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Sample records for lymphoma sll undergoing

  1. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... over time, it can progress to a more aggressive type of lymphoma. Common signs of disease include ... older or frail are typically treated with less aggressive regimens than those who are younger and healthier. ...

  2. Phase 1/2A Dose Escalation Study in CLL, SLL or NHL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-09

    Follicular Lymphoma (FL/Indolent NHL); Aggressive NHL (a NHL); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) / Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (SLL); T-cell Lymphoma (PTCL and CTCL); B-cell Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

  3. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  4. Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer T cell lymphoma, nasal type, mimicking Ebstein Barr viral esophagitis in a tonsillar lymphoma patient undergoing chemoradiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se Ryeon; Park, Eun Kyung; Won, Nam Hee; Kim, Byung Soo

    2010-09-01

    Esophageal involvement by extranodal natural killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, is rare. As a result, esophageal symptoms in these patients might at first be thought to originate from a benign condition, such as viral esophagitis. It is important to note, however, that benign conditions may mask esophageal involvement by lymphoma. Until now, there has been no report documenting esophageal involvement by lymphoma mimicking viral esophagitis in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma patient undergoing active treatment. Here, we report a case of esophageal involvement by extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, initially misdiagnosed as Ebstein Barr virus esophagitis. Lymphoma invasion of the esophagus should be considered if esophageal symptoms do not respond to usual medical esophagitis therapy in an extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, patient undergoing chemoradiation. PMID:20887494

  5. CLL/SLL with initial presentation as a longstanding cutaneous plaque: a rare case.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Edward; Alapat, Daisy; Mabry, Andrea; Gao, Ling; Shalin, Sara C

    2016-08-01

    While chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) is the most common leukemia in the western world, it uncommonly initially presents as a cutaneous lesion. When it does, it is often found incidentally in the context of another distinct lesion. We present a case of CLL/SLL that initially presented as a solitary nodular erythematous plaque on the left flank of a healthy 60-year-old man without lymphadenopathy or constitutional symptoms. The lesion had been present for many years, but had recently begun to grow and become pruritic and painful. Excisional biopsy revealed a large nodular aggregate of variably sized CD20(dim), CD5(+), CD23(+), BCL-2(+) atypical lymphocytes in the dermis without epidermotropism. The lymphocytes were negative for BCL-1/cyclinD1, BCL-6, and CD10, and no other background lesion was identified. This constellation of biopsy findings was consistent with CLL/SLL. This case emphasizes the potential for involvement by CLL/SLL in the cutaneous biopsies of otherwise asymptomatic patients. PMID:27147484

  6. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  7. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have ... immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as Swollen, painless ...

  9. [Lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Lohri, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Although malignant lymphoma is split in over 60 distinct entities, four of them, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular-, Hodgkin's- and mantle cell lymphoma constitute more than half of all new cases. A recent major revision of the Ann Arbor staging system restricts the suffix “A” and “B” just to Hodgkin's lymphoma. Bone marrow exams are abandonned in Hodgkin's and restricted in DLBCL. PET exams at different time points are crucial. PET guided therapy will lead to a reduction of the use of chemo- and radiation therapy. Many new targeted drugs have been introduced. Their therapeutic index is impressive as is their price tag. The radiation and chemotherapy free treatment of malignant lymphoma is within reach. PMID:26732717

  10. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... group of blood cancers that develop in the lymphatic system. The two main types are Hodgkin lymphoma and ... Is a type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system Generally develops in the lymph nodes and lymphatic ...

  11. Favorable outcomes in elderly patients undergoing high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dahi, Parastoo B; Tamari, Roni; Devlin, Sean M; Maloy, Molly; Bhatt, Valkal; Scordo, Michael; Goldberg, Jenna; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Hamlin, Paul A; Matasar, Matthew J; Maragulia, Jocelyn; Giralt, Sergio A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Moskowitz, Craig H; Sauter, Craig S

    2014-12-01

    High-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT-ASCT) can offer potential long-term remission or cure in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Limited experience is available on the safety and efficacy of HDT-ASCT in elderly patients. This is a single-center, retrospective study examining outcomes of HDT-ASCT for 202 NHL patients, ages 60 years and older, between January 2001 and December 2012. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were analyzed according to age at HDT-ASCT, hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index (HCT-CI), NHL histology, and remission status at the time of HDT-ASCT. The median age was 65 years (range, 60 to 74) and the majority had either diffuse large B cell lymphoma (n = 73, 37%) or mantle cell lymphoma (n = 69, 34%). One hundred and fifteen patients (57%) had high HCT-CI scores at the time of HDT-ASCT. With a median follow-up of 3.6 years (range, 4 to 11.9 years) for survivors, PFS and OS at 3 years were 60% (95% confidence interval [CI], 53% to 68%) and 73% (95% CI, 67% to 80%), respectively. Transplantation-related mortality (TRM) was 4% both at 100 days and at 1 year after HDT-ASCT. Age and HCT-CI score were not associated with OS or PFS, and high HCT-CI did not correlate with TRM. Seven patients (4%) developed secondary myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia at a median of 35 months (range, 6 to 48) after HDT-ASCT. In this single-center cohort of elderly patients with NHL undergoing HDT-ASCT, this intervention was proven tolerable and effective, with results similar to those of historic controls in younger patients. Our data suggest that age alone should not preclude HDT-ASCT in elderly patients. PMID:25175794

  12. Etiologic heterogeneity among non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sophia S.; Cozen, Wendy; Linet, Martha S.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard K.; Colt, Joanne S.; Vasef, Mohammad A.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Blair, Aaron; Bernstein, Leslie; Cross, Amanda J.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Engels, Eric A.; Hein, David W.; Hill, Deirdre A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Lim, Unhee; Lynch, Charles F.; Schenk, Maryjean; Wacholder, Sholom; Ward, Mary H.; Hoar Zahm, Shelia; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cerhan, James R.; Hartge, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Understanding patterns of etiologic commonality and heterogeneity for non-Hodgkin lymphomas may illuminate lymphomagenesis. We present the first systematic comparison of risks by lymphoma subtype for a broad range of putative risk factors in a population-based case-control study, including diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL; N = 416), follicular (N = 318), and marginal zone lymphomas (N = 106), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; N = 133). We required at least 2 of 3 analyses to support differences in risk: (1) polytomous logistic regression, (2) homogeneity tests, or (3) dichotomous logistic regression, analyzing all 7 possible pairwise comparisons among the subtypes, corresponding to various groupings by clinical behavior, genetic features, and differentiation. Late birth order and high body mass index (≥ 35) kg/m2) increased risk for DLBCL alone. Autoimmune conditions increased risk for marginal zone lymphoma alone. The tumor necrosis factor G-308A polymorphism (rs1800629) increased risks for both DLBCL and marginal zone lymphoma. Exposure to certain dietary heterocyclic amines from meat consumption increased risk for CLL/SLL alone. We observed no significant risk factors for follicular lymphoma alone. These data clearly support both etiologic commonality and heterogeneity for lymphoma subtypes, suggesting that immune dysfunction is of greater etiologic importance for DLBCL and marginal zone lymphoma than for CLL/SLL and follicular lymphoma. PMID:18796628

  13. Disseminated herpes zoster infection initially presenting with abdominal pain in patients with lymphoma undergoing conventional chemotherapy: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Okuma, Hitomi Sumiyoshi; Kobayashi, Yukio; Makita, Shinichi; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Dai; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-01-01

    Visceral disseminated varicella zoster virus (VZV) disease has a high mortality rate, and occurs in immunocompromised hosts, mostly subsequent to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Only a few cases of this disease that onset during conventional chemotherapy in patients with lymphoma have been reported. The present study reports the cases of 3 patients with disseminated and visceral VZV infection undergoing treatment for follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. All 3 patients presented with initial symptoms of abdominal pain, and 2 patients demonstrated syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone and hepatitis. All patients developed widespread cutaneous dissemination, and all had a low cluster of differentiation 4 cell count or lymphocyte count at the time of VZV diagnosis and at least 4 month prior. With intravenous systemic acyclovir therapy (Cases 1 and 3, 1500 mg/day; Case 2, 750 mg/day), the patients achieved complete recovery by day 14 of therapy. Visceral disseminated VZV infection is not limited to patients undergoing stem cell transplantation, and may present with abdominal pain with or without skin eruption. Visceral infection may take a poor clinical course, therefore, in patients with prolonged duration of low lymphocyte count and/or long-term use of steroids, the prophylactic use of acyclovir may be considered. PMID:27446355

  14. Cummins' Framework as a Tool for Continuous Improvement of SLL Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Joel R.

    2008-01-01

    This working paper will explore the usefulness of Cummins' framework relating language proficiency to academic performance (1983) as a reflection and planning tool for continuous improvement of second language learning (SLL) instruction. SLL activities designed for a Language Experience intervention class for seventh and eighth grade English…

  15. The Use of Discourse Markers among Form Four SLL Students in Essay Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunis, Melor Md; Haris, Siti Nor Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of discourse markers among Form Four second language learner (SLL) students in essay writing. The objectives of this study are to discover how Form Four SLL students use discourse markers in their essay writing and to identify the teachers' perception about the usage of discourse markers among students. 30…

  16. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  17. The value of immunohistochemistry on paraffin wax embedded tissue sections in the differentiation of small lymphocytic and mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N; Wright, D H

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To determine whether immunohistochemistry applied to paraffin wax embedded biopsy tissue can be used to distinguish between B-small lymphocytic lymphoma (B-SLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). METHODS: Formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue blocks of 12 cases of B-SLL and 12 cases of MCL were retrieved from the files of the Department of Pathology, Southampton University Hospitals Trust. Following antigen retrieval, where appropriate, sections were stained for CD3, CD5, CD20, CD23, CD43, Cyclin D, PGP9.5, and MIB1 using a streptavidin-biotin complex technique. RESULTS: CD20 stained the neoplastic cells of B-SLL and MCL, and CD3 labelled the reactive T cells in these tumours. In B-SLL, the T cells were generally dispersed among the tumour cells, whereas in MCL they often formed bands around tumour cell nodules. CD5 could be detected on T cells, following antigen retrieval. The level of expression on B cells of B-SLL and MCL was generally too low to allow detection in paraffin wax embedded tissues. CD23 stained B-SLL but not MCL. However, it could be detected in only five of the 12 cases of B-SLL. CD43 could be detected in most cases of B-SLL and MCL. It is not, therefore, of value in distinguishing between these tumours. It will, however, help in the differentiation of B-SLL and MCL from other low grade B cell lymphomas, such as follicle centre cell and marginal zone lymphomas. Cyclin D was expressed in all of the MCL but in none of the B-SLL. PGP9.5 showed reactivity in most cases of MCL and much weaker reactivity in B-SLL. The proliferation indexes of MCL were generally higher than those of B-SLL, as measured by MIB1 labelling. Both tumours, however, showed a wide range of values and considerable overlap. CONCLUSION: Staining for Cyclin D is the most reliable immunohistochemical mean of differentiating between B-SLL an MCL. High levels of PGP9.5, expressed in MCL, may be related to the degradation of Cyclin D by the ubiquitin pathway. Images PMID

  18. Sll0254 (CrtLdiox) Is a Bifunctional Lycopene Cyclase/Dioxygenase in Cyanobacteria Producing Myxoxanthophyll

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Hatem E.; Vermaas, Wim F. J.

    2006-01-01

    Upon depletion of Sll0254 in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, cyclized carotenoids were replaced by linear, relatively hydrophilic carotenoids, and the amount of the two photosystems decreased greatly. Full segregants of the sll0254 deletion in Synechocystis were not obtained, implying that this gene is essential for survival, most likely to allow normal cell division. The N-terminal half of Sll0254 has limited similarity to the family of lycopene cyclases, has an additional dehydrogenase motif near the N terminus, and is followed by a Rieske 2Fe-2S center sequence signature. To test whether Sll0254 serves as a lycopene cyclase in Synechocystis, the corresponding gene was expressed in Escherichia coli strains that can produce lycopene or neurosporene. In the presence of Sll0254 these linear carotenoids were converted into cyclized, relatively hydrophilic pigments, with masses consistent with the introduction of two hydroxyl groups and with spectra indicative of only small changes in the number of conjugated double bonds. This suggests that Sll0254 catalyzes formation of oxygenated, cyclized carotenoids. We interpret the appearance of the hydroxyl groups in the carotenoids to be due to dioxygenase activity involving the Rieske 2Fe-2S center and the additional dehydrogenase domain. This dioxygenase activity is required in the myxoxanthophyll biosynthesis pathway, after or concomitant with cyclization on the other end of the molecule. We interpret Sll0254 to be a dual-function enzyme with both lycopene cyclase and dioxygenase activity and have named it CrtLdiox. PMID:16621828

  19. Granulomatous interstitial nephritis secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Samih H; Shanafelt, Tait D; Hanson, Curtis A; Fidler, Mary E; Cornell, Lynn D; Sethi, Sanjeev; Chaffee, Kari G; Morris, Joseph; Leung, Nelson

    2015-06-01

    Granulomatous interstitial nephritis (GIN) is an uncommon pathologic lesion encountered in 0.5% to 5.9% of renal biopsies. Drugs, sarcoidosis, and infections are responsible for most cases of GIN. Malignancy is not an established cause of GIN. Here, we report a series of 5 patients with GIN secondary to chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). Patients were mostly elderly white males with an established history of CLL/SLL who presented with severe renal impairment (median peak serum creatinine, 7.3 mg/dL), leukocyturia, and mild proteinuria. One had nephromegaly. In 2 patients, the development and relapse of renal insufficiency closely paralleled the level of lymphocytosis. Kidney biopsy in all patients showed GIN concomitant with CLL/SLL leukemic interstitial infiltration. Granulomas were nonnecrotizing and epithelioid and were associated with giant cells. One biopsy showed granulomatous arteritis. One patient had a granulomatous reaction in lymph nodes and skin. Steroids with/without CLL/SLL-directed chemotherapy led to partial improvement of kidney function in all patients except 1 who had advanced cortical scarring on biopsy. In conclusion, we report an association between CLL/SLL and GIN. Patients typically present with severe renal failure due to both GIN and leukemic interstitial infiltration, which tends to respond to steroids with/without CLL/SLL-directed chemotherapy. The pathogenesis of GIN in this clinical setting is unknown but may represent a local hypersensitivity reaction to the CLL/SLL tumor cells. PMID:25795422

  20. Phase II MOR00208 in Combination With Lenalidomide for Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CLL, SLL or PLL or Older Patients With Untreated CLL, SLL or PLL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-31

    Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Impact of Conditioning Regimen on Outcomes for Patients with Lymphoma Undergoing High-Dose Therapy with Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Brent; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Artz, Andrew; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Olsson, Richard; Saber, Wael; McCarthy, Philip; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2015-01-01

    There are limited data to guide the choice of high-dose therapy (HDT) regimen prior to autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for patients with Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We studied 4,917 patients (NHL n=3,905; HL n=1,012) who underwent AHCT from 1995-2008 using the most common HDT platforms: BEAM (n=1730), CBV (n=1853), BuCy (n=789), and TBI-containing (n=545). CBV was divided into CBVhigh and CBVlow based on BCNU dose. We analyzed the impact of regimen on development of idiopathic pulmonary syndrome (IPS), transplant-related mortality (TRM), progression free and overall survival (PFS and OS). The 1-year incidence of IPS was 3-6% and was highest in recipients of CBVhigh (HR 1.9) and TBI (HR 2.0) compared to BEAM. 1-year TRM was 4-8% and was similar between regimens. Among patients with NHL, there was a significant interaction between histology, HDT regimen, and outcome. Compared to BEAM, CBVlow (HR 0.63) was associated with lower mortality in follicular lymphoma (p<0.001), and CBVhigh (HR1.44) with higher mortality in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (p=0.001). For patients with HL, CBVhigh (HR1.54), CBVlow (HR1.53), BuCy (HR1.77) and TBI (HR 3.39) were associated with higher mortality compared to BEAM (p<0.001). The impact of specific AHCT regimen on post transplant survival is different depending on histology; therefore, further studies are required to define the best regimen for specific diseases. PMID:25687795

  2. A Transcriptional Regulator Sll0794 Regulates Tolerance to Biofuel Ethanol in Photosynthetic Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhongdi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Lu, Yinhua; Jiang, Weihong; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-01-01

    To improve ethanol production directly from CO2 in photosynthetic cyanobacterial systems, one key issue that needs to be addressed is the low ethanol tolerance of cyanobacterial cells. Our previous proteomic and transcriptomic analyses found that several regulatory proteins were up-regulated by exogenous ethanol in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In this study, through tolerance analysis of the gene disruption mutants of the up-regulated regulatory genes, we uncovered that one transcriptional regulator, Sll0794, was related directly to ethanol tolerance in Synechocystis. Using a quantitative iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS proteomics approach coupled with quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR), we further determined the possible regulatory network of Sll0794. The proteomic analysis showed that in the Δsll0794 mutant grown under ethanol stress a total of 54 and 87 unique proteins were down- and up-regulated, respectively. In addition, electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the Sll0794 transcriptional regulator was able to bind directly to the upstream regions of sll1514, slr1512, and slr1838, which encode a 16.6 kDa small heat shock protein, a putative sodium-dependent bicarbonate transporter and a carbon dioxide concentrating mechanism protein CcmK, respectively. The study provided a proteomic description of the putative ethanol-tolerance network regulated by the sll0794 gene, and revealed new insights on the ethanol-tolerance regulatory mechanism in Synechocystis. As the first regulatory protein discovered related to ethanol tolerance, the gene may serve as a valuable target for transcription machinery engineering to further improve ethanol tolerance in Synechocystis. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001266 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001266). PMID:25239498

  3. Medical History, Lifestyle, Family History, and Occupational Risk Factors for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Benavente, Yolanda; Blair, Aaron; Vermeulen, Roel; Cerhan, James R.; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Monnereau, Alain; Nieters, Alexandra; Clavel, Jacqueline; Call, Timothy G.; Maynadié, Marc; Lan, Qing; Clarke, Christina A.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Norman, Aaron D.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Casabonne, Delphine; Cocco, Pierluigi; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are two subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A number of studies have evaluated associations between risk factors and CLL/SLL risk. However, these associations remain inconsistent or lacked confirmation. This may be due, in part, to the inadequate sample size of CLL/SLL cases. Methods We performed a pooled analysis of 2440 CLL/SLL cases and 15186 controls from 13 case-control studies from Europe, North America, and Australia. We evaluated associations of medical history, family history, lifestyle, and occupational risk factors with CLL/SLL risk. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We confirmed prior inverse associations with any atopic condition and recreational sun exposure. We also confirmed prior elevated associations with usual adult height, hepatitis C virus seropositivity, living or working on a farm, and family history of any hematological malignancy. Novel associations were identified with hairdresser occupation (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = 1.05 to 2.98) and blood transfusion history (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.66 to 0.94). We also found smoking to have modest protective effect (OR = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.99). All exposures showed evidence of independent effects. Conclusions We have identified or confirmed several independent risk factors for CLL/SLL supporting a role for genetics (through family history), immune function (through allergy and sun), infection (through hepatitis C virus), and height, and other pathways of immune response. Given that CLL/SLL has more than 30 susceptibility loci identified to date, studies evaluating the interaction among genetic and nongenetic factors are warranted. PMID:25174025

  4. Risk Factors for Melanoma Among Survivors of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Clara J.K.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Dores, Graça M.; Engels, Eric A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Polliack, Aaron; Warren, Joan L.; Young, Heather A.; Levine, Paul H.; Elmi, Angelo F.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have reported that survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have an increased risk of developing cutaneous melanoma; however, risks associated with specific treatments and immune-related risk factors have not been quantified. Patients and Methods We evaluated second melanoma risk among 44,870 1-year survivors of first primary NHL diagnosed at age 66 to 83 years from 1992 to 2009 and included in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Information on NHL treatments, autoimmune diseases, and infections was derived from Medicare claims. Results A total of 202 second melanoma cases occurred among survivors of NHL, including 91 after chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) and 111 after other NHL subtypes (cumulative incidence by age 85 years: CLL/SLL, 1.37%; other NHL subtypes, 0.78%). Melanoma risk after CLL/SLL was significantly increased among patients who received infused fludarabine-containing chemotherapy with or without rituximab (n = 18: hazard ratio [HR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.09 to 3.40; n = 10: HR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.42 to 6.01, respectively). Significantly elevated risks also were associated with T-cell activating autoimmune diseases diagnosed before CLL/SLL (n = 36: HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.84) or after CLL/SLL (n = 49: HR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.66 to 5.12). In contrast, among patients with other NHL subtypes, melanoma risk was not associated with specific treatments or with T-cell/B-cell immune conditions. Generally, infections were not associated with melanoma risk, except for urinary tract infections (CLL/SLL), localized scleroderma, pneumonia, and gastrohepatic infections (other NHLs). Conclusion Our findings suggest immune perturbation may contribute to the development of melanoma after CLL/SLL. Increased vigilance is warranted among survivors of NHL to maximize opportunities for early detection of melanoma. PMID:26240221

  5. Pretransplantation Minimal Residual Disease Predicts Survival in Patients with Mantle Cell Lymphoma Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Complete Remission.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Stevenson, Philip A; Cassaday, Ryan D; Graf, Solomon A; Fromm, Jonathan R; Wu, David; Holmberg, Leona A; Till, Brian G; Chauncey, Thomas R; Smith, Stephen D; Philip, Mary; Orozco, Johnnie J; Shustov, Andrei R; Green, Damian J; Libby, Edward N; Bensinger, William I; Shadman, Mazyar; Maloney, David G; Press, Oliver W; Gopal, Ajay K

    2016-02-01

    Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is standard therapy for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) in remission after induction chemotherapy, with the best results for patients in complete remission (CR). We hypothesized that evaluation of minimal residual disease (MRD) before ASCT could further stratify outcomes for these patients. Patients with MCL who underwent ASCT in clinical CR between 1996 and 2011 with pretransplantation MRD testing were eligible. Presence of a clonal IgH rearrangement, t(11; 14) by PCR or positive flow cytometry from blood or bone marrow, was considered positive. An adjusted proportional hazards model for associations with progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was performed. Of 75 MCL patients in CR, 8 (11%) were MRD positive. MRD positivity was associated with shorter OS and PFS. The median OS for MRD-negative patients was not reached, with 82% survival at 5 years, whereas for the MRD-positive patients, median OS was 3.01 years (hazard ratio [HR], 4.04; P = .009), with a median follow-up of 5.1 years. The median PFS for MRD-negative patients was not reached with 75% PFS at 5 years, whereas for MRD-positive patients, it was 2.38 years (HR, 3.69; P = .002). MRD positivity is independently associated with poor outcomes after ASCT for MCL patients in CR. PMID:26348890

  6. The Spectrum of Kidney Pathology in B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia / Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma: A 25-Year Multicenter Experience

    PubMed Central

    Poitou-Verkinder, Anne-Laure; Francois, Arnaud; Drieux, Fanny; Lepretre, Stéphane; Legallicier, Bruno; Moulin, Bruno; Godin, Michel; Guerrot, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma are 2 different presentations of the most common B-cell neoplasm in western countries (CLL/SLL). In this disease, kidney involvement is usually silent, and is rarely reported in the literature. This study provides a clinicopathological analysis of all-cause kidney disease in CLL/SLL patients. Methods Fifteen CLL/SLL patients with kidney biopsy were identified retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, pathological and laboratory data were assessed at biopsy, and during follow-up. Results At biopsy 11 patients presented impaired renal function, 7 patients nephrotic syndrome, 6 patients dysproteinemia, and 3 patients cryoglobulinemia. Kidney pathology revealed CLL/SLL-specific monoclonal infiltrate in 10 biopsies, glomerulopathy in 9 biopsies (5 membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, 2 minimal change disease, 1 glomerulonephritis with organized microtubular monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits, 1 AHL amyloidosis). Five patients presented interstitial granulomas attributed to CLL/SLL. After treatment of the hematological disease, improvement of renal function was observed in 7/11 patients, and remission of nephrotic syndrome in 5/7 patients. During follow-up, aggravation of the kidney disease systematically occurred in the absence of favorable response to hematological treatment. Conclusions A broad spectrum of kidney diseases is associated with CLL/SLL. In this setting, kidney biopsy can provide important information for diagnosis and therapeutic guidance. PMID:25811382

  7. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab and Fludarabine Phosphate in Treating Older Patients Who Are Undergoing an Autologous or Syngeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Other Malignancies in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria; Wen, Sijin; McLaughlin, Peter; O'Brien, Susan; Wierda, William G.; Lerner, Susan; Strom, Sara; Freireich, Emil J; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Other malignancies have been reported to occur with increased frequency in chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). The aim of this study was to determine the frequency, outcomes, and factors associated with other cancers in patients with CLL/SLL. Patients and Methods We reviewed the records of consecutive patients with previously untreated CLL/SLL seen at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center from 1985 to 2005. The number of second cancers observed was compared with the number expected from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Results Among 2,028 patients, 324 (16%) had a history of other cancers and 227 (11.2%) developed other malignancies during the follow-up period. Overall, 625 cancers were observed in 551 patients, including skin (30%), prostate (13%), breast (9%), melanoma (8%), lymphoma (8%), gastrointestinal (9%), lung (6%), and other cancers (17%). The risk of a second cancer was 2.2 times higher than the expected risk. The response rates in patients with and without a history of other cancers were 86% and 92%, respectively (P = .04), and the 5-year survival rates were 70% and 82%, respectively (P < .001). In Cox analysis, independent factors predicting development of new cancers were older age, male sex, and elevated levels of β2-microglobulin, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatinine. In patients who were treated for CLL/SLL, the treatment regimen did not affect the risk of subsequent cancer (P = .49). Conclusion Patients with CLL/SLL have more than twice the risk of developing a second cancer and an increased frequency of certain cancer types. Awareness of risk factors could permit early detection. PMID:19114699

  9. Excitation spectra of unconventional FQHE states in the SLL from Light Scattering Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurstbauer, Ursula; Levy, Antonio; Pinczuk, Aron; Watson, John; Gardner, Geoff; Manfra, Michael; West, Ken; Pfeiffer, Loren

    The fascinating interaction physics in the second Landau level (SLL) supports the emergence of exotic quantum phases and unconventional possibly FQHE states such as e.g. at ν = 5/2 and 2 +1/3 and the weaker state at ν = 2 +3/8 and 2 +2/5. We observe clear signatures for gapped collective excitations in inelastic light scattering experiments just for these `magic' filling factors and only for low temperatures substantiating access to the physics of the incompressible quantum fluids. The lowest excitation feature in the spectrum at 2 +1/3 occurs at around 70 μeV. The analysis of spectral lineshapes suggests magnetoroton features that are characteristic of 2D neutral excitations in a perpendicular magnetic field. The striking polarization dependence observable in light scattering experiments in the SLL are consistent with nematic FQHE states. Supported by award NSF-DMR-1306976.

  10. Daily Weight-Based Busulfan with Cyclophosphamide and Etoposide Produces Comparable Outcomes to Four-Times-Daily Busulfan Dosing for Lymphoma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brian T; Rybicki, Lisa; Carlstrom, Kelley D; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Gerds, Aaron; Hamilton, Betty; Liu, Hien; Dean, Robert; Sobecks, Ronald; Pohlman, Brad; Andresen, Steven; Kalaycio, Matt; Bolwell, Brian J; Majhail, Navneet S

    2016-09-01

    High-dose busulfan (Bu) is an integral component of commonly used preparative regimens for both allogeneic and autologous transplantation. There is significant interest in comparing the efficacy and toxicity of administering Bu every 6 (Bu6) or every 24 hours (daily Bu). To facilitate a therapeutic dose-monitoring protocol, we transitioned from Bu6 to daily Bu dosing for patients with Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Here, we retrospectively review outcomes of 400 consecutive eligible lymphoma patients who underwent ASCT from 2007 to 2013 with high-dose busulfan (Bu), cyclophosphamide (Cy), and etoposide (E). Bu was given at a fixed dose of either .8 mg/kg every 6 hours for 14 doses for 307 patients or a fixed dose of 2.8 mg/kg every 24 hours for 4 doses (days -9 through -6) for 93 patients who underwent transplantation after the transition from Bu6 to daily Bu was made. Toxicity was assessed using pulmonary and liver function tests (LFT) at specified time points before and after ASCT. Baseline patient and disease characteristics of patients dosed with Bu6 and daily Bu were similar. There was no significant difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second or diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide before and after transplantation in the Bu6 versus daily Bu cohorts. Changes in LFTs with daily Bu were not significantly different than those with Bu6. There were no differences in relapse, nonrelapse mortality, progression-free survival, or overall survival between Bu6 and Bu 24 administration schedules in univariable or multivariable analysis (P ≥ .34). For a subset of 23 patients who had first-dose Bu levels measured, we observed significant variation in an median estimated cumulative area under the curve (AUC) of 17,568 µM-minute (range, 12,104 µM-23,084 µM-minute). In conclusion, daily Bu with Cy/E is more convenient than Bu6, has equivalent outcomes, and results in no increase

  11. Sll0528, a Site-2-Protease, Is Critically Involved in Cold, Salt and Hyperosmotic Stress Acclimation of Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Haijin; Chen, Gu; Wang, Yuling; Ding, Qinglong; Wei, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Site-2-proteases (S2Ps) mediated proteolysis of transmembrane transcriptional regulators is a conserved mechanism to regulate transmembrane signaling. The universal presence of S2P homologs in different cyanobacterial genomes suggest conserved and fundamental functions, though limited data has been available. Here we provide the first evidence that Sll0528, a site-2-protease in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is crucial for salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress acclimation. Remarkable induction of sll0528 gene expression was observed under salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress, much higher than induction of the other three S2Ps. Knock-out of sll0528 gene in wild type Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 increased their sensitivity to salt, cold and hyperosmotic stress, as revealed by retarded growth, reduced pigments and disrupted photosystems. The sll0528 gene was induced to a much smaller extent by high light and mixotrophic growth with glucose. Similar growth responses of the sll0528 knockout mutant and wild type under high light and mixotrophic growth indicated that sll0528 was dispensable for these conditions. Recombinant Sll0528 protein could cleave beta-casein into smaller fragments. These results together suggest that the Sll0528 metalloprotease plays a role in the stress response and lays the foundation for further investigation of its mechanism, as well as providing hints for the functional analysis of other S2Ps in cyanobacteria. PMID:25493476

  12. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma is a very fast growing form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma . Causes Burkitt lymphoma was first discovered in children ... CT scan References National Cancer Institute: PDQ Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last ...

