom, Gordon A; Johnston, Karen M; Sabiston, Catherine M

2013-04-01

158

Personal food systems of male college hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to improve the understanding of processes involved in food choice and dietary change by examining how members of a college men's ice hockey team experienced the multiple factors influencing their food choices. The study employed a theory-guided, grounded-theory approach, participant observation, and open-ended interviews with ten team members. Field notes and transcripts were analysed using the constant

L. Ryan Smart; Carole A. Bisogni

2001-01-01

159

2005a), Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance, Geophys  

E-print Network

[1] The ‘‘hockey stick’ ’ shaped temperature reconstruction of Mann et al. (1998, 1999) has been widely applied. However it has not been previously noted in print that, prior to their principal components (PCs) analysis on tree ring networks, they carried out an unusual data transformation which strongly affects the resulting PCs. Their method, when tested on persistent red noise, nearly always produces a hockey stick shaped first principal component (PC1) and overstates the first eigenvalue. In the controversial 15th century period, the MBH98 method effectively selects only one species (bristlecone pine) into the critical North American PC1, making it implausible to describe it as the ‘‘dominant pattern of variance’’. Through Monte Carlo analysis, we show that MBH98 benchmarks for significance of the Reduction of Error (RE) statistic are substantially under-stated and, using a range of cross-validation statistics, we show that the MBH98 15th century reconstruction lacks statistical significance. Citation: McIntyre, S., and R. McKitrick (2005), Hockey sticks, principal components, and

Stephen Mcintyre; Ross Mckitrick

160

Blood Money: Incentives for Violence in NHL Hockey  

E-print Network

The level of violence in the National Hockey League (NHL) reached its highest point in 1987 and has reduced somewhat since then, although to levels much larger than before the first team expansions in 1967. Using publicly available information from several databases 1996-2007, the incentives for violence in North American ice hockey are analyzed. We examine the role of penalty minutes and more specifically, fighting, during the regular season in determining wages for professional hockey players and team-level success indicators. There are substantial returns paid not only to goal scoring skills but also to fighting ability, helping teams move higher in the playoffs and showing up as positive wage premia for otherwise observed low-skill wing players. These estimated per-fight premia, depending on fight success ($10,000 to $18,000), are even higher than those for an additional point made. By introducing a ”fight fine ” of twice the maximum potential gain ($36,000) and adding this amount to salaries paid for the team salary cap (fines would be 6.7 % of the team salary cap or the average wage of two players), all involved would have either little or no incentives to allow fighting to continue.

John P. Haisken-denew; Matthias Vorell

2008-01-01

161

Sport selection in under-17 male roller hockey.  

PubMed

Characteristics of 32 international and 41 local under-17 (U-17) (14.5-16.5 years) roller hockey players were considered in the context of discrimination by competitive level using training history, anthropometry, skeletal maturation, and several laboratory and field performance tests. More international (42%) than local (22%) players were advanced in maturity status. International players had slightly less hockey experience (years), but had more practice sessions and match time (minutes) during the season. Local players were shorter and attained better performance in the 25-m dash, while international players performed better in sit-ups, ball throw and 20-m shuttle run. The fatigue index derived from the Wingate anaerobic test was higher among local players, while peak torques of knee extension and flexion were greater in international players. Stepwise discriminant function correctly classified 85% of players by competitive level based on grip strength, ratio of eccentric and concentric knee extension, number of training sessions, playing time and fatigue index. The results suggested an interaction among strength, anaerobic fitness and training plus game time as factors in discriminating international from local level players and by inference in the selection and development of youth roller hockey players. PMID:22867426

Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel J; Vaz, Vasco; Simões, Filipe; Carvalho, Humberto M; Valente-Dos-Santos, João; Figueiredo, António J; Pereira, Vanildo; Vaeyens, Roel; Philippaerts, Renaat; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Malina, Robert M

2012-12-01

162

Comment on ``Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance'' by S. McIntyre and R. McKitrick  

E-print Network

Comment on ``Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance'' by S. McIntyre and R; published 21 October 2005. Citation: Huybers, P. (2005), Comment on ``Hockey sticks, principal components

Huybers, Peter

163

MONT 105N Analyzing Environmental Data Study/Discussion Questions on "The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars"  

E-print Network

MONT 105N ­ Analyzing Environmental Data Study/Discussion Questions on "The Hockey Stick of journals? 2. Exactly what is the "hockey stick" graph? How was it originally generated? When and where did the original conclusions? 3. When and why did the "hockey stick" become such a contentious issue in the climate

Little, John B.

164

Blood Money: A Study of the Effect of Fighting on Player Salaries in the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fighting has been a centerpiece of the National Hockey League since it was formed in 1917. Although rules have been introduced regulating the physicality of play in the NHL, fighting is demanded—and encouraged—by fans and players alike. Fans have long been attracted to the violence of professional hockey; previous studies have documented that professional hockey is a “blood sport” that

Matthew G. Morton

2011-01-01

165

Posterior approach for arthroscopic treatment of posterolateral impingement syndrome of the ankle in a top-level field hockey player  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case history of a 25-year-old field hockey player, a member of the German National Field Hockey Team, is presented. The patient could not remember any specific ankle injury, but since the World Indoor Championship in February 2003, he experienced significant but diffuse pain around the posterior ankle, especially while loading the forefoot in hockey training and competition. For 2

Heinz Lohrer; Sabine Arentz

2004-01-01

166

Site-specific bone mass differences of the lower extremities in 17-year-old ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bone mass in the pelvis and lower extremities in young ice hockey players, and especially to investigate whether any differences are related to the type and magnitude of weightbearing loading and muscle stress. The ice hockey group consisted of 22 boys (mean age 16.9±0.3) from three different ice hockey teams training

P. Nordström; R. Lorentzon

1996-01-01

167

Predictors of Injury in Ice Hockey PlayersA Multivariate, Multidisciplinary Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighty-six male high school ice hockey players partic ipated in this prospective study to determine both the incidence of injury in high school ice hockey and the influence of physical, situational, and psychosocial fac tors. Physical factors included height, weight, vision, previous injuries, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and injuries present at the time of screening evaluations. Situational factors examined were level of

Aynsley M. Smith; Michael J. Stuart; Diane M. Wiese-Bjornstal; Chris Gunnon

1997-01-01

168

Lesbian Erotics at Women's Hockey: Fans, Flashing, and the Booby Orrs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article analyzes a public breast flashing event that occurred during the women's ice hockey tournament at the OutGames\\/Western Cup Lesbigay athletic event in 2007. Employing a postfoundational perspective, I first contextualize the ice hockey subculture of the team called the Booby Orrs, outlining some of our history, norms, and context. I then tell the particular story that leads to

Judy Davidson

2009-01-01

169

The Golden Years of Indian Hockey: ‘We Climb the Victory Stand’  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article seeks to explore the glory years of Indian hockey. Now almost forgotten in the wake of the enormity of cricket's stellar popularity in India, it was hockey and not cricket that had provided India the most conspicuous sporting success on the world stage in the first half of the 20 century. The article delves into the history of

Boria Majumdar

2008-01-01

170

Hockey New Year's Eve in Canada: Nation-Making at the Montreal Forum  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although mostly forgotten by the public-at-large, hockey aficionados consider the 1975 New Year's Eve fixture between the Montreal Canadiens and the Soviet Central Army one of the greatest contests in ice hockey history. As the only game of ‘Super Series 76' played in Canada, much of the nation's citizenry turned its attention to the Montreal Forum on the last evening

Tim Elcombe

2010-01-01

171

Laterality differences in elite ice hockey: An investigation of shooting and catching orientations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the implications of motor asymmetries for skilled performers in dynamic, time-constrained, team-based activities such as ice hockey. Three studies were conducted to examine laterality differences in ice hockey. Study 1 investigated laterality distributions across three leagues of increasing calibre. Among skating players, skill level was related to changes in laterality patterns based on position, while a

Jared Puterman; Joseph Baker; Jörg Schorer

2010-01-01

172

The Estimated Rents of a Top-Flight Men’s College Hockey Player  

Microsoft Academic Search

We employed a methodology similar to Brown (1993, 1994) to estimate the marginal revenue generated by a top-flight NCAA Division I college hockey player. We added to the extant literature in two ways. First, the previous research focused on college basketball and football players. This is the first attempt to consider the case of college hockey players. Second, previous research

Leo H. Kahane

2012-01-01

173

Missing the Hockey Season? Come to this Briefing! Understanding Changes in Earth's Temperature and Climate  

E-print Network

Missing the Hockey Season? Come to this Briefing! Understanding Changes in Earth's Temperature and Climate: The Science Behind the Hockey Stick Graphs and Model Simulations LUNCHEON BRIEFING Wednesday, April 6 11:30 a.m., Room 253, Senate Russell Building The NHL may have cancelled their season

174

Sources of Stress in NCAA Division I Women Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of stress experienced by NCAA Division I women ice hockey players. Individual interviews consisting of open-ended questions were carried out with six elite athletes. The results of the qualitative analysis identified three main categories of stress: (a) hockey pressures, which included the transition to and the advantages of playing Division

Tracy L. Heller; Gordon A. Bloom; Graham I. Neil; John H. Salmela

2005-01-01

175

Development of hydroacoustical techniques for the monitoring and classification of benthic habitats in Puck Bay: Modeling of acoustic waves scattering by seagrass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Puck Bay is an area of high species biodiversity belonging to the Coastal Landscape Park of Baltic Sea Protected Areas (BSPA) and is also included in the list of the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and covered by the protection program "Natura 2000". The underwater meadows of the Puck Bay are important for Europe's natural habitats due to their role in enhancing the productivity of marine ecosystems and providing shelter and optimal feeding conditions for many marine organisms. One of the dominant species comprising the underwater meadows of the Southern Baltic Sea is the seagrass Zostera marina. The spatial extent of underwater seagrass meadows is altered by pollution and eutrophication; therefore, to properly manage the area one must monitor its ecological state. Remote acoustic methods are useful tools for the monitoring of benthic habitats in many marine areas because they are non-invasive and allow researchers to obtain data from a large area in a short period of time. Currently there is a need to apply these methods in the Baltic Sea. Here we present an analysis of the mechanism of scattering of acoustic waves on seagrass in the Southern Baltic Sea based on the numerical modeling of acoustic wave scattering by the biological tissues of plants. The study was conducted by adapting a model developed on the basis of DWBA (Distorted Wave Born Approximation) developed by Stanton and Chu (2005) for fluid-like objects, including the characteristics of the Southern Baltic seagrass. Input data for the model, including the morphometry of seagrass leaves, their angle of inclination and the density plant cover, was obtained through the analysis of biological materials collected in the Puck Bay in the framework of a research project financed by the Polish Government (Development of hydroacoustic methods for studies of underwater meadows of Puck Bay, 6P04E 051 20). On the basis of the developed model, we have analyzed the dependence of the target strength of a single seagrass leaf and the strength of surface scattering from the orientation of the leaves relative to the direction of incidence of the acoustic wave. The influences of the acoustic properties of the biological plant tissue and acoustic frequency were also examined in regards to these dependencies. It was found that the target strength of the seagrass leaf depends on the angle of inclination relative to the direction of incidence of the acoustic wave; furthermore, target strength was found to be sensitive to the frequency of the wave and the value of density and speed sound contrasts. These parameters also affect the nature of the oscillations depending on the target strenght to the angle of inclination of sea grass leaves. We have also performed a prognosis of surface scattering strength variability for sea grass meadows of Zostera marina in Puck Bay. The results obtained in this study are important for interpretation of acoustic measurements carried out in the underwater meadows of Puck Bay. Thus, they contribute to the development of non-invasive and fast acoustic monitoring methods.

Raczkowska, A.; Gorska, N.

2012-12-01

176

THE COMPETITIVE DEMANDS OF ELITE MALE RINK HOCKEY  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to simulate the activity pattern of rink hockey by designing a specific skate test (ST) to study the energy expenditure and metabolic responses to this intermittent high-intensity exercise and extrapolate the results from the test to competition. Six rink hockey players performed, in three phases, the 20-metre multi-stage shuttle roller skate test, a tournament match and the ST. Heart rate was monitored in all three phases. Blood lactate, oxygen consumption, ventilation and respiratory exchange ratio were also recorded during the ST. Peak HR was 190.7±7.2 beats · min?1. There were no differences in peak HR between the three tests. Mean HR was similar between the ST and the match (86% and 87% of HRmax, respectively). Peak and mean ventilation averaged 111.0±8.8 L · min?1 and 70.3±14.0 L · min?1 (60% of VEmax), respectively. VO2max was 56.3±8.4 mL · kg?1 · min?1, and mean oxygen consumption was 40.9±7.9 mL · kg?1 · min?1 (70% of VO2max). Maximum blood lactate concentration was 7.2±1.3 mmol · L-1. ST yielded an energy expenditure of 899.1±232.9 kJ, and energy power was 59.9±15.5 kJ · min?1. These findings suggest that the ST is suitable for estimating the physiological demands of competitive rink hockey, which places a heavy demand on the aerobic and anaerobic systems, and requires high energy consumption. PMID:24744488

Del Valle, M.E.; Egocheaga, J.; Linnamo, V.; Fernandez, A.

2013-01-01

177

The competitive demands of elite male rink hockey.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to simulate the activity pattern of rink hockey by designing a specific skate test (ST) to study the energy expenditure and metabolic responses to this intermittent high-intensity exercise and extrapolate the results from the test to competition. Six rink hockey players performed, in three phases, the 20-metre multi-stage shuttle roller skate test, a tournament match and the ST. Heart rate was monitored in all three phases. Blood lactate, oxygen consumption, ventilation and respiratory exchange ratio were also recorded during the ST. Peak HR was 190.7±7.2 beats · min(-1). There were no differences in peak HR between the three tests. Mean HR was similar between the ST and the match (86% and 87% of HRmax, respectively). Peak and mean ventilation averaged 111.0±8.8 L · min(-1) and 70.3±14.0 L (·) min(-1) (60% of VEmax), respectively. VO2max was 56.3±8.4 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1), and mean oxygen consumption was 40.9±7.9 mL · kg(-1) (·) min(-1) (70% of VO2max). Maximum blood lactate concentration was 7.2±1.3 mmol · L-1. ST yielded an energy expenditure of 899.1±232.9 kJ, and energy power was 59.9±15.5 kJ · min(-1). These findings suggest that the ST is suitable for estimating the physiological demands of competitive rink hockey, which places a heavy demand on the aerobic and anaerobic systems, and requires high energy consumption. PMID:24744488

Yagüe, Pl; Del Valle, M E; Egocheaga, J; Linnamo, V; Fernández, A

2013-09-01

178

Playing hockey, riding motorcycles, and the ethics of protection.  

PubMed

Ice hockey and motorcycle riding are increasingly popular activities in the United States that are associated with high risks of head and facial injuries. In both, effective head and facial protective equipment are available. Yet the debates about safety policies regarding the use of head protection in these activities have taken different forms, in terms of the influence of epidemiological data as well as of the ethical concerns raised. I examine these debates over injury prevention in the context of leisure activities, in which the public health duty to prevent avoidable harm must be balanced with the freedom to assume voluntary risks. PMID:23078472

Bachynski, Kathleen E

2012-12-01

179

Title and sub-title: A Review of Field Hockey Injuries and Countermeasures for Prevention  

E-print Network

Hockey is an ancient sport thought to be the forerunner of all ‘stick and ball ’ games. The modern game of hockey is played in 132 countries around the world and is second only in popularity to soccer as a team sport. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that injuries in hockey are numerous and can be serious. Most serious injuries result from being struck by the stick or the ball. Overuse injuries to the ankles and lower back are also frequently reported. Players aged between 10 and 19 years account for 50 % of all Victorian hospital emergency department presentations for hockey injuries. Most injuries presenting to hospitals are to the upper limb (mostly injuries to the hand and forearm), face (mostly struck by stick or ball) and lower limb (mostly ankle, foot and knee injuries). Injuries to the eyes are infrequent, although tend to be severe. The aim of this report is to critically review both formal research literature and informal sources of information in the context of the available epidemiological data, which describe preventive strategies and countermeasures to hockey injury. Countermeasures for preventing hockey injuries with some evidence to support effectiveness include: enforcing rules aimed at preventing dangerous use of the hockey stick and careless play of the ball; modifying rules

Shauna Sherker; Erin Cassell; Shauna Sherker; Erin Cassell

2002-01-01

180

Ice Hockey Injuries in a Japanese Elite Team: A 3-Year Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Context: As the Asian Ice Hockey League gradually expands and becomes more competitive, ice hockey-related injuries may increase. However, no reports have been published on ice hockey injuries in Japan, including the method of injury and the daily supervision of the players during the regular season. Objective: To prospectively study the incidence, types, and mechanisms of ice hockey injuries in an elite Japanese ice hockey team. Design: Prospective observational cohort study design. Setting: An elite ice hockey team, Tokyo, Japan. Patients or Other Participants: Ninety-four players during the 2002–2005 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): Data were collected for 3 consecutive seasons using an injury reporting form. Results: The overall game injury rate was 74.3 per 1000 player-game hours and 11.7 per 1000 player-game hours for injuries resulting in any time loss. The overall practice injury rates were 11.2 per 1000 player-practice hours and 1.1 per 1000 player-practice hours for injuries resulting in any time loss. Forwards had the highest rate of injury, followed by defensemen and then goalkeepers. Contusions were the most common injury, followed by strains, lacerations, and sprains. Conclusions: Most injuries among Japanese ice hockey players occurred during games. Game or play intensity may influence the injury rate during games. PMID:19295967

Kuzuhara, Kenji; Shimamoto, Hideki; Mase, Yasuyoshi

2009-01-01

181

Personality and Injury Risk Among Professional Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

Abstract: Background: Although much is known about risk for athletic injury, research on the roles of individual differences in personality and temperament on athletic injury has lagged. We hypothesized that professional athletes with high sensation-seeking and extraversion scores, and with low effortful control scores, would experience more injuries over the course of a season, would have more severe injuries, and would miss more total days of play. Methods: Prospective design with questionnaire report at time one and injury tracking throughout an 18-week athletic season. Setting: Professional hockey team in the United States. Participants: Eighteen professional hockey players (ages 21-33). Measurement: Players completed self-report personality (Sensation-Seeking Scale, Form V) and temperament (the Adult Temperament Questionnaire) measures. Quantity and severity of injury, as well as playing time missed, were tracked for 18 weeks. Results: On average, players experienced almost 6 injuries causing a loss of 10 playing days through the season. Those players scoring high on Boredom Susceptibility and Total Sensation-Seeking incurred more total injuries. Those scoring high on temperamental neutral perceptual sensitivity suffered more severe injuries. Conclusions: Athletes who suffered more injuries reported a preference for stimulating environments and boredom with non-stimulating environments. Injury severity was not correlated with sensation-seeking but was related to temperamental perceptual sensitivity. Implications for identification of injury-prone athletes, pre-injury training, and post-injury treatment are discussed. PMID:21483186

Osborn, Zachary H; Blanton, Paul D; Schwebel, David C

2009-01-01

182

Checking in: an analysis of the (lack of) body checking in women's ice hockey.  

PubMed

Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not incorporate checking, female ice hockey players are not afforded the same opportunity to flourish as men and experience bodily agency, which results in continued male domination of the game, therefore, indirectly reinforcing a gender hierarchy in hockey and society. PMID:22978197

Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

2012-09-01

183

The effect of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players.  

PubMed

[Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players. PMID:24764628

Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

2014-04-01

184

Reducing injury risk from body checking in boys' youth ice hockey.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is an increasingly popular sport that allows intentional collision in the form of body checking for males but not for females. There is a two- to threefold increased risk of all injury, severe injury, and concussion related to body checking at all levels of boys' youth ice hockey. The American Academy of Pediatrics reinforces the importance of stringent enforcement of rules to protect player safety as well as educational interventions to decrease unsafe tactics. To promote ice hockey as a lifelong recreational pursuit for boys, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the expansion of nonchecking programs and the restriction of body checking to elite levels of boys' youth ice hockey, starting no earlier than 15 years of age. PMID:24864185

Brooks, Alison; Loud, Keith J; Brenner, Joel S; Demorest, Rebecca A; Halstead, Mark E; Kelly, Amanda K Weiss; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; LaBotz, Michele; Martin, Stephanie S; Moffatt, Kody

2014-06-01

185

The Effect of a Complex Training Program on Skating Abilities in Ice Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players. PMID:24764628

Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

2014-01-01

186

Planets and Pucks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a simple activity designed to allow students to experimentally verify Kepler's second law, sometimes called the law of equal areas. It states that areas swept out by a planet as it orbits the Sun are equal for equal time intervals. (PR)

Brueningsen, Christopher; Krawiec, Wesley

1993-01-01

187

Effect of Mental Imagery Training &Tratak Kriya on Stopping of Penalty Strokes in Hockey  

E-print Network

Abstract- This study was determined to identify the effects of Mental Imagery Training &Tratak Kriya training on stopping the penalty stroke by goalkeeper in hockey.A total of 150 male hockey players from Delhi, whose average of stopping thepenalty stroke ranges from 3-5 out of 10 penalty strokes in 2 trials were selected. The subjects were further randomly divided into three groups

Tarun Routhan; Devender Singh Jaggi; Gaurav Negi

188

Still more spawner-recruitment curves: the hockey stick and its generalizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estimation of maximum reproductive rate using spawner-recruitment models involves extrapolating survival for very low spawner abundance. Existing spawner-recruitment curves often lead to biologically unreasonable extrapo- lations or are unable to model nondecreasing spawner-recruitment data adequately. One alternative is a piecewise linear spawner-recruitment model known as the hockey stick. We compare the fit of the Beverton-Holt with the hockey stick for

Nicholas J. Barrowman; Ransom A. Myers

2000-01-01

189

Injury Rates in House League, Select, and Representative Youth Ice Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

WILLER, B., B. KROETSCH, S. DARLING, A. HUTSON, and J. LEDDY. Injury Rates in House League, Select, and Representative Youth Ice Hockey. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 37, No. 10, pp. 1658-1663, 2005. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine injury rates in a youth ice hockey program over two seasons (2002-2004). Injury rates for age groups (4-18

BARRY WILLER; BETH KROETSCH; SCOTT DARLING; ALAN HUTSON; JOHN LEDDY

2005-01-01

190

Politics on Ice: The United States, the Soviet Union, and a Hockey Game in Lake Placid  

Microsoft Academic Search

:This paper explores the intersection of sport and politics by examining how and to what extent the 1980 US Men's Hockey Team's gold medal victory in Lake Placid was catapulted from the hockey arena to the political arena.Résumé:Le présent article jette un regard à l'intersection du sport et de la politique et examine comment la médaille d'or méritée en 1980

Donald E. Abelson

2010-01-01

191

High prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of asthma was studied in a ice hockey team compared with both a floor ball team and the Swiss population. Lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, asthma symptoms and exercise-induced asthma were measured in a cross-sectional prospective study. A positive response to the methacholine bronchial provocation test was found in 34.6% of the ice hockey players and 20.8%

J. D. Leuppi; M. Kuhn; C. Comminot; W. H. Reinhart

1998-01-01

192

Lung physiology at play: Hemoptysis due to underwater hockey  

PubMed Central

Hemoptysis can be a very concerning symptom, and the workup of a patient with hemoptysis may be expensive and invasive. Over the past decade, there has been increasing recognition of hemoptysis that occurs in highly trained athletes under conditions of extreme physical exertion and is explained by “pulmonary capillary stress failure”. This report highlights the physiological mechanisms of pulmonary capillary stress failure in the highly trained athlete, with emphasis on the predisposition to develop this condition in underwater sports. We describe the case of an otherwise healthy 34 year-old competitive underwater hockey player who reported hemoptysis following particularly strenuous games. We postulate that the hemoptysis was a result of the pulmonary capillary stress failure caused by the cumulative hemodynamic effects of a markedly elevated cardiac output, the increased central blood volume caused by the hydrostatic effects of submersion in water, and the negative intrathoracic pressure produced by voluntary diaphragmatic contractions.

Aversa, Meghan; Lapinsky, Stephen E.

2014-01-01

193

The Ice Hockey Injury An Interrupted Case Study  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The high school ice hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough and Rick, the star player, is slammed against the boards. Injured, he has to be  escorted from the ice. This interrupted case study follows Ricks health as it deteriorates over the next few hours. Students are presented with Rick’s symptoms and use their knowledge of anatomy and physiology to diagnose the problem. The case was developed for a one-semester animal physiology course taken mostly by sophomore and junior biology or general science majors. It could also be used in a freshman general biology course, anatomy and physiology course, or human physiology course for non-science majors.

Stephens, Phil

2004-01-01

194

NHL.com: The National Hockey League Web Site  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The NHL's official site is a good place to start for anyone interested in the professional version of Canada's national pastime. Unfortunately, the site doesn't contain an archive of boxscores and/or recaps of all games. However, extensive boxes and recaps are provided for the latest games. Updated statistics are available on a wide variety of team and individual variables, and information is available on the various teams. But what really makes this site interesting are the "Cool Shots" section (8 multimedia highlights from the previous week's play--archived back to the beginning of the season), and "Feature Files," a potpourri of information including weekly reviews, instruction, and special features highlighted by "A Day in the Life of the National Hockey League," a photo essay of the NHL on March 23, 1996.

195

ISBN 0-7731-0409-7Support Based Measures Applied to Ice Hockey Scoring Summaries: Extended Version  

E-print Network

Subject Areas: AI Applications, AI in Data Mining, AI in Multimedia We present the Hockey Line Extraction (HLE) Algorithm, which examines ice hockey scoring summaries in an attempt to determine a team’s lines. The players on a hockey team are divided into units called “lines ” that appear together on the ice. While many statistics are available on the Internet for hockey players and teams in the National Hockey League (NHL), accurately identifying current lines for a team is difficult. The HLE algorithm uses single link clustering, support based measures and positional information to identify lines of players. The HLE Algorithm and appropriate visualization techniques have been implemented in the Hockey Lines software that enables users to view relationships between players on a team. 1.

Bradley P. Kram; James A. Hall; Howard J. Hamilton; Bradley P. Kram; James A. Hall; Howard J. Hamilton; Ss A; Bradley P. Kram; James A. Hall; Howard J. Hamilton

2000-01-01

196

“Nación en el hielo: Hockey, History and the Troubled Construction of Identity in Canada, 1875-2010”  

Microsoft Academic Search

My CART 2011 Summer Grant tenure will be used to complete the research and writing of a c.25-page scholarly journal article entitled “Nación en el hielo: Hockey, History and the Troubled Construction of Identity in Canada, 1875-2010.” In December 2010, I was invited to contribute a new essay on ice hockey’s history and meaning in Canada, for a special Canadian

Andrew C. Holman

2011-01-01

197

Career/Life Transition Needs of National Hockey League Players and Career-Life Transition Needs of National Hockey League Players: Spouses Perspectives. Final Reports Prepared for the National Hockey League Players' Association.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two surveys were conducted regarding the career and life transition needs of National Hockey League (NHL) players and their spouses. The Professional Athletes' Career Transition Inventory was distributed to player representatives and members of eight NHL teams. Results revealed that 85 percent of players believed it important that help be provided…

Blann, Wayne; Zaichkowsky, Leonard

198

Proceedings from the Ice Hockey Summit on concussion: a call to action.  

