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1

Performance Prediction for a Hockey-Puck Silicon Crystal Monochromator at the Advanced Photon Source  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One of the Key Performance Parameters of the upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is the increase of the storage ring current from 100 to 150 mA. In order to anticipate the impact of this increased heat load on the X-ray optics of the beamlines, the APS has implemented a systematic review, by means of finite element analysis and computational fluid dynamics, of the thermal performance of the different types of monochromators installed at the highest-heat-load insertion device beamlines. We present here simulations of the performance of a directly liquid nitrogen-cooled silicon crystal, the hockey-puck design. Calculations of the temperature and slope error at multiple ring currents under multiple operational conditions, including the influence of power, cooling, and diffraction surface thickness are included.

Liu, Zunping; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Navrotski, Gary

2014-03-01

2

Micro Robot Hockey Simulator - Game Engine Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Like robot soccer, robot hockey is a game played between two teams of robots. A robot hockey simulator has been created, for the purpose of game strategy testing and result visualization. One major modification in robot hockey is the addition of a puck-shooting mechanism to each robot. As a result, the mechanics of interaction between the robots and the hockey

Wayne Y. Chen; Shahram Payandeh

2007-01-01

3

LX-17 and ufTATB Data for Corner-Turning, Failure and Detonation  

SciTech Connect

Data is presented for the size (diameter) effect for ambient and cold confined LX-17, unconfined ambient LX-17, and confined ambient ultrafine TATB. Ambient, cold and hot double cylinder corner-turning data for LX-17, PBX 9502 and ufTATB is presented. Transverse air gap crossing in ambient LX-17 is studied with time delays given for detonations that cross.

Souers, P C; Lauderbach, L; Garza, R; Vitello, P; Hare, D E

2010-02-03

4

LX-17 Deflagration at High Pressures and Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

We measure the laminar deflagration rate of LX-17 (92.5 wt% TATB, 7.5 wt% Kel-F 800) at high pressure and temperature in a strand burner, thereby obtaining reaction rate data for prediction of thermal explosion violence. Simultaneous measurements of flame front time-of-arrival and temporal pressure history allow for the direct calculation of deflagration rate as a function of pressure. Additionally, deflagrating surface areas are calculated in order to provide quantitative insight into the dynamic surface structure during deflagration and its relationship to explosion violence. Deflagration rate data show that LX-17 burns in a smooth fashion at ambient temperature and is represented by the burn rate equation B = 0.2P{sup 0.9}. At 225 C, deflagration is more rapid and erratic. Dynamic deflagrating surface area calculations show that ambient temperature LX-17 deflagrating surface areas remain near unity over the pressure range studied.

Koerner, J; Maienschein, J; Black, K; DeHaven, M; Wardell, J

2006-10-23

5

Science of NHL Hockey: Vectors  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NHL players are celebrated for their ability to pass the puck quickly and accurately as play moves from one end of the ice to the other. These pinpoint passes, requiring both magnitude and direction, are perfect examples of velocity vectors. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

6

Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) Calibration for LX-17  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this report is to summarize the results of a Detonation shock dynamics (DSD) calibration for the explosive LX-17. Considering that LX-17 is very similar to PBX 9502 (LX-17 is 92.5% TATB with 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder, while PBX 9502 is 95% TATB with 5% Kel-F 800 binder), we proceed with the analysis assuming many of the DSD constants are the same. We only change the parameters D{sub CJ}, B and {bar C}{sub 6} ({bar C}{sub 6} controls the how D{sub CJ} changes with pressing density). The parameters D{sub CJ} and {bar C}{sub 6} were given by Josh Coe and Sam Shaw's EOS. So, only B was optimized in fitting all the calibration data. This report first discusses some general DSD background, followed by a presentation of the available dataset to perform the calibration, and finally gives the results of the calibration and draws some conclusions. A DSD calibration of LX-17 has been conducted using the existing diameter effect data and shock shape records. The new DSD fit is based off the current PBX 9502 calibration and takes into account the effect of pressing density. Utilizing the PBX 9502 calibration, the effects of initial temperature can also be taken into account.

Aslam, Tariq D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-24

7

Dead Zones in LX-17 and PBX 9502  

SciTech Connect

Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and detonation in different pressure regimes. A pressure cut-off must also be reached to initiate the burn. Corner-turning and failure are modeled using an intermediate pressure rate region, and detonation occurs at high pressure. The TATB booster is also modeled using reactive flow, and X-ray tomography is used to partition the ram-pressed hemisphere into five different density regions. The model reasonably fits the bare corner-turning experiment but predicts a smaller dead zone with steel confinement, in contradiction with experiment. The same model also calculates the confined and unconfined cylinder detonation velocities and predicts the failure of the unconfined cylinder at 3.75 mm radius. The PBX 9502 shows a smaller dead zone than LX-17. An old experiment that showed a large apparent dead zone in Comp B was repeated with X-ray transmission and no dead zone was seen. This confirms the idea that a variable burn rate is the key to modeling. The model also produces initiation delays, which are shorter than those found in time-to-detonation.

Souers, P C; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J; Bratton, B; Cabacungan, C; Cook, III, C F; Fletcher, S; Garza, R; Grimsley, D; Handly, J; Hernandez, A; McMaster, P; Molitoris, J D; Palmer, R; Prindiville, J; Rodriguez, J; Schneberk, D; Wong, B; Vitello, P

2005-09-06

8

End-Effector Development for the PIP Puck Handling Robot  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been decided that excess, weapons-grade plutonium shall be immobilized to prevent nuclear proliferation. The method of immobilization is to encapsulate the plutonium in a ceramic puck, roughly the size of a hockey puck, using a sintering process. This method has been officially identified as the Plutonium Immobilization Process (PIP). A Can-in-Canister storage method will be used to further

Fowley

2001-01-01

9

LX-17 Corner-Turning and Reactive Flow Failure  

SciTech Connect

We have performed a series of highly-instrumented experiments examining corner-turning of detonation. A TATB booster is inset 15 mm into LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% kel-F) so that the detonation must turn a right angle around an air well. An optical pin located at the edge of the TATB gives the start time of the corner-turn. The breakout time on the side and back edges is measured with streak cameras. Three high-resolution X-ray images were taken on each experiment to examine the details of the detonation. We have concluded that the detonation cannot turn the corner and subsequently fails, but the shock wave continues to propagate in the unreacted explosive, leaving behind a dead zone. The detonation front farther out from the corner slowly turns and eventually reaches the air well edge 180{sup o} from its original direction. The dead zone is stable and persists 7.7 {micro}s after the corner-turn, although it has drifted into the original air well area. Our regular reactive flow computer models sometimes show temporary failure but they recover quickly and are unable to model the dead zones. We present a failure model that cuts off the reaction rate below certain detonation velocities and reproduces the qualitative features of the corner-turning failure.

Souers, P C; Andreski, H; Cook III, C F; Garza, R; Pastrone, R; Phillips, D; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Molitoris, J

2004-03-11

10

Modeling Detonation Experiments on Triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)Based Explosives LX17, PBX 9502, and Ultrafine TATB  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previously determined ignition and growth reactive flow model parameters for detonating LX-17 (92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene [TATB], 7.5% Kel-F binder), PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F), and pure ultrafine TATB were used to calculate the results of two new experiments. Continuous detonation velocity measurements were made using embedded fiber optic (EFO) diagnostic probes in ambient temperature (25°C) LX-17 cylinders of various diameters.

Craig M. Tarver

2012-01-01

11

First-Generation Jet Propulsion Laboratory "Hockey-Puck" Free-Flying Magnetometers for Distributed In-Situ Multiprobe Measurement of Current Density Filamentation in the Northern Auroral Zone: Enstrophy Mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The sub-orbital rocket mission was a collaborative project between the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to study filamentation phenomena in the northern Auroral zone. The Enstrophy mission test flies the JPL Free-Flying Magnetometer (FFM) concept. The FFM technology development task has been funded by NASA develop miniaturized, low-power, integrated "sensorcrafts". JPL's role was to design, integrate, test, and deliver four FFMs for deployment from the sounding rocket, allowing a unique determination of curl-B. This provides a direct measurement of magnetic-field-aligned current density along the rocket trajectory. A miniaturized three-axis fluxgate magnetometer was integrated with a 4-channel 22-bit sigma-delta Analog to Digital Converter (ADC), four temperature sensors, digital control electronics, seven (Li-SOCl2) batteries, two (4 deg x 170 deg field of view) sun-sensors, a fan-shaped-beam laser diode beacon, a (16 MHz) stable Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO) clock, Radio Frequency (RF) communication subsystem, and an antenna for approximately 15 minutes of operation where data was collected continuously and transmitted in three (3) bursts (approximately 26 seconds each) to ground station antennas at Poker Flat, Alaska. FFMs were stowed within two trays onboard the rocket during the rocket launch and were released simultaneously using the spinning action of the rocket at approximately 300 km altitude (approximately 100 sec. into the flight). FFMs were deployed with spin rate of approximately 17 Hz and approximately 3 m/sec linear velocity with respect to the rocket. For testing purposes while the rocket was in the launch pad and during flight prior to release of FFMs from the rocket, commands (such as "power on", "test", "flight", "power off', and clock "Reset" signal) were transmitted via a infrared Light Emitting Diode to an infrared detector in the FFM. Special attention was paid to low magnetic signature electronic design and choice of materials in packaging. The miniaturized fluxgate magnetometers had a range of 1-60000 nT with 0.1% full-scale linearity. The frequency range of interest for magnetic measurement was 10 mHz - 50 Hz. Digital data from the magnetometer's three axes were placed in a 4MB Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) in data packages (frames) formatted together with time tags and frame ID. After a specified time was elapsed, the data were Viterbi encoded and transmitted at a rate of 100 kbps (BPSK). Each of the four FFMs transmitted at different frequency. These carrier frequencies were in the range of 2200-2300 MHz. The antenna was a single patch on a high dielectric constant substrate covering one end-plate of the hockey-puck-sized unit. The local clocks aboard the FFMs were reset at the start of the mission and stayed synchronized within 3 msec during the mission. Position of each FFM with respect to the rocket is calculated by the knowledge of its release velocity (measured at exit point of the FFM launcher tract) providing an accuracy of 1 m over the maximum range of 3 km. Spatial and temporal nature of observants can be separated to within 3 m in space or 3 msec time interval.

Javadi, H.; Blaes, B.; Boehm, M.; Boykins, K.; Gibbs, J.; Goodman, W.; Lieneweg, U.; Lux, J.; Lynch, K.; Narvaez, P.

2000-01-01

12

Science of NHL Hockey: Reflexes & Reaction Time  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NHL goalies have lots of equipment designed to help stop pucks, but their most valuable tool is their brain. It's what sparks the nerve impulses that travel to the limbs, allowing the goalie to see and react quickly enough to make a save. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

13

Re-shock Experiments in LX17 to Investigate Reacted Equation of State  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17, where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed utilizing a

Kevin S. Vandersall; Jerry W. Forbes; Craig M. Tarver; Paul A. Urtiew; Frank Garcia

2002-01-01

14

Re-Shock Experiments in LX17 to Investigate Reacted Equation of State  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed utilizing a

Kevin S. Vandersall; Jerry W. Forbes; Craig M. Tarver; Paul A. Urtiew; Frank Garcia

2001-01-01

15

Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17  

SciTech Connect

Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

2008-02-05

16

Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17  

SciTech Connect

Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

2007-05-30

17

Modeling LX17 Detonation Growth and Decay Using the Ignition and Growth Reactive Flow Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameters for detonation waves in the TATB-based insensitive high explosive LX-17 are applied to two recent experiments. One experiment measures the slow increases in detonation velocity and pressure over several centimeters in confined charges as the steady state Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) values are approached. A second experiment measures the rate of detonation failure in

Craig Tarver; Steven Chidester

2009-01-01

18

Vulnerability of hot LX-17 to lightning strikes on exposed detonator and actuator cables  

SciTech Connect

Capacitor bank discharges with peak currents up to 700 kA were used to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch the dielectric material on top of the exploding conductor as a fast flyer plate. Velocity of the launched material, pressure profiles from the impact of the launched material and impact marks formed in aluminum witness plates were used to study the stimulus that could be transmitted to high explosive in the vicinity of the exploding cable. To quantify the risk of initiating the main charge or booster insensitive high explosive (IHE) in a weapon, one must know the threshold stimulus required for shock initiation. LX-17 samples, heated to temperatures up to 250C were impacted by 3 to 10-mm-wide stripes of 0.12-mm-thick Kapton to determine the initiation threshold velocity at ambient and elevated temperatures, The strips simulate the impact of the cover coat of a flat detonator cable which has been exploded by a lighting strike. The data allow us to assess the likelihood that a lightning strike on the cable would be able to initiate a detonation of the LX- 17 main charge.

Chau, H.H.; Osher, J.E.; Von Holle, W.G.; Lee, R.S.; Moua, K.

1993-12-01

19

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table By A. Baxter, J. Gemmer, K. Gerhart, S. Laverty, S. Weaver  

E-print Network

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table By A. Baxter, J. Gemmer, K. Gerhart, S. Laverty, S. Weaver Sponsored by Drs. Ron Umble and Zhoude Shao The Problem Examine periodic orbits on a triangular frictionless surface bounded by walls. · A triangular air hockey table with a bouncing puck. · Triangular

Umble, Ron

20

Explosive Model Tarantula 4d/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17  

SciTech Connect

Tarantula is an explosive kinetic package intended to do detonation, shock initiation, failure, corner-turning with dead zones, gap tests and air gaps in reactive flow hydrocode models. The first, 2007-2008 version with monotonic Q is here run inside JWL++ with square zoning from 40 to 200 zones/cm on ambient LX-17. The model splits the rate behavior in every zone into sections set by the hydrocode pressure, P + Q. As the pressure rises, we pass through the no-reaction, initiation, ramp-up/failure and detonation sections sequentially. We find that the initiation and pure detonation rate constants are largely insensitive to zoning but that the ramp-up/failure rate constant is extremely sensitive. At no time does the model pass every test, but the pressure-based approach generally works. The best values for the ramp/failure region are listed here in Mb units.

Souers, P C; Vitello, P A

2008-09-30

21

Recoil effect of the ice hockey stick during a slap shot.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the "recoil" effect of the ice hockey stick shaft during a stationary slap shot. Nine male adult subjects (four elite and five recreational) were tested. Their performances were evaluated by simultaneously recording stick movement and internal bending from high-speed digital video (1,000 Hz) and puck acceleration from a triaxial accelerometer positioned inside the puck. In addition, an electrical circuit measured blade-puck contact time. Data were analyzed with a one-way MANOVA for several dependent variables, including final puck velocity, puck acceleration, maximum stick shaft bending (angle and distance deflection), stick shaft angular velocities, blade-puck contact time, and corresponding time events. The results indicate the following. First, blade-puck contact time was greater for the elite than for recreational players (38 +/- 9 ms and 27 +/- 5 ms); however, measures for puck acceleration were essentially the same (63.8 g +/- 9.9 and 61.8 g +/- 19.5). Two, the elite players were able to generate greater puck velocities (120 +/- 18 km/h and 80.3 +/- 11.6 km/h). Three, the recoil timing was found to be reater for elite players (59.8% of blade-puck contact). PMID:17215552

Villaseñor, A; Turcotte, R A; Pearsall, D J

2006-08-01

22

Double shock experiments and reactive flow modeling on LX-17 to understand the reacted equation of state  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Experimental data from measurements of the reacted state of an energetic material are desired to incorporate reacted states in modeling by computer codes. In a case such as LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), where the time dependent kinetics of reaction is still not fully understood and the reacted state may evolve over time, this information becomes even more vital. Experiments were performed to measure the reacted state of LX-17 using a double shock method involving the use of two flyer materials (with known properties) mounted on the projectile that send an initial shock through the material close to or above the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state followed by a second shock at a higher magnitude into the detonated material. By measuring the parameters of the first and second shock waves, information on the reacted state can be obtained. The LX-17 detonation reaction zone profiles plus the arrival times and amplitudes of reflected shocks in LX-17 detonation reaction products were measured using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) probes and an aluminum foil coated LiF window. A discussion of this work will include the experimental parameters, velocimetry profiles, data interpretation, reactive CHEETAH and Ignition and Growth modeling, as well as detail on possible future experiments.

Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Fried, Laurence E.; Tarver, Craig M.

2014-05-01

23

Professional ice hockey injuries: a 4 years prospective study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIce Hockey is the fastest team sport with players skating up to 60 km\\/h and a puck speeding up to 160 km\\/h. Aggressive contacts between players, rigid obstacles (boards, goalposts), and solid surface may result in high energy trauma and severe injuries despite protective equipments. Precise data at the professional level are lacking.ObjectiveTo determine on several seasons the epidemiology of

G Ornon; D Fritschy; J-L Ziltener; J Menetrey

2011-01-01

24

Embedded electromagnetic gauge measurements and modeling of shock initiation in the TATB based explosives PBX 9502 and LX-17  

SciTech Connect

We have completed a series of shock initiation experiments on PBX 9502 (95 weight % dry aminated TATB explosive, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) and LX-17 (92.% wet aminated TATB, 7.5 % Kel-F 800). These experiments were performed on the gas/gas two stage gun at Los Alamos. Samples were prepared with ten or eleven embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges to measure the evolution of the wave leading up to a detonation. Additionally, one to three shock tracker gauges were used to track the position of the shock front with time and determine the point where detonation was achieved. Wave profiles indicate little delay between formation of hot-spots in the shock front and release of hotspot energy. In other words, a great deal of the buildup occurs in the shock front, rather than behind it. Run distances and times to detonation as a function of initial pressure are consistent with published data. The Ignition and Growth model with published parameters for LX-17 replicate the data very well.

Gustavsen, R. L. (Richard L.); Sheffield, S. A. (Stephen A.); Alcon, R. R. (Robert R.); Forbes, J. W. (Jerry W.); Tarver, C. M. (Craig M.); Garcia, F.

2001-01-01

25

Science of NHL Hockey: Hockey Geometry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

From the passes NHL players make to their teammates, to the shots they take to score, players in every position are constantly using geometry when playing the game. The lines, angles and curves on the ice are also examined. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

26

Hockey Stick Power!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity (on page 2 of the pdf) is a full inquiry investigation into how a hockey stick’s flex affects shooting power and accuracy. Groups of learners will gather hockey sticks with three different flex ratings. Then, they design separate accuracy and speed tests to gather data and calculate average scores for each flex rating. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Hockey.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2005-01-01

27

Formulation and Characterization of LX-17-2 from new FK 800 binder and WA, ATK, and BAE TATBs  

SciTech Connect

Currently LLNL has no Kel-F 800 or wet-aminated TATB reserves for formulation. Although both materials are soon to be commercially available, their synthesis processes have changed and the explosive must be re-evaluated. In 2000 3M phased out the uses of perfluorooctanoyl (C8) derivatives due to environmental persistence and bioaccumulation issues. A C8 derivative was used as an emulsifier for making Kel F-800. In 2001 Kel F-800 was scheduled to be discontinued and the last Kel F-800 run was made in early 2002. LANL ordered 2M$ worth of Kel-F 800 for reserves and Pantex purchased several hundred pounds to satisfy mock needs. After four years, 3M has decided to introduce a Kel-F 800-like polymer based on a new emulsifier using the same chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride monomers and emulsion polymerization process. They have produced 3 batches and claim the 'new' FK-800 is indistinguishable from the 'old' Kel-F 800 in any of their testing parameters. In June-July 2006 3M scaled up a batch of about 800 pounds and have test quantities available. We have samples of the new FK-800 for evaluation. Neither wet nor dry-aminated TATB has been synthesized in the US in any significant quantity since about 1985 and significant quantities of LX-17-1 has not been formulated since about 1990. Over the last few years as part of a DOD MANTECH, ATK Thiokol and BAE Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HAAP) have produced moderate quantities of TATB ({approx}5 kg batches) with plans to scale up for DOD applications. Thiokol TATB is polycrystalline with an average particle size of about 40 m (similar to WA TATB) but HAAP TATB is only 5-6 {micro}m (similar to ultrafine). We have obtained small quantities of these materials for evaluation. The project (1) compares new FK-800 with old Kel-F 800 and FK-800 lots currently available at LLNL, (2) compares and characterizes new TATB with old TATB, (3) formulates new FK-800 with wet-aminated TATB and new TATBs in according to HAAP slurry coating procedure into LX-17-2, and (4) evaluates the mechanical and detonation performance characteristics of this insensitive high explosive (IHE). Priorities are to prove that these new materials can be formulated, pressed to density and machined; and that they contain no impurities which might cause compatibility issues. Since 3M, LANL, Pantex and AWE are currently evaluating the new FK-800, we plan to share data rather than repeating their work. Our effort is described.

DePiero, S C; Hoffman, D M

2007-08-03

28

The Ice Hockey Injury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A high school hockey team is playing the last of three games in one day. The game gets rough, and the star player is slammed against the boards. Injured, he is escorted off the ice. This case follows his health as it deteriorates over the next several hours. Students are presented with the hockey player's symptoms, and they use their knowledge of anatomy and physiology to diagnose the problem.

Phil Stephens

2004-10-01

29

Huskie Hockey Camps Presented by  

E-print Network

love the game. We are prepared to take registrations in all our sections for girls. We have female and former Huskie Hockey Athletes and coaches Head Coach: Dave Adolph General Hockey Camps (Half Day) Some

Patterson, William P.

30

Huskie Hockey Camps Program Description  

E-print Network

. We have female group leaders and instructors. Get a group of you and get in the same session and former Huskie Hockey Athletes and coaches Head Coach: Dave Adolph 44 Huskie Hockey Camps 44 #12;General, 2012 is a holiday. Instructors: Current and former Huskie Hockey Athletes and coaches Head Coach: Dave

Saskatchewan, University of

31

Backcheck: A Hockey Retrospective  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In Canada, to grow up with ice in your veins is considered a terrifically good thing. For well over a hundred years, Canadians have lived -- almost symbiotically -- with ice hockey. While their American neighbors claim ownership over a multitude of cultural identities -- like baseball and basketball -- to varying degrees of seriousness, Canadians truly eat, sleep, and breath hockey as the sole definition of who they are. This site, produced by the National Library of Canada, does an exceptional job of providing visitors with very well arranged material reflecting on the history of hockey in Canada. In fact, while very few Web sites provide much of interest on their home pages, the letter of introduction by Roch Carrier truly makes you want to delve into Backcheck and take in some of this fascinating history. The site includes several historical articles, the gems of the site, that take you all the way back to the patent of the ice skate and the introduction of women in hockey -- including a picture of Lord Stanley's daughter playing hockey circa 1890 (thought to be the earliest photograph of women playing the sport). Also a part of the site is a small, but interesting, educational resources section including lessons for grades 4 through 12. Check it out.

32

Slapshot Physics: Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following resource is fromLessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this particular lesson, students will learn about hockey, the slapshot, and techniques such as force, weight, and speed. Students will play a simulated game of hockey and try to make a slapshot. Students will also practice the scientific method by designing and conducting their own experiment with the materials used in the simulation.

2010-01-01

33

A Hockey Hero  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author shares the story of Will Poulos, a hockey player who has developmental and physical disabilities (mild mental retardation and left cerebral palsy). Will has overcome tremendous obstacles in his life. He was born at 28 weeks in 1986 at three pounds, one ounce, and 19 inches long. He was very sick; his odds for survival…

Bolduc, Matt

2009-01-01

34

Robotic System for Automated Handling of Ceramic Pucks  

SciTech Connect

A process is being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for immobilization and ultimate disposal of legacy nuclear materials. A Ceramification System Test Facility (CSTF) is being built at LLNL, while the actual Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) will be built at Savannah River Site (SRS). The materials are formed into ceramic-based pucks in what is called the First Stage Immobilization (FSI) process. The FSI puck handling system will provide automatic conveyance of pucks through several process steps beginning with removing the ''green'' pucks from the forming press, loading and unloading the pucks into/from a sintering furnace, and ending with loading the sintered pucks into transport cans for removal from the CSTF glovebox. It will eliminate several potential operator hazards arising from operating machinery within the glovebox, reduce operator exposure to radiation, reduce the chance of damaging pucks during handling and increase the throughput of the system. Ancillary equipment is also being developed and integrated with the puck handling system to determine the mass and geometric properties of both the green and sintered pucks. Although the CSTF is intended to demonstrate equipment that is prototypical of plant systems, significant differences exist between the envisioned plant and the LLNL CSTF with respect to their respective puck handling systems. LLNL and SRS both recognize this disparity, and although the CSTF puck handling system will not be plant prototypic in overall form, it will, however, be useful in addressing several plant-relevant puck-handling issues. Thus, the CSTF puck handling system will provide both short-term benefits for operation of the CSTF itself at LLNL, and support an overall project goal of demonstrating plant prototypic equipment for the SRS facility.

Peterson, K.D.

2000-02-10

35

Solutions for the storage and handling of SPINE standard pucks.  

PubMed

Currently there is no rack system for the long-term storage of SPINE pucks in spite of their commercial availability and heavy usage at the ESRF. The only way to store pucks is in transport dewar canisters which presents a number of limitations and drawbacks. Here a simple affordable rack for storing SPINE pucks is described, which we believe is accessible to not only synchrotrons but also both academic and industrial research laboratories. PMID:22338692

Bodin, Cristian; Mauritzson, Fredrik; Horsefield, Rob; Aagaard, Anna; Guo, Hongwei; Öster, Linda; Wissler, Lisa; Ek, Margareta

2012-03-01

36

Injuries in men's international ice hockey: a 7-year study of the International Ice Hockey Federation Adult World Championship Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games  

PubMed Central

Background Information on ice hockey injuries at the international level is very limited. The aim of the study was to analyse the incidence, type, mechanism and severity of ice hockey injuries in men's international ice hockey tournaments. Methods All the injuries in men's International Ice Hockey Federation World Championship tournaments over a 7-year period were analysed using a strict definition of injury, standardised reporting strategies and an injury diagnosis made by a team physician. Results 528 injuries were recorded in games resulting in an injury rate of 14.2 per 1000 player-games (52.1/1000 player-game hours). Additionally, 27 injuries occurred during practice. For WC A-pool Tournaments and Olympic Winter Games (OWG) the injury rate was 16.3/1000 player-games (59.6/1000 player-game hours). Body checking, and stick and puck contact caused 60.7% of the injuries. The most common types of injuries were lacerations, sprains, contusions and fractures. A laceration was the most common facial injury and was typically caused by a stick. The knee was the most frequently injured part of the lower body and the shoulder was the most common site of an upper body injury. Arenas with flexible boards and glass reduced the risk of injury by 29% (IRR 0.71, (95% CI 0.56 to 0.91)). Conclusions The incidence of injury during international ice hockey competition is relatively high. Arena characteristics, such as flexible boards and glass, appeared to reduce the risk of injury. PMID:25293341

Tuominen, Markku; Stuart, Michael J; Aubry, Mark; Kannus, Pekka; Parkkari, Jari

2015-01-01

37

Science of NHL Hockey: Kinematics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NHL skaters can reach speeds in excess of 20 miles (32km) per hour, and during some short bursts approach 30 miles (48 km) per hour. Kinematics, the branch of classical mechanics, helps describe a player's movement across the ice by defining his position, velocity and acceleration. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

38

Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique  

SciTech Connect

The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

2008-01-16

39

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS  

E-print Network

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINICS CLINIC 1: Saturday & Sunday, October 27.wesleyan.edu/athletics/wihockey/index.html TO SIGN UP QUESTIONS? CALL 860-685-2904 OR EMAIL JAMCKENNA@WESLEYAN.EDU #12;WESLEYAN HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS ________________________ to participate in the WESLEYAN HOCKEY GIRLS SKILLS CLINIC offered by Wesleyan University beginning on or about

Royer, Dana

40

Massachusetts Special Olympics Poly Hockey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Poly Hockey is featured in this manual of instructions for coaches and teachers to use with mentally retarded boys and girls of all ages and ability levels. It is noted that the sport has been supported by the Board of Directors of the Special Olympics and has been used in Massachusetts for over 7 years. Explained is use of the game indoors, and…

Morrissey, Jim

41

Pendulum Collision  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animation shows a hockey puck (red) attached to a string and resting on an air hockey table. Another hockey puck (black), incident from the right, collides with the red puck. Consider both pucks as "the system."

Wolfgang Christian

42

Science of NHL Hockey: Mass, Volume & Density  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NHL fans might be surprised to learn that the ice surface at a hockey rink is only about one inch thick. Scientists and ice technicians explain the science and math that goes into building and maintaining this surface through the long NHL season. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

43

Science of NHL Hockey: Statistics & Averages  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Being a top goalie in the NHL takes more than quick reflexes and nerves of steel, it also requires a firm grip on the numbers. Namely, the key averages and statistics of goaltending. "Science of NHL Hockey" is a 10-part video series produced in partnership with the National Science Foundation and the National Hockey League.

NBC Learn

2010-10-07

44

Hockey success and birth date: The relative age effect revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a replication of studies by Barnsley et al. (1985), and Grondin et al. (1984) the authors gathered birthdates of players in the National Hockey League (NHL), Western Hockey League (WHL), Ontario Hockey League (OHL), and Quebec Major Junior Hockey League (QMJHL). The players were categorized according to month of birth. Additionally, the players were categorized by country of birth,

Joseph E Nolan; Grace Howell

2010-01-01

45

Ice hockey shot event modeling with mixture hidden Markov model  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper we present a new event analysis framework based on mixture Hidden Markov Model(HMM) for ice hockey video. Hockey is a competitive sport, which is hard to model because of its frame color homogeneity. But it does posses many temporal regularities. With the mixture representation of local observations and Markov chain property of hockey event structure the hockey

Xiaofeng Wang; Xiao-Ping Zhang

2009-01-01

46

PhET: Electric Field Hockey  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webpage contains an activity that allows users to guide a charged object, or "puck", through a maze using the electric field created by point charges placed by the user. Options exist to control the mass and sign of the charge of the puck. There are four levels of difficulty that change the barrier placement. Barriers do not affect the fields, only define the path of the puck. The user can view a vector representation of the electric field, as well as trace the path of the puck. After each attempt the user may move the existing charge or place more charges and try again. This activity gives users an immediate experience with the interaction between fields and charges. The page also contains samples of learning goals as well as user-submitted ideas and activities for use with the simulation. This simulation is part of a large and growing collection. It has been designed using principles from physics education research and refined based on student interviews.

47

Title: Swarm Robots Demonstration with e-puck robots Supervisor: Alexander Frster  

E-print Network

UROP 2009 Title: Swarm Robots Demonstration with e-puck robots Supervisor: Alexander Förster/C++ Abstract: The aim of the project is to implement a demonstration for a intelligent swarm of robots Sponsor: Luca Gambardella / UROP Keywords: swarm intelligence, e-puck, micro-controller, programming

Krause, Rolf

48

Injuries in women's ice hockey: special considerations.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is a popular collision sport with a growing number of female athletes participating each year. As participation among girls and women continues to increase, it will be important to recognize common injuries occurring during women's games. Despite difference in the rules that prohibit body checking in women's and girls' games, injury profiles are similar to those of their male counterparts. Concussions, contusions, acromioclavicular joint injuries, ligamentous knee injuries, and muscle strains occur during women's ice hockey games, with groin strains accounting for the most common practice injury. This article will review both injury rates and common injuries occurring in women's ice hockey, with a focus on the observed concussion rate and groin injuries. PMID:25391093

Abbott, Kristin

2014-01-01

49

Pythagoras and the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

The nature of the relationship Bill James found between the win\\/loss percentage of a Major League Baseball team and the number of runs the team scores and allows over the course of a season is investigated for the National Hockey League (NHL). We find the optimal form of James' model for the NHL using the absolute error criterion and demonstrate

James J. Cochran; Rob Blackstock

2009-01-01

50

Change Agent Research for Windsor Minor Hockey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was based on an earlier 1972-73 study (see SP 009 113) which led to organizational restructuring of Windsor minor hockey (WMH). It was felt that further studies comparing attitudes and beliefs with behavior would be beneficial. Of particular interest were: (a) whether or not attitudes and beliefs changed due to adjusted organization and…

Moriarty, Dick; Duthie, James

51

NU Intramural Sports Roller Hockey Rules  

E-print Network

. In-line skates will be without a brake or any brake assembly. This includes any plastic housing-court or along the two imaginary lines, created by connecting the endzone face-off spots. 10. 4 players maximum are required to wear helmets with a full face shield, hockey shin guards, elbow pads, in-line skates and gloves

Sridhar, Srinivas

52

Open E-puck Range & Bearing miniaturized board for local communication in swarm robotics  

Microsoft Academic Search

We have designed and built a new open hardware\\/software board that lets miniaturized robots communicate and at the same time obtain the range and bearing of the source of emission. The open E-puck Range & Bearing board improves an existing infrared relative localization\\/communication software library (libIrcom) developed for the e-puck robot and based on its on-board infrared sensors. The board

Álvaro Gutiérrez; Alexandre Campo; Marco Dorigo; Jesus Donate; Félix Monasterio-huelin; Luis Magdalena

2009-01-01

53

Hockey-stick steam generator for LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the criteria and evaluation leading to the selection of the Hockey Stick Steam Generator Concept and subsequent development of that concept for LMFBR application. The selection process and development of the Modular Steam Generator (MSG) is discussed, including the extensive test programs that culminated in the manufacture and test of a 35 MW(t) Steam Generator. The design of the CRBRP Steam Generator is described, emphasizing the current status and a review of the critical structural areas. CRBRP steam generator development tests are evaluated, with a discussion of test objectives and rating of the usefulness of test results to the CRBRP prototype design. Manufacturing experience and status of the CRBRP prototype and plant units is covered. The scaleup of the Hockey Stick concept to large commercial plant application is presented, with an evaluation of scaleup limitations, transient effects, and system design implications.

Hallinan, G.J.; Svedlund, P.E.

1981-01-01

54

PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments  

PubMed Central

The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the “PUCK” prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed. PMID:25364323

Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M.

2014-01-01

55

Bodychecking Rules and Concussion in Elite Hockey  

PubMed Central

Athletes participating in contact sports such as ice hockey are exposed to a high risk of suffering a concussion. We determined whether recent rule changes regulating contact to the head introduced in 2010–11 and 2011–12 have been effective in reducing the incidence of concussion in the National Hockey League (NHL). A league with a longstanding ban on hits contacting the head, the Ontario Hockey League (OHL), was also studied. A retrospective study of NHL and OHL games for the 2009–10 to 2011–12 seasons was performed using official game records and team injury reports in addition to other media sources. Concussion incidence over the 3 seasons analyzed was 5.23 per 100 NHL regular season games and 5.05 per 100 OHL regular season games (IRR 1.04; 95% CI 1.01, 1.50). When injuries described as concussion-like or suspicious of concussion were included, incidences rose to 8.8 and 7.1 per 100 games respectively (IRR 1.23; 95% CI 0.81, 1.32). The number of NHL concussions or suspected concussions was lower in 2009–10 than in 2010–11 (IRR 0.61; 95% CI 0.45, 0.83), but did not increase from 2010–11 to 2011–12 (IRR 1.05; 95% CI 0.80, 1.38). 64.2% of NHL concussions were caused by bodychecking, and only 28.4% of concussions and 36.8% of suspected concussions were caused by illegal incidents. We conclude that rules regulating bodychecking to the head did not reduce the number of players suffering concussions during NHL regular season play and that further changes or stricter enforcement of existing rules may be required to minimize the risk of players suffering these injuries. PMID:23874888

Donaldson, Laura; Asbridge, Mark; Cusimano, Michael D.

2013-01-01

56

A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part II: how concussions occur in the NHL.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Concussions in sports are a growing cause of concern, as these injuries can have debilitating short-term effects and little is known about the potential long-term consequences. This work aims to describe how concussions occur in the National Hockey League. METHODS: Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons. Digital video records were coded and analysed using a standardised protocol. RESULTS: 88% (n=174/197) of concussions involved player-to-opponent contact. 16 diagnosed concussions were a result of fighting. Of the 158 concussions that involved player-to-opponent body contact, the most common mechanisms were direct contact to the head initiated by the shoulder 42% of the time (n=66/158), by the elbow 15% (n=24/158) and by gloves in 5% of cases (n=8/158). When the results of anatomical location are combined with initial contact, almost half of these events (n=74/158) were classified as direct contact to the lateral aspect of the head. CONCLUSIONS: The predominant mechanism of concussion was consistently characterised by player-to-opponent contact, typically directed to the head by the shoulder, elbow or gloves. Also, several important characteristics were apparent: (1) contact was often to the lateral aspect of the head; (2) the player who suffered a concussion was often not in possession of the puck and (3) no penalty was called on the play. PMID:23637116

Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

2013-06-13

57

Development of an autonomous robotic air hockey player  

E-print Network

Air hockey is a widely played sport in the United States and is expanding to other countries. It is usually played on a frictionless table between two or more people. The dependency of another individual makes it impossible ...

Vang, Bee, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01

58

International Toys in Space: Hockey - Duration: 2:12.  

NASA Video Gallery

Cosmonauts Sergi Treschev and Valery Korzun discover ways to adapt the game of hockey while trying to overcome the challenges of playing the game in microgravity. Astronaut Peggy Whitson narrates t...

59

Exploring evolutionary learning in a simulated hockey environment  

E-print Network

on a restricted task, using an evo- lutionary hill-climbing algorithm, with a staged learn- ing approach. Here, we to perform the task well, a player must develop subtle skills, for example to nudge the puck away from a wall], we showed how neural network controllers could be trained in the Shock en- vironment using a hill-climbing

Blair, Alan

60

For Immediate Release --Thursday, April 3, 2014 Pronghorns men's hockey program taps Red Wings  

E-print Network

For Immediate Release -- Thursday, April 3, 2014 Pronghorns men's hockey University of Lethbridge Pronghorns Athletics has named Spiros Anastas as the new's an exciting time for Pronghorns men's hockey, it's hard not to get excited

Seldin, Jonathan P.

61

Automatic acquisition of motion trajectories: tracking hockey players  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Computer systems that have the capability of analyzing complex and dynamic scenes play an essential role in video annotation. Scenes can be complex in such a way that there are many cluttered objects with different colors, shapes and sizes, and can be dynamic with multiple interacting moving objects and a constantly changing background. In reality, there are many scenes that are complex, dynamic, and challenging enough for computers to describe. These scenes include games of sports, air traffic, car traffic, street intersections, and cloud transformations. Our research is about the challenge of inventing a descriptive computer system that analyzes scenes of hockey games where multiple moving players interact with each other on a constantly moving background due to camera motions. Ultimately, such a computer system should be able to acquire reliable data by extracting the players" motion as their trajectories, querying them by analyzing the descriptive information of data, and predict the motions of some hockey players based on the result of the query. Among these three major aspects of the system, we primarily focus on visual information of the scenes, that is, how to automatically acquire motion trajectories of hockey players from video. More accurately, we automatically analyze the hockey scenes by estimating parameters (i.e., pan, tilt, and zoom) of the broadcast cameras, tracking hockey players in those scenes, and constructing a visual description of the data by displaying trajectories of those players. Many technical problems in vision such as fast and unpredictable players' motions and rapid camera motions make our challenge worth tackling. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been any automatic video annotation systems for hockey developed in the past. Although there are many obstacles to overcome, our efforts and accomplishments would hopefully establish the infrastructure of the automatic hockey annotation system and become a milestone for research in automatic video annotation in this domain.

Okuma, Kenji; Little, James J.; Lowe, David

2003-12-01

62

Screening of asymptomatic elite youth hockey players: clinical and MRI exam  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIce hockey players are reportedly at increased risk to suffer hip injuries. This may be due to repetitive hip positions during the ice hockey skate stride.ObjectiveTo determine if specific tests used during a screening program can identify youth hockey players who are at risk of acetabular labral tears due to femoroacetabular impingement (FAI).DesignProspective screening study.SettingClinical centre screened elite youth hockey

M J Philippon; R F LaPrade; K K Briggs; J D Stull

2011-01-01

63

The Collision of Trans-Experience and the Politics of Women's Ice Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transgender identified athletes have competed at all levels in sports, though most remain hidden and silenced. In the Spring of 2003, USA Hockey banned a transsexual male-to-female (MTF) athlete from participating in the Women's National Ice Hockey Tournament. By deeming her ineligible, USA Hockey demonstrated how tightly they aim to control sex and gender in women's sport. A series of

Jodi H. Cohen; Tamar Z. Semerjian

2008-01-01

64

"No Fear Comes": Adolescent Girls, Ice Hockey, and the Embodiment of Gender.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the relationship between gender, physicality, and embodiment among Canadian adolescent girls who played ice hockey. Interview data indicated that the girls emphasized the importance of being aggressive (fearless in use of the body). Players understood that contrasts between men's hockey (more physical and aggressive) and women's hockey

Theberge, Nancy

2003-01-01

65

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table A Senior Thesis Submitted to the Department of  

E-print Network

Periodic Orbits on a Triangular Air Hockey Table A Senior Thesis Submitted to the Department 2 #12;Abstract We explore the existence of periodic orbits on a triangular air hockey table, also concerning more general triangles in section 3. 3 #12;Periodic Orbits in a Triangular Air Hockey Table

Umble, Ron

66

Exploring evolutionary learning in a simulated hockey environment  

E-print Network

on a restricted task, using an evo­ lutionary hill­climbing algorithm, with a staged learn­ ing approach. Here, we to perform the task well, a player must develop subtle skills, for example to nudge the puck away from a wall], we showed how neural network controllers could be trained in the Shock en­ vironment using a hill­climbing

Pollack, Jordan B.