  13. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-28

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  14. Copy neutral loss of heterozygosity in 20q in chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jianming; Robu, Valentin; Feder, Madelyn; Cheung, Mitchell; Neumann-Domer, Erin; Talarchek, Jacqueline; Dulaimi, Essel; Millenson, Michael M.; Testa, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based chromosome microarray analysis was used to uncover copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the long arm of chromosome 20 in blood or bone marrow specimens from three patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). All three patients presented with lymph node enlargement. While one of the patients has had a complicated clinical course, the other two have a more indolent disease. Sequence analysis of the tumor suppressor gene ASXL1, which is located in 20q and is commonly mutated in malignant myeloid diseases and occasionally in CLL/SLL specimens, revealed no mutations in our three patients with copy neutral LOH in 20q. The possible contribution of other imprinted microRNAs and antisense genes residing in 20q to the pathogenesis of a subset of CLL/SLL patients is discussed. These findings illustrate the value of SNP arrays for the detection of novel recurrent genomic alterations that may contribute to CLL/SLL onset or progression. PMID:24704113

  15. Pharmacokinetic-directed high-dose busulfan combined with cyclophosphamide and etoposide results in predictable drug levels and durable long-term survival in lymphoma patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongzheng; Graiser, Michael; Hutcherson, Donald A; Dada, M Olufemi; McMillan, Stephanie; Ali, Zahir; Flowers, Christopher R; Waller, Edmund K

    2012-08-01

    The clinical advantage of pharmacokinetic (PK)-directed-based dosing on intravenous (i.v.) versus oral busulfan-related toxicity and survival remains unclear. We performed a retrospective cohort study of sequential cohorts of patients comparing PK-directed oral and i.v. busulfan-based conditioning regimens in lymphoma patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (ASCT). Patients received oral (n = 95), every 6 hours i.v. (IV16, n = 113), or once-daily i.v. (IV4, n = 86) busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide. PK-directed dosing was performed to achieve a predefined target area under the curve (AUC) of 20,000 μM-min (range: 18,400-21,600 μM-min). PK-directed dose adjustments markedly reduced the number of patients in the oral group with total AUC higher than the targeted AUC range, and reduced the variations of total AUC values in all patient groups. One hundred-day mortality was 2.1%, 3.6%, and 3.5% for oral, IV16, and IV4 cohorts, respectively. Five-year overall survival (OS) was 57% (95% confidence interval [CI] 45%-66%) and 64% (95% CI 53%-73%) for patients who received oral and i.v. busulfan, respectively. Both multivariable and instrumental variable analyses indicated the route of delivery had no significant impact on OS, whereas refractory disease and age ≥55 were significantly associated with poorer OS. In lymphoma patients undergoing ASCT, PK-directed i.v. or oral busulfan-based conditioning regimens have comparable toxicity and OS. PMID:22370160

  16. Distribution of lymphomas in Poland according to World Health Organization classification: analysis of 11718 cases from National Histopathological Lymphoma Register project - the Polish Lymphoma Research Group study

    PubMed Central

    Szumera-Ciećkiewicz, Anan; Gałązka, K; Szpor, J; Rymkiewicz, G; Jesionek-Kupnicka, D; Gruchała, A; Ziarkiewicz-Wróblewska, B; Poniatowska-Broniek, G; Demczuk, S; Prochorec-Sobieszek, M

    2014-01-01

    Most national lymphoma registers rely on broad classifications which include Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL), multiple myeloma and leukaemia. In Poland the National Histopathological Lymphoma Register project (NHLR) was implemented by hematopathologists in accordance with the 2008 WHO classification into haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. We present the NHLR data and compare lymphoma distribution in Poland, Europe, as well as in North Central and South America. Records of 11718 patients diagnosed in 24 pathology departments from all over the country were retrieved and reclassified into indolent and aggressive lymphomas according to the 2008 revised WHO classification system. DLBCL (32.9%; 2587), CLL/SLL (31.84%; 2504) and MCL (9.04%; 711) were the three most frequent NHL. The ratio of indolent to aggressive NHL was 1.72; 63.25% (4809) to 36.25% (2794) of cases respectively. Multiple myeloma was less frequent as compared to the data from population-based national cancer register (13.32% vs. 28.94%). Major differences between NHLR and European and American data on NHL subtypes concered: higher incidence of aggressive B-cell lymphomas including DLBCL, lower FL and MALT incidence rate. The percentage of unclassified lymphomas in the study was minimal due to participation of hematopathologists. PMID:25031749

  17. Clonal evolution of B cells in transformation from low- to high-grade lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Matolcsy, András; Schattner, Elaine J.; Knowles, Daniel M.; Casali, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    An outcome of low-grade B cell non-Hodgkins's lymphomas is the transformation to high-grade diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBL). To investigate the mechanisms of clonal evolution in the transformation to DLBL, we performed longitudinal molecular analyses of immunoglobulin (Ig), VHDJH gene sequences expressed in cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), and follicular lymphoma (FL) that transformed to DLBL. Among the neoplastic CLL and SLL cells and their respective high-grade transformants, there was no evidence for a clonotypic shift or acquired mutations in the expressed Ig VHDJH gene segments, as further confirmed by a specific and sensitive PCR-single strand polymorphism analysis. In contrast, among the FL cells there was a high degree of intraclonal diversification with highly divergent VHDJH gene sequences. Despite this intraclonal heterogeneity, the related DLBL expressed a collinear but unique VHDJH gene sequence. The intraclonal genealogical tree for the FL case demonstrated that the DLBL emerged in association with unique VHDJH gene mutational events. Among the intraclonal FL and related DLBL transformants, the nature and distribution of the Ig VHDJH gene mutations were consistent with antigenic selection. Thus, clonal evolution in the transformation from low- to high-grade B cell lymphoma may involve distinct pathways which vary according to the cellular origin and the type of the progenitor B cell tumor. PMID:10229093

  18. Circulating miRNA panel for prediction of acute graft-versus-host disease in lymphoma patients undergoing matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gimondi, Silvia; Dugo, Matteo; Vendramin, Antonio; Bermema, Anisa; Biancon, Giulia; Cavané, Alessandra; Corradini, Paolo; Carniti, Cristiana

    2016-07-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) results in significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic tests for aGVHD are currently lacking, but would be beneficial in predicting aGVHD and improving the safety of allo-HSCT. Circulating microRNAs exhibit marked stability and may serve as biomarkers in several clinical settings. Here, we evaluated the use of circulating microRNAs as predictive biomarkers of aGVHD in lymphoma patients after allo-HSCT from matched unrelated donors (MUDs). After receiving informed consent, we prospectively collected plasma samples from 24 lymphoma patients before and after unmanipulated MUD allo-HSCT; microRNAs were then isolated. Fourteen patients developed aGVHD symptoms at a median of 48 days (range: 32-90) post-transplantation. Two patients developed intestinal GVHD, eight cutaneous GVHD, and four multiorgan GVHD. The microRNA expression profile was examined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). MicroRNAs 194 and 518f were significantly upregulated in aGVHD samples compared with samples taken from non-aGVHD patients. Remarkably, these upregulated microRNAs could be detected before the onset of aGVHD. Pathway prediction analysis indicated that these microRNAs may regulate critical pathways involved in aGVHD pathogenesis. Considering the noninvasive characteristics of plasma sampling and the feasibility of detecting miRNAs after allo-HSCT using real-time polymerase chain reaction, our results indicate that circulating microRNAs have the potential to enable an earlier aGVHD diagnosis and might assist in individualizing therapeutic strategies after MUD allo-HSCT. Nevertheless, standardization of blood sampling and analysis protocols is mandatory for the introduction of miRNA profiling into routine clinical use. PMID:27013207

  19. Extra-Adrenal Myelolipoma Containing Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma/Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Komal; Sidhu, Jagmohan

    2016-01-01

    Myelolipoma is a benign tumor consisting of mature fat interspersed with hematopoietic elements resembling bone marrow. The vast majority occurs within the adrenal glands, but several cases of extra-adrenal myelolipomas (EAMLs) have been reported. We report a case of a 64-year-old male who presented with complaint of lower abdominal discomfort. CT scan of abdomen and pelvis showed a 6 cm × 5 cm, well-circumscribed, predominantly fatty mass in the presacral region. Histological examination of the pelvic mass revealed a myelolipoma heavily infiltrated by small lymphoid cell aggregates with immunophenotypic features of small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL). Review of the literature revealed that there is only one published report of SLL/CLL involving a myelolipoma, which was also an extra-adrenal myelolipoma, and, therefore, our case is the second case of a SLL/CLL involving a myelolipoma that is an extra-adrenal myelolipoma. Extra-adrenal myelolipomas seem to the preferred myelolipomas for involvement by SLL/CLL. PMID:27119033

  20. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype distribution, geodemographic patterns, and survival in the US: A longitudinal analysis of the National Cancer Data Base from 1998 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamadani, Mohammed; Habermann, Thomas M; Cerhan, James R; Macon, William R; Maurer, Matthew J; Go, Ronald S

    2015-09-01

    The World Health Organization classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was introduced in 2001. However, its incorporation into clinical practice is not well-described. We studied the distribution of NHL subtypes in adults diagnosed from 1998 to 2011, evaluated time trends, geo-demographic correlates, and changes in 5-year overall survival (OS). We obtained data prospectively collected by the National Cancer Data Base, which covers 70% of US cancer cases. There were 596,476 patients diagnosed with NHL. The major subtypes were diffuse large B-cell (32.5%), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; 18.6%), follicular (17.1%), marginal zone (8.3%), mantle cell (4.1%), peripheral T-cell not-otherwise-specified (1.7%), Burkitt (1.6%), hairy cell (1.1%), lymphoplasmacytic (1.1%), and NHL not-otherwise-specified (10.8%). Over the study period, the proportion of NHL not-otherwise-specified declined by half, while marginal zone lymphoma doubled. The distribution of major and rare NHL subtypes varied according to demographics but less so geographically or by type of treatment facility. We noted several novel findings among Hispanics (lower proportion of CLL/SLL, but higher Burkitt lymphoma and nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma), Asians (higher enteropathy-associated T-cell and angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas), Blacks (higher hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma), and Native Americans (similar proportions of CLL/SLL and nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma as Asians). With the exception of peripheral T-cell not-otherwise-specified and hairy cell leukemia, 5-year OS has improved for all the major NHL subtypes. PMID:26096944

  1. A detailed analysis of the leaf rolling mutant sll2 reveals complex nature in regulation of bulliform cell development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, J-J; Wu, S-Y; Jiang, L; Wang, J-L; Zhang, X; Guo, X-P; Wu, C-Y; Wan, J-M

    2015-03-01

    Bulliform cells are large, thin-walled and highly vacuolated cells, and play an important role in controlling leaf rolling in response to drought and high temperature. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating bulliform cell development have not been well documented. Here, we report isolation and characterisation of a rice leaf-rolling mutant, named shallot-like 2 (sll2). The sll2 plants exhibit adaxially rolled leaves, starting from the sixth leaf stage, accompanied by increased photosynthesis and reduced plant height and tiller number. Histological analyses showed shrinkage of bulliform cells, resulting in inward-curved leaves. The mutant is recessive and revertible at a rate of 9%. The leaf rolling is caused by a T-DNA insertion. Cloning of the insertion using TAIL-PCR revealed that the T-DNA was inserted in the promoter region of LOC_Os07 g38664. Unexpectedly, the enhanced expression of LOC_Os07 g38664 by the 35S enhancer in the T-DNA is not responsible for the leaf rolling phenotype. Further, the enhancer also exerted a long-distance effect, including up-regulation of several bulliform cell-related genes. sll2 suppressed the outward leaf rolling of oul1 in the sll2oul1 double mutant. We conclude that leaf rolling in sll2 could be a result of the combined effect of multi-genes, implying a complex network in regulation of bulliform cell development. PMID:25213398

  2. Genetically predicted longer telomere length is associated with increased risk of B-cell lymphoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Machiela, Mitchell J; Lan, Qing; Slager, Susan L; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Teras, Lauren R; Camp, Nicola J; Cerhan, James R; Spinelli, John J; Wang, Sophia S; Nieters, Alexandra; Vijai, Joseph; Yeager, Meredith; Wang, Zhaoming; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Conde, Lucia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Cox, David G; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Giles, Graham G; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D; Kane, Eleanor; Purdue, Mark P; Vajdic, Claire M; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M; Link, Brian K; Novak, Anne J; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A; Ansell, Stephen M; Witzig, Thomas E; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry J; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans-Olov; Roos, Göran; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T; Holly, Elizabeth A; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Tinker, Lesley F; North, Kari E; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J; Villano, Danylo J; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Boeing, Heiner; Tjønneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; De Vivo, Immaculata; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chung, Charles C; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Salles, Gilles; Glenn, Martha; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Curtin, Karen; Wu, Xifeng; Smedby, Karin E; de Sanjose, Silvia; Skibola, Christine F; Berndt, Sonja I; Birmann, Brenda M; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2016-04-15

    Evidence from a small number of studies suggests that longer telomere length measured in peripheral leukocytes is associated with an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). However, these studies may be biased by reverse causation, confounded by unmeasured environmental exposures and might miss time points for which prospective telomere measurement would best reveal a relationship between telomere length and NHL risk. We performed an analysis of genetically inferred telomere length and NHL risk in a study of 10 102 NHL cases of the four most common B-cell histologic types and 9562 controls using a genetic risk score (GRS) comprising nine telomere length-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms. This approach uses existing genotype data and estimates telomere length by weighing the number of telomere length-associated variant alleles an individual carries with the published change in kb of telomere length. The analysis of the telomere length GRS resulted in an association between longer telomere length and increased NHL risk [four B-cell histologic types combined; odds ratio (OR) = 1.49, 95% CI 1.22-1.82,P-value = 8.5 × 10(-5)]. Subtype-specific analyses indicated that chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) was the principal NHL subtype contributing to this association (OR = 2.60, 95% CI 1.93-3.51,P-value = 4.0 × 10(-10)). Significant interactions were observed across strata of sex for CLL/SLL and marginal zone lymphoma subtypes as well as age for the follicular lymphoma subtype. Our results indicate that a genetic background that favors longer telomere length may increase NHL risk, particularly risk of CLL/SLL, and are consistent with earlier studies relating longer telomere length with increased NHL risk. PMID:27008888

  3. [Cutaneous lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Beyeler, M; Burg, G; Dummer, R

    2004-10-01

    Cutaneous lymphomas are uncommon. They must be distinguished from secondary skin manifestations of primary nodal lymphomas. Primary cutaneous lymphomas are divided into B-cell- and T-cell cutaneous lymphoma and commonly have good prognosis. Therapy is based on the stage of the disease. Since cure is not possible, the aim of treatment is to control the disease and reduce symptoms. A variety of new and promising therapeutic modalities have been introduced in recent years. PMID:15349694

  4. Elastic wave speeds and moduli in polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2009-01-01

    We used ultrasonic pulse transmission to measure compressional, P, and shear, S, wave speeds in laboratory-formed polycrystalline ice Ih, si methane hydrate, and sll methane-ethane hydrate. From the wave speed's linear dependence on temperature and pressure and from the sample's calculated density, we derived expressions for bulk, shear, and compressional wave moduli and Poisson's ratio from -20 to 15??C and 22.4 to 32.8 MPa for ice Ih, -20 to 15??C and 30.5 to 97.7 MPa for si methane hydrate, and -20 to 10??C and 30.5 to 91.6 MPa for sll methane-ethane hydrate. All three materials had comparable P and S wave speeds and decreasing shear wave speeds with increasing applied pressure. Each material also showed evidence of rapid intergranular bonding, with a corresponding increase in wave speed, in response to pauses in sample deformation. There were also key differences. Resistance to uniaxial compaction, indicated by the pressure required to compact initially porous samples, was significantly lower for ice Ih than for either hydrate. The ice Ih shear modulus decreased with increasing pressure, in contrast to the increase measured in both hydrates ?? 2009.

  5. Fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma in a lymph node involved with small lymphocytic lymphoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Clinton; Velilla, Rowena; Chaudhary, Humera; Al-Abbadi, Mousa A

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis of two distinct malignant entities existing concurrently and at the same location (synchronous malignancy) by fine- needle aspiration (FNA) is unusual but may occur. Small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL) in particular is associated with an increased incidence of secondary tumor, likely due to associated immunodeficiency. Co-occurrence of some carcinomas such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), may show especially aggressive behavior. A 57-year-old Caucasian male presented with recurrent upper extremity lymphedema and diffuse lymphadenopathy of the axillary and cervical regions. FNA of a large cervical lymph node was diagnostic for both atypical lymphocytic proliferation and SCC. Flow cytometric analysis showed the atypical lymphocytic proliferation to be positive for CD5, CD23, CD19, CD20, HLA-DR, CD38, and the population was kappa light chain restricted. These cells were negative for CD-10 and FMC-7 antigens, suggesting a phenotype of B-cell SLL/CLL. We report a rare occurrence of metastatic SCC to a lymph node infiltrated by SLL/CLL. The diagnosis was achieved by a combination of cytomorphologic examination of FNA smears, immunohistochemical staining of cell block material, and flow cytometry on the sample obtained by FNA. To the best of our knowledge, only three cases of SCC metastasis to SLL/CLL diagnosed by FNA have been reported in the English literature. Though rare, awareness of such a possibility and careful cytological examination under the appropriate clinical conditions is warranted. PMID:18973126

  6. Routine Primary Prophylaxis for Febrile Neutropenia with Biosimilar Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor (Nivestim) or Pegfilgrastim Is Cost Effective in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients undergoing Curative-Intent R-CHOP Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao Jun; Tang, Tiffany; Farid, Mohamad; Quek, Richard; Tao, Miriam; Lim, Soon Thye; Wee, Hwee Lin; Chan, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to compare the cost-effectiveness of various strategies of myeloid growth factor prophylaxis for reducing the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Singapore who are undergoing R-CHOP chemotherapy with curative intent. Methods A Markov model was created to compare seven prophylaxis strategies: 1) primary prophylaxis (PP) with nivestim (biosimilar filgrastim) throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 2) PP with nivestim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 3) secondary prophylaxis (SP) with nivestim; 4) PP with pegfilgrastim throughout all cycles of chemotherapy; 5) PP with pegfilgrastim during the first two cycles of chemotherapy; 6) SP with pegfilgrastim; and 7) no prophylaxis (NP). The perspective of a hospital was taken and cost-effectiveness was expressed as the cost per episode of FN avoided over six cycles of chemotherapy. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted. Results Strategies 3, 6, and 7 were dominated in the base case analysis by strategy 5. The costs associated with strategies 2, 5, 1, and 4 were US$3,813, US$4,056, US$4,545, and US$5,331, respectively. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for strategy 5 vs. strategy 2, strategy 1 vs. strategy 5, and strategy 4 vs. strategy 1 were US$13,532, US$22,565, and US$30,452, respectively, per episode of FN avoided. Strategy 2 has the highest probability to be cost-effective (ranged from 48% to 60%) when the willingness to pay (WTP) threshold is lower than US$10,000 per FN episode prevented. Conclusion In Singapore, routine PP with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (nivestim or pegfilgrastim) is cost-effective for reducing the risk of FN in patients receiving R-CHOP. PMID:26871584

  7. Rituximab extended schedule or retreatment trial for low tumour burden non-follicular indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Protocol E4402.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michael E; Hong, Fangxin; Gascoyne, Randy D; Wagner, Lynne I; Krauss, John C; Habermann, Thomas M; Swinnen, Lode J; Schuster, Stephen J; Peterson, Christopher G; Sborov, Mark D; Martin, S Eric; Weiss, Matthias; Ehmann, W Christopher; Horning, Sandra J; Kahl, Brad S

    2016-06-01

    The rituximab extended schedule or retreatment trial (RESORT; E4402) was a phase 3 randomized prospective trial comparing maintenance rituximab (MR) versus a retreatment (RR) dosing strategy in asymptomatic, low tumour burden indolent lymphoma. A planned exploratory sub-study compared the two strategies for small lymphocytic (SLL) and marginal zone lymphomas (MZL). Patients responding to rituximab weekly × 4 were randomized to MR (single dose rituximab every 3 months until treatment failure) or RR (rituximab weekly × 4) at the time of each progression until treatment failure. The primary endpoint was time to treatment failure (TTTF). Patients with SLL (n = 57), MZL (n = 71) and unclassifiable small B-cell lymphoma (n = 3) received induction rituximab. The overall response rate (ORR) was 40% [95% confidence interval (CI) 31-49%; SLL ORR 22·8%; MZL ORR 52·1%]; all 52 responders were randomized. At a median of 4·3 years from randomization, treatment failure occurred in 18/23 RR and 15/29 MR. The median TTTF was 1·4 years for RR and 4·8 years for MR (P = 0·012); median time to first cytotoxic therapy was 6·3 years for RR and not reached for MR (P = 0·0002). Survival did not differ (P = 0·72). In low tumour burden SLL and MZL patients responding to rituximab induction, MR significantly improved TTTF as compared with RR. PMID:26970533

  8. The Protein Phosphatases of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Open Reading Frames sll1033 and sll1387 Encode Enzymes That Exhibit both Protein-Serine and Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activity In Vitro.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruiliang; Potters, M B.; Shi, Liang; Kennelly, Peter J.

    2005-09-01

    The open reading frames (ORFs) encoding two potential protein-serine/threonine phosphatases from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 were cloned and their protein products expressed in Escherichia coli cells. The product of ORF sll1033, SynPPM3, is a homologue of the PPM family of protein-serine/threonine phosphatases found in all eukaryotes as well as many members of the Bacteria. Surprisingly, the recombinant protein phosphatase dephosphorylated phosphotyrosine- as well as phosphoserine-containing proteins in vitro. While kinetic analyses indicate that the enzyme was more efficient at dephosphorylating the latter, replacement of Asp(608) by asparagine enhanced activity toward a phosphotyrosine-containing protein fourfold. The product of ORF sll1387, SynPPP1, is the sole homolog of the PPP family of protein phosphatases encoded by the genome of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Like many other bacterial PPPs, the enzyme dephosphorylated phosphoserine- and phosphotyrosine-containing proteins with comparable efficiencies. However, while previously described PPPs from prokaryotic organisms required the addition of exogenous metal ion cofactors, such as Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), for activity, recombinantly produced SynPPP1 displayed near-maximal activity in the absence of added metals. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated that recombinant SynPPP1 contained significant quantities, 0.32 to 0.44 mol/mole total, of Mg and Mn. In this respect, the cyanobacterial enzyme resembled eukaryotic members of the PPP family, which are metalloproteins. mRNA encoding SynPPP1 or SynPPM3 could be detected in cells grown under many, but not all, environmental conditions.

  9. Suppressor Mutations in the Study of Photosystem I Biogenesis: sll0088 Is a Previously Unidentified Gene Involved in Reaction Center Accumulation in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianping; Shen, Gaozhong; Wang, Tao; Bryant, Donald A.; Golbeck, John H.; McIntosh, Lee

    2003-01-01

    In previous work, some members of our group isolated mutant strains of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in which point mutations had been inserted into the psaC gene to alter the cysteine residues to the FA and FB iron-sulfur clusters in the PsaC subunit of photosystem I (J. P. Yu, I. R. Vassiliev, Y. S. Jung, J. H. Golbeck, and L. McIntosh, J. Biol. Chem. 272:8032-8039, 1997). These mutant strains did not grow photoautotrophically due to suppressed levels of chlorophyll a and photosystem I. In the results described here, we show that suppressor mutations produced strains that are capable of photoautotrophic growth at moderate light intensity (20 μmol m−2 s−1). Two separate suppressor strains of C14SPsaC, termed C14SPsaC-R62 and C14SPsaC-R18, were studied and found to have mutations in a previously uncharacterized open reading frame of the Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 genome named sll0088. C14SPsaC-R62 was found to substitute Pro for Arg at residue 161 as the result of a G482→C change in sll0088, and C14SPsaC-R18 was found to have a three-amino-acid insertion of Gly-Tyr-Phe following Cys231 as the result of a TGGTTATTT duplication at T690 in sll0088. These suppressor strains showed near-wild-type levels of chlorophyll a and photosystem I, yet the serine oxygen ligand to FB was retained as shown by the retention of the S ≥ 3/2 spin state of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. The inactivation of sll0088 by insertion of a kanamycin resistance cartridge in the primary C14SPsaC mutant produced an engineered suppressor strain capable of photoautotrophic growth. There was no difference in psaC gene expression or in the amount of PsaC protein assembled in thylakoids between the wild type and an sll0088 deletion mutant. The sll0088 gene encodes a protein predicted to be a transcriptional regulator with sequence similarities to transcription factors in other prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, including Arabidopsis thaliana. The protein contains a typical helix

  10. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  11. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. Patients who have a weakened immune system are at high risk of primary lymphoma of the ...

  12. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  13. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... is closely associated with the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ), the main cause of infectious mononucleosis . The North ... form of Burkitt lymphoma is not linked to EBV. People with HIV have an increased risk for ...

  14. Canine lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    Canine lymphoma has served as the ''workhorse'' for the development of veterinary oncology and as an important animal model for human non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Significant advances have been achieved in understanding the biological behavior of the disease and in its treatment. Although it is unlikely that a cure for lymphoma will be achieved, owners should be encouraged to treat their pets, provided they understand that only prolonged remissions and survivals are likely to result. Cooperative studies, employing large numbers of dogs, are needed to optimize and refine the classification scheme to provide a system with diagnostic and prognostic correlates and derive maximum benefit from therapeutic regimens. Such studies need to be prospective in nature, with a solid statistical base incorporated into their design. Rather than being content with what we have accomplished to date in treatment of canine lymphoma, the opportunity exists for the veterinary profession to make further significant contributions to the understanding and treatment of lymphoma in the dog. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 8,500 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.5% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 193,545 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma in ...

  16. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system . The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system. ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  17. Primary Gastro Intestinal Lymphoma Presenting as Perforation Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Chandrashekar Shastry; Jackaya, Reuben Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is very rare compared to gastrointestinal tract lymphoma arising Secondary to Primary nodal disease. Extra nodal lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, most commonly being the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. They are indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions and clinically non-specific. Here, we have an interesting case where a patient presented with peritonitis and was found to have a perforated swelling in jejunum. Subsequently resection and anastomosis was done. Biopsy showed lymphoma. Patient was evaluated further by doing CECT of abdomen and thorax, which didn’t show any other site of lymphadenopathy. Patient improved with chemotherapy and is on regular follow up. Perforation in patient undergoing treatment for lymphoma are common but presentation of primary gastrointestinal lymphoma as perforation is rare and needs proper evaluation and management. PMID:27134938

  18. Endobronchial recurrence of gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Charles R; VanAsselberg, Chad B; Cook-Glen, Celeste L; Bhagat, Rajesh; Abraham, George E

    2012-10-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a diagnostic challenge when arising from bronchiolar submucosal tissue. The case herein describes a man with a lung mass and a remote history of gastric MALT lymphoma. After undergoing a bronchoscopic examination and tissue sampling, he was diagnosed with pulmonary recurrence of gastric MALT lymphoma. The diagnosis of MALT lymphoma in the lung can be challenging. Radiographic findings are typically nonspecific, and tissue biopsy by surgical means is often required. The diagnosis of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been previously demonstrated bronchoscopically when a needle aspiration is performed. This case supports the position that bronchoscopy with needle aspiration, and flow cytometry should be performed in all patients in whom pulmonary MALT lymphoma is suspected. PMID:23207539

  19. Relationship between ambient ultraviolet radiation and non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes: a U.S. population-based study of racial and ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Wheeler, David C; Arhancet, Juan; Lin, Shih-Wen; Alexander, Bruce H; Linet, Martha S; Freedman, D Michal

    2015-03-01

    Associations between ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have been inconsistent, but few studies have examined these associations for specific subtypes or across race/ethnicities. We evaluated the relationship between ambient UVR exposure and subtype-specific NHL incidence for whites, Hispanics and blacks in the United States for years 2001-2010 (n = 187,778 cases). Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for UVR quintiles using Poisson regression. Incidence was lower for the highest UVR quintile for chronic/small lymphocytic/leukemia (CLL/SLL) (IRR = 0.87, 95% CI: 0.77-0.97), mantle cell (IRR = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.69-0.97), lymphoplasmacytic (IRR = 0.58, 95% CI: 0.42-0.80), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MZLMALT) (IRR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60-0.90), follicular (FL) (IRR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.68-0.86), diffuse large B-cell (IRR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.76-0.94;), peripheral T-cell other (PTCL) (IRR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.61-0.95) and PTCL not otherwise specified (PNOS) (IRR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.61-0.98). Trends were significant for MZLMALT, FL, DLBCL, BNOS and PTCL, with FL and DLBCL still significant after Bonferroni correction. We found interaction by race/ethnicity for CLL/SLL, FL, Burkitt, PNOS and MF/SS, with CLL/SLL and FL still significant after Bonferroni correction. Some B-cell lymphomas (CLL/SLL, FL and Burkitt) suggested significant inverse relationships in whites and Hispanics, but not in blacks. Some T-cell lymphomas suggested the most reduced risk for the highest quintile of UVR among blacks (PNOS and MF/SS), though trends were not significant. These findings strengthen the case for an inverse association of UVR exposure, support modest heterogeneity between NHL subtypes and suggest some differences by race/ethnicity. PMID:25258118

  20. INFLUENCE OF AGE AND HISTOLOGY ON OUTCOME IN ADULT NON-HODGKIN’S LYMPHOMA PATIENTS UNDERGOING AUTOLOGOUS HCT: A REPORT FROM THE CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL BLOOD & MARROW TRANSPLANT RESEARCH (CIBMTR)

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Hillard M.; Carreras, Jeanette; Boudreau, Christian; Loberiza, Fausto R.; Armitage, James O.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Hale, Gregory A.; Inwards, David J.; LeMaistre, Charles F.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Marks, David I.; Miller, Alan M.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Schouten, Harry C.; van Besien, Koen; Vose, Julie M.; Bitran, Jacob D.; Khouri, Issa F.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Yu, Hongmei; Rowlings, Philip; Serna, Derek S.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Rizzo, J. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    To compare the clinical outcomes of older (age ≥ 55 years) non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) patients with younger NHL patients (< 55 years) receiving autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) while adjusting for patient-, disease-, and treatment-related variables. We compared autologous HCT outcomes in 805 NHL patients age ≥ 55 years to 1,949 NHL patients < 55 years during the years 1990–2000 using data reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). In multivariate analysis, older patients with aggressive histologies were 1.86 times [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43–2.43, p<0.001] more likely than younger patients to experience treatment-related mortality. Relative death risks were 1.33 times (CI 1.04–1.71, p=0.024) and 1.50 times (CI 1.33–169, p<0.001) higher in older compared to younger patients with follicular grade I/II and aggressive histologies, respectively. Autologous HCT in older NHL patients is feasible but most disease-related outcomes are statistically inferior to younger patients. Studies addressing supportive care particular to older patients who are most likely to benefit from this approach are recommended. PMID:19041053

  1. Nodular amyloidoma and primary pulmonary lymphoma with amyloid production: a differential diagnostic problem.

    PubMed

    Dacic, S; Colby, T V; Yousem, S A

    2000-09-01

    Nodular amyloidomas (NA) of the lung are non-neoplastic inflammatory nodules containing eosinophilic amyloid deposits and a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. In some instances, the extensive amyloid deposits may obscure an underlying lymphoproliferative disorder. The histologic and immunohistologic features that discriminate these two differential diagnostic possibilities were studied in this series of six cases of NA and five cases of primary low-grade malignant lymphomas of lung with secondary amyloid deposits (ML). Two of lymphoma cases showed histopathologic and immunophenotypic features of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (B-cell CLL/SLL), and three cases were low-grade B-cell lymphoma derived from mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Key discriminating morphologic features between NA and ML included lymphatic tracking of the cellular infiltrate (3/5 ML; 1/6 NA), pleural infiltration (3/5 ML; 0/6 NA), sheet-like masses of plasma cells (5/5 ML; 0/6 NA) and reactive follicles (4/5 ML; 1/6 NA). Lesional circumscription, vascular and bronchial destruction, lymphoepithelial lesions, and granulomas were not helpful discriminators. Immunohistochemical features indicating a dominant CD20+, CD79a+ B-cell population (5/5 ML; 0/6 NA), light chain restriction (4/5 ML; 0/6 NA), and aberrant antigen expression of CD20/CD43 (2/5 ML; 0/6 NA) were helpful. Amyloid tumors with a reactive lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate can be separated from low-grade malignant lymphomas utilizing both histologic and immunohistochemical features. PMID:11007032

  2. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. PMID:27265605

  3. Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... called primary cutaneous ALCL and follows a less aggressive course. In almost all cases of primary cutaneous ... kinase (ALK). While both lymphomas are treated as aggressive lymphomas, the prognosis for ALCL depends on whether ...

  4. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chicago Medicine Supported through grants from: ©2013 Lymphoma Research Foundation Getting the Facts is published by the Lymphoma Research Foundation (LRF) for the purpose of informing and educating ...