PubMed

The objective of this proceedings is to integrate the concussion in sport literature and sport science research on safety in ice hockey to develop an action plan to reduce the risk, incidence, severity, and consequences of concussion in ice hockey. A rationale paper outlining a collaborative action plan to address concussions in hockey was posted for review two months prior to the Ice Hockey Summit: Action on Concussion. Focused presentations devoted specifically to concussion in ice hockey were presented during the Summit and breakout sessions were used to develop strategies to reduce concussion in the sport. This proceedings and a detailed scientific review (a matrix of solutions) were written to disseminate the evidence-based information and resulting concussion reduction strategies. The manuscripts were reviewed by the authors, advisors and contributors to ensure that the opinions and recommendations reflect the current level of knowledge on concussion in hockey. Six components of a potential solution were articulated in the Rationale paper and became the topics for breakout groups that followed the professional, scientific lectures. Topics that formed the core of the action plan were: metrics and databases; recognizing, managing and return to play; hockey equipment and ice arenas; prevention and education; rules and regulations; and expedient communication of the outcomes. The attendees in breakout sessions identified action items for each section. The most highly ranked action items were brought to a vote in the open assembly, using an Audience Response System (ARS). The strategic planning process was conducted to assess: Where are we at?; Where must we get to?; and What strategies are necessary to make progress on the prioritized action items? Three prioritized action items for each component of the solution and the percentage of the votes received are listed in the body of this proceedings. PMID:21756209

Smith, A; Stuart, M; Greenwald, R; Benson, B; Dodick, D; Emery, C; Finnoff, J; Mihalik, J; Roberts, W; Sullivan, C A; Meeuwisse, W

2011-07-01

199

Evaluation of the ThinkFirst Canada, Smart Hockey, brain and spinal cord injury prevention video  

PubMed Central

Objective: The ThinkFirst Canada Smart Hockey program is an educational injury prevention video that teaches the mechanisms, consequences, and prevention of brain and spinal cord injury in ice hockey. This study evaluates knowledge transfer and behavioural outcomes in 11–12 year old hockey players who viewed the video. Design: Randomized controlled design. Setting: Greater Toronto Minor Hockey League, Toronto Ontario. Subjects: Minor, competitive 11–12 year old male ice hockey players and hockey team coaches. Interventions: The Smart Hockey video was shown to experimental teams at mid-season. An interview was conducted with coaches to understand reasons to accept or refuse the injury prevention video. Main outcome measures: A test of concussion knowledge was administered before, immediately after, and three months after exposure to the video. The incidence of aggressive penalties was measured before and after viewing the video. Results: The number of causes and mechanisms of concussion named by players increased from 1.13 to 2.47 and from 0.67 to 1.22 respectively. This effect was maintained at three months. There was no significant change in control teams. There was no significant change in total penalties after video exposure; however, specific body checking related penalties were significantly reduced in the experimental group. Conclusion: This study showed some improvements in knowledge and behaviours after a single viewing of a video; however, these findings require confirmation with a larger sample to understand the sociobehavioural aspects of sport that determine the effectiveness and acceptance of injury prevention interventions. PMID:14693901

Cook, D; Cusimano, M; Tator, C; Chipman, M; Macarthur, C

2003-01-01

200

A model for predicting the evolution of damage in the plastic bonded explosive LX17  

E-print Network

and Boundary Conditions The initial conditions for all of the state variables are given by u, (x?t =0) =0 s?. (x?, t = 0) = 0 o?(x?, t = O)=0 'rtx in Q and on oQ (4. 9) where xq denotes the spatial coordinate within the body. On the external boundary K2... and Boundary Conditions The initial conditions for all of the state variables are given by u, (x?t =0) =0 s?. (x?, t = 0) = 0 o?(x?, t = O)=0 'rtx in Q and on oQ (4. 9) where xq denotes the spatial coordinate within the body. On the external boundary K2...

Seidel, Gary Don

2012-06-07

201

FLOOR HOCKEY RULES -MEN'S, WOMEN'S & CO-REC Each player must present his/her valid UMass UCard to participate in each and every intramural contest.  

E-print Network

FLOOR HOCKEY RULES - MEN'S, WOMEN'S & CO-REC Each player must present his/her valid UMass UCard the floor hockey sticks which are provided and wear a helmet at all times. Helmets will be provided to those, elbow pads, knee pads and mouth guards are optional, but strongly recommended (Plastic ice hockey shin

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

202

FLOOR HOCKEY RULES (revised 08/11) All participants are required to complete a waiver of liability form each year. All participants in intramural  

E-print Network

FLOOR HOCKEY RULES (revised 08/11) All participants are required to complete a waiver of liability. * Floor Hockey rules will be conducted under the NIRSA rules of the game with the following additions in Red. FLOOR HOCKEY RULES: PLAYERS: Each team shall consist of FIVE players on the floor (including

203

SnapShot: Visualization to Propel Ice Hockey Analytics Hannah Pileggi, Charles D. Stolper, J. Michael Boyle, and John T. Stasko, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-print Network

SnapShot: Visualization to Propel Ice Hockey Analytics Hannah Pileggi, Charles D. Stolper, J.Working closely with professional ice hockey analysts, we designed and built SnapShot, a system to integrate visualization into the hockey intelligence gathering process. SnapShot employs a variety of information

Stasko, John T.

204

Dear Minor Hockey Team(s): On behalf of the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre at UBC, we would like to invite your  

E-print Network

Dear Minor Hockey Team(s): On behalf of the Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre at UBC, we Hockey Tourney at UBC. We are looking for Atom, PeeWee, and Bantam Recreational Division teams. Here to: Doug Mitchell Thunderbird Sports Centre Thunderbirrr' Christmas Hockey Tourney at UBC 6066

Pulfrey, David L.

205

Many roads lead to Rome - Developmental paths to Olympic gold in men's field hockey.  

PubMed

Abstract This study examined the developmental sporting activities of the Olympic Champions 2012 in men's field hockey. The volume of organised practice/training and non-organised sporting leisure play in both field hockey and other sports through childhood, adolescence and adulthood was examined and compared between the Olympic Champions and (1) current national class players and (2) international medallists of one decade earlier. Analyses revealed that the Olympic Champions performed moderate volumes of organised field hockey practice/training throughout their career and attained their first international senior medal after accumulating 4393 ± 1389 practice/training hours, but they engaged in extensive other sporting activities during childhood and youth. It took them 18 ± 3 years of involvement to attain an international medal and they had engaged for 22 ± 3 years when winning the Olympic gold medal. The Olympic Champions did not differ from national class players in the amount of hockey-specific practice/training, but in greater amounts of organised involvement in other sports and later specialisation. They differed from the international medallists of one decade earlier in less increase of organised hockey-specific practice/training during adulthood and a longer period of involvement until attaining their first international medal. The sporting activities were characterised by sizeable interindividual variation within each subsample. The findings are reflected against the deliberate practice and Developmental Model of Sports Participation (DMSP) frameworks and are discussed with reference to the concept of long-term sustainability. PMID:24707887

Güllich, Arne

2014-11-01

206

Evaluation of anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests for talent identification in female field hockey.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to develop an effective testing battery for female field hockey by using anthropometric, physiological, and skill-related tests to distinguish between regional representative (Rep, n = 35) and local club level (Club, n = 39) female field hockey players. Rep players were significantly leaner and recorded faster times for the 10-m and 40-m sprints as well as the Illinois Agility Run (with and without dribbling a hockey ball). Rep players also had greater aerobic and lower body muscular power and were more accurate in the shooting accuracy test, p < 0.05. No significant differences between groups were evident for height, body mass, speed decrement in 6 x 40-m repeated sprints, handgrip strength, or pushing speed. These results indicate that %BF, sprinting speed, agility, dribbling control, aerobic and muscular power, and shooting accuracy can distinguish between female field hockey players of varying standards. Therefore talent identification programs for female field hockey should include assessments of these physical parameters. PMID:12955867

Keogh, Justin W L; Weber, Clare L; Dalton, Carl T

2003-06-01

207

Proprioception of Foot and Ankle Complex in Young Regular Practitioners of Ice Hockey, Ballet Dancing and Running  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the proprioception of the foot and ankle complex in regular ice hockey practitioners, runners, and ballet dancers. A total of 45 young people with different exercise habits formed four groups: the ice hockey, ballet dancing, running, and sedentary groups. Kinesthesia of the foot and ankle complex was measured in plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), inversion (IV), and eversion

Jing Xian Li; Dong Qing Xu; Blaine Hoshizaki

2009-01-01

208

Effects of a Four Week Plyometric Training Program on Measurements of Power in Male Collegiate Hockey Players: 1429  

Microsoft Academic Search

EFFECTS OF A FOUR WEEK PLYOMETRIC TRAINING PROGRAM ON MEASUREMENTS OF POWER IN MALE COLLEGIATE HOCKEY PLAYERS. Reyment, Corey M., Bonis, Megan E., Lundquist, Jacob C., Tice, Brent S. Effects of a Four Week Plyometric training Program on Measurements of Power in Male Collegiate Hockey Players. J. Undergrad. Kin. Res. 2006; 1(2): 44-62. The purpose of this study was to

Corey M. Reyment; Megan E. Bonis; Jacob C. Lundquist; Lance C. Dalleck; Jeffrey M. Janot

2007-01-01

209

“The More Things Change, the More They …”: Commentary During Women's Ice Hockey at the 2010 Olympic Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research uses textual analysis rooted in cultural studies to investigate how commentary constructed women hockey players during the 2010 Olympics, one of the biggest mediated sporting events in the world. Games were aired on NBC's cable affiliates during non-prime-time hours, a departure from previous Olympic studies. Hockey is a sport that is traditionally violent, and women are often viewed

Kelly Poniatowski; Marie Hardin

2012-01-01

210

The Brave New Hockey World: A Statistical Assessment of NHL Rule Changes Paramjit Gill and Stephen Welsh  

E-print Network

The Brave New Hockey World: A Statistical Assessment of NHL Rule Changes Paramjit Gill and Stephen scored in an NHL game. The Bayesian analysis is based on dyadic model formulation which includes bothBugs. Comparison between 2003-04 and 2005-06 seasons is made. 1. Introduction The National Hockey League (NHL) last

Gill, Paramjit

211

Neuropsychological factors related to college ice hockey concussions.  

PubMed

We analyzed data from 74 male collegiate hockey players. Each athlete's season began with a baseline administration of the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) neuropsychology test battery. Fourteen athletes sustained a sport-related head injury and were readministered the test to assess the impact of the injury. A significant decrease in performance (compared to baseline) on immediate and delayed word recall and designs followed the first concussion. Following a second sport-related concussion, the 4 affected athletes showed significant decrease in visual motor speed. Performance improved on 2 response speed measures (Ps < .01). More errors occurred during a visual processing/discrimination task and immediate recall of designs declined (Ps < .05). We discuss the results in light of recent work related to the impact of early-life concussions and head injury on late-life consequences, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and more immediate issues such as return-to-play decisions for athletes. PMID:24370620

Pedersen, Heather A; Ferraro, F Richard; Himle, Michael; Schultz, Caitlin; Poolman, Mark

2014-05-01

212

Testosterone, cortisol and anxiety in elite field hockey players.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to assess the change in the levels of testosterone and cortisol after victory and defeat in male field hockey players during an important tournament. In the beginning of the game series, the players were ranked very closely to achieve (for the first time) the championship rising to The Honor Division-A, the highest status national category. The first game resulted in a 7-4 victory, the second game resulted in a 6-1 victory, and the third game resulted in a 1-2 defeat. As expected, there were changes in testosterone levels after the competition, dropping in the game which ended in defeat, and rising slightly in the two games which ended in victory; there were also changes in cortisol levels, rising in the game which ended in defeat, and showing no variations in the games which ended in victory; correlational analyses congruently showed that defeat led to rises in cortisol whereas victory led to rises in testosterone; anticipatory somatic anxiety was related to cortisol levels prior to games, and physical exertion during competition was related to the change in testosterone levels (suggesting an inhibitory effect) but not to the change in cortisol levels. Hence, this pattern of hormonal responses to a real-life dominance challenge complied with Mazur's (1985) [16] biosocial model of status and dominance motivation, by showing that testosterone and cortisol are linked to victory and defeat in a theoretically predictable fashion. PMID:23743274

Aguilar, Raúl; Jiménez, Manuel; Alvero-Cruz, José R

2013-07-01

213

Audio enabled information extraction system for cricket and hockey domains  

E-print Network

The proposed system aims at the retrieval of the summarized information from the documents collected from web based search engine as per the user query related to cricket and hockey domain. The system is designed in a manner that it takes the voice commands as keywords for search. The parts of speech in the query are extracted using the natural language extractor for English. Based on the keywords the search is categorized into 2 types: - 1.Concept wise - information retrieved to the query is retrieved based on the keywords and the concept words related to it. The retrieved information is summarized using the probabilistic approach and weighted means algorithm.2.Keyword search - extracts the result relevant to the query from the highly ranked document retrieved from the search by the search engine. The relevant search results are retrieved and then keywords are used for summarizing part. During summarization it follows the weighted and probabilistic approaches in order to identify the data comparable to the k...

Saraswathi, S; B., Sai Vamsi Krishna; S, Suresh Reddy

2010-01-01

214

Patterns of ephedra and other stimulant use in collegiate hockey athletes.  

PubMed

This study examined trends in stimulant use and attitudes toward use among American collegiate hockey athletes. All 139 players in one college hockey conference completed a comprehensive questionnaire. Over half of the athletes (51.8%) confirmed stimulant use before a hockey game or practice. About half of the respondents (48.5%) reported having used ephedra at least one time to improve athletic performance. Additionally, 17.4% reported using pseudoephedrine to improve performance in the 30 days prior to survey administration. Over half (55.4%) were aware of the recent national ban on ephedra. Fifty-nine percent stated the national ban made them less likely to use ephedra products. The majority of athletes began use prior to college. Coaches, athletic trainers, and team physicians should be aware of athletes' patterns of stimulant use. Improved educational efforts directed at younger athletes are necessary to deter abuse of metabolic stimulants. PMID:17342884

Bents, Robert T; Marsh, Erik

2006-12-01

215

A physical profile of elite female ice hockey players from the USA.  

PubMed

Despite impressive numbers of hockey participants, there is little research examining elite female ice hockey players. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the physical characteristics of elite female ice hockey players who were trying out for the 2010 US Women's Ice Hockey team. Twenty-three women participated in the study and were evaluated for body mass (kilograms), height (centimeters), age (years) vertical jump (centimeters), standing long jump (centimeters), 1RM front squat (kilograms), front squat relative to body mass (percent), 1RM bench press (kilograms), bench press relative to body mass (percent), pull-ups, and body composition (percent body fat). The athletes in this sample were 24.7 years of age (SD = 3.1) and 169.7 cm tall (SD = 6.9); on average, they weighed 70.4 kg (SD = 7.1) and reported 15.8% body fat (SD = 1.9). Mean vertical jump height was 50.3 cm (SD = 5.7) and standing long jump was 214.8 cm (SD = 10.9). Mean 1RM for the upper body strength (bench press) was 65.3 kg (SD = 12.2) (95.1 ± 15.5% of body mass), and 1RM for lower body (front squat) was 88.6 kg (SD = 11.2) (127.7 ± 16.3% of body mass). This study is the first to report the physical characteristics of elite female ice hockey players from the USA. Data should assist strength and conditioning coaches in identifying talent, testing for strengths and weaknesses, comparing future teams to these indicators, and designing programs that will enhance the performance capabilities of female ice hockey athletes. PMID:21804420

Ransdell, Lynda B; Murray, Teena

2011-09-01

216

Lesbian erotics at women's hockey: fans, flashing, and the Booby Orrs.  

PubMed

This article analyzes a public breast flashing event that occurred during the women's ice hockey tournament at the OutGames/Western Cup Lesbigay athletic event in 2007. Employing a postfoundational perspective, I first contextualize the ice hockey subculture of the team called the Booby Orrs, outlining some of our history, norms, and context. I then tell the particular story that leads to our fans flashing their breasts as we finally scored some goals. I end with my analysis of this event: how a public nude display of sexualized women's breasts in a lesbian-coded public space prompted a resistant sporting moment, at least contingently. PMID:19598052

Davidson, Judy

2009-01-01

217

The past, present, and future of hockey-stick-shaped liquid crystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recently, the liquid crystalline materials with a bent-core mesogen have attracted attentions because their interesting properties such as polarity and biaxiality of the mesophase. There are several types of bent-core mesogenic structures have been reported, for instance, banana-shaped, V-shaped molecules, boomerang-shaped, hockey stick-shaped, and Yshaped molecules. In this study, the liquid crystals and the reactive mesogens with the hockey-stick shaped mesogens will be described concerning with the structure-property relationship.

Choi, E.-Joon

2014-02-01

218

“Isn't He a Good Guy?”: Constructions of Whiteness in the 2006 Olympic Hockey Tournament  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given sports’ valued cultural position, scholars argue that images of sports stars provide viewers with guidance about how “good” men should behave (Whannel, 2002). Drawing from cultural studies theories on race in sports, this study explores representations of White hockey players in the 2006 Winter Olympics television commentary. The authors suggest that the commentary provides lessons to viewers by way

Kelly Poniatowski; Erin Whiteside

2012-01-01

219

Bilateral distal tibial stress fractures in a healthy field-hockey goalkeeper.  

PubMed

Stress fractures occurring within the lower limbs are relatively common in athletes and military personnel. The specific bones affected are often predictable when the patient's activities are considered. We present an unusual case of bilateral distal tibial stress fractures sustained while playing as a goalkeeper in field hockey, in an otherwise healthy 46-year-old woman. PMID:25188931

O'Neill, Barry James; Ryan, Katie; Burke, Neil G; Moroney, Paul John

2014-01-01

220

Intercollegiate ice hockey injuriesA case for uniform definitions and reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

The lack of agreement on definition of terms and con sistent reporting strategies in sports epidemiology com plicates the determination of injury rates in any sport. This study describes Canadian Intercollegiate ice hockey injuries over a 6-year period by following a standardized reporting strategy and clearly defined ter minology. Overall, the data show that the knee is most susceptible to

Robert L. Pelletier; William J. Montelpare; Ryan M. Stark

1993-01-01

221

A test of motor skill-specific action embodiment in ice-hockey players.  

PubMed

To further our understanding of the role of the motor system in comprehending action-related sentences, we compared action experts (athletes) to visual experts (fans) and novices when responding with an action-specific effector (either hand or foot). These conditions allowed inferences about the degree and specificity of embodiment in language comprehension. Ice hockey players, fans and novices made speeded judgments regarding the congruence between an auditorily presented sentence and a subsequently presented picture. Picture stimuli consisted of either hockey or everyday items. Half of these pictures 'matched' the action implied in the preceding sentence. Further, the action in these images involved either primarily the hand or the foot. For everyday items, action-matched items were responded to faster than action-mismatched items. However, only the players and fans showed the action-match effect for hockey items. There were no consistent effector-stimuli compatibility effects, nor skill-based interactions with compatibility, suggesting that the action-match effect was not based on motor ability per se, but rather a construction of the action based on knowledge or visual experience with the hockey related sentences. PMID:24818535

Ong, Nicole T; Lohse, Keith R; Chua, Romeo; Sinnett, Scott; Hodges, Nicola J

2014-07-01

222

Experiential Learning in the Introductory Class: The Role of Minor League Hockey in Teaching Social Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To convince my students they are surrounded by social psychology, we attended a minor league hockey game. During the next class period I asked students to write a brief paragraph about their experiences. From those paragraphs I chose four reoccurring themes to analyze from a social psychological perspective. My introductory classes and I benefited…

Forrest, Krista D.

2005-01-01

223

Table Hockey: Attack or Linking? Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with an Autistic Boy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores some issues that might arise when one considers having a table hockey game in the therapy room, and describes how an autistic boy, aged four-and-a-half when starting treatment, used that game. The unfolding process from withdrawal to separateness, intersubjectivity and playfulness is illustrated by the progress of two years of…

Nilsson, May

2009-01-01

224

Design, manufacturing, and test status of the CRBRP hockey stick steam generators  

Microsoft Academic Search

The history of the development of the hockey stick steam generator, currently being designed and fabricated for use in the CRBRP, is traced back to its inception in the late 1960's. Additional supporting development, which has formed the basis for the current CRBR design, is presented. The design requirements for the CRBR steam generators are outlined and the basic design,

A. F. Little; A. L. Bashford

1977-01-01

225

Comparison of Dynamic Balance in Collegiate Field Hockey and Football Players Using Star Excursion Balance Test  

PubMed Central

Purpose The preliminary study aimed to compare dynamic balance between collegiate athletes competing or training in football and hockey using star excursion balance test. Methods A total thirty university level players, football (n = 15) and field hockey (n = 15) were participated in the study. Dynamic balance was assessed by using star excursion balance test. The testing grid consists of 8 lines each 120 cm in length extending from a common point at 45° increments. The subjects were instructed to maintain a stable single leg stance with the test leg with shoes off and to reach for maximal distance with the other leg in each of the 8 directions. A pencil was used to point and read the distance to which each subject's foot reached. The normalized leg reach distances in each direction were summed for both limbs and the total sum of the mean of summed normalized distances of both limbs were calculated. Results There was no significant difference in all the directions of star excursion balance test scores in both the groups. Additionally, composite reach distances of both groups also found non-significant (P=0.5). However, the posterior (P=0.05) and lateral (P=0.03) normalized reach distances were significantly more in field hockey players. Conclusion Field hockey players and football players did not differ in terms of dynamic balance. PMID:24427482

Bhat, Rashi; Moiz, Jamal Ali

2013-01-01

226

Checking in: An Analysis of the (Lack of) Body Checking in Women's Ice Hockey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper, we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not…

Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

2012-01-01

227

Methodological issues in qualitative sport research: Participant observation among hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although reflexive descriptions of field research experiences are well represented in the literature, there are very few explicit accounts of doing fieldwork among athletes. This paper is a natural history of a participant observation study conducted among a group of minor league hockey players. Its purpose is to provide future sport ethnographers with an account of some field strategies and

Charles P. Gallmeier

1988-01-01

228

Performance Posting, Goal Setting, and Activity-Contingent Praise as Applied to a University Hockey Team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rate of legal body checking (hit rate) was targeted for change for each of two consecutive seasons for a university hockey team that had a chronic losing record. Following baseline recording (A), the interventions of publicly posted individual feedback (B), goal setting (C), and praise (D) were successively introduced \\

D. Chris Anderson; Charles R. Crowell; Mark Doman; George S. Howard

1988-01-01

229

Tracking and recognizing actions of multiple hockey players using the boosted particle filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a system that can automatically track multiple hockey players and simultaneously recognize their actions given a single broadcast video sequence, where detection is complicated by a pan- ning, tilting, and zooming camera. There are three contributions. Firstly, we use the Histograms of Ori- ented Gradients (HOG) to represent the players, and introduce a probabilistic framework to model

Wei-lwun Lu; Kenji Okuma; James J. Little

2009-01-01

230

Isokinetic muscular performance of the quadriceps in elite ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

On four occasions during a period of 17 months, iso kinetic maximum knee extensor output (peak torque and contractional work) and input (integrated electro myographic activity) during single and repetitive con tractions were measured in 10 male elite ice hockey players. The tests were performed in the middle and at the end of the competitive season, and after two off

Christer Johansson; Ronny Lorentzon; Axel R. Fugl-Meyer

1989-01-01

231

Development of the left ventricular hypertrophy and dilation in adolescent ice hockey players evaluated with echocardiography  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computerized echocardiography at rest was used to follow up the dynamics of left heart enlargement in adolescent ice hockey players aged 11 to 15 years. The first year of strength?endurance training did not lead to any remarkable change of echocardiographic parameters of the left heart ventricular size. A slight tendency to left ventricular hypertrophy appeared after 2 years of training,

Dušan Meško; Alexander Jurko; Mojmír Vrlík; Moniká Novomeská; Eugen Horniak; Dagmar Dzurenková

1993-01-01

232

Describing Strategies Used by Elite, Intermediate, and Novice Ice Hockey Referees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much is known about sport officials' decisions (e.g., anticipation, visual search, and prior experience). Comprehension of the entire decision process, however, requires an ecologically valid examination. To address this, we implemented a 2-part study using an expertise paradigm with ice hockey referees. Purpose: Study 1 explored the…

Hancock, David J.; Ste-Marie, Diane M.

2014-01-01

233

Trait Aggressiveness and Hockey Penalties: Predicting Hot Tempers on the Ice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies examining the validity of measures of trait aggressiveness either have been retrospective studies or have used laboratory aggression as the criterion behavior. Can a measure of trait aggressiveness predict nonlaboratory physical aggression? The Physical Aggression subscale of the Aggression Questionnaire was completed by 91 high school hockey players prior to the start of the season. At the end

Brad J. Bushman; Gary L. Wells

1998-01-01

234

Trait aggressiveness and hockey penalties: Predicting hot tempers on the ice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies examining the validity of measures of trait aggressiveness either have been retrospective studies or have used laboratory aggression as the criterion behavior. Can a measure of trait aggressiveness predict nonlaboratory physical aggression? The Physical Aggression subscale of the Aggression Questionnaire was completed by 91 high school hockey players prior to the start of the season. At the end

Brad J. Bushman; Gary L. Wells

1998-01-01

235

One for sure or three maybe - Empirical evidence for overtime play from Swiss ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to avoid too many tied games after playing the five-minute overtime period, the National Hockey League introduced two rule changes in the 1999-2000 season. First, a team that loses in overtime receives one point instead of zero points. Second, the number of skaters in overtime is reduced from five to four. The theoretical literature analyzing these rule changes

Egon Franck; Philipp Theiler

2008-01-01

236

The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule

Dennis W. Carlton; Alan S. Frankel; Elisabeth M. Landes

2004-01-01

237

And a Hockey Game Broke Out: Crime and Punishment in the NHL  

Microsoft Academic Search

We apply the economic theory of crime to the National Hockey League. We analyze a natural experiment in which games during the 1999--2000 season had either one or two referees. We determine the effect of the number of referees on both the number of penalties called and the number of rules infractions committed by players. The results indicate that increasing

Jac C. Heckelman; Andrew J. Yates

2003-01-01

238

The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on…

Carlton, Dennis W.; Frankel, Alan S.; Landes, Elisabeth M.

2004-01-01

239

The hockey-stick method to estimate evening dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) in humans.  

PubMed

The onset of melatonin secretion in the evening is the most reliable and most widely used index of circadian timing in humans. Saliva (or plasma) is usually sampled every 0.5-1 hours under dim-light conditions in the evening 5-6 hours before usual bedtime to assess the dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO). For many years, attempts have been made to find a reliable objective determination of melatonin onset time either by fixed or dynamic threshold approaches. The here-developed hockey-stick algorithm, used as an interactive computer-based approach, fits the evening melatonin profile by a piecewise linear-parabolic function represented as a straight line switching to the branch of a parabola. The switch point is considered to reliably estimate melatonin rise time. We applied the hockey-stick method to 109 half-hourly melatonin profiles to assess the DLMOs and compared these estimates to visual ratings from three experts in the field. The DLMOs of 103 profiles were considered to be clearly quantifiable. The hockey-stick DLMO estimates were on average 4 minutes earlier than the experts' estimates, with a range of -27 to +13 minutes; in 47% of the cases the difference fell within ±5 minutes, in 98% within -20 to +13 minutes. The raters' and hockey-stick estimates showed poor accordance with DLMOs defined by threshold methods. Thus, the hockey-stick algorithm is a reliable objective method to estimate melatonin rise time, which does not depend on a threshold value and is free from errors arising from differences in subjective circadian phase estimates. The method is available as a computerized program that can be easily used in research settings and clinical practice either for salivary or plasma melatonin values. PMID:24224578

Danilenko, Konstantin V; Verevkin, Evgeniy G; Antyufeev, Viktor S; Wirz-Justice, Anna; Cajochen, Christian

2014-04-01

240

Physiological correlates of skating performance in women's and men's ice hockey.  