67

Relationship of physical fitness test results and hockey playing potential in elite-level ice hockey players.  

PubMed

The primary purpose of this study was to determine the fitness variables with the highest capability for predicting hockey playing potential at the elite level as determined by entry draft selection order. We also examined the differences associated with the predictive abilities of the test components among playing positions. The secondary purpose of this study was to update the physiological profile of contemporary hockey players including positional differences. Fitness test results conducted by our laboratory at the National Hockey League Entry Draft combine were compared with draft selection order on a total of 853 players. Regression models revealed peak anaerobic power output to be important for higher draft round selection in all positions; however, the degree of importance of this measurement varied with playing position. The body index, which is a composite score of height, lean mass, and muscular development, was similarly important in all models, with differing influence by position. Removal of the goalies' data increased predictive capacity, suggesting that talent identification using physical fitness testing of this sort may be more appropriate for skating players. Standing long jump was identified as a significant predictor variable for forwards and defense and could be a useful surrogate for assessing overall hockey potential. Significant differences exist between the physiological profiles of current players based on playing position. There are also positional differences in the relative importance of anthropometric and fitness measures of off-ice hockey tests in relation to draft order. Physical fitness measures and anthropometric data are valuable in helping predict hockey playing potential. Emphasis on anthropometry should be used when comparing elite-level forwards, whereas peak anaerobic power and fatigue rate are more useful for differentiating between defense. PMID:18714234

Burr, Jaime F; Jamnik, Roni K; Baker, Joseph; Macpherson, Alison; Gledhill, Norman; McGuire, E J

2008-09-01

68

Injuries in Youth Hockey. On-Ice Emergency Care.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews the nature and frequency of injuries in youth hockey (which range from musculoskeletal injuries to life-threatening emergencies). Overall injury rates have decreased, but there is an increase in head, neck, and spine injuries. Those injuries that are serious demand prompt, skillful attention. A comprehensive format for on-ice management is…

Blanchard, Bradford M.; Castaldi, Cosmo R.

1991-01-01

69

A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

Fogel, Curtis

2010-01-01

70

Ice friction of flared ice hockey skate blades  

Microsoft Academic Search

In ice hockey, skating performance depends on the skill and physical conditioning of the players and on the characteristics of their equipment. CT Edge have recently designed a new skate blade that angles outward near the bottom of the blade. The objective of this study was to compare the frictional characteristics of three CT Edge blades (with blade angles of

Peter A. Federolf; Robert Mills; Benno Nigg

2008-01-01

71

Physiological profiles of representative women softball, hockey and netball players  

Microsoft Academic Search

Maximum aerobic and anaerobic power has been measured in 29 top class female athletes. The subjects were members of their respective South Australian representative teams for the 1977 season. The hockey players (N = 11) registered the highest mean treadmill [Vdot]0 max of 50-2 ml\\/kgmin which was significantly greater ( p < 0 05) than that of either the softballers

R. T. WITHERS; R. G. D. ROBERTS

1981-01-01

72

Concussions in Ice Hockey: Is it Time to Worry?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent events have highlighted the issue of concussions in sports, particularly in ice hockey. A concussion is an injury to the brain caused by acceleration forces imparted on the brain. Symptoms vary in severity from confusion and minor headaches to loss of consciousness and amnesia. Concussions are a common sports injury that have been associated with neurological and psychiatric impairment,

Khizer Amin

2012-01-01

73

Athlete Violence and Aggression in Hockey and Interpersonal Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because male athletes have exhibited aggressive tendencies in a variety of settings, they may be at risk for using violence both within and beyond their sports involvement. Five former college\\/professional hockey players were interviewed to determine their perspec- tives on the nature of aggression and violence in sports competition as well as in social relationships. The informants were asked about

NICK T. PAPPAS; PATRICK C. MCKENRY

74

Occupational and recreational noise exposure from indoor arena hockey games.  

PubMed

Occupational and recreational noise exposures were evaluated at two sporting arenas hosting collegiate hockey games (Venue 1) and semi-professional hockey (Venue 2). A total of 54 personal noise dosimetry samples were taken over the course of seven home hockey games: 15 workers and 9 fans at Venue 1, and 19 workers and 11 fans at Venue 2. None of the sampled workers were overexposed to noise based on Occupational Safety and Health Administration criteria. However, 40% and 57% of workers at Venue 1 and 33% and 91% of fans at Venue 2 were overexposed based on ACGIH noise exposure criteria. Noise exposures for fans were significantly different between venues, but worker noise exposures between venues were not significantly different. In addition, extensive area noise monitoring was conducted at each venue to further characterize the stadium noise on a location-by-location basis. Mean equivalent sound pressure levels ranged from 81 to 96 dBA at Venue 1 and from 85 to 97 dBA at Venue 2. Mean noise peak levels ranged from 105 to 124 dBA at Venue 1, and from 110 to 117 dBA at Venue 2. These data reflect the potential for overexposure at indoor hockey events and are useful in characterizing occupational noise exposure of indoor arena support staff and may also provide a foundation for future noise control research in indoor sports arenas. PMID:23145529

Cranston, Cory J; Brazile, William J; Sandfort, Delvin R; Gotshall, Robert W

2013-01-01

75

Intentional versus unintentional contact as a mechanism of injury in youth ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundYouth ice hockey injury rates and mechanisms have been described by various classification systems. Intentional versus unintentional contact was used to classify mechanisms of injuries. All injuries (n=247) in one youth hockey programme over a 5-year period were recorded and included in the analysis.PurposeTo evaluate youth ice hockey injuries and compare programmes that allow body checking versus programmes that do

Scott R Darling; Douglas E Schaubel; John G Baker; John J Leddy; Leslie J Bisson; Barry Willer

2011-01-01

76

Relative age and fast tracking of elite major junior ice hockey players.  

PubMed

Investigations in a variety of chronologically grouped team sports have reported that elite young athletes were more likely born in the early months of the selection year, a phenomenon known as the relative age effect. The present study investigated the birth dates and developmental paths of 238 (15 to 20 years old) Major Junior 'A' hockey players from the Ontario Hockey League to determine if a relative age effect still exists in elite junior hockey and if the path to elite sport was accelerated (i.e., fast tracked). The results identified a relative age effect in elite hockey although it is only apparent among individuals who fast track. PMID:17688123

Sherar, Lauren B; Bruner, Mark W; Munroe-Chandler, Krista J; Baxter-Jones, Adam D G

2007-06-01

77

The Three People You'll Meet at a Hockey Game  

E-print Network

members use to assign roles and reframe actions EX: "Sieve" #12;Restatements A blatant vocalization and players organize for puck drop] Band: (begins to play "charge") Crowd: (hold right hand in the air) Oh

New Hampshire, University of

78

Benthic re-colonization in post-dredging pits in the Puck Bay (Southern Baltic Sea)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stage of benthic re-colonization at a site formed by sand extraction was investigated some 10 years after the cessation of dredging. The examined post-dredging pit is one of five deep (up to 14 m) pits created with a static suction hopper on the sandy, flat and shallow (1-2 m) part of the inner Puck Bay (the southern Baltic Sea). The topography of the dredged area makes a specific trap for different kinds of organic matter. It is created by the small areas of post-dredging pits as compared to their depths. As a result, organic matter accumulation leads to anaerobic conditions and hydrogen sulfide formation. Macrofauna was not found to occur permanently in the deepest part (11 m) of the cup-shaped depression, which was characterized by its small area (0.2 km 2) and steep walls. However, permanent occurrence of meiofauna (max. 180 ind. 10 cm -2, mainly Nematoda) was noted. Undoubtedly, re-colonization of benthic fauna assemblages, typical of shallow and sandy seabed of the Puck Bay, will not follow in a natural way in the area of post-dredging pits. Also, it could not be expected that the re-colonization sequence would result in the formation of a structure similar to that of the natural depression (the Ku?nica Hollow).

Szymelfenig, Maria; Kotwicki, Lech; Graca, Bo?ena

2006-07-01

79

Site-specific bone mass differences of the lower extremities in 17-year-old ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate bone mass in the pelvis and lower extremities in young ice hockey players, and especially to investigate whether any differences are related to the type and magnitude of weightbearing loading and muscle stress. The ice hockey group consisted of 22 boys (mean age 16.9±0.3) from three different ice hockey teams training

P. Nordström; R. Lorentzon

1996-01-01

80

Nutrient fluxes via submarine groundwater discharge to the Bay of Puck, southern Baltic Sea.  

PubMed

Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) has been recognized as an important exchange pathway between hydrologic reservoirs due to its impact on biogeochemical cycles of the coastal ocean. This study reports nutrient concentrations and loads delivered by SGD into the Bay of Puck, the southern Baltic Sea. Measurements were carried out between September, 2009 and October, 2010 at groundwater seepage sites identified by low salinity of pore water. Groundwater fluxes, measured using seepage meters, ranged from 3 to 22 L m(-2)day(-1). Average concentrations of nutrients in groundwater samples collected were as follows: 0.4 ?mol L(-1) nitrate (NO(3)), 0.8 ?mol L(-1) nitrite (NO(2)), 18.2 ?mol L(-1) ammonium (NH(4)) and 60.6 ?mol L(-1) orthophosphate (PO(4)). Levels of NH(4) and PO(4) were significantly higher in samples from SGD sites than in seawater. Seawater and SGD samples showed similar NO(2) concentrations but SGD samples exhibited lower NO(3) levels than those observed in seawater samples. Measured seepage water fluxes and nutrient concentrations were used to calculate nutrient loads discharged into the study area while the literature groundwater flux and the measured nutrient concentrations were used to estimate nutrient loads discharged into the Bay of Puck. The estimates suggest that SGD delivers a dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) load of 49.9 ± 18.0 t yr(-1) and a PO(4)(-) load of 56.3 ± 5.5tyr(-1) into the Bay of Puck. The projected estimates are significant in comparison with loads delivered to the bay from other, well-recognized sources (705 ty r(-1) and 105 ty r(-1) respectively for DIN and PO(4)). Nutrient discharge input loads were projected to the entire Baltic Sea The extrapolated values indicate SGD contributes a significant proportion of phosphate load but only an insignificant proportion of DIN load. Further studies are necessary to better understand SGD contributions to the nutrient budget in the Baltic Sea. PMID:22975306

Szymczycha, Beata; Vogler, Susanna; Pempkowiak, Janusz

2012-11-01

81

Sources of Stress in NCAA Division I Women Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of stress experienced by NCAA Division I women ice hockey players. Individual interviews consisting of open-ended questions were carried out with six elite athletes. The results of the qualitative analysis identified three main categories of stress: (a) hockey pressures, which included the transition to and the advantages of playing Division

Tracy L. Heller; Gordon A. Bloom; Graham I. Neil; John H. Salmela

2005-01-01

82

Mechanical modeling of the plastic bonded explosive LX17  

E-print Network

V (46) 2 Rearranging gives: f C?'?, '~za~pdV=f pfd"AvdV+f T, ""AvdS ? f o", ., ApddV ? f Aa?". Ap?dV (47) G 2 which can be expressed in matrix notation as follows: f ([D][hv] )[C'][D][du]dV= f [Av] pr f""]dV+ f [trav] [T""]dS ? f ([D][Av]')[o "]d...

Clayton, Kyle Martin

2001-01-01

83

THE COMPETITIVE DEMANDS OF ELITE MALE RINK HOCKEY  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to simulate the activity pattern of rink hockey by designing a specific skate test (ST) to study the energy expenditure and metabolic responses to this intermittent high-intensity exercise and extrapolate the results from the test to competition. Six rink hockey players performed, in three phases, the 20-metre multi-stage shuttle roller skate test, a tournament match and the ST. Heart rate was monitored in all three phases. Blood lactate, oxygen consumption, ventilation and respiratory exchange ratio were also recorded during the ST. Peak HR was 190.7±7.2 beats · min?1. There were no differences in peak HR between the three tests. Mean HR was similar between the ST and the match (86% and 87% of HRmax, respectively). Peak and mean ventilation averaged 111.0±8.8 L · min?1 and 70.3±14.0 L · min?1 (60% of VEmax), respectively. VO2max was 56.3±8.4 mL · kg?1 · min?1, and mean oxygen consumption was 40.9±7.9 mL · kg?1 · min?1 (70% of VO2max). Maximum blood lactate concentration was 7.2±1.3 mmol · L-1. ST yielded an energy expenditure of 899.1±232.9 kJ, and energy power was 59.9±15.5 kJ · min?1. These findings suggest that the ST is suitable for estimating the physiological demands of competitive rink hockey, which places a heavy demand on the aerobic and anaerobic systems, and requires high energy consumption. PMID:24744488

Del Valle, M.E.; Egocheaga, J.; Linnamo, V.; Fernández, A.

2013-01-01

84

Submarine Groundwater Discharge as a Source of Mercury in the Bay of Puck, the Southern Baltic Sea.  

PubMed

Both groundwater flow and mercury concentrations in pore water and seawater were quantified in the groundwater seeping site of the Bay of Puck, southern Baltic Sea. Total dissolved mercury (HgTD) in pore water ranged from 0.51 to 4.90 ng l(-1). Seawater samples were characterized by elevated HgTD concentrations, ranging from 4.41 to 6.37 ng l(-1), while HgTD concentrations in groundwater samples ranged from 0.51 to 1.15 ng l(-1). High HgTD concentrations in pore water of the uppermost sediment layers were attributed to seawater intrusion into the sediment. The relationship between HgTD concentrations and salinity of pore water was non-conservative, indicating removal of dissolved mercury upon mixing seawater with groundwater. The mechanism of dissolved mercury removal was further elucidated by examining its relationships with both dissolved organic matter, dissolved manganese (Mn II), and redox potential. The flux of HgTD to the Bay of Puck was estimated to be 18.9?±?6.3 g year(-1). The submarine groundwater discharge-derived mercury load is substantially smaller than atmospheric deposition and riverine discharge to the Bay of Puck. Thus, groundwater is a factor that dilutes the mercury concentrations in pore water and, as a result, dilutes the mercury concentrations in the water column. PMID:23794765

Szymczycha, Beata; Miotk, Micha?; Pempkowiak, Janusz

2013-06-01

85

Checking in: an analysis of the (lack of) body checking in women's ice hockey.  

PubMed

Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not incorporate checking, female ice hockey players are not afforded the same opportunity to flourish as men and experience bodily agency, which results in continued male domination of the game, therefore, indirectly reinforcing a gender hierarchy in hockey and society. PMID:22978197

Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

2012-09-01

86

Reducing injury risk from body checking in boys' youth ice hockey.  

PubMed

Ice hockey is an increasingly popular sport that allows intentional collision in the form of body checking for males but not for females. There is a two- to threefold increased risk of all injury, severe injury, and concussion related to body checking at all levels of boys' youth ice hockey. The American Academy of Pediatrics reinforces the importance of stringent enforcement of rules to protect player safety as well as educational interventions to decrease unsafe tactics. To promote ice hockey as a lifelong recreational pursuit for boys, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the expansion of nonchecking programs and the restriction of body checking to elite levels of boys' youth ice hockey, starting no earlier than 15 years of age. PMID:24864185

Brooks, Alison; Loud, Keith J; Brenner, Joel S; Demorest, Rebecca A; Halstead, Mark E; Kelly, Amanda K Weiss; Koutures, Chris G; LaBella, Cynthia R; LaBotz, Michele; Martin, Stephanie S; Moffatt, Kody

2014-06-01

87

The Effect of a Complex Training Program on Skating Abilities in Ice Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] Little data exist on systemic training programs to improve skating abilities in ice hockey players. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a complex training program on skating abilities in ice hockey players. [Methods] Ten male ice hockey players (training group) that engaged in 12 weeks of complex training and skating training and ten male players (control group) that only participated in 12 weeks of skating training completed on-ice skating tests including a 5 time 18 meters shuttle, t-test, Rink dash 5 times, and line drill before, during, and the training. [Results] Significant group-by-time interactions were found in all skating ability tests. [Conclusion] The complex training program intervention for 12 weeks improved their skating abilities of the ice hockey players. PMID:24764628

Lee, Changyoung; Lee, Sookyung; Yoo, Jaehyun

2014-01-01

88

PUCK: An Automated Prompting System for Smart Environments: Towards achieving automated prompting; Challenges involved.  

PubMed

The growth in popularity of smart environments has been quite steep in the last decade and so has the demand for smart health assistance systems. A smart home-based prompting system can enhance these technologies to deliver in-home interventions to users for timely reminders or brief instructions describing the way a task should be done for successful completion. This technology is in high demand given the desire of people who have physical or cognitive limitations to live independently in their homes. In this paper, with the introduction of the "PUCK" prompting system, we take an approach to automate prompting-based interventions without any predefined rule sets or user feedback. Unlike other approaches, we use simple off-the-shelf sensors and learn the timing for prompts based on real data that is collected with volunteer participants in our smart home test bed. The data mining approaches taken to solve this problem come with the challenge of an imbalanced class distribution that occurs naturally in the data. We propose a variant of an existing sampling technique, SMOTE, to deal with the class imbalance problem. To validate the approach, a comparative analysis with Cost Sensitive Learning is performed. PMID:25364323

Das, Barnan; Cook, Diane J; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen; Seelye, Adriana M

2012-10-01

89

Facial protection and head injuries in ice hockey: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To summarise the best available evidence to determine if facial protection reduces head injury in ice hockey.Data Sources:MEDLINE and Cochrane databases through January 2009.Review Methods:Utilising terms: “head injuries,” “craniocerebral trauma [MeSH]”, “head injuries, closed [MeSH]”, head injuries, penetrating [MeSH]”, “face mask”, “face shield”, “visor” and “hockey”, 24 articles were identified through our systematic literature search. Of these, six studies met

C Asplund; S Bettcher; J Borchers

2009-01-01

90

Ice Hockey Summit II: Zero Tolerance for Head Hits and Fighting.  

PubMed

This study aimed to present currently known basic science and on-ice influences of sport-related concussion (SRC) in hockey, building upon the Ice Hockey Summit I action plan (2011) to reduce SRC. The prior summit proceedings included an action plan intended to reduce SRC. As such, the proceedings from Summit I served as a point of departure for the science and discussion held during Summit II (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, October 2013). Summit II focused on 1) Basic Science of Concussions in Ice Hockey: Taking Science Forward, 2) Acute and Chronic Concussion Care: Making a Difference, (3) Preventing Concussions via Behavior, Rules, Education, and Measuring Effectiveness, 4) Updates in Equipment: Their Relationship to Industry Standards, and 5) Policies and Plans at State, National, and Federal Levels To Reduce SRC. Action strategies derived from the presentations and discussion described in these sectors were voted on subsequently for purposes of prioritization. The following proceedings include the knowledge and research shared by invited faculty, many of whom are health care providers and clinical investigators. The Summit II evidence-based action plan emphasizes the rapidly evolving scientific content of hockey SRC. It includes the most highly prioritized strategies voted on for implementation to decrease concussion. The highest-priority action items identified from the Summit include the following: 1) eliminate head hits from all levels of ice hockey, 2) change body checking policies, and 3) eliminate fighting in all amateur and professional hockey. PMID:25757010

Smith, Aynsley M; Stuart, Michael J; Dodick, David W; Roberts, William O; Alford, Patrick W; Ashare, Alan B; Aubrey, Mark; Benson, Brian W; Burke, Chip J; Dick, Randall; Eickhoff, Chad; Emery, Carolyn A; Flashman, Laura A; Gaz, Daniel V; Giza, Chris C; Greenwald, Richard M; Herring, Stanley A; Hoshizaki, T Blaine; Hudziak, James J; Huston, John; Krause, David; LaVoi, Nicole; Leaf, Matt; Leddy, John J; MacPherson, Alison; McKee, Ann C; Mihalik, Jason P; Moessner, Anne M; Montelpare, William J; Putukian, Margot; Schneider, Kathryn J; Szalkowski, Ron; Tabrum, Mark; Whitehead, James R; Wiese-Bjornstal, Diane M

2015-01-01

91

“Nación en el hielo: Hockey, History and the Troubled Construction of Identity in Canada, 1875-2010”  

Microsoft Academic Search

My CART 2011 Summer Grant tenure will be used to complete the research and writing of a c.25-page scholarly journal article entitled “Nación en el hielo: Hockey, History and the Troubled Construction of Identity in Canada, 1875-2010.” In December 2010, I was invited to contribute a new essay on ice hockey’s history and meaning in Canada, for a special Canadian

Andrew C. Holman

2011-01-01

92

Game Intensity Analysis of Elite Adolescent Ice Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to determine ice-hockey players’ playing intensity based on their heart rates (HRs) recorded during a game and on the outcomes of an incremental maximum oxygen uptake test. Twenty ice-hockey players, members of the Polish junior national team (U18), performed an incremental test to assess their maximal oxygen uptake (V?O2max) in the two week’s period preceding 5 games they played at the World Championships. Players’ HRs at the first and second ventilatory thresholds obtained during the test were utilized to determine intensity zones (low, moderate, and high) that were subsequently used to classify HR values recorded during each of the games. For individual intensity zones, the following HRs expressed as mean values and as percentages of the maximal heart rate (HRmax) were obtained: forwards 148–158 b·min?1 (79.5–84.8% HRmax), 159–178 b·min?1 (85.4–95.6% HRmax), 179–186 b·min?1 (96.1–100.0% HRmax); defensemen 149–153 b·min?1 (80.0–82.1% HRmax), 154–175 b·min?1 (82.6–94.0% HRmax), 176–186 b·min?1 (94.5–100.0% HRmax). The amount of time the forwards and defensemen spent in the three intensity zones expressed as percentages of the total time of the game were: 54.91 vs. 55.62% (low), 26.40 vs. 22.38% (moderate) and 18.68 vs. 22.00% (high). The forwards spent more time in the low intensity zone than the defensemen, however, the difference was not statistically significant. The results of the study indicate that using aerobic and anaerobic metabolism variables to determine intensity zones can significantly improve the reliability of evaluation of the physiological demands of the game, and can be a useful tool for coaches in managing the training process. PMID:25713682

Stanula, Arkadiusz; Roczniok, Robert

2014-01-01

93

“The More Things Change, the More They …”: Commentary During Women's Ice Hockey at the 2010 Olympic Games  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research uses textual analysis rooted in cultural studies to investigate how commentary constructed women hockey players during the 2010 Olympics, one of the biggest mediated sporting events in the world. Games were aired on NBC's cable affiliates during non-prime-time hours, a departure from previous Olympic studies. Hockey is a sport that is traditionally violent, and women are often viewed

Kelly Poniatowski; Marie Hardin

2012-01-01

94

Effects of a Four Week Plyometric Training Program on Measurements of Power in Male Collegiate Hockey Players: 1429  

Microsoft Academic Search

EFFECTS OF A FOUR WEEK PLYOMETRIC TRAINING PROGRAM ON MEASUREMENTS OF POWER IN MALE COLLEGIATE HOCKEY PLAYERS. Reyment, Corey M., Bonis, Megan E., Lundquist, Jacob C., Tice, Brent S. Effects of a Four Week Plyometric training Program on Measurements of Power in Male Collegiate Hockey Players. J. Undergrad. Kin. Res. 2006; 1(2): 44-62. The purpose of this study was to

Corey M. Reyment; Megan E. Bonis; Jacob C. Lundquist; Lance C. Dalleck; Jeffrey M. Janot

2007-01-01

95

Audio enabled information extraction system for cricket and hockey domains  

E-print Network

The proposed system aims at the retrieval of the summarized information from the documents collected from web based search engine as per the user query related to cricket and hockey domain. The system is designed in a manner that it takes the voice commands as keywords for search. The parts of speech in the query are extracted using the natural language extractor for English. Based on the keywords the search is categorized into 2 types: - 1.Concept wise - information retrieved to the query is retrieved based on the keywords and the concept words related to it. The retrieved information is summarized using the probabilistic approach and weighted means algorithm.2.Keyword search - extracts the result relevant to the query from the highly ranked document retrieved from the search by the search engine. The relevant search results are retrieved and then keywords are used for summarizing part. During summarization it follows the weighted and probabilistic approaches in order to identify the data comparable to the k...

Saraswathi, S; B., Sai Vamsi Krishna; S, Suresh Reddy

2010-01-01

96

Gender Differences in Head Impacts Sustained by Collegiate Ice Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

Purpose This study aims to quantify the frequency, magnitude, and location of head impacts sustained by male and female collegiate ice hockey players over two seasons of play. Methods Over two seasons, 88 collegiate athletes (51 female, 37 male) on two female and male NCAA varsity ice hockey teams wore instrumented helmets. Each helmet was equipped with 6 single-axis accelerometers and a miniature data acquisition system to capture and record head impacts sustained during play. Data collected from the helmets were post-processed to compute linear and rotational acceleration of the head as well as impact location. The head impact exposure data (frequency, location, and magnitude) were then compared across gender. Results Female hockey players experienced a significantly lower (p < 0.001) number of impacts per athlete exposure than males (female: 1.7 ± 0.7; male: 2.9 ± 1.2). The frequency of impacts by location was the same between gender (p > 0.278) for all locations except the right side of the head, where males received fewer impacts than females (p = 0.031). Female hockey players were 1.1 times more likely than males to sustain an impact less than 50 g while males were 1.3 times more likely to sustain an impact greater than 100 g. Similarly, males were 1.9 times more likely to sustain an impact with peak rotational acceleration greater than 5,000 rad/s2 and 3.5 times more likely to sustain an impact greater than 10,000 rad/s2. Conclusions Although the incidence of concussion has typically been higher for female hockey players than male hockey players, female players sustain fewer impacts and impacts resulting in lower head acceleration than males. Further study is required to better understand the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors that lead to higher rates of concussion for females that have been previously reported. PMID:21716150

Brainard, Lindley L.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Crisco, Joseph J.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Maerlender, Arthur C.; Greenwald, Richard M.

2013-01-01

97

A physical profile of elite female ice hockey players from the USA.  

PubMed

Despite impressive numbers of hockey participants, there is little research examining elite female ice hockey players. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe the physical characteristics of elite female ice hockey players who were trying out for the 2010 US Women's Ice Hockey team. Twenty-three women participated in the study and were evaluated for body mass (kilograms), height (centimeters), age (years) vertical jump (centimeters), standing long jump (centimeters), 1RM front squat (kilograms), front squat relative to body mass (percent), 1RM bench press (kilograms), bench press relative to body mass (percent), pull-ups, and body composition (percent body fat). The athletes in this sample were 24.7 years of age (SD = 3.1) and 169.7 cm tall (SD = 6.9); on average, they weighed 70.4 kg (SD = 7.1) and reported 15.8% body fat (SD = 1.9). Mean vertical jump height was 50.3 cm (SD = 5.7) and standing long jump was 214.8 cm (SD = 10.9). Mean 1RM for the upper body strength (bench press) was 65.3 kg (SD = 12.2) (95.1 ± 15.5% of body mass), and 1RM for lower body (front squat) was 88.6 kg (SD = 11.2) (127.7 ± 16.3% of body mass). This study is the first to report the physical characteristics of elite female ice hockey players from the USA. Data should assist strength and conditioning coaches in identifying talent, testing for strengths and weaknesses, comparing future teams to these indicators, and designing programs that will enhance the performance capabilities of female ice hockey athletes. PMID:21804420

Ransdell, Lynda B; Murray, Teena

2011-09-01

98

Patients With Ice Hockey Injuries Presenting to US Emergency Departments, 1990–2006  

PubMed Central

Abstract Context: Although the number of US ice hockey participants doubled from 1990 to 2006, no nationally representative studies have examined US ice hockey injuries among participants of all ages during this period. Objective: To describe patients with ice hockey injuries presenting to a representative sample of US emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 through 2006. Design: Prospective injury surveillance study. Setting: The US Consumer Product Safety Commission collects data from 100 nationally representative EDs via the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Patients or Other Participants: Individuals injured while playing ice hockey and presenting to a NEISS-affiliated ED from 1990 through 2006. Main Outcome Measure(s): Incidence and patterns of ice hockey–related injuries. Results: From 1990 through 2006, 8228 patients with ice hockey–related injuries presented to NEISS-affiliated EDs, representing an estimated 302?368 ice hockey–related injuries sustained nationally during this time. Injuries occurred predominantly among males (93.5%). More than half of the injured were aged 9 to 14 years (28.9%) or 15 to 18 years (30.1%), and injury incidence in these age groups increased over the study period (P ?=? .009 and P < .001, respectively). The most commonly injured body sites were the face (19.1%), wrist/hand/finger (14.1%), shoulder/upper arm (13.8%), and lower leg/ankle/foot (11.1%). Lacerations (27.0%), contusions/abrasions (23.6%), fractures (17.3%), and sprains/strains (16.9%) were the most common injuries. Falls (16.5%), contact with boards (13.6%), and contact with stick (13.0%) were the most common injury mechanisms. Compared with those aged 9 to 18 years, those aged 2 to 8 years and those older than 18 years sustained larger proportions of face (injury proportion ratio [IPR] ?=? 2.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] ?=? 2.29, 3.08) and mouth (IPR ?=? 4.34; 95% CI ?=? 2.87, 6.56) injuries. Concussions were more common among those aged 2 to 18 years (9.0%) than in those who were older than 18 years (3.7%) (IPR ?=? 2.47; 95% CI ?=? 1.75, 3.49). Conclusions: Ice hockey injury patterns vary by age and sex. Our findings indicate that many trips to the ED might be prevented by using protective equipment appropriately. PMID:20831391

Deits, Jeff; Yard, Ellen E.; Collins, Christy L.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

2010-01-01

99

Neck injuries in ice hockey: a recent, unsolved problem with many contributing factors.  

PubMed

Previously unrecognized, major neck injuries in hockey have become a common problem in Canada and they have increased markedly in the 1980s. At the present time, the incidence remains high and has shown no sign of diminishing. The etiology of the problem appears to be multifactorial. Several epidemiologic factors have been identified and a reporting system established so that prevention programs can be monitored. It is hoped that greater awareness of the risk factors among players, coaches, leagues, referees, and parents will be an effective prophylactic measure in itself. Prevention must involve several approaches by hockey organizations and leagues, players, equipment manufacturers, and health care professionals and researchers. PMID:3508099

Tator, C H

1987-01-01

100

First ground-based astrometric observations of Puck by AO system. The new figure of its orbit  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have conducted a campaign of observations in May and October 1999 of the Uranian system wit the ADONIS AO system mounted on the ESO 3.6m telescope.Among other satellites of Uranus, Puck, the outermost one of the satellites discovered by Voyager 2 in July 1986 is detected on all our images. The correction of atmospheric turbulence by the AO system is stable and provides a satisfactory signal to noise ratio. In order to improve the accuracy of the satellite position determination (up to 30 mas), we had defined a Moffat-Gauss function. We determine the orbital parameters by a least square fit method and we discuss possible interpretations. Data presented here are based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile (proposal: 66.C-0707).

Descamps, P.; Marchis, F.; Berthier, J.; Prange, R.; Leguyader, C.

2000-10-01

101

Relative Age Effects and the PhD 1 Revisiting Gladwell's Hockey Players  

E-print Network

Relative Age Effects and the PhD 1 Revisiting Gladwell's Hockey Players: Influence of Relative Age examine the influence of relative age effects (RAE) upon whether someone earns the PhD. Drawing, or conclusions contained in this report. #12;Relative Age Effects and the PhD 2 1. INTRODUCTION Parental

Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

102

A Closer Look at the Relative Age Effect in the National Hockey League  

Microsoft Academic Search

At young ages, a few extra months of development can make a big difference in size, strength, and athletic ability. A child who turns 5 years old in January will be nearly 20% older by the time a child born in December has their 5th birthday. In many sports, including hockey, children born in the early months of the calendar

Vittorio Addona; Philip A. Yates

2010-01-01

103

Trajectories of Affective States in Adolescent Hockey Players: Turning Point and Motivational Antecedents  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined longitudinal trajectories of positive and negative affective states with a sample of 265 adolescent elite hockey players followed across 3 measurement points during the 1st 11 weeks of a season. Latent class growth modeling, incorporating a time-varying covariate and a series of predictors assessed at the onset of the season,…

Gaudreau, Patrick; Amiot, Catherine E.; Vallerand, Robert J.

2009-01-01

104

Checking in: An Analysis of the (Lack of) Body Checking in Women's Ice Hockey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the growing popularity of women's ice hockey in North America, players continue to face limitations because of the prohibition of body checking. In this paper, we argue from a liberal feminist philosophical perspective that this prohibition reinforces existing traditional stereotypes of female athletes. Because the women's game does not…

Weaving, Charlene; Roberts, Samuel

2012-01-01

105

A test of motor skill-specific action embodiment in ice-hockey players.  

PubMed

To further our understanding of the role of the motor system in comprehending action-related sentences, we compared action experts (athletes) to visual experts (fans) and novices when responding with an action-specific effector (either hand or foot). These conditions allowed inferences about the degree and specificity of embodiment in language comprehension. Ice hockey players, fans and novices made speeded judgments regarding the congruence between an auditorily presented sentence and a subsequently presented picture. Picture stimuli consisted of either hockey or everyday items. Half of these pictures 'matched' the action implied in the preceding sentence. Further, the action in these images involved either primarily the hand or the foot. For everyday items, action-matched items were responded to faster than action-mismatched items. However, only the players and fans showed the action-match effect for hockey items. There were no consistent effector-stimuli compatibility effects, nor skill-based interactions with compatibility, suggesting that the action-match effect was not based on motor ability per se, but rather a construction of the action based on knowledge or visual experience with the hockey related sentences. PMID:24818535

Ong, Nicole T; Lohse, Keith R; Chua, Romeo; Sinnett, Scott; Hodges, Nicola J

2014-07-01

106

Three-dimensional kinematics of the lower limbs during forward ice hockey skating  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objectives of the study were to describe lower limb kinematics in three dimensions during the forward skating stride in hockey players and to contrast skating techniques between low- and high-calibre skaters. Participant motions were recorded with four synchronized digital video cameras while wearing reflective marker triads on the thighs, shanks, and skates. Participants skated on a specialized treadmill with

TEGAN UPJOHN; RENÉ TURCOTTE; DAVID J. PEARSALL; JONATHAN LOH

2008-01-01

107

The Control of Externalities in Sports Leagues: An Analysis of Restrictions in the National Hockey League  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper provides one of the few successful demonstrations of the efficiency of certain types of restrictions in the context of a joint venture. The joint venture we examine is the National Hockey League (NHL) in the 1980s, which was then composed of 21 separately owned teams. (It now has 30 teams.) The restriction we analyze is the NHL rule on…

Carlton, Dennis W.; Frankel, Alan S.; Landes, Elisabeth M.

2004-01-01

108

Experiential Learning in the Introductory Class: The Role of Minor League Hockey in Teaching Social Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To convince my students they are surrounded by social psychology, we attended a minor league hockey game. During the next class period I asked students to write a brief paragraph about their experiences. From those paragraphs I chose four reoccurring themes to analyze from a social psychological perspective. My introductory classes and I benefited…

Forrest, Krista D.

2005-01-01

109

Carbon monoxide in indoor ice skating rinks: Evaluation of absorption by adult hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated alveolar carbon monoxide (CO) levels of 122 male, adult hockey players active in recreational leagues of the Quebec City region (Canada), before and after 10 weekly 90-minute games in 10 different rinks. We also determined exposure by quantifying the average CO level in the rink during the games. Other variables documented included age, pulmonary function, aerobic capacity, and

B. Levesque; E. Dewailly; R. Lavoie; D. PrudHomme; S. Allaire

1990-01-01

110

Validation of a cycling test of anaerobic endurance for ice hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to establish the validity, reliability and objectivity of an intermittent cycling test of anaerobic power and endurance for ice hockey players. The intermittent cycling test consisted of 6 repetitions, each 15s in duration with each repetition separated by a 15s recovery interval resulting in a total work time of 90s and a work to

D. L. Montgomery; R. Turcotte; E. W. Gamble; G. Ladouceur

1990-01-01

111

KINEMATICS OF THE FOOT AND ANKLE IN FORWARD ICE HOCKEY SKATING  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Studies on the kinematics of ice hockey skating have focused mainly on the stride rate and stride length (Marino, 1977, 1979), and on the effectiveness of starts, turns and stops (Naud & Holt 1979, 1980). Hoshizaki et al. (1989) are among the few that have examined foot kinematics during skating using a two dimensional high-speed camera system. However, using

David Pearsall; Rene Turcotte; Richard Lefebvre; Hamid Bateni; Maria Nicolaou

112

Using Line and Ellipse Features for Rectification of Broadcast Hockey Video  

E-print Network

-Homography; Rectification; Sports; Videos; Geo- metric error I. INTRODUCTION Automated sports video analysis is an active to analyze [1] or even predict [2] game play. The problem is simpler in the case of videos obtained fromUsing Line and Ellipse Features for Rectification of Broadcast Hockey Video Ankur Gupta, James J

113

Describing Strategies Used by Elite, Intermediate, and Novice Ice Hockey Referees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Much is known about sport officials' decisions (e.g., anticipation, visual search, and prior experience). Comprehension of the entire decision process, however, requires an ecologically valid examination. To address this, we implemented a 2-part study using an expertise paradigm with ice hockey referees. Purpose: Study 1 explored the…

Hancock, David J.; Ste-Marie, Diane M.

2014-01-01

114

Tracking and recognizing actions of multiple hockey players using the boosted particle filter  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a system that can automatically track multiple hockey players and simultaneously recognize their actions given a single broadcast video sequence, where detection is complicated by a pan- ning, tilting, and zooming camera. There are three contributions. Firstly, we use the Histograms of Ori- ented Gradients (HOG) to represent the players, and introduce a probabilistic framework to model

Wei-lwun Lu; Kenji Okuma; James J. Little

2009-01-01

115

A PILOT SURVEY ON INJURY AND SAFETY CONCERNS IN INTERNATIONAL SLEDGE HOCKEY  

PubMed Central

Objective: To describe sledge hockey injury patterns, safety issues and to develop potential injury prevention strategies. Design: Pilot survey study of international sledge hockey professionals, including trainers, physiotherapists, physicians, coaches and/or general managers. Setting: Personal encounter or online correspondence. Respondents: Sledge hockey professionals; a total of 10 respondents from the 5 top-ranked international teams recruited by personal encounter or online correspondence. Main Outcome Measurements: Descriptive Data reports on sledge athlete injury characteristics, quality of rules and enforcement, player equipment, challenges in the medical management during competition, and overall safety. Results: Muscle strains and concussions were identified as common, and injuries were reported to affect the upper body more frequently than the lower body. Overuse and body checking were predominant injury mechanisms. Safety concerns included excessive elbowing, inexperienced refereeing and inadequate equipment standards. Conclusions: This paper is the first publication primarily focused on sledge hockey injury and safety. This information provides unique opportunity for the consideration of implementation and evaluation of safety strategies. Safety interventions could include improved hand protection, cut-resistant materials in high-risk areas, increased vigilance to reduce intentional head-contact, lowered rink boards and modified bathroom floor surfacing. PMID:21904696

Finlayson, Heather; O'Connor, Russ; Anton, Hugh

2011-01-01

116

Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 2. Microstructural white matter alterations in acutely concussed ice hockey players: a longitudinal free-water MRI study  

PubMed Central

Object Concussion is a common injury in ice hockey and a health problem for the general population. Traumatic axonal injury has been associated with concussions (also referred to as mild traumatic brain injuries), yet the pathological course that leads from injury to recovery or to long-term sequelae is still not known. This study investigated the longitudinal course of concussion by comparing diffusion MRI (dMRI) scans of the brains of ice hockey players before and after a concussion. Methods The 2011–2012 Hockey Concussion Education Project followed 45 university-level ice hockey players (both male and female) during a single Canadian Interuniversity Sports season. Of these, 38 players had usable dMRI scans obtained in the preseason. During the season, 11 players suffered a concussion, and 7 of these 11 players had usable dMRI scans that were taken within 72 hours of injury. To analyze the data, the authors performed free-water imaging, which reflects an increase in specificity over other dMRI analysis methods by identifying alterations that occur in the extracellular space compared with those that occur in proximity to cellular tissue in the white matter. They used an individualized approach to identify alterations that are spatially heterogeneous, as is expected in concussions. Results Paired comparison of the concussed players before and after injury revealed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) common pattern of reduced free-water volume and reduced axial and radial diffusivities following elimination of free-water. These free-water–corrected measures are less affected by partial volumes containing extracellular water and are therefore more specific to processes that occur within the brain tissue. Fractional anisotropy was significantly increased, but this change was no longer significant following the free-water elimination. Conclusions Concussion during ice hockey games results in microstructural alterations that are detectable using dMRI. The alterations that the authors found suggest decreased extracellular space and decreased diffusivities in white matter tissue. This finding might be explained by swelling and/or by increased cellularity of glia cells. Even though these findings in and of themselves cannot determine whether the observed microstructural alterations are related to long-term pathology or persistent symptoms, they are important nonetheless because they establish a clearer picture of how the brain responds to concussion. PMID:24490785

Pasternak, Ofer; Koerte, Inga K.; Bouix, Sylvain; Fredman, Eli; Sasaki, Takeshi; Mayinger, Michael; Helmer, Karl G.; Johnson, Andrew M.; Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Forwell, Lorie A.; Skopelja, Elaine N.; Shenton, Martha E.; Echlin, Paul S.