  5. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  6. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium

    Cancer.gov

    The InterLymph Consortium, or formally the International Consortium of Investigators Working on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Epidemiologic Studies, is an open scientific forum for epidemiologic research in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  7. Radioimmunotherapy consolidation using (131)I-tositumomab for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma in first remission.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Mazyar; Gopal, Ajay K; Kammerer, Britt; Becker, Pamela S; Maloney, David G; Pender, Barbara; Shustov, Andrei R; Press, Oliver W; Pagel, John M

    2016-03-01

    Despite initial responses to chemoimmunotherapy, relapse and minimal residual disease (MRD) remain major issues in treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)/small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) patients. We administered (131)I-tositumomab to patients in complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) after induction chemotherapy. Toxicities and rate of PR to CR conversion and MRD elimination were assessed three months later. The study stopped prematurely after enrolling 16 patients. Four (25%) were in CR, 12 (75%) in PR, and 12 (75%) had MRD. Three months after treatment with (131)I-tositumomab, CR was achieved (n = 8; 50%) or sustained (n = 4; 25%) in 12 patients and MRD was eliminated in four of 12 patients (33%). Hematologic toxicities were anemia in one patient (6%), neutropenia in 13 (81%), and thrombocytopenia in eight (50%). Two patients (12%) developed MDS 17 and 20 months after consolidation. Consolidation with (131)I-tositumomab for CLL/SLL patients in first remission is feasible and may provide the benefit of converting PR to CR and/or eliminating MRD. PMID:26133724

  8. Pathology of Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Heckendorn, Emily; Auerbach, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    An overview of the pathology of extranodal lymphoma is presented. The emphasis of this presentation is on the classification system of extranodal lymphomas, including both B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, based on their morphology, phenotype, and molecular alterations. PMID:27265600

  9. Pegfilgrastim and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Untreated, Relapsed, or Refractory Follicular Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-20

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  10. AT13387 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, or Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  11. Burkitt lymphoma is molecularly distinct from other lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have uncovered a number of molecular signatures in Burkitt lymphoma, including unique genetic alterations that promote cell survival, that are not found in other lymphomas. These findings provide the first genetic evidence that Burkitt lymphoma

  12. Genetic aberrations in small B-cell lymphomas and leukemias: molecular pathology, clinical relevance and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Bogusz, Agata M; Bagg, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Small B-cell lymphomas and leukemias (SBCLs) are a clinically, morphologically, immunophenotypically and genetically heterogeneous group of clonal lymphoid neoplasms, including entities such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL), marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) and hairy cell leukemia (HCL). The pathogenesis of some of these lymphoid malignancies is characterized by distinct translocations, for example t(11;14) in the majority of cases of MCL and t(14;18) in most cases of FL, whereas other entities are associated with a variety of recurrent but nonspecific numeric chromosomal abnormalities, as exemplified by del(13q14), del(11q22), and +12 in CLL, and yet others such as LPL and HCL that lack recurrent or specific cytogenetic aberrations. The recent surge in next generation sequencing (NGS) technology has shed more light on the genetic landscape of SBCLs through characterization of numerous driver mutations including SF3B1 and NOTCH1 in CLL, ATM and CCND1 in MCL, KMT2D and EPHA7 in FL, MYD88 (L265P) in LPL, KLF2 and NOTCH2 in splenic MZL (SMZL) and BRAF (V600E) in HCL. The identification of distinct genetic lesions not only provides greater insight into the molecular pathogenesis of these disorders but also identifies potential valuable biomarkers for prognostic stratification, as well as specific targets for directed therapy. This review discusses the well-established and recently identified molecular lesions underlying the pathogenesis of SBCLs, highlights their clinical relevance and summarizes novel targeted therapies. PMID:27121112

  13. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists cancer ... in Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin) Ambochlorin ( ...

  14. Lymphoma in acquired generalized lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rebecca J; Chan, Jean L; Jaffe, Elaine S; Cochran, Elaine; DePaoli, Alex M; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Goujard, Cecile; Vigouroux, Corinne; Gorden, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Acquired generalized lipodystrophy (AGL) is a rare disease thought to result from autoimmune destruction of adipose tissue. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) has been reported in two AGL patients. We report five additional cases of lymphoma in AGL, and analyze the role of underlying autoimmunity and recombinant human leptin (metreleptin) replacement in lymphoma development. Three patients developed lymphoma during metreleptin treatment (two PTCL and one ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma), and two developed lymphomas (mycosis fungoides and Burkitt lymphoma) without metreleptin. AGL is associated with high risk for lymphoma, especially PTCL. Autoimmunity likely contributes to this risk. Lymphoma developed with or without metreleptin, suggesting metreleptin does not directly cause lymphoma development; a theoretical role of metreleptin in lymphoma progression remains possible. For most patients with AGL and severe metabolic complications, the proven benefits of metreleptin on metabolic disease will likely outweigh theoretical risks of metreleptin in lymphoma development or progression. PMID:25864863

  15. Discovery and Management of Diaphragmatic Hernia Related to Abandoned Epicardial Pacemaker Wires in a Pregnant Woman with {S,L,L} Transposition of the Great Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Craig C.; Valente, Anne M.; Economy, Katherine E.; Hoffman-Sage, Yael; Bevilacqua, Laura M.; Podovei, Mihaela; Opotowsky, Alexander R.

    2012-01-01

    Epicardial pacemaker leads placed during childhood are often not removed when transvenous systems are placed later in life. The risk of complications related to retained pacemaker leads and generators is not clear but is generally considered low. We report the case of a 23-year-old pregnant woman who presented with left upper quadrant pain at 20 weeks gestation. The patient was born with {S,L,L} transposition of the great arteries and had high-grade conduction disease in infancy compelling epicardial pacemaker placement. A standard transvenous pacemaker was placed at age 9 years, without removal of the epicardial system. The patient’s abdominal pain was attributed to herniation of abdominal contents through a diaphragmatic defect at the site of the abandoned epicardial pacing wire. Her pain improved spontaneously but worsened later in pregnancy leading to repair of the diaphragmatic hernia via anterolateral thoracotomy at 30 weeks gestation. The procedure was well tolerated by mother and fetus. At 38 3/7 weeks gestation, the patient underwent uneventful delivery by cesarean section for breech presentation. This case illustrates the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration in the care of women with congenital heart disease. PMID:21718459

  16. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  17. Primary Musculoskeletal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Mark D; Kransdorf, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Primary lymphoma of bone and soft tissue is rare and almost invariably of B-cell origin. Osseous lymphoma usually reveals aggressive bone destruction and associated soft tissue extension. Soft tissue involvement is optimally depicted by MR imaging. Cortical destruction allowing communication between the intraosseous and soft tissue components may be subtle with small striations of extension. Lymphoma of the deep soft tissues usually reveals long cones of intramuscular or intermuscular tumor again best depicted by MR imaging. Cutaneous or subcutaneous lymphoma demonstrates multiple nodules and plaquelike thickening. PMID:27265608

  18. Lymphoma Microenvironment and Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mina L; Fedoriw, Yuri

    2016-03-01

    Understanding of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment is poised to expand in the era of next-generation sequencing studies of the tumor cells themselves. Successful therapies of the future will rely on deeper appreciation of the interactions between elements of the microenvironment. Although the phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of tumor cells in lymphomas has progressed faster than most other solid organ tumors, concrete advancements in understanding the lymphoma microenvironment have been fewer. This article explores the composition of the lymphoma tumor microenvironment; its role in immune surveillance, evasion, and drug resistance; and its potential role in the development of targeted therapies. PMID:26940270

  19. Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Genetics of follicular lymphoma transformation

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualucci, Laura; Khiabanian, Hossein; Fangazio, Marco; Vasishtha, Mansi; Messina, Monica; Holmes, Antony B.; Ouillette, Peter; Trifonov, Vladimir; Rossi, Davide; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Chadburn, Amy; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Bhagat, Govind; Gaidano, Gianluca; Inghirami, Giorgio; Malek, Sami N.; Rabadan, Raul; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent disease, but 30-40% of cases undergo histologic transformation to an aggressive malignancy, typically represented by diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The pathogenesis of this process remains largely unknown. Using whole-exome sequencing and copy-number analysis, here we show that the dominant clone of FL and transformed FL (tFL) arise by divergent evolution from a common mutated precursor through the acquisition of distinct genetic events. Mutations in epigenetic modifiers and anti-apoptotic genes are introduced early in the common precursor, while tFL is specifically associated with alterations deregulating cell-cycle progression and DNA-damage responses (CDKN2A/B, MYC, TP53), as well as with aberrant somatic hypermutation. The genomic profile of tFL shares similarities with that of germinal center B-cell-type de novo DLBCL, but also displays unique combinations of altered genes, with diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:24388756

  1. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    DOEpatents

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  2. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  3. Angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, D; Berti, E

    2015-02-01

    Under the generic diagnosis of angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas are included several subtypes of lymphomas histopathologically characterized either by the predominantly endovascular-endoluminal presence of neoplastic lymphocytes of B-T or NK/T cell origin, or by a pathologic process centered around a blood vessels secondarily infiltrated and invaded by the spreading infiltrate. This group of lymphoproliferative disorders is heterogeneous regarding phenotype, but they share common features that are multiorgan involvement, worse prognosis, and, frequently Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) genomic integration. At onset, some of these rare lymphomas, e.g. intravascular large cell lymphoma or lymphomatoid granulomatosis (Liebow dieases), are misdiagnosed as inflammatory diseases. The actual treatments of these disorders are based upon chemotherapy and/or chemotherapy plus bone marrow transplantation with variable results. Therapeutic approaches for EBV related angiocentric and intravascular lymphomas, similarly to those employed for other viral induced lymphoproliferative disease would comprise the employment of chemotherapy together with drugs able to interfere with viral infection. Such an approach has been used in rare cases of EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly, a lymphoproliferative disorders which development is linked to immunosuppression due to senescence. The present review will focus on intravascular and angiocentric lymphomas providing histopathologic, immunophenotypical and molecular data useful to overcome to a specific diagnosis and to differentiate them from other lymphoproliferative disorders showing a secondary vascular engulfment and infiltration and some vasculitides showing overlapping histopathologic features. PMID:25531150

  4. Genetic Susceptibility to Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Skibola, Christine F.; Curry, John D.; Nieters, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genetic susceptibility studies of lymphoma may serve to identify at risk populations and to elucidate important disease mechanisms. METHODS This review considered all studies published through October 2006 on the contribution of genetic polymorphisms in the risk of lymphoma. RESULTS Numerous studies implicate the role of genetic variants that promote B-cell survival and growth with increased risk of lymphoma. Several reports including a large pooled study by InterLymph, an international consortium of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) case-control studies, found positive associations between variant alleles in TNF -308G>A and IL10 -3575T>A genes and risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Four studies reported positive associations between a GSTT1 deletion and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Genetic studies of folate-metabolizing genes implicate folate in NHL risk, but further studies that include folate and alcohol assessments are needed. Links between NHL and genes involved in energy regulation and hormone production and metabolism may provide insights into novel mechanisms implicating neuro- and endocrine-immune cross-talk with lymphomagenesis, but will need replication in larger populations. CONCLUSIONS Numerous studies suggest that common genetic variants with low penetrance influence lymphoma risk, though replication studies will be needed to eliminate false positive associations. PMID:17606447

  5. Bilateral ovarian Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-García, L; Medina Ramos, N; García Rodríguez, R; Barber, M A; Arias, M D; García, J A

    2009-01-01

    Primary ovarian lymphoma is a rare entity. We submit a case of a 34-year-old black patient presenting with a bilateral adnexal tumor. She underwent hysterectomy with double salpingo-oophorectomy followed by polychemotherapy treatment. Histology confirmed Epstein-Barr virus-positive bilateral Burkitt's lymphoma. The patient died from septic shock after a month of treatment. Endemic Burkitt's lymphoma has a predilection for the female genital tract, manifesting itself clinically as a pelvic mass and less frequently as a menstrual disorder. It is a rare entity in our environment but should be kept in mind when treating patients of African origin. PMID:19480266

  6. Pathological characteristics of oral lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, N; Kurihara, K

    1982-06-01

    Nine cases of oral extranodal lymphomas are described. Histologically, 6 cases were histiocytic, 2 lymphocytic and 1 Burkitt's lymphoma. According to the criteria of the Japanese Lymphoma Study Group, 8 cases seemingly belonged to the B-cell lymphoma classification, and one was unclassified. Geographical differences in the distribution of oral extranodal lymphomas between Japan and western countries were surveyed. A review of our cases and those in the literature revealed no significant difference in sex, age, frequency of B-cell lymphomas or site of predilection. In Japan, histiocytic lymphomas were the most common type of extranodal oral lymphomas. The most prevalent type of oral extranodal lymphomas in western countries could not be determined from the literature. PMID:6808100

  7. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following treatment. Occasionally, cancer may return, and follow-up appointments with your cancer specialist can help you catch it early if it does. Your doctor will also watch for any late side effects of your treatment. After Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  8. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... The cancer may be low grade (slow growing), intermediate grade, or high grade (fast growing). NHL is ... Accessed March 2, 2015. National Cancer Institute: PDQ Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer ...

  9. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Narula, Ritesh; Honavar, Santosh G

    2015-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL) is an uncommon, but potentially fatal intraocular malignancy, which may occur with or without primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Considered to be a subset of PCNSL, it is mostly of diffuse large B-cell type. The diagnosis of PVRL poses a challenge not only to the clinician, but also to the pathologist. Despite aggressive treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, relapses or CNS involvement are common. PMID:25971162

  10. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  11. Primary Lymphoma of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun Yong; Hahn, Jee Sook; Suh, Chang Ok; Yang, Woo Ick

    2002-01-01

    Background: Primary lymphoma of bone is a rare disease. There is yet no systematical evaluation of primary lymphoma of bone in Korea. Here we report our experience of sixteen cases with primary lymphoma of bone focusing on the survival. Methods: Sixteen cases, collected for 13 years, were evaluated on the clinical presentation, histologic subtype, stage and treatment outcomes of the primary bone lymphoma. Results: The most common presenting complaint was bone pain. Malignant lymphoma of bone involved a wide variety of sites, the most prevalent site of which in this study was the spine. Most of the cases were in the diffuse large B-cell category. The clinical stage of lymphoma was IEA in two cases, IIEA in three cases, IVEA in five cases and IVEB in three cases. All treated cases received systemic chemotherapy and ten cases among them were treated with combined modality therapy. Median overall survival was not reached after median follow-up period of 28 months and five-year overall survival rate was 54%. Conclusion: More promising therapeutic strategies are needed for survival improvement on more accumulated cases. PMID:12298430

  12. HIV infection and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, K L; Miller, R F; Dogan, A

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein–Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV‐positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved. PMID:18042692

  13. Risk factors for developing infusion reaction after rituximab administration in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tachi, T; Yasuda, M; Usui, K; Umeda, M; Nagaya, K; Osawa, T; Ichihashi, A; Noguchi, Y; Goto, H; Kasahara, S; Takahashi, T; Goto, C; Teramachi, H

    2015-10-01

    Rituximab (RTX), a monoclonal antibody against CD20, is known to cause fewer side effects than conventional anti-cancer drugs; however, infusion reaction (IR), which is specific to monoclonal antibody therapy, is frequently triggered by RTX. Therefore, we designed this study to identify risk factors based on clinical test values for developing IR after RTX administration. Eighty-nine patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who had received RTX for the first time between February 2010 and March 2013, at the Gifu Municipal Hospital were enrolled as subjects. Analysis of data was conducted for 87 patients, after excluding patients whose data were missing. Univariate analysis showed significant differences in the number of patients exhibiting a soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sLL-2R) level > 2,000 U/L and hemoglobin (Hb) < lower standard limit (LSL) between the IR and non-IR groups. Multivariate analysis showed significant differences with respect to slL-2R > 2,000 U/L [odds ratio (OR), 4.463; 95% confidence interval (Cl), 1.262-15.779; P = 0.020], Hb < LSL [OR, 3.568; 95% CI, 1.071-11.890; P = 0.038], and steroid administration [OR, 0.284; 95% Cl, 0.094-0.852; P = 0.025]. Our findings show that sIL-2R > 2,000 U/L, Hb < LSL, and a lack of steroid premedication are risk factors for developing IR following RTX treatment. PMID:26601425

  14. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma,; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  16. Obatoclax and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Aggressive Relapsed or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  17. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. Ophthalmic lymphoma: epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sjö, Lene Dissing

    2009-02-01

    With a lifetime risk of 1% and 700 new cases per year, Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the seventh most frequent type of cancer in Denmark. The incidence of NHL has increased considerably in Western countries over the last decades; consequently, NHL is an increasing clinical problem. Ophthalmic lymphoma, (lymphoma localized in the ocular region, i.e. eyelid, conjunctiva, lacrimal sac, lacrimal gland, orbit, or intraocularly) is relatively uncommon, accounting for 5%-10% of all extranodal lymphomas. It is, however, the most common orbital malignancy. The purpose of this thesis was to review specimens from all Danish patients with a diagnosis of ophthalmic lymphoma during the period 1980-2005, in order to determine the distribution of lymphoma subtypes, and the incidence- and time trends in incidence for ophthalmic lymphoma. Furthermore, an extended analysis of the most frequent subtype, extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MALT lymphoma), was done to analyse clinical factors and cytogenetic changes with influence on prognosis. A total of 228 Danish patients with a biopsy-reviewed verified diagnosis of ocular adnexal-, orbital-, or intraocular lymphoma were identified. We found that more than 50% of orbital- and ocular adnexal lymphomas were of the MALT lymphoma subtype, whereas diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) predominated intraocularly (Sjo et al. 2008a). Furthermore, lymphoma arising in the lacrimal sac was surprisingly predominantly DLBCL (Sjo et al. 2006). Incidence rates were highly dependent on patient age. There was an increase in incidence rates for the whole population from 1980 to 2005, corresponding to an annual average increase of 3.4% (Sjo et al. 2008a). MALT lymphoma arising in the ocular region was found in 116 patients (Sjo et al. 2008b). One third of patients had a relapse or progression of disease after initial therapy and relapses were frequently found at extra-ocular sites. Overall survival, however, was not significantly poorer for patients

  19. Radiation therapy for orbital lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Ping . E-mail: pzhou@partners.org; Ng, Andrea K.; Silver, Barbara; Li Sigui; Hua Ling; Mauch, Peter M.

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation techniques and evaluate outcomes for orbital lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients (and 62 eyes) with orbital lymphoma treated with radiotherapy between 1987 and 2003 were included. The majority had mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (48%) or follicular (30%) lymphoma. Seventeen patients had prior lymphoma at other sites, and 29 had primary orbital lymphoma. Median follow-up was 46 months. Results: The median dose was 30.6 Gy; one-third received <30 Gy. Electrons were used in 9 eyes with disease confined to the conjunctiva or eyelid, and photons in 53 eyes with involvement of intraorbital tissues to cover entire orbit. Local control rate was 98% for all patients and 100% for those with indolent lymphoma. Three of the 26 patients with localized primary lymphoma failed distantly, resulting in a 5-year freedom-from-distant-relapse rate of 89%. The 5-year disease-specific and overall survival rates were 95% and 88%, respectively. Late toxicity was mainly cataract formation in patients who received radiation without lens block. Conclusions A dose of 30 Gy is sufficient for indolent orbital lymphoma. Distant relapse rate in patients with localized orbital lymphoma was lower than that reported for low-grade lymphoma presenting in other sites. Orbital radiotherapy can be used for salvage of recurrent indolent lymphoma.

  20. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Follicular Lymphoma Diagnosed With Medical Thoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sumera R; Lee, Paul J; Ghasemi, Mitra; Sosa, Andres F

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas may present with a recurrent pleural effusion, usually with involvement of other thoracic or extrathoracic sites. Lymphomas typically presenting with pleural disease include primary effusion lymphoma and pyothorax-associated lymphoma. We describe an unusual case of recurrent pleural effusion secondary to follicular lymphoma with no other known extrathoracic involvement at the time of diagnosis. PMID:26496088

  2. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 72,580 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 20,150 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 569,536 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  3. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  4. Occupation and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma and Its Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis from the InterLymph Consortium

    PubMed Central

    ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Boffetta, Paolo; Vermeulen, Roel; Benke, Geza; Fritschi, Lin; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadié, Marc; Becker, Nikolaus; Nieters, Alexandra; Staines, Anthony; Campagna, Marcello; Chiu, Brian; Clavel, Jacqueline; de Sanjose, Silvia; Hartge, Patricia; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Bracci, Paige; Linet, Martha S.; Monnereau, Alain; Orsi, Laurent; Purdue, Mark P.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing; Kane, Eleanor; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Miligi, Lucia; Spinelli, John J.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cocco, Pierluigi; Kricker, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Background: Various occupations have been associated with an elevated risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but results have been inconsistent across studies. Objectives: We investigated occupational risk of NHL and of four common NHL subtypes with particular focus on occupations of a priori interest. Methods: We conducted a pooled analysis of 10,046 cases and 12,025 controls from 10 NHL studies participating in the InterLymph Consortium. We harmonized the occupational coding using the 1968 International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO-1968) and grouped occupations previously associated with NHL into 25 a priori groups. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for center, age, and sex were determined for NHL overall and for the following four subtypes: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), and peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). Results: We confirmed previously reported positive associations between NHL and farming occupations [field crop/vegetable farm workers OR = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05, 1.51; general farm workers OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.37]; we also confirmed associations of NHL with specific occupations such as women’s hairdressers (OR = 1.34; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.74), charworkers/cleaners (OR = 1.17; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.36), spray-painters (OR = 2.07; 95% CI: 1.30, 3.29), electrical wiremen (OR = 1.24; 95% CI: 1.00, 1.54), and carpenters (OR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.93). We observed subtype-specific associations for DLBCL and CLL/SLL in women’s hairdressers and for DLBCL and PTCL in textile workers. Conclusions: Our pooled analysis of 10 international studies adds to evidence suggesting that farming, hairdressing, and textile industry–related exposures may contribute to NHL risk. Associations with women’s hairdresser and textile occupations may be specific for certain NHL subtypes. Citation: ‘t Mannetje A, De Roos AJ, Boffetta P, Vermeulen R, Benke G

  5. Pathogenesis of AIDS lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Herndier, B G; Kaplan, L D; McGrath, M S

    1994-08-01

    The AIDS-associated lymphomas represent a heterogeneous set of disease processes. The largest histologic subset of lymphomas is the large-cell lymphomas, which represent a spectrum of disease processes ranging from monomorphic monoclonal B-cell proliferations to very polymorphic and polyclonal mixtures of B cells, T cells and macrophages. The next most frequent class of systemic lymphoma are the small non-cleaved cell or Burkitt's-like lymphomas. These are relatively monomorphic, monoclonal malignant B-cell proliferations. The final subset of lymphomas, which are likely to become more common as the AIDS epidemic progresses, are the primary CNS lymphomas, which are expansions of EBV-immortalized B cells. The high incidence of tumor-associated EBV in the CNS lymphomas makes these lesions somewhat analogous to an opportunistic EBV infection. In HIV disease there is a long lag after infection before the appearance of clinical manifestations of impaired T-cell immunity. During this period, both appropriate B-cell proliferation in response to antigen (including the ubiquitous HIV) and abnormal B-cell proliferation (autoimmune, dysregulated) occur as the follicular architecture is disrupted by the virus and potential APC are exposed and/or infected with HIV. The destruction of FDC or the involution of their processes could interfere with the elimination by apoptosis of low-avidity B-cell clones. Antigen-competent B cells with pre-existing chromosomal translocations such as the t(8;14) (c-myc, IgH) would have a selective growth advantage in this setting. Figure 9 shows a schematic representation of prelymphomatous and lymphomagenic events as they are projected to occur. A similar pathogenetic scheme has been postulated for follicular B-cell lymphomas: PCR studies have demonstrated that a pool of t(14;18) (IgH;bcl-2) B-cells are present in lymph nodes featuring follicular hyperplasia. In response to antigen (the evidence favoring antigen drive is extensive hypersomatic

  6. Primary intracranial lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mufti, Shagufta T.; Baeesa, Saleh S.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL), a rare form of aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), has increased in incidence during the last three decades and occurs in both immune compromised and immune competent hosts. It has an overall poor prognosis. Objective: This study attempts to further delineate the clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological profile of PCNSL at Jeddah to King Faisal Hospital and Research Center. Methods: Computerized search through the archives of King Faisal Hospital and Research Centre between July 2000- December 2012 identified 15 patients with pathologically confirmed PCNSL. These were analyzed retrospectively. Their clinico-pathological, immunohistochemical and radiological data were analyzed. Results: Of the 15 PCNSL patients, 8 (53.3%) were females and 7 (46.6%) were males. There was female predilection especially in the age group of 40-59 years. Mean age at diagnosis for all patients was 50.4 years. There was no patient in the pediatric age group. The most common location in the brain was the frontal region in 7 patients (46.6%), 7 (46.6%) had multiple intracranial masses; all 15 (100%) were Non Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, among which 13 (86.6%) were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. All 15 (100%) cases showed diffuse and strong positivity for CD 45, and CD 20. Fourteen patients were immune competent while one was immune compromised. Conclusions: PCNSL often occurs in middle-aged and aged patients. There is female predilection especially in the middle age. Frontal region is the most common location with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma being the predominant subtype. PMID:27366250

  7. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Adcetris ( ...

  8. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Ph I/II Study of Subcutaneously Administered Veltuzumab (hA20) in NHL and CLL

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-25

    NHL; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphoma, B-Cell; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Intermediate-Grade; Lymphoma, Large-Cell; Lymphoma, Low-Grade; Lymphoma, Mixed-Cell; Lymphoma, Small-Cell; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, B-Cell, Chronic; Leukemia, Prolymphocytic; Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic; Lymphoma, Small Lymphocytic; Lymphoma, Lymphoplasmacytoid, CLL; Lymphoplasmacytoid Lymphoma, CLL; CLL; SLL

  10. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  11. Follicular lymphoma of the submandibular salivary gland

    PubMed Central

    Shashidara, R.; Prasad, Priyanka R.; Jaishankar; Joseph, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Lymphomas are neoplastic diseases of lymph nodes. Lymphoma of the salivary gland is rare accounting for less than 5% of lymphomas overall. Furthermore, lymphomas arising in the submandibular gland are reported to comprise 916% of all salivary gland lymphomas. Among lymphomas originating from salivary glands, the ratio of follicular lymphoma is very low. They can also be seen in the lymph nodes of the salivary glands which is an uncommon presentation. Here, we present a case follicular lymphoma which presented as a salivary gland tumour. PMID:25364171

  12. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  13. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ≥ 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  14. Ixazomib Citrate and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Indolent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  15. Imaging of Extranodal Genitourinary Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rohena-Quinquilla, Iván R; Lattin, Grant E; Wolfman, Darcy

    2016-07-01

    The genitourinary (GU) system is commonly affected by disseminated lymphoma. Rarely, lymphoma can originate from and remain localized to one of the GU organs and thus presents as primary extranodal disease. Up to 40% of lymphomas present as extranodal disease, with only 3% having the GU system as the primary site of involvement. This article describes and correlates the radiologic and pathologic features of extranodal lymphomatous disease affecting the GU system with specific focus on the kidneys, adrenal glands, testicles, and ovaries. Lymphoma of the uterine body and cervix, external female genitalia, urinary bladder, and prostate gland is briefly discussed. PMID:27265606

  16. 14q deletions are associated with trisomy 12, NOTCH1 mutations and unmutated IGHV genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Adrien; Chapiro, Elise; Belhouachi, Nabila; Cung, Hong-Anh; Keren, Boris; Damm, Frederik; Algrin, Caroline; Lefebvre, Christine; Fert-Ferrer, Sandra; Luquet, Isabelle; Gachard, Nathalie; Mugneret, Francine; Terre, Christine; Collonge-Rame, Marie-Agnes; Michaux, Lucienne; Rafdord-Weiss, Isabelle; Talmant, Pascaline; Veronese, Lauren; Nadal, Nathalie; Struski, Stephanie; Barin, Carole; Helias, Catherine; Lafage, Marina; Lippert, Eric; Auger, Nathalie; Eclache, Virginie; Roos-Weil, Damien; Leblond, Veronique; Settegrana, Catherine; Maloum, Karim; Davi, Frederic; Merle-Beral, Helene; Lesty, Claude; Nguyen-Khac, Florence

    2014-08-01

    Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 14 [del(14q)] are rare but recurrently observed in mature B-cell neoplasms, particularly in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To further characterize this aberration, we studied 81 cases with del(14q): 54 of CLL and 27 of small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), the largest reported series to date. Using karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the most frequent additional abnormality was trisomy 12 (tri12), observed in 28/79 (35%) cases, followed by del13q14 (12/79, 15%), delTP53 (11/80, 14%) delATM (5/79, 6%), and del6q21 (3/76, 4%). IGHV genes were unmutated in 41/53 (77%) patients, with a high frequency of IGHV1-69 (21/52, 40%). NOTCH1 gene was mutated in 14/45 (31%) patients. There was no significant difference in cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities between CLL and SLL. Investigations using FISH and SNP-array demonstrated the heterogeneous size of the 14q deletions. However, a group with the same del(14)(q24.1q32.33) was identified in 48% of cases. In this group, tri12 (P = 0.004) and NOTCH1 mutations (P = 0.02) were significantly more frequent than in the other patients. In CLL patients with del(14q), median treatment-free survival (TFS) was 27 months. In conclusion, del(14q) is associated with tri12 and with pejorative prognostic factors: unmutated IGHV genes (with over-representation of the IGHV1-69 repertoire), NOTCH1 mutations, and a short TFS. PMID:24729385

  17. The feature of distribution and clonality of TCR γ/δ subfamilies T cells in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Xu, Meng; Wang, Chunyan; Zhu, Lihua; Hu, Junyan; Chen, Shaohua; Wu, Xiuli; Li, Bo; Li, Yangqiu

    2014-01-01

    Restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) Vα/Vβ repertoire expression and clonal expansion of αβ T cells especially for putative tumor-associated antigens were observed in patients with hematological malignancies. To further characterize the γδ T-cell immune status in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL), we investigated the distribution and clonality of TCR Vγ/Vδ repertoire in peripheral blood (PB), bone marrow (BM), and lymph node (LN) from patients with B-NHL. Four newly diagnosed B-NHL cases, including three with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and one with small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL), were enrolled. The restrictive expression of TCR Vγ/Vδ subfamilies with different distribution patterns could be detected in PB, BM, or LN from all of four patients, and partial subfamily T cells showed clonal proliferation. At least one clonally expanded Vδ subfamily member was found in PB from each patient. However, the expression pattern and clonality of TCR Vγ/Vδ changed in different immune organs and showed individual feature in different patients. The clonally expanded Vδ5, Vδ6, and Vδ8 were detected only in PB but neither in BM nor LN while clonally expanded Vδ2 and Vδ3 could be detected in both PB and BM/LN. In conclusion, the results provide a preliminary profile of distribution and clonality of TCR γ/δ subfamilies T cells in PB, BM, and LN from B-NHL; similar clonally expanded Vδ subfamily T cells in PB and BM may be related to the same B-cell lymphoma-associated antigens, while the different reactive clonally expanded Vγ/Vδ T cells may be due to local immune response. PMID:24963496

  18. Canine lymphoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Zandvliet, M

    2016-06-01

    Canine lymphoma (cL) is a common type of neoplasia in dogs with an estimated incidence rate of 20-100 cases per 100,000 dogs and is in many respects comparable to non-Hodgkin lymphoma in humans. Although the exact cause is unknown, environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are thought to play an important role. cL is not a single disease, and a wide variation in clinical presentations and histological subtypes is recognized. Despite this potential variation, most dogs present with generalized lymphadenopathy (multicentric form) and intermediate to high-grade lymphoma, more commonly of B-cell origin. The most common paraneoplastic sign is hypercalcemia that is associated with the T-cell immunophenotype. Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice and a doxorubicin-based multidrug protocol is currently the standard of care. A complete remission is obtained for most dogs and lasts for a median period of 7-10 months, resulting in a median survival of 10-14 months. Many prognostic factors have been reported, but stage, immunophenotype, tumor grade, and response to chemotherapy appear of particular importance. Failure to respond to chemotherapy suggests drug resistance, which can be partly attributed to the expression of drug transporters of the ABC-transporter superfamily, including P-gp and BCRP. Ultimately, most lymphomas will become drug resistant and the development of treatments aimed at reversing drug resistance or alternative treatment modalities (e.g. immunotherapy and targeted therapy) are of major importance. This review aims to summarize the relevant data on cL, as well as to provide an update of the recent literature. PMID:26953614

  19. Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mediastinal Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for lymphoma involving the mediastinum

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Toner, Sean; Hunt, Margie; Wu, Elisa J.; Yahalom, Joachim . E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility, potential advantage, and indications for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving excessively large mediastinal disease volumes or requiring repeat RT. Methods and materials: Sixteen patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 11) or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 5) undergoing primary radiotherapy or repeat RT delivered via an IMRT plan were studied. The indications for using an IMRT plan were previous mediastinal RT (n = 5) or extremely large mediastinal treatment volumes (n 11). For each patient, IMRT, conventional parallel-opposed (AP-PA), and three-dimensional conformal (3D-CRT) plans were designed using 6-MV X-rays to deliver doses ranging from 18 to 45 Gy (median, 36 Gy). The plans were compared with regard to dose-volume parameters. The IMRT/AP-PA and IMRT/3D-CRT ratios were calculated for each parameter. Results: For all patients, the mean lung dose was reduced using IMRT, on average, by 12% compared with AP-PA and 14% compared with 3D-CRT. The planning target volume coverage was also improved using IMRT compared with AP-PA but was not different from the planning target volume coverage obtained with 3D-CRT. Conclusion: In selected patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the mediastinum, IMRT provides improved planning target volume coverage and reduces pulmonary toxicity parameters. It is feasible for RT of large treatment volumes and allows repeat RT of relapsed disease without exceeding cord tolerance. Additional follow-up is necessary to determine whether improvements in dose delivery affect long-term morbidity and disease control.