PubMed

The purpose of the current investigation was to identify relationships between physiological off-ice tests and on-ice performance in female and male ice hockey players on a comparable competitive level. Eleven women, 24 ± 3.0 years, and 10 male ice hockey players, 23 ± 2.4 years, were tested for background variables: height, body weight (BW), ice hockey history, and lean body mass (LBM) and peak torque (PT) of the thigh muscles, VO2peak and aerobic performance (Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation [OBLA], respiratory exchange ratio [RER1]) during an incremental bicycle ergometer test. Four different on-ice tests were used to measure ice skating performance. For women, skating time was positively correlated (p < 0.05) to BW and negatively correlated to LBM%, PT/BW, OBLA, RER 1, and VO2peak (ml O2·kg(-1) BW(-1)·min(-1)) in the Speed test. Acceleration test was positively correlated to BW and negatively correlated to OBLA and RER 1. For men, correlation analysis revealed only 1 significant correlation where skating time was positively correlated to VO2peak (L O2·min(-1)) in the Acceleration test. The male group had significantly higher physiological test values in all variables (absolute and relative to BW) but not in relation to LBM. Selected off-ice tests predict skating performance for women but not for men. The group of women was significantly smaller and had a lower physiological performance than the group of men and were slower in the on-ice performance tests. However, gender differences in off-ice variables were reduced or disappeared when values were related to LBM, indicating a similar capacity of producing strength and aerobic power in female and male hockey players. Skating performance in female hockey players may be improved by increasing thigh muscle strength, oxygen uptake, and relative muscle mass. PMID:21785292

Gilenstam, Kajsa M; Thorsen, Kim; Henriksson-Larsén, Karin B

2011-08-01

241

Effectiveness of interventions to reduce aggression and injuries among ice hockey players: a systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background: The increasing incidence of injuries related to playing ice hockey is an important public health issue. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions designed to reduce injuries related to aggressive acts in ice hockey. Methods: We identified relevant articles by searching electronic databases from their inception through July 2012, by using Internet search engines, and by manually searching sports medicine journals, the book series Safety in Ice Hockey and reference lists of included articles. We included studies that evaluated interventions to reduce aggression-related injuries and reported ratings of aggressive behaviour or rates of penalties or injuries. Results: We identified 18 eligible studies. Most involved players in minor hockey leagues. Of 13 studies that evaluated changes in mandatory rules intended to lessen aggression (most commonly the restriction of body-checking), 11 observed a reduction in penalty or injury rates associated with rule changes, and 9 of these showed a statistically significant decrease. The mean number of penalties decreased by 1.2–5.9 per game, and injury rates decreased 3- to 12-fold. All 3 studies of educational interventions showed a reduction in penalty rates, but they were not powered or designed to show a change in injury rates. In 2 studies of cognitive behavioural interventions, reductions in aggressive behaviours were observed. Interpretation: Changes to mandatory rules were associated with reductions in penalties for aggressive acts and in injuries related to aggression among ice hockey players. Effects of educational and cognitive behavioural interventions on injury rates are less clear. Well-designed studies of multifaceted strategies that combine such approaches are required. PMID:23209118

Cusimano, Michael D.; Nastis, Sofia; Zuccaro, Laura

2013-01-01

242

The Canadian Hockey Player Problem: Cultural Reckoning and National Identities in American Collegiate Sport, 1947-80  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is a study in the social history of Canadian-American relations and it performs two functions. First, it traces the increasing presence of Canadian student athletes in American collegiate hockey, 1947-80, and the efforts of coaches, recruiters, administrators, and alumni to draw Canadians to US hockey programs. By the end of the 1950s Canadian student athletes dominated the American

Andrew C. Holman

2007-01-01

243

Telling Stories About Indigeneity and Canadian Sport: The Spectacular Cree & Ojibway Indian Hockey Barnstorming Tour of North America, 1928  

Microsoft Academic Search

In January and February 1928, 14 hockey-playing Natives from northeastern Ontario undertook a celebrated barnstorming tour of 17 cities and towns in the United States and Canada. Traveling by charter bus, the “Cree & Ojibway Indian Hockey Tour” was a well-promoted and cleverly-planned road trip that began in North Bay and swung through southwestern Ontario before it reached its real

Andrew C. Holman

2009-01-01

244

Changes in Homocysteine and 8-iso-PGF2a Levels in Football and Hockey Players After a Match  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the levels of homocysteine and 8-iso PGF2a in football and hockey players before and soon after a match, on the predisposition for development of atherosclerosis. We measured 8-iso-PGF2a and homocysteine in 21 football athletes aged 21.8 ± 3.7 years old and 18 hockey athletes 22.2 ± 3.3 years old, respectively. All

A. Papapanagiotou; I. Gissis; C. Papadopoulos; A. Souglis; G. C. Bogdanis; I. Giosos; A. Sotiropoulos

2011-01-01

245

Chronic Cough and Dyspnea in Ice Hockey Players After an Acute Exposure to Combustion Products of a Faulty Ice Resurfacer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to characterize pulmonary function and radiologic testing in ice hockey players after exposure to\\u000a combustion products of a faulty ice resurfacer. Our patients were 16 previously healthy hockey players who developed chronic\\u000a cough and dyspnea after exposure. Symptom questionnaires, pulmonary function tests (PFTs), bronchoprovocation testing, cardiopulmonary\\u000a exercise testing, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging, and

Erika S. Kahan; Ubaldo J. Martin; Steve Spungen; David Ciccolella; Gerard J. Criner

2007-01-01

246

Aggressive behavior in professional ice hockey: A cross-cultural comparison of North American and European born NHL players  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesThe current investigation examined the mediating role of an athlete's birthplace (e.g., North America, Europe) on the use of aggressive behavior in professional ice hockey. In doing so, the study attempts to uncover whether or not the use of aggressive behavior in professional ice hockey is better understood according to within-competition determinants (e.g., score differential) or should be explored in

Chris J. Gee; Larry M. Leith

2007-01-01

247

THE INCIDENCE OF LOW BACK PAIN IN NCAA DIVISION III FEMALE FIELD HOCKEY PLAYERS  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Background: The authors speculated that there may be an increased incidence of low back pain (LBP) in NCAA Division III female field hockey (FH) players. FH players may experience LBP for a variety of reasons including trauma from collisions or falls. Excluding these types of direct trauma, FH players may experience LBP due to excessive stress to spinal structures related to the forward flexed posture that predominates in field hockey. The authors speculated that because of the postural stresses inherent to field hockey there may be an increased incidence of LBP in this population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to survey NCAA Division III female FH players and an age matched control group to determine if field hockey participation results in an increased incidence of LBP. The anticipated finding of an increased incidence of LBP would provide a rationale for the development of prophylactic interventions for this population. Methods: Subjects: Female NCAA Division III FH players (n=90) ranging in age from 18–24 years old who participated in the 2008 season were surveyed in regards to the incidence of LBP. A female age-matched control group from Misericordia University (n=98) without a history of field hockey participation was also surveyed. Both groups of subjects completed a voluntary pen and paper survey on the incidence of LBP not related to menstruation. Questions included but were not limited to; whether a significant episode of LBP had been experienced, the mechanism or injury, the duration and nature/location of symptoms. Responses from both groups were anonymous and confidential. Results: There was no difference in the incidence of LBP between the female FH players and the control group (p=0.951). The incidence of LBP was 56% (50/90) in the female FH players and 55% (54/98) in the controls. There was no difference in pain characteristics including pain referral patterns between the 2 groups. However, survey responses revealed a similar mean age of onset of LBP for both groups (16.23 +/- 1.80 years of age for FH players and 16.45 +/- 2.12 years of age for controls). Conclusions: The data did not support the authors' speculation of a higher incidence of LBP in NCAA Division III female FH players compared to female age-matched controls. This suggests postures associated with field hockey do not appear to significantly increase the incidence of LBP in this population. However, the data revealed that females from both surveyed groups experienced an onset of LBP at a mean age of sixteen. Level of Evidence: 2b PMID:22666644

Pheasant, Steven; Lawrence, Kevin

2012-01-01

248

Annonceur/DJ pour les matchs de hockey des Carabins Prsentation des joueurs des deux quipes avant le dbut de la rencontre  

E-print Network

Annonceur/DJ pour les matchs de hockey des Carabins T�ches : Pr�sentation des joueurs des deux�r�t fort pour le hockey f�minin, particuli�rement les �quipes des Carabins �tre dynamique et d�montrer de l'aisance au micro. �tre disponible pour tous les matchs � domicile de hockey f�minin des Carabins

Charette, André

249

Combing Line and Point Correspondences to Calculate Homographies with Applications in Hockey Rink Registration  

E-print Network

The goal of this project is to explore the use of a combination of line and point correspondences to improve the computation of homography transformations. The rink registration aspect of the UBC Hockey Tracking System currently uses only keypoint matches between frames leaving the line information on the rink unutilized. The hypothesis is that use of line information will help make the homography calculation more robust, especially in a closeup situation where not many keypoints are visible. The current system uses the normalized DLT (Direct Linear Transform) algorithm to calculate homographies from point correspondences that are acquired using the Kanade-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) tracker. A RANSAC algorithm is used to prune outlier correspondences from the calculation. Both the DLT and RANSAC algorithms are extended to use line correspondences as well as points. Experimental results are presented for a simple chessboard image. Rink registration for the hockey system is not yet improved due to a weakness in the DLT algorithm regarding normalization. 1

Elan Dubrofsky

250

[Socialization on the role of the coach in minor league hockey].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the socialization model developed by Kenyon and McPherson (1973) to determine the degree of socialization of minor league hockey coaches. A questionnaire was administered to 333 current coaches and 175 former coaches from the Quebec City area. Results showed that the coaches' perception of their competence, the degree of watching professional hockey as a spectator, the material factors, and the influence of the peer group were positively associated with their degree of socialization; however, the influence of their own children on the decision to be a coach was negatively associated with their degree of socialization. Results also show that less than 30% of the variance was explained by the model. Different research strategies are suggested in order to better investigate the phenomenon. PMID:1655193

Spallanzani, C

1991-09-01

251

Poor peak dorsiflexor torque associated with incidence of ankle injury in elite field female hockey players.  

PubMed

This study set out to determine the incidence of ankle injuries amongst provincial female field hockey players in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), South Africa, during the 2004 field hockey season and relate this to their injury and playing profile, proprioceptive ability and peak isokinetic torque of the ankle plantar and dorsiflexor muscles. Players participating in the senior, U21 and U19/high school provincial A teams (n=47) detailed their hockey playing and training history and injuries sustained during the 2004 season. A subsample of injured and matched, uninjured controls (n=18) underwent anthropometric, proprioceptive and isokinetic testing. Incidence of injury in the 2004 season was 0.98 per player or 6.32 injuries per 1000 player/h(-1), with 25.5% of players (n=12) reporting injuries to the ankle joint. All ankle injuries occurred on artificial turf and 75% occurred during a match. Forwards and links that had been playing for six to seven years presented with the highest incidence of ankle injuries. Injured players were able to maintain balance on a proprioceptive board for 10.31+/-8.2 s versus 23.9+/-15.3 s in matched, uninjured controls (p=0.078). Both mean (27.4+/-5.5 Nm versus 32.7+/-4.7 Nm) and median (27.0, 23.0-31.5 versus 31.8, 30.0-35.1 Nm) peak isokinetic torque of the dorsiflexors of injured legs was significantly lower than in uninjured, contralateral legs of the injured players (p=0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Poor peak dorsiflexion torque in the injured leg was identified as a factor associated with ankle injury in this sample of injured, elite field hockey players. PMID:17560829

Naicker, Marlene; McLean, Michelle; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Peters-Futre, Edith M

2007-12-01

252

Habituation of 10-year-old hockey players to treadmill skating  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed changes in selected physiological and kinematic variables over 6 weeks of treadmill skating in an effort to understand the process of habituation to this novel training modality. Seven male, Atom-A hockey players who were injury-free and had no previous treadmill skating experience participated in the study. Players performed four 1-min skating bouts at progressively increasing speeds, each

Kelly L. Lockwood; Gail Frost

2007-01-01

253

Trends in North American Newspaper Reporting of Brain Injury in Ice Hockey  

PubMed Central

The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998–2000 and 2009–2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to ‘perception of risks’ and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

Cusimano, Michael D.; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W.; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

2013-01-01

254

THE ANXIETY LEVEL OF HOCKEY ATHLETES AS THE COMPETITION PROGRESSED By  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to examine if there was any significant difference in the level of cognitive anxiety, somatic anxiety and self-confidence of hockey players as the competition progressed from the semi-finals to the finals. The instrument, Competition State Anxiety Inventory-2 (Marten, Vealey & Burton, 1990), was a set of questionnaire consisting of 27 items equally divided into 3 sub-scales of

Mary Magdalene Teh

255

Bone properties in child and adolescent male hockey and soccer players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children and adolescents who train extensively in high-impact, weight-bearing activities have enhanced bone mineral density. The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone strength, as reflected by quantitative ultrasound (QUS, Sunlight Omniscence), of child (10–12 yrs old) and adolescent (14–16 yrs old) male soccer and hockey players in comparison with age-matched controls. The groups included 30 child (CH) and

Bareket Falk; Sarah Braid; Michael Moore; Matthew Yao; Phil Sullivan; Nota Klentrou

2010-01-01

256

Scheduling for the National Hockey League Using a Multi-objective Evolutionary Algorithm  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We describe a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm that derives schedules for the National Hockey League according to three objectives: minimising the teams' total travel, promoting equity in rest time between games, and minimising long streaks of home or away games. Experiments show that the system is able to derive schedules that beat the 2008-9 NHL schedule in all objectives simultaneously, and that it returns a set of schedules that offer a range of trade-offs across the objectives.

Craig, Sam; While, Lyndon; Barone, Luigi

257

The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches From The Front Lines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A central figure in the controversy over human-caused climate change has been The Hockey Stick, a simple, easy-to-understand graph my colleagues and I constructed to depict changes in Earth's temperature back to 1000 AD. The graph was featured in the high-profile Summary for Policy Makers of the 2001 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and it quickly became an icon in the debate over human-caused (anthropogenic) climate change. I will tell the story behind the Hockey Stick, using it as a vehicle for exploring broader issues regarding the role of skepticism in science, the uneasy relationship between science and politics, and the dangers that arise when special economic interests and those who do their bidding attempt to skew the discourse over policy-relevant areas of science. In short, I attempt to use the Hockey Stick to cut through the fog of disinformation that has been generated by the campaign to deny the reality of climate change. It is my intent, in so doing, to reveal the very real threat to our future that lies behind it.

Mann, M. E.

2011-12-01

258

Penalty corner routines in elite women's indoor field hockey: prediction of outcomes based on tactical decisions.  

PubMed

Indoor hockey is a highly competitive international sport, yet no research to date has investigated the key actions within this sport. As with outdoor field hockey, penalty corners represent one of the most likely situations in which goals can be scored. All 36 matches of the round-robin phase of the 2010-2011 England Hockey League Women's Premier Division 'Super Sixes' competition were analysed with the purpose of establishing which factors can predict the scoring of a goal using binary logistic regression analysis. Seventy-two (22.6%) of the 319 observed penalty corners resulted in a goal. The strongest predictor of scoring a goal was taking the penalty corner from the goalkeeper's right. Based on the odds ratio (OR), the odds of the attacking team scoring were 2.27 (confidence interval (CI) = 1.41-3.65) times higher with penalty corners taken from the goalkeeper's right as opposed to the left. Additionally, if the goalkeeper decided to rush to the edge of the circle, the odds of the attacking team failing to score were 2.19 (CI = 1.18-4.08) times higher compared to when the goalkeeper remained near the goal line. These results suggest that strategic decisions from the players and coaches have an important part to play in the success of penalty corners. Future research should investigate the impact of goalkeepers' movement and further examine the technical and tactical intricacies of penalty corners. PMID:23305340

Vinson, Don; Padley, Simon; Croad, Alison; Jeffreys, Mark; Brady, Abbe; James, David

2013-01-01

259

Reliability of a repeated-sprint test for field-hockey.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of a repeated-sprint test, specifically designed for field-hockey, as it was based directly on the time-motion analysis of elite level competition. The test consisted of 6 x 30-m over-ground sprints departing on 25s, with an active recovery (approximately 3.1-3.3 ms(-1)) between sprints. Ten highly trained, male, field-hockey players (mean+/-S.D.: age, 23+/-3 years; body mass, 78.1+/-7.1 kg) participated in this study. Following familiarisation, the subjects performed the repeated-sprint test on two occasions, 7 days apart. The reliability of the test variables was assessed by the typical error of measurement (TE). The total sprint time was very reliable (T(1): 26.79+/-0.76 s versus T2: 26.83+/-0.74 s), as the TE was 0.7% (95% CL, 0.5-1.2%). However, the percent sprint decrement was less reliable (T1: 5.6+/-0.9% versus T2: 5.8+/-1.0%), with the TE being 14.9% (95% CL, 10.8-31.3%). In summary, it is suggested that this field-hockey-specific, repeated-sprint test is very reliable when the results are presented as the total sprint time. PMID:16581293

Spencer, M; Fitzsimons, M; Dawson, B; Bishop, D; Goodman, C

2006-05-01

260

TRAINING-INDUCED CHANGES IN DRAG-FLICK TECHNIQUE IN FEMALE FIELD HOCKEY PLAYERS  

PubMed Central

The penalty corner is one of the most important goal plays in field hockey. The drag-flick is used less by women than men in a penalty corner. The aim of this study was to describe training-induced changes in the drag-flick technique in female field hockey players. Four female players participated in the study. The VICON optoelectronic system (Oxford Metrics, Oxford, UK) measured the kinematic parameters of the drag-flick with six cameras sampling at 250 Hz, prior to and after training. Fifteen shots were captured for each subject. A Wilcoxon test assessed the differences between pre-training and post-training parameters. Two players received specific training twice a week for 8 weeks; the other two players did not train. The proposed drills improved the position of the stick at the beginning of the shot (p < 0.05), the total distance of the shot (p < 0.05) and the rotation radius at ball release (p < 0.01). It was noted that all players had lost speed of the previous run. Further studies should include a larger sample, in order to provide more information on field hockey performance. PMID:24868116

Gomez, M.; Martin-Casado, L.; Navarro, E.

2012-01-01

261

Risk of injury associated with bodychecking experience among youth hockey players  

PubMed Central

Background: In a previous prospective study, the risk of concussion and all injury was more than threefold higher among Pee Wee ice hockey players (ages 11–12 years) in a league that allows bodychecking than among those in a league that does not. We examined whether two years of bodychecking experience in Pee Wee influenced the risk of concussion and other injury among players in a Bantam league (ages 13–14) compared with Bantam players introduced to bodychecking for the first time at age 13. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study involving hockey players aged 13–14 years in the top 30% of divisions of play in their leagues. Sixty-eight teams from the province of Alberta (n = 995), whose players had two years of bodychecking experience in Pee Wee, and 62 teams from the province of Quebec (n = 976), whose players had no bodychecking experience in Pee Wee, participated. We estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for injury and for concussion. Results: There were 272 injuries (51 concussions) among the Bantam hockey players who had bodychecking experience in Pee Wee and 244 injuries (49 concussions) among those without such experience. The adjusted IRRs for game-related injuries and concussion overall between players with bodychecking experience in Pee Wee and those without it were as follows: injury overall 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63 to 1.16); concussion overall 0.84 (95% CI 0.48 to 1.48); and injury resulting in more than seven days of time loss (i.e., time between injury and return to play) 0.67 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.99). The unadjusted IRR for concussion resulting in more than 10 days of time loss was 0.60 (95% CI 0.26 to 1.41). Interpretation: The risk of injury resulting in more than seven days of time loss from play was reduced by 33% among Bantam hockey players in a league where bodychecking was allowed two years earlier in Pee Wee compared with Bantam players introduced to bodychecking for the first time at age 13. In light of the increased risk of concussion and other injury among Pee Wee players in a league where bodychecking is permitted, policy regarding the age at which hockey players are introduced to bodychecking requires further consideration. PMID:21690221

Emery, Carolyn; Kang, Jian; Shrier, Ian; Goulet, Claude; Hagel, Brent; Benson, Brian; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; McAllister, Jenelle; Meeuwisse, Willem

2011-01-01

262

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collison and Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-13

263

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision and Speeds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-13

264

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2006-01-13

265

LAUER, LARRY L., Ph. D. Playing Tough and Clean Hockey: Developing Emotional Management Skills to Reduce Individual Player Aggression. (2005)  

E-print Network

Aggression in youth ice hockey is prevalent and has many negative consequences including the possibility of injury (Widmeyer & McGuire, 1993). Multiple antecedents lead to aggression (Bushman & Anderson, 2001), however, emotions and related cognitions are often the precursor. Very few attempts have been made to control aggressive behavior in sport. Therefore, the Playing Tough and Clean Hockey Program is a nine session program created to teach youth ice hockey players emotional management skills to reduce aggressive behavior while continuing to play physical hockey. Four youth ice hockey players participated in a season long (30 or more games per participant) single-subject multiple baseline AB (baseline, program) design study. The study had two purposes, (1) examine the program’s influence on the emotional control, emotional toughness, and aggressive behavior of participants, and, (2) to conduct an evaluation of the program’s effectiveness. It was hypothesized that participants would have enhanced emotional control and toughness (i.e., ability to respond positively in an adverse situation) and would exhibit fewer acts of aggression following the program’s implementation. Participants completed post-game reports

Directed Dr; Daniel Gould

266

Heirs to Tom Brown’s School Days: Ralph Henry Barbour, Arthur Stanwood Pier and the Elite School Hockey Story before World War I  

Microsoft Academic Search

My CART Summer Grant application proposes to complete the research and writing of a c.35-page scholarly book chapter. This chapter is titled “Heirs to Tom Brown’s School Days: Ralph Henry Barbour, Arthur Stanwood Pier and the Elite School Hockey Story before World War I,” one of five chapters (plus introduction and epilogue) in my book manuscript called The Hockey Boys:

Andrew C. Holman

2010-01-01

267

Using Revealed and Stated Preference Data to Estimate the Demand and Consumption Benefits of Sporting Events: An Application to National Hockey League Game Trips  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the demand for hockey game trips among metropolitan and non-metropolitan residents of Alberta, Canada. Using data on both revealed and stated preference game trip behaviour from a telephone survey conducted throughout Alberta, we estimate the effect of ticket prices, team quality, arena amenities, and capacity on the latent demand for NHL hockey. We find that lower ticket

John C. Whitehead; Bruce K. Johnson; Daniel S. Mason; Gordon J. Walker

2009-01-01

268

THE ROLE OF AEROBIC CAPACITY IN HIGH-INTENSITY INTERMITTENT EFFORTS IN ICE-HOCKEY  

PubMed Central

The primary objective of this study was to determine a relationship between aerobic capacity (V.O2max) and fatigue from high-intensity skating in elite male hockey players. The subjects were twenty-four male members of the senior national ice hockey team of Poland who played the position of forward or defence. Each subject completed an on-ice Repeated-Skate Sprint test (RSS) consisting of 6 timed 89-m sprints, with 30 s of rest between subsequent efforts, and an incremental test on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory, the aim of which was to establish their maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max). The analysis of variance showed that each next repetition in the 6x89 m test was significantly longer than the previous one (F5,138=53.33, p<0.001). An analysis of the fatigue index (FI) calculated from the times recorded for subsequent repetitions showed that the value of the FI increased with subsequent repetitions, reaching its maximum between repetitions 5 and 6 (3.10±1.16%). The total FI was 13.77±1.74%. The coefficient of correlation between V.O2max and the total FI for 6 sprints on the distance of 89 m (r =–0.584) was significant (p=0.003). The variance in the index of players’ fatigue in the 6x89 m test accounted for 34% of the variance in V.O2max. The 6x89 m test proposed in this study offers a high test-retest correlation coefficient (r=0.78). Even though the test is criticized for being too exhaustive and thereby for producing highly variable results it still seems that it was well selected for repeated sprint ability testing in hockey players.

Roczniok, R.; Maszczyk, A.; Pietraszewski, P.; Zajac, A.

2014-01-01

269

Time-motion analysis of elite field hockey during several games in succession: a tournament scenario.  

PubMed

International field hockey tournaments may require teams to play three games within a period of four days. Therefore, there is potential for residual fatigue to affect the movement patterns of players during subsequent games. The purpose of this study was to document changes in time-motion analysis of 14 elite male field hockey players during three games within a period of four days during an international tournament. In addition, the nature of and any changes in repeated-sprint activity were investigated using a criteria of a minimum of three sprints with a mean recovery duration between sprints of < 21 s. The percent of total game time spent standing significantly increased across all three games (7.4+/-.2, 11.2+/-2.7 and 15.6+/-5.6%, respectively, P<0.05). Conversely, the percent time spent jogging significantly decreased from game 1 to game 2 and from game 1 to game 3 (40.5+/-7.3, 34.8+/-7.4 and 29.4+/-5.7%, respectively, P<0.05). Furthermore, the percent time in striding significantly increased from game 1 to game 3 and from game 2 to game 3 (4.1+/-1.3, 5.1+/-0.9 and 5.8+/-1.4%, respectively. P<0.05). Changes in mean motion frequency and duration were recorded across games for the motions of standing, striding and sprinting. The frequency of exercise bouts that met the criteria for 'repeated-sprint' decreased across the three games (17, 11 and 8, respectively). In summary, the results suggest that when elite field hockey players play three games within four days there are significant changes in time-motion analysis. PMID:16602166

Spencer, M; Rechichi, C; Lawrence, S; Dawson, B; Bishop, D; Goodman, C

2005-12-01

270

International field hockey players perform more high-speed running than national-level counterparts.  

PubMed

This study compared the activity profile of national and international male field hockey athletes. Sixteen players (mean (±SD) age, stature, and body mass: 22 ± 4 y, 178 ± 8 cm, and 78 ± 9 kg, respectively) competing in the national-level Australian Hockey League (AHL) and 16 players [mean (±SD) age, stature, and body mass: 27 ± 4 y, 179 ± 5 cm, and 77 ± 5 kg, respectively] competing in the international Champions Trophy (CT) tournament participated in this study. Global positioning systems assessed total distance (TD), meters per minute (m·min(-1)), and high-speed running distance (HSR; >4.17 m·s(-1)). Differences in multistage fitness test performance, movement between competition, positions, and halves were assessed using effect size and percent difference ±90% confidence intervals. The CT players had a 10.1% greater multistage fitness test, 13.9% and 42.0% more TD and HSR, respectively, than AHL. During CT, strikers performed 10.1 ± 7.4% less HSR than midfielders and 26.6 ± 8.2% more HSR than defenders. The AHL defenders covered less TD and HSR distance compared with strikers and midfielders (8.1 ± 3.6% and 8.4 ± 2.6%; 36.1 ± 11.1% and 51.5 ± 12.1%, respectively). The AHL strikers, midfielders, and defenders (19.9 ± 8.8%, 32.1 ± 7.9%, and 30.3 ± 10.7%, respectively), all performed less HSR distance than their CT counterparts. Finally, TD decreased from the first to second halves across all positions (6.1-7.5%) in both competitions. International competition increases the running profile of hockey players, with greater HSR at the elite level and positional differences including decreased running during the second half in both competitions. PMID:22446668

Jennings, Denise H; Cormack, Stuart J; Coutts, Aaron J; Aughey, Robert J

2012-04-01

271

Neck injuries presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999 for ice hockey, soccer, and American football  

PubMed Central

Objective: To examine the number and rate of neck injuries in the community as a whole for ice hockey, soccer, and American football by analysing data from patients presenting to emergency departments in the United States from 1990 to 1999. Methods: Data compiled for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission were used to generate estimates for the total number of neck injuries and the more specific diagnoses of neck fractures, dislocations, contusions, sprains, strains, and lacerations occurring nationally from 1990 to 1999. These data were combined with yearly participation figures to generate rates of injury presenting to emergency departments for each sport. Results: There were an estimated 5038 neck injuries from ice hockey, 19 341 from soccer, and 114 706 from American football. These could be broken down as follows: 4964 contusions, sprains, or strains from ice hockey, 17 927 from soccer, and 104 483 from football; 105 neck fractures or dislocations from ice hockey, 214 from soccer, and 1588 from football; 199 neck lacerations for ice hockey, 0 for soccer, and 621 for football. The rates for total neck injuries and combined neck contusions, sprains, or strains were higher for football than for ice hockey or soccer in all years for which data were available. Conclusion: The rate of neck injury in the United States was higher in football than in ice hockey or soccer in the time period studied. PMID:15793079

Delaney, J; Al-Kashmiri, A

2005-01-01

272

Bidirectional reflectance spectroscopy 7. The single particle phase function hockey stick relation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The measured volume-average single particle angular scattering functions of a large number of types of particle of interest for planetary regoliths in the visible-near-IR wavelength region can be represented to a reasonable approximation by two-parameter, double Henyey-Greenstein functions. When the two parameters of this function are plotted against one another they are found to be inversely correlated and lie within a restricted zone shaped like a hockey stick within the parameter space. The centroid of the zone is a curve that can be represented by a simple empirical equation. The wide variety of types of particles used to construct the plot implies that this equation may represent most of the particles found in regoliths. This means that when modeling the bidirectional reflectance of a regolith it may be possible to reduce the number of parameters necessary to specify the reflectance, and also to characterize the entire single particle phase function from observations at phase angles less than 90°. Even if the hockey stick relation has a finite width, rather than being a line, it restricts the parameter space that must be searched when fitting data. The curve should also be useful for forward modeling particle phase functions.

Hapke, Bruce

2012-11-01

273

"I Went to a Fight the Other Night and a Hockey Game Broke Out"  

PubMed Central

Background: The current study explored the relationship between fighting behavior and passage of time, across games and seasons, in an attempt to assess if violent behavior in hockey is impulsive or intentional. Hypothesis: Before engaging in fighting behavior, players assess the utility of their actions and thus will fight less when the game is on the line (third period) and when champions are crowned (postseason). Methods: An archival exploration utilizing open access databases from multiple Internet sources. Results: During the 2010-2011 National Hockey League (NHL) season, players were significantly less likely to be involved in a fight as the game was coming to a close than in its early stages. In addition, data from the past 10 NHL seasons showed that players were significantly more violent in preseason games than during the regular season. They were also least likely to be involved in a fight during the postseason. Conclusion: The converging evidence suggests that players take into account the penalties associated with fighting and are less likely to engage in violence when the stakes are high, such as at the end of a game or a season. This implies, in turn, that major acts of aggression in the league are more likely to be calculated rather than impulsive. The findings suggest that a more punitive system should diminish fighting behavior markedly. PMID:24427418

Goldschmied, Nadav; Espindola, Samantha

2013-01-01

274

Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: Evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players  

SciTech Connect

We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and smoking status. Environmental concentrations varied from 1.6 to 131.5 parts per million (ppm). We examined the absorption/exposure relationship using a simple linear regression model. In low CO exposure levels, physical exercise lowered the alveolar CO concentration. However, we noted that for each 10 ppm of CO in the ambient air, the players had adsorbed enough CO to raise their carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels by 1 percent. This relationship was true both for smokers and non-smokers. We suggest that an average environmental concentration of 20 ppm of CO for the duration of a hockey game (90 minutes) should be reference limit not to be exceeded in indoor skating rinks.