2015-01-01

117

Telling Stories About Indigeneity and Canadian Sport: The Spectacular Cree & Ojibway Indian Hockey Barnstorming Tour of North America, 1928  

Microsoft Academic Search

In January and February 1928, 14 hockey-playing Natives from northeastern Ontario undertook a celebrated barnstorming tour of 17 cities and towns in the United States and Canada. Traveling by charter bus, the “Cree & Ojibway Indian Hockey Tour” was a well-promoted and cleverly-planned road trip that began in North Bay and swung through southwestern Ontario before it reached its real

Andrew C. Holman

2009-01-01

118

Chronic Cough and Dyspnea in Ice Hockey Players After an Acute Exposure to Combustion Products of a Faulty Ice Resurfacer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to characterize pulmonary function and radiologic testing in ice hockey players after exposure to\\u000a combustion products of a faulty ice resurfacer. Our patients were 16 previously healthy hockey players who developed chronic\\u000a cough and dyspnea after exposure. Symptom questionnaires, pulmonary function tests (PFTs), bronchoprovocation testing, cardiopulmonary\\u000a exercise testing, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) imaging, and

Erika S. Kahan; Ubaldo J. Martin; Steve Spungen; David Ciccolella; Gerard J. Criner

2007-01-01

119

The influence of social variables and moral disengagement on prosocial and antisocial behaviours in field hockey and netball  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we examined: (a) the effects of perceived motivational climate and coaching character-building competency on prosocial and antisocial behaviours towards team-mates and opponents in field hockey and netball; (b) whether the effects of perceived character-building competency on sport behaviours are mediated by moral disengagement; and (c) whether these relationships are invariant across sport. Field hockey (n = 200) and netball

Ian D. Boardley; Maria Kavussanu

2009-01-01

120

THE INCIDENCE OF LOW BACK PAIN IN NCAA DIVISION III FEMALE FIELD HOCKEY PLAYERS  

PubMed Central

Purpose/Background: The authors speculated that there may be an increased incidence of low back pain (LBP) in NCAA Division III female field hockey (FH) players. FH players may experience LBP for a variety of reasons including trauma from collisions or falls. Excluding these types of direct trauma, FH players may experience LBP due to excessive stress to spinal structures related to the forward flexed posture that predominates in field hockey. The authors speculated that because of the postural stresses inherent to field hockey there may be an increased incidence of LBP in this population. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to survey NCAA Division III female FH players and an age matched control group to determine if field hockey participation results in an increased incidence of LBP. The anticipated finding of an increased incidence of LBP would provide a rationale for the development of prophylactic interventions for this population. Methods: Subjects: Female NCAA Division III FH players (n=90) ranging in age from 18–24 years old who participated in the 2008 season were surveyed in regards to the incidence of LBP. A female age-matched control group from Misericordia University (n=98) without a history of field hockey participation was also surveyed. Both groups of subjects completed a voluntary pen and paper survey on the incidence of LBP not related to menstruation. Questions included but were not limited to; whether a significant episode of LBP had been experienced, the mechanism or injury, the duration and nature/location of symptoms. Responses from both groups were anonymous and confidential. Results: There was no difference in the incidence of LBP between the female FH players and the control group (p=0.951). The incidence of LBP was 56% (50/90) in the female FH players and 55% (54/98) in the controls. There was no difference in pain characteristics including pain referral patterns between the 2 groups. However, survey responses revealed a similar mean age of onset of LBP for both groups (16.23 +/- 1.80 years of age for FH players and 16.45 +/- 2.12 years of age for controls). Conclusions: The data did not support the authors' speculation of a higher incidence of LBP in NCAA Division III female FH players compared to female age-matched controls. This suggests postures associated with field hockey do not appear to significantly increase the incidence of LBP in this population. However, the data revealed that females from both surveyed groups experienced an onset of LBP at a mean age of sixteen. Level of Evidence: 2b PMID:22666644

Pheasant, Steven; Lawrence, Kevin

2012-01-01

121

Association between Short Sleeping Hours and Physical Activity in Boys Playing Ice Hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To determine physical activity in healthy boys and how physical activity relates to training and daily awake hours. Study design In 66 boys (5 to 15 years) affiliated with an ice-hockey club, we measured total daily energy expenditure (TDEE, doubly-labeled water) and basal metabolic rate (ventilated-hood method). Physical activity energy expenditure for the whole day (DAEE), during training, and

URS EIHOLZER; UDO MEINHARDT; VALENTIN ROUSSON; MICHAEL SCHLUMPF; GERHARD FUSCH; CHRISTOPH FUSCH; THEO GASSER; FELIX GUTZWILLER

122

Trends in North American Newspaper Reporting of Brain Injury in Ice Hockey  

PubMed Central

The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998–2000 and 2009–2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to ‘perception of risks’ and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

Cusimano, Michael D.; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W.; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

2013-01-01

123

Does skate sharpening affect individual skating performance in an agility course in ice hockey?  

Microsoft Academic Search

When sharpening ice hockey blades a hollow is created at the running surface of the blade. This study aimed to quantify the\\u000a effect of different blade hollows on (a) blade–ice friction, (b) skating performance in an agility course, and (c) players’\\u000a perception of blade sharpness, performance, and comfort. Friction was quantified by measuring the deceleration of a sled running\\u000a on

Peter Federolf; Adam Redmond

2010-01-01

124

Association of strength and range of motion with alpha angles in elite youth hockey players  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIncreased alpha angle of the hip is associated with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Decreased hip range of motion (ROM) and hip adductor\\/abductor muscular imbalances are reportedly associated with FAI.ObjectiveTo determine if there is a relationship between decreased hip ROM and hip muscle imbalances with the degree of observed alpha angle.DesignProspective screening study.SettingClinical centre screened elite major midget youth hockey players.Participants20 asymptomatic

M J Philippon; R F LaPrade; K K Briggs; J D Stull

2011-01-01

125

Trends in North American newspaper reporting of brain injury in ice hockey.  

PubMed

The frequency and potential long-term effects of sport-related traumatic brain injuries (TBI) make it a major public health concern. The culture within contact sports, such as ice hockey, encourages aggression that puts youth at risk of TBI such as concussion. Newspaper reports play an important role in conveying and shaping the culture around health-related behaviors. We qualitatively studied reports about sport-related TBI in four major North American newspapers over the last quarter-century. We used the grounded-theory approach to identify major themes and then did a content analysis to compare the frequency of key themes between 1998-2000 and 2009-2011. The major themes were: perceptions of brain injury, aggression, equipment, rules and regulations, and youth hockey. Across the full study period, newspaper articles from Canada and America portrayed violence and aggression that leads to TBI both as integral to hockey and as an unavoidable risk associated with playing the game. They also condemned violence in ice hockey, criticized the administrative response to TBI, and recognized the significance of TBI. In Canada, aggression was reported more often recently and there was a distinctive shift in portraying protective equipment as a solution to TBI in earlier years to a potential contributing factor to TBI later in the study period. American newspapers gave a greater attention to 'perception of risks' and the role of protective equipment, and discussed TBI in a broader context in the recent time period. Newspapers from both countries showed similar recent trends in regards to a need for rule changes to curb youth sport-related TBI. This study provides a rich description of the reporting around TBI in contact sport. Understanding this reporting is important for evaluating whether the dangers of sport-related TBI are being appropriately communicated by the media. PMID:23613957

Cusimano, Michael D; Sharma, Bhanu; Lawrence, David W; Ilie, Gabriela; Silverberg, Sarah; Jones, Rochelle

2013-01-01

126

Examination of birthplace and birthdate in World Junior ice hockey players.  

PubMed

The present study investigated birthdate (known as the Relative Age Effect; RAE) and birthplace as determinants of expertise in an international sample of elite ice hockey players. The sample included 566 World Junior (WJR) ice hockey players from four countries (Canada, n = 153; USA, n = 136; Sweden, n = 140; Finland, n = 137). Participants competed in the International Ice Hockey Federation World U20 Championship between 2001 and 2009. A series of Poisson regression models were conducted to examine the consistency of direct then interactive relationships between both birthdate and birthplace and WJR membership across the four countries (Canada, USA, Sweden, and Finland). Findings revealed a consistent RAE across the four countries for World Junior participation from 2000 to 2009. WJR players from the four countries were also less likely to be from major cities. In addition, there was no evidence in any of the four countries of an interaction between RAE and birthplace. Future research should explore the contextual and cultural factors that influence elite athlete development in smaller towns, cities and communities. PMID:21800970

Bruner, Mark W; Macdonald, Dany J; Pickett, William; Côté, Jean

2011-09-01

127

A 26 year physiological description of a National Hockey League team.  

PubMed

The primary purpose of this investigation was to examine the physiological profile of a National Hockey League (NHL) team over a period of 26 years. All measurements were made at a similar time of year (pre-season) in 703 male (mean age +/- SD = 24 +/- 4 y) hockey players. The data were analyzed across years, between positions (defensemen, forwards, and goaltenders), and between what were deemed successful and non-successful years using a combination of points acquired during the season and play-off success. Most anthropometric (height, mass, and BMI) and physiological parameters (absolute and relative VO2 peak, relative peak 5 s power output, abdominal endurance, and combined grip strength) showed a gradual increase over the 26 year period. Defensemen were taller and heavier, had higher absolute VO2 peak, and had greater combined grip strength than forwards and goaltenders. Forwards were younger and had higher values for relative VO2 peak. Goaltenders were shorter, had less body mass, a higher sum of skinfolds, lower VO2 peak, and better flexibility. The overall pre-season fitness profile was not related to team success. In conclusion, this study revealed that the fitness profile for a professional NHL ice-hockey team exhibited increases in player size and anaerobic and aerobic fitness parameters over a 26 year period that differed by position. However, this evolution of physiological profile did not necessarily translate into team success in this particular NHL franchise. PMID:18641719

Quinney, H A; Dewart, Randy; Game, Alex; Snydmiller, Gary; Warburton, Darren; Bell, Gordon

2008-08-01

128

Trends in reporting of mechanisms and incidence of hip injuries in males playing minor ice hockey in Canada: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background There has been a noted increase in the diagnosis and reporting of sporting hip injuries and conditions in the medical literature but reporting at the minor hockey level is unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the trend of reporting hip injuries in amateur ice hockey players in Canada with a focus on injury type and mechanism. Methods A retrospective review of the Hockey Canada insurance database was performed and data on ice hockey hip injuries reported between January 2005 and June 2011 were collected. The study population included all male hockey players from Peewee (aged 11–12 years) to Senior (aged 20+ years) participating in amateur level competition sanctioned by Hockey Canada. Reported cases of ice hockey hip injuries were analyzed according to age, mechanism of injury, and injury subtype. Annual injury reporting rates were determined and using a linear regression analysis trended to determine the change in ice hockey hip injury reporting rate over time. Results One hundred and six cases of ice hockey-related hip injuries were reported in total. The majority of injuries (75.5%) occurred in players aged 15–20 years playing at the Junior level. Most injuries were caused by a noncontact mechanism (40.6%) and strains were the most common subtype (50.0%). From 2005 to 2010, the number of reported hip injuries increased by 5.31 cases per year and the rate of reported hip injury per 1,000 registered players increased by 0.02 cases annually. Conclusion Reporting of hip injuries in amateur ice hockey players is increasing. A more accurate injury reporting system is critical for future epidemiologic studies to accurately document the rate and mechanism of hip injury in amateur ice hockey players. PMID:24966705

Ayeni, Olufemi R; Kowalczuk, Marcin; Farag, Jordan; Farrokhyar, Forough; Chu, Raymond; Bedi, Asheesh; Willits, Kevin; Bhandari, Mohit

2014-01-01

129

Gastrointestinal temperature increases and hypohydration exists after collegiate men's ice hockey participation.  

PubMed

The cold environments in which ice hockey players participate are counterintuitive to the predisposing factors of heat- and hypohydration-related illnesses. This population has received little consideration in hypohydration-related illness risk assessments. Protective equipment, multiple clothing layers, and performance intensity may predispose these athletes to significant decreases in hydration and increases in core temperature. The purpose of this study was to measure hydration status and gastrointestinal temperature (T(GI)) in male ice hockey players during practice sessions that focused on pre-season skill development and cardiovascular conditioning. The study used a repeated measures design. Data were collected in a collegiate ice hockey rink (ambient temperature = 6.03 +/- 1.65 degrees C; relative humidity = 40.4 +/- 11.89%). Seventeen ice hockey players (age = 20.6 +/- 1.1, height = 180 +/- 5 cm, mass = 85.04 +/- 7.9 kg) volunteered for this study. Urine-specific gravity (USG) and body weight were measured before and after two 110-minute practice sessions. Urine reagent strips measured USG. Calibrated CorTemp (HQ, Inc., Palmetto, FL, USA) radiofrequency telemetered thermometers collected T(GI) before, during, and after two 110-minute practice sessions. Individual participant sweat rates were calculated. Data from both sessions were pooled. T(GI) (p < 0.0001), and USG (p < 0.0001) increased over the 110-minute session. Post-exercise body weight (83.9 +/- 7.6 kg) was statistically lower (p < 0.001) than the pre-exercise weight (85.0 +/- 7.9 kg). Sweat rates were calculated to be 0.83 +/- 0.50 L.h(-1). These male ice hockey players become hypohydrated during participation potentially predisposing them to dehydration-related illnesses. This change in hydration status resulted in a gastrointestinal temperature increase and significant weight loss during activity. Prevention and rehydration strategies such as those developed by the American College of Sports Medicine and National Athletic Trainers' Association should be implemented to reduce the possibility of heat-related illness for this population. PMID:20042926

Batchelder, Benson C; Krause, B Andrew; Seegmiller, Jeff G; Starkey, Chad A

2010-01-01

130

Field hockey players have different values of ulnar and tibial motor nerve conduction velocity than soccer and tennis players.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to describe motor nerve conduction velocity in upper and lower extremities in sportsmen. Fifteen high-level field hockey players, seventeen soccer players and ten tennis players were recruited from the Polish National Field Hockey League, Polish Soccer League Clubs, and Polish Tennis Association clubs,respectively. The control group comprised of seventeen healthy, non-active young men. Nerve conduction velocities of ulnar and tibial nerve were assessed with NeuroScreen electromyograph (Toennies, Germany) equipped with standard techniques of supramaximal percutaneus stimulation with constant current and surface electrodes. No significant differences in motor nerve conduction velocities were found between dominant and non-dominant limbs in each studied group. Ulnar nerve conduction velocity measured from above elbow to below elbow was significantly lower only in the field hockey players' dominant limb. Tibial conduction velocity of the field hockey players' non-dominant lower limb was higher in comparison to the tennis players and the control group. There was no significant correlation between body mass and NCV as well as between height of subjects and NCV in both athletes or non-athletes. A slight trend towards a lower TCV values in athletes with longer duration of practicing sport was found. It was most pronounced in the non-dominant lower extremity of field hockey players. PMID:21308651

Pawlak, Matthias; Kaczmarek, Dominik

2010-12-01

131

Examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates in male youth ice-hockey players.  

PubMed

The relative age effect suggests that athletes born in the first two quartiles of a given selection year experience a selection advantage and therefore a greater opportunity for success. We describe two studies examining the relationship between relative age, competition level, and dropout rates of Ontario Minor Hockey Association male ice-hockey players from ages 10 to 15 years (n?=?14?325). In Study 1, dropout was highest among players born in quartiles three and four [?(2) (3)?=?16.32, P?hockey and adds further depth to our understanding of this persistent phenomenon. PMID:24118622

Lemez, S; Baker, J; Horton, S; Wattie, N; Weir, P

2014-12-01

132

The role of aerobic capacity in high-intensity intermittent efforts in ice-hockey.  

PubMed

The primary objective of this study was to determine a relationship between aerobic capacity ([Formula: see text]O2max) and fatigue from high-intensity skating in elite male hockey players. The subjects were twenty-four male members of the senior national ice hockey team of Poland who played the position of forward or defence. Each subject completed an on-ice Repeated-Skate Sprint test (RSS) consisting of 6 timed 89-m sprints, with 30 s of rest between subsequent efforts, and an incremental test on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory, the aim of which was to establish their maximal oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2max). The analysis of variance showed that each next repetition in the 6x89 m test was significantly longer than the previous one (F5,138=53.33, p<0.001). An analysis of the fatigue index (FI) calculated from the times recorded for subsequent repetitions showed that the value of the FI increased with subsequent repetitions, reaching its maximum between repetitions 5 and 6 (3.10±1.16%). The total FI was 13.77±1.74%. The coefficient of correlation between [Formula: see text]O2max and the total FI for 6 sprints on the distance of 89 m (r =-0.584) was significant (p=0.003). The variance in the index of players' fatigue in the 6x89 m test accounted for 34% of the variance in [Formula: see text]O2max. The 6x89 m test proposed in this study offers a high test-retest correlation coefficient (r=0.78). Even though the test is criticized for being too exhaustive and thereby for producing highly variable results it still seems that it was well selected for repeated sprint ability testing in hockey players. PMID:25177097

Stanula, A; Roczniok, R; Maszczyk, A; Pietraszewski, P; Zaj?c, A

2014-08-01

133

The Impact of a Sports Vision Training Program in Youth Field Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study was to investigate whether a sports vision training program improves the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training. The choice reaction time task at the D2 board (Learning Task I), the functional field of view task (Learning Task II) and the multiple object tracking (MOT) task (Transfer Task) were assessed before and after the intervention and again six weeks after the second test. Analyzes showed significant differences between the two groups for the choice reaction time task at the D2 board and the functional field of view task, with significant improvements for the intervention group and none for the control group. For the transfer task, we could not find statistically significant improvements for either group. The results of this study are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications. Key pointsPerceptual training with youth field hockey playersCan a sports vision training program improve the visual performance of youth male field hockey players, ages 12 to 16 years, after an intervention of six weeks compared to a control group with no specific sports vision training?The intervention was performed in the “VisuLab” as DynamicEye® SportsVision Training at the German Sport University Cologne.We ran a series of 3 two-factor univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on both within subject independent variables (group; measuring point) to examine the effects on central perception, peripheral perception and choice reaction time.The present study shows an improvement of certain visual abilities with the help of the sports vision training program. PMID:24150071

Schwab, Sebastian; Memmert, Daniel

2012-01-01

134

Goal orientations of young male ice hockey players and their parents.  

PubMed

In this study, the researchers investigated the relationship between parent and player dispositional goal orientations associated with playing youth hockey. The authors used the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (J. L. Duda & J. Whitehead, 1998) to measure task and ego orientation in 123 boys (10-13 years old) and 1 of their parents. Sons rated their own goal orientations for hockey and their perceptions of their parent's goal orientations. Parents rated their goal orientations for their son and their perceptions of their son's goal orientations. Mothers and fathers did not differ in their goal orientations for their son. Travel-team and nontravel-team players did not differ. For ego orientation, the son's self-ratings correlated significantly with the parent's goals for the son, but not for task orientation. Sons reported being significantly more ego-oriented than their parents desired. Sons perceived that their parents had goal orientations similar to their own. The data from this study are congruent with the assertion that parents socialize their children's goal orientations and that ego orientation may be more salient and easily communicated than task orientation. PMID:15636385

Bergin, David A; Habusta, Steven F

2004-12-01

135

High-intensity interval training has positive effects on performance in ice hockey players.  

PubMed

In spite of the well-known benefits that have been shown, few studies have looked at the practical applications of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on athletic performance. This study investigated the effects of a HIIT program compared to traditional continuous endurance exercise training. 24 hockey players were randomly assigned to either a continuous or high-intensity interval group during a 4-week training program. The interval group (IG) was involved in a periodized HIIT program. The continuous group (CG) performed moderate intensity cycling for 45-60?min at an intensity that was 65% of their calculated heart rate reserve. Body composition, muscle thickness, anaerobic power, and on-ice measures were assessed pre- and post-training. Muscle thickness was significantly greater in IG (p=0.01) when compared to CG. The IG had greater values for both ? peak power (p<0.003) and ? mean power (p<0.02). Additionally, IG demonstrated a faster ? sprint (p<0.02) and a trend (p=0.08) for faster ? endurance test time to completion for IG. These results indicate that hockey players may utilize short-term HIIT to elicit positive effects in muscle thickness, power and on-ice performance. PMID:25329432

Naimo, M A; de Souza, E O; Wilson, J M; Carpenter, A L; Gilchrist, P; Lowery, R P; Averbuch, B; White, T M; Joy, J

2015-01-01

136

“I Went to a Fight the Other Night and a Hockey Game Broke Out”  

PubMed Central

Background: The current study explored the relationship between fighting behavior and passage of time, across games and seasons, in an attempt to assess if violent behavior in hockey is impulsive or intentional. Hypothesis: Before engaging in fighting behavior, players assess the utility of their actions and thus will fight less when the game is on the line (third period) and when champions are crowned (postseason). Methods: An archival exploration utilizing open access databases from multiple Internet sources. Results: During the 2010-2011 National Hockey League (NHL) season, players were significantly less likely to be involved in a fight as the game was coming to a close than in its early stages. In addition, data from the past 10 NHL seasons showed that players were significantly more violent in preseason games than during the regular season. They were also least likely to be involved in a fight during the postseason. Conclusion: The converging evidence suggests that players take into account the penalties associated with fighting and are less likely to engage in violence when the stakes are high, such as at the end of a game or a season. This implies, in turn, that major acts of aggression in the league are more likely to be calculated rather than impulsive. The findings suggest that a more punitive system should diminish fighting behavior markedly. PMID:24427418

Goldschmied, Nadav; Espindola, Samantha

2013-01-01

137

Practicing Field Hockey Skills Along the Contextual Interference Continuum: A Comparison of Five Practice Schedules  

PubMed Central

To overcome the weakness of the contextual interference (CI) effect within applied settings, Brady, 2008 recommended that the amount of interference be manipulated. This study investigated the effect of five practice schedules on the learning of three field hockey skills. Fifty-five pre-university students performed a total of 90 trials for each skill under blocked, mixed or random practice orders. Results showed a significant time effect with all five practice conditions leading to improvements in acquisition and learning of the skills. No significant differences were found between the groups. The findings of the present study did not support the CI effect and suggest that either blocked, mixed, or random practice schedules can be used effectively when structuring practice for beginners. Key pointsThe contextual interference effect did not surface when using sport skills.There appears to be no difference between blocked and random practice schedules in the learning of field hockey skills.Low (blocked), moderate (mixed) or high (random) interference practice schedules can be used effectively when conducting a multiple skill practice session for beginners. PMID:24149204

Cheong, Jadeera Phaik Geok; Lay, Brendan; Grove, J. Robert; Medic, Nikola; Razman, Rizal

2012-01-01

138

Contextual effects on activity profiles of domestic field hockey during competition and training.  

PubMed

Game context is widely accepted to influence performance but most data available is 'categorical' and addresses performance rather than activity. This study assessed direct effects of opposition and team ranking in field hockey to establish influences on activity. One hundred and eight (n=108) female field hockey players (age 16-39years) participated, giving 186 competition and 48 training analyses. Team average distance (mean±SD) observed in a mid-ranked team during competition ranged from 5949±611 to 7719±257m demonstrating an opposition rank effect (Pearson's r=.71; adjusted R(2)=.42). However, multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated a stronger relationship in lower ranked teams (Pearson's r=.99; adjusted R(2)=.97 through 3-9). In contrast, no team rank effect was observed during randomly monitored competition where team average distance ranged from 5177±444 to 7316±241m (Pearson's r=.15 and adjusted R(2)=.12). In training, however, a team rank effect was observed in distance-related performance indicators where team average distance during small-sided games ranged from 5877±188 to 3551±193m drill (per 70min) with Pearson's r=.95 and adjusted R(2)=.87. The presence of contextual effects has significant practical implications for team sports where the training load assumed from competition may be overestimated. PMID:25697973

White, Andrew D; MacFarlane, Niall G

2015-04-01

139

Skating mechanics of change-of-direction manoeuvres in ice hockey players.  

PubMed

Ice hockey requires rapid transitions between skating trajectories to effectively navigate about the ice surface. Player performance relates in large part to effective change-of-direction manoeuvres, but little is known about how those skills are performed mechanically and the effect of equipment design on them. The purpose of this study was to observe the kinetics involved in those manoeuvres as well as to compare whether kinetic differences may result between two skate models of varying ankle mobility. Eight subjects with competitive ice hockey playing experience performed rapid lateral (90°) left and right change-of-direction manoeuvres. Kinetic data were collected using force strain gauge transducers on the blade holders of the skates. Significantly greater forces were applied by the outside skate (50-70% body weight, %BW) in comparison to the inside skate (12-24%BW, p < 0.05). Skate model and turn direction had no main effect, though significant mixed interactions between leg side (inside/outside) with skate model or turn direction (p < 0.05) were observed, with a trend for left-turn dominance. This study demonstrates the asymmetric dynamic behaviour inherent in skating change-of-direction tasks. PMID:25419626

Fortier, Antoine; Turcotte, René A; Pearsall, David J

2014-11-01

140

A 7-year review of men’s and women’s ice hockey injuries in the NCAA  

PubMed Central

Background Ice hockey is a high-speed collision sport with recognized injury potential. Body checking, identified as a primary cause of injury, is allowed in men’s hockey but is not allowed at any level for female players. The injury patterns in collegiate hockey should reflect this fundamental difference in how the game is played. In this study, we reviewed the injuries sustained by National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) hockey players over a 7-year period. Methods We conducted a retrospective database review of injuries and exposures reported to the Injury Surveillance System to determine rates of injury or differences in the pattern of injury between the sexes. Results The rate of injury during games for men (18.69/1000 athlete-exposures [AEs]) and women (12.10/1000 AEs) was significantly higher than the rate of injury during practice. The rate of concussion was 0.72/1000 AEs for men and 0.82/1000 AEs for women, and the rate remained stable over the study period. Player contact was the cause of concussions in game situations for 41% of women and 72% of men. Conclusion Both men and women had increased rates of practice-related injuries that resulted in time loss during the study period. In addition, there were high rates of concussions from player contact. The concussion rate in women was higher than expected. A more detailed examination with focused data collection may impact these findings. PMID:20858376

Agel, Julie; Harvey, Edward J.

2010-01-01

141

Effects of a rule change that eliminates body-checking on the relative age effect in Ontario minor ice hockey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relative age effects in sport reflect an over-representation of athletes born early in a selection year that lead to selection and performance advantages. These effects might be enhanced by rules that increase physicality. An opportunity to investigate these influences arose when Hockey Canada altered its body-checking rules. Two studies are described that investigate the possible influence of this rule change.

David J. Hancock; Bradley W. Young; Diane M. Ste-Marie

2011-01-01

142

The geopolitics of failure: Swedish journalism and the demise of the national ice hockey team in Salt Lake City, 2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

When the Swedish ice hockey team lost to Belarus [Vitryssland] in the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics after a ‘sudden death’ goal, the Swedish media surpassed one another in throwing insults at the team, and the players were regarded with contempt as traitors. Of key significance in understanding this animosity towards the team's loss against Belarus are the historical and

Peter Dahlén

2012-01-01

143

Examining the Bertuzzi–Moore NHL ice hockey incident: Crossing the line between sanctioned and unsanctioned violence in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines sanctioned and unsanctioned aggression and violence in sport. It focuses on a recent notorious violent incident in a National Hockey League (NHL) game between the Vancouver Canucks and the Colorado Avalanche. The incident involved Vancouver's Todd Bertuzzi and Colorado's Steve Moore. Bertuzzi was the aggressor, and Moore suffered a fracture to the C3 and C4 vertebrae at

John H. Kerr

2006-01-01

144

Division I hockey players generate more power than Division III players during on- and off-ice performance tests.  

PubMed

Current research has found anthropometric and physiologic characteristics of hockey players that are correlated to performance. These characteristics, however, have never been examined to see if significant differences exist between on- and off-ice performance markers at different levels of play; Division I, Elite Junior, and Division III. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences that may exist between these characteristics in Division I (24), Elite Junior (10), and Division III hockey (11) players. Forty-five (age 18-24) hockey players completed anthropometric, on-ice, and off-ice tests to ascertain average measures for each division of play. On-ice testing was conducted in full hockey gear and consisted of acceleration, top speed, and on-ice repeated shift test (RST). Off-ice tests included vertical jump, Wingate™, grip strength, and a graded exercise test performed on a skating treadmill to ascertain their VO2peak. Division I players had significantly lower body fat than their Division III peers (p = 0.004). Division I players also scored significantly better on measures of anaerobic power; vertical jump (p = .001), Wingate Peak Power (p = 0.05), grip strength (p = 0.008), top speed (p = .001), and fastest RST course time (p = .001) than their Division III counterparts. There was no significant difference between Division I and Elite Junior players for any on- or off-ice performance variable. The results of this study indicate that performance differences between Division I and Division III hockey players appears to be primarily due to rate of force production. PMID:25436625

Peterson, Ben J; Fitzgerald, John S; Dietz, Calvin C; Ziegler, Kevin S; Ingraham, Stacy J; Baker, Sarah E; Snyder, Eric M

2014-11-26

145

Effects of badminton and ice hockey on bone mass in young males: a 12-year follow-up.  

PubMed

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of different types of weight bearing physical activity on bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and evaluate any residual benefits after the active sports career. Beginning at 17 years of age, BMD was measured 5 times, during 12 years, in 19 badminton players, 48 ice hockey players, and 25 controls. During the active career, badminton players gained significantly more BMD compared to ice hockey players at all sites: in their femoral neck (mean difference (Delta) 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.04), humerus (Delta 0.06 g/cm(2), p=0.01), lumbar spine (Delta 0.08 g/cm(2), p=0.01), and their legs (Delta 0.05 g/cm(2), p=0.003), after adjusting for age at baseline, changes in weight, height, and active years. BMD gains in badminton players were higher also compared to in controls at all sites (Delta 0.06-0.17 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all). Eleven badminton players and 37 ice hockey players stopped their active career a mean of 6 years before the final follow-up. Both these groups lost significantly more BMD at the femoral neck and lumbar spine compared to the control group (Delta 0.05-0.12 g/cm(2), p<0.05 for all). At the final follow-up, badminton players had significantly higher BMD of the femoral neck, humerus, lumbar spine, and legs (Delta 0.08-0.20 g/cm(2), p<0.01 for all) than both ice hockey players and controls. In summary, the present study may suggest that badminton is a more osteogenic sport compared to ice hockey. The BMD benefits from previous training were partially sustained with reduced activity. PMID:20601297

Tervo, Taru; Nordström, Peter; Nordström, Anna

2010-09-01

146

Planets and Pucks.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a simple activity designed to allow students to experimentally verify Kepler's second law, sometimes called the law of equal areas. It states that areas swept out by a planet as it orbits the Sun are equal for equal time intervals. (PR)

Brueningsen, Christopher; Krawiec, Wesley

1993-01-01

147

A model for predicting the evolution of damage in the plastic bonded explosive LX17  

E-print Network

. . . . . Figure 9: An Idealized Representative Volume of a Damaged Zone. . . . . . . . . Figure 10: Single Fibril Traction and Displacement Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . Figure 11: Defining Area Averaged Traction in a Damaged Zone RVE . . . Figure 12...-established concept. In fracture mechanics, cohesive zones refer to areas ahead of crack tips where non-zero tractions have been specified in such a manner as to inhibit crack tip advancement. Dugdale (1960) and Barenblatt (1962) were the first to propose the use...

Seidel, Gary Don

2002-01-01

148

ALE3D Statistical Hot Spot Model Results for LX17  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Statistical Hot Spot shock initiation and detonation reactive flow model for solid explosives in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code provides physically realistic descriptions of: hot spot formation; ignition (or failure to ignite); growth of reaction (or failure to grow) into surrounding particles; coalescence of reacting hot spots; transition to detonation; and self-sustaining detonation. The model has already successfully modeled

Albert L. Nichols; Craig M. Tarver; Estella M. McGuire

2004-01-01

149

ALE3D Statistical Hot Spot Model Results for LX17  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Statistical Hot Spot shock initiation and detonation reactive flow model for solid explosives in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code provides physically realistic descriptions of: hot spot formation; ignition (or failure to ignite) growth of reaction (or failure to grow) into surrounding particles; coalescence of reacting hot spots; transition to detonation; and self-sustaining detonation. The model has already successfully modeled

Albert L. Nichols; Craig M. Tarver; Estella M. McGuire

2004-01-01

150

Explosive Model Tarantula V1/JWL++ Calibration of LX-17: #2  

SciTech Connect

Tarantula V1 is a kinetic package for reactive flow codes that seeks to describe initiation, failure, dead zones and detonation simultaneously. The most important parameter is P1, the pressure between the initiation and failure regions. Both dead zone formation and failure can be largely controlled with this knob. However, V1 does failure with low settings and dead zones with higher settings, so that it cannot fulfill its purpose in the current format. To this end, V2 is under test. The derivation of the initiation threshold P0 is discussed. The derivation of the initiation pressure-tau curve as an output of Tarantula shows that the initiation package is sound. A desensitization package is also considered.

Souers, P C; Vitello, P

2009-05-01

151

Cardiovascular Prevention in a High Risk Sport, Ice Hockey: Applications in Wider Sports Physical Therapy Practice  

PubMed Central

Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk – including history taking, chart review, physical examination – and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients. PMID:21522221

2006-01-01

152

With an urban renaissance underway, Hartford begins to think about their hockey heritage  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Blowhole! Hartford Whalershttp://www.hartfordwhalers.org/Brass Bonanzahttp://www.brassbonanza.com/hcc/The Sports Economisthttp://www.thesportseconomist.com/Grateful Dead Live at Hartford Civic Center on October 10, 1984http://www.archive.org/details/gd1984-10-14.fob.beyerm88.suraci.77990.sbeok.flac16Mark Twain Househttp://www.marktwainhouse.org/Since 1997, the city of Hartford has been searching for some new whalers. Of course, they aren't looking for a few old salts to go out and hunt those gentle beasts of the deep (that's generally prohibited by international treaties and Hartford is more than a harpoon toss from the Atlantic Ocean), but rather an intrepid band of die-hard hockey fans are searching for the former NHL team known as the Hartford Whalers. This industrial town and noted insurance capital has been without major league hockey since the Hartford Whalers pulled up stakes and moved to the generally ice-free city of Raleigh. Interestingly enough, the Hartford Whalers Booster Club keeps the hockey home fires burning by hosting various events, and they have recently created an online petition to build support for a new NHL arena in Hartford. During the mid-1990s there was a spate of NHL team relocations as the Quebec Nordiques decamped to Colorado and the Winnipeg Jets became the Phoenix Coyotes. Whalers fans remain dedicated to the spirit and legacy of the team, and long-time fan Marty Evtushek said it best when he noted recently that, "They were more rooted in the community. In New York, they were in their high-rises and didn't bother with the average fans. The Whalers were our neighbors." The first link will take users to an article from the New York Times about the hockey lobbying efforts of the Hartford Whalers Boosters Club. Moving on, the second link leads to a site that provides users with a slew of information on the history of the Whalers, complete with rosters, uniform information, and so on. The third link is an audio trove of Whalers-related sounds, including the final outgoing message from the team store answering machine. Most people will also want to listen to "Brass Bonanza" here, the Whalers' Herb Alpert-like theme song. The fourth link will whisk users away to an excellent weblog on sports economics written by a team of economists from schools such as College of the Holy Cross and Clemson University. The fifth link leads to a much celebrated Grateful Dead concert (courtesy of the Internet Archive) that took place at the former home of the Whalers, the Hartford Civic Arena. Finally, the sixth link leads to the homepage of the Mark Twain House. Twain lived in Hartford for seventeen years, and this site provides a host of material on Twain's life and this rather impressive building.

Grinnell, Max

2009-05-08

153

CHRONIC LEG PAIN IN A DIVISION II FIELD HOCKEY PLAYER: A CASE REPORT  

PubMed Central

Exertional compartment syndromes in athletes represent a diagnostic and management challenge for clinicians. The clinical presentation of exertional compartment syndrome is similar to other more common musculoskeletal disorders. A lack of special tests or unique diagnostic identifiers for use in decision making by out?patient clinicians complicates early recognition of this disorder and may delay optimal management. The purpose of this case report is to retrospectively explore the clinical presentation and the decision?making during the course of care of a field hockey athlete eventually determined to have exertional compartment syndrome. Suggestions to assist in recognition and guidance in patient management are included as well as the procedures required for differential diagnosis. Procedures utilized during conservative care are also described in detail. Level of Evidence: 5 (Single Case Report) PMID:24567863

Snowden, Julie; Becker, Jonathan A.; Hazle, Charles

2014-01-01

154

Chiral random grain boundary phase of achiral hockey-stick liquid crystals.  

PubMed

A disordered chiral conglomerate, the random grain boundary (RGB) phase, has been observed below the smectic A liquid crystal phase of an achiral, hockey-stick molecule. In cells, the RGB phase appears dark between crossed polarizers but decrossing the polarizers reveals large left- and right-handed chiral domains with opposite optical rotation. Freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy reveals that the RGB phase is an assembly of randomly oriented blocks of smectic layers, an arrangement that distinguishes the RGB from the dark, chiral conglomerate phases of bent-core mesogens. X-ray diffraction indicates that there is significant layer shrinkage at the SmA-RGB phase transition, which is marked by the collapse of layers with long-range order into small, randomly oriented smectic blocks. PMID:25310113

Chen, Dong; Wang, Haitao; Li, Min; Glaser, Matthew A; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A

2014-12-01

155

Field Hockey  

MedlinePLUS

... cards will get you kicked out of a game, and many leagues will suspend you for additional games for dangerous play. Keep your head up and ... while playing, ask to come out of the game and don't start playing again until the ...

156

Youth sports & public health: framing risks of mild traumatic brain injury in american football and ice hockey.  

PubMed

The framing of the risks of experiencing mild traumatic brain injury in American football and ice hockey has an enormous impact in defining the scope of the problem and the remedies that are prioritized. According to the prevailing risk frame, an acceptable level of safety can be maintained in these contact sports through the application of technology, rule changes, and laws. An alternative frame acknowledging that these sports carry significant risks would produce very different ethical, political, and social debates. PMID:25264090

Bachynski, Kathleen E; Goldberg, Daniel S

2014-01-01

157

Athlete Aggression on the Rink and off the IceAthlete Violence and Aggression in Hockey and Interpersonal Relationships  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because male athletes have exhibited aggressive tendencies in a variety of settings, they may be at risk for using violence both within and beyond their sports involvement. Five former college\\/professional hockey players were interviewed to determine their perspectives on the nature of aggression and violence in sports competition as well as in social relationships.The informants were asked aboutathletes’violence and aggression

Nick T. Pappas; Patrick C. McKenry; Beth Skilken Catlett

2004-01-01

158

The performance of the ice hockey slap and wrist shots: the effects of stick construction and player skill  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction of players’ skill level, body strength, and sticks of various construction\\u000a and stiffness on the performance of the slap and wrist shots in ice hockey. Twenty male and twenty female subjects were tested.\\u000a Ten of each gender group were considered skilled and ten unskilled. In addition to general strength tests,

T.-C. Wu; D. Pearsall; A. Hodges; R. Turcotte; R. Lefebvre; D. Montgomery; H. Bateni

2003-01-01

159

Effects of a rule change that eliminates body-checking on the relative age effect in Ontario minor ice hockey.  