  1. Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Lymphoma Immunotherapy: Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Zappasodi, Roberta; de Braud, Filippo; Di Nicola, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The rationale to treat lymphomas with immunotherapy comes from long-standing evidence on their distinctive immune responsiveness. Indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, in particular, establish key interactions with the immune microenvironment to ensure prosurvival signals and prevent antitumor immune activation. However, reports of spontaneous regressions indicate that, under certain circumstances, patients develop therapeutic antitumor immunity. Several immunotherapeutic approaches have been thus developed to boost these effects in all patients. To date, targeting CD20 on malignant B cells with the antibody rituximab has been the most clinically effective strategy. However, relapse and resistance prevent to cure approximately half of B-NHL patients, underscoring the need of more effective therapies. The recognition of B-cell receptor variable regions as B-NHL unique antigens promoted the development of specific vaccines to immunize patients against their own tumor. Despite initial promising results, this strategy has not yet demonstrated a sufficient clinical benefit to reach the regulatory approval. Several novel agents are now available to stimulate immune effector functions or counteract immunosuppressive mechanisms, such as engineered antitumor T cells, co-stimulatory receptor agonist, and immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies. Thus, multiple elements can now be exploited in more effective combinations to break the barriers for the induction of anti-lymphoma immunity. PMID:26388871

  4. MDX-010 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-22

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Geldanamycin Analogue in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Lenalidomide and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  7. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  8. Lymphoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Venyo, Anthony Kodzo-Grey

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lymphoma of the urinary bladder (LUB) is rare. Aims. To review the literature on LUB. Methods. Various internet databases were used. Results. LUB can be either primary or secondary. The tumour has female predominance; most cases occur in middle-age women. Secondary LUB occurs in 10% to 25% of leukemias/lymphomas and in advanced-stage systemic lymphoma. Less than 100 cases have been reported. MALT typically affects adults older than 60 years; 75% are female. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is also common and may arise from transformation of MALT. LUB presents with haematuria, dysuria, urinary frequency, nocturia, and abdominal or back pain. Macroscopic examination of LUBs show large discrete tumours centred in the dome or lateral walls of the bladder. Positive staining of LUB varies by the subtype of lymphoma; B-cell lymphomas are CD20 positive. MALT lymphoma is positively stained for CD20, CD19, and FMC7 and negatively stained for CD5, CD10, and CD11c. LUB stains negatively with Pan-keratin, vimentin, CK20, and CK7. MALT lymphoma exhibits t(11; 18)(q21: 21). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the MALT type of LUB with no recurrence. Conclusions. LUB is diagnosed by its characteristic morphology and immunohistochemical characteristics. Radiotherapy is a useful treatment. PMID:24511310

  9. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  10. Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult

  11. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  13. Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in asians.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Soo; Kang, Dong Young; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Sang Tae; Suh, Kee Suck

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma describes a heterogeneous group of neoplasms of skin homing T cells that vary considerably in clinical presentation, histologic appearance, immunophenotype, and prognosis. This paper addresses the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in Asians with respect to clinical-epidemiologic and histopathological features. Compared with Western countries, Asia usually has higher rates of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas such as extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma, subcutaneous panniculitis T-cell lymphoma, and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and lower rates of cutaneous B-cell lymphomas. Among many variants of mycosis fungoides, hypopigmented lesions, pityriasis lichenoides-like lesions, and ichthyosiform lesions are more prevalent in Asia than in the West. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is endemic in southwestern Japan especially in the Kyushu island. The clinicopathologic characteristics of cutaneous lymphoma vary according to geography, and this may be ascribed to genetic and environmental etiologic factors. PMID:22844610

  14. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  15. Study of ADCT-301 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Hodgkin Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinaemia; Lymphoma,T-cell Cutaneous; Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral

  16. Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-08

    HIV Infection; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  17. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  18. Primary Extranodal Lymphoma of the Thorax.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, Seth J; Franks, Teri J; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2016-07-01

    Primary pulmonary lymphomas represent a pathologically heterogeneous group of disorders that often share imaging features, which include peribronchovascular nodules and masses or areas of nonresolving consolidation. Primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma is an extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma seen in younger patients that has imaging and pathologic features that demonstrate some degree of overlap with Hodgkin lymphoma. Primary lymphomas of the pleural space are rare and associated with concomitant viral infections. PMID:27265602

  19. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Asexual metazoans undergo senescence.

    PubMed

    Martínez, D E; Levinton, J S

    1992-10-15

    August Weismann popularized the notion that metazoans have a potentially immortal germ line separated from a mortal soma, and evolutionary biologists regard senescence as an evolved characteristic of the soma. Many have claimed that metazoans that do not sequester their germ line have no clear distinction between germ line and soma, and consequently they should lack senescence. Here we present experimental evidence that senescence occurs in the asexually reproducing marine oligochaete Paranais litoralis. We also analyze data reported in Sonneborn's classical study and show that the rhabdocoel Stenostomum incaudatum undergoes senescence. We argue that the stability of commitment to somatic function and the fact that asexual metazoans form their germ cells from undifferentiated stem cells are sufficient to allow for senescence of the asexual metazoan's soma. Thus the evolution of somatic differentiation, and not germ-line sequestration, would be the necessary condition for the evolution of senescence. PMID:11607334

  1. Cilengitide (EMD 121974) in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  2. Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Yoon; Seymour, John F; Wang, Michael L

    2016-04-10

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an uncommon subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma previously considered to have a poor prognosis. Large gains were made in the first decade of the new century when clinical trials established the importance of high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell rescue and high-dose cytarabine in younger patients and the benefits of maintenance rituximab and bendamustine in older patients. In particular, greater depth of understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of MCL has resulted in an explosion of specifically targeted new efficacious agents. In particular, agents recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration include the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, immunomodulator lenalidomide, and Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib. We review recent advances in the understanding of MCL biology and outline our recommended approach to therapy, including choice of chemoimmunotherapy, the role of stem-cell transplantation, and mechanism-based targeted therapies, on the basis of a synthesis of the data from published clinical trials. PMID:26755518

  3. Primary hepatic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Padhan, Rajesh Kumar; Das, Prasenjit; Shalimar

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic lymphoma (PHL) is a lymphoproliferative disorder confined to the liver without evidence of involvement of spleen, lymph nodes, bone marrow or other lymphoid structures. This is in contrast to Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) that often involves the liver as a secondary manifestation. PHL is a rare disease and constitutes 0.016% of all cases of NHL. PHL typically occurs in middle aged men, and usually the chief presenting symptoms are non specific which includes right upper quadrant pain, B symptoms like fever and weight loss and constitutional symptoms. Most frequent physical finding is hepatomegaly which occurs in 75% of patients. Jaundice is rare and present only in less than 5% of patients. Majority of PHL originates from B cells. The blood investigations and imaging findings are nonspecific. Histopathology is essential and confirms the diagnosis. Treatment modalities include combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The prognosis without therapy is grim. The prognosis and management of PHL is different from hepatocellular carcinoma or metastatic disease, hence it is essential to differentiate it from these diseases. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the importance of accurate diagnosis before implementing therapeutic plan for any hepatic space occupying lesion in liver. PMID:26591949

  4. Lymphoma relapse presenting as neurolymphomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Pham, My; Awad, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Neurolymphomatosis (NL) is a rare neurological manifestation of lymphoma characterized by malignant lymphoma cells infiltrating cranial or peripheral nerve, or their roots. We present the first reported Australian case of a patient whose initial presentation of relapsed mantle cell lymphoma was NL. Our case highlights that clinical and imaging findings of NL often mimic other neuropathies, and hence presents unique challenges that may lead to delayed diagnosis and management. We emphasize the importance of considering NL in the differential diagnosis and combining imaging with other diagnostic modalities such as lumbar puncture (LP) to aid in the diagnosis of NL particularly where there is acute neurological deterioration. PMID:26889293

  5. Primary lymphoma of the gallbladder.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E. P.; Lazda, E.; Grant, D.; Davis, J.

    1993-01-01

    A case of primary lymphoma of the gallbladder is described which is rare in the medical literature. A 76 year old man presented with acute cholecystitis and septicaemia. Investigation showed a lung abscess and a gallbladder mass. The mass was thought to be an empyema and cholecystostomy was performed. Biopsy of the gallbladder wall showed high-grade B cell lymphoma. The patient unfortunately succumbed to overwhelming septicaemia in the postoperative period. Postmortem examination confirmed primary lymphoma of the gallbladder without dissemination. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8415351

  6. Core needle biopsies and surgical excision biopsies in the diagnosis of lymphoma-experience at the Lymph Node Registry Kiel.

    PubMed

    Johl, Alice; Lengfelder, Eva; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines of the European Society of Medical Oncology recommend surgical excision biopsies of lymph nodes for the diagnosis of lymphoma whenever possible. However, core needle biopsies are increasingly used. We aimed to understand the common practice to choose the method of biopsy in Germany. Furthermore, we wanted to understand performance of surgical excision and core needle biopsies of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of lymphoma. The files of 1510 unselected, consecutive lymph node specimens from a consultation center for lymphoma diagnosis were analyzed. Core needle biopsies were obtained frequently from lymph nodes localized in mediastinal, abdominal, retroperitoneal, or thoracic regions. Patients undergoing core needle biopsies were significantly older and suffered significantly more often from lymphoma than patients undergoing surgical excision biopsies. Although more immunohistochemical tests were ordered by the pathologist for core needle biopsies specimens than for surgical excision biopsies specimens, core needle biopsies did not yield a definite diagnosis in 8.3 % of cases, compared to 2.8 % for SEB (p = 0.0003). Restricting the analysis to cases with a final diagnosis of follicular lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, core needle biopsies identified a simultaneous low- and high-grade lymphoma (transformation) in 3.3 % of cases, compared to 7.6 % for surgical excision biopsies (p = 0.2317). In Germany, core needle biopsies are preferentially used in elderly patients with a high likelihood of suffering from lymphoma. Core needle appeared inferior to surgical excision biopsies at providing a definite diagnosis and at identifying multiple lymphoma differentiations and transformation. PMID:27236576

  7. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  9. Anti-CD22 CAR-T Therapy for CD19-refractory or Resistant Lymphoma Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-22

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III/IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  10. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-21

    Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  11. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  12. A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  13. Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  14. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-19

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  15. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  16. Detection of Enhancer-Associated Rearrangements Reveals Mechanisms of Oncogene Dysregulation in B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Russell J.H.; Drier, Yotam; Whitton, Holly; Cotton, M. Joel; Kaur, Jasleen; Issner, Robbyn; Gillespie, Shawn; Epstein, Charles B.; Nardi, Valentina; Sohani, Aliyah R.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Bernstein, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    B-cell lymphomas frequently contain genomic rearrangements that lead to oncogene activation by heterologous distal regulatory elements. We utilized a novel approach, termed ‘Pinpointing Enhancer-Associated Rearrangements by Chromatin Immunoprecipitation’ or PEAR-ChIP, to simultaneously map enhancer activity and proximal rearrangements in lymphoma cell lines and patient biopsies. This method detects rearrangements involving known cancer genes, including CCND1, BCL2, MYC, PDCD1LG2, NOTCH1, CIITA, and SGK1, as well as novel enhancer duplication events of likely oncogenic significance. We identify lymphoma subtype-specific enhancers in the MYC locus that are silenced in lymphomas with MYC-activating rearrangements and are associated with germline polymorphisms that alter lymphoma risk. We show that BCL6-locus enhancers are acetylated by the BCL6-activating transcription factor MEF2B, and can undergo genomic duplication, or target the MYC promoter for activation in the context of a “pseudo-double-hit” t(3;8)(q27;q24) rearrangement linking the BCL6 and MYC loci. Our work provides novel insights regarding enhancer-driven oncogene activation in lymphoma. PMID:26229090

  17. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G; Davies, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  18. [Pulmonary alterations in Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jóna, Ádám; Illés, Árpád; Szemes, Katalin; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2016-01-31

    Most of Hodgkin lymphoma patients survive due to combined chemo/radiotherapy. Improved survival brings long-term side effects to the front, which may determine the patients' subsequent quality of life and expected lifetime. This manuscript aims to analyze lung manifestations of Hodgkin lymphoma and treatment related pulmonary complications, demonstrated with own cases. The lung involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma is often secondary, and primary pulmonary involvement is very rare. The authors found 8-12% of lung involvement among their patients. Side effects of treatment consist of pulmonary infections in conjuction with immunosuppression, while on the other hand bleomycin and chest irradiation as part of current standard of care induced pneumonitis and fibrosis are reported. The pulmonary involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma may cause differential diagnostic difficulty. Lung involvement could modify stage and consequently treatment, and the development of side effects might determine later quality of life and expected lifetime. Therefore, identification of lung involvement is crucial. PMID:26801361

  19. MORAb-004 in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Cardiac Sarcoidosis Masked by Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tobita, Takashige; Hattori, Hidetoshi; Serizawa, Naoki; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Uto, Kenta; Momose, Mitsuru; Kameyama, Kaori; Shiga, Tsuyoshi; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2016-08-01

    There is an association between sarcoidosis and lymphoma, termed "sarcoidosis-lymphoma syndrome." Sarcoidosis is generally detected before lymphoma, but it could present after or even concurrently with the diagnosis of lymphoma. We describe a patient presenting with ventricular tachycardia and lymphadenopathy. A diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma was made histologically. The patient responded to treatment, but had persistent (18)F-fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake in the lymph nodes and heart on follow-up positron emission tomography. Second biopsies of lymph node and endomyocardial both confirmed sarcoidosis. This finding suggests that we should maintain a high degree of suspicion for cardiac sarcoidosis in lymphoma patients. PMID:27094123

  1. Persistent Infection of Drug-resistant Influenza A Virus during Chemotherapy for Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Toru; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Kawakami, Fumihiro; Isobe, Rei; Kaneko, Naoto; Mimura, Yuto; Ito, Toshiro; Furuta, Kiyoshi; Shimazaki, Mami; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kitano, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the case of an 80-year-old man with malignant lymphoma who became persistently infected with influenza A virus. Although he was repeatedly treated with NA inhibitors, such as oseltamivir or peramivir, nasal cavity swab tests for influenza A antigen continued to be positive for more than 2 months. Virological analyses revealed that he was infected with the NA inhibitor-resistant A (H3N2) virus possessing an R292K substitution in the NA protein. These findings suggest that a drug-resistant influenza virus strain might selectively survive antiviral therapy in elderly patients with refractory malignant lymphoma undergoing multiple chemotherapies. PMID:27374689

  2. Burkitt Lymphoma: beyond discoveries

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    First described in 1958 in Uganda, Burkitt lymphoma (BL) attracted interest worldwide following reports of its uneven geographic distribution and rapidly fatal clinical course. Both suggested infectious etiology and curability. Seminal discoveries followed in quick succession. Viral etiology – due to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) – was confirmed. Chromosomal translocations, involving cellular MYC, a protooncogene, were discovered, shown to be a hallmark of BL, and central to the genetic basis of cancer. Cure of BL using combination chemotherapy was demonstrated. Unfortunately, civil disturbance in Africa disrupted BL research and blunted its impact on education and oncology care in Africa. Important questions went unanswered. The risk of BL due to malaria or EBV was not quantified. Efforts to answer whether BL could be prevented – by preventing malaria or early EBV infection – were abandoned. The mechanism of malaria in BL is unknown. In Africa, BL remains mostly fatal and diagnosis is still made clinically. Unprecedented advances in molecular, genomics and proteomic technologies, promising to unlock mysteries of cancers, have re-awakened interest in BL. With return of stability to Africa, the unanswered questions about BL are re-attracting global interest. This interest now includes exploiting the knowledge gained about genetics, proteomics, and bioinformatics to enable the development of targeted less toxic treatment for BL; and simpler methods to diagnose BL with high accuracy and sensitivity. The articles in the Burkitt Lymphoma (BL): Beyond Discoveries in Infectious Agents and Cancer highlight BL as priority. Authors explore etiology, pathology, pathogenesis of BL, and whether knowledge gained in the studies of BL can catalyze sustainable cancer services in one of the world’s poorest served regions. PMID:24079372

  3. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. Study of ADCT-402 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lineage Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  6. Safety and Tolerability of HSC835 in Patients Undergoing Single Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Single Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation; Non-myeloablative Conditioning; Acute Myelocytic Leukemia; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphomas; Large-cell Lymphoma; Hodgkin Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma; Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Mantle-cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  7. Memory-enriched CAR-T Cells Immunotherapy for B Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  8. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. Apolizumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-15

    Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma or Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed or Refractory Intraocular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Central Nervous System; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Retinal Lymphoma

  12. Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  14. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About AIDS-Related Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  15. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  16. Gray zone lymphomas in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiayuan; Greffe, Brian; Cook, Bruce; Giller, Roger; Graham, Douglas K; McGranahan, Amy N; Wang, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Gray zone lymphomas are defined as lymphoid malignancies that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular investigations have been performed. The 2008 World Health Organization Classification proposed 2 gray zone lesions: (1) B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma and (2) B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. These gray zone lesions are rare, especially in pediatric patients, and create a great challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because this differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this manuscript, we report 2 cases of pediatric patients with gray zone lymphoma and review clinicopathologic features, treatment options, and outcomes of this uncommon tumor. PMID:20331368

  17. Gastrointestinal Lymphoma: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Somwaru, Alexander S; Mehrotra, Anupamjit K; Levine, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Extranodal lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of hematologic neoplasms that can affect every abdominal organ, with distinctive pathologic, radiologic, and clinical features. The radiologic findings are closely related to the underlying pathophysiology, and an understanding of these characteristic features should facilitate recognition of extranodal lymphoma and its various subtypes. Within the abdomen, lymphoma is found most commonly in the gastrointestinal tract, especially the stomach. This article presents the findings in gastrointestinal tract lymphoma. PMID:27265607

  18. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas in pregnancy: tackling therapeutic quandaries.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Farbstein, Dan; Brenner, Benjamin; Horowitz, Netanel A

    2014-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) often present with systemic symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath and night sweats, mimicking pregnancy-related features which may result in delayed disease diagnosis. Furthermore, the wish to avoid investigational imaging, aiming to protect the fetus from radiation exposure, may lead to a further delay, which does not often result in significant changes in HL clinical nature and patient outcome. In contrast, a more aggressive behavior (i.e., advanced disease stage and reproductive organ involvement) of most NHL types diagnosed in pregnancy may require urgent therapeutic intervention to prevent disease progression. Current management of pregnancy-associated NHL depends on histological subtype of the disease, gestational stage at diagnosis and the urgency of treatment for a specific patient. Patients diagnosed with indolent lymphoma may often be just followed, whereas those presenting with aggressive or highly aggressive disease need to be urgently treated with chemoimmunotherapy, either after undergoing an elective pregnancy termination if diagnosed at an early gestational stage, or with pregnancy preservation, if diagnosed later. Supportive care of NHL is also important; however, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) which is commonly used outside of pregnancy, should be cautiously employed, considering its established teratogenicity in animals, though this is less proven in humans. In conclusion, given the paucity of studies prospectively evaluating the outcome of pregnant women with NHL, international efforts are warranted to elucidate critical issues and develop guidelines for the management of such patients. PMID:25108745

  19. Mantle cell lymphoma: biological insights and treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Leonard, John P; Williams, Michael E; Goy, Andre; Grant, Steven; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Rosen, Steve T; Sweetenham, John W

    2009-08-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) exhibits considerable molecular heterogeneity and complexity, and is regarded as one of the most challenging lymphomas to treat. With increased understanding of the pathobiology of MCL, it is proposed that MCL is the result of 3 major converging factors, namely, deregulated cell cycle pathways, defects in DNA damage responses, and dysregulation of cell survival pathways. In the present era of targeted therapies, these biologic insights have resulted in the identification of several novel rational targets for therapeutic intervention in MCL that are undergoing active clinical testing. To date, there is no standard of care in MCL. Several approaches including conventional anthracycline-based therapies and intensive high-dose strategies with and without stem cell transplantation have failed to produce durable remissions for most patients. Moreover, considering the heterogeneity of MCL, it is increasingly being recognized that risk-adapted therapy might be a relevant therapeutic approach in this disease. At the first and second Global Workshops on Mantle Cell Lymphoma, questions addressing advances in the pathobiology of MCL, optimization of existing therapies, assessment of current data with novel therapeutic strategies, and the identification of molecular or phenotypic risk factors for utilization in risk-adapted therapies were discussed and will be summarized herein. PMID:19717376

  20. 17-DMAG in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenstr

  1. Primary Testicular Pre-B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Mohammad Forat; Jenabzadeh, Alireza; Hosseini, Somayeh; Massumi, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    Primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma is a rare entity. We report a case of a 13-year-old boy referred with unilateral testicular swelling. After preliminary work-up orchiectomy was performed Histopathology detected primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma. Lymphoblastic lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of testicular masses in children. PMID:27170920

  2. Primary Testicular Pre-B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Binesh, Fariba; Yazdi, Mohammad Forat; Jenabzadeh, Alireza; Hosseini, Somayeh; Massumi, Roghayeh

    2016-01-01

    Primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma is a rare entity. We report a case of a 13-year-old boy referred with unilateral testicular swelling. After preliminary work-up orchiectomy was performed Histopathology detected primary testicular lymphoblastic lymphoma. Lymphoblastic lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of testicular masses in children. PMID:27170920

  3. Rituximab and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-08-11

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. [Bile duct obstruction due to non-Hodkin's lymphoma in patients with HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Domínguez, E; Rodríguez Serrano, D A; Mendoza, J; Iscar, T; Sarriá, C; García-Buey, L

    2003-12-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome increases the risk of developing non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma (NHL) (relative risk over 100). NHL tend to be high-grade and to affect the central nervous system and digestive tract. Biliary tract compression is usually due to external compression from enlarged lymph nodes, but is not usually the first manifestation.We describe 2 cases of bile duct obstruction secondary to NHL in patients diagnosed with HIV infection. Histological diagnosis of the lymphoma can be difficult but is necessary so that these patients do not undergo highly aggressive surgical treatment instead of chemotherapy, which currently produces the best results. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of including lymphomas in the differential diagnosis of bile duct obstruction in patients with HIV infection. PMID:14670238

  5. Plasmodium Infection Promotes Genomic Instability and AID Dependent B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Robbiani, Davide F.; Deroubaix, Stephanie; Feldhahn, Niklas; Oliveira, Thiago Y.; Callen, Elsa; Wang, Qiao; Jankovic, Mila; Silva, Israel T.; Rommel, Philipp C.; Bosque, David; Eisenreich, Tom; Nussenzweig, André; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chronic infection with Plasmodium falciparum was epidemiologically associated with endemic Burkitt’s lymphoma, a mature B cell cancer characterized by chromosome translocation between the c-myc oncogene and Igh, over 50 years ago. Whether infection promotes B cell lymphoma, and if so by what mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between parasitic disease and lymphomagenesis we used Plasmodium chabaudi (Pc) to produce chronic malaria infection in mice. Pc induces prolonged expansion of germinal centers (GCs), unique compartments where B cells undergo rapid clonal expansion and express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA mutator. GC B cells elicited during Pc infection suffer widespread DNA damage leading to chromosome translocations. Although infection does not change the overall rate, it modifies lymphomagenesis to favor mature B cell lymphomas that are AID dependent and show chromosome translocations. Thus, malaria infection favors mature B cell cancers by eliciting protracted AID expression in GC B cells. PMID:26276629

  6. Viral Studies in Burkitt Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Queiroga, Eduardo M.; Gualco, Gabriela; Chioato, Lucimara; Harrington, William J.; Araujo, Iguaracyra; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a highly aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma, composed of a monomorphic population of medium-sized B cells with a high proliferation rate and a consistent MYC translocation. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with BL with different frequencies depending on the clinical variant. Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, or human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), infects a wide range of normal cells, having a well-established role in the pathogenesis of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) and MCD-associated plasmablastic lymphoma. In secondary immunodeficiencies, such as HIV-1 infection and organ transplantation, HHV-8 is considered an opportunistic pathogen linked to the development of lymphomas in patients with AIDS and HIV+ patients. We studied the association of EBV and HHV-8 by immunohistochemical analysis, in situ hybridization, and polymerase chain reaction in a large number of well-characterized BLs. EBV was present in 45.0% of all BL cases with higher incidence in the pediatric group; most cases were EBV type A. We found no association of BL with HHV-8 in EBV+ BL or in EBV–cases, including the HIV+ BL group. PMID:18628086

  7. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  9. Emerging immunotherapy in pediatric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Erker, Craig; Harker-Murray, Paul; Burke, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma collectively are the third most common cancer diagnosed in children each year. For children who relapse or have refractory disease, outcomes remain poor. Immunotherapy has recently emerged as a novel approach to treat hematologic malignancies. The field has been rapidly expanding over the past few years broadening its armamentarium which now includes monoclonal antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates and cellular therapies including bispecific T-cell engagers and chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells. Many of these agents are in their infancy stages and only beginning to make their mark on lymphoma treatment while others have begun to show promising efficacy in relapsed disease. In this review, the authors provide an overview of current and emerging immunotherapies in the field of pediatric lymphoma. PMID:26616565

  10. Management of lymphoma in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Hodby, K; Fields, P A

    2009-01-01

    One in every thousand pregnancies is complicated by a concurrent diagnosis of cancer. Lymphoma is currently the fourth most common malignancy diagnosed during pregnancy and its incidence is rising. The diagnosis and management of any malignancy during pregnancy is clearly a clinical and emotional minefield for both patients and health-care professionals. The major challenge is to optimize medical treatment offered to the mother, while limiting the impact on the fetus. Given the relative rarity of the situation, current practice is guided by case reports and personal experience of management of similar patients. Our centre has a large and busy lymphoma practice, and has cared for several women diagnosed with a variety of subtypes of lymphoma over the years. This review aims to summarize current opinion about best practice regarding these patients and discusses options available from the current literature.

  11. Alvocidib, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Lymphoproliferative Disorders or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Oblimersen and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumor or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-24

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. An unusual case of composite lymphoma involving chronic lymphocytic leukemia follicular lymphoma and Hodgkin disease.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Ledakis, Peter; Novinski, Daniel; Fu, Kai; Hutchins, Mark; Frankforter, Scot; Mleczko, Kris; Sanger, Warren G; Chan, Wing C

    2004-05-01

    Composite lymphomas constitute the presence of two different types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the same anatomic site. We report an unusual case of a 73-year-old woman who initially presented with a composite lymphoma of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and follicular lymphoma. After 5 years of follow-up and intermittent treatment, she developed Hodgkin disease with diffuse liver involvement. Biopsy of the liver showed Reed-Sternberg cells with typical morphology and immunophenotype. While fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses for t(14;18) were positive in the lymph node tissue with follicular lymphoma, we were unable to show the same in the liver biopsy specimen. Here, we describe the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features of this unusual composite lymphoma case involving CLL and follicular lymphoma, with the subsequent development of a Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:15291370

  14. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Alisertib With and Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. [Cutaneous lymphomas: new entities and rare variants].

    PubMed

    Kempf, W; Mitteldorf, C

    2015-02-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are the second most common group of extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Recently several new variants and entities have been described but have not yet become part of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. These forms include the granulomatous form of mycosis fungoides, which is associated with a poorer prognosis, as well as indolent CD8+ lymphoproliferations on the head and at acral localizations. Within the group of cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders, new histological types of lymphomatoid papulosis have been identified, such as type D (CD8+ epidermotropic) and type E (angioinvasive) which simulate aggressive lymphomas. Cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas are a prognostically heterogeneous group of cutaneous lymphomas. The cutaneous CD8+ aggressive epidermotropic cytotoxic T-cell lymphoma and cutaneous gamma/delta T-cell lymphoma are very aggressive neoplasms, whereas cutaneous CD4+ small to medium-sized T-cell lymphoma in its solitary or localized form represents an indolent lymphoproliferation: the terminology, histogenesis and differentiation from nodular T-cell pseudolymphoma are still a matter of debate. Among B-cell lymphomas, disorders associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are discussed focusing on EBV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly and EBV-associated mucocutaneous ulcer. This review describes the clinical, histological and immunophenotypic features of new and rare entities and variants of cutaneous lymphomas and highlights the impact of the clinicopathological correlation in the diagnostic process. PMID:25589355

  17. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  18. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  19. Brentuximab Vedotin + Rituximab as Frontline Therapy for Pts w/ CD30+ and/or EBV+ Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-28

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Epstein-Barr Virus Infection; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis

  20. BCL2 mutations are associated with increased risk of transformation and shortened survival in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Cristina; Schneider, Paula A.; Dai, Haiming; Dogan, Ahmet; Maurer, Matthew J.; Church, Amy K.; Novak, Anne J.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Wu, Xiaosheng; Ding, Husheng; Meng, X. Wei; Cerhan, James R.; Slager, Susan L.; Macon, William R.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Karp, Judith E.; Gore, Steven D.; Kay, Neil E.; Jelinek, Diane F.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S.

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL), an indolent neoplasm caused by a t(14;18) chromosomal translocation that juxtaposes the BCL2 gene and immunoglobulin locus, has a variable clinical course and frequently undergoes transformation to an aggressive lymphoma. Although BCL2 mutations have been previously described, their relationship to FL progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the frequency and nature of BCL2 mutations in 2 independent cohorts of grade 1 and 2 FLs, along with the correlation between BCL2 mutations, transformation risk, and survival. The prevalence of BCL2 coding sequence mutations was 12% in FL at diagnosis and 53% at transformation (P < .0001). The presence of these BCL2 mutations at diagnosis correlated with an increased risk of transformation (hazard ratio 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0-6.2; P < .0001) and increased risk of death due to lymphoma (median survival of 9.5 years with BCL2 mutations vs 20.4 years without; P = .012). In a multivariate analysis, BCL2 mutations and high FL international prognostic index were independent risk factors for transformation and death due to lymphoma. Some mutant Bcl-2 proteins exhibited enhanced antiapoptotic capacity in vitro. Accordingly, BCL2 mutations can affect antiapoptotic Bcl-2 function, are associated with increased activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression, and correlate with increased risk of transformation and death due to lymphoma. PMID:25452615

  1. [Comparison of salvage chemotherapy regimen ACES with ESHAP for refractory or relapsed malignant lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Imataki, Osamu; Tamai, Yotaro; Kawakami, Kimihiro

    2007-10-01

    Standard salvage chemotherapy for refractory or relapsed malignant lymphoma has not been defined. The efficacy and feasibility of the ACES regimen, consisting of carboplatin at 100 mg/m(2) on day 1 to 4, etoposide at 80 mg/m(2) on day 1 to 4, high-dose Ara-C at 2 g/m(2) on day 5 and methylprednisolone at 500 mg/day for 5 days, for refractory or relapsed lymphoma were retrospectively reviewed in comparison with the ESHAP regimen. The subjects were 29 patients, including 7 aggressive follicular lymphomas, 16 large B cell lymphomas and 6 Hodgkin lymphomas. Characteristics of patients with ESHAP (19 cases) and the ACES (10 cases) group were as follows: male/female ratio, 10/9 and 3/7; median age, 49 (range, 31-72) and 54 (22-65); and initial clinical stage (I and II / III / IV), 5/8/6 and 1/1/8, respectively. Among the 29 patients, complete response was achieved in 68% (13/19) in ESHAP and 40% (4/10) in ACES.Progression-free survival and overall survival were 31.3% and 34.3%, respectively. Hematological toxicity was not significantly different between the two groups, and renal toxicity was significantly higher in ESHAP (52%) than ACES (0%). We concluded that the ACES regimen had a possibility of effective consolidation therapy for the elderly aiming to undergo autologous stem cell transplantation. PMID:17940378

  2. Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL)-Like Lymphoma in a Child With Congenital Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lam, Grace K S; Abdelhaleem, Mohamed; Somers, Gino R; Roifman, Chaim; Read, Stanley; Abla, Oussama

    2016-09-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare lymphoma that occurs more frequently in immunocompromised adults and has a poor survival. We report a 9-year-old female with combined immunodeficiency with an Epstein-Barr virus positive/human herpes virus 8 negative PEL-like lymphoma. The treatment with systemic chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, zidovudine, and interferon-α failed to control disease progression. This is the first reported pediatric case of PEL-like lymphoma. Increased diagnostic awareness and more effective treatment strategies are needed for this rare lymphoma. PMID:27186682

  3. Study of BKM120 & Rituximab in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma and Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage

  6. Novel targeted therapies for mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Alinari, Lapo; Christian, Beth; Baiocchi, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell malignancy characterized by short median survival despite intensive therapies. The clinical behavior of MCL most likely relates to the complex pathophysiology of the disease which includes its genetic hallmark, the chromosomal translocation t(11;14) resulting in aberrant expression of cyclin D1, alteration in the DNA damage response, and constitutive activation of key antiapoptotic pathways such as phosphatidyl-inositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB). Together, these changes result in cell cycle dysregulation and give rise to profound genetic instability. Given this complex pathophysiology, the limited number of options for patients with relapsed/refractory MCL, and the difficulty in achieving long-lasting remissions with conventional approaches, it is essential to explore new treatment options targeting the pathophysiology of MCL. We have recently reported that milatuzumab, a fully humanized anti-CD74 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in combination with anti-CD20 mAbs has significant preclinical and clinical activity in MCL. Here we discuss these results, provide additional insights into milatuzumab-mediated MCL cell death, and report preliminary data on the activity of other targeted biologic agents including PCI-32765, CAL-101 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors currently undergoing evaluation at our institution and others. PMID:22361516

  7. Computational diagnosis of canine lymphoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkes, E. M.; Alexandrakis, I.; Slater, K.; Tuli, R.; Gorban, A. N.