Levesque, B.; Dewailly, E.; Lavoie, R.; Prud'Homme, D.; Allaire, S. (Centre hospitalier de l'Universite Laval, Quebec City (Canada))

1990-05-01

275

Aneurysmal Bone Cyst in a Female Collegiate Field Hockey Player: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present the case of an intercollegiate field hockey player with an aneurysmal bone cyst of the femur and the clinical decision making necessary in the evaluation, management, surgical intervention, and positive outcome of this athlete. Background: A 21-year-old field hockey player presented with signs and symptoms typical of a deep thigh contusion. She had no history of direct or indirect trauma, infection, or previous injury. Differential Diagnosis: Aneurysm, bone cyst, chondroma, giant cell tumor, osteochondroma, osteosarcoma, osteoid osteoma. Treatment: When her symptoms persisted beyond 6 months despite conservative care, she underwent radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and bone scan, which revealed a lesion in the right femur. At surgery, the lesion was diagnosed as an aneurysmal bone cyst, and it was excised by an incisional x-ray-guided biopsy followed by curettage and bone grafting. Uniqueness: The aneurysmal bone cyst presented as a typical thigh strain or deep contusion during the athlete's training and conditioning season. After all forms of conservative management proved ineffective, the athlete was referred to her physician. A detailed history and physical examination demonstrated no underlying musculoskeletal pathology coinciding with the athlete's symptoms. Conclusions: Increased clinical awareness is necessary when conservative management fails to resolve an athletic injury in an appropriate length of time. Proper diagnostic tools are essential in determining the pathology of the injury and whether surgical intervention is needed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3. PMID:16558615

Berry, David C.; Barton, Julie; Deivert, Richard G.

2000-01-01

276

1 year test-retest reliability of ImPACT in professional ice hockey players.  

PubMed

The Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) battery is widely used to assess neurocognitive outcomes following sports-related concussion. The purpose of this study was to examine the 1 year test-retest reliability of ImPACT in a multilingual sample of professional hockey players. A total of 305 professional hockey players were tested 1 year apart using ImPACT. Reliable change confidence intervals were calculated and test-retest reliability was measured using Pearson and Intraclass correlation coefficients. Results indicated that the 1-year test-retest reliabilities for the Visual Motor and Reaction Time Composites ranged from low to high (.52 to .81). In contrast, 1-year test-retest reliabilities for the Verbal and Visual Memory Composites were low (.22 to .58). The 1-year test-retest results provided mixed support for the use of Visual Motor and Reaction Time Composites in select samples; in contrast, the Verbal and Visual Memory Composites may not be sensitive to clinical change. PMID:24345194

Bruce, Jared; Echemendia, Ruben; Meeuwisse, Willem; Comper, Paul; Sisco, Amber

2014-01-01

277

Somatotype characteristics of male sprinters, basketball, soccer, and field hockey players.  

PubMed

In an effort to describe the physique associated with regular involvement in sports activity, the somatotypes of a group of 51 elite male athletes comprising sprinters (n = 10), basketball (n = 12), soccer (n = 15), and field hockey (n = 14) players, and 11 male nonathletes were studied. The subjects' physiques were assessed using the Health-Carter anthropometric somatotype method. Analysis of variance and Newman-Keuls post hoc method were used to test for significant differences among the mean somatotype ratings of the groups. The findings indicated that the nonathletes (3.5) were significantly more endomorphic (P less than 0.05) than the soccer players (2.5) and sprinters (2.4). The sprinters (3.6) and basketball players (3.7) had markedly higher ectomorphic ratings (P less than 0.05) as compared with the hockey players (2.0). The mesomorphic component did not differentiate the groups. The differences observed among the groups which could be attributed to genetic and environmental influences reflect the variability in the morphological characteristics of athletes and nonathletes. PMID:4077363

Toriola, A L; Salokun, S O; Mathur, D N

1985-12-01

278

Effects of Carbohydrate Intake Before and During An Ice Hockey Game on Blood and Muscle Energy Substrates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Study of the effect of a supplemental carbohydrate intake for seven elite ice hockey players before and during a game demonstrated that the supplement could result in less glycogen usage per distance skated, which had important implications for athletes who may participate in more than one game a day. (Author/CB)

Simard, Clermont; And Others

1988-01-01

279

Proprioception of foot and ankle complex in young regular practitioners of ice hockey, ballet dancing and running.  

PubMed

This study examined the proprioception of the foot and ankle complex in regular ice hockey practitioners, runners, and ballet dancers. A total of 45 young people with different exercise habits formed four groups: the ice hockey, ballet dancing, running, and sedentary groups. Kinesthesia of the foot and ankle complex was measured in plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), inversion (IV), and eversion (EV) at 0.4 degrees /s using a custom-made device. The results showed the following: (1) significantly better perceived passive motion sense in PF/DF was found as compared with the measurements in IV/EV within each group (P < .01); (2) ice hockey and ballet groups perceived significantly better passive motion sense in IV/EV than the running (P < .05) and the sedentary (P < .01) groups; and (3) no significant difference in the all measurements was found between running and sedentary groups. The benefits of ice hockey and ballet dancing on proprioception may be associated with their movement characteristics. PMID:19967600

Li, Jing Xian; Xu, Dong Qing; Hoshizaki, Blaine

2009-01-01

280

Enforcement of Mouthguard Use and Athlete Compliance in National Collegiate Athletic Association Men's Collegiate Ice Hockey Competition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated enforcement patterns and athlete compliance with the National Collegiate Athletic Association rule requiring the wearing of mouthguards in men's collegiate ice hockey games during one season. Surveys of athletic trainers indicated that the use of mouthguards in competition was not consistently enforced by athletic trainers, coaches,…

Hawn, Kristen L.; Visser, Mary Frances; Sexton, Patrick J.

2002-01-01

281

Cervical spine alignment in the immobilized ice hockey player. A computed tomographic analysis of the effects of helmet removal.  

PubMed

To determine if helmet removal causes a significant increase in lordosis of the cervical spine in ice hockey players, we radiographically assessed the position of the cervical spine in subjects immobilized to a standard spine backboard wearing shoulder pads both with and without a helmet. Ten adult male volunteers (ages, 18 to 28 years) with no previous history of cervical spine injuries were fitted with an appropriately sized ice hockey helmet and shoulder pads and immobilized in a supine position to a standard spine backboard. Computerized tomographic lateral scout scans were obtained of the cervical spine for three conditions: 1) no equipment (control), 2) helmet and shoulder pads, and 3) shoulder pads only (helmet removed). With the helmet removed and the shoulder pads remaining, a significant increase in C2 to C7 lordosis was found when compared with the other two conditions. Individual segmental measurements revealed a significant increase in cervical lordosis at the C6-7 level with the helmet removed compared with the helmet and shoulder pads condition. Our results demonstrate that the removal of an ice hockey helmet from a supine player causes a significant increase in lordosis (extension) of the cervical spine. We recommend that ice hockey helmets not be removed from injured players, with rare exceptions, because doing so results in unnecessary motion of the cervical spine. PMID:11101101

Laprade, R F; Schnetzler, K A; Broxterman, R J; Wentorf, F; Gilbert, T J

2000-01-01

282

Cervical Spine Alignment in the Immobilized Ice Hockey PlayerA Computed Tomographic Analysis of the Effects of Helmet Removal  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine if helmet removal causes a significant increase in lordosis of the cervical spine in ice hockey players, we radiographically assessed the position of the cervical spine in subjects immobilized to a standard spine backboard wearing shoulder pads both with and without a helmet. Ten adult male volunteers (ages, 18 to 28 years) with no previous history of cervical

Robert F. LaPrade; Kent A. Schnetzler; Robert J. Broxterman; Fred Wentorf; Erik Wendland; Thomas J. Gilbert

2000-01-01

283

The effects of team diversity on a team process and team performance in the National Hockey League  

E-print Network

and managers, while also contributing to the theoretical body of literature for sport and diversity research. This research examined National Hockey League teams and players during a three year period (2001-2004). English Canadians made up 42.5% of the players...

Waltemyer, David Scott

2009-05-15

284

Cardiovascular prevention in a high risk sport, ice hockey: applications in wider sports physical therapy practice.  

PubMed

Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk - including history taking, chart review, physical examination - and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients. PMID:21522221

Hopkins-Rosseel, Diana H

2006-11-01

285

Ice hockey lung – a case of mass nitrogen dioxide poisoning in the Czech Republic  

PubMed Central

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a toxic gas, a product of combustion in malfunctioning ice-resurfacing machines. NO2 poisoning is rare but potentially lethal. The authors report a case of mass NO2 poisoning involving 15 amateur ice hockey players in the Czech Republic. All players were treated in the Department of Respiratory Diseases at Brno University Hospital in November 2010 – three as inpatients because they developed pneumonitis. All patients were followed-up until November 2011. Complete recovery in all but one patient was achieved by December 2010. None of the 15 patients developed asthma-like disease or chronic cough. Corticosteroids appeared to be useful in treatment. Electric-powered ice-resurfacing machines are preferable in indoor ice skating arenas. PMID:24032121

Brat, Kristian; Merta, Zdenek; Plutinsky, Marek; Skrickova, Jana; Ing, Miroslav Stanek

2013-01-01

286

Chiral random grain boundary phase of achiral hockey-stick liquid crystals.  

PubMed

A disordered chiral conglomerate, the random grain boundary (RGB) phase, has been observed below the smectic A liquid crystal phase of an achiral, hockey-stick molecule. In cells, the RGB phase appears dark between crossed polarizers but decrossing the polarizers reveals large left- and right-handed chiral domains with opposite optical rotation. Freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy reveals that the RGB phase is an assembly of randomly oriented blocks of smectic layers, an arrangement that distinguishes the RGB from the dark, chiral conglomerate phases of bent-core mesogens. X-ray diffraction indicates that there is significant layer shrinkage at the SmA-RGB phase transition, which is marked by the collapse of layers with long-range order into small, randomly oriented smectic blocks. PMID:25310113

Chen, Dong; Wang, Haitao; Li, Min; Glaser, Matthew A; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A

2014-10-30

287

[Analysis of the behavior of the coach in relation to violence in minor league hockey].  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to verify if, during games, the behavior of ice hockey coaches at the bantam level tends to incite players to use roughness and to infringe upon the rules of the game, as the Néron report (1977) states. The video recording of 27 games using a split-screen technique made it possible to view simultaneously the players in action as well as the coaches' behavior. Analysis of the videotapes revealed that the coaches (n = 11) at the bantam level often exhort their players to put more intensity in their physical contacts (legal body checking), but they more often encouraged them to control themselves and avoid penalties. In general, the coaches displayed very little behavior that encouraged violent actions from the players. PMID:1647855

Trudel, P; Guertin, D; Bernard, D; Boileau, R; Marcotte, G

1991-06-01

288

With an urban renaissance underway, Hartford begins to think about their hockey heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Blowhole! Hartford Whalershttp://www.hartfordwhalers.org/Brass Bonanzahttp://www.brassbonanza.com/hcc/The Sports Economisthttp://www.thesportseconomist.com/Grateful Dead Live at Hartford Civic Center on October 10, 1984http://www.archive.org/details/gd1984-10-14.fob.beyerm88.suraci.77990.sbeok.flac16Mark Twain Househttp://www.marktwainhouse.org/Since 1997, the city of Hartford has been searching for some new whalers. Of course, they aren't looking for a few old salts to go out and hunt those gentle beasts of the deep (that's generally prohibited by international treaties and Hartford is more than a harpoon toss from the Atlantic Ocean), but rather an intrepid band of die-hard hockey fans are searching for the former NHL team known as the Hartford Whalers. This industrial town and noted insurance capital has been without major league hockey since the Hartford Whalers pulled up stakes and moved to the generally ice-free city of Raleigh. Interestingly enough, the Hartford Whalers Booster Club keeps the hockey home fires burning by hosting various events, and they have recently created an online petition to build support for a new NHL arena in Hartford. During the mid-1990s there was a spate of NHL team relocations as the Quebec Nordiques decamped to Colorado and the Winnipeg Jets became the Phoenix Coyotes. Whalers fans remain dedicated to the spirit and legacy of the team, and long-time fan Marty Evtushek said it best when he noted recently that, "They were more rooted in the community. In New York, they were in their high-rises and didn't bother with the average fans. The Whalers were our neighbors." The first link will take users to an article from the New York Times about the hockey lobbying efforts of the Hartford Whalers Boosters Club. Moving on, the second link leads to a site that provides users with a slew of information on the history of the Whalers, complete with rosters, uniform information, and so on. The third link is an audio trove of Whalers-related sounds, including the final outgoing message from the team store answering machine. Most people will also want to listen to "Brass Bonanza" here, the Whalers' Herb Alpert-like theme song. The fourth link will whisk users away to an excellent weblog on sports economics written by a team of economists from schools such as College of the Holy Cross and Clemson University. The fifth link leads to a much celebrated Grateful Dead concert (courtesy of the Internet Archive) that took place at the former home of the Whalers, the Hartford Civic Arena. Finally, the sixth link leads to the homepage of the Mark Twain House. Twain lived in Hartford for seventeen years, and this site provides a host of material on Twain's life and this rather impressive building.

Grinnell, Max

2009-05-08

289

Conservative management of symptomatic Carpal Bossing in an elite hockey player: a case report  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present the characteristics and create awareness of symptomatic carpal bossing and discuss potential etiologies and the role of conservative management through the presentation of an athlete with traumatic onset of symptomatic carpal bossing. Clinical features: This case report outlines the presentation and conservative management of an elite eighteen year old hockey player with symptomatic carpal bossing after a traumatic on ice collision. Carpal bossing is a bony, dorsal prominence in the quadrangular joint of the wrist that is inconsistently symptomatic. Intervention and outcome: A conservative treatment plan consisting of education, reassurance, avoidance of aggravation, and soft tissue therapy allowed return to play in two weeks without restrictions or need for surgical consultation. Conclusion: With inconsistent recurrence rates and surgical complications, the role of conservative management for symptomatic carpal bossing deserves further exploration. The conservative practitioner should be aware of the signs and symptoms of symptomatic carpal bossing to institute suitable treatment. PMID:20037693

Kissel, Peter

2009-01-01

290

In situ removal of the ``hockey stick`` fissile material deposit at the East Tennessee Technology Park  

SciTech Connect

Prior to shutdown of the gaseous diffusion process at the Oak Ridge K-25 Plant (now East Tennessee Technology Park), leakage of humid air into the process piping and equipment caused reactions with UF{sub 6}, which produced nonvolatile uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposition and other solid uranium fluoride compounds. During the period 1988--1991, Lockheed Martin Energy Systems performed nondestructive analysis (NDA) radiological surveys of the K-25 Site process facilities that previously had contained or processed uranium. These surveys were made to estimate the mass and {sup 235}U assay of localized uranium deposits remaining within the process piping and equipment. Three deposits were identified that had sufficient mass to achieve criticality. Two of these, the horizontal pipe and the T pipe deposits, required the addition of a moderator before a criticality accident could occur. The third was a very large uranium deposit determined by NDA to be distributed annularly in the process piping. Because of the shape of the system, it came to be called the hockey stick deposit. Because of the foregoing concerns with the hockey stick deposit, it was decided to gain experience by removing the less hazardous smaller deposits with their less complicated geometries first. Thus, the horizontal pipe deposit, the simplest and least reactive case, was handled first, in June 1997. Next, the T pipe, which was an intersection of large-diameter pipes and which posed additional problems because of a more complex geometry, was handled in August 1997. From this experience, the deposit removal techniques and procedures were refined. In December 1997, this large deposit was removed, and the contents were placed in a safe array configuration.

Lewis, K.D.; Tollefson, D.A. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (United States)

1998-12-31

291

Recreational Ice Hockey Injuries in Adult Non-Checking Leagues: A United States Perspective  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to analyze injuries among adult recreational ice hockey players. This was an observational prospective cohort study with data collected on injuries sustained during one season in the adult recreational ice hockey leagues of Oneida County, NY. The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures. The most common anatomic region injured was the head/neck/face (35%). Collisions were most often reported as the mechanism of injury (44%). Fracture was the most common diagnosis. Of players wearing face protection (full cage or shield, or partial visor/half shield), none suffered facial injuries, while all facial injuries reported were to players not wearing facial protection. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. A lack of protective equipment was associated with 38% of injuries and 24% of injuries involved penalties. A history of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players with 28% re-injuring the same body part. This study’s findings suggested various strategies to address player injuries such as mandatory full facial protection and shoulder pads, strict enforcement of game rules, and game rule modifications (no body checking). Further research is needed on the role of preventive rehabilitation in players with previous injury history. Key Points The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures, similar to previous Canadian literature. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. 38% of injuries involved a lack of protective equipment and 24% of injuries involved penalties. Full facial protection and shoulder pads should be compulsory. Strict enforcement of game rules is necessary. History of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players. PMID:24431962

Caputo, Pasqualino; Mattson, Douglas J.

2005-01-01

292

Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to analyze injuries among adult recreational ice hockey players. This was an observational prospective cohort study with data collected on injuries sustained during one season in the adult recreational ice hockey leagues of Oneida County, NY. The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures. The most common anatomic region injured was the head/neck/face (35%). Collisions were most often reported as the mechanism of injury (44%). Fracture was the most common diagnosis. Of players wearing face protection (full cage or shield, or partial visor/half shield), none suffered facial injuries, while all facial injuries reported were to players not wearing facial protection. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. A lack of protective equipment was associated with 38% of injuries and 24% of injuries involved penalties. A history of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players with 28% re-injuring the same body part. This study's findings suggested various strategies to address player injuries such as mandatory full facial protection and shoulder pads, strict enforcement of game rules, and game rule modifications (no body checking). Further research is needed on the role of preventive rehabilitation in players with previous injury history. Key PointsThe injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures, similar to previous Canadian literature.The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures.38% of injuries involved a lack of protective equipment and 24% of injuries involved penalties.Full facial protection and shoulder pads should be compulsory.Strict enforcement of game rules is necessary.History of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players. PMID:24431962

Caputo, Pasqualino; Mattson, Douglas J

2005-03-01

293

Physical and performance differences among forwards, defensemen, and goalies in elite women's ice hockey.  

PubMed

Positional differences have been examined in women's basketball, field hockey, netball, and volleyball, but not in elite women's ice hockey. Our purpose was to describe and compare physical, fitness, and skating performance characteristics of forwards (F), defensemen (D), and goalies (G). Subjects were 112 University of Alberta women players (21.4 +/- 2.9 years of age). A full anthropometric battery was conducted on each player. Heath-Carter anthropometric somatotypes were calculated. Percent body fat (%fat) was estimated from both general and population-specific equations. Subjects performed off-ice fitness tests (vertical jump, 40-yd dash, Leger test for predicting .V(O2)max) and on-ice fitness (Modified 3-Repeat Sprint Skate Test-MRSS, blood lactate after sprint test) and skating performance tests (6.10-m acceleration test, Cornering S-Turn Agility Test). Descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses of variance were run using SPSS (Version 10.0) for the MacIntosh, with a significance level set a priori at p < 0.05. Significant positional differences were found for bicristal breadths (D > G, F > G); relaxed arm circumference (D > F, G > F); supraspinale and biceps skinfolds (G > D, G > F); and endomorphy (G > F). Significant differences among positions were also found for the MRSS (G > D > F) and agility tests (G > D, G > F). D tended to have the most robust build overall. F were leaner than D and G, and their smaller relaxed arm circumference measurements most likely reflect less subcutaneous fat on the upper arm. F had greater anaerobic power than D, followed by G, and they tended to have greater aerobic capacity. F and D were more agile than G. Performance demands appear to be position specific. F need to be the most versatile and fit because of a greater amount and variety of work performed both during practices and games; their required degrees of versatility and fitness are followed by those required of D and G. PMID:16977704

Geithner, Christina A; Lee, Amanda M; Bracko, Michael R

2006-08-01

294

Pulmonary function decay in women ice hockey players: is there a relationship to ice rink air quality?  

PubMed

Fossil-fueled ice rink resurfacing machines emit high levels of ultrafine and fine particulate matter (PM(1)) and may be related to asthmalike symptoms in skaters. We examined PM(1) exposure and airway status in elite women ice hockey players over 4 training years. Lung function, asthma symptoms, and rink PM(1) were evaluated. Pre- and postexercise spirometry was performed on 14 female hockey players and 9 female control nordic skiers 4 times over 4 yr. Baseline lung functions were normalized to height cubed (Ht(3)) and recalculated to subject mean height (1.69 m) to evaluate change. Venue CO, NO(2), and PM(1) were measured. Training history for hockey players included 2 yr in a low-[PM(1)] rink, followed by transition to high-[PM(1)] fossil fuel machine resurfaced rinks; [PM(1)] for control ski venue was low. [CO] and [NO(2)] were acceptable at all venues. Controls showed no baseline function change over 4 yr. For hockey players, 1997 lung function values at the low-[PM(1)] venue were significantly higher than 2001 high-[PM(1)] venue values (p <.05); decay per year between 1997 and 2001 was greater for FEF(25-75) (251 +/- 185, 83 +/- 40, 109 +/- 58, 109 +/- 187 ml yr(-1), mean +/- SD for FEF(25-75), FVC, FEV1, PEF, respectively; p <.05). No relationships between baseline lung functions and airway hyperresponsiveness or symptoms were identified. Five of 9 controls had symptoms, and 10 of 14 subjects had symptoms. This preliminary study suggests [PM(1)] is related to airway function decay in ice rink athletes. PMID:15204772

Rundell, Kenneth W

2004-03-01

295

The validity of a non-differential global positioning system for assessing player movement patterns in field hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nine games players (mean age 23.3 years, s = 2.8; height 1.73 m, s = 0.08; body mass 70.0 kg, s = 12.7) completed 14 laps of a measured circuit that incorporated intermittent running and directional changes, representative of the movements made by field hockey players during match-play. The distances and speeds recorded by a global positioning satellite (GPS) system (Spi Elite™) were compared statistically with speed measurements

Hannah MacLeod; John Morris; Alan Nevill; Caroline Sunderland

2009-01-01

296

Effects of badminton and ice hockey on bone mass in young males: A 12-year follow-up  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of weight bearing physical activity on bone mineral density (BMD, g\\/cm2) and evaluate any residual benefits after the active sports career. Beginning at 17years of age, BMD was measured 5 times, during 12years, in 19 badminton players, 48 ice hockey players, and 25 controls. During the

Taru Tervo; Peter Nordström; Anna Nordström

2010-01-01

297

A prospective study of concussions among National Hockey League players during regular season games: the NHL-NHLPA Concussion Program  

PubMed Central

Background In 1997, the National Hockey League (NHL) and NHL Players’ Association (NHLPA) launched a concussion program to improve the understanding of this injury. We explored initial postconcussion signs, symptoms, physical examination findings and time loss (i.e., time between the injury and medical clearance by the physician to return to competitive play), experienced by male professional ice-hockey players, and assessed the utility of initial postconcussion clinical manifestations in predicting time loss among hockey players. Methods We conducted a prospective case series of concussions over seven NHL regular seasons (1997–2004) using an inclusive cohort of players. The primary outcome was concussion and the secondary outcome was time loss. NHL team physicians documented post-concussion clinical manifestations and recorded the date when a player was medically cleared to return to play. Results Team physicians reported 559 concussions during regular season games. The estimated incidence was 1.8 concussions per 1000 player-hours. The most common postconcussion symptom was headache (71%). On average, time loss (in days) increased 2.25 times (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.41–3.62) for every subsequent (i.e., recurrent) concussion sustained during the study period. Controlling for age and position, significant predictors of time loss were postconcussion headache (p < 0.001), low energy or fatigue (p = 0.01), amnesia (p = 0.02) and abnormal neurologic examination (p = 0.01). Using a previously suggested time loss cut-point of 10 days, headache (odds ratio [OR] 2.17, 95% CI 1.33–3.54) and low energy or fatigue (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.04–2.85) were significant predictors of time loss of more than 10 days. Interpretation Postconcussion headache, low energy or fatigue, amnesia and abnormal neurologic examination were significant predictors of time loss among professional hockey players. PMID:21502355

Benson, Brian W.; Meeuwisse, Willem H.; Rizos, John; Kang, Jian; Burke, Charles J.

2011-01-01

298

Examining Sport Concussion Assessment Tool ratings for male and female youth hockey players with and without a history of concussion  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundConcussion is one of the most commonly occurring injuries in sport today. The Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) is a commonly used paper neurocognitive tool. To date, little is known about SCAT baseline normative values in youth athletes.ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to determine normative values on the SCAT for male and female youth hockey players.MethodsThis is a secondary

Kathryn J Schneider; Carolyn A Emery; Jian Kang; Geoff M Schneider; Willem H Meeuwisse

2010-01-01

299

‘Indian hockey [and football] tricks’: race, magic, wonder and empire in Australian–Indian sporting relations, 1926–19381  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a study of Australian-Indian sporting relations in the 1920s and 1930s. It draws attention to a number of tours made by hockey (Indian teams to Australia in 1926, 1935 and 1938), cricket (an Australian team to India 1935-36) and soccer teams (an Indian team to Australia in 1935). It does so with reference to a number of

Erik Nielsen

2012-01-01

300

‘Indian hockey [and football] tricks’: race, magic, wonder and empire in Australian–Indian sporting relations, 1926–1938  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a study of Australian-Indian sporting relations in the 1920s and 1930s. It draws attention to a number of tours made by hockey (Indian teams to Australia in 1926, 1935 and 1938), cricket (an Australian team to India 1935-36) and soccer teams (an Indian team to Australia in 1935). It does so with reference to a number of

Erik Nielsen

2012-01-01

301

Athlete Aggression on the Rink and off the IceAthlete Violence and Aggression in Hockey and Interpersonal Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because male athletes have exhibited aggressive tendencies in a variety of settings, they may be at risk for using violence both within and beyond their sports involvement. Five former college\\/professional hockey players were interviewed to determine their perspectives on the nature of aggression and violence in sports competition as well as in social relationships.The informants were asked aboutathletes’violence and aggression

Nick T. Pappas; Patrick C. McKenry; Beth Skilken Catlett

2004-01-01

302

Biomechanical analysis of the penalty-corner drag-flick of elite male and female hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to analyse the kinematic sequencing in the penalty-corner drag-flicks of elite male and female field hockey players of international calibre. Thirteen participants (one skilled male drag-flicker and six male and six female elite players) participated in the study. An optoelectronic motion analysis system was used to capture the drag-flicks with six cameras, sampling at

Cristina López De Subijana; Daniel Juárez; Javier Mallo; Enrique Navarro

2010-01-01

303

Youth sports & public health: framing risks of mild traumatic brain injury in american football and ice hockey.  

PubMed

The framing of the risks of experiencing mild traumatic brain injury in American football and ice hockey has an enormous impact in defining the scope of the problem and the remedies that are prioritized. According to the prevailing risk frame, an acceptable level of safety can be maintained in these contact sports through the application of technology, rule changes, and laws. An alternative frame acknowledging that these sports carry significant risks would produce very different ethical, political, and social debates. PMID:25264090

Bachynski, Kathleen E; Goldberg, Daniel S

2014-09-01

304

In your face: facial metrics predict aggressive behaviour in the laboratory and in varsity and professional hockey players  

PubMed Central

Facial characteristics are an important basis for judgements about gender, emotion, personality, motivational states and behavioural dispositions. Based on a recent finding of a sexual dimorphism in facial metrics that is independent of body size, we conducted three studies to examine the extent to which individual differences in the facial width-to-height ratio were associated with trait dominance (using a questionnaire) and aggression during a behavioural task and in a naturalistic setting (varsity and professional ice hockey). In study 1, men had a larger facial width-to-height ratio, higher scores of trait dominance, and were more reactively aggressive compared with women. Individual differences in the facial width-to-height ratio predicted reactive aggression in men, but not in women (predicted 15% of variance). In studies 2 (male varsity hockey players) and 3 (male professional hockey players), individual differences in the facial width-to-height ratio were positively related to aggressive behaviour as measured by the number of penalty minutes per game obtained over a season (predicted 29 and 9% of the variance, respectively). Together, these findings suggest that the sexually dimorphic facial width-to-height ratio may be an ‘honest signal’ of propensity for aggressive behaviour. PMID:18713717

Carre, Justin M; McCormick, Cheryl M

2008-01-01

305

Paradigms in Physics: Central Forces on an Airtable  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This student activity is designed to help upper division undergraduate students work with central forces in classical mechanics. A hockey puck is tethered to the center of an air-hockey table, and the students observe the motion of the hockey puck, allowing them to observe the effects of central forces on the puck. Students are asked to plot the potential energy graph of the hockey puck. An instructor's guide is available to help guide the activity along with the student handout. This material is part of the Paradigms in Physics project at Oregon State University. This work promotes the use of active student learning in upper division physics courses. Both learning materials and learning strategies are provided to help both students and instructors.

2013-02-21

306

The Top Ten Similarities between Playing Hockey and Building a Better Internet  

E-print Network

This article is an editorial note submitted to CCR. It has NOT been peer reviewed. The author takes full responsibility for this article’s technical content. Comments can be posted through CCR online. Time tends to pass more quickly than we would like. Sometimes it is helpful to reflect on what you have accomplished, and to derive what you have learned from the experiences. These “lessons learned ” may then be leveraged by yourself or others in the future. Occasionally, an external event will motivate this self reflection. For me, it was the 50th anniversary reunion of the St. Walburg Eagles, held in July 2011. The Eagles are a full-contact (ice) hockey team I played with between 1988 and 1996 1, while attending university. What would I tell my friends and former teammates that I had been doing for the past 15+ years? After some thought, I realized that my time as an Eagle had prepared me for a research career, in ways I would never have imagined. This article 2 shares some of these similarities, to motivate others to reflect on their own careers and achievements, and perhaps make proactive changes as a result.