PubMed

Relative age effects in sport reflect an over-representation of athletes born early in a selection year that lead to selection and performance advantages. These effects might be enhanced by rules that increase physicality. An opportunity to investigate these influences arose when Hockey Canada altered its body-checking rules. Two studies are described that investigate the possible influence of this rule change. Study 1 used cross-sectional data to contrast relative age effects for 9-year-olds in games with and without body-checking (birth quartile 1 ranged from 27 to 39%; birth quartile 4 from 10 to 20%). Study 2 used quasi-longitudinal data to examine age effects when players transitioned from a season in which body-checking was permitted to one that prohibited such checking (birth quartile 1 ranged from 27 to 39%; birth quartile 4 from 11 to 20%). Chi-square statistics demonstrated relative age effects in both studies irrespective of body-checking. Post-hoc analyses indicated reductions in these effects that were limited to some second and third quartiles when body-checking was prohibited. Body-checking is not a critical mechanism of relative age effects. The physicality of ice hockey, regardless of body-checking, and increased experience in ice hockey are influential. PMID:21834643

Hancock, David J; Young, Bradley W; Ste-Marie, Diane M

2011-10-01

160

Developmental contexts and sporting success: birth date and birthplace effects in national hockey league draftees 2000–2005  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine relative age and birth place effects in hockey players drafted to play in the National Hockey League (NHL) between 2000 and 2005 and determine whether these factors influenced when players were chosen in the draft. Methods 1013 North American draftees were evaluated from the official NHL website, which provided birthplace, date of birth and selection order in the draft. Population size was collected from Canadian and American census information. Athletes were divided into four quartiles on the basis of selection date to define age cohorts in hockey. Data between the Canadian and American players were also compared to see if the optimal city sizes differed between the two nations. Results Relative age and birthplace effects were found, although the optimal city size found was dissimilar to that found in previous studies. Further, there were inconsistencies between the Canadian and American data. Conclusion Contextual factors such as relative age and size of birthplace have a significant effect on likelihood of being selected in the NHL draft. PMID:17331975

Baker, Joseph; Logan, A Jane

2007-01-01

161

A systematic video analysis of National Hockey League (NHL) concussions, part I: who, when, where and what?  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Although there is a growing understanding of the consequences of concussions in hockey, very little is known about the precipitating factors associated with this type of injury. AIM: To describe player characteristics and situational factors associated with concussions in the National Hockey League (NHL). METHODS: Case series of medically diagnosed concussions for regular season games over a 3.5-year period during the 2006-2010 seasons using an inclusive cohort of professional hockey players. Digital video records were coded and analysed using the Heads Up Checklist. RESULTS: Of 197 medically diagnosed concussions, 88% involved contact with an opponent. Forwards accounted for more concussions than expected compared with on-ice proportional representation (95% CI 60 to 73; p=0.04). Significantly more concussions occurred in the first period (47%) compared with the second and third periods (p=0.047), with the majority of concussions occurring in the defensive zone (45%). Approximately 47% of the concussions occurred in open ice, 53% occurred in the perimeter. Finally, 37% of the concussions involved injured players' heads contacting the boards or glass. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes several specific factors associated with concussions in the NHL, including period of the game, player position, body size, and specific locations on the ice and particular situations based on a player's position. PMID:23766438

Hutchison, Michael G; Comper, Paul; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Echemendia, Ruben J

2013-06-13

162

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision and Speeds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Wolfgang Christian

163

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collison and Gravity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Wolfgang Christian

164

Physlet Force Concept Inventory: Collision  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The animations depict a hockey puck sliding with constant speed v0 in a straight line from point "a" to point "b" on a frictionless horizontal surface. Forces exerted by the air are negligible. When the puck reaches point "b", it receives a swift horizontal kick in the direction of the black arrow. Had the puck been at rest at point "b", then the kick would have sent the puck in horizontal motion with a speed vk in the direction of the kick.

Wolfgang Christian

165

A Cool Sport Full of Physics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just ``hockey'' as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and colliding

Alain Haché

2008-01-01

166

A Cool Sport Full of Physics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just "hockey" as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and colliding against…

Hache, Alain

2008-01-01

167

Can injury in major junior hockey players be predicted by a pre-season functional movement screen – a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background: The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a tool that is commonly used to predict the occurrence of injury. Previous studies have shown that a score of 14 or less (with a maximum possible score of 21) successfully predicted future injury occurrence in athletes. No studies have looked at the use of the FMS to predict injuries in hockey players. Objective: To see if injury in major junior hockey players can be predicted by a preseason FMS. Methods: A convenience sample of 20 hockey players was scored on the FMS prior to the start of the hockey season. Injuries and number of man-games lost for each injury were documented over the course of the season. Results: The mean FMS score was 14.7+/?2.58. Those with an FMS score of ?14 were not more likely to sustain an injury as determined by the Fisher’s exact test (one-tailed, P = 0.32). Conclusion: This study did not support the notion that lower FMS scores predict injury in major junior hockey players. PMID:25550667

Dossa, Khaled; Cashman, Glenn; Howitt, Scott; West, Bill; Murray, Nick

2014-01-01

168

A Unique Finger Injury in a Professional Hockey Player: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present an uncommon athletic soft tissue wound and its proper management. Background: Soft tissue wounds are common in athletic competition. However, the subcategory of puncture wounds due to impalement by foreign bodies is quite rare. Although initial observation of a puncture wound may show minimal injury and blood loss, one must be concerned about damage to underlying structures and risk of infection. Differential Diagnosis: Fracture, tendon injury, neurovascular compromise, soft tissue injury. Treatment: When dealing with an impaled foreign object, it is vital to stabilize the injured area and leave the object in place. Prompt evaluation and removal by a physician is necessary. Also, the risk of infection is significant after a puncture wound, and prophylactic antibiotics should be considered. Uniqueness: Impalement by foreign objects is rare in sports, particularly hockey. Incorrect management of athletes with this injury could lead to additional morbidity. Conclusions: Although puncture wounds and impalement by foreign objects are not frequently seen in athletes, proper recognition, treatment, and management are essential to avoid complications and loss of function. Imagesp380-a PMID:16558593

Keating, Michael J.

1999-01-01

169

Three-dimensional kinematics of the lower limbs during forward ice hockey skating.  

PubMed

The objectives of the study were to describe lower limb kinematics in three dimensions during the forward skating stride in hockey players and to contrast skating techniques between low- and high-calibre skaters. Participant motions were recorded with four synchronized digital video cameras while wearing reflective marker triads on the thighs, shanks, and skates. Participants skated on a specialized treadmill with a polyethylene slat bed at a self-selected speed for 1 min. Each participant completed three 1-min skating trials separated by 5 min of rest. Joint and limb segment angles were calculated within the local (anatomical) and global reference planes. Similar gross movement patterns and stride rates were observed; however, high-calibre participants showed a greater range and rate of joint motion in both the sagittal and frontal planes, contributing to greater stride length for high-calibre players. Furthermore, consequent postural differences led to greater lateral excursion during the power stroke in high-calibre skaters. In conclusion, specific kinematic differences in both joint and limb segment angle movement patterns were observed between low- and high-calibre skaters. PMID:18610773

Upjohn, Tegan; Turcotte, René; Pearsall, David J; Loh, Jonathan

2008-05-01

170

Why Do Sleeping Nematodes Adopt a Hockey-Stick-Like Posture?  

PubMed Central

A characteristic posture is considered one of the behavioral hallmarks of sleep, and typically includes functional features such as support for the limbs and shielding of sensory organs. The nematode C. elegans exhibits a sleep-like state during a stage termed lethargus, which precedes ecdysis at the transition between larval stages. A hockey-stick-like posture is commonly observed during lethargus. What might its function be? It was previously noted that during lethargus, C. elegans nematodes abruptly rotate about their longitudinal axis. Plausibly, these “flips” facilitate ecdysis by assisting the disassociation of the old cuticle from the new one. We found that body-posture during lethargus was established using a stereotypical motor program and that body bends during lethargus quiescence were actively maintained. Moreover, flips occurred almost exclusively when the animals exhibited a single body bend, preferentially in the anterior or mid section of the body. We describe a simple biomechanical model that imposes the observed lengths of the longitudinally directed body-wall muscles on an otherwise passive elastic rod. We show that this minimal model is sufficient for generating a rotation about the anterior-posterior body axis. Our analysis suggests that posture during lethargus quiescence may serve a developmental role in facilitating flips and that the control of body wall muscles in anterior and posterior body regions are distinct. PMID:25025212

Tramm, Nora; Oppenheimer, Naomi; Nagy, Stanislav

2014-01-01

171

Comparison of impact characteristics of four different ice hockey arena dasher boards.  

PubMed

During recent years the incidence of ice hockey related concussions has increased. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to determine how dasher board materials and structures affect impact characteristics and thereby concussion risk. The measurements were divided into two parts; 1. physiological characteristics of body checks were determined in real game measurements, and 2. simulation of body checks in the laboratory. Peak forces and stopping distances were determined from the high-speed camera data, and stiffness values were subsequently calculated. Dasher board materials and structures had a clear effect on impact characteristics. Flexible protective shielding material resulted in 17% and 16% lower peak forces, 110% and 136% greater stopping distances and 62% and 56% lower stiffness values in the straight and the corner parts of the dasher board, respectively, compared to the reference dasher board. However, the dasher board with flexible protective shielding material including metal shielding support posts between each shielding panel yielded inconsistent results. The shielding support posts were much stiffer compared to the protective shielding. The single-framed dasher board was found to be 29% and 11% more flexible than its dual-framed counterpart, and heavier protective shielding resulted in 33% and 19% higher element stiffness in the straight and the corner parts of the dasher board, respectively. In light of the results and the epidemiology of concussions, it seems that the most safe dasher board would be single-framed with light and flexible protective shielding material, and would not include shielding support posts. PMID:24533490

Poutiainen, Piritta; Peltonen, Jussi; Isolehto, Juha; Avela, Janne

2014-01-01

172

Perceived tiredness and heart rate variability in relation to overload during a field hockey World Cup.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to examine the utility of perceived tiredness to predict cardiac autonomic response to overload among field hockey players during the 2006 World Cup. The French Society for Sports Medicine (SFMS) questionnaire was administered at the start of the Cup to evaluate perception of tiredness. Autonomic function was assessed nine days later at the semifinal match by time and frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability. An anxiety questionnaire was administered so that the effect of precompetitive anxiety on heart rate variability could be controlled. Results showed a negative correlation between perceived tiredness scores and time domain indexes, and a positive correlation of perceived tiredness scores and the high frequency component ratio (LF/HF ratio) of heart rate variability. Anxiety did not influence the precompetitive cardiac response despite somatic anxiety's correlation with sympathetic response (LF/HF ratio) and tiredness scores. Perceived tiredness predicted the autonomic cardiac response to competitive overload. Thus, the perceived tiredness assessment would be a good early marker of fatigue and overload states during competition. PMID:20681325

Parrado, Eva; Cervantes, Julio; Pintanel, Monica; Rodas, Gil; Capdevila, Lluís

2010-06-01

173

Head impact exposure in male and female collegiate ice hockey players.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to quantify head impact exposure (frequency, location and magnitude of head impacts) for individual male and female collegiate ice hockey players and to investigate differences in exposure by sex, player position, session type, and team. Ninety-nine (41 male, 58 female) players were enrolled and 37,411 impacts were recorded over three seasons. Frequency of impacts varied significantly by sex (males: 287 per season, females: 170, p<0.001) and helmet impact location (p<0.001), but not by player position (p=0.088). Head impact frequency also varied by session type; both male and female players sustained more impacts in games than in practices (p<0.001), however the magnitude of impacts did not differ between session types. There was no difference in 95th percentile peak linear acceleration between sexes (males: 41.6 g, females: 40.8 g), but 95th percentile peak rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were greater for males than females (4424, 3409 rad/s(2), and 25.6, 22.3, respectively). Impacts to the back of the helmet resulted in the greatest 95th percentile peak linear accelerations for males (45.2 g) and females (50.4 g), while impacts to the side and back of the head were associated with the greatest 95th percentile peak rotational accelerations (males: 4719, 4256 rad/sec(2), females: 3567, 3784 rad/sec(2) respectively). It has been proposed that reducing an individual's head impact exposure is a practical approach for reducing the risk of brain injuries. Strategies to decrease an individual athlete's exposure need to be sport and gender specific, with considerations for team and session type. PMID:24210478

Wilcox, Bethany J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Greenwald, Richard M; Chu, Jeffrey J; McAllister, Thomas W; Flashman, Laura A; Maerlender, Arthur C; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J

2014-01-01

174

Muscle Oxygen Changes following Sprint Interval Cycling Training in Elite Field Hockey Players.  

PubMed

This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT) on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT). Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP) and a control group (CON). The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2), tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb), total tissue haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation (TSI %) were taken. In the EXP group (5.34±0.14 to 5.50±0.14m.s-1) but not the CON group (pre = 5.37±0.27 to 5.39±0.30m.s-1) significant changes were seen in the 30-15IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ?TSI (-7.59±0.91 to -12.16±2.70%); ?HHb+HMb (35.68±6.67 to 69.44±26.48?M.cm); and ?HbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29±13.82 to -109.36±22.61?M.cm). No significant differences were seen in ?tHb (-45.81±15.23 to -42.93±16.24). NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes. PMID:25807517

Jones, Ben; Hamilton, David K; Cooper, Chris E

2015-01-01

175

Muscle Oxygen Changes following Sprint Interval Cycling Training in Elite Field Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT) on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT). Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP) and a control group (CON). The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2), tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb), total tissue haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation (TSI %) were taken. In the EXP group (5.34±0.14 to 5.50±0.14m.s-1) but not the CON group (pre = 5.37±0.27 to 5.39±0.30m.s-1) significant changes were seen in the 30-15IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ?TSI (?7.59±0.91 to ?12.16±2.70%); ?HHb+HMb (35.68±6.67 to 69.44±26.48?M.cm); and ?HbO2+ MbO2 (?74.29±13.82 to ?109.36±22.61?M.cm). No significant differences were seen in ?tHb (?45.81±15.23 to ?42.93±16.24). NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes. PMID:25807517

Jones, Ben; Hamilton, David K.; Cooper, Chris E.

2015-01-01

176

Head Impact Exposure in Male and Female Collegiate Ice Hockey Players  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to quantify head impact exposure (frequency, location and magnitude of head impacts) for individual male and female collegiate ice hockey players and to investigate differences in exposure by sex, player position, session type, and team. Ninety-nine (41 male, 58 female) players were enrolled and 37,411 impacts were recorded over three seasons. Frequency of impacts varied significantly by sex (males: 287 per season, females: 170, p<0.001) and helmet impact location (p<0.001), but not by player position (p=0.088). Head impact frequency also varied by session type; both male and female players sustained more impacts in games than in practices (p<0.001), however the magnitude of impacts did not differ between session types. There was no difference in 95th percentile peak linear acceleration between sexes (males: 41.6g, females: 40.8g), but 95th percentile peak rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were greater for males than females (4424, 3409 rad/s2, and 25.6, 22.3, respectively). Impacts to the back of the helmet resulted in the greatest 95th percentile peak linear accelerations for males (45.2g) and females (50.4g), while impacts to the side and back of the head were associated with the greatest 95th percentile peak rotational accelerations (males: 4719, 4256 rad/sec2, females: 3567, 3784 rad/sec2 respectively). It has been proposed that reducing an individual’s head impact exposure is a practical approach for reducing the risk of brain injuries. Strategies to decrease an individual athlete’s exposure need to be sport and gender specific, with considerations for team and session type. PMID:24210478

Wilcox, Bethany J.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Greenwald, Richard M.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Flashman, Laura A.; Maerlender, Arthur C.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Crisco, Joseph J.

2014-01-01

177

Analysis of international competition and training in men's field hockey by global positioning system and inertial sensor technology.  

PubMed

This study assessed the relative demands of elite field hockey training and competition to determine whether familiar exercise prescription strategies provide an appropriate training stimulus. Sixteen elite male field hockey players (age, 25 ± 4 years; body mass, 70.9 ± 6.6 kg; and maximal oxygen consumption, 61.0 ± 2.1 ml·kg·min [mean ± SD]) participated in the study. Seventy-five elite level competition and 37 training analyses from 8 games and 4 training sessions were obtained. Training duration was longer than competition and covered a greater total distance (109 ± 2.5 vs. 74 ± 0.3 minutes and 7318 ± 221 vs. 5868 ± 75 m; p < 0.001 in both). The distance covered sprinting and running at high intensity was not different between training and competition (114 ± 6 vs. 116 ± 9 m when sprinting and 457 ± 6 vs. 448 ± 7 m for high-intensity running). More high-intensity accelerations were performed during training than in competition (37 ± 3 vs. 20 ± 2). Despite having lower predicted aerobic capacity and covering less distance in competition than in some previous studies, these data support the suggestion that it is high-intensity activity that differentiates international level competition and further suggests that international players can replicate the intensity of competition during small-sided games. PMID:24978837

White, Andrew D; MacFarlane, Niall G

2015-01-01

178

The effects of heavy upper-body strength training on ice sledge hockey sprint abilities in world class players.  

PubMed

The current study investigated the effects of 6 weeks of heavy upper-body strength training on maximal strength and sprint abilities in eight world class ice sledge hockey players. Before and after the strength training intervention, all subjects performed a 30-m maximal sprint on ice (where time for each 10 m section was measured) and 1 repetition maximal (1RM) strength test in the bench pull (BP), pull-down (PD), pull over (PO) and front pull (FP) exercises. Three weekly sessions with 3×6-8RM for these strength exercises were added during the intervention period. From pre- to post-test, 1RM in the strength exercises improved by 4-8%, whereas 30-m sprint time, all 10-m section times and the calculated power output in the 10-m acceleration phase all improved by 2-3% (all P<.05). The pre- to post-test changes in 30-m sprint time and the initial 10-m time correlated significantly with the changes in 1RM for BP (r=0.59 and 0.55) and PD (r=0.60 and 0.68) (all P<.05). In conclusion, the results of this study strongly suggest that heavy upper-body strength training improves upper-body strength and ice sledge hockey sprint abilities, and that the magnitude of improvements in strength correlates with the improvements in sprint abilities. PMID:25457423

Sandbakk, Øyvind; Hansen, Mads; Ettema, Gertjan; Rønnestad, Bent

2014-12-01

179

SnapShot: Visualization to Propel Ice Hockey Analytics Hannah Pileggi, Charles D. Stolper, J. Michael Boyle, and John T. Stasko, Senior Member, IEEE  

E-print Network

into tables of numbers, divorced from the rinks, pitches, and courts where they were generated. Currently, these professional analysts use R, Stata, SAS, and other statistical software packages for uncovering insights from visualization techniques to display shot data, yet given the importance of a specific hockey statistic, shot

Stasko, John T.

180

Skin conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: part I - mechanical dermatoses.  

PubMed

Figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters experience a range of dermatologic conditions and tissue-related injuries on account of mechanical trauma, infectious pathogens, inflammatory processes and environmental factors related to these competitive pursuits. Sports medicine practitioners, family physicians, dermatologists and coaches should be familiar with these skin conditions to ensure timely and accurate diagnosis and management of affected athletes. This review is Part I of a subsequent companion review and provides a comprehensive review of mechanical dermatoses experienced by ice-skating athletes, including skater's nodules and its variants, pump bumps, piezogenic pedal papules, talon noir, skate/lace bite, friction bullae, corns and calluses, onychocryptosis, skater's toe and skate blade-induced lacerations. These injuries result from friction, shear forces, chronic pressure and collisions with surfaces that occur when athletes endure repetitive jump landings, accelerated starts and stops and other manoeuvres during rigorous training and competition. Ill-fitting skates, improper lacing techniques and insufficient lubrication or protective padding of the foot and ankle often contribute to the development of skin conditions that result from these physical and mechanical stresses. As we will explain, simple measures can frequently prevent the development of these conditions. The treatment of skater's nodules involves reduction in chronic stimulation of the malleoli, and the use of keratolytics and intralesional steroid injections; if malleolar bursitis develops, bursa aspirations may be required. Pump bumps, which result from repetitive friction posteriorly, can be prevented by wearing skates that fit correctly at the heel. Piezogenic pedal papules may be treated conservatively by using heel cups, compressive stockings and by reducing prolonged standing. Talon noir usually resolves without intervention within several weeks. The treatment of skate bite is centred on reducing compression by the skate tongue of the extensor tendons of the anterior ankle, which can be accomplished by use of proper lacing techniques, increasing pliability of the skate tongue and using protective padding, such as Bunga Pads™. Anti-inflammatory medications and cold compresses can also help reduce inflammation. Friction bullae are best managed by careful lancing of painful blisters and application of petrolatum or protective dressings to accelerate healing; preventative measures include the use of well fitting skates, proper lacing techniques and moisture-wicking socks. Corns and calluses are similarly best prevented by the use of well fitted skates and orthotic devices. Symptomatic, debridement reduces the irritant effect of the thick epidermis, and can be accomplished by soaking the area in warm water followed by paring. Application of creams with high concentrations of urea or salicylic acid can also soften callosities. Cases of onychocryptosis benefit from warm soaks, antibiotic ointments and topical steroids to reduce inflammation, but sometimes chemical or surgical matricectomies are required. Preventative measures of both onychocryptosis and skater's toe include cutting toenails straight across to allow for a more equal distribution of forces within the toe box. Finally, the prevention and treatment of lacerations, which constitute a potentially fatal type of mechanical injury, require special protective gear and acute surgical intervention with appropriate suturing. The subsequent companion review of skin conditions in ice skaters will discuss infectious, inflammatory and cold-induced dermatoses, with continued emphasis on clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:21846161

Tlougan, Brook E; Mancini, Anthony J; Mandell, Jenny A; Cohen, David E; Sanchez, Miguel R

2011-09-01

181

The role of visual perception measures used in sports vision programmes in predicting actual game performance in Division I collegiate hockey players.  

PubMed

Abstract In the growing field of sports vision little is still known about unique attributes of visual processing in ice hockey and what role visual processing plays in the overall athlete's performance. In the present study we evaluated whether visual, perceptual and cognitive/motor variables collected using the Nike SPARQ Sensory Training Station have significant relevance to the real game statistics of 38 Division I collegiate male and female hockey players. The results demonstrated that 69% of variance in the goals made by forwards in 2011-2013 could be predicted by their faster reaction time to a visual stimulus, better visual memory, better visual discrimination and a faster ability to shift focus between near and far objects. Approximately 33% of variance in game points was significantly related to better discrimination among competing visual stimuli. In addition, reaction time to a visual stimulus as well as stereoptic quickness significantly accounted for 24% of variance in the mean duration of the player's penalty time. This is one of the first studies to show that some of the visual skills that state-of-the-art generalised sports vision programmes are purported to target may indeed be important for hockey players' actual performance on the ice. PMID:25142869

Poltavski, Dmitri; Biberdorf, David

2015-01-01

182

Generic Hockey-Stick Model for Estimating Benchmark Dose and Potency: Performance Relative to BMDS and Application to Anthraquinone  

PubMed Central

Benchmark Dose Model software (BMDS), developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, involves a growing suite of models and decision rules now widely applied to assess noncancer and cancer risk, yet its statistical performance has never been examined systematically. As typically applied, BMDS also ignores the possibility of reduced risk at low doses (“hormesis”). A simpler, proposed Generic Hockey-Stick (GHS) model also estimates benchmark dose and potency, and additionally characterizes and tests objectively for hormetic trend. Using 100 simulated dichotomous-data sets (5 dose groups, 50 animals/group), sampled from each of seven risk functions, GHS estimators performed about as well or better than BMDS estimators, and a surprising observation was that BMDS mis-specified all of six non-hormetic sampled risk functions most or all of the time. When applied to data on rodent tumors induced by the genotoxic chemical carcinogen anthraquinone (AQ), the GHS model yielded significantly negative estimates of net potency exhibited by the combined rodent data, suggesting that—consistent with the anti-leukemogenic properties of AQ and structurally similar quinones—environmental AQ exposures do not likely increase net cancer risk. In addition to its simplicity and flexibility, the GHS approach offers a unified, consistent approach to quantifying environmental chemical risk. PMID:21731536

Bogen, Kenneth T.

2010-01-01

183

NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT OF A PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY PLAYER WITH THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF SPORTS HERNIA: A CASE REPORT  

PubMed Central

Study Design: Case Report Background: Injury or weakness of lower abdominal attachments and the posterior inguinal wall can be symptoms of a “sports hernia” and an underlying source of groin pain. Although several authors note conservative treatment as the initial step in the management of this condition, very little has been written on the specific description of non-surgical measures. Most published articles favoring operative care describe poor results related to conservative management; however they fail to report what treatment techniques comprise non-operative management. Case Presentation: The subject of this case report is a professional ice hockey player who sustained an abdominal injury in a game, which was diagnosed as a sports hernia. Following the injury, structured conservative treatment emphasized core control and stability with progressive peripheral demand challenges. Intrinsic core control emphasis continued throughout the treatment progression and during the functional training prior to return to sport. Outcome: The player completed his recovery with return to full competition seven weeks post injury, and continues to compete in the NHL seven years later. Discussion: Surgical intervention has been shown to be effective in the treatment of the “sports hernia.” However it is the authors' opinion that conservative care emphasizing evaluation of intrinsic core muscular deficits and rehabilitation directed at addressing these deficits is an appropriate option, and should be considered prior to surgical intervention. PMID:22319682

Woodward, J. Scott; Parker, Andrew; MacDonald, Robert M.

2012-01-01

184

Biomechanical analysis of the penalty-corner drag-flick of elite male and female hockey players.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to analyse the kinematic sequencing in the penalty-corner drag-flicks of elite male and female field hockey players of international calibre. Thirteen participants (one skilled male drag-flicker and six male and six female elite players) participated in the study. An optoelectronic motion analysis system was used to capture the drag-flicks with six cameras, sampling at 250 Hz. Select ground reaction force parameters were obtained from a force platform which registered the last support of the front foot. Twenty trials were captured from each subject. Both player groups showed significantly (p < 0.05) smaller ball velocity at release, peak angular velocity of the pelvis, and negative and positive peak angular velocities of the stick than the skilled subject. Normalised ground reaction forces of the gender groups were also smaller than that of the skilled drag-flicker. By comparing these players we established that the cues of the skill level are a wide stance, a whipping action (rapid back lift) of the stick followed by an explosive sequential movement of the pelvis, upper trunk and stick. PMID:20806843

López de Subijana, Cristina; Juárez, Daniel; Mallo, Javier; Navarro, Enrique

2010-06-01

185

Acute whole body vibration training increases vertical jump and flexibility performance in elite female field hockey players  

PubMed Central

Objective: To quantify the acute effect of whole body vibration (WBV) training on arm countermovement vertical jump (ACMVJ), grip strength, and flexibility performance. Methods: Eighteen female elite field hockey players each completed three interventions of WBV, control, and cycling in a balanced random manner. WBV was performed on a Galileo machine (26 Hz) with six different exercises being performed. For the control, the same six exercises were performed at 0 Hz, whilst cycling was performed at 50 W. Each intervention was 5 min in duration with ACMVJ, grip strength, and flexibility measurements being conducted pre and post intervention. Results: There was a positive interaction effect (interventionxpre-post) of enhanced ACMVJ (p<0.001) and flexibility (p<0.05) parameters following WBV; however no changes were observed after the control and cycling interventions. There was no interaction effect for grip strength following the three interventions. Conclusions: Acute WBV causes neural potentiation of the stretch reflex loop as shown by the improved ACMVJ and flexibility performance. Additionally, muscle groups less proportionally exposed to vibration do not exhibit physiological changes that potentiate muscular performance. PMID:16244199

Cochrane, D; Stannard, S

2005-01-01

186

Imagine Life without Friction  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students are introduced to the concept of inertia and its application to a world without the force of friction acting on moving objects. When an object is in motion, friction tends to be the force that acts on this object to slow it down and eventually come to a stop. By severely limiting friction through the use of hover pucks, students learn that the energy of one moving puck is transferred directly to another puck at rest when they collide. Students learn the concept of the conservation of energy via a "collision," and come to realize that with friction, energy is converted primarily to heat to slow and stop an object in motion. In the associated activity, "The Puck Stops Here," students investigate the frictional force of an object when different materials are placed between the object and the ground. They apply this understanding to the challenge to design a new hockey puck for the National Hockey League.

2014-09-18

187

Effect of hockey-stick-shaped molecules on the critical behavior at the nematic to isotropic and smectic-A to nematic phase transitions in octylcyanobiphenyl  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the field of soft matter research, the characteristic behavior of both nematic-isotropic (N -I ) and smectic-A nematic (Sm -A N ) phase transitions has gained considerable attention due to their several attractive features. In this work, a high-resolution measurement of optical birefringence (? n ) has been performed to probe the critical behavior at the N -I and Sm -A N phase transitions in a binary system comprising the rodlike octylcyanobiphenyl and a laterally methyl substituted hockey-stick-shaped mesogen, 4-(3-n -decyloxy-2-methyl-phenyliminomethyl)phenyl 4-n -dodecyloxycinnamate. For the investigated mixtures, the critical exponent ? related to the limiting behavior of the nematic order parameter close to the N -I phase transition has come out to be in good conformity with the tricritical hypothesis. Moreover, the yielded effective critical exponents (?', ?', ?') characterizing the critical fluctuation near the Sm -A N phase transition have appeared to be nonuniversal in nature. With increasing hockey-stick-shaped dopant concentration, the Sm -A N phase transition demonstrates a strong tendency to be driven towards a first-order nature. Such a behavior has been accounted for by considering a modification of the effective intermolecular interactions and hence the related coupling between the nematic and smectic order parameters, caused by the introduction of the angular mesogenic molecules.

Chakraborty, Anish; Chakraborty, Susanta; Das, Malay Kumar

2015-03-01

188

Psychometric properties and reference values for the ImPACT neurocognitive test battery in a sample of elite youth ice hockey players.  

PubMed

This cross-sectional study aimed to determine psychometric properties and reference values for ImPACT in a sample of 704 elite ice hockey players aged 13-17. Baseline ImPACT tests were completed at the beginning of the 2011-2012 season. Players aged 16-17 had better visual motor processing speed, adjusted R(2) = .0522, F(2, 45) = 10.79, ? = 2.87, p < .001, and impulse control, adjusted R = .0185, F(2,45) = 7.46, ? = -1.35, p = .001, than younger players, and girls had greater total symptom ratings than boys (z = -3.47, p = .0005). There were no other sex- or age-related differences in neurocognitive performance, and no effect of previous concussion on ImPACT scores. Reference values with cut-off scores are presented. PMID:24389705

McKay, Carly D; Brooks, Brian L; Mrazik, Martin; Jubinville, Andrea L; Emery, Carolyn A

2014-03-01

189

Skin conditions in figure skaters, ice-hockey players and speed skaters: part II - cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory dermatoses.  

PubMed

Participation in ice-skating sports, particularly figure skating, ice hockey and speed skating, has increased in recent years. Competitive athletes in these sports experience a range of dermatological injuries related to mechanical factors: exposure to cold temperatures, infectious agents and inflammation. Part I of this two part review discussed the mechanical dermatoses affecting ice-skating athletes that result from friction, pressure, and chronic irritation related to athletic equipment and contact with surfaces. Here, in Part II, we review the cold-induced, infectious and inflammatory skin conditions observed in ice-skating athletes. Cold-induced dermatoses experienced by ice-skating athletes result from specific physiological effects of cold exposure on the skin. These conditions include physiological livedo reticularis, chilblains (pernio), Raynaud phenomenon, cold panniculitis, frostnip and frostbite. Frostbite, that is the literal freezing of tissue, occurs with specific symptoms that progress in a stepwise fashion, starting with frostnip. Treatment involves gradual forms of rewarming and the use of friction massages and pain medications as needed. Calcium channel blockers, including nifedipine, are the mainstay of pharmacological therapy for the major nonfreezing cold-induced dermatoses including chilblains and Raynaud phenomenon. Raynaud phenomenon, a vasculopathy involving recurrent vasospasm of the fingers and toes in response to cold, is especially common in figure skaters. Protective clothing and insulation, avoidance of smoking and vasoconstrictive medications, maintaining a dry environment around the skin, cold avoidance when possible as well as certain physical manoeuvres that promote vasodilation are useful preventative measures. Infectious conditions most often seen in ice-skating athletes include tinea pedis, onychomycosis, pitted keratolysis, warts and folliculitis. Awareness, prompt treatment and the use of preventative measures are particularly important in managing such dermatoses that are easily spread from person to person in training facilities. The use of well ventilated footgear and synthetic substances to keep feet dry, as well as wearing sandals in shared facilities and maintaining good personal hygiene are very helpful in preventing transmission. Inflammatory conditions that may be seen in ice-skating athletes include allergic contact dermatitis, palmoplantar eccrine hidradenitis, exercise-induced purpuric eruptions and urticaria. Several materials commonly used in ice hockey and figure skating cause contact dermatitis. Identification of the allergen is essential and patch testing may be required. Exercise-induced purpuric eruptions often occur after exercise, are rarely indicative of a chronic venous disorder or other haematological abnormality and the lesions typically resolve spontaneously. The subtypes of urticaria most commonly seen in athletes are acute forms induced by physical stimuli, such as exercise, temperature, sunlight, water or particular levels of external pressure. Cholinergic urticaria is the most common type of physical urticaria seen in athletes aged 30 years and under. Occasionally, skaters may develop eating disorders and other related behaviours some of which have skin manifestations that are discussed herein. We hope that this comprehensive review will aid sports medicine practitioners, dermatologists and other physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of these dermatoses. PMID:21985216

Tlougan, Brook E; Mancini, Anthony J; Mandell, Jenny A; Cohen, David E; Sanchez, Miguel R

2011-11-01

190

The Experience Exchange n Ew vEnTu r E com p ETiTion wom En's f i Eld hockEy p l ay-of f r u n m ba i s l au dEd  

E-print Network

to the National Technical Information Service advisory board. 26 sPotlight on: athletics Women's field hockey Colburn Donna Harris Tina Senecal '95, '08 MBA january 2011, VoluMe 18, nuMber 1 Bryant's College University, 1150 Douglas Pike, Smithfield, RI 02917-1284. Periodicals postage paid at Providence, RI

Blais, Brian

191

The determination of critical rest interval from the intermittent critical velocity test in club-level collegiate hockey and rugby players.  

PubMed

The intermittent critical velocity (ICV) test is used to quantify the relationship between velocity and time to exhaustion, yielding an aerobic parameter (ICV), an anaerobic parameter (anaerobic running capacity [ARC]), and critical rest interval (CRI). Critical rest interval is the theoretical rest period needed to maintain repeated bouts of exercise for an extended period of time without inducing fatigue during intermittent treadmill running. Fourteen collegiate, club-level male participants (mean ± SD; age: 21.4 ± 1.8 years; weight: 82.8 ± 5.9 kg; body fat: 11.8 ± 5.4%; and VO2max: 51.2 ± 2.8 ml · kg · min), primarily hockey and rugby players, completed the ICV test, using 15-second repeated sprints to exhaustion during separate sessions of treadmill running at varying supramaximal intensities. The time and total distance for each running session were used to determine ICV and ARC via linear regression. The CRI was calculated using the relationship between total distance during the ICV test and the number of intervals completed. Mean ICV and ARC (± SD) values were calculated as 4.80 ± 0.3 m · s and 154.1 ± 36 m, respectively. The mean ICV values were significantly different from the mean peak velocity (± SD) (4.67 ± 0.17 m · s) achieved during the VO2max test (p = 0.011). The CRI was calculated as mean ± SD: 33.9 ± 1.9 seconds. Body fat percentage measured by air displacement plethysmography (BOD POD®; r = -0.649; p = 0.012), lean body mass (r = -0.556; p = 0.039), fat mass (r = -0.634; p = 0.015), body weight (r = -0.669; p = 0.006), and relative VO2max (r = 0.562; p = 0.036) were significantly correlated with ICV. The ARC (r = 0.804; p = 0.001) and velocity at ventilatory threshold (r = -0.630; p = 0.016) were significantly correlated with CRI. The ability to quantify CRI, an additional variable derived from the ICV test, provides a possible measure that can be used in the prescription and evaluation of training methods. PMID:21399529

Fukuda, David H; Smith, Abbie E; Kendall, Kristina L; Cramer, Joel T; Stout, Jeffrey R

2011-04-01

192

Myositis ossificans traumatica of the deltoid ligament in a 34 year old recreational ice hockey player with a 15 year post-trauma follow-up: a case report and review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Myositis ossificans traumatica is a relatively common injury associated with sports especially those involving contact. It continues to frustrate both athlete and health practitioner alike due to its continued lack of treatment options and a lengthy natural history. This case study chronicles the observation of a 34 year old recreational ice hockey player who presented 7 years post-trauma, was diagnosed with myositis ossificans traumatica and was followed up on 8 years later (15 years post-trauma). This case report is suspected to be the first published case study of its kind. The literature review outlines the various types of myositis ossificans, its incidence, pathogenesis, differential diagnoses including osteosarcoma, and the various methods/modalities reported in its treatment. PMID:21120014

Muir, Brad

2010-01-01

193

Safety Tips: Hockey (For Parents)  

MedlinePLUS

... flexors. Back Continue Keeping it Safe During a Game There's a reason why tripping, hooking, slashing, high- ... by theirs. Other penalties designed to keep the game safe involve roughing, boarding, and checking from behind. ...

194

Case Study: Ice Hockey Injury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study for high school and/or undergraduate students in anatomy and physiology. In particular this case study explores the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. Users of the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science will be required to register (free) to gain access to the answer key (and must be of teaching status to receive the key). Included in the resource are the case overview, objectives, case study, teaching notes and answer key.

Philip J Stephens (Villanova University Biology)

2004-04-19

195

American Dietetic Association found that many popular foods  

E-print Network

the size of a tennis ball One bagel is about the size of a hockey puck 1.5 ounces of cheese is the size of three dominoes Two tablespoons of peanut butter is roughly equivalent to a ping-pong ball A half cup of vege- tables is the size of a light bulb Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think by Brian

O'Toole, Alice J.

196

Campus Computing Looks Ahead: Tracking the Digital Puck.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines data from the 2002 Campus Computing Survey to determine trends in information technology in higher education and future possibilities. Discusses Web portals; electronic commerce capabilities, including use of credit cards; budget challenges, including budget cuts; and mobile technology and wireless networks. (LRW)

Green, Kenneth C.

2002-01-01

197

The 'Patient experience' revolution.  

PubMed

We're arguably at the most pivotal time in our young profession. The ACA has provided EMS an unprecedented opportunity to become a part of the healthcare system, a move that many of us have dreamed about for decades. We need to pay attention to the changing dynamics of the environment in which we operate. The factors that currently impact hospitals, doctors and other healthcare providers will also impact us sooner than we think. Take the time to help shape our future and how we participate in this new healthcare system. It's time to focus on the patient and the patient's experience with our service. Wayne Gretzky said two important things during an interview when he was asked what makes him such a great hockey player. One was, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take." The other was, "A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been." Our advice to you is to go ahead, take the shot, get ahead of the other team and focus on improved customer satisfaction sooner rather than later. PMID:24660359

Hooten, Doug; Zavadsky, Matt

2014-02-01

198

Communicating Uncertainty: The phantom hockey stick  

E-print Network

are related to other proxy vari- ables: e.g. tree ring width, lake and marine sediments, corals, ice cores to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 2001 report. · Used informally to argue human influence on climate a fixed method. What if tree rings respond differently in 1200AD? · Maxima are always tricky ... Little

Nychka, Douglas

199

Sport Scholarship programme Hockey at Birmingham  

E-print Network

to free physiotherapy triage sessions and subsidised sports medicine treatments. Sport scholarships and a personalised strength and conditioning programme n Sports medicine support including musculoskeletal screening

Heinke, Dietmar

200

A Cool Sport Full of Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Of all sports, ice hockey is possibly the one with the widest array of physics elements in it. The game provides many examples that can bring physics to life in the classroom. Ice hockey (or just "hockey" as many Canadians would say) sees athletes sliding on ice at high speeds and in various ways, shooting and slapping pucks, and colliding against each other. The interaction between the skate blade and the ice is a problem of great physical complexity. The question "Why is ice so slippery?" has puzzled generations of scientists and, surprisingly, clear answers have come relatively recently. There is even some optics involved in hockey: how many sports are watched behind tempered glass (or Plexiglas) windows? The optical and mechanical properties of these materials are worth a physics classroom discussion. In this paper, I will review a few topics discussed at length in my book The Physics of Hockey.1,2 Interested readers may also find additional articles on our website.3

Haché, Alain

2008-10-01

201

Ultra-Compact Motor Controller  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor contro ller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram packag e that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position s ensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44 -pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus , RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPI O), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier.

Townsend, William T.; Cromwell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

2012-01-01

202

Augmented Reality Comes to Physics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Augmented reality (AR) is a technology used on computing devices where processor-generated graphics are rendered over real objects to enhance the sensory experience in real time. In other words, what you are really seeing is augmented by the computer. Many AR games already exist for systems such as Kinect and Nintendo 3DS and mobile apps, such as Tagwhat and Star Chart (a must for astronomy class). The yellow line marking first downs in a televised football game2 and the enhanced puck that makes televised hockey easier to follow3 both use augmented reality to do the job.

Buesing, Mark; Cook, Michael

2013-04-01

203

In Proportion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through this nutrition activity (page 5 of the PDF), learners will understand—and probably be surprised by—how big serving sizes of various foods should be. This is accomplished in a very interesting way: learners will practice estimating by comparing various foods to everyday objects, like a hockey puck and a computer mouse. This activity was created as a pre-visit for a traveling science show, but makes a great stand-alone activity as well! It is an excellent visual representation for learners to remember.