    2014-03-01

    One out of four dogs will develop cancer in their lifetime and 20% of those will be lymphoma cases. PetScreen developed a lymphoma blood test using serum samples collected from several veterinary practices. The samples were fractionated and analysed by mass spectrometry. Two protein peaks, with the highest diagnostic power, were selected and further identified as acute phase proteins, C-Reactive Protein and Haptoglobin. Data mining methods were then applied to the collected data for the development of an online computer-assisted veterinary diagnostic tool. The generated software can be used as a diagnostic, monitoring and screening tool. Initially, the diagnosis of lymphoma was formulated as a classification problem and then later refined as a lymphoma risk estimation. Three methods, decision trees, kNN and probability density evaluation, were used for classification and risk estimation and several preprocessing approaches were implemented to create the diagnostic system. For the differential diagnosis the best solution gave a sensitivity and specificity of 83.5% and 77%, respectively (using three input features, CRP, Haptoglobin and standard clinical symptom). For the screening task, the decision tree method provided the best result, with sensitivity and specificity of 81.4% and >99%, respectively (using the same input features). Furthermore, the development and application of new techniques for the generation of risk maps allowed their user-friendly visualization.

  8. [Mediterranean lymphoma mimicking Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Jouini, S; Ayadi, K; Mokrani, A; Wachuku, E; Hmouda, H; Gourdie, R

    2001-07-01

    We report an uncommon localization of mediterranean lymphoma of the terminal ileum in a 28 year-old male patient. Ultrasound and Computed Tomography showed moderate regular and symmetrical intestinal wall thickening simulating Crohn's disease. We highlight the role of computed tomography in the diagnosis, staging and detection of complications. PMID:11507451

  9. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. Cytomegalovirus retinitis mimicking intraocular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gooi, Patrick; Farmer, James; Hurley, Bernard; Brodbaker, Elliott

    2008-12-01

    We present a case of an unusual retinal infiltrate requiring retinal biopsy for definitive diagnosis. A 62-year-old man with treated lymphoma presented with decreased vision in the right eye associated with a white retinal lesion, which extended inferonasally from an edematous disc. Intraocular lymphoma was considered as a diagnosis; thus, the patient was managed with vitrectomy and retinal biopsy. Cytological analysis of the vitreous aspirate could not rule out a lymphoproliferative disorder. The microbial analysis was negative. Histology of the lesion showed extensive necrosis and large cells with prominent nucleoli. To rule out lymphoma, a battery of immunostains was performed and all were negative. However the limited amount of tissue was exhausted in the process. Subsequently, a hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) slide was destained, on which a CMV immunostain was performed. This revealed positivity in the nuclei and intranuclear inclusions within the large atypical cells. A diagnosis of CMV retinitis was made. Retinal biopsy may provide a definitive diagnosis and direct patient care toward intravenous gancyclovir in the case of CMV or toward radiation and chemotherapy for intraocular lymphoma. When faced with a limited amount of tissue, destaining regular H/E slides is a possible avenue to performing additional immunohistochemical studies. PMID:19668455

  11. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  12. Carfilzomib and Hyper-CVAD in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-09

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  13. Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Low-Grade Follicular Lymphoma, Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. [Malignant Lymphoma of the Brain, and Dementia].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Mizutani, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    A differential diagnosis of acute and subacute progressive dementias includes malignant lymphoma of the brain. We reviewed primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), intravascular lymphomatosis (IVL), lymphomatosis cerebri, and the relapse and invasion of systemic lymphomas. PCNSL is confined to the central nervous system; the infiltration and compression by the lymphoma result in adverse neurological symptoms. IVL is a rare form of malignant lymphoma that is characterized by the proliferation of primarily B-cell type lymphoma cells within the blood vessels of various organs. This causes ischemia and results in the associated neurological symptoms. Medical history and neuroimaging studies provide crucial informations to distinguish the lymphomas from other diseases that cause dementia, such an Alzheimer's disease. MRI imaging of the brain using contrast agent, and the biopsy of diseased tissues are essential for the diagnosis of the lymphomas. A histopathological examination is the most effective way to diagnose malignant lymphomas of the brain. Presently, the treatment of choice for PCNSL is the intravenous administration of high dose methotrexate with and without radiation therapy. Futhermore, Rituximab-containing chemotherapy has proved to greatly improve the prognosis of IVL. A better outcome can be achieved with the earlier diagnosis and treatment of the malignant lymphoma of the brain. PMID:27056856

  15. Genetic Testing Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic

  16. AR-42 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Relapsed Multiple Myeloma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large

  17. Rituximab With or Without Yttrium Y-90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma? What are the key statistics about non-Hodgkin lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) ... coming years. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  19. What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for non-Hodgkin lymphoma What’s new in non-Hodgkin lymphoma research and treatment? Research ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma is focused on looking at new and better ways to treat this disease. Chemotherapy ...

  20. Isolated subglottic lymphoma: an interesting cause of dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Yardley, M P; Chui, P

    1993-01-01

    Isolated laryngeal lymphomas are exceedingly rare tumours: they tend to be greyish submucosal swellings and to respond well to radiotherapy. A case of subglottic lymphoma is presented, along with a review of previously reported cases of subglottic lymphomas. PMID:8461251

  1. A case of conjunctival follicular lymphoma mimicking mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Abd Al-Kader, Lamia; Sato, Yasuharu; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Ohshima, Koh-Ichi; Sogabe, Yuka; Fujii, Kazuhiro; Iwaki, Noriko; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Ocular adnexal lymphoma may involve the eyelids, conjunctiva, orbital tissue, or lacrimal structures. The majority are non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphomas of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma type. Follicular lymphomas represent a small percentage of ocular adnexa lymphomas, particularly in Japan. We report a 68-year-old female patient who presented with a salmon pink patch-like lesion of the left conjunctiva, suspected of being (MALT) lymphoma. However, histologic and immunohistologic examinations were consistent with follicular lymphoma. This case demonstrates the importance of considering such rare lymphomas when making a diagnosis of ocular adnexal lymphoid neoplasms. [J Clin Exp Hematop 53(1): 49-52, 2013]. PMID:23801133

  2. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  3. Rituximab and Oblimersen in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Follicular Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  4. Bortezomib and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma Who Have Previously Undergone Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  5. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Children With Recurrent or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-16

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  6. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T

  7. Cladribine, gemcitabine, busulfan, and SAHA combination as a potential pretransplant conditioning regimen for lymphomas: A preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jie; Valdez, Benigno C; Li, Yang; Liu, Yan; Teo, Esmeralda C; Nieto, Yago; Champlin, Richard E; Andersson, Borje S

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an effective treatment for patients with refractory lymphomas. Nucleoside analogs (NAs) and DNA alkylating agents are efficacious in treating hematologic malignancies. To design an efficacious and more economical pretransplant regimen for lymphoma patients, we analyzed the cytotoxicity of cladribine (Clad), gemcitabine (Gem), busulfan (Bu), and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) in lymphoma cell lines. J45.01 and U937 lymphoma cell lines were exposed to drugs, alone or in combination, for 48 hours and analyzed with the MTT and annexin V assays, Western blotting, and flow cytometry. On the basis of the IC5-10 values of the drugs, the Clad+Gem+Bu combination inhibited the proliferation of both cell lines to ∼55%-60%. Addition of SAHA to this combination decreased proliferation further to ∼30%. Exposure to the Clad+Gem+Bu+SAHA combination activated the DNA damage response and ATM-CHK2 pathway; modified histones; decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, which caused leakage of apoptosis-inducing factors; and activated apoptosis. Pretreatment of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK blocked the phosphorylation of histone 2AX and cleavage of PARP-1 and caspases. The Clad+Gem+Bu+SAHA combination provides synergistic cytotoxicity in lymphoma cell lines. Our results may be a basis for using this combination as a pretransplant conditioning regimen in a clinical trial for lymphoma patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, replacing the more expensive nucleoside analog clofarabine. PMID:26976752

  8. Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  9. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy After Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk, Intermediate-Grade, B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  10. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Idelalisib in Japanese Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (With or Without Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia); Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  11. Primary Gastric Burkitt’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Swarupa; Mehta, Anurag; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Sharma, Anila; Louis, A. Robert; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Saxena, Upasna; Simson, David K.; Dewan, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    The primary gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, although rare, is among the most common extra-nodal lymphomas, considering that gastric lymphomas are more common than intestinal lymphomas. Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive form of B-cell lymphoma that is typically endemic in Africa, while non-endemic cases are found in the rest of the world. Primary gastric BL is extremely rare and only around 50 cases have been reported worldwide. Here we present the case of a young HIV-negative male, who was referred to our department with a stage IV gastric BL. He was planned for palliative chemotherapy, but after the first cycle of chemotherapy he succumbed to the progression of the disease. PMID:25568743

  12. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  13. PXD101 and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Hodgkin Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin

  14. B Cell Lymphoma mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cosatti, M A; Pisoni, C N; Altuve, J L; Lorente, C

    2016-01-01

    Non Hodking´s lymphoma (NHL) may involve bones but synovial involvement is uncommon. We describe a patient who presented with polyarthritis, sicca symptoms and rash suggestive of rheumatoid arthritis. An atypical skin rash prompted skin and synovial biopsies. A diagnosis of synovial and skin malignant large B-cell lymphoma anaplastic subtype was performed. Chemotherapy with dexamethasone, vincristine and rituximab was started. Following treatment the patient had complete resolution of cutaneous and articular lymphoma manifestations. PMID:27419896

  15. Bilateral conjunctival follicular lymphoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Wall, Palak B; Traboulsi, Elias I; Hsi, Eric D; Singh, Arun D

    2015-04-01

    Follicular lymphoma is exceedingly rare in children. We present the case of a 10-year-old patient with a conjunctival lesion on the left eye who later developed a similar lesion on the right eye. Excisional biopsy of the left eye lesion revealed follicular lymphoma. The patient was treated with systemic rituximab. To our knowledge, only 4 other cases of pediatric conjunctival follicular lymphoma have been reported, all of which were isolated lesions that were treated with excisional biopsy alone. PMID:25824110

  16. Primary effusion lymphoma presenting as a cutaneous intravascular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Xian, Rena R.; Burns, Kathleen H.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.; Taube, Janis M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is a rare and aggressive lymphoma that arises in the context of immunosuppression and is characterized by co-infection with Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus-8/Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV). It was originally described as arising in body cavity effusions, but presentation as a mass lesion (extracavitary PEL) is now recognized. Here, we describe a case of PEL with an initial presentation as an intravascular lymphoma with associated skin lesions. The patient was a 53-year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who presented with fevers, weight loss and skin lesions concerning for Kaposi sarcoma (KS). A skin biopsy revealed no evidence of KS; however, dermal vessels contained large atypical cells that expressed CD31 and plasma cell markers but lacked most B- and T-cell antigens. The atypical cells expressed EBV and HHV-8. The patient subsequently developed a malignant pleural effusion containing the same neoplastic cell population. The findings in this case highlight the potential for unusual intravascular presentations of PEL in the skin as well as the importance of pursuing microscopic diagnosis of skin lesions in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:25355615

  17. Immunotherapy for B-cell lymphoma: current status and prospective advances.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Nurit

    2012-01-01

    Therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has progressed significantly over the last decades. However, the majority of patients remain incurable, and novel therapies are needed. Because immunotherapy ideally offers target selectivity, an ever increasing number of immunotherapies, both passive and active, are undergoing development. The champion of passive immunotherapy to date is the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab that revolutionized the standard of care for lymphoma. The great success of rituximab catalyzed the development of new passive immunotherapy strategies that are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These include improvement of rituximab efficacy, newer generation anti-CD20 antibodies, drug-conjugated and radio labeled anti-CD20 antibodies, monoclonal antibodies targeting non-CD20 lymphoma antigens, and bispecific antibodies. Active immunotherapy aims at inducing long-lasting antitumor immunity, thereby limiting the likelihood of relapse. Current clinical studies of active immunotherapy for lymphoma consist largely of vaccination and immune checkpoint blockade. A variety of protein- and cell-based vaccines are being tested in ongoing clinical studies. Recently completed phase III clinical trials of an idiotype protein vaccine suggest that the vaccine may have clinical activity in a subset of patients. Efforts to enhance the efficacy of active immunotherapy are ongoing with an emphasis on optimization of antigen delivery and presentation of vaccines and modulation of the immune system toward counteracting immunosuppression, using antibodies against immune regulatory checkpoints. This article discusses results of the various immunotherapy approaches applied to date for B-cell lymphoma and the ongoing trials to improve their effect. PMID:22566889

  18. [Oral Burkitt lymphoma in an immunocompetent patient].

    PubMed

    Chbicheb, S; Hakkou, F; El Wady, W

    2012-03-01

    We report a case of Burkitt lymphoma of the jaws in an immunocompetent adolescent, revealed by intraoral swelling. An orthopantomogram showed multiple osteolytic lesions. Biopsy revealed Burkitt lymphoma. The disease was treated with chemotherapy. Complete remission was attained 15 months after the end of treatment. Burkitt lymphomas accounts for 30-40% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas in children, with diagnosis confirmed by histology. Immunophenotyping completes the diagnosis by identifying the presence of B markers. Chemotherapy is currently the main treatment of BL, because of the high chemosensitivity of the tumor and its low radiosensitivity. Overall survival in localized stages is close to 100%. PMID:22285713

  19. [Primary bone lymphoma with multicentric involvement].

    PubMed

    Graziadio, Marcelo; Medina, Natalia; Amato, Marcelo; Ardaiz, María Del Carmen; Ilutovich, Santiago; Torino, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Primary bone lymphoma is a rare disease, which usually has a different presentation and evolution than lymphomas of other locations. We are presenting a case of primary bone lymphoma of rapid growth, in cranial and sternal locations. In its evolution, once the excision of the primary lesion of the skull was performed, the patient presented new lesions of rapid growth at the skull and femur level, and progression of pre-sternal lesion. With large B-cell diffuse non-Hodgkin lymphoma pathology, the patient initiated R-CHOPP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone and rituximab) with rapid reduction of all lesions without evidence of progression after the six cycles. PMID:23089121

  20. Conjunctival Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Darshak S.; Rundle, Paul; Salvi, Sachin M.; Fernando, Malee; Mudhar, Hardeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) represents an uncommon variant of T-cell lymphomas and most often presents insidiously with systemic symptoms. This report constitutes the first documented case of conjunctival AITL, masquerading as nodular episcleritis, and describes both the clinical and pathological findings. Furthermore, conjunctival T-cell lymphoma in general remains a rare occurrence, and a survey of previously reported cases reveals a wide variation in clinical presentation. A high index of suspicion, thorough examination and conjunctival biopsy are essential to reaching the diagnosis of conjunctival lymphoma. PMID:27231687

  1. Conjunctival Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Darshak S; Rundle, Paul; Salvi, Sachin M; Fernando, Malee; Mudhar, Hardeep Singh

    2015-02-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) represents an uncommon variant of T-cell lymphomas and most often presents insidiously with systemic symptoms. This report constitutes the first documented case of conjunctival AITL, masquerading as nodular episcleritis, and describes both the clinical and pathological findings. Furthermore, conjunctival T-cell lymphoma in general remains a rare occurrence, and a survey of previously reported cases reveals a wide variation in clinical presentation. A high index of suspicion, thorough examination and conjunctival biopsy are essential to reaching the diagnosis of conjunctival lymphoma. PMID:27231687

  2. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  3. MS-275 and Isotretinoin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Ibrutinib for mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tucker, David L; Rule, Simon A

    2016-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare and aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Ibrutinib is a first-in-class, oral inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase which acts by downstream inhibition of the B-cell receptor. Early clinical trials have demonstrated excellent tolerability and a modest side-effect profile in relapsed/refractory MCL. Although the majority of disease responses are partial, efficacy data are impressive with more than two-thirds of patients demonstrating a durable response. This article focuses on all aspects of ibrutinib in the context of MCL, including a summary of the basic pharmacology and pharmacokinetics; a review of the safety and efficacy data published to date and a discussion of the future implications in MCL. PMID:26759179

  5. [Perspective of cutaneous lymphoma reserach].

    PubMed

    Dummer, Reinhard; Urosevic, Mirjana; Cozzio, Antonio; Asagoe, Kenji; Döbbeling, Udo; Burg, Günter

    2006-06-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are characterized by an expansion of hematopoietic cells in the special microenvironment of the skin. They represent a special challenge both for researches and for clinicians who treat patients with these disorders. New research data concerning the biology of lymphocytes and the cutaneous microenvironment have increased our knowledge of these diseases in the last decades. The new WHO/EORTC classification definitely will facilitate a more detailed investigation of the various subtypes. PMID:16734840

  6. Orbital lymphoma: Role of radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, B S; Sharma, S C

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the literature for clinical presentation, treatment, outcome and complications of using radiotherapy for the treatment of orbital lymphoma. For this, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched through January 2007 for published data on primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the orbit. The search was conducted in all document types, using the following terms “Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, MALT (mucosa associated lymphoid tissue) and orbit”. Data extracted were based on age, sex, therapeutic methods and outcome of treatment. When full articles were not available, abstracts were used as a source of information. Only those articles whose abstracts or full text were available in English were included in table. The review of reports of NHL of the orbit, in general, served as a source of information about its clinical behavior, treatment and overall prognosis. Fifty-six publications were identified, including six in languages other than English. There was no randomized trial. All the studies were retrospective. The studies were heterogeneous in patient number (3 to 112), histology, disease stage (IE to IV), radiotherapy doses used (4 to 53.8Gy), local control rates (65 to 100%), distant relapse rates (0 to 67%, from low grade to high grade) and five-year survival rates (33 to 100%). Three of the studies with a good number of patients also demonstrated clinical benefit with radiotherapy in terms of superior efficacy or less toxicity. Available data support the acceptance of radiotherapy as a standard therapeutic option in patients with low to intermediate grade orbital lymphoma. Toxicity of radiotherapy is mild if delivered precisely. PMID:19237780

  7. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

  8. Hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yuya; Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Mori, Minako; Inoue, Daichi; Kimura, Takaharu; Shimoji, Sonoko; Togami, Katsuhiro; Tabata, Sumie; Kurata, Masayuki; Imai, Yukihiro; Matsushita, Akiko; Nagai, Kenichi; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2010-04-01

    A 32-year-old male with chronic hepatitis B was admitted to a hospital with cellulitis in the right leg in September 2006. Pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, and systemic superficial lymph node swelling were noted, and he was referred to our hospital. He developed fever and liver dysfunction in June 2007 and underwent a splenectomy. His pancytopenia subsequently improved. A pathologic diagnosis of hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma was made by examining spleen tissue and biopsy specimens of the liver and mesenteric lymph node. He had stage IVB disease because neoplastic T cells were noted in the bone marrow. The response of the lymphoma to conventional chemotherapy including the CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisolone) and DeVIC (dexamethasone, etoposide, ifoshamide, carboplatin) regimens was poor and transient. A partial remission was obtained with an ESHAP (etoposide, cisplatin, cytarabine, methylprednisolone) regimen. Therefore, we planned a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from an HLA-haploidentical sibling donor. He was moved to the Department of Hematology, Hyogo Medical College, to receive this BMT as part of a clinical trial. During the conditioning procedure for the transplantation, however, he died of septicemia. Since hepatosplenic alphabeta T cell lymphoma is very rare with only 23 reported cases to date, herein we report this case and discuss the therapeutic strategy. PMID:20217452

  9. Follicular lymphoma: evolving therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Brad S; Yang, David T

    2016-04-28

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the most common indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Western hemisphere. After decades of stagnation, the natural history of FL appears to have been favorably impacted by the introduction of rituximab. Randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that the addition of rituximab to standard chemotherapy induction has improved the overall survival. Maintenance rituximab strategies can improve progression-free survival. Even chemotherapy platforms have changed in the past 5 years, as bendamustine combined with rituximab has rapidly become a standard frontline strategy in North America and parts of Europe. Recent discoveries have identified patients at high risk for poor outcomes to first-line therapy (m7-Follicular Lymphoma International Prognostic Index [m7-FLIPI]) and for poor outcomes after frontline therapy (National LymphoCare Study). However, several unmet needs remain, including a better ability to identify high-risk patients at diagnosis, the development of predictive biomarkers for targeted agents, and strategies to reduce the risk of transformation. The development of targeted agents, exploiting our current understanding of FL biology, is a high research priority. A multitude of novel therapies are under investigation in both the frontline and relapsed/refractory settings. It will be critical to identify the most appropriate populations for new agents and to develop validated surrogate end points, so that novel agents can be tested (and adopted, if appropriate) efficiently. PMID:26989204

  10. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  11. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic

  12. Tanespimycin and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous

  13. CD43 expression in B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Treasure, J.; Lane, A.; Jones, D. B.; Wright, D. H.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the expression of CD43 in frozen sections in a range of B cell lymphomas. METHODS: The monoclonal antibody WR14, clustered provisionally in the Fourth Leucocyte Typing Workshop as a CD43 reagent, was investigated by epitope blocking studies on formalin fixed reactive lymph node tissue, using the established CD43 antibody MT1, to validate its use as a CD43 reagent. CD43 expression was studied in 131 immunophenotypically defined B cell lymphomas, including lymphocytic lymphoma (Lc, n = 13), centrocytic lymphoma (Cc, n = 14), and a range of follicle centre cell lymphomas (FCC) including centroblastic/centrocytic follicular (CbCcF, n = 48), centroblastic diffuse (CbD, n = 39), centroblastic/centrocytic diffuse (CbCcD, n = 4), centroblastic follicular and diffuse (Cb FD, n = 3) and centroblastic/centrocytic follicular and diffuse (CbCc FD, n = 1). Nine lymphomas of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) were also examined. RESULTS: Epitope blocking studies showed that WR14 is a CD43 reagent that binds to an epitope identical with or close to that recognised by MT1. Eleven of 13 (84%) cases of Lc and 11 of 14 (78%) cases of Cc expressed CD43; 87 of 95 (91%) cases of FCC did not. All eight low grade lymphomas of MALT were negative. One high grade lymphoma, transformed from a low grade MALT lymphoma, was positive for CD43. The expression of CD43 by tumours of B cell lineage was associated with the expression of CD5 (p < 0.001) although either antigen could occasionally be found in the absence of the other. CONCLUSION: CD43 reagents can be used in conjunction with CD5 antibodies for the immunophenotypic discrimination of follicle centre cell lymphomas from non-follicle centre cell lymphomas. Images PMID:1280654

  14. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  15. Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory CD30+ Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  17. Stem Cell Transplantation for Indolent Lymphoma. A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    van Besien, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic transplantation is established as a curative treatment for follicular lymphoma, but with considerable short and long-term morbidity and mortality. Data and controversies regarding conditioning regimen, donor source, GVHD prophylaxis, post transplant interventions and approaches to predict and reduce morbidity and mortality are reviewed. Total body irradiation is very effective but toxic and reduced intensity conditioning is often preferred though associated with somewhat higher rates of recurrence. The risk of chronic GVHD and its late sequelae can be markedly reduced by in-vivo T-cell depletion using alemtuzumab but also leads to somewhat higher incidence of disease recurrence. When using such treatment strategies, one can consider prophylactic or preemptive donor lymphocyte infusions or low toxicity medical treatment such as rituximab. Overall the long term outcomes, particularly survival and current progression free survival of patients undergoing allogeneic transplantation for indolent lymphoma have steadily improved and transplant can now often safely be considered up to the sixth decade of life. Outcomes of unrelated donor transplantation approach those of HLA-identical sibling transplant and even mismatched umbilical cord transplant can be considered in selected patients. The assessment of risks and benefits is aided by the use of various novel tools. PMID:21641099

  18. Nature and importance of follicular lymphoma precursors

    PubMed Central

    Mamessier, Emilie; Broussais-Guillaumot, Florence; Chetaille, Bruno; Bouabdallah, Reda; Xerri, Luc; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Nadel, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that cancer development is a protracted process requiring the stepwise acquisition of multiple oncogenic events. In humans, this process can take decades, if not a lifetime, blurring the notion of ‘healthy’ individuals. Follicular lymphoma exemplifies this multistep pathway of oncogenesis. In recent years, variants of follicular lymphoma have been recognized that appear to represent clonal B-cell expansions at an early stage of follicular lymphoma lymphomagenesis. These include follicular lymphoma in situ, duodenal follicular lymphoma, partial involvement by follicular lymphoma, and in the blood circulating follicular lymphoma-like B cells. Recent genetic studies have identified similarities and differences between the early lesions and overt follicular lymphoma, providing important information for understanding their biological evolution. The data indicate that there is already genomic instability at these early stages, even in instances with a low risk for clinical progression. The overexpression of BCL2 in t(14;18)-positive B cells puts them at risk for subsequent genetic aberrations when they re-enter the germinal center and are exposed to the influences of activation-induced cytidine deaminase and somatic hypermutations. The emerging data provide a rationale for clinical management and, in the future, may identify genetic risk factors that warrant early therapeutic intervention. PMID:24790058

  19. Rituximab, Rasburicase, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Advanced B-Cell Leukemia or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-10

    Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  2. Rituximab, Lenalidomide, and Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Follicular Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  3. FDG-PET/CT in lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D'souza, Maria M; Jaimini, Abhinav; Bansal, Abhishek; Tripathi, Madhavi; Sharma, Rajnish; Mondal, Anupam; Tripathi, Rajendra Prashad

    2013-01-01

    Lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases that arise from the constituent cells of the immune system or from their precursors. 18F-fludeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is now the cornerstone of staging procedures in the state-of-the-art management of Hodgkin's disease and aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. It plays an important role in staging, restaging, prognostication, planning appropriate treatment strategies, monitoring therapy, and detecting recurrence. However, its role in indolent lymphomas is still unclear and calls for further investigational trials. The protean PET/CT manifestations of lymphoma necessitate a familiarity with the spectrum of imaging findings to enable accurate diagnosis. A meticulous evaluation of PET/CT findings, an understanding of its role in the management of lymphomas, and knowledge of its limitations are mandatory for the optimal utilization of this technique. PMID:24604942

  4. Treatment options for ocular adnexal lymphoma (OAL)

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Victoria Mary Lendrum

    2009-01-01

    Most lymphomas that involve the ocular adnexal structure are low grade, B cell, non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas. The treatment depends upon the grade and stage of the disease. High grade lymhoma requires treatment with systemic chemotherapy whereas the localized low grade (extranodal marginal zone lymphoma) can be successfully managed with local radiotherapy. Chlamydia psittaci infection is associated with low grade ocular lymphoma; however there is wide geographic variation in the strength of this association. Blanket antibiotic therapy is not advised unless there is proof of an infective agent. The monoclonal antibody, rituximab, may be successful for CD20 positive lymphoma, although it is likely that rituximab will have better long-term results when used in combination with systemic chemotherapy. PMID:20054418

  5. Aberrant immunophenotypes of mantle cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Wohlschlaeger, Ch; Lange, K; Merz, H; Feller, A C

    2003-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphomas (MCL) are characterized by cytomorphological criteria, a distinct immunophenotype and a characteristic chromosomal aberration (t(11;14)). In morphological variants of MCL the immunohistochemical constellation with CD5-positivity and CD23-negativity is a helpful and decisive diagnostic aid to differentiate MCL from other B-cell-lymphomas, e.g. lymphocytic lymphomas (B-CLL). In this study the morphological, immunophenotypical, and genetical features of 50 MCL were analysed. Five cases revealed an aberrant immunophenotype with lacking expression of CD5 (n = 3) and positive reactivity to CD23 (n = 2) while cyclin D1 expression could be demonstrated in all 5 cases. These constellations show that there is, besides morphological subgroups, a small group of MCL with aberrant immunophenotypes, which has to be taken into account in the differential diagnosis to lymphocytic lymphoma and other lymphomas. PMID:12688344

  6. Study of Bortezomib and Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma or NK/T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-26

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma (Not Otherwise Specified); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma Nasal Type; Enteropathy- Type T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) (ALK-1 Negative); Relapsed ALCL (ALK-1 Positive) Post Autologous Transplant

  7. Rare Case of Primary Gastric Burkitt Lymphoma in a Child.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soon Chul; Hwang, Jung Won; Lee, Min Kyung; Hwang, Pyoung Han

    2016-08-25

    Primary gastric tumors are very rare in children. Burkitt lymphoma is a common type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and gastric Burkitt lymphoma usually occurs in the aged. When involving the gastrointestinal tract, primary gastric Burkitt lymphoma is very rare in younger childhood. Many gastric lymphomas including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma are associated with Helicobacter pylori infection or acute bleeding symptom. We report a seven-year-old boy who presented with only some vomiting and postprandial pain. His upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy revealed a large primary Burkitt lymphoma with no acute bleeding and no evidence of H. pylori infection. After chemotherapy, he remains in remission. PMID:27554215

  8. Prognostic analyses on anatomical and morphological classification of feline lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hirofumi; Fujino, Yasuhito; Chino, Junko; Takahashi, Masashi; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2014-06-01

    The present study was carried out to analyze the prognosis of 163 cats with lymphoma classified anatomically and cytomorphologically. Anatomically, alimentary lymphoma was the most common form and showed significantly shorter survival than mediastinal and nasal lymphomas in cats. Cytomorphologically, there was no predominant subtype in feline lymphomas. Immunoblastic type (18%), centroblastic type (16%), globule leukocyte type (15%), lymphocytic type (12%), lymphoblastic type (12%), pleomorphic medium and large cell type (10%) and anaplastic large cell type (7%) were relatively common subtypes. Most of the cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma had the alimentary form. Comparing median survival time among classifications, cats with globule leukocyte lymphoma showed significantly shorter survival than those with high-grade and other low-grade lymphomas. Furthermore, cats with high-grade lymphomas showed significantly shorter survival than cats with other low-grade lymphomas. The present study indicated the clinical significance of anatomical and cytomorphological evaluation in feline lymphomas. PMID:24521793

  9. Ondansetron in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-26

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell

  10. Orbital MALT lymphoma, abdominal hodgkin lymphoma, and systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma develop sequentially in one patient.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Ichimura, Kouichi; Shinagawa, Katsuji

    2012-01-01

    In February 2002, a 42-year-old woman developed ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), MALT lymphoma, in the bilateral orbits involving lacrimal glands. She underwent 30 Gy external beam irradiation to the orbital lesions on both sides. She was well until November 2008 when she developed abdominal lymphadenopathy and transabdominal excisional biopsy showed mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma at stage II. She underwent standard combination chemotherapy. In July 2010, she developed systemic lymphadenopathy and was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by cervical lymph node biopsy. She underwent rituximab monotherapy and finally allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in October 2010, but died of renal failure in February 2011. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene gave rise to dominant discrete fragments of the same size between the orbital lesion with MALT lymphoma in 2002 and the cervical lymph node lesion with DLBCL in 2010. The sequential development of MALT lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and DLBCL in the long-term course of this patient suggests the common origin of the neoplastic cells, changing their pathological faces in response to irradiation and combination chemotherapy. PMID:22706530

  11. Intraoral Burkitt's lymphoma in an HIV positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Ajila, Vidya; Gopakumar, R.; Hegde, Shruthi; Babu, Subhas G.