Martin Arlitt

307

Head impact exposure in male and female collegiate ice hockey players.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to quantify head impact exposure (frequency, location and magnitude of head impacts) for individual male and female collegiate ice hockey players and to investigate differences in exposure by sex, player position, session type, and team. Ninety-nine (41 male, 58 female) players were enrolled and 37,411 impacts were recorded over three seasons. Frequency of impacts varied significantly by sex (males: 287 per season, females: 170, p<0.001) and helmet impact location (p<0.001), but not by player position (p=0.088). Head impact frequency also varied by session type; both male and female players sustained more impacts in games than in practices (p<0.001), however the magnitude of impacts did not differ between session types. There was no difference in 95th percentile peak linear acceleration between sexes (males: 41.6 g, females: 40.8 g), but 95th percentile peak rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were greater for males than females (4424, 3409 rad/s(2), and 25.6, 22.3, respectively). Impacts to the back of the helmet resulted in the greatest 95th percentile peak linear accelerations for males (45.2 g) and females (50.4 g), while impacts to the side and back of the head were associated with the greatest 95th percentile peak rotational accelerations (males: 4719, 4256 rad/sec(2), females: 3567, 3784 rad/sec(2) respectively). It has been proposed that reducing an individual's head impact exposure is a practical approach for reducing the risk of brain injuries. Strategies to decrease an individual athlete's exposure need to be sport and gender specific, with considerations for team and session type. PMID:24210478

Wilcox, Bethany J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Chu, Jeffrey J; McAllister, Thomas W; Flashman, Laura A; Maerlender, Arthur C; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J

2014-01-01

308

Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices  

E-print Network

This work is the first of a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we outline an analytic method to predict in which design and operating conditions the COP of the entire cooling system (refrigerator and cooling tower) ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is maximum. ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is investigated as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. With this method, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can therefore be determined in advance. We estimate the optimal design of an average-sized ice rink, including pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia). We also single out an optimal brine density and show the impact of the electric consumption of the pump on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our theoretical predictions are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the pr...

Ferrantelli, Andrea; Räikkönen, Miska; Viljanen, Martti

2012-01-01

309

Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices  

E-print Network

This work is the first in a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we adopt an analytical method, called functional optimization, to find which design and operating conditions maximize the Coefficient Of Performance of the entire cooling system (brine pumps and cooling tower), which we call ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. This is addressed as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. By maximizing such function, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can thus be determined accurately and rigorously. We investigate the importance of pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia) for average-sized ice rinks. An optimal brine density is found, and we compute the weight of the electric consumption of the brine pumps on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our formulas are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the program COMSOL Multiphysics. The multivariable approach here discussed is general, and can be applied to the rigorous preliminary study of diverse situations in building physics and in many other areas of interest.

Andrea Ferrantelli; Paul Melóis; Miska Räikkönen; Martti Viljanen

2012-11-02

310

Cambios en la variabilidad de la frecuencia cardiaca (VFC) en jugadores de hockey hierba durante el Campeonato del Mundo de 2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study is to determine the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) in field hockey players during the course of a world championship. The Spanish national team took part in the study by making daily records of the R-R interval (Omegawave System) on the days when matches took place. The baseline heart rate (HR) and several parameters

Gil Rodas; Xavier Yanguas; Carles Pedret; Joan Ramos; Lluís Capdevila

2011-01-01

311

The Impact of Introducing Legal Punishment on the Frequency of Aggressive Behaviour in Professional Ice Hockey: Using the Todd Bertuzzi Incident as an Ecological Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stiffer punishment has long been heralded as the answer to curbing violence and aggression within the sport of ice hockey. Oddly however, this proposition has never received empirical validation. Rather, it exists on the basis of intuition, anecdotal reports, and theoretical assumptions. Therefore, the purpose of the current investigation was to assess the impact of a high profile legal charge

Chris J. Gee

2007-01-01

312

Three-dimensional kinematics of the knee and ankle joints for three consecutive push-offs during ice hockey skating starts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little biomechanical research has been conducted recently on hockey skating despite the sport's worldwide appeal. One reason for this lack of biomechanical knowledge stems from the difficulty of collecting data. The lack of accuracy, the disputable realism of treadmills, and the large field of view required are some of the technical challenges that have to be overcome. The main objective

Dany Lafontaine

2007-01-01

313

One for Sure or Maybe Three Empirical Evidence for Overtime Play from a Comparison of Swiss Ice Hockey and the NHL  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to avoid too many tied games after playing the five-minute overtime period, the National Hockey League (NHL) introduced two rule changes in the 1999-2000 season. First, a team that loses in overtime receives one point instead of zero points. Second, the number of skaters in overtime is reduced from five to four. The theoretical literature analyzing these rule

Egon Franck; Philipp Theiler

2012-01-01

314

Intramural 6v6 Floor Hockey League **Please refer to the Captain's Manual for a complete list of all Intramural Sport guidelines & procedures**  

E-print Network

. Game time is forfeit time! C. No jewelry can be worn during games. Captains are responsible for makingIntramural 6v6 Floor Hockey League **Please refer to the Captain's Manual for a complete list of all Intramural Sport guidelines & procedures** A. General IM Procedures A. Teams should arrive 15

Almor, Amit

315

Imagine Life without Friction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the concept of inertia and its application to a world without the force of friction acting on moving objects. When an object is in motion, friction tends to be the force that acts on this object to slow it down and eventually come to a stop. By severely limiting friction through the use of hover pucks, students learn that the energy of one moving puck is transferred directly to another puck at rest when they collide. Students learn the concept of the conservation of energy via a "collision," and come to realize that with friction, energy is converted primarily to heat to slow and stop an object in motion. In the associated activity, "The Puck Stops Here," students investigate the frictional force of an object when different materials are placed between the object and the ground. They apply this understanding to the challenge to design a new hockey puck for the National Hockey League.

Engineering K-Phd Program

316

MATH FOR KIDS March 24, 2003  

E-print Network

MATH FOR KIDS March 24, 2003 Parity A domino is a 2 Ã? 1 rectangle with 0 to 6 spots on each square in a chain? 6. Three hockey pucks, A, B, and C, lie on a playing field. A hockey player hits one of them

317

by A. Fam and S. Rizkalla LABORATORY SIMULATION OF IMPACT LOADING ON  

E-print Network

by A. Fam and S. Rizkalla LABORATORY SIMULATION OF IMPACT LOADING ON LAMINATED GLASS FOR ICE HOCKEY indus- tries. In ice hockey arenas, glass is typically used as a shield to protect spectators. In this particular application, glass is subjected to the impact of pucks flying at very high velocities, as high

318

Examination of the relationship between peak linear and angular accelerations to brain deformation metrics in hockey helmet impacts.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is a contact sport which has a high incidence of brain injury. The current methods of evaluating protective devices use peak resultant linear acceleration as their pass/fail criteria, which are not fully representative of brain injuries as a whole. The purpose of this study was to examine how the linear and angular acceleration loading curves from a helmeted impact influence currently used brain deformation injury metrics. A helmeted Hybrid III headform was impacted in five centric and non-centric impact sites to elicit linear and angular acceleration responses. These responses were examined through the use of a brain model. The results indicated that when the helmet is examined using peak resultant linear acceleration alone, they are similar and protective, but when a 3D brain deformation response is used to examine the helmets, there are risks of brain injury with lower linear accelerations which would pass standard certifications for safety. PMID:22185521

Post, Andrew; Oeur, Anna; Hoshizaki, Blaine; Gilchrist, Michael D

2013-01-01

319

The ability of parents to accurately report concussion occurrence in their bantam-aged minor hockey league children  

PubMed Central

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the ability of hockey parents/guardians to recognize concussion symptoms in their 13–14 year old (Bantam-aged) children. Outcome Measures: The outcome measures were the ability to recognize different signs and symptoms listed on the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) as well as 8 detractors consisting of signs and symptoms not associated with post concussive syndrome. Additional questions assessing the parents’ knowledge of concussion management and recognition abilities were also posed. Participants: Parents of Bantam-aged minor hockey league athletes volunteered for the study. Methods: The study investigators distributed questionnaires during the warm up period or following their children’s games to the study participants. Following questionnaire completion, participants were provided with an information package outlining the correct signs and symptoms of concussion. Results: The mean number of correct responses to signs and symptoms of concussion was 21.25/25 for the mothers and 20.41/25 for the fathers. The mean number of detractors identified as not associated with concussion was 5.93/8 for the mothers and 4.85/8 for the fathers, indicating that mothers were more capable of recognizing the signs and symptoms than fathers. An analysis of variance including sporting experience in the model did not strengthen the relationship between parent gender and test outcome. Conclusion: This investigation revealed that there is still a disconnect in regards to key components of recognizing a concussion, such as difficulty with sleep, disorientation symptoms, and emotional irritability. Mothers have displayed an ability to better differentiate between true and false signs and symptoms of concussion as compared to fathers. Continued education and awareness of mild traumatic brain injury in athletes should address the misconceptions amongst parents in regards to the true signs and symptoms of a concussion. PMID:20037689

Coghlin, Craig J; Myles, Bryan D; Howitt, Scott D.

2009-01-01

320

Skin conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: part I - mechanical dermatoses.  

PubMed

Figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters experience a range of dermatologic conditions and tissue-related injuries on account of mechanical trauma, infectious pathogens, inflammatory processes and environmental factors related to these competitive pursuits. Sports medicine practitioners, family physicians, dermatologists and coaches should be familiar with these skin conditions to ensure timely and accurate diagnosis and management of affected athletes. This review is Part I of a subsequent companion review and provides a comprehensive review of mechanical dermatoses experienced by ice-skating athletes, including skater's nodules and its variants, pump bumps, piezogenic pedal papules, talon noir, skate/lace bite, friction bullae, corns and calluses, onychocryptosis, skater's toe and skate blade-induced lacerations. These injuries result from friction, shear forces, chronic pressure and collisions with surfaces that occur when athletes endure repetitive jump landings, accelerated starts and stops and other manoeuvres during rigorous training and competition. Ill-fitting skates, improper lacing techniques and insufficient lubrication or protective padding of the foot and ankle often contribute to the development of skin conditions that result from these physical and mechanical stresses. As we will explain, simple measures can frequently prevent the development of these conditions. The treatment of skater's nodules involves reduction in chronic stimulation of the malleoli, and the use of keratolytics and intralesional steroid injections; if malleolar bursitis develops, bursa aspirations may be required. Pump bumps, which result from repetitive friction posteriorly, can be prevented by wearing skates that fit correctly at the heel. Piezogenic pedal papules may be treated conservatively by using heel cups, compressive stockings and by reducing prolonged standing. Talon noir usually resolves without intervention within several weeks. The treatment of skate bite is centred on reducing compression by the skate tongue of the extensor tendons of the anterior ankle, which can be accomplished by use of proper lacing techniques, increasing pliability of the skate tongue and using protective padding, such as Bunga Pads™. Anti-inflammatory medications and cold compresses can also help reduce inflammation. Friction bullae are best managed by careful lancing of painful blisters and application of petrolatum or protective dressings to accelerate healing; preventative measures include the use of well fitting skates, proper lacing techniques and moisture-wicking socks. Corns and calluses are similarly best prevented by the use of well fitted skates and orthotic devices. Symptomatic, debridement reduces the irritant effect of the thick epidermis, and can be accomplished by soaking the area in warm water followed by paring. Application of creams with high concentrations of urea or salicylic acid can also soften callosities. Cases of onychocryptosis benefit from warm soaks, antibiotic ointments and topical steroids to reduce inflammation, but sometimes chemical or surgical matricectomies are required. Preventative measures of both onychocryptosis and skater's toe include cutting toenails straight across to allow for a more equal distribution of forces within the toe box. Finally, the prevention and treatment of lacerations, which constitute a potentially fatal type of mechanical injury, require special protective gear and acute surgical intervention with appropriate suturing. The subsequent companion review of skin conditions in ice skaters will discuss infectious, inflammatory and cold-induced dermatoses, with continued emphasis on clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:21846161

Tlougan, Brook E; Mancini, Anthony J; Mandell, Jenny A; Cohen, David E; Sanchez, Miguel R

2011-09-01

321

Are pre-season reports of neck pain, dizziness and\\/or headaches risk factors for concussion in male youth ice hockey players?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundConcussion is a commonly encountered injury associated with potential long-term sequelae. No previous studies have evaluated dizziness, neck pain and headache as potential risk factors for concussion.ObjectiveThe objective of this study is to determine the risk of concussion in male youth hockey players with preseason reports of neck pain, headaches and dizziness.DesignThis study is a secondary data analysis of a

K Schneider; C Emery; J Kang; G Schneider; W Meeuwisse

2011-01-01

322

Knowing what to do and doing it: Differences in self-assessed tactical skills of regional, sub-elite, and elite youth field hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

To determine whether youth athletes with an “average” (regional), “high” (sub-elite), and “very high” (elite) level of performance differ with respect to their self-assessed tactical skills, 191 youth field hockey players (mean age 15.5 years, s = 1.6) completed the Tactical Skills Inventory for Sports (TACSIS) with scales for declarative (“knowing what to do”) and procedural (“doing it”) knowledge. Multivariate analyses of

Marije T. Elferink-Gemser; Rianne Kannekens; Jim Lyons; Yvonne Tromp; Chris Visscher

2010-01-01

323

Vitamin d status and v[combining dot above]o2peak during a skate treadmill graded exercise test in competitive ice hockey players.  

PubMed

Fitzgerald, JS, Peterson, BJ, Warpeha, JM, Wilson, PB, Rhodes, GS, and Ingraham, SJ. Vitamin D status and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak during a skate treadmill graded exercise test in competitive ice hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 28(11): 3205-3210, 2014-Vitamin D status has been associated with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) in cross-sectional investigations in the general population. Data characterizing the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration and CRF in athletes are lacking. Junior and collegiate ice hockey players were recruited from the Minneapolis, MN (44.9° N), area during the off-season period (May 16-June 28). The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association between 25(OH)D concentration and CRF in a sample population of competitive ice hockey players. Circulating 25(OH)D level was assessed from a capillary blood sample analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak during a skate treadmill graded exercise test (GXT) was used to assess CRF. Data on both 25(OH)D concentration and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak were available for 52 athletes. Insufficient 25(OH)D concentrations were found in 37.7% of the athletes (<32 ng·ml). Vitamin D status was not significantly associated with any physiological or physical parameter during the skate treadmill GXT. PMID:24832977

Fitzgerald, John S; Peterson, Ben J; Warpeha, Joseph M; Wilson, Patrick B; Rhodes, Greg S; Ingraham, Stacy J

2014-11-01

324

Impact of maximum speed on sprint performance during high-level youth female field hockey matches: female athletes in motion (FAiM) study.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the impact of maximum sprint speed on peak and mean sprint speed during youth female field hockey matches. Two high-level female field hockey teams (U-17, n = 24, and U-21, n = 20) were monitored during a 4-game international test series using global position system technology and tested for maximum sprint speed. Dependent variables were compared using a 3-factor ANOVA (age group, position, and speed classification); effect sizes (Cohen d) and confidence limits were also calculated. Maximum sprint speed was similar between age groups and positions, with faster players having greater speed than slower players (29.3 ± 0.4 vs 27.2 ± 1.1 km/h). Overall, peak match speed in youth female field hockey players reaches approximately 90% of maximum sprint speed. Absolute peak match speed and mean sprint speed during matches were similar among the age groups (except match 1) and positions (except match 2); however, peak match speed was greater for faster players in matches 3 and 4. No differences were observed in the relative proportion for mean sprint speeds for age groups or positions, but slower players consistently displayed similar relative mean sprint speeds by using a greater proportion of their maximum sprint speed. PMID:24152425

Vescovi, Jason D

2014-07-01

325

Sediment quality thresholds: Estimates from hockey stick regression of liver lesion prevalence in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus)  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive, integrative assessments of coastal sediment quality are best effected by using large, diverse data sets that include measures of biological dysfunction observed in association with chronic exposure to sediment contaminants. Under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program, the National Benthic Surveillance Project accumulated a database of synoptic sediment contaminant concentrations and indices of biological effects that were measured in indigenous animals collected during field surveys conducted from 1984 to 1994. This compilation of data provided the opportunity to develop a new approach for determining sediment quality criteria to add to the current repertoire of environmental assessment tools. Using a two-segment hockey stick regression, statistically significant chemical thresholds of biological effects were estimated for hepatic lesion prevalences in English sole (Pleuronectes vetulus, formerly Parophrys vetulus) in relation to sediment concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These threshold estimates are notably lower than many of those reported for other techniques. Application of this relatively simple dose-response model to subacute, chronic effects that are involved in pepatocarcinogenesis and associated with sediment toxicant content (1) reflects the link between toxicopathic disease progression and conditions observed in benthic fish exposed to contaminants and (2) provides endpoints for assessing sediment quality contaminant concentrations that are not necessarily acutely fatal but may have long-term health implications for populations that are chronically exposed.

Horness, B.H.; Lomax, D.P.; Johnson, L.L.; Myers, M.S.; Pierce, S.M.; Collier, T.K. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (United States)

1998-01-01

326

Dosimetry of a single ''hockey stick'' portal for treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis  

SciTech Connect

Conventional treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis portal usually involves multiple-field, moving junction treatments to avoid overlapping fields over the spinal cord. To avoid these problems, we irradiate the cranio-spinal axis using a single ''hockey stick'' portal and the 25-MV x-ray beam from a Varian Clinac-35/sup X/ linear accelerator. Patients are positioned prone on the floor 229 cm from the radiation source and the collimators are rotated 45/sup 0/ so the maximum diagonal dimension of the field 116 cm at 229 cm is coincident with the cranio-spinal axis. The head is alternately rotated to treat the right-hand side one day and the left-hand side the next day. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in an anatomical phantom reveals that, relative to the 100% dose delivered at 4-cm depth on the central axis of the blocked field, the midline posterior fossa dose is about 100%, with a maximum dose of about 105% to the extreme posterior portion of the skull. The midline neck dose is about 95% and the dose to the inferior portion of the spinal cord is about 105%. The doses to other critical organs are also presented.

Glasgow, G.P.; Marks, J.E.

1983-09-01

327

Isokinetic trunk strength and lumbosacral range of motion in elite female field hockey players reporting low back pain.  

PubMed

This study was funded, in part, by a Small Faculties Grant from the University of Alberta. Physical therapists have reported an increased incidence of low back pain (LBP) in female field hockey (FH) players, commonly accompanied by decreased trunk range of motion (ROM) and strength. The purpose of this study was to compare lumbosacral sagittal ROM and isokinetic trunk strength in three groups of women: 1) FH athletes with a history of chronic LBP, 2) pain-free FH athletes, and 3) an age-matched, healthy nonathletic control group. Photographs (35 mm) of subjects wearing spinal motion markers were used to determine the limits of lumbosacral saggital ROM in standing. Eccentric and concentric isokinetic trunk flexion and extension torques were measured in sitting through 60 degrees of trunk movement using a Kin-Com dynamometer set at 60 degrees /sec. The ANOVA showed that the pain group had 12 degrees and 18 degrees less extension (p < .01), as well as 18 degrees and 24 degrees less total ROM (p < .001) than the pain-free and control groups, respectively. Only peak (p < .001) and average (p < .03) eccentric extension torques were weaker in the pain group than in the nonathletic control group. These results suggest that physical therapists should perform preseason screening of trunk strength and lumbosacral ROM. In-season trunk extension stretching and strengthening is needed in the training regimes of these athletes. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1992;16(3):129-135. PMID:18796763

Fenety, A; Kumar, S

1992-01-01

328

A simple video-based timing system for on-ice team testing in ice hockey: a technical report.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate a newly developed on-ice timing system for team evaluation in the sport of ice hockey. We hypothesized that this new, simple, inexpensive, timing system would prove to be highly accurate and reliable. Six adult subjects (age 30.4 ± 6.2 years) performed on ice tests of acceleration and conditioning. The performance times of the subjects were recorded using a handheld stopwatch, photocell, and high-speed (240 frames per second) video. These results were then compared to allow for accuracy calculations of the stopwatch and video as compared with filtered photocell timing that was used as the "gold standard." Accuracy was evaluated using maximal differences, typical error/coefficient of variation (CV), and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between the timing methods. The reliability of the video method was evaluated using the same variables in a test-retest analysis both within and between evaluators. The video timing method proved to be both highly accurate (ICC: 0.96-0.99 and CV: 0.1-0.6% as compared with the photocell method) and reliable (ICC and CV within and between evaluators: 0.99 and 0.08%, respectively). This video-based timing method provides a very rapid means of collecting a high volume of very accurate and reliable on-ice measures of skating speed and conditioning, and can easily be adapted to other testing surfaces and parameters. PMID:24936905

Larson, David P; Noonan, Benjamin C

2014-09-01

329

NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT  

PubMed Central

Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

2012-01-01

330

CATECHOLAMINES AND ?2-ADRENOCEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION BEFORE AND AFTER MAXIMAL INCREMENTAL CYCLE TEST IN YOUNG ICE HOCKEY PLAYERS: RELATION TO WORK PERFORMED  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to assess the plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations as well as whole blood ?2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2) expression in young ice hockey players before and immediately after exercise in relation to performed work. Nineteen Youth National Team ice hockey players were subjected to the maximal incremental cycloergometer exercise. The test was done in the pre-competitive phase of training. Among many parameters the plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations and ADRB2 gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were determined before and after exercise. The average performed work was 3261.3 ± 558.3 J · kg?1 and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) for all players was 53.85 ± 3.91 mL · kg?1 min?1. The geometric mean of the ADRB2 gene expression was statistically significantly different before and after exercise (P ? 0.05), while adrenaline and noradrenaline levels in plasma significantly increased after exercise. In the analysed group of athletes we found that initial level of plasma noradrenaline correlated with the performed work (r = - 0.55, P < 0.014) and normalized ADRB2 expression before the exercise correlated with the work done by them (r = 0.48, P<0.039). However, no statistically significant correlations were found between the plasma adrenaline or noradrenaline concentrations and ADRB2 gene expression in peripheral blood of the players. The performed work in the maximal incremental exercise test of regularly training young ice hockey players depends on the initial levels of noradrenaline in plasma and ADRB2 mRNA in PBMC. PMID:24744472

Janikowska, G.; Bogacz, A.; Bijak, A.; Stanjek-Cichoracka, A.; Mazurek, U.; Gabrys, T.

2013-01-01

331

On-ice sweat rate, voluntary fluid intake, and sodium balance during practice in male junior ice hockey players drinking water or a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the repeatability of hydration and sweat measurements taken during on-ice hockey practices with players drinking only water, and determined whether having only a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CES) to drink during practices decreased fluid intake or affected other hydration and (or) sweat measures. All testing was conducted on elite players of an Ontario Hockey League team (+/-SE; mean age, 17.6 +/- 0.3 years; mean height, 182.9 +/- 1.4 cm; mean body mass, 83.0 +/- 1.7 kg). Players were studied 3 times over the course of 6 weekly on-ice practices (+/-SE; mean playing time, 1.58 +/- 0.07 h; mean temperature, 11.4 +/- 0.8 degrees C; mean relative humidity, 52% +/- 3%). There was strong repeatability of the measured hydration and sweat parameters between 2 similar on-ice practices when players drank only water. Limiting the players to drinking only a CES (as opposed to water) did not decrease fluid intake during practice (+/-SE; mean CES intake, 0.72 +/- 0.07 L.h-1 vs. mean water intake, 0.82 +/- 0.08 L.h-1) or affect sweat rate (1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.1 L.h-1), sweat sodium concentration (72.4 +/- 5.6 mmol.L-1 vs. 73.0 +/- 4.4 mmol.L-1), or percent body mass loss (1.1% +/- 0.2% vs. 0.9% +/- 0.2%). Drinking a CES also improved sodium balance (-2.1 +/- 0.2 g.h-1 vs. -2.6 +/- 0.3 g.h-1) and provided the players with a significant carbohydrate (43 +/- 4 g.h-1 vs. 0 +/- 0 g.h-1) during practice. In summary, a single field sweat test during similar on-ice hockey practices in male junior hockey players is sufficient to evaluate fluid and electrolyte balance. Also, a CES does not affect voluntary fluid intake during practice, compared with water, in these players. The CES provided some salt to offset the salt lost in sweat, and carbohydrate, which may help maintain physical and mental performance in the later stages of practice. PMID:20555377

Palmer, Matthew S; Logan, Heather M; Spriet, Lawrence L

2010-06-01

332

The effect of unilateral hockey bag carriage on the muscle activities of the trunk and lower limb of young healthy males during gait.  

PubMed

This study explored the trunk and lower limb muscle activity of 15 males during unilateral hockey bag carriage of 10%, 20%, and 30% of one's body weight (BW) compared with without a load during walking. The electromyography (EMG) activities of the left and right erector spinae, rectus abdominis, gluteus maximus, rectus femoris, vastus medialis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and the medial gastrocnemius were studied. A 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to examine the differences between the load weight and muscle side. Results showed significant increase in peak EMG and iEMG in the carrying side vastus medialis, rectus abdominis, semitendinosus, and gastrocnemii (p < 0.05) at the 30% BW load. The noncarrying side showed a greater peak EMG in the semitendinosus and rectus femoris at the 30% BW load when compared with the carrying side (p < 0.05). It was concluded that unilateral hockey bag carriage is similar to both backpack and side-pack carriage styles. PMID:24392769

Corrigan, Liam Patrick; Li, Jing Xian

2014-01-01

333

Physlets: Mechanics Problems: Newton's Laws - Momentary Push  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This item is an applet-based problem for introductory physics on the topic of inertia in motion. A hockey puck moving on a frictionless air hockey table is given a momentary push in the +y direction. What is the motion of the puck after the push? The user chooses from four animations that represent possible results. Physlet-based problems are intended to probe student understanding, elicit misconceptions, and serve as a springboard for discussion. Electronic student response systems (clickers) are often used to allow anonymous "voting" on the correct answer.

Christian, Wolfgang; Belloni, Mario

2009-01-14

334

The Experience Exchange n Ew vEnTu r E com p ETiTion wom En's f i Eld hockEy p l ay-of f r u n m ba i s l au dEd  

E-print Network

Mentorship The Experience Exchange n Ew vEnTu r E com p ETiTion wom En's f i Eld hockEy p l ay to the National Technical Information Service advisory board. 26 sPotlight on: athletics Women's field hockey is the first team in school history to qualify for Division I postseason play. 28 sPotlight on: students Senior

Blais, Brian

335

Psychometric properties and reference values for the ImPACT neurocognitive test battery in a sample of elite youth ice hockey players.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study aimed to determine psychometric properties and reference values for ImPACT in a sample of 704 elite ice hockey players aged 13-17. Baseline ImPACT tests were completed at the beginning of the 2011-2012 season. Players aged 16-17 had better visual motor processing speed, adjusted R(2) = .0522, F(2, 45) = 10.79, ? = 2.87, p < .001, and impulse control, adjusted R = .0185, F(2,45) = 7.46, ? = -1.35, p = .001, than younger players, and girls had greater total symptom ratings than boys (z = -3.47, p = .0005). There were no other sex- or age-related differences in neurocognitive performance, and no effect of previous concussion on ImPACT scores. Reference values with cut-off scores are presented. PMID:24389705

McKay, Carly D; Brooks, Brian L; Mrazik, Martin; Jubinville, Andrea L; Emery, Carolyn A

2014-03-01

336

Inductive Principles for Restricted Boltzmann Machine Learning Benjamin M. Marlin, Kevin Swersky, Bo Chen and Nando de Freitas  

E-print Network

Inductive Principles for Restricted Boltzmann Machine Learning Benjamin M. Marlin, Kevin Swersky games hockey nhl launch league lunar mars mission moon nasa satellite solar space pc software players program windows puck season shuttle technology bm w car dealer engine honda data disk drive m em ory

Marlin, Benjamin

337

Overlap of internal models in motor cortex for mechanical loads during reaching  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hallmark of the human motor system is its ability to adapt motor patterns for different environmental conditions, such as when a skilled ice-hockey player accurately shoots a puck with or without protective equipment. Each object (stick, shoulder pad, elbow pad) imparts a distinct load upon the limb, and a key problem in motor neuroscience is to understand how the

Paul L. Gribble; Stephen H. Scott

2002-01-01

338

Augmenting Live Broadcast Sports with 3D Tracking Information  

E-print Network

that many of our effects operate on live video streams at frame-rate (60 Hz) with latencies of less than the offside line ­ a line that moves dynamically depending on the game play. Fig. 1. In the K-Zone system the game object (the ball in baseball, the puck in hockey); instrumenting broadcast cameras and creating

Balch, Tucker

339

Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps A. Jaouadi,1, 2, 3  

E-print Network

power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre- Gaussian of a "finger" or of a "hockey puck" in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams. PACS numbers: 03.75.Hh, 03

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

Experimental measurement and numerical simulation of residual stresses in a carburized layer of a 5120 steel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combined experimental and numerical study of residual stress and microstructure has been performed for a carburized steel 5120 specimen. Specimens were cut from 5120 steel bar stock, in the shape of hockey pucks and were subsequently carburized and quenched. X-ray diffraction was used to record stress profiles through the case for the martensite and retained austenite on the two

P. Rangaswamy; M. A. M. Bourke; J. C. Shipley; J. A. Goldstone

1995-01-01

341

Campus Computing Looks Ahead: Tracking the Digital Puck.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines data from the 2002 Campus Computing Survey to determine trends in information technology in higher education and future possibilities. Discusses Web portals; electronic commerce capabilities, including use of credit cards; budget challenges, including budget cuts; and mobile technology and wireless networks. (LRW)

Green, Kenneth C.