2012-06-26

204

Metazoan meiofauna within the oxygen-minimum zone off Chile: Results of the 2001-PUCK expedition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A quantitative study of metazoan meiofauna was carried out at continental shelf and slope stations affected by the oxygen-minimum zone in the eastern South Pacific off Chile. Densities of meiobenthos at the investigated stations off Antofagasta (22°S), Concepción (36°S), and Chiloé (42°S) ranged from 1282.1 to 8847.8 ind 10 cm -2. Oxygen deficiency led only to average abundances, despite higher food availability and freshness at the corresponding sites. Sediment organic carbon, chlorophyll- a, and phaeopigment contents were used as measures of the input from water-column primary production, which accumulated at the oxygen-minimum zone stations. The highest abundances were found at a station with an oxygen content of 0.79 mL L -1, which was slightly elevated from what is defined as oxygen minimum (0.5 mL L -1). The most oxygenated site yielded the lowest densities. Meiofauna assemblages became more diverse with increasing bottom-water oxygenation, whereas nematodes were the most abundant taxon at every station, followed by annelids, copepods, and nauplii.

Veit-Köhler, Gritta; Gerdes, Dieter; Quiroga, Eduardo; Hebbeln, Dierk; Sellanes, Javier

2009-07-01

205

Reconstructions of paleoclimate: Beyond the hockey stick. (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Our understanding of past climate before the instrumental record is based on a variety of indirect information gleaned from climate proxies. Some well studied proxies include tree ring width and density, lake sediments, pollen indices and temperatures from bore holes. Combining such observations and including physical constraints on the target climate processes is well suited to recent methods in Bayesian statistics and is in contrast to previous methods used for paleoclimate reconstruction. This talk gives an introduction to this new perspective. To reconstruct past temperatures a traditional approach views the proxies as imperfect "thermometers" and calibrates them with instrument observations during a period where both are present. With this calibration one uses the proxies to predict temperature in other periods. This direct approach has the disadvantage that is it difficult to quantify the uncertainty of the reconstruction and to account for proxies that respond to temperature at different temporal and spatial scales. In addition, when different subsets of proxies are available for different reconstruction periods it is problematic to produce a single consistent and continuous reconstruction. A Bayesian hierarchical method demands more assumptions on the target climate process but also produces a more consistent analysis that addresses these shortcomings. The basic idea is to divide the statistical model into three distinct levels: a data level where the proxy measurement is related to the climate process, a process level that asserts a statistical model for the climate process and finally a level that puts prior distributions on unknown statistical parameters. With these statistical models in place, the relationships are inverted using Bayes theorem to give a distribution of the climate process given the proxy data and instrumental record. In the past, this inversion has been difficult to carry out analytically but with more abundant computational resources these computations can now be done using Monte Carlo techniques (e.g. Markov Chain Monte Carlo). Although this hierarchy of statistical models may seem to require more assumptions some of these need to be tacitly assumed in more traditional approaches. Also, assumptions on the climate process can build in basic climate constraints, such as energy balances, that are both reasonable and can produce a more accurate reconstruction. As an example, a reconstruction for Northern Hemisphere annual temperatures will be presented. This reconstruction takes advantage of several forcing series (e.g CO2 concentrations) as covariates and also provides an ensemble of reconstructions to convey the uncertainty in the analysis. This framework is also suitable for reconstructions of spatial fields and of several climate variables, such as temperature and precipitation, simultaneously.

Nychka, D. W.; Li, B.

2010-12-01

206

Air Hockey Implies Chaos Kristen Casalenuovo I. Introduction  

E-print Network

representation (frictionless, reflection) of chaotic scattering problem e. We are extending this problem to cases on board and demonstrate using tennis balls and super balls. c. Collisions are not instantaneous, so... III

Anlage, Steven

207

Video Gaming Promotes Concussion Knowledge Acquisition in Youth Hockey Players  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While the positive uses for video games in an educational setting have also been established, the educational aim is usually made explicit. The goal of this research was to develop a video game wherein the educational aspect was implicitly embedded in the video game, such that the gameing activity remained interesting and relevant. Following a…

Goodman, David; Bradley, Nori L.; Paras, Bradley, Williamson, Ian J.; Bizzochi, James

2006-01-01

208

Insulin Delivery System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

When Programmable Implantable Medication System (PIMS) is implanted in human body, it delivers precise programmed amounts of insulin over long periods of time. Mini-Med Technologies has been refining the Technologies since initial development at APL. The size of a hockey puck, and encased in titanium shell, PIMS holds about 2 1/2 teaspoons of insulin at a programmed basal rate. If a change in measured blood sugar level dictates a different dose, the patient can vary the amount of insulin delivered by holding a small radio transceiver over the implanted system and dialing in a specific program held in the PIMS computer memory. Insulin refills are accomplished approximately 4 times a year by hypodermic needle.

1988-01-01

209

Experimental measurement and numerical simulation of residual stresses in a carburized layer of a 5120 steel  

SciTech Connect

A combined experimental and numerical study of residual stress and microstructure has been performed for a carburized steel 5120 specimen. Specimens were cut from 5120 steel bar stock, in the shape of hockey pucks and were subsequently carburized and quenched. X-ray diffraction was used to record stress profiles through the case for the martensite and retained austenite on the two flat surfaces oriented up and down during the quench. Layer removal was performed by electropolishing. Rietveld analysis was used to determine the lattice parameters of the phases at each depth varying with both carbon content and stress. The experimental measurements are compared with a numerical simulation of the phase transformation and the metallurgical changes following the carburization and quench. Results am discussed in the context of the microstructure and the role played by the retained austenite in interpretation. In addition the carbon profile obtained from the lattice parameters is compared with profiles measured using burnout.

Rangaswamy, P.; Bourke, M.A.M.; Shipley, J.C.; Goldstone, J.A.

1995-09-01

210

Communication in a Swarm of Miniature Robots: The e-Puck as an Educational Tool for Swarm Robotics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Swarm intelligence, and swarm robotics in particular, are reaching a point where leveraging the potential of communication within an artificial system promises to uncover new and varied directions for inter- esting research without compromising the key properties of swarm- intelligent systems such as self-organization, scalability, and robustness. However, the physical constraints of using radios in a robotic swarm are hardly

Christopher M. Cianci; Xavier Raemy; Jim Pugh; Alcherio Martinoli

2006-01-01

211

Updated On: 3/21/2014 15:44 Teams: Dont Puck WIth Us points Combat Wombats points  

E-print Network

Gentili 0 Nicole Fox 0 Jacob Lehr 3 Kelsey Peabody 0 Drew Crittenden 0 Matt Novak 0 Liz Tucci 0 Tim Barry Jr 0 Ryan Olsen 0 Clare Cashen 0 #12;fcc coon brigade points Super Super Seniors points The Boston

Sridhar, Srinivas

212

Atlantic University Field Hockey League Tournament #1 @ SMU/DAL 2014 The Atlantic University Field Hockey League is comprised of teams from Acadia, Dalhousie, Saint  

E-print Network

Keala McGuire UPEI Shut Out: Grace Sullivan 14. DAL 4 vs ACA 0 DAL Goals: Nicole Wong 2, Nikki Burge Hollis UPEI Shut Out: Grace Sullivan 2. ACA 0 vs UNB 1 UNB Goal: Jessica Hay UNB Shut Out: SarahGuire, Taylor Coleman, Alyssa Arbing, Lacey MacLauchlan, Kathryn Koughan, Ashley Hollis UPEI Shut Out: Grace

Brownstone, Rob

213

Atlantic University Field Hockey League Tournament #2 @ UPEI 2014 The Atlantic University Field Hockey League is comprised of teams from Acadia, Dalhousie, Saint  

E-print Network

Coleman UPEI Shut Out: Grace Sullivan 9. UNB 0 vs DAL 4 DAL Goals: Samantha Spooner 2, Nicole Wong, Jackie: Sydney Stavert, Makayla McGuirk, Lacey MacLauchlan UPEI Shut Out: Grace Sullivan #12;16. ACA 0 vs SMU 2, Mikayla McGuirk, Ashley Hollis UPEI Shut Out: Grace Sullivan 19. SMU 1 vs UNB 0 SMU Goal: Brittany Avery

Brownstone, Rob

214

Experienced hockey coach and defense attorney with Machiaveliian leadership skills in  

E-print Network

DucatiOn CINDY J.H.YEN National Chengchi University B.A. in Public Finance Expected Graduate Date June 2012 / Taipei, Taiwan · Relevant Coursework: Corporate Finance, Public Finance, Financial Report Analysis

Ouhyoung, Ming

215

An Examination of the Relative Age Effect in Developmental Girls' Hockey in Ontario  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The relative age effect (RAE) suggests that athletes may be provided with greater opportunities for success depending on the position of their birthdate in a sport's selection year. While the effect has been well established in men's sports, less is known about women's sports. This study examined the RAE in developmental girls'…

Smith, Kristy L.; Weir, Patricia L.

2013-01-01

216

Coach Selections and the Relative Age Effect in Male Youth Ice Hockey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Relative age effects (RAEs; when relatively older children possess participation and performance advantages over relatively younger children) are frequent in male team sports. One possible explanation is that coaches select players based on physical attributes, which are more likely witnessed in relatively older athletes. Purpose: To determine if…

Hancock, David J.; Ste-Marie, Diane M.; Young, Bradley W.

2013-01-01

217

Hockey Night in Canada and Waltzing Matilda: Examining Culture in a Global Classroom.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper, the result of a collaboration between professors at the University of Calgary in Canada and Ararat Community College in Victoria (Australia), was presented at the 2001 Teaching the in Community Colleges Conference, "Teaching and Learning: What Have We Discovered and Where Are We Headed?" In this paper, the authors describe their…

Jacobsen, Michele; Tate, Joanne

218

The Validity and Reliability of a Performance Assessment Procedure in Ice Hockey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Coaches and physical educators must obtain valid data relating to the contribution of each of their players in order to assess their level of performance in team sport competition. This information must also be collected and used in real game situations to be more valid. Developed initially for a physical education class context, the…

Nadeau, Luc; Richard, Jean-Francois; Godbout, Paul

2008-01-01

219

Minor Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) in Ice Hockey and Other Contact Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Minor Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) is caused by the inertial effect of a mechanical impact to the head with sudden rotational acceleration forces. MTBI produces, in the less severe cases, only transient disturbances of ionic homeostasis with temporary disturbances of brain function. Depending on the severity of the trauma, animal and human studies have demonstrated focal intraaxonal alterations in neurofilamentous\\/cytoskeletal

Nicola Biasca; Stephan Wirth; William Maxwell; Hans-Peter Simmen

2005-01-01

220

An Experimental Investigation of Detonation Corner-Turning Using High Resolution Radiography  

SciTech Connect

We have performed experiments investigating detonation corner turning over a range of high-explosives including LX-17, Composition B, LX-04 and Tritonal. The primary diagnostic utilized here was a new high-resolution x-ray system that was capable of recording a time sequence of the detonation process as it negotiated the corner of interest and propagated. For LX-17 our data detail the formation of a significant dead-zone. Although the detonation eventually turned the corner in LX-17, the dead zone persisted to late times and evidence exists that it never was consumed by either detonation or fast combustion processes. In LX-17 the detonations ability to corner-turn increases as the density is reduced. Furthermore, lowering the density decreases the size of the dead-zone and alters its shape. The other high-explosives investigated were able to turn the corner immediately with no indication of any dead-zone formation.

Molitoris, J D; Andreski, H G; Garza, R G; Batteux, J D; Souers, P C

2006-07-19

221

Bose-Einstein condensation in dark power-law laser traps  

SciTech Connect

We investigate theoretically an original route to achieve Bose-Einstein condensation using dark power-law laser traps. We propose to create such traps with two crossing blue-detuned Laguerre-Gaussian optical beams. Controlling their azimuthal order l allows for the exploration of a multitude of power-law trapping situations in one, two, and three dimensions, ranging from the usual harmonic trap to an almost square-well potential, in which a quasihomogeneous Bose gas can be formed. The usual cigar-shaped and disk-shaped Bose-Einstein condensates obtained in a 1D or 2D harmonic trap take the generic form of a 'finger' or of a 'hockey puck' in such Laguerre-Gaussian traps. In addition, for a fixed atom number, higher transition temperatures are obtained in such configurations when compared with a harmonic trap of the same volume. This effect, which results in a substantial acceleration of the condensation dynamics, requires a better but still reasonable focusing of the Laguerre-Gaussian beams.

Jaouadi, A. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Gaaloul, N. [Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Welfengarten 1, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Viaris de Lesegno, B.; Pruvost, L. [CNRS, Laboratoire Aime Cotton (LAC), F-91405 Orsay (France); Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay, F-91405 France (France); Telmini, M. [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moleculaire et Applications (LSAMA), Department of Physics, Faculty of Science of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar, T-2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Charron, E. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay (ISMO), F-91405 Orsay (France); CNRS, Orsay, F-91405 (France)

2010-08-15

222

Square lattice honeycomb tri-carbide fuels for 50 to 250 KN variable thrust NTP design  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Ultrahigh temperature solid solution of tri-carbide fuels are used to design an ultracompact nuclear thermal rocket generating 950 seconds of specific impulse with scalable thrust level in range of 50 to 250 kilo Newtons. Solid solutions of tri-carbide nuclear fuels such as uranium-zirconium-niobium carbide. UZrNbC, are processed to contain certain mixing ratio between uranium carbide and two stabilizing carbides. Zirconium or niobium in the tri-carbide could be replaced by tantalum or hafnium to provide higher chemical stability in hot hydrogen environment or to provide different nuclear design characteristics. Recent studies have demonstrated the chemical compatibility of tri-carbide fuels with hydrogen propellant for a few to tens of hours of operation at temperatures ranging from 2800 K to 3300 K, respectively. Fuel elements are fabricated from thin tri-carbide wafers that are grooved and locked into a square-lattice honeycomb (SLHC) shape. The hockey puck shaped SLHC fuel elements are stacked up in a grooved graphite tube to form a SLHC fuel assembly. A total of 18 fuel assemblies are arranged circumferentially to form two concentric rings of fuel assemblies with zirconium hydride filling the space between assemblies. For 50 to 250 kilo Newtons thrust operations, the reactor diameter and length including reflectors are 57 cm and 60 cm, respectively. Results of the nuclear design and thermal fluid analyses of the SLHC nuclear thermal propulsion system are presented. .

Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis; Gouw, Reza; Furman, Eric

2001-02-01

223

FRIEDRICH-SCHILLER-UNIVERSITT JENA  

E-print Network

kompilieren und auszuführen 5 Dieser Artikel bezieht sich auf Puck in der Version 1.8.1. #12;3 Das Puck.jsp heruntergeladen werden. Im Folgenden wird von einer Standardinstallation unter einem Windows-System ausgegangen

224

One Dimensional Motion: Position versus Time Graphs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the following exercises, the graph drawn is of position versus time. The animation shows the position of a puck as time progresses. Note the position of the puck at various times and compare the animation to the graph.

Wolfgang Christian

225

SENATOR SCRANTON & GOVERNOR HOCKEY MOM: The Importance of Vice Presidential Candidates in Presidential Vote Choice Yesterday and Today  

Microsoft Academic Search

To what extent do vice presidential candidates affect individual-level vote choice for president? The accepted wisdom is that vice presidential candidates are of minor importance to most voters. The journalistic consensus is that VPs are just \\

Stacy G. Ulbig

226

Comment on ``Hockey sticks, principal components, and spurious significance'' by S. McIntyre and R. McKitrick  

E-print Network

] MBH98 use principal component analysis (PCA) to distill the large number of tree ring records (90 of the data, the seventy North American tree ring records (NOAMER) extending back to AD1400, and show [Cook and Kairiukstis, 1990], reported as fractional changes from mean tree ring width or maximum ring

Huybers, Peter

227

Secrets of Success In the fall of 1979, Bill Wenmark, a former ice hockey player from Deephaven, Minnesota,  

E-print Network

-training workouts, usually on an exercise bike, but also some strength training. The training program works. Through must want to run the marathon-not because your boss did it or your spouse did it. 2. Loosen up. Recipe. If it's going to take you five or more hours to finish, you may also want to practice eating (and more

Huang, Jianyu

228

Measurement of Hybrid III Head Impact Kinematics Using an Accelerometer and Gyroscope System in Ice Hockey Helmets.  

PubMed

Helmet-based instrumentation is used to study the biomechanics of concussion. The most extensively used systems estimate rotational acceleration from linear acceleration, but new instrumentation measures rotational velocity using gyroscopes, potentially reducing error. This study compared kinematics from an accelerometer and gyroscope-containing system to reference measures. A Hybrid III (HIII) adult male anthropometric test device head and neck was fit with two helmet brands, each instrumented with gForce Tracker (GFT) sensor systems in four locations. Helmets were impacted at various speeds and directions. Regression relationships between GFT-measured and reference peak kinematics were quantified, and influence of impact direction, sensor location, and helmet brand was evaluated. The relationship between the sensor output and the reference acceleration/velocity experienced by the head was strong. Coefficients of determination for data stratified by individual impact directions ranged from 0.77 to 0.99 for peak linear acceleration and from 0.78 to 1.0 for peak rotational velocity. For the data from all impact directions combined, coefficients of determination ranged from 0.60 to 0.80 for peak resultant linear acceleration and 0.83 to 0.91 for peak resultant rotational velocity. As expected, raw peak resultant linear acceleration measures exhibited large percent differences from reference measures. Adjustment using regressions resulted in average absolute errors of 10-15% if regression adjustments were done by impact direction or 25-40% if regressions incorporating data from all impact directions were used. Average absolute percent differences in raw peak resultant rotational velocity were much lower, around 10-15%. It is important to define system accuracy for a particular helmet brand, sensor location, and impact direction in order to interpret real-world data. PMID:25476162

Allison, Mari A; Kang, Yun Seok; Maltese, Matthew R; Bolte, John H; Arbogast, Kristy B

2014-12-01

229

Ibots Learn Genuine Team Solutions Cristina Versino and Luca Maria Gambardella  

E-print Network

, the reinforcement signal directly evaluates the behavior of the only robot in charge of the task. The picture of real robots in a puck collection task. Each robot in the team learns a personal policy through individual payo . For example, a robot is rewarded whenever it either grasps a puck or drops a puck at a home

Gambardella, Luca Maria

230

SER-CAT Remote Server Paul Swartz  

E-print Network

;Additional Equipment #12;Pucks are Placed in the Robot Dewar #12;Loging Into System · Double left click · Sample Preparation · Logging Into System · Robot States · Robot Use · Sample Alignment · Beam.com/ · 16 samples per puck · 7 pucks per rack · 1 rack per shipping dewar · 112 samples per set #12

Cavanagh, John

231

Femoroacetabular Impingement in Professional Ice Hockey PlayersA Case Series of 5 Athletes After Open Surgical Decompression of the Hip  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Femoroacetabular impingement of the hip joint has been identified as a major cause for hip pain in athletes. Surgical open decompression of the hip has historically been proposed as the first treatment of choice. Functional outcomes in athletes after this procedure are unknown.Purpose: To describe the functional and sport-related outcome 2 years after open surgical hip decompression in a

Mario Bizzini; Hubert P. Notzli; Nicola A. Maffiuletti

2007-01-01

232

FLOOR HOCKEY RULES -MEN'S, WOMEN'S & CO-REC Each player must present his/her valid UMass UCard to participate in each and every intramural contest.  

E-print Network

, necklaces, watches and earrings, is illegal. Also, hats and bandanas are not permitted. Taping of earrings. 2. Teams will switch sides after each period; except for overtime. 3. The clock will continuously run through the first two periods. a. The clock will stop with two minutes or less to play

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

233

Establishing the Test–Retest Reliability & Concurrent Validity for the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST) in Adolescent Male Ice Hockey Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study the authors examine the test–retest reliability and concurrent validity of the Repeat Ice Skating Test (RIST). This was an on-ice field anaerobic test that measured average peak power and was validated with 3 anaerobic lab tests: (a) vertical jump, (b) the Margaria–Kalamen stair test, and (c) the Wingate Anaerobic Test. The participants (n?=?14) were 11- to 12-year-old

Allan Power; Brent E. Faught; Eryk Przysucha; Moira McPherson; William Montelpare

2012-01-01

234

Ignition and Growth Modeling of Detonating TATB Cones and Arcs  

Microsoft Academic Search

. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based explosives LX-17 and PBX 9502 is applied to recent experimental data on converging conical charges plus confined and unconfined arc charges. The conical charges are at first overdriven by the converging flow and then fail to detonate as the radial rarefaction wave slows the reaction rate. Unconfined

Craig Tarver; Steven Chidester

2007-01-01

235

Reactive Flow Modeling of the Interaction of TATB Detonation Waves with Inert Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Ignition & Growth model for the shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is applied to calculating the main features of detonation waves in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) based high explosives LX-17, PBX 9502 and EDC-35. Under detonation conditions, TATB based explosives exhibit reaction zone lengths of 2 to 3 mm depending on the interactions between the detonation wave and

Craig M. Tarver; Estella M. McGuire

2002-01-01

236

The Westmount Arena Fire   

E-print Network

A short article on the origins of professional ice hockey in Canada. The article describes an early fire of an arena in Westmount Montreal, QC. This fire's impact on professional ice hockey is discussed as well as initial details about...

Gales, John

237

Updated: 1/12/11 The Department of Recreational Sports maintains 15 different outdoor facilities which include basketball courts, cricket pitches, jogging paths, sand  

E-print Network

which include basketball courts, cricket pitches, jogging paths, sand volleyball courts, roller hockey lighted basketball courts ·Lighted roller hockey rink ·Two lighted sand volleyball courts 11th Avenue: ·Three lighted basketball courts ·One lighted roller hockey rink ·One sand volleyball court Fred Beekman

Jones, Michelle

238

Ultra-Compact Motor Controller  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This invention is an electronically commutated brushless motor controller that incorporates Hall-array sensing in a small, 42-gram package that provides 4096 absolute counts per motor revolution position sensing. The unit is the size of a miniature hockey puck, and is a 44-pin male connector that provides many I/O channels, including CANbus, RS-232 communications, general-purpose analog and digital I/O (GPIO), analog and digital Hall inputs, DC power input (18-90 VDC, 0-l0 A), three-phase motor outputs, and a strain gauge amplifier. This controller replaces air cooling with conduction cooling via a high-thermal-conductivity epoxy casting. A secondary advantage of the relatively good heat conductivity that comes with ultra-small size is that temperature differences within the controller become smaller, so that it is easier to measure the hottest temperature in the controller with fewer temperature sensors, or even one temperature sensor. Another size-sensitive design feature is in the approach to electrical noise immunity. At a very small size, where conduction paths are much shorter than in conventional designs, the ground becomes essentially isopotential, and so certain (space-consuming) electrical noise control components become unnecessary, which helps make small size possible. One winding-current sensor, applied to all of the windings in fast sequence, is smaller and wastes less power than the two or more sensors conventionally used to sense and control winding currents. An unexpected benefit of using only one current sensor is that it actually improves the precision of current control by using the "same" sensors to read each of the three phases. Folding the encoder directly into the controller electronics eliminates a great deal of redundant electronics, packaging, connectors, and hook-up wiring. The reduction of wires and connectors subtracts substantial bulk and eliminates their role in behaving as EMI (electro-magnetic interference) antennas. A shared knowledge by each motor controller of the state of all the motors in the system at 500 Hz also allows parallel processing of higher-level kinematic matrix calculations.

Townsend, William T.; Crowell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

2012-01-01

239

Miniature Free-Flying Magnetometer Utilizing System-On-A-Chip Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Four Free-Flying Magnetometers (FFMs), developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy mission, were successfully deployed from the payload of a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. The FFMs functioned successfully by synchronously measuring the vector magnetic field at 4 points separate from the payload and at relative distances up to 3 km, and communicated their data, in bursts, to the ground. This is the first time synchronized in-situ multipoint measurements of the Earth's magnetic field utilizing miniature spin-stabilized "sensorcraft" have been performed. The data they provided have enabled, for the first time, the direct measure of field-aligned current density and are enabling new science by determining the fine-scale structure of the currents in the Earth's ionosphere involved in the production of aurora. These proof-of-concept "hockey puck" (80 mm diameter, 38 mm height, 250 gram mass) FFMs were built using off-the-shelf commercial, industrial, and military grade surface-mount electronic components. Radiation-hard electronics was not required for the Enstrophy mission's short sub-orbital flight. The successful design, implementation, and flight demonstration of this 1st generation FFM design has provided a solid base for further development of a 2nd generation FFM design for planetary science applications. A reliable ultra-miniature radiation-hard 2nd-generation FFM utilizing System-On-A-Chip (SOAC) technologies is proposed. This design would be targeted for long-term planetary missions to investigate magnetospheric field configurations in regions having small-scale structure and to separate spatial and temporal variations. A fleet of short-lived (expendable) FFMs would be deployed into a targeted region to gather multiprobe vector magnetic field data. The FFMs would be ejected from a parent spacecraft at a speed of a few m/sec and would cover spatial volumes of order tens of kilometers for times of order one hour. The parent spacecraft would carry a sufficient number of FFMs for multiple deployments. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Eyre, F. B.; Blaes, B. R.

2001-01-01

240

Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on the initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shock initiation of the insensitive high-explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under simulated accident conditions in which two shock waves interact producing locally high pressures and temperatures. Two experimental geometries were studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges to measure the increases in pressure due to exothermic reaction at various locations as functions of

Craig M. Tarver; Paul A. Urtiew; William C. Tao

1995-01-01

241

Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fabry–Perot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5%

Craig M. Tarver; John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt

1997-01-01

242

Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on the initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shock initiation of the insensitive high-explosive LX-17, which contains 92.5% triaminotrinitrobenzene and 7.5% Kel-F binder, was studied under simulated accident conditions in which two shock waves interact producing locally high pressures and temperatures. Two experimental geometries were studied using embedded manganin pressure gauges to measure the increases in pressure due to exothermic reaction at various locations as functions of

Craig M. Tarver; Paul A. Urtiew; William C. Tao

1995-01-01

243

Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene  

Microsoft Academic Search

FabryâPerot laser interferometry is used to obtain nanosecond time resolved particle velocity histories of the free surfaces of copper, tantalum, or magnesium disks driven by detonating triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB)-based charges and of the interfaces between detonating TATB and transparent salt crystals. Detonation reaction zone profiles are measured for self-sustaining detonation waves propagating through various thicknesses of LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5%

Craig M. Tarver; John W. Kury; R. Don Breithaupt

1997-01-01

244

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Conceptual Design  

SciTech Connect

'The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading conceptual design and includes a process block diagram, process description, preliminary equipment specifications, and several can loading issues. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.'

Kriikku, E.

1999-05-13

245

Team Flag Football Golf Indoor Soccer Bowling Dodgeball FALL TOTAL Floor Hockey Basketball Outdoor Soccer Softball Kickball Spring Total Year End Total The Hot Mines Chicks 20 5 10 20 30 85 30 15 25 10 10 90 175  

E-print Network

Ballers 15 15 0 15 Jones Road 15 15 0 15 Swim Team 15 15 0 15 Cobra Kai 5 10 15 0 15 The Insane Tactical 5 Redemption 2 10 10 0 10 umadbro? 10 10 0 10 Fish Tank 10 10 0 10 HIMYM 5 5 10 0 10 Sofa Kings XE 5 5 5 5 10

246

Racial and Gender Report Card, 2003: A Comprehensive Analysis of the Hiring Practices of the National Basketball Association, National Football League, National Hockey League, Major League Baseball, Major League Soccer, Women's National Basketball Association, and NCAA and Its Member Institutions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the 12th issue of the "Racial and Gender Report Card," which assesses hiring practices of women and people of color in U.S. professional and amateur sports and sporting organizations. It considers the composition of players, coaches, and front office/athletic department employees in the leading sports organizations. Each organization is…

Lapchick, Richard E.

247

Performance SPort DeveloPment Programme  

E-print Network

Diving Equestrian Fencing Football Futsal Gaelic Football Golf Gymnastics Handball Hockey Hurling Ju Jitsu Judo Karate Karting Modern Pentathlon / Biathlon Netball Orienteering Pool Rifle Shooting Rowing

Oakley, Jeremy

248

61 FR 46134 - Copyright Restoration of Works in Accordance With the Uruguay Round Agreements Act; List...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Psyche. The white witch of Rosehall. Law, Katharine The anatomy of Puck. Hobberdy Dick. Kate Crackernuts. The personnel...G.) Literary Executors of the Estate of After democracy. Anatomy of frustration. The Camford visitation. The common...

1996-08-30

249

Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization  

SciTech Connect

The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.

Congdon, J.W.

2001-07-10

250

Updated On: 9/15/2014 19:58 Teams: The Iceholes points BMS Mountain Goats points  

E-print Network

Brandon Bogan 0 Justin bedrosian 0 Sean donohue 0 Josh Gosbee 0 Graham Doherty 0 Ben Hartman 0 Players NHL All Stars points Tryna Puck points Stephen Rougas - C 0 Scott Carson - C 0 Nick Hermann - C 0

Sridhar, Srinivas

251

A Robotic Platform for Studying the Evolution of Communication  

E-print Network

accelerometer, 8 red LEDs with a diffusion ring, a speaker, 3 microphones, a 2D color camera facing forward connect to a workstation using its built-in Bluetooth module. One of the e-puck's main advantages is its

Floreano, Dario

252

40 CFR 63.9565 - What definitions apply to this subpart?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...objects. Products that use friction materials include, but are not limited to, disc brake pucks, disc brake pads, brake linings, brake shoes, brake segments, brake blocks, brake discs, clutch facings, and clutches. HAP solvent...

2011-07-01

253

40 CFR 63.9565 - What definitions apply to this subpart?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...objects. Products that use friction materials include, but are not limited to, disc brake pucks, disc brake pads, brake linings, brake shoes, brake segments, brake blocks, brake discs, clutch facings, and clutches. HAP solvent...

2013-07-01

254

40 CFR 63.9565 - What definitions apply to this subpart?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...objects. Products that use friction materials include, but are not limited to, disc brake pucks, disc brake pads, brake linings, brake shoes, brake segments, brake blocks, brake discs, clutch facings, and clutches. HAP solvent...

2010-07-01

255

40 CFR 63.9565 - What definitions apply to this subpart?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...objects. Products that use friction materials include, but are not limited to, disc brake pucks, disc brake pads, brake linings, brake shoes, brake segments, brake blocks, brake discs, clutch facings, and clutches. HAP solvent...

2014-07-01

256

40 CFR 63.9565 - What definitions apply to this subpart?  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...objects. Products that use friction materials include, but are not limited to, disc brake pucks, disc brake pads, brake linings, brake shoes, brake segments, brake blocks, brake discs, clutch facings, and clutches. HAP solvent...

2012-07-01

257

Introduction Subsumption Architecture  

E-print Network

Introduction Subsumption Architecture Metabolic Architecture Comparison Conclusions A metabolic subsumption architecture for cooperative control of the e-puck Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham Verena Verena Fischer and Simon Hickinbotham A metabolic subsumption architecture 1 #12;Introduction Subsumption

Leeds, University of

258

Score a Facilities Hat Trick: Strategic Goals for Successful Hiring, Training, and Team Commitment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Granted, it might be a bit of a stretch to find comparable attributes between an ice hockey team and facilities management organizations. However, if you are open-minded to the possibility and begin to analyze each of these entities, you will find there are some distinct similarities. Ice hockey is a fast-paced and ever-changing game, much like a…

Loy, Darcy

2012-01-01

259

The Effect of Role Ambiguity on Competitive State Anxiety.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the relationship between role ambiguity and precompetition state anxiety among high school athletes playing field hockey. Surveys of male and female field hockey players in the United Kingdom indicated that ambiguity concerning the scope of one's offensive responsibilities was predictive cognitive state anxiety, while ambiguity…

Beauchamp, Mark R.; Bray, Steven R.; Eys, Mark A.; Carron, Albert V.

2003-01-01

260

The Moderating Effect a Sport's Rules Have on a Home Team's Competitive Advantage  

Microsoft Academic Search

To test our hypothesis we examine the game-by-game performance of professional baseball and hockey teams. We examine nine years of data from Major League Baseball and eight years of data for the National Hockey League. We use probit regression analysis to examine the data. Probit regression analysis is used because the dependent variable is coded as a 1 if the

William M. Foster

2007-01-01

261

When “where” is more important than “when”: Birthplace and birthdate effects on the achievement of sporting expertise  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we assessed whether contextual factors related to where or when an athlete is born influence their likelihood of playing professional sport. The birthplace and birth month of all American players in the National Hockey League, National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, and Professional Golfer's Association, and all Canadian players in the National Hockey League were collected from

JEAN COTE ´; Dany J. Macdonald; Joseph Baker; Bruce Abernethy

2006-01-01

262

Department of Recreation and Wellness -Division of Student Affairs ReleasePARENT/GUARDIAN/ADULT PARTICIPANT: PLEASE  

E-print Network

associated with ice skating/hockey. In consideration of being permitted to enroll, I hereby voluntarily in a recreational setting » Promotes physical fitness through a fun, competitive on-ice experience » Allows players release Bowling Green State University, and the BGSU Ice Arena 3-On-3 Hockey program, its employees

Moore, Paul A.

263

The use of Video Game Technology for Investigating Perceptual and Cognitive Awareness in Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a framework for investigating and manipulating the attentional components of video game play in order to affect learning transfer across different task environments. Several groups of video game players (VGP) and non video game players - both hockey and non-hockey groups (NVGPH, NVGP) will be tested at baseline on several aspects of visual processing skill. The NVGP

Desmond E. Mulligan; Michael W. Dobson; Janet Mccracken

2005-01-01

264

J Neurosurg / February 4, 2014 DOI: 10.3171/2013.12.JNS132090  

E-print Network

.4 million individuals in the US every year.12 The incidence of concussion is likely much higher, as not all those who sustain a concussion Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 2. Microstructural white matter alterations in acutely concussed ice hockey players: a longitudinal free-water MRI study Clinical article Ofer

265

Assessing the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes who participate in contact sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined the enduring residual neuropsychological effects of head trauma in college athletes using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), Postconcussion Syndrome Checklist, and the Stroop task. Based on a brief self-report concussion history survey, male and female athletes who participated in ice hockey, field hockey, lacrosse, and\\/or soccer were assigned to one of

Chad Killam; Robin L. Cautin; Anthony C. Santucci

2005-01-01

266

2011 2012 CALENDAR"Encouraging The Lifelong Pursuit Of Active, Healthy Lifestyles" Campus Recreation at UMass Lowell  

E-print Network

Floor Hockey Ice Hockey Indoor Lacrosse Indoor & Outdoor Soccer Kickball Ladder Golf 9 Ball/8 Ball Pool Ping Pong Racquetball Slam Dunk Contest Softball Squash Tennis Volleyball Wallyball Wi eball 3 Point Locker Rooms & Sauna Costello Gym Pool Rec-Cycles - Free Bicycle Lending Library Pool & Ping Pong Tables

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

267

Nontraditional Games in a Foreign Environment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study investigated students' reactions to the addition of nontraditional games (played in and traditional to another country) to the physical education curriculum. Seventh grade students in Australia were introduced to game development, skills, and present status of two sports, 'Midget' Hockey, a modified version of Canadian ice hockey, and…

Cross, Thomas S.

268

www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 39 BRUCEGILBERT/EARTHINSTITUTE  

E-print Network

to the overwhelming evidence that man-made climate change is already well under way. The Wall Street Journal editorial of global climate change. The editorial page sits in its own redoubt, separated from the reporters--and from the truth. A July 14 editorial, "Hockey Stick Hokum," epitomizes the problem. The climate-change "hockey

269

Free-Flying Magnetometer Data System  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Free-Flying Magnetometer (FFM) is an autonomous "sensorcraft" developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the Enstrophy sounding rocket mission. This mission was a collaborative project between the University of New Hampshire, Cornell University and JPL. The science goal of the mission was the study of current filamentation phenomena in the northern auroral region through multipoint measurements of magnetic field. The technical objective of the mission was the proof of concept of the JPL FFM design and the demonstration of an in-situ multipoint measurement technique employing many free-flying spacecraft. Four FFMs were successfully deployed from a sounding rocket launched from Poker Flats, Alaska on February 11, 1999. These hockey-puck-sized (80 mm diameter, 38 mm. height, 250 gram mass) free flyers each carry a miniature 3-axis flux-gate magnetometer that output +/- 2 V signals corresponding to a +/- 60,000 nT measurement range for each axis. The FFM uses a synchronized four-channel Sigma(Delta) Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC) having a dynamic range of +/- 2.5V and converting at a rate of 279 samples/second/channel. Three channels are used to digitize the magnetometer signals to 17-bit (1.144 nT/bit) resolution. The fourth ADC channel is multiplexed for system monitoring of four temperature sensors and two battery voltages. The FFM also contains two sun sensors, a laser diode which emits a fan-shaped beam, a miniature S-band transmitter for direct communication to the ground station antennas, an ultra-stable Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator (TCXO) clock, an integrated data subsystem implemented in a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), a 4 Mbit Static Random Access Memory (SRAM) for data storage and Lithium Thionyl Chloride batteries for power. Communicating commands to the FFM prior to deployment is achieved with an infrared (IR) link. The FFM IR receiver responds to 9-bit pulse coded signals that are generated by an IR Light Emitting Diode (LED) in the payload for turning FFM power on or off and placing the FFM in a test mode or flight mode. The IR links are also used to synchronize (zero) the clocks onboard all the FFMs through a reset pulse originating from the payload GPS receiver that is issued when the FFMs are in flight mode. The FPGA based data subsystem manages continuous data collection from the four ADC channels and sun sensors, formatting and storing the data to SRAM, and controlling downlink transmission. The transmitter is powered only after a 2547 frame SRAM buffer has been filled (approx. 5 minutes of data). The data is Viterbi encoded and sent to the S-band transmitter via a First-In-First-Out (FIFO) buffer who's output is clocked at 100 bits/second. After the 26-second transmission, the transmitter is turned off to reduce noise coupling to the sensitive magnetometer. The data subsystem control consists of a master state machine that performs data flow management and is interfaced through a prioritized interrupt scheme to state machines that service the ADC, sun sensors and transmitter FIFO. Continuous data collection prevents the missing of data during transmission and provides implicit time tagging of the data acquired by the ADC because of synchronization with the TCXO clock.

Blaes, B.; Javadi, H.; Spencer, H.

2000-01-01

270

Detonator cable initiation system safety investigation: Consequences of energizing the detonator and actuator cables  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to explore and assess the worst-case response of a W89-type weapons system, damaged so as to expose detonator and/or detonator safing strong link (DSSL) cables to the most extreme, credible lightning-discharge, environment. The test program used extremely high-current-level, fast-rise-time (1- to 2-{mu}s) discharges to simulate lightning strikes to either the exposed detonator or DSSL cables. Discharges with peak currents above 700 kA were required to explode test sections of detonator cable and launch a flyer fast enough potentially to detonate weapon high explosive (HE). Detonator-safing-strong-link (DSSL) cables were exploded in direct contact with hot LX-17 and Ultrafine TATB (UFTATB). At maximum charging voltage, the discharge system associated with the HE firing chamber exploded the cables at more than 600-kA peak current; however, neither LX-17 nor UFTATB detonated at 250{degree}C. Tests showed that intense surface arc discharges of more than 700 kA/cm in width across the surface of hot UFTATB [generally the more sensitive of the two insensitive high explosives (IHE)] could not initiate this hot IHE. As an extension to this study, we applied the same technique to test sections of the much-narrower but thicker-cover-layer W87 detonator cable. These tests were performed at the same initial stored electrical energy as that used for the W89 study. Because of the narrower cable conductor in the W87 cables, discharges greater than 550-kA peak current were sufficient to explode the cable and launch a fast flyer. In summary, we found that lightning strikes to exposed DSSL cables cannot directly detonate LX-17 or UFTATB even at high temperatures, and they pose no HE safety threat.

Osher, J.; Chau, H.; Von Holle, W.

1994-03-01

271

Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT6 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 6 Section 1  

SciTech Connect

The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT6 experiment was fired on April 1, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT6, 160 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 20, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The earliest PDV signal extinction was 54.2 microseconds at 30 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 64.5 microseconds at the central axis. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 55 millimeters at 14.1 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1860 meters per second. At 55 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2408 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.77. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 227 kilobars at 20.1 microseconds, indicating a late time chemical reaction in the LX-17 dead-zone. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 1.7 microseconds.

Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

2008-06-25

272

Molten salt destruction of energetic materials: Emission and absorption measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Spectroscopic aspects of decomposition behaviors of the high explosives LX-17 (92.5 wt % 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) plus 1.5 wt % Kel-F 800 plastic binder), LX-04 (85 wt % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) plus 15 wt % Viton A plastic binder), and 2,6-Dinitrotoluene (DNT) were investigated when 0.3 or 1.0 g samples were immersed into molten salt baths (700 °C molten LiC1-NaC1-KC1 eutectics). UV-VIS

Michelle L. Pantoya; Benjamin D. Shaw

2002-01-01

273

NOTE: Red, Gray, and Blue: Near Infrared Spectrophotometry of Faint Moons of Uranus and Neptune  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the CoCo Cold Coronagraph at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, we observed the uranian satellites Miranda, Puck, Portia, and Rosalind and the neptunian satellite Proteus in the near infrared (JHK) to determine the albedos of those faint satellites. In V-J, all of Puck, Portia, Rosalind, and Proteus are very blue, similar to the colors of many icy satellites and of water ice. The satellites we observed have a wide range of J-H colors, with Miranda being blue, Proteus being gray, and Puck, Portia, and Rosalind being red. For the satellites for which we could determine H-K (Miranda, Puck, and Proteus), the colors are gray to red. As a whole, spectrally, these five satellites lie between icy Solar System satellites (e.g., saturnian satellites or the major uranian satellites) and Kuiper belt objects. The redness of Proteus and Puck and perhaps other satellites suggests the presence of organic material, although the redness is also similar to that of C- and D-class asteroids and some outer jovian moons. In all cases, diagnostic spectral features could be masked by broadband photometry.

Trilling, David E.; Brown, Robert H.

2000-11-01

274

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Concepts  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium Immobilization Facility will encapsulate plutonium in ceramic pucks and seal the pucks inside welded cans. Remote equipment will place these cans in magazines and the magazines in a Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister. The DWPF will fill the canister with glass for permanent storage. This report discusses five can loading conceptual designs and the lists the advantages and disadvantages for each concept. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas. The can loading welder and cutter are very similar to the existing Savannah River Site (SRS) FB-Line bagless transfer welder and cutter and thus they are a low priority development item.

Kriikku, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Ward, C.; Stokes, M.; Randall, B.; Steed, J.; Jones, R.; Hamilton, L.; Rogers, L.; Fiscus, J.; Dyches, G.

1998-05-01

275

Comprehensive Characterization of Voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives from 10 nm to 1 cm: Effects of Temperature Cycling and Compressive Creep  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the characterization of voids and Microstructure in TATB-based Explosives over several orders of magnitude, from sizes on the order of 10 nm to about 1 cm. This is accomplished using ultra small angle x-ray scattering to investigate voids from a few nm to a few microns, ultra small angle neutron scattering for voids from 100 nm to 10 microns, and x-ray computed microtomography to investigate microstructure from a few microns to a few centimeters. The void distributions of LX-17 are outlined, and the microstructure of LX-17 is presented. Temperature cycling and compressive creep cause drastically different damage to the microstructure. Temperature cycling leads to a volume expansion (ratchet growth) in TATB-based explosives, and x-ray scattering techniques that are sensitive to sizes up to a few microns indicated changes to the void volume distribution that had previously accounted for most, but not all of the change in density. This paper presents the microstructural damage larger than a few microns caused by ratchet growth. Temperature cycling leads to void creation in the binder poor regions associated with the interior portion of formulated prills. Conversely, compressive creep causes characteristically different changes to microstructure; fissures form at binder-rich prill boundaries prior to mechanical failure.

Willey, T M; Lauderbach, L; Gagliardi, F; Cunningham, B; Lorenz, K T; Lee, J I; van Buuren, T; Call, R; Landt, L; Overturf, G

2010-02-26

276

Towards Next Generation TATB-based Explosives by Understanding Voids and Microstructure from 10 nm to 1 cm  

SciTech Connect

TATB-based explosives have been investigated on length scales spanning several orders of magnitude, from just under 10 nm to larger than 1 cm. This has been accomplished using a combination of ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), ultra-small angle neutron scattering (USANS), and x-ray computed tomography (XRCT). USAXS determines distributions the smallest structures including hot-spot voids from hundreds of nanometers to a few microns, USANS extends this range to about 10 microns, and two variants of XRCT cover sizes from microns to centimeters. Several examples are presented for LX-17, a triaminotrinitrobenzene based plastic bonded explosive using Kel-F 800. As an extension of previous USAXS results, in these proceedings, an alternate binder results in a more uniform microstructure for the PBX, useful towards design of next-generation TATB-based explosives. These data are an important step to understanding microstructural mechanisms that affect the mechanical properties of TATB-based explosives, and provide complete a comprehensive characterization of the structure of LX-17 from nanometers to centimeters that can be used as empirical input to computational models of detonation, and in determining the relationship between voids and microstructure to detonation properties.

Willey, T M; Overturf, G

2009-03-26

277

Issue 235 1 July 2011 Sharing stories of Imperial's community recognition for  

E-print Network

hockey in 2012. I would have preferred to be at the opening ceremony, enjoying fireworks far more than Althea Hartley-Forbes (Chemistry) said: "I wanted to become part of the HSC network, as I know how hard

278

e-mail interface started August 1991 download data available from start  

E-print Network

logs starting from 1993 · 233,000 full text documents (with full graphics), as of 1 May 2003 · physics-branes de sitter #12;graphics baseball specs references hockey car clinton unix space quicktime computer

Menczer, Filippo

279

The influence of birth date and place of development on youth sport participation.  

PubMed

Previous research highlights the critical role that contextual factors play in shaping athlete development. The purpose of the present study was to investigate two of these contextual factors: birth date (known as the relative age effect, RAE) and city of development as determinants of participation in a sample of youth ice hockey players. The sample included 146,424 athletes registered with Ontario youth ice hockey between the 2004 and 2010 seasons. Chi-square statistics determined a significant RAE in youth ice hockey. Findings also revealed a significant association between small cities of development and increased youth ice hockey participation. Finally, there was no evidence of an interaction between relative age and city of development. The characteristics of smaller communities that may facilitate sport participation across all youth are discussed, along with recommendations for future research. PMID:22998526

Turnnidge, J; Hancock, D J; Côté, J

2014-04-01

280

Undergrads talk research at RIA showcase U of C students have the chance to get a jump  

E-print Network

and chemistry student Noah Puskas discussed his findings about the toxicity of nanoparticles. More than a dozen that are used in all Noah Puskas kinds of product, like hockey sticks, cosmetics and sunscreen," Puskas, 32

de Leon, Alex R.

281

Concussions in the NHL: A narrative review of the literature.  

PubMed

Ice hockey has been identified as a sport with a high risk for concussions. Given the health sequelae associated with the injury, a great deal of attention has been placed on its diagnosis, management and return-to-play protocols. The highest level of ice hockey in North America is played in the National Hockey League (NHL), and concussions pose a serious threat to the health of the players and the game itself. Unfortunately, the scientific literature on concussions in ice hockey is derived mostly from research conducted on youth and amateur levels of play, leaving a gap in our knowledge at the professional level. This narrative review attempts to summarize what is known about concussion incidence, mechanisms of injury and risk factors in the NHL. PMID:25550658

Izraelski, Jason

2014-12-01

282

Aggression in Sport: Its Implications for Character Building.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The premise that "sports builds character" is scrutinized through a discussion of several contact sports--boxing, hockey, and football. The fine line between assertiveness and aggression is explored, and the interrelationship between society and sports is investigated. (JN)

VanDyke, Roger R.

1980-01-01

283

Sport at City Your guide to getting involved  

E-print Network

Badminton 11 Boxing and Karate 12 Hockey 14 Tennis and Cheerleading 15 Equestrian 16 Rugby 17 Netball 18 Zandiyeh Karate Club Colours Dominic Quinton Badminton Emma Barnes Fencing Fabio D'Andrea Fencing Rik

Weyde, Tillman

284

Moraxella Catarrhalis: A Common Cause of Childhood Illnesses  

MedlinePLUS

... Children Radio: Halloween Safety (Audio) Home Care of Children with Complex Medical Needs Protective Eyewear Reduces Risk of Head, Eye and Face Injuries in Field Hockey Mental Health Issues Linked to ...

285

22 CFR 229.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2011-04-01

286

14 CFR 1253.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2011-01-01

287

15 CFR 8a.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2013-01-01

288

36 CFR 1211.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2012-07-01

289

7 CFR 15a.41 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...contact sport. For the purposes of this part, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity. A...

2014-01-01

290

21 CFR 1140.16 - Conditions of manufacture, sale, and distribution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...distributed any free samples of smokeless tobacco: (i) To a sports team or entertainment group; or (ii) At any football, basketball, baseball, soccer, or hockey event or any other sporting or entertainment event determined by the Secretary to be...

2012-04-01

291

45 CFR 86.41 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...contact sport. For the purposes of this part, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball and other sports the purpose of major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity. A...

2013-10-01

292

18 CFR 1317.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2014-04-01

293

10 CFR 5.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2011-01-01

294

29 CFR 36.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2013-07-01

295

41 CFR 101-4.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2011-07-01

296

49 CFR 25.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2014-10-01

297

7 CFR 15a.41 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...contact sport. For the purposes of this part, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity. A...

2013-01-01

298

18 CFR 1317.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2013-04-01

299

45 CFR 618.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2014-10-01

300

7 CFR 15a.41 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...contact sport. For the purposes of this part, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity. A...

2011-01-01

301

22 CFR 146.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2013-04-01

302

28 CFR 54.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2013-07-01

303

45 CFR 2555.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2014-10-01

304

44 CFR 19.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2011-10-01

305

44 CFR 19.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2012-10-01

306

10 CFR 1042.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2012-01-01

307

40 CFR 5.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2014-07-01

308

31 CFR 28.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2014-07-01

309

21 CFR 1140.16 - Conditions of manufacture, sale, and distribution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...distributed any free samples of smokeless tobacco: (i) To a sports team or entertainment group; or (ii) At any football, basketball, baseball, soccer, or hockey event or any other sporting or entertainment event determined by the Secretary to be...

2013-04-01

310

22 CFR 146.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2012-04-01

311

14 CFR 1253.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2012-01-01

312

6 CFR 17.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2012-01-01

313

21 CFR 1140.16 - Conditions of manufacture, sale, and distribution.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...distributed any free samples of smokeless tobacco: (i) To a sports team or entertainment group; or (ii) At any football, basketball, baseball, soccer, or hockey event or any other sporting or entertainment event determined by the Secretary to be...

2014-04-01

314

14 CFR 1253.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2013-01-01

315

7 CFR 15a.41 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...contact sport. For the purposes of this part, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity. A...

2012-01-01

316

38 CFR 23.450 - Athletics.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...For the purposes of these Title IX regulations, contact sports include boxing, wrestling, rugby, ice hockey, football, basketball, and other sports the purpose or major activity of which involves bodily contact. (c) Equal opportunity....

2011-07-01

317

Concussions in the NHL: A narrative review of the literature  

PubMed Central

Ice hockey has been identified as a sport with a high risk for concussions. Given the health sequelae associated with the injury, a great deal of attention has been placed on its diagnosis, management and return-to-play protocols. The highest level of ice hockey in North America is played in the National Hockey League (NHL), and concussions pose a serious threat to the health of the players and the game itself. Unfortunately, the scientific literature on concussions in ice hockey is derived mostly from research conducted on youth and amateur levels of play, leaving a gap in our knowledge at the professional level. This narrative review attempts to summarize what is known about concussion incidence, mechanisms of injury and risk factors in the NHL. PMID:25550658

Izraelski, Jason

2014-01-01

318

2012 Fall Congregation Professor Stephen J. Toope  

E-print Network

learned from teachers and professors, on what you learned through your independent academic work, on what-Canadian or Inuit; gay, straight or bi; a deeply frustrated member of the hockey nation. I hope that your university

Pulfrey, David L.

319

Research, faculty, student and community news, brought to you by the Faculty of Science. Allergy Project  

E-print Network

he started playing hockey, a sport which led the father and Carleton University neuroscience professor to start thinking about concussions. "It was a big concern when my wife and I started sending our

Dawson, Jeff W.

320

Leading the way, staying in touch, making the difference SEASON 11 TOGETHERFostering Inclusion in  

E-print Network

TOGETHERFostering Inclusion in the Great Lakes State Leading the way, staying in touch, making the difference SPRING HEROES A group of area hockey players achieved their share of success on the ice and in the office. 20

Lu, Yi

321

Master of Science Program In Biomedical Engineering  

E-print Network

Arena for professional hockey and basketball, and the Newark Ironbound, a neighborhood with dozens by faculty who are energetic in their teaching and research. NJIT's location close to world-class medical

Bieber, Michael

322

S o m m e r -s e m e s t e r  

E-print Network

Golf 30 Gymnastik (Bodyshape,Wirbelsäulengymnastik) 30 Handball 30 Hockey 31 Inline-Skaterhockey 31 Jiu-Jitsu/Selbstverteidigung 31 Jonglieren 31 Judo 32 Ju-Jutsu 32 Kanupolo 32 Karate (Shotokan, Modernes Sportkarate) 32 Kendo 33

Kaus, Boris

323

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries  

MedlinePLUS

... playing sports? Teens who play contact sports, like football and soccer, are most likely to have a ... the things you love — like running or playing football, field hockey, or softball — can be frustrating. If ...

324

Fitness for Kids Who Don't Like Sports  

MedlinePLUS

... that require short outputs of energy, like baseball, football, gymnastics, golf, and shorter track and field events. ... school. If your daughter wants to try flag football or ice hockey, for example, help her find ...

325

`I wish there didn't have to be gay people' The logics of homophobia  

E-print Network

`I wish there didn't have to be gay people' The logics of homophobia Jodie Clark Sheffield Hallam;Homophobia in a hockey team I wish there didn't have to be gay people Oh! Everyone's gay! I'm told that I'll end up being gay because I'm a hockey player #12;Sullivan claims it's in the water in her house 'cause

Bontcheva, Kalina

326

Application of price uncertainty quantification models and their impacts on project evaluations  

E-print Network

Price Change CPI = Consumer Price Index Fp = Future Cash Flows HIST = Historical IHS = Inverted Hockey Stick IRR = Internal Rate of Return j = Month of the Cash Flow MPC = Monthly Price Change n = Number of Periods NPV = Net... Forecasts????????????. 14 3.2.3 Historical Forecasts????????????. 17 3.2.4 Sequential Gaussian Simulation Forecasts???.. 19 3.2.5 Inverted Hockey Stick Forecasts???????. 20 3.3 Calibration of IHS Uncertainty Estimates??????.. 22 3.4 Distribution...

Fariyibi, Festus Lekan

2006-10-30

327

Shopping for Science.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes inexpensive science materials for doing science activities using the steps in the learning cycle: engage, explore, explain, extend, and evaluate. The hands-on activities help students construct knowledge of dissolving and filtering, chemical reactions, conductivity of metals, heat absorption, motion (frictionless puck), sound production…

Ward, John; And Others

1992-01-01

328

Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many…

Kalajian, Peter

2013-01-01

329

Physics Notes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Short articles describe the use of a lever to transfer energy between pucks on a frictionless surface, a demonstration of the principle of conservation of linear momentum, the construction of an inexpensive joulemeter, the design and construction of a simple logic demonstration board using integrated circuits, mounting of Geiger-counters to…

School Science Review, 1972

1972-01-01

330

The acquisition of intentionally indexed and object centered affordance gradients : a biomimetic controller and mobile robotics benchmark.  

E-print Network

The acquisition of intentionally indexed and object centered affordance gradients : a biomimetic controller and mobile robotics benchmark. Mart´i S´anchez-Fibla , Armin Duff and Paul F.M.J. Verschure for mobile robotics that we solve using E-puck robot simulations: learn the affordances of several objects

Verschure, Paul

331

Development of the Molecular Adsorber Coating for Spacecraft and Instrument Interiors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On-orbit Molecular Contamination occurs when materials outgas and deposit onto very sensitive interior surfaces of the spacecraft and instruments. The current solution, Molecular Adsorber Pucks, has disadvantages, which are reviewed. A new innovative solution, Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC), is currently being formulated, optimized, and tested. It is a sprayable alternative composed of Zeolite-based coating with adsorbing properties.

Abraham, Nithin

2011-01-01

332

Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Preliminary Specifications  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading preliminary equipment specifications and includes a process block diagram, process description, equipment list, preliminary equipment specifications, plan and elevation sketches, and some commercial catalogs. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.

Kriikku, E.

1998-11-25

333

Congratulations HST Class of 2009 The 35th HST Graduation exercises were held on June 3rd at the Harvard  

E-print Network

Harvard Medical School TMEC Atrium, 2nd Floor 260 Longwood Ave, Boston in this issue Teaching scienceD, VP for Research and Associate Provost at MIT. Alumni Nussbaum and Puck share their thoughts on family Harvard-MIT Program MD class in 1971. They reminisced separately on topics ranging from their favorite HST

Bhatia, Sangeeta

334

A Preponderance of Elastic Properties of Alpha Plutonium Measured Via Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Samples of {alpha} plutonium were fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility. Cylindrical samples were machined from cast pucks. Precision immersion density and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements were completed on 27 new samples, yielding elastic moduli measurements. Mechanical tests were performed in compression yielding stress-strain curves as a function of rate, temperature and phase.

Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrow, Adam M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-06

335

Energetic materials destruction using molten salt  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. LLNL has built a small-scale unit to test the destruction of HE using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process. In addition to the high explosive HMX, destruction has been carried out on RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. Also destroyed was a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, destruction has been carried out on a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, and PBX-9404.

Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

1994-04-29

336

Summary of Shock Initiation Data for TATB-based Explosives  

SciTech Connect

This short summary of previously published data was compiled to provide the actual in-situ gauge data to allow modeling of these experiments. Although the purpose here is to fulfill a deliverable for a JOWOG 9 Focused Exchange (09-006), it is just as applicable to other exchanges as well. The TATB materials described here are Ultra Fine (UF) TATB and LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F by weight), with the details of the experiments provided in the prior publications. The data is provided in the appendices of the document, but will be provided electronically as text files due to being amenable to importing into the code in that manner for comparison.

Vandersall, K S

2010-04-03

337

TARANTULA 2011 in JWL++  

SciTech Connect

Using square zoning, the 2011 version of the kinetic package Tarantula matches cylinder data, cylinder dead zones, and cylinder failure with the same settings for the first time. The key is the use of maximum pressure rather than instantaneous pressure. Runs are at 40, 200 and 360 z/cm using JWL++ as the host model. The model also does run-to-detonation, thin-pulse initiation with a P-t curve and air gap crossing, all in cylindrical geometry. Two sizes of MSAD/LX-10/LX-17 snowballs work somewhat with these settings, but are too weak, so that divergent detonation is a challenge for the future. Butterfly meshes are considered but do not appear to solve the issue.

Souers, P C; Haylett, D; Vitello, P

2011-10-27

338

Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT7 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 7 Section 1  

SciTech Connect

The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT7 experiment was fired on April 3, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT7, 160 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 20, 30, 35, 45, 55, 65, 75 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The PDV earliest signal extinction was 50.7 microseconds at 45 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 65.0 microseconds at 20 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 55 millimeters and at 15.2 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1447 meters per second. At 65 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2360 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.61. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 49 kilobars at 23.3 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 4.6 microseconds.

Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

2008-06-25

339

Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT4 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 4 Section 1  

SciTech Connect

The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT4 was fired on March 19, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT4, 120 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 64 degrees Fahrenheit. The earliest PDV signal extinction was 44.9 microseconds at 30 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 69.5 microseconds at 10 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 50 millimeters at 13.3 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1558 meters per second. At 40 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2019 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.77. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 98.6 kilobars at 15.0 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 0.7 microseconds.

Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

2008-06-25

340

Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT3 Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Data Volume 3 Section 1  

SciTech Connect

The Jack Rabbit Pretest (PT) 2021E PT3 was fired on March 12, 2008 at the Contained Firing Facility, Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This experiment is part of an effort to determine the properties of LX-17 in a regime where corner-turning behavior and dead-zone formation are not well understood. Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) measured diagnostic plate velocities confirming the presence of a persistent LX-17 dead-zone formation and the resultant impulse gradient applied under the diagnostic plate. The Jack Rabbit Pretest 2021E PT3, 120 millimeter diameter experiment returned data on all eight PDV probes. The probes measured on the central axis and at 10, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50 millimeters from the central axis. The experiment was shot at an ambient room temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. The earliest PDV signal extinction was 41.7 microseconds at 30 millimeters. The latest PDV signal extinction time was 65.0 microseconds at 10 millimeters. The measured velocity ranged from meters per second to thousands of meters per second. First detonation wave induced jump-off was measured at 40 millimeters at 10.9 microseconds. The PDV data provided an unambiguous indication of dead-zone formation and an impulse gradient applied to the diagnostic plate. The central axis had a last measured velocity of 1636 meters per second. At 40 millimeters the last measured velocity was 2056 meters per second. The low-to-high velocity ratio was 0.80. Velocity data was integrated to compute diagnostic plate cross section profiles. Velocity data was differentiated to compute a peak pressure under the diagnostic plate at the central axis of 64.6 kilobars at 15.7 microseconds. Substantial motion (>1 m/s) of the diagnostic plate over the dead-zone is followed by detonation region motion within approximately 2.2 microseconds.

Hart, M M; Strand, O T; Bosson, S T; Bonner, R A; Hester, D M

2008-06-25

341

In-Situ Monitoring of the Microstructure of TATB-based Explosive Formulations During Temperature Cycling using Ultra-small Angle X-ray Scattering  

SciTech Connect

TATB (1,3,5 triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene), an extremely insensitive explosive, is used both in plastic-bonded explosives (PBXs) and as an ultra-fine pressed powder (UFTATB). With both PBXs and UFTATB, an irreversible expansion occurs with temperature cycling known as ratchet growth. In TATB-based explosives using Kel-F 800 as binder (LX-17 and PBX-9502), additional voids, sizes hundreds of nanometers to a few microns account for much of the volume expansion caused by temperature cycling. These voids are in the predicted size regime for hot-spot formation during ignition and detonation, and thus an experimental measure of these voids is important feedback for hot-spot theory and for determining the relationship between void size distributions and detonation properties. Also, understanding the mechanism of ratchet growth allows future choice of explosive/binder mixtures to minimize these types of changes to explosives, further extending PBX shelf life. This paper presents the void size distributions of LX-17, UFTATB, and PBXs using commercially available Cytop M, Cytop A, and Hyflon AD60 binders during temperature cycling between -55 C and 70 C. These void size distributions are derived from ultra-small angle x-ray scattering (USAXS), a technique sensitive to structures from about 10 nm to about 2 mm. Structures with these sizes do not appreciably change in UFTATB, indicating voids or cracks larger than a few microns appear in UFTATB during temperature cycling. Compared to Kel-F 800 binders, Cytop M and Cytop A show relatively small increases in void volume from 0.9% to 1.3% and 0.6% to 1.1%, respectively, while Hyflon fails to prevent irreversible volume expansion (1.2% to 4.6%). Computational mesoscale models of ratchet growth and binder wetting and adhesion properties point to mechanisms of ratchet growth, and are discussed in combination with the experimental results.

Willey, T M; Hoffman, D M; van Buuren, T; Lauderbach, L; Ilavsky, J; Gee, R H; Maiti, A; Overturf, G; Fried, L

2008-02-06

342

Petrographic composition and directional properties of tills on the NW surroundings of the Gda?sk Bay, Northern Poland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the authors focus on some selected lithological properties of tills: petrographic composition of the 5-10 mm fraction, petrographic composition of the coarse fraction (>20 mm, analysed by the indicator erratics method) and the long axis orientation of clasts. As the study area the authors chose a territory located in Northern Poland on the NW surroundings of the Gda?sk Bay - between Puck and Lake ?arnowieckie. It was found that during the Last Glaciation the study region was fed mainly from the territory of Sweden, middle and south-eastern Sweden in particular. There existed, in parallel with the dominant (in the study region) NNW ice-sheet advance direction, also another, local ice-sheet advance route manifested in the east, which deposited a till bed in the neighbourhood of Puck.

Wo?niak, Piotr Pawe?; Czubla, Piotr; Wysiecka, Gra?yna; Drapella, Ma?gorzata

2009-10-01

343

Discrepant Results in a 2-D Marble Collision  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Video analysis of 2-D collisions is an excellent way to investigate conservation of linear momentum. The often-desired experimental design goal is to minimize the momentum loss in order to demonstrate the conservation law. An air table with colliding pucks is an ideal medium for this experiment, but such equipment is beyond the budget of many schools. Substituting marbles on a table for air pucks introduces angular momentum and sliding friction so that simple video analysis will demonstrate that linear momentum is not conserved.1,2 Nevertheless, these labs offer students insights into the real-world application of physics. During a recent classroom trial, an unexpected result forced my students to think creatively and critically about what happened in the experiment.

Kalajian, Peter

2013-03-01

344

Nine Planets: Planetary Picture List  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This section of The Nine Planets provides links to internet solar system images of the nine planets and their moons. Images include the Sun, Mercury, Venus, the Earth and Moon, Mars (Phobos, Deimos), Jupiter (Amalthea, Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto), Saturn (Pan, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Epimetheus, Janus, Mimas, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, Rhea, Titan, Hyperion, Iapetus, Phoebe), Uranus (Puck, Miranda, Ariel, Umbriel, Titania, Oberon), Neptune (Triton, Proteus), and Pluto with Charon. Miscellanous images include asteroids, comets, meteorites, and spacecraft.

345

Living history biography  

SciTech Connect

A living history biography is presented of Theodore T. Puck. This history is intimately involved with the progress towards mapping of the human genome through research at the forefront of molecular cytogenetics. A review of historical research aims such as human genetics studies based on somatic cells, isolation of mutants as genetic markers, complementation analysis, gene mapping and the measurement of mutation is presented. 37 refs., 4 figs.

Puck, T.T. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-11-15

346

Changes in X-ray Sensitivity of HeLa Cells during the Division Cycle  

Microsoft Academic Search

MEASUREMENT by Puck and Marcus of the reproductive survival of randomly dividing cultures of HeLa S3 cells after X-irradiation revealed an exponential response to dose following a shoulder1. However, the possibility was not excluded that these populations are in fact heterogeneous, the cells undergoing small, or large but brief, fluctuations in sensitivity during the division cycle. We have examined this

Toyozo Terasima; L. J. Tolmach

1961-01-01

347

Spontaneous facial expressions of happy bowlers and soccer fans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kraut and Johnston (1979) found surprisingly few smiles in large samples of bowlers and hockey fans during happy events--unless they were simultaneously engaged in social interaction. A limitation of their studies is that there was no direct test of subjects' actual emotional experience at the moments in which they were observed. This article reports two field studies in which emotions

María-Angeles Ruiz-Belda; José-Miguel Fernández-Dols; Pilar Carrera; Kim Barchard

2003-01-01

348

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Dueling projects face big hurdles  

E-print Network

will be financed, and pointed to other indoor winter ski parks around the world. #12;Much as Walt Disney who park promoter approached the company that owns the Florida Panthers hockey team about opening a small like that would be an attraction," said Michael Yormark, president of the Panthers group. His company

Belogay, Eugene A.

349

Researching Lives Through Time: Time, Generation and Life Stories  

E-print Network

), now the world's leading oral history archive. In 1994 he established Qualidata, the ESRC's action unit and Intergenerational Research 13-18 Jenny Hockey 5. Life Stories, History and Social Change 19-28 Paul Thompson #12;3 1, environmental economics, food, globalisation, gender, health, international relations, management, media, risk

Quartly, Graham

350

The Development of Ojibway Language Materials.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Revitalization of the Nishinaabeg language started in 1998 with the development of language materials. A committee on Nishinaabemwin orthography advised on the development of the text and writing system. Teaching methods follow the four parts of Medicine Wheel teachings: spiritual, emotional, physical, and mental. An interactive hockey game and a…

Pheasant-Williams, Shirley

2003-01-01

351

Descriptive Epidemiology of Collegiate Men's Baseball Injuries: National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, 1988-1989 Through 2003-2004  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To review 16 years of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) injury surveillance data for men's ice hock- ey and to identify potential areas for injury prevention initiatives. Background: The NCAA began injury surveillance of men's ice hockey during the 1988-1989 academic year. These data represent all 3 NCAA divisions; the last Division II champion- ship, however, was held during

Randall Dick; Eric L. Sauers; Julie Agel; Greg Keuter; Stephen W. Marshall; Kenneth McCarty; Edward McFarland; Sport Pharm

2007-01-01

352

OF OUR Points the University of Massachusetts Amherst  

E-print Network

of Race, Rights, and Murder in Jazz-Age America. A dozen UMass faculty received Guggenheims in the last 15 Commission- er's Cup as well as the conference's men's and women's cups--a sweep unprecedented in Atlantic 10 history. UMass women's teams won titles in field hockey (team pictured above), rowing, softball, swimming

Nagurney, Anna

353

Parity and Predictability of Competitions E. Ben-Naim,1,  

E-print Network

87545 2 Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 We present an extensive Baseball (MLB), the National Hockey League (NHL), the National Basketball Associa- tion (NBA, such as the quickly abandoned 1939 FA sea- son, and nineteenth-century results for the National League in baseball

Ben-Naim, Eli

354

Security bus route and stop numbers  

E-print Network

Oval 1 Baseball Wellington Road free parking area Soccer/Hockey All day ticket parking Tennis courts Arts Centre E3 68 Physics C2 27 Religious Centre D3 9 SE4 Multi-level Car Park E4 71 Senior Chemistry D

Li, Yuan-Fang

355

FACULTY 2013-2014 * On leave 2013-2014  

E-print Network

Coll William Barrale, Assistant Professor of Physical Education, Head Baseball and Assistant Football semester + Visitor first semester + + Visitor second semester *Daniel P. Aalberts, Professor of Physics Professor of Physical Education and Head Field Hockey Coach, 1993, BA, Williams College, 1996, MS, Smith

Aalberts, Daniel P.

356

Parity and Predictability of Competitions E. BenNaim, 1, # F. Vazquez, 1, 2, + and S. Redner 1, 2, #  

E-print Network

, New Mexico 87545 2 Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 We present League Baseball (MLB), the National Hockey League (NHL), the National Basketball Associa­ tion (NBA, such as the quickly abandoned 1939 FA sea­ son, and nineteenth­century results for the National League in baseball

Ben-Naim, Eli

357

What is the most competitive sport? E. Ben-Naim,1,  

E-print Network

87545 2 Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 We present an extensive of the English Football Association (FA), Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Hockey League (NHL. For example, in baseball where the winning fraction x typically falls between 0.400 and 0.600, the variance

Ben-Naim, Eli

358

What is the most competitive sport? E. BenNaim, 1, # F. Vazquez, 1, 2, + and S. Redner 1, 2, #  

E-print Network

87545 2 Department of Physics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 We present an extensive of the English Football Association (FA), Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Hockey League (NHL­end standings. For example, in baseball where the winning fraction x typically falls between 0.400 and 0

Ben-Naim, Eli

359

J Neurosurg / February 4, 2014 DOI: 10.3171/2013.12.JNS132092  

E-print Network

hockey players with a history of concussion: a diffusion tensor imaging study Clinical article Takeshi anD inga k. kOerTe, M.D.1,3 1 Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; 2 Department of Psychiatry

360

1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

Roach, Ronald

1997-01-01

361

"Emerging" Sports for Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has recently introduced nine new sports to intercollegiate athletics: team handball, archery, badminton, bowling, crew, ice hockey, squash, synchronized swimming, and water polo. The initiative is intended to encourage colleges to create more athletic opportunities for women. It sets scholarship limits…

Blum, Debra E.

1994-01-01

362

Factors affecting the relative age effect in NHL athletes  

PubMed Central

Background The relative age effect (RAE) has been reported for a number of different activities. The RAE is the phenomena whereby players born in the first few months of a competition year are advantaged for selection to elite sports. Much of the literature has identified elite male athletics, such as the National Hockey League (NHL), as having consistently large RAEs. We propose that RAE may be lessened in the NHL since the last examination. Methods We examined demographic and selection factors to understand current NHL selection biases. Results We found that RAE was weak and was only evident when birth dates were broken into year halves. Players born in the first half of the year were relatively advantaged for entry into the NHL. We found that the RAE is smaller than reported in previous studies. Intraplayer comparisons for multiple factors, including place of birth, country of play, type of hockey played, height and weight, revealed no differences. Players who were not drafted (e.g., free agents) or who played university hockey in North America had no apparent RAE. Conclusion We found little evidence of an RAE in the current NHL player rosters. A larger study of all Canadian minor hockey intercity teams could help determine the existence of an RAE. PMID:24869606

Parent-Harvey, Caroline I.; Desjardins, Christophe; Harvey, Edward J.

2014-01-01

363

Your Resource Guide to WVU's Residential  

E-print Network

Pittsburgh Pirates Baseball Game Residential Education Quiz Bowl Off-Broadway Show in Pittsburgh Community.C. Residence Hall Association (RHA) Talent Show Pittsburgh Penguins Hockey Game Residential Education Sophomore throughout the summer. welcomeweek.wvu.edu Residential Education Programming Opportunities Volleypalooza

Mohaghegh, Shahab

364

Questionable Supervision by Physical Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to Court records, student Pedro Godoy (Godoy) filed a suit against the school district (Central Islip Union Free School District) and teacher Otis R. Scerbo (Scerbo), seeking to recover damages for personal injuries allegedly sustained by Godoy while participating in a game of floor hockey during physical education class. Scerbo (the…

Sawyer, Thomas H.; Gimbert, Tonya L.

2013-01-01

365

Athletes, Doctors, and Lawyers with First Names Beginning with “D” Die Sooner  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many people, names have symbolic power that extends to their timing of death. This study examined the relationship between the symbolic significance of the first letters in the names of professional athletes (baseball, football, hockey, and basketball) and their longevity. A similar analysis was performed for doctors (radiologists, dermatologists, obstetricians\\/gynecologists) and lawyers for comparison purposes. There was a progressive

Ernest L. Abel; Michael L. Kruger

2009-01-01

366

from the Head  

E-print Network

is the need to reduce the teaching load for faculty, especially for our young and .... entitled “Multi-parameter Fourier analysis.” Pipher received ... class and will apply to all baccalaureate programs. ... degree at Purdue in English and film studies in 1998 and previously worked as a ... Blue Jacket hockey games. Dan and his ...

Sally Goeke

2009-07-14

367

n iPhone application that directs you to local sales. A  

E-print Network

A n iPhone application that directs you to local sales. A website that caters to sports addicts and graduate students from many of Columbia's divisions and one Teach- ers College administrator. Each en for a virtual multi- game "table" that would include table tennis, pool and ice hockey. There were no judges

Shepard, Kenneth

368

Spinal Column and Spinal Cord Injuries in Mountain BikersA 13Year Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Multiple studies have described in general the injuries associated with mountain biking, and detailed accounts of spine injuries sustained in hockey, gymnastics, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and paragliding have previously been published. However, no large-scale detailed assessment of mountain biking associated spinal fractures and spinal cord injuries has previously been published.Purpose: This study was undertaken to describe the patient demographics,

Emily R. Dodwell; Brian K. Kwon; Barbara Hughes; David Koo; Andrea Townson; Allan Aludino; Richard K. Simons; Charles G. Fisher; Marcel F. Dvorak; Vanessa K. Noonan

2010-01-01

369

Winthrop House Has a new pair of  

E-print Network

Inside &ONLINE Winthrop House Has a new pair of housemasters, Ronald Sullivan Jr. and Stephanie contest, played amid the strains of the rockin' Harvard band (above), women's hockey bat- tle," "Dragnet," and "Driving Miss Daisy," Aykroyd is also the leader of the Blues BrothersBand.AykroydisafounderoftheHouse

370

Ken Marchant attended his first Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association meeting in 1973 as a representative of the Nova Scotia College Conference, now known as the ACAA (Atlantic Collegiate Athletic Association). From then on he  

E-print Network

as a representative of the Nova Scotia College Conference, now known as the ACAA (Atlantic Collegiate Athletic it all he held the post of athletic director at Nova Scotia Agricultural College, now known as Dalhousie, Nova Scotia in 1975, witnessing an incredible 12-1 comeback in Winnipeg while serving as CCAA hockey

Brownstone, Rob

371

Winter Olympic Sports  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Exploring Winter Olympic Sports Let's take a look at some of the different winter olympic sports Alpine Skiing Biathalon Bobsleigh Cross country Curling Figure Skating Freestyle skiing Ice Hockey Luge Nordic Combined Short track speed skating Skeleton Ski Jumping Snowboard Speed Skating ...

Mrs. Keller

2010-01-23

372

The dark side of self- and social perception: Black uniforms and aggression in professional sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black is viewed as the color of evil and death in virtually all cultures. With this association in mind, we were interested in whether a cue as subtle as the color of a person's clothing might have a signifi- cant impact on his or her behavior. To test this possibility, we examined whether professional football and ice hockey teams that

Mark G. Frank; Thomas Gilovich

1988-01-01

373

Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet The Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet 2009, the most anticipated sports event of the year,  

E-print Network

Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet 11 - 18th The Inter-IIT Students Sports Meet 2009, the most anticipated sports event of the year, was inaugurated on 11 December 2009 th Every year the sports meet. In the main Inter-IIT Sports Meet IITK reached the semi finals of 7 out of 8 games. The Hockey and Football

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

374

Sports Penalties: An Alternative Means of Measuring Aggression.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Used the official records of all games played in the Western Hockey League (N=432) during a season for a Principal Components analysis of 19 aggressive penalties. Results suggested that inter-personal aggression in the sport is multiply determined and can arise for eight different sets of conditions or antecedents. (Author/LLL)

Russell, Gordon W.; Russell, Audrey M.

1984-01-01

375

A Laboratory/Field Study of Television Violence and Aggression in Children's Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study on the effect of viewing violence on television on childrens' behavior was conducted within the context of sport activity. Three sports--baseball, hockey, and lacrosse--were chosen. Teams of children from three different age groups were the subjects. Within each of the age levels in each sport, teams were selected and assigned to…

McCabe, Ann E.; Moriarty, Richard J.

376

Studies of Television and Youth Sports: Laboratory/Field Research on the Effects of Pro-Social and Anti-Social TV Models on Children/Youth in Sport/Athletics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the question of whether or not exposure to televised professional sports affects the social behavior of young people who themselves actively engage in those sports. Lacrosse, hockey, baseball were monitored on television, with students questioned about the impact the behavior of the players (pro-social and anti-social) has…

Moriarty, Dick; And Others

377

Kursplan UNISPORT Sommer 2014 Sportsttten TU  

E-print Network

Rugby Thomas Beachvolleyball Jens Tanzen BS- Latein/Technik Tanzen A-Kurs 15:00 Okinawa Karate Marwin Karate Marwin Salsa-Party für alle Tanzen A-Kurs Lauftreff Clemens Spielgruppe Steinebach Spielgruppe:00 Karate Michael Tischtennis WKM Conrad Inline Hockey allgemeine �bungsstunde Sergej Konditionstraining

Pinnau, René

378

Internet-Accessible Scholarly Resources for the Humanities and Social Sciences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter focuses on the presentations of a program session on Internet-accessible scholarly resources, held at the 1996 ACLS Annual Meeting. Articles in the newsletter include: "Building the Scene: Words, Images, Data, and Beyond" (David Green); "Electronic Texts: The Promise and the Reality" (Susan Hockey); "Images on the Internet: Issues…

ACLS Newsletter, 1997

1997-01-01

379

The Analysis of the Thinking Styles and Creativity of the Sports Students Studying in the Different Fields of University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study analyzes the creativity and thinking levels of athletes studying at the different college departments; 61 female and 75 male athletes, a total of 136 ice-hockey players have participated in the research. As data collection tools, Thinking Styles Inventory and The Creativity Scale have been used in the study. SPSS 15.0 for Windows…

Eraslan, Meric

2014-01-01

380

A Training System for the Japanese Art of Flower Arrangement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Computer Graphics (CG) and Virtual Reality (VR) technologies have rapidly improved in recent years. It enabled us to develop some useful systems such as air hockey, catch ball, tennis and horseback riding for sports field, surgical simulations and support systems for medical field, calligraphy and flower arrangement for educational field. The good training systems have force feedback for users to

S. Takara; M. Kosugi

381

A Pirate's Life: A Model and a Metaphor for Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses various ways in which context may be interpreted to enhance learning and performance; illustrates domains of learning using a hockey team as an example; and suggests implications for learning, performance, and instructional design. Highlights include an ecological systems model; and examples of individual development, team learning, and…

Solomon, David L.