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive form of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma composed of malignant cells of B lymphocyte origin. Burkitt's lymphoma is a rarity in the Indian subcontinent. Though intraoral Burkitt's lymphoma in HIV positive individuals is very uncommon, its importance lies in the fact that it is often the first sign of the underlying immunosuppression. We present a case of Burkitt's lymphoma in right maxillary region which was the first manifestation of HIV in the patient. PMID:23188938

  12. The Role of Surgery in Primary Gastric Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, Agustin; Nambo, M Jesús; Neri, Natividad; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Cuadra, Ivonne; Alvarado, Isabel; Castañeda, Claudia; Fernández, Raúl; González, Martha

    2004-01-01

    Objective: We began a controlled clinical trial to assess efficacy and toxicity of surgery (S), surgery + radiotherapy (SRT), surgery + chemotherapy (SCT), and chemotherapy (CT) in the treatment of primary gastric diffuse large cell lymphoma in early stages: IE and II1. Summary Background Data: Management of primary gastric lymphoma remains controversial. No controlled clinical trials have evaluated the different therapeutic schedules, and prognostic factors have not been identified in a uniform population. Patients and Methods: Five hundred eighty-nine patients were randomized to be treated with S (148 patients), SR (138 patients), SCT (153 patients), and CT (150 patients). Radiotherapy was delivered at doses of 40 Gy; chemotherapy was CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone) at standard doses. International Prognostic Index (IPI) and modified IPI (MIPI) were assessed to determine outcome. Results: Complete response rates were similar in the 4 arms. Actuarial curves at 10 years of event-free survival (EFS) were as follows: S: 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22% to 41%); SRT: 23% (95% CI, 16% to 29%); that were statistically significant when compared with SCT: 82% (95% CI, 73% to 89%); and CT: 92% (95% CI, 84% to 99%) (P < 0.001). Actuarial curves at 10 years showed that overall survivals (OS) were as follows: S: 54% (95% CI, 46% to 64%); SRT: 53% (95% CI, 45% to 68%); that were statistically significant to SCT: 91% (95% CI, 85% to 99%); CT: 96% (95% CI, 90% to 103%)(P < 0.001). Late toxicity was more frequent and severe in patients who undergoing surgery. IPI and MIPI were not useful in determining outcome and multivariate analysis failed to identify other prognostic factors. Conclusion: In patients with primary gastric diffuse large cell lymphoma and aggressive histology, diffuse large cell lymphoma in early stage SCT achieved good results, but surgery was associated with some cases of lethal complications. Thus it appears that CT

  13. Plitidepsin (Aplidin) is a potent inhibitor of diffuse large cell and Burkitt lymphoma and is synergistic with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Barboza, Nora M; Medina, Daniel J; Budak-Alpdogan, Tulin; Aracil, Miguel; Jimeno, José M; Bertino, Joseph R; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2012-01-15

    Plitidepsin (Aplidin), an antitumor agent of marine origin, presently is undergoing phase II/III clinical trials, and has shown promise for the treatment of lymphoma. Here, we describe the antitumor effects of plitidepsin alone and in combination with rituximab and investigated the effects of each drug and the combination on the cell cycle and mechanism of cell death. Several Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma (DLCL) lines and Burkitt cell lines were tested for sensitivity to plitidepsin and rituximab. All DLCL and Burkitt lymphoma cell lines were inhibited by plitidepsin in nanomolar concentrations, while rituximab sensitivity varied among different cell lines. Ramos and the RL cell lines proved sensitive to rituximab and were used to test the effects of each of the two drugs. The two agents exhibited synergism at all tested concentrations. For in vivo studies, irradiated athymic nude mice were engrafted with the Ramos lymphoma. Treatment was initiated when the tumors were ~0.5 cm in diameter, and toxic and therapeutic effects were monitored. In the in vivo study, additive effects of the combined two drugs, was demonstrated without an increase in host toxicity. The in vitro synergy and the in vivo additive antitumor effects without an increase in host toxicity with two relatively non-marrow suppressive agents encourages further development of this combination for treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas. PMID:22336911

  14. Inhibition of estrogen biosynthesis enhances lymphoma growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Talaber, Gergely; Yakimchuk, Konstantin; Guan, Jiyu; Inzunza, Jose; Okret, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Most lymphomas show higher incidence and poorer prognosis in males compared to females. However, the endocrine contribution to this gender difference is not entirely known. Here we show that castration accelerates lymphoma growth in C57BL6 male mice grafted with murine EG7 T cell lymphoma cells. However, the androgen receptor antagonist Bicalutamide did not affect lymphoma growth, suggesting no impact of androgen receptor signaling on lymphoma progression. In contrast, inhibition of androgen-to-estrogen conversion by the aromatase inhibitor (AI) Letrozole induced faster lymphoma growth in mice, suggesting that androgens impact lymphoma growth through its conversion to estrogens. This was supported by the inability of dihydrotestosterone, which is not converted to estrogens by aromatase, to influence lymphoma growth in castrated male mice. Lymphoma growth was also stimulated in immunocompromised mice grafted with human B cell lymphoma (Granta-519) and treated with either reversible or irreversible AIs, showing that the blockage of estrogen synthesis caused enhanced growth of both murine T and human B cell lymphomas and with different AIs. Additionally, AI-treated EG7 lymphomas showed accelerated growth not only in male but also in intact female mice. Altogether, our results demonstrate that aromatase inhibition accelerates lymphoma growth but not androgens per se, highlighting a protective role of estrogens in lymphoma pathogenesis. These results also raise concern that the use of AIs in women with breast cancer might enhance lymphoma progression. PMID:26943574

  15. HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Secondary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Double-hit and double-protein-expression lymphomas: aggressive and refractory lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Coiffier, Bertrand

    2015-11-01

    Double-hit lymphoma (DHL) is a subgroup of aggressive lymphomas with both MYC and BCL2 gene rearrangements, characterised by a rapidly progressing clinical course that is refractory to aggressive treatment and short survival. Over time, the definition was modified and now includes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) with MYC translocation combined with an additional translocation involving BCL2 or BCL6. Some cases that have a similar clinical course with concomitant overexpression of MYC or BCL2 proteins were recently characterised as immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas (ie, double-protein-expression lymphomas [DPLs]). The clinical course of these DPLs is worse than so-called standard DLBCL but suggested by some studies to be slightly better than DHL, although there is overlap between the two categories. Present treatment does not allow cure or long-term survival in patients with genetic or immunohistochemical double-hit lymphomas, but several new drugs are being developed. PMID:26545844

  18. [Primary testicular malignant lymphoma in a hemodialysis patient : a case report].

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Hiroyoshi; Sakaki, Manabu; Hamao, Takumi

    2015-02-01

    We report a case of testicular malignant lymphoma in a hemodialysis patient. A 65-year-old man who had been undergoing hemodialysis for 8 years and 10 months consulted our hospital with right testicular enlargement in August 2012. Under a diagnosis of testicular cancer from manipulation test and ultrasonography, high orchiectomy was performed. Computed tomography showed swelling of the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. Histopathological examination revealed diffuse, non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, CD20+. R-CHOP chemotherapy was initiated and retroperitoneal lymph node swelling completely disappeared after 1 cycle of chemotherapy. After completing 2 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient developed interstitial pneumonia, and thus radiotherapy to the retroperitoneal space including the left testis was performed. As of July 2014, the patient remains alive without recurrence. PMID:25812596

  19. Bendamustine Hydrochloride, Etoposide, Dexamethasone, and Filgrastim For Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Refractory or Recurrent Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  20. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, John T

    2015-09-01

    The non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) of childhood include high-grade mature B cell lymphoma [Burkitt lymphoma (BL), diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMLBCL)], anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL). The prognosis for children with NHL is generally excellent, although there are some higher risk groups. In this regard, PMLBCL is generally associated with a poorer outcome than BL or DLBCL of comparable stage. The long-term event-free survival for children with ALCL is approximately 70 %. Novel biological agents, including those that target CD-30 or ALK, may hold promise for improving treatment results. Children with LL are treated with regimens derived from those used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent biological study of LL may provide insights into revising treatment stratification. The challenge in pediatric NHL, a group that already has a relatively good prognosis, is to improve treatment outcome without increasing concerning late effects. PMID:26174528

  1. Risk of CNS dissemination in extranodal lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2014-04-01

    Extranodal lymphomas constitute a heterogeneous group of malignancies, accounting for roughly 60% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The extranodal organ where lymphomas arise is an important determining factor of biological, molecular, and aetio-pathogenic features, and of presentation, dissemination pattern, and outcome. An increased risk of CNS involvement, an uncommon but lethal event, has been suggested in some extranodal lymphomas, but the absolute risk is still debatable for most of these malignancies. This debate is because of the presence of selection biases and other confounding factors in related literature, which inevitably has led to conflicting recommendations. The identification of extranodal lymphomas at increased risk of CNS dissemination is an important unmet clinical need; affected patients could benefit from early CNS assessment by neuroimaging and cerebrospinal fluid analysis and adequate CNS prophylaxis, avoiding unnecessary prophylaxis and related toxicity in low-risk patients. This Review discusses relevant confounding factors and identifies high-risk extranodal lymphomas analysing histopathological category, involved organ, and other specific risk factors, which could be helpful for result interpretation and patient stratification in future clinical trials. Finally, a recommendation is provided for CNS-directed management of high-risk extranodal lymphoma patients in daily practice. PMID:24694639

  2. EBV and HIV-Related Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bibas, Michele; Antinori, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    HIV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders represent a heterogeneous group of diseases, arising in the presence of HIV-associated immunodeficiency. The overall prevalence of HIV-associated lymphoma is significantly higher compared to that of the general population and it continues to be relevant even after the wide availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (1). Moreover, they still represent one of the most frequent cause of death in HIV-infected patients. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a γ-Herpesviruses, is involved in human lymphomagenesis, particularly in HIV immunocompromised patients. It has been largely implicated in the development of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders as Burkitt lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin disease (HD), systemic non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NC). Virus-associated lymphomas are becoming of significant concern for the mortality of long-lived HIV immunocompromised patients, and therefore, research of advanced strategies for AIDS-related lymphomas is an important field in cancer chemotherapy. Detailed understanding of the EBV lifecycle and related cancers at the molecular level is required for novel strategies of molecular-targeted cancer chemotherapy The linkage of HIV-related lymphoma with EBV infection of the tumor clone has several pathogenetic, prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications which are reviewed herein. PMID:21416008

  3. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors, Multiple Myeloma, or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma With or Without Impaired Liver or Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Lymphoma in Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Brugières, Laurence; Brice, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas are one of the commonest malignancies in adolescents and young adults (AYA) accounting respectively for 22% of all cancers in patients aged 15-24 years (16% for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and 6% for non-HL (NHL)). The distribution of NHL subtypes in this age group differs strikingly from the distribution in children and in older adults with 4 main subtypes accounting for the majority of the cases: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) including primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma or anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Age-related differences in tumor biology have been demonstrated mainly in DLBCL but there is still a need for biological studies to better understand age-related differences in this age group. AYA patients currently diagnosed with HL and NHL have 5-year survival expectations exceeding 90 and 75%, respectively. Different therapeutic strategies are often used in children and adult lymphoma and the dispersion of lymphoma care between adult and pediatric hematologist-oncologists results in heterogeneous strategies for each subgroup according to age. The impact of these different strategies on outcomes is not easy to evaluate given the paucity of population-based data focused on this age group, taking into account tumor biology and the lack of a uniform staging system. Given the excellent results obtained with current therapies, the challenge now is to develop strategies aimed at reducing acute and long-term toxicity in most patients while maintaining high cure rates and to identify patients at high risk of failure requiring new strategies including more selective targeted therapies. PMID:27595360

  5. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Malignant Neoplasm; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Rituximab in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-28

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Graft Versus Host Disease; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III

  7. Study of MLN8237 in Patients With Advanced Hematological Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-17

    B-cell Follicular Lymphoma; B-cell Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Mantle Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (SLL); B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (B-CLL); Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia; Noncutaneous Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Not Otherwise Specified (PTCL-NOS); Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma (AITL); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma (EATCL); NK Lymphoma (NKL)

  8. Oxaliplatin, Ifosfamide and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-21

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Primary Burkitt lymphoma in the posterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Zied; Charfi, Slim; Hentati, Abdessalem; Ayadi, Ines; Abid, Hanene; Frikha, Imed

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old boy was admitted to our hospital with complaints of posterior chest pain and dyspnea. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the chest revealed a mass in the posterior mediastinum, extending from T8 to T11 with intraspinal involvement. A percutaneous core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of Burkitt lymphoma. He was treated according to the Lymphoma Malignancy B protocol 2001 arm C3, but he presented with liver and brain relapses and died 7.5 months after admission. Although lymphoma is rarely localized in the posterior mediastinum, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of posterior mediastinal masses in children. PMID:26038605

  10. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  11. An overview of cutaneous T cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Bagherani, Nooshin; Smoller, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are a heterogeneous group of extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas that are characterized by a cutaneous infiltration of malignant monoclonal T lymphocytes. They typically afflict adults with a median age of 55 to 60 years, and the annual incidence is about 0.5 per 100,000. Mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, and primary cutaneous peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are the most important subtypes of CTCL. CTCL is a complicated concept in terms of etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. Herein, we summarize advances which have been achieved in these fields. PMID:27540476

  12. Neuroimaging in Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Seyed Ali; Vossough, Arastoo; Hajmomenian, Mehrdad; Assadsangabi, Reza; Mohan, Suyash

    2016-08-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare aggressive high-grade type of extranodal lymphoma. PCNSL can have a variable imaging appearance and can mimic other brain disorders such as encephalitis, demyelination, and stroke. In addition to PCNSL, the CNS can be secondarily involved by systemic lymphoma. Computed tomography and conventional MRI are the initial imaging modalities to evaluate these lesions. Recently, however, advanced MRI techniques are more often used in an effort to narrow the differential diagnosis and potentially inform diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. PMID:27443998

  13. Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Colby, T V; Dorfman, R F

    1979-01-01

    Malignant lymphomas involving the salivary glands are probably more common than has been previously recognized. They must be differentiated from the benign lymphoepithelial lesion, although there may be an association between the two. The entire histologic spectrum of malignant lymphomas found at other sites can be seen in the salivary gland. In this study of 59 patients with lymphoma affecting the salivary gland, a large percentage were found to have disseminated disease. We recommend the same rigorous clinical evaluation and staging procedures as used in patients who present with primary lymph node involvement. PMID:583554

  14. Genetics of Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yu; Feldman, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) comprises a group of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas unified by common morphologic and immunophenotypic characteristics, but with a spectrum of clinical presentations and behaviors. Early identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements in some ALCLs led to recognition of ALK as an important diagnostic and prognostic biomarker, and a key driver of ALCL pathobiology. Rearrangements and other genetic abnormalities of ALK subsequently were identified in diverse other human malignancies. Recent clinical, pathologic, and genetic data have begun to shed light on ALK-negative ALCLs, revealing significant heterogeneity within this more ill-defined entity. PMID:26104084

  15. SECOND AUTOLOGOUS STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR RELAPSED LYMPHOMA AFTER A PRIOR AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sonali M.; van Besien, Koen; Carreras, Jeanette; Bashey, Asad; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Freytes, Cesar O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory A.; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Holmberg, Leona A.; Keating, Armand; Maziarz, Richard T.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Navarro, Willis H.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Schouten, Harry C.; Seftel, Matthew; Wiernik, Peter H.; Vose, Julie M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Hari, Parameswaran

    2012-01-01

    We determined treatment-related mortality (TRM), progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) after a second autologous HCT (HCT2) for patients with lymphoma relapse after a prior HCT (HCT1). Outcomes for patients with either Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, n=21) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL, n=19) receiving HCT2 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) were analyzed. The median age at HCT2 was 38 years (range, 16–61) and 22 (58%) patients had a Karnofsky performance score less than 90. HCT2 was performed >1 year after HCT1 in 82%. The probability of TRM at day 100 was 15% (95% CI, 3–22%). The 1, 3 and 5 yr probabilities of PFS were 50% (95% CI, 34–66%), 36% (95% CI, 21–52%) and 30% (95% CI, 16–46%), respectively. Corresponding probabilities of survival were 65% (95% CI, 50–79%), 36% (95% CI, 22–52%) and 30% (95% CI, 17–46%), respectively. At a median follow up of 72 months (range, 12–124 months) after HCT2, 29 patients (73%) have died, 18 (62%) secondary to relapsed lymphoma. The outcomes of patients with HL and NHL were similar. In summary, this series represents the largest reported group of patients with relapsed lymphomas undergoing SCT2 following failed SCT1, and with long-term follow-up. Our series suggests that SCT2 is feasible in patients relapsing after prior HCT1, with a lower TRM than that reported for allogeneic transplant in this setting. HCT2 should be considered for patients with relapsed HL or NHL after HCT1 without alternative allogeneic stem cell transplant options. PMID:18640574

  16. Bortezomib and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Small Intestine Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  17. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cytomegalovirus Infection; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously

  18. 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Advanced Epithelial Cancer, Malignant Lymphoma, or Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-06

    AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Primary CNS Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Chondrosarcoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small

  19. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  20. A Phase II Study of Single Agent Brentuximab Vedotin in Relapsed/Refractory CD30 Low (<10%) Mature T Cell Lymphoma (TCL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepato-splenic T-cell Lymphoma; Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T-cell Lymphoma; NK T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Mycosis Fungoides

  1. High-Dose Y-90-Ibritumomab Tiuxetan Added to Reduced-Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Regimen for Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  2. Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Mottok, Anja; Fanale, Michelle

    2016-07-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a rare subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma with distinct clinicopathologic features. It is typified by the presence of lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells, which are CD20(+) but CD15(-) and CD30(-) and are found scattered amongst small B lymphocytes arranged in a nodular pattern. Despite frequent and often late or multiple relapses, the prognosis of NLPHL is very favorable. There is an inherent risk of secondary aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and studies support that risk is highest in those with splenic involvement at presentation. Given disease rarity, the optimal management is unclear and opinions differ as to whether treatment paradigms should be similar to or differ from those for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). This review provides an overview of the existing literature describing pathological subtypes, outcome and treatment approaches for NLPHL. PMID:27496311

  3. Study Identifies New Lymphoma Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    NCI researchers have identified new therapeutic targets for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs that hit these targets are under clinical development and the researchers hope to begin testing them in clinical trials of patients with DLBCL.

  4. Primary Vitreoretinal Lymphoma Masquerading as Refractory Retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Zloto, Ofira; Elkader, Amir E. Abd; Fabian, Ido Didi; Vishnevskia-Dai, Vicktoria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report a case of a patient with primary vitreoretinal lymphoma masquerading as retinitis. Methods Retrospective review of the patient's clinical, histopathological and imaging records. Results Cytopathology was negative for malignancy, and preliminary polymerase chain reaction results supported the diagnosis of varicella zoster virus retinitis. Therefore, the patient was treated with antiviral therapy. However, under this treatment, the retinitis progressed. As a result, primary vitreoretinal lymphoma was suspected, and empirical treatment with intravitreal methotrexate injections was started. Under this treatment, the ocular features improved. Five months after initial ocular presentation and ocular resolution, the patient presented with central nervous system lymphoma. Conclusion This case should raise the awareness of the variable clinical presentations, the challenging diagnosis and treatment of primary vitreoretinal lymphoma. All cases should be continuously systemically evaluated. PMID:26557084

  5. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the chest a computerized tomography (CT or CAT) scan , which rotates around the patient and creates ... ray (Video) Getting an MRI (Video) Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Chemotherapy Hodgkin Lymphoma Stem Cell Transplants ...

  6. Mantle cell lymphoma: Frontline and salvage therapy.

    PubMed

    Romaguera, Jorge E

    2008-10-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a therapeutic challenge because of its lower cure rate when compared with other lymphomas such as diffuse large cell lymphoma. The current emphasis in the treatment of newly diagnosed MCL has been on intensifying chemotherapy, but there is no consensus on the need to consolidate with autologous stem cell transplantation. These approaches, however, have not resulted in a cure. Newer strategies include the use of models to aid in tailoring therapy. Likewise, autologous stem cell consolidation does not cure relapsed disease. Because of its known graft-versus-lymphoma effect, allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers a potentially curative option for relapsed MCL. New insights into resistance pathways and new drugs created to inhibit them offer great promise in the treatment of newly diagnosed and previously treated MCL. PMID:20425467

  7. EBV associated lymphomas in 2008 WHO classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tiantian; Fu, Qianqian; Gao, Dalin; Ge, Liyan; Sun, Lin; Zhai, Qiongli

    2014-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous γ-herpes virus that asymptomatically infects more than 90% of the world's population. The exact mechanism of EBV in oncogenesis is an area of active debate. However, EBV has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several kinds of lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders, including B-, T- and NK-cell derived. Subsequent studies have proven that the EBV gene expression product plays an activating and/or promoting role on lymphomagenesis, and paves the way for novel cellular therapies of EBV-associated lymphomas. This review concentrates on the pathology, morphology, treatment and prognosis of EBV-associated lymphomas in the 2008 WHO classification of tumors of hematopoietic and lymphoma tissues. PMID:24355441

  8. Clinical Management Updates in Mantle Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Robert; Sanchez, James; Rosen, Steven T

    2016-04-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is often considered incurable. Different clinical and biological biomarkers can be utilized to categorize this lymphoma into various risk levels. Several randomized trials reported in 2015 shed light on the optimal induction therapy. Recent advances include: (1) identification of new pathways to target, (2) novel therapeutics to treat patients with relapsed/refractory disease, and (3) monitoring of minimal residual disease and adoption of a maintenance therapy approach to prevent relapses post induction or post stem cell transplantation. Due to the efforts of translational/clinical research, the overall survival of patients with mantle cell lymphoma has increased and should continue to improve. PMID:27083466

  9. Risk factors identified for certain lymphoma subtypes

    Cancer.gov

    In a large international collaborative analysis of risk factors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), scientists were able to quantify risk associated with medical history, lifestyle factors, family history of blood or lymph-borne cancers, and occupation for 11

  10. FDA Approves First Immunotherapy for Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    The FDA has approved nivolumab (Opdivo®) for the treatment of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma whose disease has relapsed or worsened after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation followed by brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris®)

  11. Immune Therapy Makes Headway Against a Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma. And those pretreated with more aggressive chemotherapy did even better, researchers report. "It's a ... trial, a group of 20 patients who received aggressive two-drug chemotherapy responded very well to the ...

  12. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Cancer.gov

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  13. Burkitt lymphoma with unusual presentation: Acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koca, Tugba; Aslan, Nagehan; Dereci, Selim; Akcam, Mustafa

    2015-08-01

    Pancreatitis due to malignant infiltration is an uncommon condition in childhood. Pancreatic lymphomas constitute <2% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only six reported cases with various clinical presentation have been documented in the literature. Described herein is the case of a nine-year-old boy with abdominal pain, jaundice, emesis, weight loss, diarrhea, who developed hyperlipidemia and cholestasis. Pancreatitis was suspected due to high amylase and lipase. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed diffuse enlargement of the pancreas. This sausage pancreas imaging was suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis, but the patient was diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma on bone marrow aspiration, and rapidly improved with chemotherapy. Burkitt lymphoma should be kept in mind when patients present with pancreatitis, especially with diffuse enlarged pancreas. PMID:26031558

  14. International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph)

    Cancer.gov

    A consortium designed to enhance collaboration among epidemiologists studying lymphoma, to provide a forum for the exchange of research ideas, and to create a framework for collaborating on analyses that pool data from multiple studies

  15. Gene Therapy After Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection

  16. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  17. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-07

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  18. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  19. Lenalidomide And Rituximab as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent

  20. Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) – diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Skalec, Karolina; Litwin, Linda; Drozdz, Katarzyna; Gac, Pawel; Jazwiec, Przemyslaw; Zymlinski, Robert; Molenda, Wlodzimierz; Szuba, Andrzej; Janczak, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma (PCL) is the very rare disease that is associated with a high mortality rate. A prompt and proper diagnosis may affect the prognosis, and proper treatment may improve life expectancy. This report documents the case of a 74-year-old female with primary cardiac lymphoma. Unfortunately, the patient died from heart failure on her 23rd day in hospital. PMID:26702288

  1. Bryostatin 1 Plus Vincristine in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma After Bone Marrow or Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  2. PXD101 and 17-N-Allylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-15

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV

  3. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  4. High-dose gallium imaging in lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.C.; Leonard, R.C.; Canellos, G.P.; Skarin, A.T.; Kaplan, W.D.

    1983-08-01

    The role of gallium-67 imaging in the management of patients with lymphoma, traditionally assessed using low tracer doses and the rectilinear scanner, was assessed when using larger doses (7 to 10 mCi) and a triple-peak Anger camera. Gallium scan results in 51 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 21 patients with Hodgkin's disease were compared with simultaneous radiologic, clinical, and histopathologic reports. Subsequent disease course was also evaluated in light of radionuclide findings. Sensitivity and specificity of the scans were 0.90 or greater for both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease, and overall accuracy by site was 96 percent. Although there are insufficient numbers of pretreatment scans to allow any conclusions, our data suggest that newer approaches to gallium scanning in treated patients are (1) highly specific in all lymphomas and most sensitive in high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; (2) valuable in assessing the mediastinum in both non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease; and (3) helpful adjuncts to computed tomographic scanning and ultrasonography in assessing abdominal node disease.

  5. Novel treatments for T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Yoon; Oki, Yasuhiro; Fanale, Michelle A

    2015-01-01

    T-cell lymphomas are a biologically and clinically diverse collection of diseases that collectively account for 10% to 15% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Unlike B-cell lymphomas, the response of T-cell lymphomas to standard anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens is suboptimal and the prognosis of patients is accordingly poor. To address these shortcomings, there has been a proliferation in biologic agents with novel mechanisms of action that target surface antigens, signaling pathways, or cellular processes. Given the large number of candidate molecules showing preclinical promise and the rarity of these diseases, drug development for peripheral T-cell lymphoma is challenging. We provide an overview of agents that have recently been approved for relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma and highlight efforts to introduce these agents into front-line treatment protocols in combination with chemotherapy. We discuss biologic doublets currently being evaluated as "chemotherapy-free" salvage regimens and highlight some of the most promising investigational agents in early clinical development. PMID:25993211

  6. Vaccines for lymphomas: idiotype vaccines and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Levy, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines for lymphomas have been developed to induce active and long-lasting immune responses against lymphoma capable of eradicating the tumor. Most of these vaccines use the tumor B cell idiotype (the unique variable region of the surface immunoglobulin) as a tumor-specific antigen. The first human clinical trial for lymphoma vaccine was initiated 20 years ago. Along with several other phase I/II trials, it showed encouraging results which supported the initiation of three phase III trials. The results of these trials have recently been released (although not published yet) which failed to demonstrate a prolongation in progression-free survival following chemotherapy. Despite this disappointing result, a number of observations have accumulated over the years that suggest some clinical efficacy of lymphoma vaccines. Several strategies are being developed to improve these results that include optimization of antigen delivery and presentation as well as enhancement of anti-tumor T cell function. This review describes the clinical development of lymphoma vaccines and delineates advances, problems and prospects towards integration of this strategy in the therapeutic armamentarium for lymphoma. PMID:18951668

  7. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  8. CPI-613, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Genetically Engineered Lymphocyte Therapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma That is Resistant or Refractory to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-27

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  10. Clinicopathologic characteristics and treatment of marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma).

    PubMed

    Raderer, Markus; Kiesewetter, Barbara; Ferreri, Andrés J M

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) accounts for 7% to 8% of newly diagnosed lymphomas. Because of its association with infectious causes, such as Helicobacter pylori (HP) or Chlamydophila psittaci (CP), and autoimmune diseases, it has become the paradigm of an antigen-driven malignancy. MALT lymphoma usually displays an indolent course, and watch-and-wait strategies are justified initially in a certain percentage of patients. In patients with gastric MALT lymphoma or ocular adnexal MALT lymphoma, antibiotic therapy against HP or CP, respectively, is the first-line management of choice, resulting in lymphoma response rates from 75% to 80% after HP eradication and from 33% to 65% after antibiotic therapy for CP. In patients who have localized disease that is refractory to antibiotics, radiation is widely applied in various centers with excellent local control, whereas systemic therapies are increasingly being applied, at least in Europe, because of the potentially systemic nature of the disease. Therefore, the objective of this review is to briefly summarize the clinicopathologic characteristics of this distinct type of lymphoma along with current data on management strategies. PMID:26773441

  11. Mechanical Stimulation in Preventing Bone Density Loss in Patients Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-07-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Poor Prognosis Metastatic Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved

  12. Intravenous Chemotherapy or Oral Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage III-IV HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma

  13. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab, Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Hodgkin's or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. [Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma developed newly after 9-year remission of a follicular lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Hirano, Taichi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Toyozumi, Yasuo; Arima, Nobuyuki; Tsuda, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) occasionally transforms into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). This is generally associated with a poor prognosis, necessitating more potent chemotherapy as salvage treatment. However, de novo DLBCL, but not DLBCL transformed from FL, can be treated as primary DLBCL. We encountered a 63-year-old woman who developed DLBCL after a 9-year remission following treatment of FL. To differentiate DLBCL transformed from FL and de novo DLBCL, VDJ gene rearrangements in IgH were examined by PCR using biopsy specimens from both lymphomas. The results revealed the two lymphomas to be different clones. Thus, she was diagnosed with primary DLBCL. Therefore, routine chemotherapy and radiation therapy were conducted for the primary DLBCL with a limited stage, achieving complete remission. Treatment based on the clonality assessment of VDJ gene rearrangements is potentially useful for treating late relapse of B-cell lymphoma according to the pathological conditions of patients. PMID:26935635

  16. Anti-ICOS Monoclonal Antibody MEDI-570 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Follicular Variant or Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Follicular Variant Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Bevacizumab and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumor, Lymphoma, Intracranial Glioblastoma, Gliosarcoma or Anaplastic Astrocytoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-14

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV

  18. The spectrum of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a description of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-05-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization (WHO) 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this study, we present 10 cases of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma and have organized the criteria described by the WHO into four patterns along with detailed clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic characterization and outcome data. Our findings show a male preponderance, median age of 37 years and a mediastinal presentation in 80% of cases. All cases expressed at least two markers associated with B-cell lineage and good response to combination chemotherapy currently employed for non-Hodgkin lymphomas. PMID:22222636

  19. Vorinostat and Combination Chemotherapy With Rituximab in Treating Patients With HIV-Related Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Other Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Plasmablastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Grade 3b Follicular Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Plasmablastic Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  20. This is an exciting time in the treatment of lymphoma.

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cover Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma "This is an exciting time in the treatment of lymphoma." Past Issues / Summer ... best medication for each patient, indicates the best time for treatments, and sheds light on the patient's ...

  1. General Information about Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  2. General Information about Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  3. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these cases. ...

  4. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these ...

  5. Senator Arlen Specter: Backing Medical Research and Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma Senator Arlen Specter: Backing Medical Research and Battling Lymphoma Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table ... a long-time supporter and proponent of medical research. Recently, he underwent his second round of chemotherapy ...

  6. Senator Arlen Specter: Backing Medical Research and Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cover Story: Leukemia/Lymphoma Senator Arlen Specter: Backing Medical Research and Battling Lymphoma Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... been a long-time supporter and proponent of medical research. Recently, he underwent his second round of ...

  7. Non-Hodgkins lymphoma of maxilla: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, M. G.; Agrawal, S. M.; Kambalimath, Deepashri H.