2002-01-01

342

Myositis ossificans traumatica of the deltoid ligament in a 34 year old recreational ice hockey player with a 15 year post-trauma follow-up: a case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Myositis ossificans traumatica is a relatively common injury associated with sports especially those involving contact. It continues to frustrate both athlete and health practitioner alike due to its continued lack of treatment options and a lengthy natural history. This case study chronicles the observation of a 34 year old recreational ice hockey player who presented 7 years post-trauma, was diagnosed with myositis ossificans traumatica and was followed up on 8 years later (15 years post-trauma). This case report is suspected to be the first published case study of its kind. The literature review outlines the various types of myositis ossificans, its incidence, pathogenesis, differential diagnoses including osteosarcoma, and the various methods/modalities reported in its treatment. PMID:21120014

Muir, Brad

2010-12-01

343

Myositis ossificans traumatica of the deltoid ligament in a 34 year old recreational ice hockey player with a 15 year post-trauma follow-up: a case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Myositis ossificans traumatica is a relatively common injury associated with sports especially those involving contact. It continues to frustrate both athlete and health practitioner alike due to its continued lack of treatment options and a lengthy natural history. This case study chronicles the observation of a 34 year old recreational ice hockey player who presented 7 years post-trauma, was diagnosed with myositis ossificans traumatica and was followed up on 8 years later (15 years post-trauma). This case report is suspected to be the first published case study of its kind. The literature review outlines the various types of myositis ossificans, its incidence, pathogenesis, differential diagnoses including osteosarcoma, and the various methods/modalities reported in its treatment. PMID:21120014

Muir, Brad

2010-01-01

344

Potpourri: Hollywood, History, and Hockey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers thoughts on criticisms directed against conservatives, the deline of Montreal's commercial activity, and the deaths of economist F. A. Hayek, author Roger Lemelin, and journalist Barbara Frum. Briefly examines the irony of teaching sex education while downplaying religious instruction. Explores the decline of Quebec's culture and…

Kelebay, Yarema Gregory

1992-01-01

345

Safety Tips: Hockey (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... flexors. Back Continue Keeping it Safe During a Game There's a reason why tripping, hooking, slashing, high- ... by theirs. Other penalties designed to keep the game safe involve roughing, boarding, and checking from behind. ...

346

Case Study: Ice Hockey Injury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study for high school and/or undergraduate students in anatomy and physiology. In particular this case study explores the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Users of the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science will be required to register (free) to gain access to the answer key (and must be of teaching status to receive the key). Included in the resource are the case overview, objectives, case study, teaching notes and answer key.

Philip J Stephens (Villanova University Biology)

2004-04-19

347

Particle-hole intruder levels in 67Cu, collectivity, monopole shifts, and the hockey-stick behaviour of ell - 1/2 5/2- levels in neutron-rich odd-mass Cu nuclei  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A new sequence of gamma rays with energies of 572, 499, 585, and 674 keV has been identified in 67Cu populating the 7/2- level at 2362 keV. Owing to the strong population of the 2362-keV level via an ell = 3 proton pickup reaction, that level is assigned to be an f7/2-1 2-particle-1-hole "intruder" proton configuration, and the new levels are found to form a sequence consistent with intruder sequences in the adjacent odd-mass Cu isotopes and in the odd-mass Sb isotopes. The changing position of the intruder sequence in the odd-mass Cu isotopes is discussed and related to the onset of collectivity associated with the presence of g9/2 neutrons beyond N = 40. The increase in collectivity is also discussed for a number of isotonic and isotopic chains as more protons or neutrons, respectively, are added beyond an oscillator shell boundary. For most of these systems, the ell -1/2 levels show a systematic "hockey-stick-like" behaviour with a sharp decrease in energy with the addition of the first protons or neutrons, owing to both the added collectivity and the tensor interaction, and then a lower slope when collectivity changes are diminished and only the tensor interaction is influencing the changes in level positions.

Walters, W. B.; Chiara, C. J.

2011-01-01

348

Depression research and treatment: Are we skating to where the puck is going to be?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper critically reviews empirical findings regarding current key assumptions underlying the nature and treatment of depression which heavily rely on the DSM approach. This review shows that empirical evidence provides little support for these assumptions. In response to these findings, an etiologically based, biopsychosocial, dynamic interactionism model of depression is proposed. This model could foster further integration in research

Patrick Luyten; Sidney J. Blatt; Boudewijn Van Houdenhove; Jozef Corveleyn

2006-01-01

349

Baseball Elimination (hockey and basketball too)  

E-print Network

.cs.princeton.edu/wayne #12;The Problem testteam wins losses to play against = rij i wi li ri Atl Phi NY Mon Atlanta 83 71 8, but Atlanta already has 83 ­ wi + ri to play against = rij i wi li ri Atl Phi NY Mon Atlanta 83 71 8 ­ 1 6 1 Philly 80 79 3 1 ­ 0 2 New York 78

Wayne, Kevin

350

Sport Scholarship programme Hockey at Birmingham  

E-print Network

respected degree programmes, makes Birmingham the university of choice for high academic and sporting Centres, and with a strong tradition in both university and national league competitions, University. In addition the club has Sophie Bray, Sarah Haycroft and Alice Sharp, all current England U21's and winners

Heinke, Dietmar

351

A Cool Sport Full of Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just "hockey" as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and colliding against each other. The interaction between the skate blade and the ice is a problem of great physical complexity. The question "Why is ice so slippery?" has puzzled generations of scientists and, surprisingly, clear answers have come relatively recently. There is even some optics involved in hockey: how many sports are watched behind tempered glass (or Plexiglas) windows? The optical and mechanical properties of these materials are worth a physics classroom discussion. In this paper, I will review a few topics discussed at length in my book The Physics of Hockey.1,2 Interested readers may also find additional articles on our website.3

Haché, Alain

2008-10-01

352

ReviewsGCSE Book Review: Modular Science for AQA GCSE Book Review: Modular Science for Edexcel GCSE Book Review: Revise for GCSE Science (Edexcel Modular Foundation and Higher) GCSE Book Review: AQA GCSE Physics, AQA GCSE Physics Additions Book Review: Studying Maths and its Applications Book Review: Medical Physics, 2nd edition Book Review: The Physics of Hockey Book Review: Nine Crazy Ideas In Science Book Review: Light and Dark Talking Point: The Skeptical Environmentalist Places To Visit: Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Powys Resources: Sources of Energy Web Watch: Terence, this is stupid stuff...  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

GCSE BOOK REVIEWS (162) Modular Science for AQA Modular Science for Edexcel Revise for GCSE Science (Edexcel Modular Foundation and Higher) AQA GCSE Physics, AQA GCSE Physics Additions BOOK REVIEWS (166) Studying Maths and its Applications Medical Physics, 2nd edition The Physics of Hockey Nine Crazy Ideas In Science Light and Dark TALKING POINT (169) The Skeptical Environmentalist PLACES TO VISIT (170) Centre for Alternative Technology, Machynlleth, Powys RESOURCES (172) Sources of Energy WEB WATCH (173) Terence, this is stupid stuff...

2003-03-01

353

Augmented Reality Comes to Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

2013-04-01

354

Using action observation to study superior motor performance: a pilot fMRI study  

PubMed Central

The most efficient way to acquire motor skills may be through physical practice. Nevertheless, it has also been shown that action observation may improve motor performance. The aim of the present pilot study was to examine a potential action observation paradigm used to (1) capture the superior performance of expert athletes and (2) capture the underlying neural mechanisms of successful action observation in relation to task experience. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure regional blood flow while presenting videos of a hockey player shooting a puck toward a hockey goal. The videos (a total of 120) where stopped at different time frames with different amount of information provided, creating a paradigm with three different levels of difficulty to decide the fate of a shot. Since this was only a pilot study, we first tested the paradigm behaviorally on six elite expert hockey players, five intermediate players, and six non-hockey playing controls. The results showed that expert hockey players were significantly (p < 0.05) more accurate on deciding the fate of the action compared to the others. Thus, it appears as if the paradigm can capture superior performance of expert athletes (aim 1). We then tested three of the hockey players and three of the controls on the same paradigm in the MRI scanner to investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of successful action anticipation. The imaging results showed that when expert hockey players observed and correctly anticipated situations, they recruited motor and temporal regions of the brain. Novices, on the other hand, relied on visual regions during observation and prefrontal regions during action decision. Thus, the results from the imaging data suggest that different networks of the brain are recruited depending on task experience (aim 2). In conclusion, depending on the level of motor skill of the observer, when correctly anticipating actions different neural systems will be recruited. PMID:24348365

Olsson, Carl-Johan; Lundstrom, Peter

2013-01-01

355

2008 Wesleyan University Baseball 3 Wesleyan Quick Facts / Info  

E-print Network

..................................John Crooke Field Hockey......................................... Patti Klecha-Porter Football's Ice Hockey .............................................Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey

Royer, Dana

356

GENERALIZED HOCKEY STICK IDENTITIES AND iV-DIMENSIONAL BLOCKWALKING  

E-print Network

Traditionally, the word "abracadabra " was encrypted onto amulets and other magical paraphernalia to help ward off evil. George Polya ([8], [9]) provided the cryptic form of this word shown in Figure 1 and asked how many ways abracadabra can be spelled out using this diagram. If we replace the diagram in Figure 1 with the grid shown in Figure 2 where letters in the original

Charles H. Jones

1994-01-01

357

Last Updated: 8/4/2012 FLOOR HOCKEY  

E-print Network

equipment to be used. All gear used must have a soft covering. II. Illegal and Required Equipment A. Shoes i on season performance and sportsmanship ratings. III. Rosters A. Teams will be allowed to add additional" with the minimum number of players to avoid a forfeit. b. "Ready to play" includes having the proper game equipment

Pittendrigh, Barry

358

Video Gaming Promotes Concussion Knowledge Acquisition in Youth Hockey Players  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the positive uses for video games in an educational setting have also been established, the educational aim is usually made explicit. The goal of this research was to develop a video game wherein the educational aspect was implicitly embedded in the video game, such that the gameing activity remained interesting and relevant. Following a…

Goodman, David; Bradley, Nori L.; Paras, Bradley, Williamson, Ian J.; Bizzochi, James

2006-01-01

359

Human perceptions of artificial surfaces for field hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Measuring the performance of a sports surface is typically derived from a series of field and laboratory tests that assess\\u000a the playing properties under simulated game conditions. However, from a player’s perspective their own comfort and confidence\\u000a in the surface and its playing characteristics are equally if not more important. To date no comparative study to measure\\u000a playing preference tests

P. R. Fleming; C. Young; J. R. Roberts; R. Jones; N. Dixon

2005-01-01

360

Size matters at hockey Players born in second half of  

E-print Network

and is dwarfed by some of the behemoths he plays against. He keeps getting cut from elite teams because coaches say, "He's too small." The scenario is far from theoretical. A new study shows that kids born later and growing. The study, conducted by University of Saskatchewan researcher Lauren Sherar, will be published

Patterson, William P.

361

2011 PROSPECTUS2011 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN FIELD HOCKEYWESLEYAN FIELD HOCKEY  

E-print Network

Graham Equipment Manager...........Bob Chiapetta Equipment Room Attendant......Jason Helbig Facility.......Drew Black Intramural Director.............Mark Woodworth '94 Sports Information Director.......Brian KattenAthletics Facebook page .....................wesleyan.athletics Twitter handle......................@wescores Sports

Devoto, Stephen H.

362

PROPRIOCEPTION OF ANKLE JOINT IN YOUNG HOCKEY PLAYERS  

Microsoft Academic Search

factors that leads to progressive degeneration of the joint and continued deficits in joint dynamics, balance, and coordination. Much clinical research has demonstrated that individuals with proprioception and neuromuscular response deficits as a result of injury, lesions, and joint degeneration are less capable of maintaining postural stability and equilibrium. However, no normal reference data on ankle proprioception represented by kinesthesia

Jing Xian Li; Blaine Hoshizaki

363

Equity in Athletics 2011 Institution: University of New Hampshire-Main Campus (183044) User ID: E1830441  

E-print Network

Cross Country Diving Equestrian Fencing Field Hockey Football Golf Gymnastics Ice Hockey Lacrosse Rifle Teams Men's Teams Women's Teams Basketball Field Hockey Football Gymnastics Ice Hockey Lacrosse Skiing

364

Chemical routes to synthesize lithium cobalt oxide powders for rechargeable lithium batteries  

SciTech Connect

Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) is known to be a good cathode material for high voltage (4V) rechargeable Li-ion batteries. New chemical routes based on aqueous solution chemistry have been developed to synthesize molecularly mixed precursors that transform to form LiCoO{sub 2} at temperatures as low as 400{degrees}C. The resultant oxide powders are nanocrystalline ({approx} 20-40 nm) and exhibit unique morphologies and microstructures depending on the molecular environment of the ions in solution. Cathodes fabricated from the oxide powders and tested in {open_quote}hockey-puck{close_quote} test cells exhibited specific capacities of about 135 mAh/g with a reversible range close to 0.5 Li ions. Results of the phase evolution and microstructural analysis are discussed in relation to the electrochemical performance of the cathodes.

Gallet, D.; Waghray, A.; Kumta, P.N. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31

365

Management: Global positioning and wireless dispatching  

SciTech Connect

Over the last several years, my company has been supplying many service companies with wireless dispatching solutions. Recently the impact of the system has been greatly increased with the introduction of a GPS (Global Position Systems) interface. This adds visual recognition as to the whereabouts of each vehicle within the customer service area. The only equipment required in the field for GPS is a transmit/receive device and a wireless modem, one mounted out of the way in the vehicle (under the seat) and a {open_quotes}hockey puck{close_quotes} size unit on the roof of the vehicle. The GPS received unit and wireless modem are used to retrieve the longitude, latitude and ground speed coordinates and transmit them back to the host system.

Wood, M. [ICC International, Cedar Knolls, NJ (United States)

1996-02-01

366

Non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerical experiments are performed investigating the non-ideal detonation behaviour of PBX 9502 in two setups. In the first setup we consider a three-dimensional rate stick experiment. A booster charge initiates a reaction front leading to a curved detonation wave. The numerical results are compared to theory and experimental evidence. The effects of weak and strong confinement are discussed. The second setup considers the so called ``hockey puck experiment.'' Experimental results show the appearance of a dead zone due to the effect of the geometry. This is captured by the numerical results, which also reveal that the initially spherical detonation is diffracted leading to local detonation failure. The numerical simulations are performed by solving a mathematical model for a three-phase medium based on the Euler equations. The numerical results are obtained using high-resolution shock-capturing methods combined with adaptive mesh refinement.

Schoch, Stefan; Nikiforakis, Nikos

2009-06-01

367

Experimental measurement and numerical simulation of residual stresses in a carburized layer of a 5120 steel  

SciTech Connect

A combined experimental and numerical study of residual stress and microstructure has been performed for a carburized steel 5120 specimen. Specimens were cut from 5120 steel bar stock, in the shape of hockey pucks and were subsequently carburized and quenched. X-ray diffraction was used to record stress profiles through the case for the martensite and retained austenite on the two flat surfaces oriented up and down during the quench. Layer removal was performed by electropolishing. Rietveld analysis was used to determine the lattice parameters of the phases at each depth varying with both carbon content and stress. The experimental measurements are compared with a numerical simulation of the phase transformation and the metallurgical changes following the carburization and quench. Results am discussed in the context of the microstructure and the role played by the retained austenite in interpretation. In addition the carbon profile obtained from the lattice parameters is compared with profiles measured using burnout.

Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Shipley, J.C.; Goldstone, J.A.

1995-09-01

368

Particle-In-Cell Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft is planned to provide a first electric field measurement in Mercury's magnetosphere by mounting two types of the electric antennas: WPT and MEFISTO. The sophisticated calibration of such measurements should be performed based on precise knowledge of the antenna characteristics in space plasma. However, it is difficult to know prac-tical antenna characteristics considering the plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern antenna designing techniques such as a "hockey puck" principle is applied to MEFISTO, which introduces much complexity in its overall configuration. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a nu-merical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of the modern instrument. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have developed a particle simulation code named EMSES based on the particle-in-cell technique including a treatment antenna conductive sur-faces. In this paper, we mainly focus on electrostatic (ES) features and photoelectron distri-bution in the vicinity of MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technol-ogy for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called puck located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the entire spacecraft body. We report some numerical analyses on the influence of the guard electrode on the surrounding plasma environment by using the developed model.

Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

369

Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on the initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The shock initiation of the insensitive high-explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under simulated accident conditions in which two shock waves interact producing locally high pressures and temperatures. Two experimental geometries were studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges to measure the increases in pressure due to exothermic reaction at various locations as functions of time. These pressure histories were compared to ignition and growth reactive flow model calculations to determine whether a second shock compression of reacting LX-17 caused unusually rapid reaction rates and thus more extreme hazards. One experiment used a tandem flyer plate of aluminum and steel separated by a gap to shock the LX-17 charge, allow it to rarify, and then reshock the damaged charge to even higher pressures. These experiments revealed no significant enhancement of the LX-17 reaction rates under this shock, rarefaction, and reshock loading. The second experiment used a grooved flyer plate to produce a subcritical shock wave in LX-17, which then diverged and collided, producing a Mach stem interaction at the charge axis. The threshold conditions under which the Mach stem grew to detonation were measured. The standard LX-17 ignition and growth model yielded excellent agreement with the pressure gauge records in the Mach stem interaction region. The formation of Mach stem interactions by nearly simultaneous multiple high-velocity impacts was identified as a serious shock initiation hazard for heterogeneous solid explosives.

Tarver, Craig M.; Urtiew, Paul A.; Tao, William C.

1995-09-01

370

Particle-In-Cell Modeling and Analysis of an Electric Antenna for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sophisticated calibration of a space-based electric antenna should be performed based on precise knowledge of electric antenna characteristics in space plasma environment. However, it is often difficult to know practical antenna characteristics considering the effects of plasma kinetics and spacecraft-plasma interactions by means of only theoretical approaches. Furthermore, some modern electric field instruments, such as the Cluster EFW instrument and MEFISTO for the BepiColombo/MMO spacecraft, are designed based on a ``hockey puck'' principle, which introduces much complexity in their overall configurations. Thus a strong demand arises regarding the establishment of a numerical method that can solve the complex configuration and plasma dynamics for evaluating the electric properties of such modern instruments. For the self-consistent antenna analysis, we have newly developed an electromagnetic (EM) particle simulation code named EMSES. The code is based on the particle-in-cell technique and also supports a treatment of inner boundaries describing spacecraft conductive surfaces. This enables us to naturally include the effects of the inhomogeneous plasma environment such as a plasma and photoelectron sheaths created around the antenna. The support of the full EM treatment is also important to apply our tool to antenna properties for not only electrostatic (ES) but also EM plasma waves. In the current study, we mainly focus on ES features and photoelectron distribution in the vicinity of the electric field instrument MEFISTO. Our simulation model includes (1) a photoelectron guard electrode, (2) a bias current provided from the spacecraft body to the sensing element, (3) a floating potential treatment for the spacecraft body, and (4) photoelectron emission from sunlit surfaces of the conductive bodies. Of these, the photoelectron guard electrode is a key technology for producing an optimal condition of plasma environment around MEFISTO. Specifically, we introduced a pre-amplifier housing called "puck" located between the conductive boom and the sensor wire. The photoelectron guard is then simulated by forcibly fixing the potential difference between the puck surface and the spacecraft body. For the modeling of the photoelectron guard electrode and the current biasing, we use the Capacity Matrix technique in order to assure the conservation condition of total charge owned by the entire spacecraft body. Our preliminary simulation run successfully showed an intended behavior of the above numerical models. By using the model, we started numerical analysis on an ES structure around MEFISTO and current-voltage characteristic of the instrument. We report some simulation results on the influence of the guard electrode on the surrounding plasma environment and the electric properties of MEFISTO.

Miyake, Yohei; Usui, Hideyuki; Kojima, Hirotsugu

2010-05-01

371

An Examination of the Relative Age Effect in Developmental Girls' Hockey in Ontario  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relative age effect (RAE) suggests that athletes may be provided with greater opportunities for success depending on the position of their birthdate in a sport's selection year. While the effect has been well established in men's sports, less is known about women's sports. This study examined the RAE in developmental girls'…

Smith, Kristy L.; Weir, Patricia L.

2013-01-01

372

The uncertain hockey stick: a statistical perspective on the reconstruction of past temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A reconstruction of past temperatures based on proxies is inherently a statistical process and a deliberate statistical model for the reconstruction can also provide companion measures of uncertainty. This view is often missed in the heat of debating the merits of different analyses and interpretations of paleoclimate data. Although statistical error is acknowledged to be just one component of the total uncertainty in a reconstruction, it can provide a valuable yardstick for comparing different reconstructions or drawing inferences about features. In this talk we suggest a framework where the reconstruction is expressed as a conditional distribution of the temperatures given the proxies. Random draws from this distribution provide an ensemble of reconstructions where the spread among ensemble members is a valid statistical measure of uncertainty. This approach is illustrated for Northern Hemisphere temperatures and the multi-proxy data used by Mann, Bradley and Hughes (1999). Here we explore the scope of the statistical assumptions needed to carry through a rigorous analysis and use Monte Carlo sampling to determine the uncertainty in maxima or other complicated statistics in the reconstructed series. The principles behind this simple example for the Northern Hemisphere can be extended to regional reconstructions, incorporation of additional types proxies and the use of statistics from numerical models.

Nychka, Douglas

2007-03-01

373

REPLY TO AMMANN AND WAHL: “COMMENT ON “HOCKEY STICKS, PRINCIPAL COMPONENTS AND SPURIOUS SIGNIFICANCE”  

E-print Network

Guelph Ontario Canada N1G 2W1Ammann and Wahl (AW herein) build their entire comment on two methodological arguments (principal components using the correlation matrix and rescaling impact on RE benchmarking), which repeat almost verbatim two arguments previously made by Huybers [2005], neither adding new justification, nor discussing, much less rebutting, anything in our Reply [McIntyre and McKitrick 2005c; “MM05c ” herein]. Nor do they address the subsequent discussion in Bürger and Cubasch [2005]. Additionally, AW not only repeat results that we had previously published, but claim them as their own and then accuse us of having failed to report them. In their abstract and summary, AW make claims that are unsupported in their text, then assert our results are “unfounded, ” despite the fact that results from their own code yields validation statistics (unreported by AW) that strikingly confirm claims in McIntyre and McKitrick [2005a] (MM05a) concerning spurious significance in the Mann et al. [1998] (MBH98) reconstruction. Correlation or Covariance PCs? Huybers argued that tree ring chronologies should be divided by their standard deviation prior to PC calculations (his “full normalization”), acknowledging that this option was

Stephen Mcintyre; Adelaide St. West; Ross Mckitrick

374

The `hockey stick' and the 1990s: a statistical perspective on reconstructing hemispheric temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The short instrumental record of about 100-150 yr forces us to use proxy indicators to study climate over long timescales. The climate information in these indirect data is embedded in considerable noise, and the past temperature reconstructions are therefore full of uncertainty, which blurs the understanding of the temperature evolution. To date, the characterization and quantification of uncertainty have not been a high priority in reconstruction procedures. Here we propose a new statistical methodology to explicitly account for three types of uncertainties in the reconstruction process. Via ensemble reconstruction, we directly obtain the distribution of decadal maximum as well as annual maximum. Our method is an integration of linear regression, bootstrapping and cross-validation techniques, and it (1) accounts for the effects of temporal correlation of temperature; (2) identifies the variability of the estimated statistical model and (3) adjusts the effects of potential overfitting. We apply our method to the Northern Hemisphere (NH) average temperature reconstruction. Our results indicate that the recent decadal temperature increase is rapidly overwhelming previous maxima, even with uncertainty taken into account, and the last decade is highly likely to be the warmest in the last millennium.

Li, Bo; Nychka, Douglas W.; Ammann, Caspar M.

2007-10-01

375

Learning How to Coach: The Different Learning Situations Reported by Youth Ice Hockey Coaches  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Large-scale coach education programs have been developed in many countries around the world to help prepare coaches for their important role. Coaches have said that they also learn to coach from experience, starting from when they were young athletes until their current coaching positions. Finally, in the last decade, Internet…

Wright, Trevor; Trudel, Pierre; Culver, Diane

2007-01-01

376

The uncertain hockey stick: a statistical perspective on the reconstruction of past temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Temperature reconstructions based on proxies is inherently a statistical process and a deliberate statistical model for the reconstruction can also provide companion measures of uncertainty. Although statistical error is acknowledged to be just one component of the total uncertainty in a reconstruction, it can provide a valuable yardstick for comparing different reconstructions or drawing inferences about features. In this talk we suggest a framework where the reconstruction is expressed as a conditional distribution of the temperatures given the proxies. Random draws from this distribution provide an ensemble of reconstructions where the spread among ensemble members is a valid statistical measure of uncertainty. This approach is illustrated for Northern Hemisphere temperatures and the multi-proxy data used by Mann, Bradley and Hughes (1999). Here we explore the scope of the statistical assumptions needed to carry through a rigorous analysis and use Monte Carlo sampling to determine the uncertainty in maxima or other complicated statistics in the reconstructed series. The principles behind this basic example for the Northern Hemisphere can be extended to regional reconstructions (e.g. climate field reconstructions),incorporation of additional types proxies and the use of statistics from numerical models.

Nychka, D.; Li, B.

2006-12-01

377

Adductor tendinopathy in a hockey player with persistent groin pain: a case report.  

PubMed

Groin pain may stem from a variety of different causes. Adductor tendinopathy is a common but infrequently recognised cause of chronic groin pain especially in athletes. This case report describes a case of clinically suspected adductor tendinopathy in an amateur athlete confirmed by MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). Relevant literature on musculotendinous injuries of the groin along with differential diagnosis for groin pain is discussed. There are several differential diagnoses for athletes that present with groin pain. Therefore, it is important to accurately diagnose the origin of groin pain as the plan of management is dependent of the specificity of the diagnosis. The diagnosis of adductor tendinopathy is made with a history of chronic groin pain along with pain/weakness during isometric adduction of the hip muscles. It is confirmed by MR imaging. PMID:21120018

Avrahami, Daniel; Choudur, Hema N

2010-12-01

378

The avoidability of head and neck injuries in ice hockey: an historical review.  

PubMed

The number of minor traumatic brain injury (mTBI), cerebral concussions, is increasing and cannot be eliminated by any kind of equipment. Prevention strategies, such as the introduction of "checking from behind" rules have become effective in decreasing the number of severe spinal injuries. A new "head checking" rule should reduce mTBI in the same way in the following years. Mouthguards should be mandatory as an effective device for the prevention of dental and orofacial injuries, as well as reducing the incidence and severity of mTBI. A new internet database system, the International Sports Injury System (ISIS) should improve epidemiological analysis of head, face, and spinal injuries worldwide. ISIS should provide an internationally compatible system for continuous monitoring of risk factors, protective effects of equipment, and protective effects of equipment and effects of changes in rules through the years. PMID:12453835

Biasca, N; Wirth, S; Tegner, Y

2002-12-01

379

Heritage, sport tourism and Canadian junior hockey: nostalgia for social experience or sport place?  

Microsoft Academic Search

North American cities, working with their respective sports franchises, have built new facilities which have deliberately embraced romanticized notions of their sporting pasts. In this instance, the nostalgia experience is tied closely to the facility itself. However, not all sports facilities have embraced heritage elements in their design and used heritage as a vehicle for nostalgia sport tourism. Facilities built

Daniel S. Mason; Gregory H. Duquette; Jay Scherer

2005-01-01

380

Concussions in Ice Hockey: Baseline Testing, Reporting Accuracy, and Cervical Functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was threefold: firstly, to demonstrate the utility of the SCAT2 as both a baseline measurement and a tool to aid in the decision making process following the occurrence of a concussion; secondly, to assess the accuracy of reporting and\\/or relaying a diagnosis of a concussion; and finally to attempt to measure a relationship between cervical

Craig J. Coghlin

2010-01-01

381

Pre-competition hormonal and psychological levels of elite hockey players: Relationship to the ‘home advantage’  

Microsoft Academic Search

The home advantage is a robust phenomenon that occurs in the world of amateur and professional sport. Athletic teams have been shown to win significantly more games in their home venue as compared to their opponents' venue. Studies have suggested that the home advantage may be related to familiarity with the facility, increased crowd density and even pre-competition hormonal levels.