2002-01-01

382

BY CHRISTIAN MEYER AND MICHAEL H. SHEER Concrete international /OCTOBER 2005 43  

E-print Network

.S.: a 232-ft (71-m) span, 340-ft-long (104-m) barrel shell for an ice hockey arena in Hershey, PA.1 are being built with regularity in the U.S. However, steel, rather than concrete, was the material of choice

Meyer, Christian

383

1998 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Announces the Sports Scholars Awards for 1998. One male and one female college athlete are profiled, and others are named for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, riflery, bowling, football, wrestling, soccer, lacrosse, field hockey, swimming/diving, gymnastics, crew, tennis, golf, volleyball, track/field, cross country, downhill skiing, and…

Chenoweth, Karin; Evelyn, Jamilah

1998-01-01

384

More info at: http://www.nepassage.org Point of Contact: Jill Gravink, Director & Founder  

E-print Network

. Northeast Passage is a program of the University of New Hampshire's College of Health and Human Services, and waterskiing. Competition Teams offer training and team participation in sled hockey and quad rugby. Athlete Development offers a unique opportunity for competitive athletes with disabilities to train and attend UNH

New Hampshire, University of

385

M A G A Z I N E WINTER 2006  

E-print Network

Requested NONPROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID PERMIT 69 LOWELL, MA 01854 Come share our view. From the top of 225 Hockey Team Makes History with National Championship 25 Campus Athletics Lowell Textile School · Massachusetts State Normal School · State Teachers College at Lowell · Lowell Textile Institute Lowell

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

386

907.474.7000 www.uaf.edu/fs  

E-print Network

Request (EWORF) In Person: Physical Plant Building For after-hours emergency maintenance requests, please@fs.uaf.edu with questions or comments. Patty Ice Arena The Patty Ice Arena supports the UAF hockey team, student activities, staff, and community groups by providing the best possible skating surface, a well-maintained and safe

Hartman, Chris

387

Leadership Development of Team Captains in Collegiate Varsity Athletics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the leadership development of team captains and student-athletes engaged in NCAA Division III intercollegiate athletics at 6 private institutions of higher education. Student-athletes in the sports of men's and women's soccer, women's field hockey, men's and women's cross country, and women's tennis completed the 2nd edition of…

Grandzol, Christian; Perlis, Susan; Draina, Lois

2010-01-01

388

Multimodality Cranial Image Fusion Using External Markers Applied via a Vacuum Mouthpiece and a Case Report  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To present a simple and precise method of combining functional information of cranial SPECT and PET images with CT and MRI, in any combination. Material and Methods: Imaging is performed with a hockey mask-like reference frame with image modality-specific markers in precisely defined positions. This frame is reproducibly connected to the VBH vacuum mouthpiece, granting objectively identical repositioning of

Reinhart A. Sweeney; Reto J. Bale; Roy Moncayo; Karl Seydl; Thomas Trieb; Wilhelm Eisner; Johannes Burtscher; Eveline Donnemiller; Günther Stockhammer; Peter Lukas

2003-01-01

389

Hip adductor muscle function in forward skating  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adductor strain injuries are prevalent in ice hockey. It has long been speculated that adductor muscular strains may be caused by repeated eccentric contractions which decelerate the leg during a stride. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of skating speed with muscle activity and lower limb kinematics, with a particular focus on the role of the

Ryan Chang; Rene Turcotte; David Pearsall

2009-01-01

390

Lumbar Mobility and Low Back Pain During AdolescenceA Longitudinal Three-Year Follow-up Study in Athletes and Controls  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this 3-year longitudinal study, we studied lumbar mobility and the occurrence of low back pain among 98 adolescents who were free of previous severe low back pain: 33 nonathletes (16 boys, 17 girls), 34 boy athletes (ice hockey and soccer players) and 31 girl athletes (figure skaters and gymnasts). During the fol lowup, low back pain lasting longer than

Urho M. Kujala; Simo Taimela; Airi Oksanen; Jouko J. Salminen

1997-01-01

391

Athletes, Doctors, and Lawyers with First Names Beginning with "D" Die Sooner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For many people, names have symbolic power that extends to their timing of death. This study examined the relationship between the symbolic significance of the first letters in the names of professional athletes (baseball, football, hockey, and basketball) and their longevity. A similar analysis was performed for doctors (radiologists,…

Abel, Ernest L.; Kruger, Michael L.

2010-01-01

392

Personality characteristics of male and female participants in team sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Males members of two college teams, baseball and football, and female members of two teams, field hockey and lacrosse (combined) and equestrians, were compared on the five scales of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ). All teams were significantly higher on the Activity and lower on the Neuroticism-Anxiety scales than the general college population of the University of Delaware. Lacrosse and

Dennis M. O'Sullivan; Marvin Zuckerman; Michael Kraft

1998-01-01

393

Staying at the Top: Playing Position and Performance Affect Career Length in Professional Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In an effort to understand the process of skill acquisition and decline, researchers have largely neglected a critical aspect of this development--maximizing time at the highest levels of achievement. This study examined length of career for professional athletes in basketball, football, ice hockey, and baseball and considers whether career length…

Baker, Joseph; Koz, Dan; Kungl, Ann-Marie; Fraser-Thomas, Jessica; Schorer, Jorg

2013-01-01

394

75 FR 65323 - The Tennis Channel, Inc. v. Comcast Cable Communications, LLC; File No. CSR-8258-P  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...inspection and copying during regular business hours in the FCC Reference Center, Federal...is not relevant to the issue of whether doing so violated Section 616 of the Act and...claims that ice hockey and the Tour de France comprise Versus's most popular...

2010-10-22

395

Limit Value Assessment for Respirable Coal Mine Dust in Germany  

Microsoft Academic Search

Occupational limit values for airborne noncarcinogenic substances are defined as threshold limit values in Germany. This concept presumes a “hockey stick” relationship between mean shift concentrations and health effects. A population-based threshold limit value (in Germany called the MAK value) is defined as the maximum value on the exposure scale below which a constant baseline risk is observed. This concept

P. Morfeld; H.-J. Vautrin; A. Kösters; K. Lampert; C. Piekarski

1997-01-01

396

HMC Names Lane MacDonald Managing Director of Private Equity Harvard Management Company today announced that Lane MacDonald, an accomplished  

E-print Network

hockey team when it won the NCAA Championship in 1989. MacDonald also represented the United States role in assessing and reshaping HMC's private equity portfolio, and will report to Andrew Wiltshire for Private Equity before being promoted in 2012 to his current role, Managing Director of HMC's Public

Wolfe, Patrick J.

397

NanoStraetmedMaterials.VoL 9. PIP.451-454.1997 l~evier Scie~e Ltd  

E-print Network

antiferromagnetic (AF) ¢:~ ferromagnetic (F) aligned states by domain wall nucleation and growth; the Co layers IN SYMMETRIC SPIN-VALVES: NANOSTRUCTURE AND DOMAIN DYNAMICS Harsh Deep Chopra~tl, B. J. Hockey ~, L. J, magnetically pinned by NiO, undergo reversal at high fields (48 mT), but no accompanying wall motion

Chopra, Harsh Deep

398

J Neurosurg / February 4, 2014 DOI: 10.3171/2013.12.JNS132093  

E-print Network

adult popu- Hockey Concussion Education Project, Part 1. Susceptibility-weighted imaging study in male, Massachusetts; and 12 The Elliott Sports Medicine Clinic, Burlington, Ontario, Canada Object. Concussion subconcussive and concussive injury. The goal was to investi- gate how the burden of these hypointensities

399

The long-awaited, much-anticipated launch of the new Dig Field, West  

E-print Network

.wits.ac.za/sport @WitsSport Wits Sport Council www.witsvibe.co.za Today's featured fixture: Varsity Cup vs Wits NMMU Madibaz Wits Rugby Stadium 16h45 #12;Wits Orienteering Club (Witsoc) has grown dramatically this year place for the men's 20 category. The official opening of Wits Hockey's new world-class artificial turf

Wagner, Stephan

400

Hungarian adventure In the fall of 2008 I was lucky to become a part of EU Mobility `Control  

E-print Network

, SFU head of the program, announcing: "There is an opportunity to be a part of an exchange program Europe) and air hockey (in Canada), which involves finding both hardware and software solutions, where the heating was done with coal until recently and every building has a underground premise

Payandeh, Shahram

401

Athletes' Evaluations of Their Head Coach's Coaching Competency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study provided initial validity evidence for multidimensional measures of coaching competency derived from the Coaching Competency Scale (CCS). Data were collected from intercollegiate men's (n = 8) and women's (n = 13) soccer and women's ice hockey teams (n = 11). The total number of athletes was 585. Within teams, a multidimensional…

Myers, Nicholas D.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Maier, Kimberly S.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Reckase, Mark D.

2006-01-01

402

Understanding Sexual Aggression Against WomenAn Examination of the Role of Men's Athletic Participation and Related Variables  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from 139 college men who participated in and viewed contact (e.g., ice hockey) and noncontact (e.g., tennis) sports at different rates of frequency were examined to determine if there was a relationship between these variables and level of sexual aggression against women. The authors also examined whether attitudes toward women, fraternity membership, and sports ideology were related to sexual

Theresa J. Brown; Kenneth E. Sumner; Romy Nocera

2002-01-01

403

A Case Study of Wikis and Student-Designed Games in Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on the incorporation of wiki technology within physical education. Boys from two classes at a school in the United Kingdom were divided into small teams and given the task of creating a new game in a same genre as football, hockey, netball or rugby. Each team had a wiki on which were recorded all the plans and developments of…

Hastie, Peter A.; Casey, Ashley; Tarter, Anne-Marie

2010-01-01

404

Office of Alumni Relations Southwick Hall 250  

E-print Network

Service Requested NONPROFIT ORG US POSTAGE PAID PERMIT 69 LOWELL, MA 01854Learning with Purpose UMass I Hockey East Champions Home Opener · Division I Volleyball and Women's Soccer · Athletic Alumni Run/Walk · Celebration of Philanthropy · Family Day · Campus Tours · Student Leader Alumni Reunion NEW

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

405

An Analysis of Nondestructive Evaluation Techniques for Polymer Matrix Composite Sandwich Materials  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Structural sandwich materials composed of triaxially braided polymer matrix composite material face sheets sandwiching a foam core are being utilized for applications including aerospace components and recreational equipment. Since full scale components are being made from these sandwich materials, it is necessary to develop proper inspection practices for their manufacture and in-field use. Specifically, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques need to be investigated for analysis of components made from these materials. Hockey blades made from sandwich materials and a flat sandwich sample were examined with multiple NDE techniques including thermographic, radiographic, and shearographic methods to investigate damage induced in the blades and flat panel components. Hockey blades used during actual play and a flat polymer matrix composite sandwich sample with damage inserted into the foam core were investigated with each technique. NDE images from the samples were presented and discussed. Structural elements within each blade were observed with radiographic imaging. Damaged regions and some structural elements of the hockey blades were identified with thermographic imaging. Structural elements, damaged regions, and other material variations were detected in the hockey blades with shearography. Each technique s advantages and disadvantages were considered in making recommendations for inspection of components made from these types of materials.

Cosgriff, Laura M.; Roberts, Gary D.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Zheng, Diahua; Averbeck, Timothy; Roth, Donald J.; Jeanneau, Philippe

2006-01-01

406

Social Cognitive Correlates of Young Adult Sport Competitors' Sunscreen Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young adults participating in outdoor sports represent a high-risk group for excessive sun exposure. The purpose of this study was to identify modifiable social cognitive correlates of sunscreen use among young adult competitors. Participants aged 18 to 30 years who competed in soccer (n = 65), surf-lifesaving (n = 63), hockey (n = 61), and tennis…

Berndt, Nadine C.; O'Riordan, David L.; Winkler, Elisabeth; McDermott, Liane; Spathonis, Kym; Owen, Neville

2011-01-01

407

August 6, 2011 Klinsmann Will Find There Are No  

E-print Network

-level player for Germany's national team as well as for top clubs in England, Italy and Germany. As a coach, he it to a soccer team. As a nation of immigrants, the origins and identity of one's ancestors are a key part the United States hockey team knocked off the mighty Soviets in the 1980 Winter Olympics, that victory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

408

Activits autres Liste non Evnement Lieu Cible Nombre Descriptif  

E-print Network

13 à 14 ans +/- 120 / an basketball, judo, volley-ball, tennis de table Vacances sportives Ville de ballons Eté : roller, hockey, natation, tir à l'arc, tennis, athlétisme, sports ballon, base-ball demande 1. Parcours - circuit adapté 2. Approche des jeux de balle à la main et au pied 3. Approche des

Cerf, Nicolas

409

Video Genre Categorization and Representation using Audio-Visual Information  

E-print Network

to classify videos into one of several main genres, for instance, cartoons, music, news, sports, documentaries or into more fine-grained sub-genres, for instance specific types of sports (football, hockey, etc.) and movies-centered concepts such as outdoor vs. indoor scenes, action segments and scenes showing violence (see TRECVid

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

410

Content-Based Video Description for Automatic Video Genre Categorization  

E-print Network

at classifying videos into one of several main genres, e.g. car- toons, music, news, sports, documentaries, etc.; or even more fine-grained into sub-genres, e.g. identifying specific types of sports (football, hockey segments, violence scenes, etc. (see TRECVid campaign [1]). In this paper we focus on the global

Widmer, Gerhard

411

Violence in Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasing violence in sports is deplored, and a warning is issued on an apparent trend toward antisocial behavior. Contact sports such as hockey and football are cited as typically engendering aggression among athletes, but spectator sports (boxing, car racing, basketball, and baseball) are also singled out as eliciting increasing violence on the…

Cooper, Donald L.

412

Powered by Editorial Manager and Preprint Manager from Aries Systems Corporation hal-00732716,version1-17Sep2012 Author manuscript, published in "Journal of Multimedia Tools and Applications xx, xx (2013) pp. xx-xx"  

E-print Network

videos into one of several main genres, e.g. cartoons, music, news, sports, documentaries; or even more fine- grained into sub-genres, e.g. identifying specific types of sports (e.g. football, hockey, violence scenes (see TRECVid campaign [3]). In this paper we focus on the global classification task

Boyer, Edmond

413

On violence in professional team sport as the endogenous result of profit maximization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusion  The role of violence has been treated explicitly in modeling hockey teams as profit maximizing agents. The estimated model appears to offer a reasonable descriptive picture of team behavior, and the statistical results provide no compelling rejection of the underlying hypotheses on which the model is based.Without a doubt, violence in sports is to a considerable extent purely spontaneous and

K. G. Stewart; Donald G. Ferguson; J. C. H. Jones

1992-01-01

414

Roadmap to Teen Health  

MedlinePLUS

... can do with your family and friends tEam SportS iNdividUaL aCtivitiES Such as baseball, football, basketball, hockey, ... the right kind of safety equipment for your sport such as: 4 The right kind of helmet ...

415

6/26/09 11:38 PMThat Shot Was Out? A Clue on When to Challenge a Call -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/24/sports/tennis/24tennis.html?ref=sports  

E-print Network

disgruntled player should not only consider challenging the call for review by digital replay system. He TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE HEALTH SPORTS OPINION ARTS STYLE TRAVEL JOBS REAL ESTATE AUTOS BASEBALL PRO FOOTBALL COLLEGE FOOTBALL PRO BASKETBALL COLLEGE BASKETBALL HOCKEY SOCCER GOLF TENNIS GLOBAL SPORTS BUY TICKETS

Whitney, David

416

Measuring Employer-Based Discrimination Versus Customer-Based Discrimination  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines alternative hypotheses as to why French Canadians are underrepresented on National Hockey League teams based in English Canada relative to their representation on teams based in the United States. Copyright 2003 American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Inc..

Neil Longley

2003-01-01

417

No Evidence of Impaired Neurocognitive Performance in Collegiate Soccer Players  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high incidence of cerebral concussion has been reported among soccer players. We studied whether long-term or chronic neuropsychological dysfunction was present in collegiate soccer players. Two hundred forty subjects from a National Collegiate Athletic Association division I institution were stratified into three groups: soccer athletes (91), nonsoccer athletes (96 women's field hockey, women's lacrosse, and baseball players), and controls

Kevin M. Guskiewicz; Stephen W. Marshall; Steven P. Broglio; Robert C. Cantu; Donald T. Kirkendall

2002-01-01

418

Get active. Get involved. Get competitive. Welcome to the 2013 review of City University London's programme of sport, including  

E-print Network

Union Ali-Cina Fahimi Table Tennis Anthony Hall Rugby Union William Corley Jr. Men's Basketball Edward 8 Cheerleading Cricket 9 Fencing 10 Football 11 Golf 12 Hockey 13 Kung Fu Netball 14 Rugby Table Tennis 15 Tennis 16 Individual Sport Equestrian 17 Fencing (Sabre) Karate 18 Development Sport American

Weyde, Tillman

419

Girls Physical Education Handbook.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook was designed to provide the student with basic information for various individual, dual, and team sports. The individual and dual sports which are discussed include archery, badminton, creative dance, fencing, golf, gymnastics, and games such as deck tennis, table tennis, horseshoes, and shuffledboard. Basketball, field hockey,…

Fairfax County Schools, VA.

420

Sports for Life  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When Saul Lerner became director of physical education, athletics, and health for the Bellmore-Merrick (New York) School District 14 years ago, football, soccer, basketball, and floor hockey were staples of most physical education classes on Long Island and around the rest of the country. The mindset of physical educators was to emphasize sports…

Schachter, Ron

2010-01-01

421

Alpine Skiing in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many students settle indoors in the winter. However, this does not mean that winter should be a period of time with no physical activity. Several snow activities could be practiced during those months, such as ice-skating, ice-hockey, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, alpine skiing, or snowboarding. In order to counteract the tendency for…

Mendez-Gimenez, Antonio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

2012-01-01

422

Exercise-Induced Asthma  

MedlinePLUS

... be more challenging, as can cold-weather endurance sports like cross-country skiing or ice hockey. But that doesn't mean your child can't participate in these sports if he or she truly enjoys them. In ...

423

The Physics of Sports: A Physicist's View  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this talk, I will present a physicist's way of looking at various aspects of sports. In particular, I will focus the discussion on how one might improve or enhance performance by thinking as a physicist about the processes involved. Examples that will be discussed will range from why hockey sticks are (today) curved to why good (basketball) dribbling should

James Faller

2006-01-01

424

Lunar Cycles and Human Aggression: A Replication.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tested lunar-aggression hypothesis using the aggressive penalties awarded in ice hockey over a season of competition. Interpersonal aggression was found to be unrelated to either the synodic or anomalistic cycles. Discussion centers on the persistence of lunar beliefs and their links to the literature on selective exposure and interpersonal…

Russell, Gordon W.; de Graaf, Jane P.

1985-01-01

425

University Communications & Marketing P.O Box 1002  

E-print Network

: (717) 871-2009 Athletics Advertising Intercollegiate Athletics at Millersville Men's Baseball of Varsity Sports Women's Basketball Cross Country Field Hockey Lacrosse Soccer Softball Swimming Tennis Advertising Specifications Page Unit Full Page 7 1/2" x 10 1/2" Half page vertical 3 3/4" x 10 1/2" Half page

Hardy, Christopher R.

426

Some Ways of Helping Underachievers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A program of intervention called therapeutic tutoring to help underachievers is described. Intervention centers around students' loci of control, through a process of identifying areas in which students feel empowered and relating academic experiences to these areas. Academic exercises based on Monopoly, cricket, rugby, soap operas, field hockey,…

Willings, David; Greenwood, Bill

1990-01-01

427

Agenda for Climate, Statistics, and Satellites June 8-10, 2009  

E-print Network

Session chair: Bowman 8:30 am: Nychka - The uncertain hockey stick 9:15 am: Chang - Weather Noise and AMOC - Ship tracks 10:00 am: break 10:30 am: Houze - Extreme convection near the Himalayas and Andes 11:15 am Correcting for signal attenuation from noise: Sharpening the focus on past climate Jim Lawrence University

428

Experimental models of repetitive brain injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs in a significant portion of trauma patients, especially in specific populations, such as child abuse victims or athletes involved in contact sports (e.g. boxing, football, hockey, and soccer). A continually emerging hypothesis is that repeated mild injuries may cause cumulative damage to the brain, resulting in long-term cognitive dysfunction. The growing attention to this

John T. Weber

2007-01-01

429

Proceedings of the 45th Annual Meeting of the Association of Computational Linguistics, pages 800807, Prague, Czech Republic, June 2007. c 2007 Association for Computational Linguistics  

E-print Network

to the rela- tionship between its use and its prosodic realization. (Hockey, 1993) did find that okay differs is to identify the acoustic, prosodic and phonetic fea- tures of okay tokens for which listeners assign differ of context and prosody in the interpretation of `okay' Agust´in Gravano, Stefan Benus, H´ector Ch´avez, Julia

Benus, Stefan

430

Speed-A-Way, Physical Education: 5551.14.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This course outline is a guide (grades 7-12) for teaching speed-a-way, a game combining soccer, basketball, speedball, and field hockey skills. The course format includes discussions, demonstrations, skills practice, films, and tests that focus on mastery of skills, understanding of rules and officiating, testing skill performance and rules…

King, Katheryn

431

Free Fall  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this quick activity (page 1 of PDF), learners will use a simple physics of motion and gravity demonstration to test their predicting skills. Learners predict which quarter will hit the floor first during this free fall experiment. This activity not only requires learners to observe carefully, but also listen carefully! Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV: Hockey.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2005-01-01

432

Moisture Outgassing Rates from TATB-Formulations: Experiments and Kinetic Model Development  

SciTech Connect

Moisture outgassing rates from materials are of interest and importance to a variety of different fields. Because water can attack and accelerate decomposition, aging, or rusting of various parts, the assembly of an apparatus with 'wet' materials can shorten the lifetime of the apparatus. Outgassing of moisture from materials can be quite slow and a material that is seemingly dry at the time of assembly may slowly release water over years. This slow release of water will compromise the other constituents of the apparatus (e.g. electrical components, metals, organic materials) and shorten the lifetime of the apparatus. For apparatuses that are expensive or laborious to construct, it is especially important to understand and be able to predict the mechanisms and rates of water release from various materials. Such an understanding can support the development of accurate estimates of the apparatus's serviceable age and may allow for mitigation strategies in order to protect other parts from water. Energetic materials such as TATB based PBX-9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F 800) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F) pose a particularly challenging problem because they are heterogeneous materials with potentially many different sources and mechanisms of water release. Water molecules could be adsorbed into the polymeric binder matrix, trapped in occlusions within the polymer and the TATB crystals/particles, or trapped within defect sites in the TATB crystal. Finally, many studies indicate that water is a decomposition product under rapid heating conditions, at high temperatures and/or high pressure. Previous studies have measured the water release rate(s) from LX-17 or PBX-9502 prill/powder in order to establish oven drying times prior to use. These studies limited their time frame to a few days or a week of drying. Other studies have looked at the rate of water release of large pressed parts contained in sealed containers. Finally, some studies have looked at the rate of water diffusion through pressed parts, or the effects of wet vs. dry machining, or the influence of the synthesis methods in the amount of water present. There are a few different models that have been developed to predict the rate of water release from LX-17 or PBX-9502. These models are, to some extent, limited by the limitations of the experiments. Because all these experiments looked at water release over a relatively short period of time and left the samples relatively undamaged, they serve as a lower bound. In this work, we perform experiments and develop models that can serve as an upper bound on the rate and amount of water that can be released. Our experimental approach is to use temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and monitor the rate and amount of water release as a function of temperature. We analyzed our experimental data using two different kinetic analysis methods (isoconversional analysis and nth-order Arrhenius kinetic fits) and used the results to make predictions. The suitability of these kinetic analysis methods as well as the applicability of these experiments to long term aging (e.g. years) issues are discussed. Using the kinetics from our experiments, we predict the water release at temperature and timescales relevant to the existing literature. Based on our analysis and comparison with older data, the kinetic model(s) developed in this work serve as a relatively accurate (i.e. order of magnitude) method for predicting the water release under a variety of thermal histories.

Glascoe, E A; Dinh, L N; Small IV, W

2009-07-29

433

Shock-wave initiation of heated plastified TATB detonation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Explosive, plastified TATB, attracts attention with its weak sensitivity to shock loads and high temperature stability ( Pthreshold ? 6.5 GPa and Tcrit ? 250 0Q). However, at its cooling to T 250 0Q plastified TATB becomes as sensitive to shock load as octogen base HE: the excitation threshold reduces down to Pthreshold 2.0 GPa. The main physical reason for the HE sensitivity change is reduction in density at heating and, hence, higher porosity of the product (approximately from 2Moreover, increasing temperature increases the growth rate of uhotf spots which additionally increases the shock sensitivity [1]. Heated TATB experiments are also conducted at VNIIEF. The detonation excitation was computed within 1D program system MAG using EOS JWL for HE and EP and LLNL kinetics [1,2,3]. Early successful results of using this kinetics to predict detonation excitation in heated plastified TATB in VNIIEF experiments with short and long loading pulses are presented. Parameters of the chemical zone of the stationary detonation wave in plastified TATB (LX-17) were computed with the data from [1]. Parameters Heated In shell Cooled Unheated ?0 , g/cm3 1.70 1.81 1.84 1.905 D , km/s 7.982 7.764 7.686 7.517 PN, GPa 45.4 45.8 35.7 32.9 PJ, GPa 27.0 27.3 27.2 26.4 ?x , mm 0.504 0.843 1.041 2.912 ?t , ns 63.1 108.6 135.5 387.4 [1] Effect of Confinement and Thermal Cycling on the Shock Initiation of LX-17 P.A. Urtiew, C.M. Tarver, J.L. Maienschein, and W.C. Tao. LLNL. Combustion and Flame 105: 43-53 (1996) [2] C.M. Tarver, P.A. Urtiew and W.C. Tao (LLNL) Effects of tandem and colliding shock waves on initiation of triaminotrinitrobenzene. J.Appl. Phys. 78(5), September 1995 [3] Craig M. Tarver, John W. Kury and R. Don Breithaupt Detonation waves in triaminotrinitrobenzene J. Appl. Phys. 82(8) , 15 October 1997.

Kuzmitsky, Igor; Rudenko, Vladimir; Gatilov, Leonid; Koshelev, Alexandr

1999-06-01

434

Molten salt destruction as an alternative to open burning of energetic material wastes  

SciTech Connect

LLNL has built a small-scale (about 1 kg/hr throughput unit to test the destruction of energetic materials using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) process. We have modified the unit described in the earlier references to inject energetic waste material continuously into the unit. In addition to the HMX, other explosives we have destroyed include RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. We have also destroyed a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyl ammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, we have destroyed a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10 (HMX/Viton), LX-16 (PETN/FPC461, LX-17 (TATB/Kel F), and PBX-9404 (HMX)/CEF/Nitro cellulose). Our experiments have demonstrated that energetic materials can be safely and effectively treated by MSD.We have also investigated the issue of steam explosions in molten salt units, both experimentally and theoretically, and concluded that steam explosions can be avoided under proper design and operating conditions. We are currently building a larger unit (nominal capacity 5 kg/hr,) to investigate the relationship between residence time, temperature, feed concentration and throughputs, avoidance of back-burn, a;nd determination of the products of combustion under different operating conditions.

Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

1994-07-05

435

Materials and Sensor R&D to Transform the Nuclear Stockpile: Livermore?s Transformational Materials Initiative  

SciTech Connect

As the nation's nuclear weapons age and the demands placed on them change, significant challenges face the nuclear stockpile. Risks include material supply issues, ever-increasing lifecycle costs, and loss of technical expertise across the weapons complex. For example, non-nuclear materials are becoming increasingly difficult to replace because manufacturing methods and formulations have evolved in such a way as to render formerly available materials unprofitable, unsafe, or otherwise obsolete. Subtle formulation changes in available materials that occur without the knowledge of the weapons community for proprietary reasons have frequently affected the long-term performance of materials in the nuclear weapon environment. Significant improvements in performance, lifetime, or production cost can be realized with modern synthesis, modeling, and manufacturing methods. For example, there are currently supply and aging issues associated with the insensitive high explosive formulations LX-17 and PBX 9502 that are based on triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) and Kel-F, neither of which are commercially available today. Assuring the reliability of the stockpile through surveillance and regularly scheduled Life Extension Programs is an increasingly expensive endeavor. Transforming our current stockpile surveillance--a system based on destructive testing of increasingly valuable assets--to a system based on embedded sensors has a number of potential advantages that include long-term cost savings, reduced risk associated with asset transportation, state-of-health assessments in the field, and active management of the stockpile.

Maxwell, R; Fried, L; Campbell, G; Saab, A; Kotovsky, J; Carter, C; Chang, J

2009-10-11

436

The Piecewise Linear Reactive Flow Rate Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For non-ideal explosives a wide range of behavior is observed in experiments dealing with differing sizes and geometries. A good predictive detonation model must be able to reproduce many phenomena including such effects as: variations in the detonation velocity with the radial diameter of rate sticks; slowing of the detonation velocity around gentle corners; production of dead zones for abrupt corner turning; failure of small diameter rate sticks; and failure for rate sticks with sufficiently wide cracks. Most models have been developed to explain one effect at a time. Often, changes are made in the input parameters used to fit each succeeding case with the implication that this is sufficient for the model to be valid over differing regimes. We feel that it is important to develop a model that is able to fit experiments with one set of parameters. To address this we are creating a new generation of models that are able to produce better fitting to individual data sets than prior models and to simultaneous fit distinctly different regimes of experiments. Presented here are details of our new Piecewise Linear Fit reactive flow model applied to LX-17. Auspices Statement: This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

Vitello, Peter

2005-07-01

437

Dynamic Characterization of Mock Explosive Material Using Reverse Taylor Impact Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The motivation for the current study is to evaluate the dynamic loading response of an inert mock explosive material used to replicate the physical and mechanical properties of LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 insensitive high explosives. The evaluation of dynamic material parameters is needed for predicting the deformation behavior including the onset of failure and intensity of fragmentation resulting from high velocity impact events. These parameters are necessary for developing and validating physically based material constitutive models that will characterize the safety and performance of energetic materials. The preliminary study uses a reverse Taylor impact configuration that was designed to measure the dynamic behavior of the explosive mock up to and including associated fragmentation. A stationary rod-shaped specimen was impacted using a compressed-gas gun by accelerating a rigid steel anvil attached to a sabot. The impact test employed high-speed imaging and velocity interferometry diagnostics for capturing the transient deformation of the sample at discrete times. Once established as a viable experimental technique with mock explosives, future studies will examine the dynamic response of insensitive high explosives and propellants.

Ferranti, L; Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J; Vandersall, K S

2010-03-25

438

A frictional work predictive method for the initiation of solid high explosives from low-pressure impacts  

SciTech Connect

The goal of these tests was to provide information that would aid in the prediction of HE response in accident situations where the initiating stimulus was less than that required for direct shock initiation. Before these tests were run, a prediction of threshold impact velocity was made (70m/s) using a rough average of previously reported threshold factional work from skid tests (1 cal/cm{sub 2}) and the experimental value for coefficient of friction of 0.5({plus_minus}) measured in the same tests for PBX-9404. The actual testing proved the threshold impact velocity to be much less, and the pretest prediction was not only wrong, it was not conservative. This work presents a methodology for more accurately predicting the reaction threshold for HE involved in an accident such as an airplane crash or a severe land transportation accident. The main focus of this work is on LX-10-1 (94.5% 5.5% Viton A binder, density 1.86g/cm{sup 3}). Additional work was done on LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% KelF binder, density 1.90g/cm{sub 3}), a very insensitive explosive. The explicit two-dimensional finite element code, DYNA2D, was used to model the tests and predict the HE response. The finite element mesh of the projectile and target were generated using MAZE. The post-processing of the DYNA2D analysis was done with ORION.

Chidester, S.K.; Green, L.G.; Lee, C.G.

1993-07-01

439

Creep Testing Plastic-Bonded Explosives in Uni-axial Compression  

SciTech Connect

High fidelity measurements of time-dependent strain in the plastic-bonded explosives LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 have been performed under constant, uni-axial, compressive load using a custom designed apparatus. The apparatus uses a combination of extensometers and linear variable differential transformers coupled with a data acquisition system, thermal controls, and gravitational loading. The materials being tested consist of a crystalline explosive material mixed with a polymeric binder. The behavior of each material is related to the type of explosive and to the percentage and type of binder. For any given plastic-bonded explosive, the creep behavior is also dependent on the stress level and test temperature. Experiments were conducted using a 3 x 3 stress-temperature matrix with a temperature range of 24 C to 70 C and with stresses ranging from 250-psi to 780-psi. Analysis of the data has shown that logarithmic curve fits provide an accurate means of quantification and facilitate a long-term predictive capability. This paper will discuss the design of the apparatus, experimental results, and analyses.

Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J

2008-03-13

440

Upgrade of the CATS sample changer on FIP-BM30A at the ESRF: towards a commercialized standard.  

PubMed

An upgraded version of the sample changer ;CATS' (Cryogenic Automated Transfer System) that was developed on the FIP-BM30A beamline at the ESRF is presented. At present, CATS is installed at SLS (three systems), BESSY (one system), DLS (two systems) and APS (four systems for the LSCAT beamline). It consists mainly of an automated Dewar with an assortment of specific grippers designed to obtain a fast and reliable mounting/dismounting rate without jeopardizing the flexibility of the system. The upgraded system has the ability to manage any sample standard stored in any kind of puck. PMID:19096169

Jacquamet, L; Joly, J; Bertoni, A; Charrault, P; Pirocchi, M; Vernede, X; Bouis, F; Borel, F; Périn, J P; Denis, T; Rechatin, J L; Ferrer, J L

2009-01-01

441

System-level design of an RFID sweat electrolyte sensor patch.  

PubMed

Wearable digital health devices are dominantly found in rigid form factors such as bracelets and pucks. An adhesive RFID sensor bandage (patch) is reported, which can be made completely intimate with human skin, a distinct advantage for chronological monitoring of biomarkers in sweat. In this demonstration, a commercial RFID chip is adapted with minimum components to allow potentiometric sensing of mM ionic solutes in sweat, and surface temperature, as read by an Android smart-phone app (in-vitro tests). PMID:25570878

Rose, Daniel P; Ratterman, M; Griffin, Daniel K; Hou, Linlin; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Naik, Rajesh K; Hagen, Joshua A; Papautsky, I; Heikenfeld, Jason

2014-01-01

442

Catastrophic pediatric sports injuries.  

PubMed

The high school sports of wrestling, gymnastics, ice hockey, baseball, track, and cheerleading should receive closer attention to prevent injury. Safer equipment and sport-specific conditioning should be provided and injuries strictly monitored. Greater attention must also be paid to swimming and diving techniques, and continued observation is needed for heat stroke and heat intolerance in sports such as football, wrestling, basketball, track and field, and cross-country. An increased awareness of commotio cordis in sports other than baseball should include ice hockey, football, track field events, and lacrosse. American football because of the sheer numbers and associated catastrophic injury potential must continue to be monitored at the highest medical levels! PMID:12119866

Luckstead, Eugene F; Patel, Dilip R

2002-06-01

443

Only A Game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Whether it's hockey, baseball, or volleyball, it's just a game, right? To some it might be, and that's actually the title ("Only a Game") of this compelling radio program produced by NPR and WBUR in Boston. The show is hosted by commentator Bill Littlefield, and the witty and interesting program covers topics like "the explosion of interest in women's sports, competitive opportunities for the disabled, and the business of sports." Past guests on the show have included Robert Pinsky, Roger Angell, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Muhammad Ali. Visitors to the site should start by listening to the most recent show, and then move on to the "Archives" area. Here they will find book reviews, links to past shows, and photo galleries. The show's topics as of late have been far ranging, and they have included exploration of the art of hockey mask making and bull racing in Indonesia.

Littlefield, Bill

444

THE USE OF ACETIC ACID IONTOPHORESIS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF A SOFT TISSUE INJURY  

PubMed Central

Background: Contusions are common injuries that occur in athletics. If repeated, complications like myositis ossificans can occur. This case describes the examination and treatment of an athlete with an acute soft tissue injury. Objective: To describe the treatment approach used with a hockey player who sustained a soft tissue injury in his upper extremity. Case Description: A 19 year old male sustained a soft tissue injury to his upper arm while playing hockey. The athlete complained of pain rated a 2-3 out of 10. He had a well circumscribed, firm, 8 by 5 centimeter palpable mass present along the lateral arm, and was able to passively flex his elbow from 56° to 135°, demonstrating a 56° loss of elbow extension. Functionally, he was able to perform most activities of daily living, but he was unable to play hockey. Over 29 days, the athlete was treated one time with pulsed ultrasound and ice and nine times with iontophoresis using a 2% acetic acid solution. Additionally, the athlete performed pain-free active range of motion exercises for the elbow. Outcome: Following treatment, the athlete's pain resolved, the palpable mass disappeared, and his passive range of motion at the elbow was 0° to 135°. Most importantly, the athlete was able to resume playing hockey. Discussion: Acetic acid iontophoresis may be a successful intervention for soft tissue injuries of the upper extremity. In this case, it appeared helpful in decreasing the athlete's impairments and contributed to quicker resumption of all functional activities in less time than previously reported in the literature using traditional treatment interventions. PMID:21655380

Ebaugh, David

2010-01-01

445

Catastrophic spine injuries in sports.  

PubMed

Catastrophic spine injuries in sports are rare but tragic events. The sports with the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing and snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and baseball. A common mechanism of injury for all at-risk sports is an axial compression force to the top of the head with the neck slightly flexed. We review common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for spine injuries in the at-risk sports. PMID:15659279

Boden, Barry P; Prior, Chris

2005-02-01

446

Terror Management and Trait Empathy: Evidence that Mortality Salience Promotes Reactions of Forgiveness among People with High (vs. low) Trait Empathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Terror management research has typically found that people respond harshly toward offending others when reminded of their\\u000a mortality. In the current research we examined whether mortality salience would increase attitudes of forgiveness toward such\\u000a individuals, especially among those with high trait empathy. Consistent with prior research, Study 1 showed that mortality\\u000a salience increased forgiveness of a violent hockey player, but

Jeff Schimel; Michael J. A. Wohl; Todd Williams

2006-01-01

447

Exploratorium: Sport Science  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Looking at the processes and actions embedded within various team and individual sports is a great way to get exposed to concepts and ideas from physics, engineering, and any other number of basic and applied sciences. The Exploratorium Museum in San Francisco has developed this remarkable site that brings together interactive exhibits, activities, and video clips on the world of sport science. The materials here are organized primarily by sport. The site includes areas on skateboarding, baseball, hockey and other activities.

448

Force-velocity relationship and maximal power on a cycle ergometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The force-velocity relationship on a Monark ergometer and the vertical jump height have been studied in 152 subjects practicing\\u000a different athletic activities (sprint and endurance running, cycling on track and\\/or road, soccer, rugby, tennis and hockey)\\u000a at an average or an elite level. There was an approximatly linear relationship between braking force and peak velocity for\\u000a velocities between 100 and

H. Vandewalle; G. Peres; J. Heller; J. Panel; H. Monod

1987-01-01

449

Dose-response analysis of infants prenatally exposed to methyl mercury: An application of a single compartment model to single-strand hair analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method of estimating fetal exposure is used in a dose-response analysis of data from the 1971 outbreak of methyl mercury poisoning in rural Iraq. An X-ray fluorescence instrument for the measurement of single strands of human hair was employed to obtain longitudinal profiles recapitulating fetal exposure. Logit and hockey-stick models as well as nonparametric smoothing are used to

C. Cox; T. W. Clarkson; D. O. Marsh; L. Amin-Zaki; S. Tikriti; G. G. Myers

1989-01-01

450

The effect of a prophylactic dose of flurbiprofen on muscle soreness and sprinting performance in trained subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a prophylactic dose of a local, transcutaneously administered, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug on muscle soreness, muscle damage and sprinting performance in young trained males. Twenty-five subjects aged 19 3 years, actively participating in rugby union and field hockey, were familiarized with the test procedure and then divided at random into

A. SEMARK; T. D. NOAKES; A. S. T. CLAIR GIBSON; M. I. LAMBERT

1999-01-01

451

Traumatic Brain Injury in High School Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Results Of 23 566 reported injuries in the 10 sports during the 3-year study period, 1219 (5.5%) were MTBIs. Of the MTBIs, football accounted for 773 (63.4%) of cases; wrestling, 128 (10.5%); girls' soccer, 76 (6.2%); boys' soccer, 69 (5.7%); girls' bas- ketball, 63 (5.2%); boys' basketball, 51 (4.2%); softball, 25 (2.1%); baseball, 15 (1.2%); field hockey, 13 (1.1%); and

John W. Powell; Kim D. Barber-Foss

1999-01-01

452

GYMNASE DOUBLE Activits l'horaire  

E-print Network

20 h 21 h 22 h Pratique badminton Piranhas 21 h à 23 h Ka Cheong Jim Basketball 19 h à 21 h Ligue h 30 à 20 h Pratique Volley Piranhas 20 h à 22 h STM Multi sport 17h à 18h Ludia Hockey 17 h 30 à 19 h 05 à 13 h 05 Power Yoga 12 h 05 à 13 h 05 7 h Pratique badminton Piranhas 7h à 9 h 8 h 9 h

Québec, Université du

453

Sport Days/Times Location League Options Sun: 7-11pm  

E-print Network

Sport Days/Times Location League Options 3on3 Basketball Sun: 7-11pm Tue/Thu: 7-11pm Dillon Gym Courts 2 & 3 Mens, CoRec Ice Hockey Mon-Wed: 9:30-11:30pm Baker Rink Open Indoor Soccer Sun: 7-11pm Mon/Wed: 7-11pm Dillon Gym Courts 2 & 3 Mens, CoRec Wallyball Sun-Thu: 7-11pm Dillon Squash Cts Mens, Co

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

454

Skating Injuries and Their Treatment  

PubMed Central

There are approximately 682 figure skating clubs in Canada (not including hockey or general recreational figure skating), with anywhere up to 600 or more members. This means that there are probably over 200,000 figure skaters in Canada today. This article deals with the general and specific medical problems that face these skaters, and what a physician should know about treating them. PMID:20468795

Lemasters, George S.