    2011-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a group of neoplasms that originate from the cells of the lymphoreticular system. Forty percent of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas arise from extra nodal sites. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas detected primarily in the bone are quite rare, but among jaw lesions, they are more frequently present in the maxilla than in the mandible. There are no classical characteristic clinical features of lymphomas involving the jaw bones. Swelling, ulcer or discomfort may be present in the region of the lymphoma, or it may mimic a periapical pathology or a benign condition. Extranodal non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the maxilla could present as one of the early manifestation of detrimental diseases. Clinically these types of lymphoma can mimic an inflammatory endo-periodontal lesion with symptoms of pain and local discomfort. The greater the delay in diagnosis subsequently worsens the prognosis. A case of maxillary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an unusual presentation is discussed. PMID:22639517

  8. Ultrasonographic characteristics of canine renal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Angela J; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Benigni, Livia

    2014-01-01

    There is little published information on the ultrasonographic appearance of canine renal lymphoma. The purpose of this retrospective study was to provide additional information regarding the ultrasonographic characteristics of canine renal lymphoma, suggest ultrasonographic description criteria, and evaluate the role of fine-needle aspirate cytology in the diagnosis of this disease. The ultrasonographic features of confirmed renal lymphoma were reviewed in ten dogs. Pyelectasia was found in all dogs. Other ultrasonographic findings were loss of corticomedullary distinction (9/10 dogs), renomegaly (8/10 dogs), renal deformity (6/10 dogs), hypoechoic lesion(s) (6/10 dogs), and hyperechoic lesion(s) (2/10 dogs). Hypoechoic lesions were described as masses, nodules, and indistinct areas. In 30% of the cases (3/10 dogs) ultrasound revealed only minor abnormalities, including grade 1 pyelectasia, mild renomegaly, and focal loss of corticomedullary definition. Bilateral lesions were seen in nine dogs (90%). Renal fine-needle aspirates were performed in 9/10 dogs, yielding a diagnosis in seven on first attempt (78%). Two dogs had been given a provisional cytological diagnosis of round cell neoplasia; in one dog lymphoma was confirmed by second aspirate and by tissue core biopsy in the other. In 1/10 dogs, lymphoma was found at necropsy. Findings indicated that ultrasonographic signs of canine renal lymphoma may be subtle, canine renal lymphoma should be included in the differential diagnosis when the above ultrasonographic features are observed, and fine-needle aspirate cytology is a useful method for diagnosing this disease. PMID:24629062

  9. Primary Uterine Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jing; Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xuefeng; Yang, Panpan; Wang, Li; Jing, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary uterine non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is extremely rare accounting for <1% of all extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Imaging findings of primary uterine lymphoma have rarely been reported before. We present magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT findings in a patient with primary uterine peripheral T-cell lymphoma. A 27-year-old female presented with intermittent fever with neutropenia for 7 months. MRI showed an ill-defined mass involved both the uterine corpus and cervix, resulting in diffuse enlargement of the uterus. This mass showed inhomogeneous hypointensity on unenhanced T1-weighted images, hyperintensity on diffusion-weighted imaging, relative hypointensity compared to the surrounding myometrium on T2-weighted images and lower enhancement than the surrounding myometrium on enhanced T1-weighted images. FDG PET/CT showed intense FDG uptake in the thickened wall of the uterine corpus and cervix with SUVmax of 26.9. There were multiple hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the pelvis and retroperitoneum. Uterine curettage and CT-guided biopsy of the uterine mass revealed peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Bone marrow biopsy revealed no evidence of lymphomatous involvement. The imaging and pathologic findings were consistent with primary uterine lymphoma. After 3 circles of chemotherapy, follow-up enhanced MRI showed decreased thickness of the uterine wall. Despite its rarity, primary uterine non-Hodgkin's lymphoma should be taken into consideration when a uterine tumor shows large size, relative hypointesity on both T2-weighted images and enhanced T1-weighted images compared to the surrounding myometrium, and intense FDG uptake on PET/CT. MRI may be helpful for describing the relationship between the tumor and adjacent structures. FDG PET/CT may be useful for tumor detection and staging. PMID:27124063

  10. Rituximab, Romidepsin, and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Ofatumumab and Bendamustine Hydrochloride With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Untreated Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-24

    Grade 3a Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  12. Obatoclax Mesylate, Rituximab, and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  13. Rituximab, Combination Chemotherapy, and 90-Yttrium Ibritumomab Tiuxetan for Patients With Stage I or II Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-17

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors With Liver Dysfunction

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; AIDS Related Immunoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Burkitt Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Lymphoma; AIDS-Related Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Glioma; Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Colorectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Thyroid Gland Carcinoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  15. Composite diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular B-cell lymphoma - case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Turbatu, Andrei; Stoian, Marilena; Brezean, Iulian; Stoica, Victor Constantin Ion; Colita, Andrei; Dobrea, Camelia; State, Nicoleta; Ionescu, Cosmin; Ivanescu, Ana-Maria; Oprea, Madalina; Ghimici, Cecilia; Lupu, Anca Roxana

    2014-06-01

    Composite lymphoma refers to the co-occurrence of two or more morphologically and immunophenotypically separate lymphomas in the same topographic site at the time of clinical presentation. It is an infrequent type of lymphoid neoplasm, present in lymphoid tissue and may be due to the existence of two genetically related neoplasms such as transformation of a single lymphoma into another more aggressive lymphoma or be due to the presence of two clonally unrelated lymphomas. This paper is presenting a case of diffuse non-Hodgkin large B-cell lymphoma with areas of low grade and high grade follicular non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma in a retroperitoneal lymph node and spleen of an 62 year old woman. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry features proved the diagnosis of composite lymphoma. PMID:25705280

  16. Composite Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Follicular B-Cell Lymphoma – Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    TURBATU, Andrei; STOIAN, Marilena; BREZEAN, Iulian; STOICA, Victor Constantin Ion; COLITA, Andrei; DOBREA, Camelia; STATE, Nicoleta; IONESCU, Cosmin; IVANESCU, Ana-Maria; OPREA, Madalina; GHIMICI, Cecilia; LUPU, Anca Roxana

    2014-01-01

    Composite lymphoma refers to the co-occurrence of two or more morphologically and immunophenotypically separate lymphomas in the same topographic site at the time of clinical presentation. It is an infrequent type of lymphoid neoplasm, present in lymphoid tissue and may be due to the existence of two genetically related neoplasms such as transformation of a single lymphoma into another more aggressive lymphoma or be due to the presence of two clonally unrelated lymphomas. This paper is presenting a case of diffuse non-Hodgkin large B-cell lymphoma with areas of low grade and high grade follicular non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma in a retroperitoneal lymph node and spleen of an 62 year old woman. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry features proved the diagnosis of composite lymphoma. PMID:25705280

  17. Pancreas Metastasization of Nasal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chong; Bu, Xiangzhao; Li, Xiangyang; Liu, Ling; Xie, Xiaomei; Zhuo, Shichao; Yin, Haitao

    2015-09-01

    We report here a case of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma with metastasization into the pancreas. A 43-year-old Chinese female patient presented with right nasal obstruction and purulent rhinorrhea that lasted for the past half year and worsened gradually despite antibiotic medical treatment. Physical examination revealed a mass in the right nasal cavity and an enlarged lymph node in the right submandibular region. A PET/CT scan and immunostaining of the resectate led to a diagnosis of nasal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, clinical stage IIE, and the International Prognostic Index score of 1. The patient received radiotherapy followed by four cycles of the CHOP chemotherapy. A complete remission was achieved, and the patient was disease-free for 9 months. On a subsequent follow-up, abdominal ultrasound scan, enhanced abdominal CT scan, and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy revealed pancreatic metastasis secondary to nasal lymphoma. Radiotherapy (40 Gy) to the whole pancreas was done, followed by two courses of the SMILE regime chemotherapy, leading to a complete remission. At the moment, the patient is undergoing subsequent chemotherapy. PMID:25638348

  18. Household Chemical Exposures and the Risk of Canine Malignant Lymphoma, a Model for Human Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Takashima-Uebelhoer, Biki B.; Barber, Lisa G.; Zagarins, Sofija E.; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Gollenberg, Audra L.; Moore, Antony S.; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies of companion animals offer an important opportunity to identify risk factors for cancers in animals and humans. Canine malignant lymphoma (CML) has been established as a model for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Previous studies have suggested that exposure to environmental chemicals may relate to development of CML. Methods We assessed the relation of exposure to flea and tick control products and lawn-care products and risk of CML in a case-control study of dogs presented to a tertiary-care veterinary hospital (2000–2006). Cases were 263 dogs with biopsy-confirmed CML. Controls included 240 dogs with benign tumors and 230 dogs undergoing surgeries unrelated to cancer. Dog owners completed a 10-page questionnaire measuring demographic, environmental, and medical factors. Results After adjustment for age, weight, and other factors, use of specific lawn care products was associated with greater risk of CML. Specifically, the use of professionally applied pesticides was associated with a significant 70% higher risk of CML (odds ratio(OR)=1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.1–2.7). Risk was also higher in those reporting use of self-applied insect growth regulators (OR = 2.7; 95% CI=1.1–6.8). The use of flea and tick control products was unrelated to risk of CML. Conclusions Results suggest that use of some lawn care chemicals may increase the risk of CML. Additional analyses are needed to evaluate whether specific chemicals in these products may be related to risk of CML, and perhaps to human NHL as well. PMID:22222006

  19. Clinical diagnosis and treatment of leukemias and lymphomas. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    The special listing of current cancer research projects is a publication of the INTERNATIONAL CANCER RESEARCH DATA BANK (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of onggoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Acute and chronic leukemias; Hodgkin's lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas; Supportive care of leukemias and lymphomas; Cooperative groups; Broad programs.

  20. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  1. Long-term follow-up of autologous stem-cell transplantation for follicular and transformed follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Berglund, A; Enblad, G; Carlson, K; Glimelius, B; Hagberg, H

    2000-07-01

    Despite the fact that follicular lymphomas are both chemo- and radiosensitive, the disease is generally non-curable. These lymphomas often undergo transformation to a more malignant state. In order to improve the prognosis, high-dose treatment with stem cell support has been tested, but its role in the treatment of this disease is still unclear. Fourteen men and eight women with a median age of 45 yr (34-59) were treated with high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation between 1987 and 1996. The patients were selected to undergo intensive therapy because of an estimated short survival (median < 3 yr), even though they had chemosensitive disease and adequate performance status. Eleven patients' lymphomas had transformed, and the other eleven patients had one or more unfavourable prognostic signs such as advanced stage, bulky disease, multiple relapses, or short remission duration. The conditioning regimen has varied over the period, but BEAC (Becenum, etoposide, cytarabine, cyclophosphamide) or etoposide/cyclophosphamide with or without total body irradiation (TBI) was used in most patients. Nine patients had their stem cells purged. After a median follow-up time of 74 months overall survival was 81% and disease-free survival 72%. One toxic procedure-related death occured. There was no difference in outcome between patients with a transformed lymphoma compared to those without transformation. The patients treated with TBI had a significantly worse outcome. Toxicity was also much higher in TBI-treated patients, including four cases of secondary malignancy (three myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cases and one patient with breast carcinoma). This retrospective study, with the longest follow-up time so far reported, shows a promising 6-yr DFS of 72% in a group of follicular lymphoma patients with a bad prognosis. The outcome of patients with transformed lymphoma compared to historical controls is especially encouraging. The high incidence of MDS is

  2. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Oral manifestations of lymphoma: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Taísa Domingues Bernardes; Ferreira, Camila Belo Tavares; Leite, Gustavo Boehmer; de Menezes Pontes, José Roberto; Antunes, Héliton S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a malignant disease with two forms: Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is diagnosed in extranodal sites in 40% of cases, and the head and neck region is the second most affected, with an incidence of 11–33%, while HL has a very low incidence in extranodal sites (1–4%). The aim of this study was to identify the oral manifestations of lymphoma through a systematic literature review, which we conducted using the PubMed, Lilacs, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. We found 1456 articles, from which we selected 73. Among the intraoral findings, the most frequent were ulcerations, pain, swelling, and tooth mobility, while the extraoral findings included facial asymmetry and cervical, submandibular, and submental lymphadenopathy. Among the few studies reporting imaging findings, the most cited lesions included hypodense lesions with diffuse boundaries, bone resorptions, and tooth displacements. The publications reviewed highlight gaps in the areas of early detection, diagnosis, and proper treatment. PMID:27594910

  4. Indolent lymphomas in the pediatric population: follicular lymphoma, IRF4/MUM1+ lymphoma, nodal marginal zone lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Sander, Birgitta; Chan, John K C; Xerri, Luc; Ott, German; Campo, Elias; Swerdlow, Steven H

    2016-02-01

    Indolent lymphomas in the pediatric population were discussed during the 2014 European Association for Haematopathology/Society of Hematopathology workshop in Istanbul, Turkey. This session was focused on pediatric-type follicular lymphoma (FL), and its differential diagnosis with the newly recognized entity of IRF4/MUM1+ lymphomas mainly involving Waldeyer's ring. The differential diagnosis between t(14;18) negative FL grade 1/2 and pediatric-type FL in adults was highlighted. The overlapping pathological and clinical features between FL and nodal marginal zone lymphoma (NMZL) in children and young adults were recognized and morphologic and immunophenotypical criteria helpful for the differential diagnosis were presented. Both pediatric-type FL and NMZL are indolent processes that should be distinguished from atypical lymphoid hyperplasia of the tonsils and lymph nodes. The demonstration of a B cell monoclonal population by molecular studies is strongly recommended for the diagnosis. Recognition of these indolent variants to avoid overtreatment was emphasized. Whereas most indolent lymphomas in the pediatric population show characteristic clinical, pathologic, and genetic features that differ from the adult counterpart, other rare indolent lymphoid tumors such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have similar characteristics. In this report, novel findings, areas of special interest, and diagnostic challenges emerging from the cases submitted to the workshop will be discussed. PMID:26416032

  5. Novel Agents in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Marcus S.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a mature B cell neoplasm constituting 5–7% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Overall prognosis with current therapeutics remains poor, thus numerous novel agents are currently under investigation. In this review we focus on early phase trials that have demonstrated promise in mantle cell. Constitutive activation of signaling components downstream of the B cell receptor play an important role in the pathobiology of mantle cell lymphoma. Targeting of this signaling pathway has become a focus with specific agents under development including inhibitors of spleen tyrosine kinase, phosphoinositide-3-kinase and Bruton’s tyrosine kinase. Promsing data also supports further development of BH-3 mimetics, a crucial component of anti-apoptotic signaling. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have an established role in cutaneous T cell lymphoma and are now under investigation in mantle cell lymphoma as well. With further understanding of cellular signaling, the armamentarium of treatment options will be enhanced, with the hope of improving the prognosis of this disease. PMID:22687455

  6. Cytodiagnostics of canine lymphomas - possibilities and limitations.

    PubMed

    Sapierzyński, R; Kliczkowska-Klarowicz, K; Jankowska, U; Jagielski, D

    2016-01-01

    Malignant lymphomas are one of the most common malignant tumours occurring in dogs. The basic method of lymphoma diagnosis in human, as well as in canine oncology is histopathology supported by immunohistochemistry. It was suggested that in veterinary medicine excisional biopsy of lymph node and histopathology should be considered only where the cytologic diagnosis is equivocal or needs to be confirmed. There are at least three basic reasons for which cytological examination ought to be accepted as a sufficient and reliable diagnostic method for lymphoma in dogs. Firstly, most dog owners consider the fine-needle biopsy as an acceptable non-harmful method of sample collection. Secondly, an increasing number of studies recommend cytology as an accurate test for diagnosing and subtyping canine lymphoma. Finally, the vast majority of canine lymphoma subtypes belong to 4-5 categories characterized by a typical cytological picture. Immunocytochemical staining of cytological smears gives new diagnostic possibilities, such as detection of markers better characterizing given growth or a potential goal for target therapy in individual cases (for example inhibitors of platelet-derived growth factor). PMID:27487521

  7. Oral manifestations of lymphoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Silva, Taísa Domingues Bernardes; Ferreira, Camila Belo Tavares; Leite, Gustavo Boehmer; de Menezes Pontes, José Roberto; Antunes, Héliton S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a malignant disease with two forms: Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is diagnosed in extranodal sites in 40% of cases, and the head and neck region is the second most affected, with an incidence of 11-33%, while HL has a very low incidence in extranodal sites (1-4%). The aim of this study was to identify the oral manifestations of lymphoma through a systematic literature review, which we conducted using the PubMed, Lilacs, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. We found 1456 articles, from which we selected 73. Among the intraoral findings, the most frequent were ulcerations, pain, swelling, and tooth mobility, while the extraoral findings included facial asymmetry and cervical, submandibular, and submental lymphadenopathy. Among the few studies reporting imaging findings, the most cited lesions included hypodense lesions with diffuse boundaries, bone resorptions, and tooth displacements. The publications reviewed highlight gaps in the areas of early detection, diagnosis, and proper treatment. PMID:27594910

  8. Gammaherpesviruses and canine lymphoma: no evidence for direct involvement in commonly occurring lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Alice; McAulay, Karen A.; Henriques, Joaquim; Alves, Margarida; Bell, Adam J.; Morris, Joanna S.; Jarrett, Ruth F.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common haematopoietic malignancy in dogs, but little is known about the aetiology of this heterogeneous group of cancers. In humans, the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several lymphoma subtypes. Recently, it was suggested that EBV or an EBV-like virus is circulating in dogs. We therefore investigated whether EBV, or a novel herpesvirus, is associated with canine lymphoma using both serological and molecular techniques. In an assay designed to detect antibodies to EBV viral capsid antigens, 41 % of dogs were positive. Dogs with cancers, including lymphoma, were more frequently positive than controls, but no particular association with B-cell lymphoma was noted. EBV-specific RNA and DNA sequences were not detected in lymphoma tissue by in situ hybridization or PCR, and herpesvirus genomes were not detected using multiple degenerate PCR assays with the ability to detect novel herpesviruses. We therefore found no evidence that herpesviruses are directly involved in common types of canine lymphoma although cannot exclude the presence of an EBV-like virus in the canine population. PMID:25722346

  9. [In situ lymphoma and other early stage malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Martínez, L; Adam, P; Fend, F

    2013-05-01

    The increasing use of immunohistochemical and molecular investigations of lymphatic tissues results in more frequent detection of early lymphoid proliferations. These show some but not all features of malignant lymphomas without fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of lymphoid malignancy. In addition to well-known premalignant B-cell proliferations, such as monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), so-called in situ lymphomas have recently been described with minimal infiltrates of clonal B-cells in morphologically reactive lymphoid tissues which show the phenotypic and genetic features of specific B-cell lymphoma subtypes and often show a characteristic topographical distribution. This article addresses a group of clonal lymphoproliferations with usually localized disease and excellent clinical prognosis, such as pediatric follicular lymphoma and nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Another group of early lesions not addressed in this review are virally induced lymphoproliferations which represent a grey zone between purely reactive lesions and malignant lymphomas and may pose significant diagnostic as well as clinical problems. In this review diagnostic criteria for early or in situ lesions and their distinction from partial infiltration by malignant lymphoma are described. PMID:23459785

  10. Blood Sample Markers of Reproductive Hormones in Assessing Ovarian Reserve in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-06

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone

  11. Incidental and Isolated Follicular Lymphoma In Situ and Mantle Cell Lymphoma In Situ Lack Clinical Significance.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Glenda; González de Villambrosía, Sonia; Martínez-López, Azahara; Batlle, Ana; Revert-Arce, José B; Cereceda Company, Laura; Ortega Bezanilla, César; Piris, Miguel A; Montes-Moreno, Santiago

    2016-07-01

    Follicular lymphoma in situ (FLIS) and mantle cell lymphoma in situ (MCLIS) are histopathologic findings of undetermined clinical significance. We studied a series of 341 consecutive lymph node resection specimens from patients diagnosed with colorectal (201 cases) and breast (140 cases) adenocarcinoma between 1998 and 2000. Incidental and isolated FLIS was identified in 11/341 patients (3.23%), whereas incidental and isolated MCLIS was found in 2/341 patients (0.59%). None of these cases developed overt lymphoma. A second series of 17 cases of FLIS (16 cases) and MCLIS (1 case) from consultation files was analyzed. Five cases with incidental and isolated FLIS were identified. None of these cases developed overt lymphoma. Overall, none of the 16 cases with incidental and isolated FLIS in both series developed overt FL after a median follow-up of 54 months (range, 7 to 187 mo). However, 12 of these cases with a clinical suspicion of lymphoproliferative disorder showed the association (in different lymph nodes) or combination (in the same sample) of FLIS or MCLIS with other lymphoid neoplasms (FL, splenic marginal zone lymphoma, nodal marginal zone lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, multiple myeloma). In conclusion, the clinical relevance of FLIS and MCLIS seems to strictly depend on the clinical context. Incidental FLIS or MCLIS seem to have a very low risk for transformation, which recommends careful clinical examination after histopathologic diagnosis and conservative management with follow-up for a limited period of time. PMID:26945339

  12. The SMAC mimetic, LCL-161, reduces survival in aggressive MYC-driven lymphoma while promoting susceptibility to endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    West, A C; Martin, B P; Andrews, D A; Hogg, S J; Banerjee, A; Grigoriadis, G; Johnstone, R W; Shortt, J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) antagonize caspase activation and regulate death receptor signaling cascades. LCL-161 is a small molecule second mitochondrial activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetic, which both disengages IAPs from caspases and induces proteasomal degradation of cIAP-1 and -2, resulting in altered signaling through the NFκB pathway, enhanced TNF production and sensitization to apoptosis mediated by the extrinsic pathway. SMAC mimetics are undergoing clinical evaluation in a range of hematological malignancies. Burkitt-like lymphomas are hallmarked by a low apoptotic threshold, conveying sensitivity to a range of apoptosis-inducing stimuli. While evaluating LCL-161 in the Eμ-Myc model of aggressive Burkitt-like lymphoma, we noted unexpected resistance to apoptosis induction despite ‘on-target' IAP degradation and NFκB activation. Moreover, LCL-161 treatment of lymphoma-bearing mice resulted in apparent disease acceleration concurrent to augmented inflammatory cytokine-release in the same animals. Indiscriminate exposure of lymphoma patients to SMAC mimetics may therefore be detrimental due to both unanticipated prolymphoma effects and increased susceptibility to endotoxic shock. PMID:27043662

  13. The SMAC mimetic, LCL-161, reduces survival in aggressive MYC-driven lymphoma while promoting susceptibility to endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    West, A C; Martin, B P; Andrews, D A; Hogg, S J; Banerjee, A; Grigoriadis, G; Johnstone, R W; Shortt, J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) antagonize caspase activation and regulate death receptor signaling cascades. LCL-161 is a small molecule second mitochondrial activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetic, which both disengages IAPs from caspases and induces proteasomal degradation of cIAP-1 and -2, resulting in altered signaling through the NFκB pathway, enhanced TNF production and sensitization to apoptosis mediated by the extrinsic pathway. SMAC mimetics are undergoing clinical evaluation in a range of hematological malignancies. Burkitt-like lymphomas are hallmarked by a low apoptotic threshold, conveying sensitivity to a range of apoptosis-inducing stimuli. While evaluating LCL-161 in the Eμ-Myc model of aggressive Burkitt-like lymphoma, we noted unexpected resistance to apoptosis induction despite 'on-target' IAP degradation and NFκB activation. Moreover, LCL-161 treatment of lymphoma-bearing mice resulted in apparent disease acceleration concurrent to augmented inflammatory cytokine-release in the same animals. Indiscriminate exposure of lymphoma patients to SMAC mimetics may therefore be detrimental due to both unanticipated prolymphoma effects and increased susceptibility to endotoxic shock. PMID:27043662

  14. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  15. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  16. [Prognosis of childhood mediastinal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Okamura, J; Ikuno, Y; Sakata, N; Kai, T; Tasaka, H

    1990-11-01

    Between 1973 and 1989, 16 children with non-Hodgkins lymphoma (NHL) with a mediastinal mass (MM) were treated at our institution with multi-agent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. They also received central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis including intrathecal methotrexate administration (14 cases) and cranial irradiation (7 cases). Twelve were boys and 4 girls. Median age was 11 +/- 3. One patient died of air way obstruction one day after admission. Fourteen of 15 patients entered into complete remission (CR) and one patient partial remission. Five remains in CR 7 to 175 months after diagnosis (median 76 months). Nine patients relapsed in the bone marrow (3 cases), CNS (3), testicles (1), neck lymph node (1) and bones plus kidneys (1). Of these, 7 patients died within 13 months after initial relapse. The disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival of all patients were 27% and 33%, respectively. Analysis of the prognostic factors among patients with MM+ -NHL revealed that the serum LDH level below 1,000IU/l was a good prognostic sign. Other factors such as age, stage, initial WBC count, size of MM and response of the MM to the initial treatment did not correlate with DFS. Because of its rarity and the poor treatment result, we need more aggressive treatment program by a multiinstitutional study for MM+ -NHL. PMID:2287064

  17. Pembrolizumab in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Maly, Joseph; Alinari, Lapo

    2016-09-01

    Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key immune-inhibitory molecule expressed on T cells and implicated in CD4+ T-cell exhaustion and tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a unique B-cell malignancy in the sense that malignant Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells represent a small percentage of cells within an extensive immune cell infiltrate. PD-1 ligands are upregulated on RS cells as a consequence of both chromosome 9p24.1 amplification and Epstein-Barr virus infection and by interacting with PD-1 promote an immune-suppressive effect. By augmenting antitumor immune response, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, another monoclonal antibody against PD-1, have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL as well as an acceptable toxicity profile with immune-related adverse events that are generally manageable. In this review, we explore the rationale for targeting PD-1 in cHL, review the clinical trial results supporting the use of checkpoint inhibitors in this disease, and present future directions for investigation in which this approach may be used. PMID:27147112

  18. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  19. Veliparib, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Selective T-Cell Depletion to Reduce GVHD (Patients) Receiving Stem Cell Tx to Treat Leukemia, Lymphoma or MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-09

    Graft vs Host Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Leukemia; Leukemia, Myeloid; Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Chronic; Leukemia, Lymphocytic; Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Mantle-cell; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Hodgkin Disease

  1. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Systemic Mature T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sonali M.; Burns, Linda J.; van Besien, Koen; LeRademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Fenske, Timothy S.; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hsu, Jack W.; Schouten, Harry C.; Hale, Gregory A.; Holmberg, Leona A.; Sureda, Anna; Freytes, Cesar O.; Maziarz, Richard Thomas; Inwards, David J.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gross, Thomas G.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Costa, Luciano J.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Laport, Ginna G.; Montoto, Silvia; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients and Methods Outcomes of 241 patients (112 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, 102 peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified, 27 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma) undergoing autologous HCT (autoHCT; n = 115; median age, 43 years) or allogeneic HCT (alloHCT; n = 126; median age, 38 years) were analyzed. Primary outcomes were nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Patient, disease, and HCT-related variables were analyzed in multivariate Cox proportional hazard models to determine association with outcomes. Results AutoHCT recipients were more likely in first complete remission (CR1; 35% v 14%; P = .001) and with chemotherapy-sensitive disease (86% v 60%; P < .001), anaplastic large-cell histology (53% v 40%; P = .04), and two or fewer lines of prior therapy (65% v 44%; P < .001) compared with alloHCT recipients. Three-year PFS and OS of autoHCT recipients beyond CR1 were 42% and 53%, respectively. Among alloHCT recipients who received transplantations beyond CR1, 31% remained progression-free at 3 years, despite being more heavily pretreated and with more refractory disease. NRM was 3.5-fold higher (95% CI, 1.80 to 6.99; P < .001) for alloHCT. In multivariate analysis, chemotherapy sensitivity (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.87) and two or fewer lines of pretransplantation therapy (HR, 5.02; 95% CI, 2.15 to 11.72) were prognostic of survival. Conclusion These data describe the roles of autoHCT and alloHCT in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and suggest greater effectiveness earlier in the disease course, and limited utility in multiply relapsed disease. Notably, autoHCT at relapse may be a potential option for select patients, particularly those with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma histology. PMID:23897963

  2. Hodgkin Lymphoma, Version 2.2015

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Richard T.; Advani, Ranjana H.; Ai, Weiyun Z.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Aoun, Patricia; Bello, Celeste M.; Benitez, Cecil M.; Bierman, Philip J.; Blum, Kristie A.; Chen, Robert; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Forero, Andres; Gordon, Leo I.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Huang, Jiayi; Johnston, Patrick B.; Khan, Nadia; Maloney, David G.; Mauch, Peter M.; Metzger, Monika; Moore, Joseph O.; Morgan, David; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Mulroney, Carolyn; Poppe, Matthew; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Seropian, Stuart; Tsien, Christina; Winter, Jane N.; Yahalom, Joachim; Burns, Jennifer L.; Sundar, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is an uncommon malignancy involving lymph nodes and the lymphatic system. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are the 2 main types of HL. CHL accounts for most HL diagnosed in the Western countries. Chemotherapy or combined modality therapy, followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response using the Deauville criteria (5-point scale), is the standard initial treatment for patients with newly diagnosed CHL. Brentuximab vedotin, a CD30-directed antibody-drug conjugate, has produced encouraging results in the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. The potential long-term effects of treatment remain an important consideration, and long-term follow-up is essential after completion of treatment. PMID:25964641

  3. [Pulmonary Langerhans histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Paris, A; Dib, M; Rousselet, M-C; Urban, T; Tazi, A; Gagnadoux, F

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans histiocytosis (PLH) is a rare disease due to the accumulation of Langerhans cells at the level of the bronchioles. These dendritic immunocytes form granulomata and destroy the wall of the airway. We report a case of PLH developing at the same time as Hodgkin's lymphoma in a young woman who smoked tobacco and cannabis. We observed a complete remission of the PLH lesions parallel to the remission of the Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy, in the absence of any change in the consumption of tobacco and cannabis. This observation leads us to discuss the potential relationships between PLH on one hand, and smoking, the lymphoma and its treatment on the other. PMID:21943541

  4. Mantle cell lymphoma: observation to transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Babak; Sweetenham, John W

    2015-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma as a rare non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma can present in different clinical presentations such as an aggressive form or a more indolent picture. Treatment modality is based on multiple factors including age, presence or absence of symptoms, and comorbidities. Watchful waiting is a reasonable approach for asymptomatic patients especially in elderly. In symptomatic patients, treatment is chemo-immunotherapy followed by maintenance immunotherapy or autologous bone marrow transplant. Allogeneic bone marrow transplant has a potential benefit of cure for relapsed/refractory cases, but it has a high mortality rate. Novel treatment with agents such as ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown promising results in relapse/refractory cases. We extensively review the most recent data on diagnostic and therapeutic management of mantle cell lymphoma through presenting two extreme clinical scenarios. PMID:25642314

  5. Advances in Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Lauren B; Mohile, Nimish A

    2015-12-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that is limited to the CNS. Although novel imaging techniques aid in discriminating lymphoma from other brain tumors, definitive diagnosis requires brain biopsy, vitreoretinal biopsy, or cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Survival rates in clinical studies have improved over the past 20 years due to the addition of high-dose methotrexate-based chemotherapy regimens to whole-brain radiotherapy. Long-term survival, however, is complicated by clinically devastating delayed neurotoxicity. Newer regimens are attempting to reduce or eliminate radiotherapy from first-line treatment with chemotherapy dose intensification. Significant advances have also been made in the fields of pathobiology and treatment, with more targeted treatments on the horizon. The rarity of the disease makes conducting of prospective clinical trials challenging, requiring collaborative efforts between institutions. This review highlights recent advances in the biology, detection, and treatment of PCNSL in immunocompetent patients. PMID:26475775

  6. Computed tomographic features of primary brain lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Barsky, M F; Coates, R K; Macdonald, D R

    1989-04-01

    Head computed tomographic (CT) examinations of 14 patients with primary brain lymphoma were reviewed to assess the CT features of the presenting and subsequent lesions. Presenting lesions were single in 62% and multiple in 38%. Lesions tended to be iso- or hyperdense and homogeneously enhancing. They were commonly located in the deep hemispheric regions, corpus callosum, and posterior fossa. Despite these characteristic patterns, the diagnosis of lymphoma was initially considered in just three patients. Follow-up CT showed good initial response to radiotherapy in 10 patients although mortality was high and posttherapy changes were frequent. Consideration of primary brain lymphoma by radiologists is important, as needle biopsy and radiotherapy may be preferred to a surgical resection. PMID:2702505

  7. Obinutuzumab for the treatment of indolent lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Jennifer; Gribben, John G

    2016-08-01

    Obinutuzumab is a humanized, type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody designed for strong induction of direct cell death and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The Phase III GADOLIN trial tested the clinical efficacy of obinutuzumab plus bendamustine followed by obinutuzumab monotherapy in rituximab-refractory indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma versus treatment with bendamustine alone. It demonstrated significantly longer progression-free survival for the obinutuzumab-containing regimen in this difficult to treat patient group. Based on the results of this trial, US FDA approval was most recently granted for obinutuzumab in the treatment of follicular lymphoma that has relapsed after or was refractory to a rituximab-containing regimen. This article summarizes the available data on chemistry, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety of obinutuzumab in the treatment of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27117452

  8. Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Mohleen; Feurdean, Mirela

    2016-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL) is a rare but distinct type of T cell lymphoma with an aggressive course and high mortality. Most patients are diagnosed late in the disease and usually present with generalized lymphadenopathy. A minority have skin lesions at the time of diagnosis, more commonly in the form of nonspecific maculopapular rash with or without pruritus. We report a rare case of AITL presenting with chronic, recurrent angioedema and urticaria-like lesions and no palpable peripheral adenopathy. Primary Care physicians, dermatologists, and allergists must maintain a high index of suspicion for cutaneous manifestations of lymphoma, especially if the skin lesions are refractory to standard treatment. Timely diagnosis is essential to improve survival. PMID:26925107

  9. EBV-associated lymphomas in adults

    PubMed Central

    Roschewski, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a ubiquitous γ-herpes virus that infects most people but results in life-threatening diseases in only a small subset. Persons who are unable to maintain the virus in its latent state can develop uncontrolled EBV-driven lymphoproliferative disorders and lymphomas. EBV-associated lymphomas are well-characterized in patients with known defects in cellular immunity as occurs post-transplantation or HIV/AIDS but are increasingly recognized in patients without overt immunodeficiencies. Improved understanding of the biology of these lymphomas and the role EBV plays in lymphomagenesis offers the opportunity for improved therapies targeted at important signaling pathways and immunotherapy specific against EBV viral antigens. PMID:22409825