Justin Carré; Cameron Muir; Joey Belanger; Susan K. Putnam

2006-01-01

382

Seasonal variation in fitness in a women's National League hockey squad  

Microsoft Academic Search

Regular fitness assessments are crucial in monitoring the efficacy of a training programme, judging return to play after injury and motivating athletes. The data can be used by practitioners to track differences in fitness at specific time points in the season or between playing positions. This study presents three seasons of test data in an elite women's squad, covering their

E Jones; A McGregor

2010-01-01

383

Spring Constants for Hockey Dan Russell and Linda Hunt, Kettering University, Flint, MI  

E-print Network

-world application of Hooke's law and the concept of an elastic spring constant. Most physics students are in there are many other systems that exhibit simple har- monic oscillation. 1,2 In this paper we explore Hooke's Law and the dimensions of the stick are constant, so Eq. (1) is just Hooke's law for a mass- spring system, F = k , where

Russell, Daniel A.

384

Cornell Hockey Cornell Overall Team Statistics (as of Dec 03, 2007)  

E-print Network

0 0 26 Esposito, John 11 3 5 8 13 .231 +10 0-0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Ryan, Joakim 11 4 3 7 19 Collins, Sean 11 3 2 5 25 .120 +3 2-4 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 McCarron, John 11 0 5 5 20 .000 +3 9-18 9 0 0 0 0 0 24 Gotovets, Kirill 6 1 1 2 6 .167 0 2-4 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 Jillson, Locke 9 1 1 2

Rodriguez, Carlos

385

Le marché des joueurs de la Ligue nationale de hockey : une approche économique  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes and analyzes how players are distributed among the NHL teams. These allocative rules are the option or reserve clause with or without compensation, the universal draft of amateur players, the intra-league annual draft and the waivers. After having empirically shown that the competitive equality argument among teams cannot be used as a basis for such noncompetitive practices,

Michel Boucher

1983-01-01

386

Place Identity and Sport Tourism: The Case of the Heritage Classic Ice Hockey Event  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sport is an important factor in the construction of place identity. This is particularly evident in the case of nostalgia based sport events that have been consciously developed in an attempt to influence destination image. It is unclear, however, just how much influence attraction planners have on identity in the face of varying media interpretations. This paper examines the way

Greg Ramshaw; Tom Hinch

2006-01-01

387

Experienced hockey coach and defense attorney with Machiaveliian leadership skills in  

E-print Network

DucatiOn CINDY J.H.YEN National Chengchi University B.A. in Public Finance Expected Graduate Date June 2012 / Taipei, Taiwan · Relevant Coursework: Corporate Finance, Public Finance, Financial Report Analysis

Ouhyoung, Ming

388

Ice Hockey vs. Ithaca College Sa 11/2 Women's Soccer Tournament Su 11/3  

E-print Network

's Volleyball Regional Tournament Sa 11/16 Swim Club Meet vs. Syracuse Sa 11/16 Water Polo Alumni Game Sa 11 A Ball Working Out! - FREE We 11/13 @ Noon Fitness & Wellness ARC CPR/AED for Prof. Rescuer - $95 Su 11 Activities Cemetery History Hike II - $15 Sa 11/2 Pine Needle Basket Making - $45 Su 11/3 Canoe Wars II

Suzuki, Masatsugu

389

Electrochemical characterization of thio sol-gel derived titanium sulfide (TiS{sub 2}) powders with unique morphologies  

SciTech Connect

A novel thio sol-gel process utilizing titanium alkoxide as the metal source has been used to synthesize TiS{sub 2} powders exhibiting uniquely different morphologies. The pure alkoxide and its partially modified form using benzene sulfonic acid (BSA) have been reacted with H{sub 2}S to yield a solid precursor. Upon heat treatment in flowing H{sub 2}S the precursors were converted to TiS{sub 2} exhibiting distinctly different morphologies. These powders have been characterized for their chemical stoichiometry (using X-ray diffraction). At the same time the sulfide was also prepared using conventional techniques involving the reaction of the individual elements in a sealed evacuated quartz ampoule at elevated temperatures of 500{degrees}C. The morphologies of both, the thio sol-gel derived and conventionally synthesized powders have been compared using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Preliminary electrochemical tests were also performed by fabricating test cathodes of these materials and using them in {open_quotes}hockey puck{close_quotes} cells incorporating lithium as both the anode and the reference electrodes. These studies were conducted to analyze the effect of the different morphologies of the synthesized powders on their electrochemical performance.

Sriram, M.A.; Kumta, P.N. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-31

390

The Energetic Particles Spectrometers (EPS) on MESSENGER and New Horizons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the course of this decade, two NASA deep space mission to the inner and outer heliosphere, MESSENGER to the planet Mercury and New Horizons to the planet Pluto, will carry onboard energetic particle spectrometers. The combination of measurements near the Sun (0.3 AU), and from the outer heliosphere (up to almost 40 AU), will ideally complement the information available from Ulysses and from near-Earth orbiting spacecraft, yielding boundary conditions on the processes that accelerate energetic particles. EPS is a hockey-puck-size Time-of-Flight (ToF) spectrometer that measures ions and electrons over a broad range of energies and pitch angles. Particle composition and energy spectra will be measured for H to Fe from 15 keV/nucleon to 3 MeV/nucleon and for electrons from 15 keV to 1 MeV. The ion section of EPS is a compact ToF telescope with two main components: a ToF section and a Solid State Detector (SSD) array to measure separately velocity and total energy of the incoming particles. Electrons are identified in EPS by the presence of an energy signal and by the absence of start or stop pulses, since energetic electrons have low efficiency for production of secondary electrons when passing through thin foils. For both ions and electrons the angle of arrival is determined by the position of the solid-state detector that collects the particle.

Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R.; Andrews, G. B.; Keath, E.; Mitchell, D.; Ho, G.

2003-09-01

391

Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order ? allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a “finger” or of a “hockey puck” in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

Jaouadi, A.; Gaaloul, N.; Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Telmini, M.; Pruvost, L.; Charron, E.

2010-08-01

392

Using Fiber Optics to Measure Carrier Drift Velocity of Germanium at 40mK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) uses ultrapure germanium detectors at milliKelvin temperatures to attempt to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a candidate for dark matter. When some particle interacts with the crystal structure, ionization and phonon signals are produced. Each particle interaction gives off a unique ratio of ionization signal to phonon signal. In this way, background noise can be separated from events that may involve WIMPs. Current germanium detectors are about the size of a hockey puck. If detectors can be made larger, there would be a greater probability of having a WIMP interaction. To make larger detectors, we need to better understand carrier transport processes in the germanium detectors. So, we measured the carrier drift velocity at 40milliKelvin, the temperature at which detectors operate. The carrier drift velocity gives us insight into how much impurity is present in the germanium detectors. We made this measurement using a fiber optics line. The fiber optics line allowed us to carry light from a 780nm laser diode at room temperature, into our dilution refrigerator and onto a germanium detector at 40milliKelvin. A laser diode allowed us to create electron-hole pairs on the surface of a germanium detector in a much more precise way than a radiation source.

Lam, Albert

2010-11-01

393

Microstructure of nematic amorphous block copolymers: Dependence on the nematic volume fraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a model for the structure formation in nematic amorphous copolymers and simulation results for a two-dimensional (2D) implementation. The model is based on a dynamic mean-field method, which allows one to specify the polymer system on two different levels of detail. On the detailed level the nematic amorphous block copolymer molecules are represented by a wormlike chain, characterized by three profiles defining its architecture. The first profile sets the sequence of different monomer types along the chain. The second distinguishes whether individual segments do or do not contribute to the nematic order. The third profile defines how the stiffness varies along the chain. On the coarsened level the system is described in terms of density distributions representing the different monomer species and an orientation distribution for the local alignment of the nematic segments. The simulations investigate how the volume fraction of the nematic component effects the resulting mesostructure. With increasing volume fraction of the nematic block 2D equivalents of ``hockey puck'' micelles and smectic-C and smectic-A-like structures are found.

Hamm, M.; Goldbeck-Wood, G.; Zvelindovsky, A. V.; Fraaije, J. G. E. M.

2003-05-01

394

CERTIFICATION Institution Self-Study Instrument Report -Boston U.  

E-print Network

2010): Field Hockey America East Conference Men's Basketball America East Conference Men's Crew Eastern College Athletic Conference Men's Cross Country America East Conference Men's Ice Hockey Hockey East of 165 Date Printed Apr 05, 2010 Women's Ice Hockey Hockey East Association Women's Lacrosse America East

Spence, Harlan Ernest

395

Multimed Tools Appl DOI 10.1007/s11042-010-0722-9  

E-print Network

Multimed Tools Appl DOI 10.1007/s11042-010-0722-9 Ice hockey shooting event modeling with mixture hockey videos. Hockey is a competitive sport and hockey videos are hard to analyze because of the homogeneity of its frame features. However, the temporal dynamics of hockey videos is highly structured. Using

Zhang, Xiao-Ping

396

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WOMEN'S TRACK & FIELDWESLEYAN WOMEN'S TRACK & FIELD  

E-print Network

's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

397

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S TRACK & FIELDWESLEYAN MEN'S TRACK & FIELD  

E-print Network

's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

398

2012 PROSPECTUS2012 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN VOLLEYBALLWESLEYAN VOLLEYBALL  

E-print Network

's Crew.....................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country...........John Crooke Field Hockey........................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey................Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey ..........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

399

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S CREWWESLEYAN MEN'S CREW  

E-print Network

's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

400

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WOMEN'S CREWWESLEYAN WOMEN'S CREW  

E-print Network

's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

401

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WOMEN'S SWIMMINGWESLEYAN WOMEN'S SWIMMING  

E-print Network

........................Phil Carney Women's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

402

2012 PROSPECTUS2012 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WOMEN'S LACROSSEWESLEYAN WOMEN'S LACROSSE  

E-print Network

's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

403

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S SQUASHWESLEYAN MEN'S SQUASH  

E-print Network

........................Phil Carney Women's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

404

2012 PROSPECTUS2012 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S LACROSSEWESLEYAN MEN'S LACROSSE  

E-print Network

's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

405

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WOMEN'S TENNISWESLEYAN WOMEN'S TENNIS  

E-print Network

's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

406

2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN WRESTLING  

E-print Network

........................Phil Carney Women's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

407

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY WOMEN'S LACROSSE  

E-print Network

M/W Cross Country...........John Crooke Field Hockey............................Patti Klecha................................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey.................Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey .........Jodi Mc

Royer, Dana

408

2011-12 PROSPECTUS2011-12 PROSPECTUS WESLEYAN MEN'S SWIMMINGWESLEYAN MEN'S SWIMMING  

E-print Network

........................Phil Carney Women's Crew...................Pat Tynan M/W Cross Country ...........John Crooke Field Hockey....................................Chris Potter/Jeff Gilarde Men's Ice Hockey..............Chris Potter Women's Ice Hockey.........Jodi Mc

Devoto, Stephen H.

409

International Soccer Player Jump Rope Instructor  

E-print Network

; Language Translators; National Merit Finalist; Research; Scholarship Recipients Sports: Baseball; Basketball; Crew; Field Hockey; Football; Golf; Ice Hockey; Intramural Athletics; Lacrosse; Pole Vault Coach; Racquetball; Roller Hockey; Rowing; Softball; Swimming; Tennis; Ultimate Frisbee; Volleyball; Wrestling Other

410

2006 Wesleyan University Baseball 1 2006 Wesleyan University Baseball2  

E-print Network

.......................................Bob Chiapetta Administrative Assistant............................Rachael Zilboorg Baseball History .......................................John Crooke Womens Cross Country ..................................John Crooke Field Hockey Golf ...................................................................Chris Potter Mens Ice Hockey

Royer, Dana

411

2007 Wesleyan University Baseball 1 2007 Wesleyan University Baseball2  

E-print Network

................................................Joe Fountain Equipment Manager .......................................Bob Chiapetta Baseball History .......................................John Crooke Women's Cross Country ..................................John Crooke Field Hockey Golf ...................................................................Chris Potter Men's Ice Hockey

Royer, Dana

412

Secrets of Success In the fall of 1979, Bill Wenmark, a former ice hockey player from Deephaven, Minnesota,  

E-print Network

muscle ached. Even my fingernails ached." Nevertheless, Wenmark continued in the sport and currently and coaches. Get the best advice. 5. Think positive. You are a special person. Reward yourself with self. This includes everything from race equipment (shoes, socks, racing gear, sunglasses), endurance drinks or gels

Huang, Jianyu

413

Perfectionism and achievement goals in young Finnish ice-hockey players aspiring to make the Under16 national team  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research on perfectionism suggests that is it useful to differentiate between perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns. Regarding the 2 × 2 achievement goal framework, the usefulness of this differentiation was recently demonstrated in a study with university student athletes (Stoeber, Stoll, Pescheck, & Otto, 2008, Study 2), in which it was found that perfectionistic strivings were associated with mastery-approach and performance-approach goals

Joachim Stoeber; Oliver Stoll; Olli Salmi; Jukka Tiikkaja

2009-01-01

414

The Effect Of Game Day Promotions On Consumer Behavior In The East Coast Hockey League(ECHL)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors associated with attendance at sporting events has been well documented in recent literature. Numerous studies have been conducted in college and professional sports, yet little work to date has examined factors associated with attendance in the minor leagues. Very few studies have specifically investigated special game day promotions at the minor league level. Based on the absence of some

Brian Edmund Pruegger

2003-01-01

415

What's the Difference Between a Hockey Mom and a Pit Bull? Perceptions of Charisma in the 2008 Election  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many previous studies, gender roles have been shown to play a significant part in voters? opinions about candidates. Researchers have shown that women, on the whole, have been viewed as less capable of managing certain leadership roles (Eagly and Karau, 2002; Eagly and Carli, 2007). While research has explored bias against women seeking political office generally, this question took

Lindsay Eberhardt; Jennifer Merolla

416

High Prevalence of Pelvic and Hip Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Asymptomatic Collegiate and Professional Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Prior retrospective studies have reported magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of common adductor— abdominal rectus enthesopathy and acetabular labral tear in athletes treated for athletic pubalgia and hip pain. The true prevalence of these findings and association with symptoms in this population is unknown.Purpose: This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of pelvic and hip MRI findings and

Matthew L. Silvis; Timothy J. Mosher; Brandon S. Smetana; Vernon M. Chinchilli; Donald J. Flemming; Eric A. Walker; Kevin P. Black

2011-01-01

417

Employment Law, Negotiation, and the Business Environment: A Cooperative Collective Bargaining Negotiation of the National Hockey League Lockout of 2004  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Employment law is a "must-cover" subject in business environment courses. Comparing the plethora of topics requiring coverage with the limited time devoted to employment law during a typical academic term, other important employment subjects--such as negotiation and collective bargaining--commonly receive short shrift. This article offers a…

Ciocchetti, Corey A.

2008-01-01

418

Heat transfer at the mold-metal interface in permanent mold casting of aluminum alloys project. Annual project status report for the period October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

In the first year of this three-year project, substantial progress has been achieved. This project on heat transfer coefficients in metal permanent mold casting is being conducted in three areas. They are the theoretical study at the University of Michigan, the experimental investigations of squeeze casting and semi-solid casting at CMI-Tech Center, and the experimental investigation of low pressure permanent mold casting at Amcast Automotive. U-M did an initial geometry which was defined for ProCAST to solve, and then a geometry half the size was defined and solved using the same boundary conditions. A conceptual mold geometry was examined and is represented as an axisymmetric element.Furthermore, the influences of the localized heat transfer coefficients on the casting process were carefully studied. The HTC Evaluator has been proposed and initially developed by the U-M team. The Reference and the Database Modules of the HTC Evaluator have been developed, and extensively tested. A series of technical barriers have been cited and potential solutions have been surveyed. At the CMI-Tech Center, the Kistler direct cavity pressure measurement system has been purchased and tested. The calibrations has been evaluated. The probe is capable of sensing a light finger pressure. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The experimental mold has been designed and modified. The first experiment is scheduled for October 14, 1998. The geometry of the experimental hockey-puck casting has been given to the U-M team for numerical analysis.

Pehlke, R.D.; Hao, S.W.

1998-09-30

419

A Hardware Implementation of Hierarchical Clustering Shobana Padmanabhan, Moshe Looks, Dan Legorreta, Young Cho, and John Lockwood  

E-print Network

each from the groups rec.sport.hockey, rec.sport.baseball, talk.politics.mideast, and rec) (23) (29) (42) 56% hockey (23) 71% mideast (21)66% mideast (21) 53% b_ball (13)43% hockey (16)63% hockey (11)66% b_ball (12) (6

Cho, Young Hyun

420

u n i v e r s i t y o f v e r m o n t many offer inter-collegiate competition  

E-print Network

Hockey Figure Skating Football Freestyle Ski Golf Gymnastics Hoop Dancing Ice Hockey (men's and women's) Kayak Lacrosse (men's and women's) Nordic Ski Quidditch Roller Hockey (men's) Running Rugby Football'S: Basketball Cross-Country (running) Ice Hockey Lacrosse Skiing Soccer Track & Field (indoor, outdoor) Wo

Hayden, Nancy J.

421

417 North Mercer road, BowliNg greeN, oh 43403  

E-print Network

:___________________________________________ HOME or CELL 2013/14 Season Team level: ________________________________________ Hockey Organization: N 4 S P R I N G C L I N I C S HOCKEY Mail to: BGSU ICE ARENA Youth Hockey Spring Clinics 417 N. Mercer Road Bowling Green, OH 43403-0035 FAX TO: 419.372.0303 COMMUNITY PARTNERS » Bowling GreenYouth Hockey

Moore, Paul A.

422

Dartmouth College Athletics Date Time Sport Opponent  

E-print Network

UniversityNovFri 18 7:00 PM Men's Ice Hockey at Clarkson UniversityNovSat 19 7:00 PM Men's Ice Hockey at University of VermontNovSun 27 4:00 PM Men's Ice Hockey at Rensselaer Polytechnic InstituteJanFri 6 7:30 PM Men's Ice Hockey at Union CollegeJanSat 7 7:00 PM Men's Ice Hockey vs. University of New Hampshire (at

Lotko, William

423

Kidd, Bruce and John Mcfarlane. The Death of Hockey. New Press. Toronto, ON. 1972. Kilbourn, William, Ed. Religion in Canada: The Spiritual Development of a Nation.  

E-print Network

ience. Edward Arnold Publishers Ltd. London, UK. 1977. Van Manen, Max. Researching Lived Experience: Human Science for an Action Sensitive Pedagogy. State University of New York Press. Albany, NY. 1990. White, Philip. "Sports: why do we care so much?" In Taking Sport Seriously: Social Issues in Canadian Sport. Peter Donnelly, Editor. Thompson Educational Publishing, Inc. Toronto, Ontario. 1997. 19-21. Zeitlin, Irving M. Ideology and the Development of Sociological Theory. 6 Edition. Prentice-Hall, Inc. Upper Saddle River, NJ. 1997. 161 Carrier, Roch. Our Life with the Rocket: The Maurice Richard Story. Translated from the French by Sheila Fischman. Penguin Books Canada Ltd. Toronto, ON. 2001. Casey, Edward S. Getting Back Into Place: Toward a Renewed Understanding of the Place-World. Indiana University Press. Bloomington & Indiana. 1993. ______________. Remembering: A Phenomenological Study. 2 Edition. Indiana University Press. Bloomington and Indiana. 2000. Cult

Mclelland And Stewart; Lisa Anne Gunderson; Lisa Anne Gunderson

2004-01-01

424

Femoroacetabular Impingement in Professional Ice Hockey PlayersA Case Series of 5 Athletes After Open Surgical Decompression of the Hip  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Femoroacetabular impingement of the hip joint has been identified as a major cause for hip pain in athletes. Surgical open decompression of the hip has historically been proposed as the first treatment of choice. Functional outcomes in athletes after this procedure are unknown.Purpose: To describe the functional and sport-related outcome 2 years after open surgical hip decompression in a

Mario Bizzini; Hubert P. Notzli; Nicola A. Maffiuletti

2007-01-01

425

Nations on Their Shoulders: How Member Nations’ Flags Past and Present Dictate What Their Jerseys Look Like in the International Ice Hockey Federation  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the most part, the flags of the world’s nations have changed very significantly and rather dramatically since 1898. Some countries have grown larger, others smaller. Some have disappeared, others have been created. Some have had a combination of several of those actions occur in their twentieth-century histories. But, whether these things have happened voluntarily, violently, or otherwise, the flags

Brien Puff

2012-01-01

426

352 Nils B. [ostmann & Sander L. Koole Schonpflug, W. (1983). Coping efficiency and situational demands. In G. R. J. Hockey (Ed.),  

E-print Network

. (2003). Mental fatigue and the control of cognitive processes: Effects on perseveration and planning the school cafeteria added the fast food stand, students have been able to make their own decisions about Reizkonfrontationsverfahren so effektiv? [Action control in treatment of anxiety dis- orders: What makes exposure so effective

Gross, James J.

427

Establishing the Test–Retest Reliability & Concurrent Validity for the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST) in Adolescent Male Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the authors examine the test–retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST). This was an on-ice field anaerobic test that measured average peak power and was validated with 3 anaerobic lab tests: (a) vertical jump, (b) the Margaria–Kalamen stair test, and (c) the Wingate Anaerobic Test. The participants (n?=?14) were 11- to 12-year-old

Allan Power; Brent E. Faught; Eryk Przysucha; Moira McPherson; William Montelpare

2012-01-01

428

WHEN EUSTACE TILLEY CAME TO MADISON SQUARE GARDEN: PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY AND THE EDITORIAL POLICY OF THE NEW YORKER IN THE 1920 SA ND1930S  

Microsoft Academic Search

In even its earliest months of publication during the winter of 1925, the New Yorker sought to position itself as an upscale humor magazine. But the often-too-slim periodical was notoriously uneven in its first numbers, and it was difficult for its few readers to see how editor Harold Ross would develop the reputation for sophistication he desired for the New

Craig Monk

2005-01-01

429

Determination of nicotine and nicotine metabolites in urine by hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry: Potential use of smokeless tobacco products by ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumption of nicotine in the form of smokeless tobacco (snus, snuff, chewing tobacco) or nicotine-containing medication (gum, patch) may benefit sport practice. Indeed, use of snus seems to be a growing trend and investigating nicotine consumption amongst professional athletes is of major interest to sport authorities. Thus, a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS\\/MS) method for the detection and quantification of

François Marclay; Martial Saugy

430

SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE TATB BASED EXPLOSIVE RX-03-GO WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING  

SciTech Connect

Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M

2009-06-23

431

The increased shock sensitivity of PBX 9502 at high temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A modified gap test using brass attenuators has been designed that can significantly heat explosive samples prior to testing. The sensitivity of PBX 9502 when heated to 180, 200, 230 & 260°C and soaked for 30 minutes was investigated. It was discovered that under the moderate confinement (0.46 MPa) of this test, the sensitivity of the material did increase close to literature data for LX-17 (a very similar composition) heated to 250°C under numerically unquantified 'heavy confinement'.

Rae, P. J.; Baca, E. V.; Cartelli, A. R.; Holmes, M. D.; Kuiper, T. A.

2014-05-01

432

Dynamic Characterization of Mock Explosive Material Using Reverse Taylor Impact Experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The motivation for the current study is to evaluate the dynamic loading response of an inert mock explosive material used\\u000a to replicate the physical and mechanical properties of LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 insensitive high explosives. The evaluation of\\u000a dynamic material parameters is needed for predicting the deformation behavior including the onset of failure and intensity\\u000a of fragmentation resulting from high

Louis Ferranti Jr.; Franco J. Gagliardi; Bruce J. Cunningham; Kevin S. Vandersall

2010-01-01

433

Reactive Flow Modeling of the Interaction of TATB Detonation Waves with Inert Materials  

SciTech Connect

The Ignition & Growth model for the shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is applied to calculating the main features of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based high explosives LX-17, PBX 9502 and EDC-35. Under detonation conditions, TATB based explosives exhibit reaction zone lengths of 2 to 3 mm depending on the interactions between the detonation wave and the surrounding inert materials. This paper describes comparisons of Ignition & Growth calculations with data from several two- and three-dimensional experiments in which various materials are used to confine the TATB based explosives. The calculated unconfined failure diameters of PBX 9502 are normalized to the measured values at five initial temperatures. Failure diameters for LX-17 are then estimated by changing only the fraction ignited near the shock front. Fabry-Perot data on spherically divergent LX-17 snowball experiments is also compared to calculations. Calculated detonation velocities, wave front curvatures, and metal acceleration velocities are compared to experimental detonation data for TATB-based high explosives in tantalum, copper, PMMA, brass, and beryllium confinement. Three-dimensional prism failure test results on PBX 9502 are also stimulated using the ALE3D code.

Tarver, C M; McGuire, E M

2002-07-01

434

Big Data? Why Share? User data aggregated in cloud  

E-print Network

· Control information release Browsing history User interest profile Distill Top: Computers: Security: Internet: Privacy Top: Arts: Movies: Genres: Film Noir Top: Sports: Hockey: Ice Hockey Top: Science: Math

Livshits, Ben

435

Plutonism at Different Crustal Levels of an Arc: Insights From the 5 to 40 km (Paleodepth) North Cascades Crustal Section, Washington  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The crystalline core of the North Cascades preserves a Cretaceous crustal section that facilitates evaluation of pluton construction, emplacement, geometry, composition, and deformation at widely variable crustal levels (~5 to 40 km paleodepth) in a thick (> 55 km) continental magmatic arc. The oldest and largest pulse of plutonism was focused between 96-89 Ma when fluxes were a minimum of 3.9x10-6km3/yr/km of arc length, but the coincidence with regional crustal thickening and underthrusting of a cool outboard terrane resulted in relatively low mid- to deep-crustal temperatures for an arc. A second, smaller peak of magmatism at 78-71 Ma (minimum of 8.2x10-7km3/yr/km of arc length) occurred during regional transpression. Tonalite dominates at all levels of the section. Intrusions range from large plutons to thin (< 50 m) dispersed sheets encased in metamorphic rocks that record less focused magmatism. The percentage of igneous rocks increases systematically from shallow to middle to deep levels; from approximately 37% to 55% to 65% of the total rock volume. Unfocused magmas comprise much higher percentages (approximately 19%) of the total plutonic rock at deep- and mid-crustal depths, but only 1% at shallower levels, whereas the largest intrusions were emplaced into shallow crust. Plutons have a range of shapes, including: asymmetric wedges to funnels; subhorizontal tabular sheets; steep-sided, blade-shaped bodies with high aspect ratios in map view; and steep-sided, vertically extensive (> 8 km) bodies shaped like thick disks and/or hockey pucks. Sheeted intrusions and gently dipping tabular bodies are more common with depth. Some of these plutons fit the model that most intrusions are subhorizontal and tabular, but many do not, reflecting the complex changes in lithology and rheology in arc crust undergoing regional shortening. The steep sheeted plutons partly represent magma transfer zones that fed the large shallow plutons, which were sites of intermittent magma accumulation for up to 5.5 m.y. Downward movement of host rocks by multiple processes occurred at all crustal levels during pluton emplacement. Ductile flow and accompanying rigid rotation were the dominant processes; stoping played an important secondary role, and magma wedging and regional deformation also aided emplacement. Overall, there are some striking changes with increasing depth, but many features and processes in the arc are similar throughout the crustal section, probably reflecting the relatively small differences in peak temperatures between the mid- and deep crust. Such patterns may be representative of thick continental magmatic arcs constructed during regional shortening.

Miller, R. B.; Paterson, S. R.; Matzel, J. P.

2008-12-01

436

Miniature Free-Flying Magnetometer Utilizing System-On-A-Chip Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four Free-Flying Magnetometers (FFMs), developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy mission, were successfully deployed from the payload of a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. The FFMs functioned successfully by synchronously measuring the vector magnetic field at 4 points separate from the payload and at relative distances up to 3 km, and communicated their data, in bursts, to the ground. This is the first time synchronized in-situ multipoint measurements of the Earth's magnetic field utilizing miniature spin-stabilized "sensorcraft" have been performed. The data they provided have enabled, for the first time, the direct measure of field-aligned current density and are enabling new science by determining the fine-scale structure of the currents in the Earth's ionosphere involved in the production of aurora. These proof-of-concept "hockey puck" (80 mm diameter, 38 mm height, 250 gram mass) FFMs were built using off-the-shelf commercial, industrial, and military grade surface-mount electronic components. Radiation-hard electronics was not required for the Enstrophy mission's short sub-orbital flight. The successful design, implementation, and flight demonstration of this 1st generation FFM design has provided a solid base for further development of a 2nd generation FFM design for planetary science applications. A reliable ultra-miniature radiation-hard 2nd-generation FFM utilizing System-On-A-Chip (SOAC) technologies is proposed. This design would be targeted for long-term planetary missions to investigate magnetospheric field configurations in regions having small-scale structure and to separate spatial and temporal variations. A fleet of short-lived (expendable) FFMs would be deployed into a targeted region to gather multiprobe vector magnetic field data. The FFMs would be ejected from a parent spacecraft at a speed of a few m/sec and would cover spatial volumes of order tens of kilometers for times of order one hour. The parent spacecraft would carry a sufficient number of FFMs for multiple deployments. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Eyre, F. B.; Blaes, B. R.