1972-01-01

455

Nutrition Science and the Winter Olympics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Science is a powerful asset for athletes who want to use nutrition to their advantage. Whether an Olympic medal is won by tenths of a second in a ski race, decimal points in a figure skating competition, or goals in an ice hockey game, an athlete's nutritional status makes a critical difference in reaching peak performance.This course explores the science of sports nutrition and shows how to apply nutrition principles to benefit an athlete's training and performance.

456

Bridge Building  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a quick activity (on page 2 of the PDF) about how the arrangement of carbon atoms determines carbon's different properties. Learners will build bridges with Post-It notes that model two types of carbon molecules, graphite and carbon nanotubes, and test which structure of the same material can bear the weight of the most pennies. Also relates to linked video, DragonflyTV Nano: Hockey Sticks.

Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

2008-01-01

457

A behavioural dynamic model of the relative age effect.  

PubMed

The relationship between date of birth and success in a variety of sports, including hockey, is well established. This phenomenon is known as the relative age effect (RAE). We model the RAE in Canadian youth hockey as a positive feedback loop where an initial age advantage is reinforced through additional training and playing opportunities based on perceived skill superiority. The same causal mechanism leads to a higher quit rate for relatively younger players. Our model effectively replicates the birth month distribution of Canadian National Hockey League players (R2 = 86.79%) when driven by Canadian birth distributions. We use this model to evaluate three policies that aim to lessen the RAE. All of the policies reduce the RAE with a significant delay. The most effective policy is a combination of providing additional support to age disadvantaged children and rotating the cut-off date for youth leagues between January 1st and July 1st annually. In equilibrium, this approach leads to a 96% reduction in the RAE compared to the base case. PMID:24404926

Pierson, Kawika; Addona, Vittorio; Yates, Philip

2014-01-01

458

When "where" is more important than "when": birthplace and birthdate effects on the achievement of sporting expertise.  

PubMed

In this study, we assessed whether contextual factors related to where or when an athlete is born influence their likelihood of playing professional sport. The birthplace and birth month of all American players in the National Hockey League, National Basketball Association, Major League Baseball, and Professional Golfer's Association, and all Canadian players in the National Hockey League were collected from official websites. Monte Carlo simulations were used to verify if the birthplace of these professional athletes deviated in any systematic way from the official census population distribution, and chi-square analyses were conducted to determine whether the players' birth months were evenly distributed throughout the year. Results showed a birthplace bias towards smaller cities, with professional athletes being over-represented in cities of less than 500,000 and under-represented in cities of 500,000 and over. A birth month/relative age effect (in the form of a distinct bias towards elite athletes being relatively older than their peers) was found for hockey and baseball but not for basketball and golf. Comparative analyses suggested that contextual factors associated with place of birth contribute more influentially to the achievement of an elite level of sport performance than does relative age and that these factors are essentially independent in their influences on expertise development. PMID:17115521

Côté, Jean; Macdonald, Dany J; Baker, Joseph; Abernethy, Bruce

2006-10-01

459

WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox operational test report  

SciTech Connect

The Low Level Waste (LLW) Process Gloveboxes are designed to: receive a 55 gallon drum in an 85 gallon overpack in the Entry glovebox (GBIOI); and open and sort the waste from the 55 gallon drum, place the waste back into drum and relid in the Sorting glovebox (GB 102). In addition, waste which requires further examination is transferred to the LLW RWM Glovebox via the Drath and Schraeder Bagiess Transfer Port (DO-07-201) or sent to the Sample Transfer Port (STC); crush the drum in the Supercompactor glovebox (GB 104); place the resulting puck (along with other pucks) into another 85 gallon overpack in the Exit glovebox (GB 105). The status of the waste items is tracked by the Data Management System (DMS) via the Plant Control System (PCS) barcode interface. As an item is moved from the entry glovebox to the exit glovebox, the Operator will track an items location using a barcode reader and enter any required data on the DMS console. The Operational Test Procedure (OTP) will perform evolution`s (described below) using the Plant Operating Procedures (POP) in order to verify that they are sufficient and accurate for controlled glovebox operation.

Kersten, J.K.

1998-02-19

460

Ground-based high resolution observations of the Uranian system in the near IR.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The system of Uranus has been observed in May 1999 by means of the adonis/SHARPII+ Adaptive Optics system implemented on the 3.6 m telescope of La Silla-ESO (Chile). The use of the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor on the planet itself and the excellent seeing conditions have permitted to reach an angular resolution of ~ 0.14'' in the H broad band (1.6mu m). The sharpness of the images has been subsequently restored using a new myopic deconvolution method (MAP) including a specific edge preserving object prior. The images have revealed the presence of a latitudinal structure of the atmospheric clouds on the planetary disk (J and H bands), the presence of the Epsilon ring and its longitudinal anomaly.The most internal rings (Delta, Gamma, Eta) are also visible after deconvolution. Three of the known satellites has been detected: Ariel, Miranda and Puck (discovered by Voyager in 1989). We detect a significant shift of Puck's position with respect to the expected position, derived from the NASA/JPL Ephemeris Generator. We also present photometry of the 3 satellites and of the ring Epsilon using the J, H, K filters.

Marchis, F.; Berthier, J.; Descamps, P.; Fusco, T.; Prange, R.; Sekiguchi, T.

1999-09-01

461

Molecular Adsorber Coating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

2011-01-01

462

Recent advances in the molten salt technology for the destruction of energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

The DOE has thousands of pounds of energetic materials which result from dismantlement operations at the Pantex Plant. The authors have demonstrated the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process for the treatment of explosives and explosive-containing wastes on a 1.5 kilogram of explosive per hour scale and are currently building a 5 kilogram per hour unit. MSD converts the organic constituents of the waste into non-hazardous substances such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water. Any inorganic constituents of the waste, such as binders and metallic particles, are retained in the molten salt. The destruction of energetic material waste is accomplished by introducing it, together with air, into a crucible containing a molten salt, in this case a eutectic mixture of Na, K, and Li carbonates. The following pure component DOE and DoD explosives have been destroyed in LLNL`s experimental unit at their High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF): ammonium picrate, HMX, K-6, NQ, NTO, PETN, RDX, TATB, and TNT. In addition, the following formulations were also destroyed: Comp B, LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, PBX-9404, and XM46, a US Army liquid gun propellant. In this 1.5 kg/hr unit, the fractions of carbon converted to CO and of chemically bound nitrogen converted to NOx were found to be well below 1T. In addition to destroying explosive powders and molding powders the authors have also destroyed materials that are typical of real world wastes. These include shavings from machined pressed parts of plastic bonded explosives and sump waste containing both explosives and non-explosive debris. Based on the information obtained on the smaller unit, the authors have constructed a 5 kg/hr MSD unit, incorporating LLNL`s advanced chimney design. This unit is currently under shakedown tests and evaluation.

Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.

1995-11-01

463

Kinetic Modeling of Slow Energy Release in Non-Ideal Carbon Rich Explosives  

SciTech Connect

We present here the first self-consistent kinetic based model for long time-scale energy release in detonation waves in the non-ideal explosive LX-17. Non-ideal, insensitive carbon rich explosives, such as those based on TATB, are believed to have significant late-time slow release in energy. One proposed source of this energy is diffusion-limited growth of carbon clusters. In this paper we consider the late-time energy release problem in detonation waves using the thermochemical code CHEETAH linked to a multidimensional ALE hydrodynamics model. The linked CHEETAH-ALE model dimensional treats slowly reacting chemical species using kinetic rate laws, with chemical equilibrium assumed for species coupled via fast time-scale reactions. In the model presented here we include separate rate equations for the transformation of the un-reacted explosive to product gases and for the growth of a small particulate form of condensed graphite to a large particulate form. The small particulate graphite is assumed to be in chemical equilibrium with the gaseous species allowing for coupling between the instantaneous thermodynamic state and the production of graphite clusters. For the explosive burn rate a pressure dependent rate law was used. Low pressure freezing of the gas species mass fractions was also included to account for regions where the kinetic coupling rates become longer than the hydrodynamic time-scales. The model rate parameters were calibrated using cylinder and rate-stick experimental data. Excellent long time agreement and size effect results were achieved.

Vitello, P; Fried, L; Glaesemann, K; Souers, C

2006-06-20

464

Fatigue of LX-14 and LX-19 plastic bonded explosives  

SciTech Connect

The DOD uses the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-14 in a wide variety of applications including shaped charges and explosively forged projectiles. LX- 19 is a higher energy explosive, which could be easily substituted for LX-14 because it contains the identical Estane 5703p binder and more energetic CL-20 explosive. Delivery systems for large shaped charges, such as TOW-2, include the Apache helicopter. Loads associated with vibrations and expansion from thermal excursions in field operations may, even at low levels over long time periods, cause flaws, already present in the PBX to grow. Flaws near the explosive/liner interface of a shaped charge can reduce performance. Small flaws in explosives are one mechanism (the hot spot mechanism) proposed for initiation and growth to detonation of PBXs like LX-14, PBXN 5, LX-04 and LX-17 among others. Unlike cast-cured explosives and propellants, PBXs cannot usually be compression molded to full density. Generally, the amount of explosive ignited by a shock wave is approximately equal to the original void volume. Whether or not these flaws or cracks grow during field operations to an extent sufficient to adversely affect the shaped charge performance or increase the vulnerability of the PBX is the ultimate question this effort could address. Currently the fatigue life of LX-14 under controlled conditions is being studied in order to generate its failure stress as a function of the number of fatigue cycles (S- N curve). Proposed future work will address flaw and crack growth and their relationship to hot-spot concentration and explosive vulnerability to shock and/or fragment initiation.

Hoffman, D. M., LLNL

1998-04-23

465

Neutron Screening Measurements of 110 gallon drums at T Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Nondestructive Assay (NDA) Service Center was contracted to develop and demonstrate a simple and inexpensive method of assaying 110 gallon drums at the Hanford Site’s T-Plant. The drums contained pucks of crushed old drums used for storage of transuranic (TRU) waste. The drums were to be assayed to determine if they meet the criteria for TRU or Low Level Waste (LLW). Because of the dense matrix (crushed steel drums) gamma measurement techniques were excluded and a mobile, configurable neutron system, consisting of four sequentially connected slab detectors was chosen to be used for this application. An optimum measurement configuration was determined through multiple test measurements with californium source. Based on these measurements the initial calibration of the system was performed applying the isotopic composition for aged weapon-grade plutonium. A series of background and blank puck drum measurements allowed estimating detection limits for both total (singles) and coincidence (doubles) counting techniques. It was found that even conservative estimates for minimum detection concentration using singles count rate were lower than the essential threshold of 100 nCi/g. Whereas the detection limit of coincidence counting appeared to be about as twice as high of the threshold. A series of measurements intended to verify the technique and revise the initial calibration obtained were performed at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility with plutonium standards. Standards with a total mass of 0.3 g of plutonium (which is estimated to be equivalent of 100 nCi/g for net waste weight of 300 kg) loaded in the test puck drum were clearly detected. The following measurements of higher plutonium loadings verified the calibration factors obtained in the initial exercise. The revised and established calibration factors were also confirmed within established uncertainties by additional measurements of plutonium standards in various locations in the test drum. Due to necessity to dispense the blank test drum an alternative method of baseline determination was established during field measurements. Count rates of ambient background were corrected by the differences between observed background and blank test drum count rates which were previously determined over a series of measurements. Only 31 drums out of 352 counted during the intensive measurement campaign at T-Plant were determined to be Suspect TRU. 25 of these drums were re-measured at the WRAP facility using the SuperHENC. Of the 25 drums measured, 21 were confirmed to be TRU and the remaining four LLW.

Mozhayev, Andrey V.; Hilliard, James R.; Berg, Randal K.

2011-01-14

466

Effects of bright light treatment on psychomotor speed in athletes  

PubMed Central

Purpose: A recent study suggests that transcranial brain targeted light treatment via ear canals may have physiological effects on brain function studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques in humans. We tested the hypothesis that bright light treatment could improve psychomotor speed in professional ice hockey players. Methods: Psychomotor speed tests with audio and visual warning signals were administered to a Finnish National Ice Hockey League team before and after 24 days of transcranial bright light or sham treatment. The treatments were given during seasonal darkness in the Oulu region (latitude 65 degrees north) when the strain on the players was also very high (10 matches during 24 days). A daily 12-min dose of bright light or sham (n = 11 for both) treatment was given every morning between 8 and 12 am at home with a transcranial bright light device. Mean reaction time and motor time were analyzed separately for both psychomotor tests. Analysis of variance for repeated measures adjusted for age was performed. Results: Time × group interaction for motor time with a visual warning signal was p = 0.024 after adjustment for age. In Bonferroni post-hoc analysis, motor time with a visual warning signal decreased in the bright light treatment group from 127 ± 43 to 94 ± 26 ms (p = 0.024) but did not change significantly in the sham group 121 ± 23 vs. 110 ± 32 ms (p = 0.308). Reaction time with a visual signal did not change in either group. Reaction or motor time with an audio warning signal did not change in either the treatment or sham group. Conclusion: Psychomotor speed, particularly motor time with a visual warning signal, improves after transcranial bright light treatment in professional ice-hockey players during the competition season in the dark time of the year. PMID:24860513

Tulppo, Mikko P.; Jurvelin, Heidi; Roivainen, Eka; Nissilä, Juuso; Hautala, Arto J.; Kiviniemi, Antti M.; Kiviniemi, Vesa J.; Takala, Timo

2014-01-01

467

Spinal injuries in sports.  

PubMed

Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:19084763

Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

2009-02-01

468

Spinal injuries in sports.  

PubMed

Athletic competition has long been a known source of spinal injuries. Approximately 8.7% of all new cases of spinal cord injuries in the United States are related to sports activities. The sports activities that have the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing, snowboarding, rugby, and cheerleading. Axial compression forces to the top of the head can lead to cervical fracture and quadriplegia in any sport. It is critical for any medical personnel responsible for athletes in team sports to have a plan for stabilization and transfer of an athlete who sustains a cervical spine injury. PMID:18295084

Boden, Barry P; Jarvis, Christopher G

2008-02-01

469

Influence of Propionibacterium avidum KP-40 on the cellular immune system after intensive sport activity.  

PubMed

Intensive sport activities resulted in temporary downregulation of defined immune functions. To check its influence on the cellular immune system, 15 male professional ice hockey players of a German first league club were observed and a decrease of lymphocyte subset counts and activities was found after anaerobic exercise. To stabilize cellular immune functions, the players were orally treated with Propionibacterium avidum KP-40 (10 mg per administration; twice a day; 7 days), a well documented bacterial immunmodifier. After administration of Propionibacterium avidum KP-40, lymphocyte counts and activities after anaerobic exercise resembled normal values. For some subjects, defined lymphocyte subset counts and activities even exceeded normal values. PMID:8837397

Pottkämper, M; Randerath, O; Beuth, J; Pulverer, G

1996-07-01

470

Composite Materials  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is an activity (located on page 3 of PDF) about composites, materials made of 2 or more different components. Learners will be challenged to build the best mud bricks, one of the earliest examples of composites. From a supply of various building components, which the learners will examine for their different properties, they will build mud bricks, then dry them and put them through several tests. *Bricks must bake in the sun for 2-3 days prior to testing. Resource contains information about how this activity relates to carbon nanotubes and links to video, DragonflyTV Nano: Hockey Sticks.

2012-05-09

471

Fabrication and properties of CNTs reinforced polymeric matrix nanocomposites for sports applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The polymeric matrix composites have found extensive applications in sports because of high strength to weight ratio, ease of processing, and longer life. This work was carried out to study the properties of different sections of composite field hockey sticks and the influence of carbon nanotubes on their properties. The samples were fabricated by compression molding process. The increase in mechanical properties by the incorporation of carbon nanotubes is correlated with the process parameters to consider enhancement in the overall performance of the stick sections.

Rasheed, A.; Khalid, F. A.

2014-06-01

472

What is the most interesting team sport?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

What is the most interesting team sport? We answer this question via an extensive statistical survey of game scores, consisting of more than 1/4 million games in over a century. We propose the likelihood of upsets as a measure of competitiveness. We demonstrate the utility of this measure via a comparative analysis of several popular team sports including soccer, baseball, hockey, basketball, and football. We also develop a mathematical model, in which the stronger team is favored to win a game. This model allows to us conveniently estimate the likelihood of upsets from the more easily-accessible standings data.

Vazquez, Federico; Ben-Naim, Eli; Redner, Sidney

2006-03-01

473

Slapshot Science!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following resource is fromLessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this particular lesson, students will learn about the slapshot, which is the fastest, hardest shot in ice hockey. Students will investigate elastic collisions, energy transfer and momentum exchange and will conduct an experiment which simulates making a slapshot.

2010-01-01

474

Momentum And The Physics Of A Slapshot  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The following resource is fromLessonopoly, which has created student activities and lesson plans to support the video series, Science of the Olympic Winter Games, created by NBC Learn and the National Science Foundation. Featuring exclusive footage from NBC Sports and contributions from Olympic athletes and NSF scientists, the series will help teach your students valuable scientific concepts. In this particular lesson, students will begin this lesson by investigating a fun and memorable elastic collision. After watching the NBC Learn Video, Slap Shot Physics: Hockey, they will use dynamics carts (or skateboards) to investigate and develop a conceptual understanding of the conservation of momentum.

2010-01-01

475

KSC-04PD-1316  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Mike Bolt holds the Stanley Cup, won this year by the National Hockey Leagues Tampa Bay Lightning. Bolt is the Stanley Cup keeper. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. Jay Feaster, general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning, brought the cup to KSC while on a tour. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

2004-01-01

476

KSC-04PD-1318  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. In the Orbiter Processing Facility, Jay Feaster, general manager of the National Hockey League 2004 Champions Tampa Bay Lightning, sits next to the Stanley Cup in front of the open hatch into Discovery. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. Feaster brought the cup to KSC while on a tour. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

2004-01-01

477

KSC-04PD-1315  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Jack Legere, NASA Quality Assurance specialist for the Shuttle Program, displays the Stanley Cup to employees in the Orbiter Processing Facility. Behind him is Discovery. Jay Feaster, general manager of the National Hockey League 2004 Champions Tampa Bay Lightning, brought the cup to KSC while on a tour. The cup was also briefly available for viewing by employees in the KSC Training Auditorium. The Stanley Cup weighs 35 pounds and is more than 100 years old. The Lightning will be added to the cup in September.

2004-01-01

478

[Injuries in organized physical education 1976-1987 in Czechoslovakia].  

PubMed

A statistical analysis of 176,278 cases of trauma caused by the organized sports activities was made and evaluated. The highest number occurs in the adult group aged 20-29 years. The analysis is concerned with the severity of the injury judged by the duration of treatment. It also refers to the hazards of individual sports and games based on the relative rate of trauma. Sports activities with maximum risk include skibob riding, ice hockey, boxing and rugby football. The paper described the method employed for data collection and shows how to apply the results in trauma prevention in unorganized spontaneous sports activities pursued by mass population. PMID:2790906

Kucera, M

1989-08-01

479

[Sports injuries of the nervous system].  

PubMed

Almost 1% of all Germans suffer sports injuries each year, almost 5% of all peripheral nerve lesions are due to sports. A review is given on various activities detailing the specific risks for traumata of the central and peripheral nervous system. Specifically these are volleyball, handball, basketball, American football, soccer, bowling, hockey, baseball, tennis, golf, javelin, fencing, wrestling, judo, boxing, running, jumping, dancing, mountain climbing, weight lifting, gymnastics, horse-back riding, swimming, rowing, skiing, skating, shooting, (motor) biking, car racing, flying, and sports for the disabled. The knowledge of typical traumata should enable the neurologist to rapidly and reliably recognize related lesions and to contribute to their prevention or improvement. PMID:10478302

Lang, C; Stefan, H

1999-08-01

480

Interview with Charlie Loke  

E-print Network

of Peterhouse) who were to act as guardians in England; they suggested going to The Leys instead 16:36:13 First impressions of The Leys; meeting with Colin Kinnear; adoption of the name Charlie as no one could pronounce Yung Wai; no masters that made a great... impression; learnt to play hockey and even rugger; have always been a scientist, particularly biology; had wanted to be a marine biologist but discouraged by family so ended up doing medicine; but as soon as qualified reverted to research as true interest...

Loke, Charlie

2007-06-21

481

The Science of the Winter Olympics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

NBC Learn, the educational arm of NBC News, teamed up with the National Science Foundation (NSF) to produce Science of the Olympic Winter Games, a 16-part video series that explores the science behind individual Olympic events, including Downhill and Aerial Skiing, Speed Skating and Figure Skating, Curling and Hockey, and Ski Jumping, Bobsledding and Snowboarding. Each video is complemented with lesson plans which include fun classroom activities. The lesson plans can be found at Lessonopoly and were written by teachers at Academic Business Consultants for grades 6-9 and are aligned with California State Standards.

NBC Learn

2010-01-01

482

Automated sample mounting and technical advance alignment system for biological crystallography at a synchrotron source  

SciTech Connect

High-throughput data collection for macromolecular crystallography requires an automated sample mounting system for cryo-protected crystals that functions reliably when integrated into protein-crystallography beamlines at synchrotrons. Rapid mounting and dismounting of the samples increases the efficiency of the crystal screening and data collection processes, where many crystals can be tested for the quality of diffraction. The sample-mounting subsystem has random access to 112 samples, stored under liquid nitrogen. Results of extensive tests regarding the performance and reliability of the system are presented. To further increase throughput, we have also developed a sample transport/storage system based on ''puck-shaped'' cassettes, which can hold sixteen samples each. Seven cassettes fit into a standard dry shipping Dewar. The capabilities of a robotic crystal mounting and alignment system with instrumentation control software and a relational database allows for automated screening and data collection to be developed.

Snell, Gyorgy; Cork, Carl; Nordmeyer, Robert; Cornell, Earl; Meigs, George; Yegian, Derek; Jaklevic, Joseph; Jin, Jian; Stevens, Raymond C.; Earnest, Thomas

2004-01-07

483

Automated sample mounting and alignment system for biological crystallography at a synchrotron source.  

PubMed

High-throughput data collection for macromolecular crystallography requires an automated sample mounting and alignment system for cryo-protected crystals that functions reliably when integrated into protein-crystallography beamlines at synchrotrons. Rapid mounting and dismounting of the samples increases the efficiency of the crystal screening and data collection processes, where many crystals can be tested for the quality of diffraction. The sample-mounting subsystem has random access to 112 samples, stored under liquid nitrogen. Results of extensive tests regarding the performance and reliability of the system are presented. To further increase throughput, we have also developed a sample transport/storage system based on "puck-shaped" cassettes, which can hold sixteen samples each. Seven cassettes fit into a standard dry shipping Dewar. The capabilities of a robotic crystal mounting and alignment system with instrumentation control software and a relational database allows for automated screening and data collection to be developed. PMID:15062077

Snell, Gyorgy; Cork, Carl; Nordmeyer, Robert; Cornell, Earl; Meigs, George; Yegian, Derek; Jaklevic, Joseph; Jin, Jian; Stevens, Raymond C; Earnest, Thomas

2004-04-01

484

Spectrophotometry of Inner Satellites of Uranus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose spectrophotometry with the FOS/Red of the innerUranian satellites Puck, Portia, and Juliet, which areimpossible to observe from the ground. Small apertures willbe used for accurate measurements of the scattered light fromUranus, and we expect to get good spectra over the wavelengthrange 0.28 to 0.80 microns. We will also obtain a high-quality spectrum of Miranda to wavelengths as short as 0.22microns. The results will be interpreted with reference toknown reflectance spectra for similar objects including C- andD-type asteroids, satellites and rings of outer planets, andlaboratory spectra of dark carbon-bearing compounds. Thisprograms follows our successful recovery of eight innersatellites of Uranus with the Planetary Camera in HST Cycle 4.

Zellner, Benjamin

1996-07-01

485

Reading Like a Historian: Philippine War Political Cartoons  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students analyze political cartoons in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did the United States annex the Philippines after the Spanish-American War? The teacher first uses a timeline to review basic information about the war, then distributes Rudyard Kipling’s poem “The White Man’s Burden,” which students analyze in pairs. Then, students are split into 6 groups and receive 2 different cartoons each: 1 from a pro-imperial magazine like Judge or Puck, and 1 from an anti-imperial magazine like Life or The World. Using a graphic organizer, students examine the cartoons and then present 1 of them to the class, explaining how the cartoonist makes his point. A final class discussion contextualizes the cartoons and the events of the late 1890s.

Stanford History Education Group

2012-10-20

486

Remotely controlling of mobile robots using gesture captured by the Kinect and recognized by machine learning method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The main purpose of this paper is to use machine learning method and Kinect and its body sensation technology to design a simple, convenient, yet effective robot remote control system. In this study, a Kinect sensor is used to capture the human body skeleton with depth information, and a gesture training and identification method is designed using the back propagation neural network to remotely command a mobile robot for certain actions via the Bluetooth. The experimental results show that the designed mobile robots remote control system can achieve, on an average, more than 96% of accurate identification of 7 types of gestures and can effectively control a real e-puck robot for the designed commands.

Hsu, Roy CHaoming; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Lin, Chih-Chuan; Lai, Chien-Hung; Liu, Cheng-Ting

2013-01-01

487

Genetic-Algorithm Seeding Of Idiotypic Networks For Mobile-Robot Navigation  

E-print Network

Robot-control designers have begun to exploit the properties of the human immune system in order to produce dynamic systems that can adapt to complex, varying, real-world tasks. Jernes idiotypic-network theory has proved the most popular artificial-immune-system (AIS) method for incorporation into behaviour-based robotics, since idiotypic selection produces highly adaptive responses. However, previous efforts have mostly focused on evolving the network connections and have often worked with a single, pre-engineered set of behaviours, limiting variability. This paper describes a method for encoding behaviours as a variable set of attributes, and shows that when the encoding is used with a genetic algorithm (GA), multiple sets of diverse behaviours can develop naturally and rapidly, providing much greater scope for flexible behaviour-selection. The algorithm is tested extensively with a simulated e-puck robot that navigates around a maze by tracking colour. Results show that highly successful behaviour sets can...

Whitbrook, Amanda; Garibaldi, Jonathan

2008-01-01

488

Presidential Elections, 1860-1884  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Harpweek (last reviewed in the April 8, 2000 Scout Report for Social Sciences) recently launched two new sites featuring nineteenth-century political cartoons and prints. The first offers close to 200 political cartoons and prints commenting on US presidential elections between 1860 and 1876 (1880 and 1884 will be added in October). The images are drawn from periodicals such as Harper's Weekly, Vanity Fair, and Puck, as well as the Library of Congress political print collection, and feature famous cartoonists and artists such as Thomas Nast, Matt Morgan, A.B. Frost, and Joseph Keppler. The cartoons and prints are organized by election and candidate, and are displayed with captions and links to additional information such as a timeline, campaign issues, political tactics, and biographies. Combined, these two sites are an outstanding resource for researchers and students of American political history and the history of political prints and cartoons.

489

RIMPAC 08: Naval Oceanographic Office glider operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Naval Oceanographic Office (NAVOCEANO) Glider Operations Center (GOC) supported its first joint-mission exercise during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 08, a multi-national naval exercise conducted during July 2008 near the Hawaiian Islands. NAVOCEANO personnel deployed four Seagliders from USNS SUMNER for Anti-submarine Warfare (ASW) operations and four Slocum gliders for Mine Warfare (MIW) operations. Each Seaglider was equipped with a Sea-Bird Electronics (SBE) 41cp CTD and Wet Labs, Inc. bb2fl ECO-puck optical sensor. The instrumentation suite on the Slocum gliders varied, but each Slocum glider had an SBE 41cp CTD combined with one of the following optical sensors: a Wet Labs, Inc. AUVb scattering sensor, a Wet Labs, Inc. bb3slo ECO-puck backscattering sensor, or a Satlantic, Inc. OCR radiometer. Using Iridium communications, the GOC had command and control of all eight gliders, with Department of Defense (DoD) personnel and DoD contractors serving as glider pilots. Raw glider data were transmitted each time a glider surfaced, and the subsequent data flow included processing, quality-control procedures, and the generation of operational and tactical products. The raw glider data were also sent to the Naval Research Laboratory at Stennis Space Center (NRLSSC) for fusion with satellite data and modeled data (currents, tides, etc.) to create optical forecasting, optical volume, and electro-optical identification (EOID) performance surface products. The glider-based products were delivered to the ASW and MIW Reach Back Cells for incorporation into METOC products and for dissemination to the Fleet. Based on the metrics presented in this paper, the inaugural joint-mission operation was a success.

Mahoney, Kevin L.; Grembowicz, Ken; Bricker, Bruce; Crossland, Steve; Bryant, Danielle; Torres, Marc; Giddings, Tom

2009-05-01

490

Development and testing of molecular adsorber coatings  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulas that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

2012-10-01

491

Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

2012-01-01

492

The effect of leg preference on postural stability in healthy athletes.  

PubMed

In research regarding postural stability, leg preference is often tested and controlled for. However, leg preference may vary between tasks. As athletes are a group of interest for postural stability testing, we evaluated the effect of five leg preference tasks categorization (step up, hop, ball kick, balance, pick up) on single-leg postural stability of 16 field hockey athletes. The 'center of pressure speed' was calculated as the primary outcome variable of single-leg postural stability. Secondary variables were 'mean length of the GRF vector in the horizontal plane', 'mean length of the ankle angular velocity vector', and 'mean length of the hip angular velocity vector', as well as the separate outcomes per degree of freedom. Results showed that leg preference was inconsistent between leg preference tasks. Moreover, the primary and secondary variables yielded no significant difference between the preferred and non-preferred legs, regardless of the applied leg preference task categorization (p>0.05). The present findings do not support the usability of leg preference tasks in controlling for bias of postural stability. In conclusion, none of the applied leg preference tasks revealed a significant effect on postural stability in healthy field hockey athletes. PMID:24239407

Huurnink, Arnold; Fransz, Duncan P; Kingma, Idsart; Hupperets, Maarten D W; van Dieën, Jaap H

2014-01-01

493

Born at the Wrong Time: Selection Bias in the NHL Draft  

PubMed Central

Relative age effects (RAEs) occur when those who are relatively older for their age group are more likely to succeed. RAEs occur reliably in some educational and athletic contexts, yet the causal mechanisms remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct test of one mechanism, selection bias, which can be defined as evaluators granting fewer opportunities to relatively younger individuals than is warranted by their latent ability. Because RAEs are well-established in hockey, we analyzed National Hockey League (NHL) drafts from 1980 to 2006. Compared to those born in the first quarter (i.e., January–March), those born in the third and fourth quarters were drafted more than 40 slots later than their productivity warranted, and they were roughly twice as likely to reach career benchmarks, such as 400 games played or 200 points scored. This selection bias in drafting did not decrease over time, apparently continues to occur, and reduces the playing opportunities of relatively younger players. This bias is remarkable because it is exhibited by professional decision makers evaluating adults in a context where RAEs have been widely publicized. Thus, selection bias based on relative age may be pervasive. PMID:23460902

Deaner, Robert O.; Lowen, Aaron; Cobley, Stephen

2013-01-01

494

Influence of birth quarter on the rate of physical activities and sports participation.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess the potential influence of birth quarter on the frequency of physical activity and participation in specific activities during adulthood. We used data from one national and one provincial survey, the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey and the 1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey (Enquête sociale et de santé du Québec) respectively. We analysed the distribution of participants at each level of practice of a given leisure activity and work-related physical activity. In the Canadian Community Health Survey, a relative age effect was found for participation in soccer in the 25- to 60-year-old population. However, for volleyball, a significant relative age effect was also observed but with over-representation of the last quarters of the year for the whole population and for men aged 12-60 years. In the Quebec Social and Health Survey, significant differences in the frequency of distribution without a relative age effect were revealed for participation in women's ice hockey, work-related physical activity level, and stage of change for physical activity. Overall, the data indicate that the systematic relative age effect reported in other studies for some competitive sports, such as ice hockey and soccer, is not as prevalent in leisure physical activities during adulthood. This may reflect lower competitive selection and attrition in population physical activity compared with competitive sports in younger athletes. PMID:20397099

Larouche, Richard; Laurencelle, Louis; Grondin, Simon; Trudeau, François

2010-04-01

495

Seismic refraction and GPR measurements of depth to bedrock: A case study from Randolph College, Virginia  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Randolph College is located in Lynchburg, VA, in the eastern edge of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Lynchburg city lies in the James River Synclinorium and consists of metasedimentary and metaigneous rocks. As part of College's plan to expand, a new soccer field will be build. For that purpose, part of a hill has to be excavated. Information was needed on the depth to the bedrock at the site. We conducted a seismic refraction experiment as part of an eight week summer research program for undergraduate students. We used 24 vertical geophones, spaced at 1.5 m interval. Our recording device was a 12 channel Geometrics geode (ES 3000). The source was an 8 pound sledge hummer. Source positions were chosen to be at 5, 10, 15 and 20 m on both sides of the array. We collected data along a tree line (in two segments) and across a hockey field. The data collected from the hockey field had very low signal to noise ratio and clear refraction arrivals. The other two acquisition lines were much noisier and difficult to interpret. Our results are consistent with data from seven bore holes in close proximity to the field site. We interpreted depth to bedrock to be between 4 and 12 m. The bedrock velocities are consistent with weathered gneiss. To improve the interpretation of the tree line records, we conducted a GPR survey. The preliminary radar images are showing highly heterogeneous subsurface with multiple point reflectors.

Datta, A.; Pokharel, R.; Toteva, T.

2007-12-01

496

Threshold effect in lead-induced peripheral neuropathy  

SciTech Connect

We previously demonstrated a negative correlation between blood lead level and motor nerve conduction velocity in 202 asymptomatic 5 to 9-year-old children living near a lead smelter in Idaho. Blood lead levels ranged from 13 to 97 micrograms/dL. To determine whether a threshold exists between blood lead level and maximal motor nerve conduction velocity, we conducted three regression analyses on these data: a ''hockey stick'' regression, a logistic regression, and a quadratic regression. We found evidence for a threshold in all three analyses: at a blood level of 30 micrograms/dL in the ''hockey stick'' regression, at 20 micrograms/dL in the logistic, and at 25 to 30 micrograms/dL in the quadratic. Neither age, sex, socioeconomic status, nor duration of residence near the smelter significantly modified the relationship. These analyses confirm that asymptomatic increased lead absorption causes slowing of nerve conduction, but they also indicate that measurement of maximal motor nerve conduction velocity is an insensitive screen for low-level lead toxicity.

Schwartz, J.; Landrigan, P.J.; Feldman, R.G.; Silbergeld, E.K.; Baker, E.L. Jr.; von Lindern, I.H.

1988-01-01

497

Eye injuries in athletics and recreation.  

PubMed

Sports-related eye injuries represent a significant eye health hazard worldwide. In the USA, it is estimated that eye injuries from sports account for more than 100,000 physician visits per year at the cost of greater than $175 million. The sports responsible for the greatest number of injuries are baseball, ice hockey, and racquet sports. In the USA there are over 189 million participants in these sports with a disproportionate number (one-third) of injuries involving the pediatric population. The most common injuries are abrasions and contusions, followed by more serious injuries, including hyphema. Substantial reduction in the incidence of eye injuries through prevention has been demonstrated in the sport of hockey which can serve as a model for other sports. Specific criteria for protective eyewear must be developed. Polycarbonate plastic lenses and frames which are sturdy and impact resistant provide optimal protection. Lensless goggles, street wear and spectacle correction glasses do not provide adequate eye protection. The ophthalmologist's role in preventing sports-related eye injuries includes addressing particular sports participants needs, identifying one-eyed athletes, and informing patients of the need for protective eyewear. PMID:8970237

Napier, S M; Baker, R S; Sanford, D G; Easterbrook, M

1996-01-01

498

Groin Injuries in Sports Medicine  

PubMed Central

Context: An in-season groin injury may be debilitating for the athlete. Proper diagnosis and identification of the pathology are paramount in providing appropriate intervention. Furthermore, an adductor strain that is treated improperly can become chronic and career threatening. Any one of the 6 muscles of the adductor muscle group can be involved. The degree of injury can range from a minor strain (grade 1), where minimal playing time is lost, to a severe strain (grade 3), in which there is complete loss of muscle function. Persistent groin pain and muscle imbalance may lead to athletic pubalgia. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant studies were identified through a literature search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database from 1990 to 2009, as well as a manual review of reference lists of identified sources. Results: Ice hockey and soccer players seem particularly susceptible to adductor muscle strains. In professional ice hockey and soccer players throughout the world, approximately 10% to 11% of all injuries are groin strains. These injuries have been linked to hip muscle weakness, a previous injury to that area, preseason practice sessions, and level of experience. This injury may be prevented if these risk factors are addressed before each season. Conclusion: Despite the identification of risk factors and strengthening intervention for athletes, adductor strains continue to occur throughout sport. If groin pain persists, the possibility of athletic pubalgia needs to be explored, because of weakening or tears in the abdominal wall muscles. A diagnosis is confirmed by exclusion of other pathology. PMID:23015943

Tyler, Timothy F.; Silvers, Holly J.; Gerhardt, Michael B.; Nicholas, Stephen J.

2010-01-01

499

Comparison of the home advantage in nine different professional team sports in Spain.  

PubMed

Home advantage is a well-established phenomenon in many sports. The present study is unique in that it includes different sports analysed in the same country, at the same level of competition, and over the same time period. Nine team sports from Spain were included: baseball, basketball, handball, indoor soccer, roller hockey, rugby, soccer, volleyball, and water polo. Data for five seasons (2005-2006 to 2009-2010) were obtained, totaling 9,472 games. The results confirmed the existence of home advantage in all nine sports. There was a statistically significant difference between the sports; home advantage was highest in rugby (67.0%), and lowest in volleyball (55.7%), water polo (56.2%), and roller hockey (58.3%). The design of the study controlled for some of the likely causes of home advantage, and the results suggested that the high home advantage for rugby was likely a reflection of the continuous, aggressive, and intense nature of the sport. PMID:21987916

Gómez, Miguel A; Pollard, Richard; Luis-Pascual, Juan-Carlos

2011-08-01

500

A Study of Detonation Diffraction in the Ignition-and-Growth Model  

SciTech Connect

Heterogeneous high-energy explosives are morphologically, mechanically and chemically complex. As such, their ab-initio modeling, in which well-characterized phenomena at the scale of the microstructure lead to a rationally homogenized description at the scale of observation, is a subject of active research but not yet a reality. An alternative approach is to construct phenomenological models, in which forms of constitutive behavior are postulated with an eye on the perceived picture of the micro-scale phenomena, and which are strongly linked to experimental calibration. Most prominent among these is the ignition-and-growth model conceived by Lee and Tarver. The model treats the explosive as a homogeneous mixture of two distinct constituents, the unreacted explosive and the products of reaction. To each constituent is assigned an equation of state, and a single reaction-rate law is prescribed for the conversion of the explosive to products. It is assumed that the two constituents are always in pressure and temperature equilibrium. The purpose of this paper is to investigate in detail the behavior of the model in situations where a detonation turns a corner and undergoes diffraction. A set of parameters appropriate for the explosive LX-17 is selected. The model is first examined analytically for steady, planar, 1-D solutions and the reaction-zone structure of Chapman-Jouguet detonations is determined. A computational study of two classes of problems is then undertaken. The first class corresponds to planar, 1-D initiation by an impact, and the second to corner turning and diffraction in planar and axisymmetric geometries. The 1-D initiation, although interesting in its own right, is utilized here as a means for interpretation of the 2-D results. It is found that there are two generic ways in which 1-D detonations are initiated in the model, and that these scenarios play a part in the post-diffraction evolution as well. For the parameter set under study the model shows detonation failure, but only locally and temporarily, and does not generate sustained dead zones. The computations employ adaptive mesh refinement and are finely resolved. Results are obtained for a rigid confinement of the explosive. Compliant confinement represents its own computational challenges and is currently under study. Also under development is an extended ignition-and-growth model which takes into account observed desensitization of heterogeneous explosives by weak shocks.

Kapila, A K; Schwendeman, D W; Bdzil, J B; Henshaw, W D

2006-04-14