2001-01-01

437

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design  

SciTech Connect

'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

Kriikku, E.

1999-05-13

438

Experience Tech Program Review  

E-print Network

& Performing Arts $10.78 for AthleGcs (Hockey) $5.39 for Gates Tennis · Hourly rates (per person): · Doubles $5 · Singles $10 #12;Husky Hockey/MacInnes Ice Arena 9 What are the benefits? · Free hockey Fckets to first 750 students

439

EU-Canada mobility programs' personal experience The EU-Canada mobility program helps students go on exchange from the EU to  

E-print Network

of the Hockey robot. This meant #12;designing, implementing and testing a robot that plays Hockey. My main task as the motor control circuitry and tested it by building the hockey robot itself. By doing this I've developed into the history, geography, politics and culture of Canada allowing me to get a deeper understanding of my

Payandeh, Shahram

440

PHOTO:MARTINDEE Getting to Beijing  

E-print Network

be something of a coming-out party for UBC's men's field hockey program. League champion for the past three Anthony Wright takes to the field hockey pitch in Beijing this summer. In what surely is an Olympic record and field), mother Thelma Wright (1972, 1976; 1,500 m run) and father Lee Wright (1964, 1976; field hockey

Farrell, Anthony P.

441

AthleticsDevelopmentOffice 145MainStreet  

E-print Network

's Basketball Field Hockey Football (`Cat Club) Women's Gymnastics (Gym Cat Club) Men's Hockey Women's Hockey fund. When the football team defeated Army in September of 2008, Coach Sean McDonnell's '78 face said. UNH also ranked second in the nation among public institutions for the NCAA Graduation Success Rate

New Hampshire, University of

442

Andr Laperrire Laboratoire des technologies  

E-print Network

Davis) November 7 2013 Chrisnel Blot Spectralux Montréal #12;Groupe ­ Technologie2 History of hockey in Canada > Ice hockey appeared in Canada early in the 1800s. > Lord Stanley of Preston, the Governor General of Canada, was such an avid hockey enthusiast that in 1892 he donated a trophy, known today

California at Davis, University of

443

Divided loyalty: Jaipal Singh and his many journeys1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This essay looks at a sporting great and Olympian, Jaipal Singh (1903–70), who also had a lengthy political career after his playing days were over. Jaipal was India's first hockey captain in the Olympics. He led the team that won the hockey gold in the 1928 Amsterdam Olympics. This would mark the beginning of India's dominance of Olympic hockey for

Ronojoy Sen

2009-01-01

444

Learning Tractable Graphical Models: Latent Trees and Tree Mixtures  

E-print Network

Learning Tractable Graphical Models: Latent Trees and Tree Mixtures Anima Anandkumar U.C. Irvine satellite science program puck scsi season pc phone question religion players power research rights shuttle

Anandkumar, Animashree

445

Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.

Congdon, J.W.

2001-07-10

446

Plutonium Immobilization Program cold pour tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) is a joint venture between the Savannah River Site, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to carry out the disposition of excess weapons-grade plutonium. This program uses the can-in-canister (CIC) approach. CIC involves encapsulating plutonium in ceramic forms (or pucks), placing the pucks in sealed stainless steel cans, placing

G. L. Hovis; M. W. Stokes; M. E. Smith; J. W. Wong

1999-01-01

447

Insensitive fuze train for high explosives  

DOEpatents

A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124 is described. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124. 3 figures.

Cutting, J.L.; Lee, R.S.; Von Holle, W.G.

1994-01-04

448

Insensitive fuze train for high explosives  

DOEpatents

A generic insensitive fuze train to initiate insensitive high explosives, such as PBXW-124. The insensitive fuze train uses a slapper foil to initiate sub-gram quantities of an explosive, such as HNS-IV or PETN. This small amount of explosive drives a larger metal slapper onto a booster charge of an insensitive explosive, such as UF-TATB. The booster charge initiates a larger charge of an explosive, such as LX-17, which in turn, initiates the insensitive high explosive, such as PBXW-124.

Cutting, Jack L. (Livermore, CA); Lee, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA); Von Holle, William G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01

449

Sport Clubs RECord Men's Soccer -Oct 9  

E-print Network

pm Brazos Valley Bank Ballpark Men's Soccer B - Oct 11 Vs. UT Arlington 3pm Penberthy 8 Ice Hockey Field 8 Ice Hockey-Oct 24 Vs. Texas 5:45pm Arctic Wolf Ice Arena Judo--Oct 24 Go Shibata Tournament Rec--Oct 25 Vs. SH 3pm Penberthy Field 7 Ice Hockey--Oct 30 & 31 Vs. UTSA 5:45pm Arctic Wolf Ice Arena

450

Promoting the ‘arriviste’ city: Producing neoliberal urban identity and communities of consumption during the Edmonton Oilers’ 2006 playoff campaign  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the spring of 2006, the National Hockey League’s (NHL) Edmonton Oilers made a surprise run to the Stanley Cup final for the first time in 16 years. Predictably, hockey fans and media pundits responded enthusiastically to the one-time return to glory of their men’s professional hockey team. Drawing from threads of political economy, historical analysis, cultural studies and queer

Jay Scherer; Judy Davidson

2011-01-01

451

Cerebellar medulloblastoma. Results of a new method of radiation treatment. [Local x irradiation of posterior fossa and use of hockey-stick port for exposure of whole brain and spine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nine patients with medulloblastoma were referred to the Radiation Oncology Section at the University of Chicago from 1966 to 1976. In all patients, the tumor was situated in the posterior cranial fossa, projecting from the cerebellum into the fourth ventricle. After partial tumor resection and histological diagnosis, radiation treatment was instituted: a localized dose of 1000 rad to the posterior

R. P. Tokars; H. G. Sutton; M. L. Griem

1979-01-01

452

Team Flag Football Golf Indoor Soccer Bowling Dodgeball FALL TOTAL Floor Hockey Basketball Outdoor Soccer Softball Kickball Spring Total Year End Total The Hot Mines Chicks 20 5 10 20 30 85 30 15 25 10 10 90 175  

E-print Network

Ballers 15 15 0 15 Jones Road 15 15 0 15 Swim Team 15 15 0 15 Cobra Kai 5 10 15 0 15 The Insane Tactical 5 One Man Wolf Pack 5 5 10 0 10 Skeeters 10 10 0 10 FOCUS 10 10 0 10 Air Force 10 10 0 10 The Eggerts 2 5 Chance Time 5 5 5 Kick Balls 5 5 5 Kick in a Box 5 5 5 Long Hair Don't Care 5 5 5 Suck My Kick 5 5

453

Racial and Gender Report Card, 2003: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Hiring Practices of the National Basketball Association, National Football League, National Hockey League, Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, Women's National Basketball Association, and NCAA and Its Member Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the 12th issue of the "Racial and Gender Report Card," which assesses hiring practices of women and people of color in U.S. professional and amateur sports and sporting organizations. It considers the composition of players, coaches, and front office/athletic department employees in the leading sports organizations. Each organization is…

Lapchick, Richard E.

454

www.programs.uOttawa.ca 5-63 www.arts.uOttawa.ca  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 APA3123 Hockey and Canadian Culture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CDN2105 History of the Jews of Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CDN3100 Histories and Perceptions of History in Canada

Petriu, Emil M.

455

Free-Flying Magnetometer Data System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Free-Flying Magnetometer (FFM) is an autonomous "sensorcraft" developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy sounding rocket mission. This mission was a collaborative project between the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University and JPL. The science goal of the mission was the study of current filamentation phenomena in the northern auroral region through multipoint measurements of magnetic field. The technical objective of the mission was the proof of concept of the JPL FFM design and the demonstration of an in-situ multipoint measurement technique employing many free-flying spacecraft. Four FFMs were successfully deployed from a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. These hockey-puck-sized (80 mm diameter, 38 mm. height, 250 gram mass) free flyers each carry a miniature 3-axis flux-gate magnetometer that output +/- 2 V signals corresponding to a +/- 60,000 nT measurement range for each axis. The FFM uses a synchronized four-channel Sigma(Delta) Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) having a dynamic range of +/- 2.5V and converting at a rate of 279 samples/second/channel. Three channels are used to digitize the magnetometer signals to 17-bit (1.144 nT/bit) resolution. The fourth ADC channel is multiplexed for system monitoring of four temperature sensors and two battery voltages. The FFM also contains two sun sensors, a laser diode which emits a fan-shaped beam, a miniature S-band transmitter for direct communication to the ground station antennas, an ultra-stable Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO) clock, an integrated data subsystem implemented in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), a 4 Mbit Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) for data storage and Lithium Thionyl Chloride batteries for power. Communicating commands to the FFM prior to deployment is achieved with an infrared (IR) link. The FFM IR receiver responds to 9-bit pulse coded signals that are generated by an IR Light Emitting Diode (LED) in the payload for turning FFM power on or off and placing the FFM in a test mode or flight mode. The IR links are also used to synchronize (zero) the clocks onboard all the FFMs through a reset pulse originating from the payload GPS receiver that is issued when the FFMs are in flight mode. The FPGA based data subsystem manages continuous data collection from the four ADC channels and sun sensors, formatting and storing the data to SRAM, and controlling downlink transmission. The transmitter is powered only after a 2547 frame SRAM buffer has been filled (approx. 5 minutes of data). The data is Viterbi encoded and sent to the S-band transmitter via a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) buffer who's output is clocked at 100 bits/second. After the 26-second transmission, the transmitter is turned off to reduce noise coupling to the sensitive magnetometer. The data subsystem control consists of a master state machine that performs data flow management and is interfaced through a prioritized interrupt scheme to state machines that service the ADC, sun sensors and transmitter FIFO. Continuous data collection prevents the missing of data during transmission and provides implicit time tagging of the data acquired by the ADC because of synchronization with the TCXO clock.

Blaes, B.; Javadi, H.; Spencer, H.

2000-01-01

456

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

Kriikku, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

1998-05-01

457

Shock sensitivity of IHE at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Insensitive high explosives (IHE`s) based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB) have been demonstrated to be very insensitive to shock, thermal, friction and other stimuli. Hazard scenarios can involve more than one stimulus, such as heating followed by fragment impact (shock). The shock sensitivity of the IHE`s LX-17 and PBX-9502 preheated to a temperature (250{degree}C) just below thermal runaway is quantitatively studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges. The thermal expansion of TATB to 250{degree}C is measured to determine the state of the explosive prior to shock initiation. LX-17 and PBX-9502 are found to be significantly more sensitive at 250{degree}C than at lower temperatures, but still less sensitive than ambient temperature HMX-based explosives. An ignition and growth reactive flow computer model of the shock initiation of hot IHE is developed to allow predictions of the response of hot IHE to impact scenarios which can not be tested directly.

Urtiew, P.A.; Cook, T.M.; Maienschein, J.L.; Tarver, C.M.

1993-06-01

458

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading FY98 Year End Design Report  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will immobilize plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report summarizes FY98 Can Loading work completed for the Plutonium Immobilization Project and it includes summaries of reports on Can Size, Equipment Review, Preliminary Concepts, Conceptual Design, and Preliminary Specification. Plant trip reports for the Greenville Automation and Manufacturing Exposition, Rocky Flats BNFL Pu repackaging glovebox line, and vendor trips are also included.

Kriikku, E.

1998-11-25

459

Skill Acquisition in Students with and without Pervasive Developmental Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purposes of this study were (a) to examine skill acquisition in field hockey of seven junior-high school students with PDD, who attended an inclusive class; and (b) to compare the degree of skill acquisition in field hockey of junior-high school students without disabilities who attend an inclusive class and those who attend a regular class.…

Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Margalit, Matan

2009-01-01

460

Beliefs about Gender Appropriateness, Ability, and Competence in Physical Activity.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used self-efficacy theory as a framework to investigate the interaction of beliefs about gender appropriateness and conceptions of ability on competence beliefs in physical activity. College students completed surveys about the sport of hockey, watched a video of a specific hockey skill, and responded to questions about the skill. Results support…

Solmon, Melinda A.; Lee, Amelia M.; Belcher, Doland; Harrison, Louis, Jr.; Wells, Lori

2003-01-01

461

Canada House Sarah Watson, Program Director  

E-print Network

providing some facts about the history of hockey and the development of putting cheese curds and gravy. Similarities and differences between Vermont and Canada will be investigated, from our common history of immigration to the production of maple syrup and love of hockey. Overall, we will gain a general knowledge

Hayden, Nancy J.

462

The BosTon College ChroniclemarCh 15, 2007-vol. 15 no. 13  

E-print Network

- plications for the University. That figure, the highest in BC history, represents an increase of almost eight locally) and on WEEI Radio (850 AM). The women's ice hockey team ­ ranked seventh in the nation with a 24, NY, at 8 p.m. on Friday. The game will be televised nationally by CSTV. Men's ice hockey (24

Huang, Jianyu

463

UMassLowellM A G A Z I N E F O R A L U M N I A N D F R I E N D S Alumnus Harish Hande  

E-print Network

in this issue of the UMass Lowell Magazine, along with a look at the history of innovation on this campus and Hockey Game: Saturday, Dec. 1, Tsongas Center at UMass Lowell, 6 p.m. reception in the Club Rooms (behind section 112), 7 p.m. game. Reconnect with UMass Lowell while watching the River Hawks hockey team vs

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

464

C&Cof MARS Student exchange in Canada My name is Vitlis Dniel, and I am a BSc. student of Budapest University of Technology  

E-print Network

Canadian history, and digital control course just for practice since I already took that course in my home, sauna, badminton courts, tennis courts, hockey arena and a lot of other rooms as much as you want. In the first weeks I bought a pair of ice skates and hockey equipment, I joined the badminton club and I

Payandeh, Shahram

465

UMassLowellM A G A Z I N E F O R A L U M N I A N D F R I E N D S WINTER 2011-2012  

E-print Network

's Talk About It: Making Sense of the American Civil War" --a five-part discussion series led by History Skate @ Fenway Park Jan. 28: Delta Kappa Phi Reunion @ River Hawks vs. UMass Amherst hockey game, Tsongas Center at UMass Lowell Jan. 28: Sigma Phi Omicron Reunion @ River Hawks vs. UMass Amherst hockey

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

466

Assessing the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes who participate in contact sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Postconcussion Syndrome Checklist, and the Stroop task. Based on a brief self-report concussion history survey, male and female athletes who participated in ice hockey, field hockey, lacrosse, and\\/or soccer were assigned to one of

Chad Killam; Robin L. Cautin; Anthony C. Santucci

2005-01-01

467

One of five University of Minnesota campuses 13 bachelor degrees in 77 majors and 63 minors  

E-print Network

More than 100 home games each year Eight national champions + 2011 NCAA Men's Division I Hockey + Five-time NCAA Women's Division I Hockey + 2008 and 2010 NCAA Division II National Football AcademicAcademics One of five University of Minnesota campuses 13 bachelor degrees in 77 majors and 63

Netoff, Theoden

468

In partnership with the Dalhousie Alumni Association, the Dalhousie Tigers invite you to a great evening at the World Trade and Convention Centre. The 8th Annual Dal Tigers Dinner & Auction, presented by Molson Coors Canada, is a unique event to raise fun  

E-print Network

, the Stanley Cup playoffs, the 2003 IIHF World Junior Hockey championship where he won a Gemini award, the 2003 and has authored three books, "Brad Richards: A Hockey Story," "All Sorts of Sports Trivia from Atlantic in six Grey Cups, claiming victory in three. He is currently third in Alouettes' history in receptions

Brownstone, Rob

469

The BosTon College ChronicleOCtOber 16, 2008-vOl. 17 nO. 4  

E-print Network

hockey's winningest ac- tive coach -- has a pretty simple strategy for his success: Recruit players who as college hockey's best player in his senior season at BC and now plays for the NHL's New Jersey Devils. "He for Boston College," represents the largest fund-raising initiative in the school's history, far exceeding

Huang, Jianyu

470

REPOIRTfiVOLUMEEIGHTEEN,NUMBEREIGHT APRIL 24, 1972, VANCOUVER 8, B.C.  

E-print Network

-72 seasonwas a very good year. For the first time in the University's history, boththe men-CollegiateAthleticUnion championships. . Thetrack team came out ontopintheWCIAA championships, as didthe women's field hockey along with Ron Fowler, the veteran linebacker. The outlook was a little brighter for the UBC hockey team

Farrell, Anthony P.

471

J Neurosurg / February 4, 2014 DOI: 10.3171/2013.12.JNS132092  

E-print Network

hockey players with a history of concussion: a diffusion tensor imaging study Clinical article Takeshi diffusion tensor imag- ing (DTI) in ice hockey players with a history of clinically symptomatic concussion compared with players without a history of concussion. Methods. Sixteen players with a history

472

Saturday, September 25, 2010 Lundholm Gymnasium  

E-print Network

of the highest scoring defensemen in the storied history of the UNH women's ice hockey program, recording 40 of Apollo's contributions to her teammates, the program, and the sport. "As a hockey player Lauren was in a class of her own," says one teammate. "She was one of the first U.S. National team players and helped

New Hampshire, University of

473

The Moderating Effect a Sport's Rules Have on a Home Team's Competitive Advantage  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test our hypothesis we examine the game-by-game performance of professional baseball and hockey teams. We examine nine years of data from Major League Baseball and eight years of data for the National Hockey League. We use probit regression analysis to examine the data. Probit regression analysis is used because the dependent variable is coded as a 1 if the

William M. Foster

2007-01-01

474

Criterion validity of the athletic motivation inventory: Issues in professional sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to conduct a preliminary criterion validity assessment of the Athletic Motivation Inventory (AMI). Subjects were 649 ice hockey players who were eligible for the National Hockey League (NHL) entry draft. Each player was rated for the dependent measure, psychological strength, by at least one of three NHL scouts from one team. This criterion

Henry Davis IV

1991-01-01

475

Key to car parking (check signs for latest information) Residential  

E-print Network

to Dromana Railway crossing Student village Foot Samada Street Residences Map by Design and Publishing on all campuses. Holmes Street Bloom Street Millard Street SamadaStreet McMahonsRoad Frankston-FlindersRoad McMahonsRoad Hastings Road YuilleStreet Monash University Peninsula campus Hockey ground Hockey

Sekercioglu, Y. Ahmet

476

J Neurosurg / February 4, 2014 DOI: 10.3171/2013.12.JNS132090  

E-print Network

.4 million individuals in the US every year.12 The incidence of concussion is likely much higher, as not all those who sustain a concussion Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 2. Microstructural white matter alterations in acutely concussed ice hockey players: a longitudinal free-water MRI study Clinical article Ofer

477

When “where” is more important than “when”: Birthplace and birthdate effects on the achievement of sporting expertise  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we assessed whether contextual factors related to where or when an athlete is born influence their likelihood of playing professional sport. The birthplace and birth month of all American players in the National Hockey League, National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, and Professional Golfer's Association, and all Canadian players in the National Hockey League were collected from

JEAN COTE ´; Dany J. Macdonald; Joseph Baker; Bruce Abernethy

2006-01-01

478

Oldest and Largest The Weather  

E-print Network

made grown men cry in meet- ings. Wally is based on a guy behind my cubicle. There's a little MITBy'Eain J. Lei.' I . .' Angus Huang '01, and Jonathan J. women's hockey coach during a By Brian Loux England Storm, a team in Featu re the creator The head coach of MIl' Varsity the MIl' women's hockey team

479

Nontraditional Games in a Foreign Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated students' reactions to the addition of nontraditional games (played in and traditional to another country) to the physical education curriculum. Seventh grade students in Australia were introduced to game development, skills, and present status of two sports, 'Midget' Hockey, a modified version of Canadian ice hockey, and…

Cross, Thomas S.

480

A New Contactless Conveyor System for Handling Clean and Delicate Products Using Induced Air Flows  

E-print Network

. This is the principle of popular air-hockey tables. To propel the object levitating on the table, two principles have been proposed: suction and inclined air jet. Luntz and Moon [5], [6] use an air-hockey table in addition to few flow sinks (suction points) above the table. The sinks create a stable flow pattern towards

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

481

The Effect of Role Ambiguity on Competitive State Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the relationship between role ambiguity and precompetition state anxiety among high school athletes playing field hockey. Surveys of male and female field hockey players in the United Kingdom indicated that ambiguity concerning the scope of one's offensive responsibilities was predictive cognitive state anxiety, while ambiguity…

Beauchamp, Mark R.; Bray, Steven R.; Eys, Mark A.; Carron, Albert V.

2003-01-01

482

Using Revealed and Stated Preference Data to Estimate the Demand and Consumption Benefits of Sporting Events: An Application to the NHL1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the implications for demand for hockey tickets among residents of Edmonton, Calgary, and the Province of Alberta. Using data on both revealed and stated preferences from a telephone survey conducted throughout Alberta, we estimate the effect of ticket prices, team quality, arena amenities, and capacity on the latent demand for NHL hockey. We also include travel costs

John C. Whitehead; Bruce K. Johnson; Daniel S. Mason; Gordon J. Walker

483

A Hybrid Constraint Programming and Enumeration Approach for Solving NHL Playoff Qualification and  

E-print Network

A Hybrid Constraint Programming and Enumeration Approach for Solving NHL Playoff Qualification of points needed to possibly qualify for a playoff spot in the National Hockey League (NHL). Our approach and elimination problems for the National Hockey League (NHL) playoffs1 . Our solutions to both the qualification

van Beek, Peter

484

TRANSFERGUIDE FOUNDED IN 1829, Rochester Institute of  

E-print Network

Media); College of Liberal Arts; National Technical Institute for the Deaf; College of Science. Other organizations on campus. ATHLETICS: At RIT, men's hockey, basket- ball, lacrosse, and women's volleyball, tennis, track, and wrestling Women's Teams--basketball, crew, cross country, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer

Zanibbi, Richard

485

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS INTRAMURAL SPORTS  

E-print Network

-cleated shoes are prohibited. D The official shall not permit any player to wear equipment that, in his or her1 UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS INTRAMURAL SPORTS WOMEN'S FIELD HOCKEY RULES The International Hockey regardless of the score. II. EQUIPMENT A. Mouthguards are required and shinguards are strongly recommended. B

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

486

Speaking notes Imagine UBC  

E-print Network

will be the venue for women's hockey and sledge hockey during the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games! #12;3 Today, I want to briefly discuss four different topics ­ topics that are perhaps as pertinent to Olympic athletes as they are to new students, and these are: plans... expectations...hopes...and fears. First

Pulfrey, David L.

487

Late Life Depressed Mood: Crafting Meaning from Experience and Knowledge  

E-print Network

depression: The problem of cultural effects on  symptomatology.  Transcultural Psychiatric Research Review , depression and a disease construct and diagnosis.  Chapter 2 reviews  research Depression research and  treatment: Are we skating to where the puck is going to be?  Clinical Psychology Review , 

Gustavson, Kristen Ann

2010-01-01

488

Shopping for Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes inexpensive science materials for doing science activities using the steps in the learning cycle: engage, explore, explain, extend, and evaluate. The hands-on activities help students construct knowledge of dissolving and filtering, chemical reactions, conductivity of metals, heat absorption, motion (frictionless puck), sound production…

Ward, John; And Others

1992-01-01

489

Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

Kalajian, Peter

2013-01-01

490

Industrial motivations: Conceptual Automotive Styling Tools (CAST)  

E-print Network

Industrial motivations: Conceptual Automotive Styling Tools (CAST) Karan Singh #12;Conceptual. · Sweeps. · Steels. · Paint box. · Whats missing? A refinable digital 3D model. An automotive designers Freeform Local Global #12;Modeling interfaces · Tape Drawing. · ShapeTape. · Steels, Sweeps. · Pen, puck

Toronto, University of

491

Techniques for Teachers Section  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Includes a simple technique to demonstrate Millikan's oil drop experiment, an environmental studies experiment to measure dissolved oxygen in water samples, and a technique to demonstrate action-reaction. Science materials described are the Pol-A-Star Tomiscope, Nuffield chemistry film loops, air pucks and pH meters. (JR)

Tait, A., Ed.

1973-01-01

492

Intramural Sport Supervisor Job Description Appointment Time Period  

E-print Network

-- studying, homework, projects, newspapers, personal cell phone use (calls in, calls out), use of computers, Cones, Balls, Pucks, Helmets, Sticks, Bats, Masks, Pads, Bumpers, Goals, Nets, Pads, Bases, Scorecards on (if necessary) Scoreboard/Timing Mechanism turned on Safety/Hazard check Cones, Goals, Bumpers, Tables

Shyy, Wei

493

Shakespeare  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Helping students to see that themes repeat themselves throughout time allows them to see inside their own hearts more clearly. Use these sites to learn more about William Shakespeare and his time. Shakespeare for Kids Queen Elizabeth Puck s Place You can add your own sonnets or pictures Go inside the Globe Theatre ...

Steele, Karen

2007-01-16

494

Development of the Molecular Adsorber Coating for Spacecraft and Instrument Interiors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On-orbit Molecular Contamination occurs when materials outgas and deposit onto very sensitive interior surfaces of the spacecraft and instruments. The current solution, Molecular Adsorber Pucks, has disadvantages, which are reviewed. A new innovative solution, Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC), is currently being formulated, optimized, and tested. It is a sprayable alternative composed of Zeolite-based coating with adsorbing properties.

Abraham, Nithin

2011-01-01

495

Apparatus for Teaching Physics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Summarizes the advantages in using the Daedalon Air Table, which supplies compressed air to the pucks instead of the table surface itself. Describes methods for constructing an electronic null detector using a Weston type galvanometer and an integrated circuit operational amplifier. Also describes a redesigned and improved sound-level meter. (CS)

Gottlieb, Herbert H., Ed.

1980-01-01

496

Flat Polishing for TEM sample preparation Things you will need to buy or borrow  

E-print Network

1 Flat Polishing for TEM sample preparation Things you will need to buy or borrow YINQE has lots such as Dumont #3, angled tweezers (#6) and a diamond scribe molybdenum TEM grid with open hole Nail clippers don't want wax all over the holder. 7. Place the sample holder into the polishing puck, and retract

Devoret, Michel H.

497

A hierarchy of models for type-II superconductors S. J. Chapman  

E-print Network

of magnetically levitated (maglev) trains. A small experimental maglev \\train", developed at the University o at Oxford University 1 , is shown in Figure 1a. There a superconducting puck is magnetically levitated above materials. Traditional low-temperature superconducting devices include Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR

Chapman, Jon

498

A Preponderance of Elastic Properties of Alpha Plutonium Measured Via Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Samples of {alpha} plutonium were fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility. Cylindrical samples were machined from cast pucks. Precision immersion density and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements were completed on 27 new samples, yielding elastic moduli measurements. Mechanical tests were performed in compression yielding stress-strain curves as a function of rate, temperature and phase.

Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrow, Adam M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-06

499

TARANTULA 2011 in JWL++  

SciTech Connect

Using square zoning, the 2011 version of the kinetic package Tarantula matches cylinder data, cylinder dead zones, and cylinder failure with the same settings for the first time. The key is the use of maximum pressure rather than instantaneous pressure. Runs are at 40, 200 and 360 z/cm using JWL++ as the host model. The model also does run-to-detonation, thin-pulse initiation with a P-t curve and air gap crossing, all in cylindrical geometry. Two sizes of MSAD/LX-10/LX-17 snowballs work somewhat with these settings, but are too weak, so that divergent detonation is a challenge for the future. Butterfly meshes are considered but do not appear to solve the issue.

Souers, P C; Haylett, D; Vitello, P

2011-10-27

500

The unusual stability of TATB (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene): A review of the scientific literature  

SciTech Connect

This review is intended as an up-to-date review of the scientific literature on TATB since its discovery as a high explosive. In particular, it focuses on clarifying our current understanding of the relationship between the structure of TATB and its unique thermal stability. We review a large number of different publications by many authors. A small portion of the work on TATB'' presented actually consists of experimental studies on TATB formulated as PBX-9502 or as LX-17. Where relevant, this distinction is indicated. However, inasmuch as this review focuses on thermal response and the relationship of chemical reactivity to the molecular and lattice structure of TATB as a pure material, results from these other formulations may not be directly applicable, and in general we have omitted them. 4 refs.

Rice, S.F.; Simpson, R.L.

1990-07-04