  10. Tonsillar follicular lymphoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Amit, Sonal; Purwar, Neetu; Agarwal, Asha; Lalchandani, Devendra

    2012-01-01

    Follicular lymphomas (FL) are among the most common non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in adults. However, they are rare in children making up less than 3% of paediatric NHL cases. They occur most commonly in the head and neck region, lymph nodes or tonsils, with occasional extra-nodal occurrences. Distinction of FL from potentially clonal but, reactive follicular hyperplasia is important. We report a case of a 6-year-old male child presenting with night stridor since 6 months. Clinical examination revealed asymmetrical enlargement of the left tonsil. Routine left tonsillectomy was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. Diagnosis of follicular lymphoma was made on histopathological examination and further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. PMID:23188842

  11. Nasal T cell lymphoma: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Maliha; Ikram, Mubasher; Junaid, Montasir

    2014-03-01

    Nasal type of Natural Killer (NK)/T cell lymphoma manifests in the nasal cavity. Approximately 95% of them are associated with EBV(Ebstein Barr Virus) with a strong predilection for the Asian population. It has certain systemic and localized symptoms which aid in diagnosis of the condition. However, the histological criteria is pivotal in confirming the diagnosis as well as aiding in confirming the association of EBV. Nasal type of NK/T cell lymphoma has a guarded prognosis. Treatment plan include radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy. Despite all this, the 5-year survival rate ranges from 15-75%. A 35 years old male presented with an ulcerative nasal lesion. Diagnosed as nasal type of NK/T cell lymphoma via a tissue biopsy, it was managed by chemo-radiotherapy leading to complete resolution of symptoms and disease free on his follow-up 6 months later. PMID:24718007

  12. Ocular Adnexal Lymphoma Presenting with Visual Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Shuchi; Corrêa, Zélia M.; Karim, Nagla; Medlin, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Context: Elderly patients with visual loss often have age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataract as common causes of visual loss. Other less common etiologies should be considered, especially in those presenting with systemic associations. Case Report: The patient discussed in our review is an 80-year-old female, with a history of diabetic retinopathy and macular degeneration who presented with a sudden deterioration of vision. While this was initially attributed to diabetic retinopathy, she was eventually noted to have a salmon patch lesion in her conjunctiva, diagnosed on biopsy to be a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Conclusion: Because of the significant rate of disseminated disease among patients with lymphomas in the orbit that carries a worse prognosis, early diagnosis is essential to promote better overall survival of these patients. We describe here a patient diagnosed with conjunctival lymphoma associated with pronounced visual loss and review the literature on this subject. PMID:27011948

  13. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  14. Grayscale and color Doppler features of testicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bertolotto, Michele; Derchi, Lorenzo E; Secil, Mustafa; Dogra, Vikram; Sidhu, Paul S; Clements, Richard; Freeman, Simon; Grenier, Nicolas; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ramchandani, Parvati; Cicero, Calogero; Abete, Luca; Bussani, Rossana; Rocher, Laurence; Spencer, John; Tsili, Athina; Valentino, Massimo; Pavlica, Pietro

    2015-06-01

    Pooled data from 16 radiology centers were retrospectively analyzed to seek patients with pathologically proven testicular lymphoma and grayscale and color Doppler images available for review. Forty-three cases were found: 36 (84%) primary and 7 (16%) secondary testicular lymphoma. With unilateral primary lymphoma, involvement was unifocal (n = 10), multifocal (n = 11), or diffuse (n = 11). Synchronous bilateral involvement occurred in 6 patients. Color Doppler sonography showed normal testicular vessels within the tumor in 31 of 43 lymphomas (72%). Testicular lymphoma infiltrates through the tubules, preserving the normal vascular architecture of the testis. Depiction of normal testicular vessels crossing the lesion is a useful adjunctive diagnostic criterion. PMID:26014335

  15. The evolving role of lenalidomide in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Galanina, Natalie; Petrich, Adam; Nabhan, Chadi

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma have driven a paradigm shift from standard chemotherapy to an ever-expanding choice of targeted agents and combinations. As an orally bioavailable immunomodulator with antineoplastic, immunologic, and antiproliferative activity in B-cell lymphoma, lenalidomide has emerged as one such option. Lenalidomide demonstrates clinically significant activity with a favorable safety profile as a single agent, as well as in combination therapy. Herein, we review accumulated clinical data on lenalidomide, with particular reference to patients with first-line and relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma, indolent lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:26902680

  16. Grayscale and Color Doppler Features of Testicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bertolotto, Michele; Derchi, Lorenzo E.; Secil, Mustafa; Dogra, Vikram; Sidhu, Paul S.; Clements, Richard; Freeman, Simon; Grenier, Nicolas; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ramchandani, Parvati; Cicero, Calogero; Abete, Luca; Bussani, Rossana; Rocher, Laurence; Spencer, John; Tsili, Athina; Valentino, Massimo; Pavlica, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Pooled data from 16 radiology centers were retrospectively analyzed to seek patients with pathologically proven testicular lymphoma and grayscale and color Doppler images available for review. Forty-three cases were found: 36 (84%) primary and 7 (16%) secondary testicular lymphoma. With unilateral primary lymphoma, involvement was unifocal (n = 10), multifocal (n = 11), or diffuse (n = 11). Synchronous bilateral involvement occurred in 6 patients. Color Doppler sonography showed normal testicular vessels within the tumor in 31 of 43 lymphomas (72%). Testicular lymphoma infiltrates through the tubules, preserving the normal vascular architecture of the testis. Depiction of normal testicular vessels crossing the lesion is a useful adjunctive diagnostic criterion. PMID:26014335

  17. Incidental finding of lymphoma after septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tajudeen, Bobby A.; Bhuta, Sunita M.; Palma Diaz, Miguel Fernando; Kedeshian, Paul A.; Suh, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Septoplasty, or surgical correction of the deviated septum, is an elective, routinely performed rhinologic procedure to address nasal airway obstruction. In many cases, resected septal cartilage and bone fragments are sent for pathologic review, although there is no consensus on this practice. We reported two cases of incidentally diagnosed lymphoma after elective septoplasty and discussed clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management. Methods: Retrospective chart review of two patients who underwent septoplasty at a tertiary academic medical center and found to have incidental lymphoma based on histopathology. Results: Two patients who underwent septoplasty had an incidental diagnosis of lymphoma on pathologic analysis. One patient was noted to have an S-shaped septal deviation that produced bilateral nasal obstruction. She underwent a difficult septoplasty, in which the mucoperichondrial flap was firmly adherent to the underlying septum and bone. Final pathology demonstrated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. She was treated with chemoradiation and remained free of disease at 59 months. The other patient had a history of nasal trauma, which produced left septal deviation. He underwent an uncomplicated septoplasty, with pathology that demonstrated low-grade B-cell lymphoma. Because there was no evidence of active disease, the decision was made to not treat and to observe the patient clinically. Conclusions: This is the first reported series of septal lymphoma incidentally diagnosed on routine septoplasty. Although histopathologic review of specimens from routine nasal and sinus surgery is not routinely performed, this report highlighted the importance of this process, on a case-by-case basis, in detecting unexpected malignancies that otherwise were clinically silent. PMID:27470206

  18. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  19. Cutaneous lymphoma in a juvenile dog.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ul Soo; Jeong, Seong Mok; Kang, Min-Soo; Jung, In Sung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Lee, Chang Woo

    2004-01-01

    An 18-month-old male Doberman Pinscher was referred to the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of the College of Veterinary Medicine for an erythemic nodular mass on the right forelimb. The mass was diagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma, based on cytologic examination of a mass aspirate and histopathology. Using immunohistochemistry, the neoplastic cells were positive for CD3 but negative for CD79a, E-cadherin, and pancytokeratin, confirming their origin as T lymphocytes. No tumor recurrence was noted 18 months after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a solitary nodular form of cutaneous lymphoma in a young dog. PMID:15048628

  20. Langerhans cell histiocytosis followed by Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ik Soo; Park, In Keun; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Shin; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Huh, Joo Ryung; Suh, Cheol Won

    2012-12-01

    A 22-year-old man was referred to our institution due to lower back pain and was diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The patient achieved complete remission with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One year later, right cervical lymphadenopathy was observed and Hodgkin's lymphoma was confirmed on biopsy. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, and experienced no further symptoms. Further, no evidence of recurrence was observed on follow-up imaging. This report discusses the association between Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:23269889

  1. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Followed by Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, IK Soo; Park, In Keun; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Shin; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Huh, Joo Ryung

    2012-01-01

    A 22-year-old man was referred to our institution due to lower back pain and was diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The patient achieved complete remission with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One year later, right cervical lymphadenopathy was observed and Hodgkin's lymphoma was confirmed on biopsy. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, and experienced no further symptoms. Further, no evidence of recurrence was observed on follow-up imaging. This report discusses the association between Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:23269889

  2. Genomic landscape of cutaneous T cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Hong, Bok S.; Bunick, Christopher G.; Chen, Kan; Bjornson, Robert D.; Maman, Yaakov; Wang, Tiffany; Tordoff, Jesse; Carlson, Kacie; Overton, John D.; Liu, Kristina J.; Lewis, Julia M.; Devine, Lesley; Barbarotta, Lisa; Foss, Francine M.; Subtil, Antonio; Vonderheid, Eric C.; Edelson, Richard L.; Schatz, David G.; Boggon, Titus J.; Girardi, Michael; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a non-Hodgkin lymphoma of skin-homing T lymphocytes. We performed exome and whole genome DNA sequence and RNA sequencing on purified CTCL and matched normal cells. The results implicate mutations in 17 genes in CTCL pathogenesis, including genes involved in T cell activation and apoptosis, NFκB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and DNA damage response. CTCL is distinctive in that somatic copy number variants (SCNVs) comprise 92% of all driver mutations (mean of 11.8 pathogenic SCNVs vs. 1.0 somatic single nucleotide variants per CTCL). These findings have implications for novel therapeutics. PMID:26192916

  3. [Pancoast tumor-like primary lung lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Zaucha, Renata; Jassem, Jacek

    2007-01-01

    Apical lung location of lymphomas is extremely rare and may pose diagnostic problems. Here we present a case of advanced primary Pancoast-like left apical lung lymphoma incidentally diagnosed in a 72 year old asymptomatic woman after a routine, prophylactic chest X-ray performed in June 2005. FNB was not diagnostic therefore an open lung biopsy was attempted. Histopathological examination of the excised specimen was consistent with B-cell low-grade marginal zone extranodal NHL (BALTL); CD20+, CD3-. Treatment combined of 9 cycles of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy of the residual mass allowed to achieve a long-term complete remission. PMID:17973229

  4. Sugar-coated signaling in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Strout, Matthew P

    2015-10-15

    In this issue of Blood, complementary studies by Amin et al and Linley et al demonstrate that sugar moieties linked to surface immunoglobulin (sIg) of follicular lymphoma (FL) cells directly interact with endogenous lectins within the lymphoma niche and lead to activation of downstream B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathways. In addition to providing further insight into the role of the microenvironment in lymphomagenesis, these findings expose a unique molecular interaction that may represent a viable target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26472734

  5. The molecular mechanisms of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Felberbaum, Rachael S.

    2005-01-01

    Classic Hodgkin's lymphoma is characterized by the appearance of giant abnormal cells called Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. HRS cells arise from germinal center B lymphocytes and in about 50 percent of patients, are infected with Epstein-Barr Virus. In addition, HRS cells show constitutive NF-kappaB activation and are resistant to apoptosis. This paper reviews several recent studies that for the first time implicate specific molecules in the pathogenesis of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma. Targeting these molecules could lead to the development of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:16720015

  6. Primary cutaneous lymphomas: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Olek-Hrab, Karolina; Ruckemann-Dziurdzińska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (CLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative neoplasms, with lymphatic proliferation limited to the skin with no involvement of lymph nodes, bone marrow or viscera at the diagnosis. Cutaneous lymphomas originate from mature T-lymphocytes (65% of all cases), mature B-lymphocytes (25%) or NK cells. Histopathological evaluation including immunophenotyping of the skin biopsy specimen is the basis of the diagnosis, which must be complemented with a precise staging of the disease and identification of prognostic factors, to allow for the choice of the best treatment method as well as for the evaluation of the treatment results. PMID:26759546

  7. [Lymphoma of Ocular and Periocular Tissues - Clinicopathological Correlations].

    PubMed

    Schmack, I; Grossniklaus, H E; Hartmann, S

    2016-07-01

    Lymphomas of the ocular adnexa and intraocular tissue include a wide range of lymphoproliferative neoplastic disorders. They are predominantly extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of lymphoid neoplasm and individual morphological, immunophenotypical, and molecular genetic features, indicate that they may be divided into B-cell (approximately 80 % of all NHL) and T-cell lymphomas (approximately 10-20 % of all NHL). The most common forms of ocular NHL are extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (EMZL) of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT-type), follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and mantel cell lymphoma. The clinical signs and symptoms are usually very unspecific and depend on the location, size, and extent of the underlying lymphoma subtype. Typical low grade lymphomas have an indolent clinical course and often remain unrecognized for many years. On the other hand, high grade NHLs, such as DLBCL or MCL, are frequently aggressive, with rapid tumour growth and poor prognosis, despite early detection. Histopathology is still the gold standard in the diagnosis of ocular lymphomas. Basic understanding of the principal pathophysiological and clinical aspects of the development and progression of orbital and ocular lymphomas seems to be mandatory for optimal diagnosis and treatment and for improving survival and prognosis. Both residents in training and board certified ophthalmologists should be aware of these problems. PMID:27468099

  8. Adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Jessica; El-Mallawany, Nader Kim; Abla, Oussama

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid malignancies accounting for a significant portion of cancers occurring in children, adolescents and young adults with an increasing incidence with age. The adolescent and young adult (AYA) population presents a specific set of characteristics and challenges. The most common diseases occurring in adolescents and young adults include Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. There is also a higher incidence of primary central nervous system lymphoma in AYA patients. Cure rates largely depend on risk-stratification, and are generally superior to outcomes in comparison to older adult data but less than in younger children. Here, we review the unique clinical and biological characteristics of NHL occurring in the AYA population with a focus on how to achieve similar curative outcomes in AYA that have been established in younger cohorts. PMID:27071675

  9. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. Primary colorectal lymphoma comprising both components of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma combined with cytomegalovirus colitis.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Ryo; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Motoyasu, Osawa; Murao, Takahisa; Ishii, Manabu; Fujita, Minoru; Tokunaga, Hirotoshi; Akiyama, Takashi; Wada, Hideho; Sugihara, Takashi; Shiotani, Akiko; Haruma, Ken

    2016-04-01

    A 16-year-old girl presented to our hospital with diarrhea and abdominal pain. The macroscopic findings of colonoscopy revealed multiple submucosal tumors and multiple ulcers, which were localized in the sigmoid colon, and diffuse granular mucosa which extended to the total colon. The pathological diagnosis was malignant lymphoma comprising both components of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, because the large lymphoma cells were CD20+, CD10-, and CD5-. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of colorectal biopsy samples from multiple ulcers revealed cytomegalovirus (CMV)-positive cells. The patient was diagnosed with primary colorectal lymphoma comprising both components of DLBCL and MALT lymphoma combined with CMV colitis. She received anti-viral medication and chemotherapy. PMID:27015999

  12. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review

    PubMed Central

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a “classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL” in a young male patient and review of literature. PMID:27601842

  13. B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Burkitt's lymphoma: A case report and review.

    PubMed

    Chettiankandy, Tabita Joy; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Kumar, Keshav; Ahire, Manisha Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between DLBCL and classical BL or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this article, we present a "classical unclassifiable lymphoma with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL" in a young male patient and review of literature. PMID:27601842

  14. The Impact of Graft-versus-Host Disease on the Relapse Rate in Patients with Lymphoma Depends on the Histological Subtype and the Intensity of the Conditioning Regimen.

    PubMed

    Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Pavletic, Steven Z; Flowers, Mary E; Klein, John P; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Montoto, Silvia; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Bredeson, Christopher N; Costa, Luciano J; Dandoy, Christopher; Freytes, César O; Fung, Henry C; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Hamadani, Mehdi; Hayashi, Robert J; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Inwards, David J; Lazarus, Hillard M; Maloney, David G; Martino, Rodrigo; Munker, Reinhold; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F; Rizzieri, David A; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Smith, Sonali M; Socié, Gérard; Wirk, Baldeep; Yu, Lolie C; Saber, Wael

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the impact of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on the relapse rate of different lymphoma subtypes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Adult patients with a diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma (FL), peripheral T cell lymphoma, or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) undergoing HLA-identical sibling or unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation between 1997 and 2009 were included. Two thousand six hundred eleven cases were included. A reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen was used in 62.8% of the transplantations. In a multivariate analysis of myeloablative cases (n = 970), neither acute (aGVHD) nor chronic GVHD (cGVHD) were significantly associated with a lower incidence of relapse/progression in any lymphoma subtype. In contrast, the analysis of RIC cases (n = 1641) showed that cGVHD was associated with a lower incidence of relapse/progression in FL (risk ratio [RR], .51; P = .049) and in MCL (RR, .41; P = .019). Patients with FL or MCL developing both aGVHD and cGVHD had the lowest risk of relapse (RR, .14; P = .007; and RR, .15; P = .0019, respectively). Of interest, the effect of GVHD on decreasing relapse was similar in patients with sensitive disease and chemoresistant disease. Unfortunately, both aGVHD and cGVHD had a deleterious effect on treatment-related mortality and overall survival (OS) in FL cases but did not affect treatment-related mortality, OS or PFS in MCL. This study reinforces the use of RIC allo-HCT as a platform for immunotherapy in FL and MCL patients. PMID:25981509

  15. Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma – A Case Report of An Uncommon Extranodal T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    V, Geetha; Kudva, Ranjini

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma is a rare primary intestinal lymphoma. It is often, but not always associated with celiac disease. Intraepithelial T cells are postulated as the cell of origin. It is a rare disease accounting for fewer than 5% of all gastrointestinal tract lymphomas. Recent studies indicate that EATL consists of two diseases that are morphologically and genetically distinct and differ with respect to their frequency of association with celiac disease. Current WHO classification recognises two subtypes of EATL – type 1 (classic) and type 2, based on morphology and immunophenotype. EATL type 1 is a large cell lymphoma which is more common and is more commonly associated with celiac disease compared to type 2. Most common site of involvement is the small intestine. We report a case of EATL type 1, in a 62-year-old female patient who presented with features of intestinal obstruction. However, she did not have spruce like featutes. PMID:25478355

  16. Clinical impact of molecular features in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pon, Julia R; Marra, Marco A

    2016-01-14

    Our understanding of the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) has been dramatically enhanced by recent attempts to profile molecular features of these lymphomas. In this article, we discuss ways in which testing for molecular features may impact DLBCL and FL management if clinical trials are designed to incorporate such tests. Specifically, we discuss how distinguishing lymphomas on the basis of cell-of-origin subtypes or the presence of other molecular features is prognostically and therapeutically significant. Conversely, we discuss how the molecular similarities of DLBCL and FL have provided insight into the potential of both DLBCL and FL cases to respond to agents targeting alterations they have in common. Through these examples, we demonstrate how the translation of our understanding of cancer biology into improvements in patient outcomes depends on analyzing the molecular correlates of treatment outcomes in clinical trials and in routinely treated patients. PMID:26447189

  17. [Primary bilateral adrenal T-cell lymphoma. A case report rarer than B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sfaxi, M; Bouzouita, A; Bouasker, I; Kourda, N; Ben Slama, M R; Ben Jilani Baltaji, S; Chebil, M

    2008-06-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoma is a rare condition. Only 70 cases were described in the literature. Adrenal lymphoma is often bilateral and in most of the cases of B-cell type. T-cell lymphoma is exceptional. The prognosis is bad and patient can die early because of acute adrenal insufficiency. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who was admitted for acute adrenal insufficiency due to primary bilateral adrenal T-cell lymphoma. He had corticotherapy and surgical exploration for intra-abdominal sepsis. He died because of multivisceral deficiency. Clinical features and imaging are not specific. (18)F-FDG PET Scan is an excellent mean to detect malignant tumor of adrenal gland. Percutaneous needle biopsy is useful to determine histology. The standard treatment is chemotherapy. PMID:18455145

  18. Primary Mediastinal Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piña-Oviedo, Sergio; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Primary mediastinal Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) is rare. Nodular sclerosis CHL (NS-CHL) is the most common subtype involving the anterior mediastinum and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. Primary thymic CHL is exceedingly rare. The disease typically affects young women and is asymptomatic in 30% to 50% of patients. Common symptoms include fatigue, chest pain, dyspnea and cough, but vary depending on the location and size of the tumor. B-symptoms develop in 30% of cases. By imaging, primary mediastinal CHL presents as mediastinal widening/mediastinal mass that does not invade adjacent organs but may compress vital structures as bulky disease. Histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. Primary mediastinal NS-CHL consists of nodules of polymorphous inflammatory cells surrounded by broad fibrous bands extending from a thickened lymph node capsule. The cellular nodules contain variable numbers of large Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells, required for diagnosis. Primary thymic CHL may exhibit prominent cystic changes. The histopathologic recognition of NS-CHL can be challenging in cases with prominent fibrosis, scant cellularity, artifactual cell distortion, or an exuberant granulomatous reaction. The differential diagnosis includes primary mediastinal non-HLs, mediastinal germ cell tumors, thymoma, and metastatic carcinoma or melanoma to the mediastinum. Distinction from primary mediastinal non-HLs is crucial for adequate therapeutic decisions. Approximately 95% of patients with primary mediastinal CHL will be alive and free of disease at 10 years after treatment with short courses of combined chemoradiotherapy. In this review, we discuss the history, classification, epidemiology, clinicoradiologic features, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis, and treatment of primary mediastinal CHL. PMID:27441757

  19. Early lesions of follicular lymphoma: a genetic perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mamessier, Emilie; Song, Joo Y.; Eberle, Franziska C.; Pack, Svetlana; Drevet, Charlotte; Chetaille, Bruno; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Adelaïde, José; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max; Pittaluga, Stefania; Roulland, Sandrine; Chott, Andreas; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Nadel, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of follicular lymphoma is a multi-hit process progressing over many years through the accumulation of numerous genetic alterations. Besides the hallmark t(14;18), it is still unclear which other oncogenic hits contribute to the early steps of transformation and in which precursor stages these occur. To address this issue, we performed high-resolution comparative genomic hybridization microarrays on laser-capture micro-dissected cases of follicular lymphoma in situ (n=4), partial involvement by follicular lymphoma (n=4), and duodenal follicular lymphoma (n=4), assumed to represent, potentially, the earliest stages in the evolution of follicular lymphoma. Cases of reactive follicular hyperplasia (n=2), uninvolved areas from follicular lymphoma in situ lymph nodes, follicular lymphoma grade 1–2 (n=5) and follicular lymphoma grade 3A (n=5) were used as controls. Surprisingly, alterations involving several relevant (onco)genes were found in all entities, but at significantly lower proportions than in overt follicular lymphoma. While the number of alterations clearly assigns all these entities as precursors, the pattern of partial involvement by follicular lymphoma alterations was quantitatively and qualitatively closer to that of follicular lymphoma, indicating significant selective pressure in line with its faster rate of progression. Among the most notable alterations, we observed and validated deletions of 1p36 and gains of the 7p and 12q chromosomes and related oncogenes, which include some of the most recurrent oncogenic alterations in overt follicular lymphoma (TNFRSF14, EZH2, MLL2). By further delineating distinctive and hierarchical molecular and genetic features of early follicular lymphoma entities, our analysis underlines the importance of applying appropriate criteria for the differential diagnosis. It also provides a first set of candidates likely to be involved in the cascade of hits that pave the path of the various progression phases

  20. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  1. Ofatumumab, Pentostatin, and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage 0 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  2. Primary Vitreoretinal Lymphoma: A Report from an International Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma Collaborative Group Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, James L.; Coupland, Sarah E.; Davis, Janet L.; Harbour, J. William; Johnston, Patrick B.; Cassoux, Nathalie; Touitou, Valerie; Smith, Justine R.; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Pulido, Jose S.

    2011-01-01

    Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL), also known as primary intraocular lymphoma, is a rare malignancy typically classified as a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and most frequently develops in elderly populations. PVRL commonly masquerades as posterior uveitis and has a unique tropism for the retina and central nervous system (CNS). Over 15% of primary CNS lymphoma patients develop intraocular lymphoma, usually occurring in the retina and/or vitreous. Conversely, 65%–90% of PVRL patients develop CNS lymphoma. Consequently, PVRL is often fatal because of ultimate CNS association. Current PVRL animal models are limited and require further development. Typical clinical findings include vitreous cellular infiltration (lymphoma and inflammatory cells) and subretinal tumor infiltration as determined using dilated fundoscopy, fluorescent angiography, and optical coherent tomography. Currently, PVRL is most often diagnosed using both histology to identify lymphoma cells in the vitreous or retina and immunohistochemistry to indicate monoclonality. Additional adjuncts in diagnosing PVRL exist, including elevation of interleukin-10 levels in ocular fluids and detection of IgH or T-cell receptor gene rearrangements in malignant cells. The optimal therapy for PVRL is not defined and requires the combined effort of oncologists and ophthalmologists. PVRL is sensitive to radiation therapy and exhibits high responsiveness to intravitreal methotrexate or rituximab. Although systemic chemotherapy alone can result in high response rates in patients with PVRL, there is a high relapse rate. Because of the disease rarity, international, multicenter, collaborative efforts are required to better understand the biology and pathogenesis of PVRL as well as to define both diagnostic markers and optimal therapies. PMID:22045784

  3. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Plus Rituximab With and Without Filgrastim and Interleukin-11 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-26

    Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  5. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Interleukin-2 or Observation Following Radiation Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-27

    Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma

  7. Immunologic Autograft Engineering and Survival in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Porrata, Luis F; Burgstaler, Edwin A; Winters, Jeffrey L; Jacob, Eapen K; Gastineau, Dennis A; Suman, Vera J; Inwards, David J; Ansell, Stephen M; Micallef, Ivana N; Johnston, Patrick B; Nevala, Wendy; Markovic, Svetomir N

    2016-06-01

    Retrospective studies have reported that the collected and infused autograft absolute lymphocyte count (A-ALC) affects clinical outcomes after autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (APHSCT). We hypothesized that manipulation of the apheresis machine to target a higher A-ALC dose would translate into prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing APHSCT. Between December 2007 and October 2010, we performed a double-blind, phase III, randomized study randomly assigning 122 patients with NHL to undergo collection with the Fenwal Amicus Apheresis system with our standard settings (mononuclear cells offset of 1.5 and RBC offset of 5.0) or at modified settings (mononuclear cells offset of 1.5 and RBC of 6.0). The primary endpoint was PFS. Neither PFS (hazard ratio [HR] of modified to standard, 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], .62 to 2.08; P = .70) nor overall survival (OS) (HR modified to standard, .85; 95% CI, .39 to 1.86; P = .68) were found to differ by collection method. Collection of A-ALC between both methods was similar. Both PFS (P = .0025; HR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.39 to 5.52) and OS (P = .004; HR, 3.38; 95% CI, 1.27 to 9.01) were inferior in patients infused with an A-ALC < .5 × 10(9) lymphocytes/kg compared with patients infused with an A-ALC ≥ .5 × 10(9) lymphocytes/kg, regardless of the method of collection. We did not detect significant differences in clinical outcomes or in the A-ALC collection between the modified and the standard Fenwal Amicus settings; however, despite physician discretion on primary number of collections and range of cells infused, higher A-ALC infused dose were associated with better survival after APHSCT. PMID:26826432

  8. HHV-8 and EBV-positive intravascular lymphoma: an unusual presentation of extracavitary primary effusion lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Genevieve M.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Shirley, Courtney M.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Kasamon, Yvette L.; Taube, Janis M.; Borowitz, Michael J.; Duffield, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular lymphomas are rare and aggressive hematolymphoid tumors. Here we describe a human herpesvirus type-8/Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive intravascular lymphoma. The patient was a 59 year-old HIV-positive man who presented with diarrhea, abdominal pain, fevers, night sweats, and weight loss. Radiographic studies of the abdomen and pelvis revealed numerous subcentimeter nodules within the subcutaneous fat that lacked connection to the skin. An excisional biopsy demonstrated large atypical cells within vessels in the deep subcutaneous fat, and many of the vessels contained extensive organizing thrombi. The atypical cells lacked strong expression of most B-cell markers but were positive for MUM-1 and showed partial expression of several T-cell markers. An immunohistochemical stain for HHV-8 and an in situ hybridization for EBV were both positive in the neoplastic cells. The disease had a rapidly progressive and fatal course. This lymphoma appears to represent an entirely intravascular form of primary effusion lymphoma, and highlights the propensity for HHV-8 and EBV-positive lymphoid neoplasms to show aberrant expression of T-cell markers, illustrates the utility of skin biopsies for the diagnosis of intravascular lymphoma, and suggests that biopsies to evaluate for intravascular lymphoma should be relatively deep and include subcutaneous fat. PMID:24525514

  9. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan, Fludarabine, Radiation Therapy, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. How we diagnose and treat vitreoretinal lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fend, Falko; Ferreri, Andrés J M; Coupland, Sarah E

    2016-06-01

    The eye is a rare site for the development of malignant lymphoma. Based on cell type and involved intraocular structures, which as a whole represent an immune-privileged site, several subtypes of primary intraocular lymphoma need to be discerned. Primary vitreoretinal lymphoma (PVRL), the most common form, is an aggressive B-cell malignancy and considered a subtype of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Ocular symptoms are non-specific and often mimic uveitis, frequently resulting in delayed diagnosis. Bilateral ocular involvement and dissemination/relapse in the CNS are common. Diagnosis of PVRL is usually based on the analysis of vitreous biopsy material. In addition to cytological and immunocytochemical examination, measurements of cytokine levels and molecular determination of B-cell clonality and recurrent mutations increase the diagnostic yield. Both systemic chemotherapy and exclusively local treatment, including ocular radiotherapy and intravitreal chemotherapy, are successful approaches for the management of PVRL, although it is currently not predictable which patients require systemic treatment in order to avoid cerebral dissemination, a complication associated with a considerably worse prognosis. PMID:27133587

  11. Therapeutic options in peripheral T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaping; Xu, Wei; Liu, Hong; Li, Jianyong

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a rare and heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas with a very poor prognosis. The standard first-line treatments have resulted in unsatisfactory patient outcomes. With the exception of low-risk anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), the majority of patients relapse rapidly; the current 5-year overall survival rates are only 10-30%. Novel targeted therapies and combination chemotherapies are required for the treatment of patients with PTCL. In recent years, some retrospective and prospective studies have been performed concerning PTCL. Consequently, a number of novel agents and their relevant combination therapies have been identified, including histone deacetylase inhibitors, immunoconjugates, antifolates, monoclonal antibodies, immunomodulatory agents, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, kinase inhibitors, bendamustine, L-asparaginase, and other targeted agents. It is hoped that these innovative approaches will finally improve outcomes in patients with PTCL. This review summarizes the currently available approaches for the treatment of PTCL with an emphasis on potential new agents, including the role of stem cell transplantation. PMID:27071634

  12. Intracerebral lymphoma deposits: investigation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Plowman, P.N.; Wise, R.J.S.

    1984-06-01

    In a recently studied series of 12 patients with intracerebral lymphoma deposits, the following are noteworthy: Although most intracerebral lymphoma deposits are dramatically and homogenously enhanced on CT brain scan, this is not always the case; two patients with apparently necrotic centers are presented. Subtraction of enhanced CT brain scanning cuts before and after radiotherapy allow a quantitation of tumor response. The apparent paradox of deficient lymphoma deposit angiogenesis on angiography and good enhancement on CT scan was probed by positron emission topmography (ECAT) in the only patient who did not have a confounding prior craniotomy. ECAT and histopathological examination suggest that the microvasculature of intracerebral lymphoma deposits is rich. The ECAT data demonstrated that regional tumor blood flow was comparable to that in grey matter, but tumor oxygen metabolism was intermediate between grey and white matter. The interesting observation of coupled depression of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in the cerebrum overlying the tumor and its surrounding edema is discussed. A protracted radiotherapy prescription (with daily fractions of 175 cGY) is favored.

  13. Presumed primary muscular lymphoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Thuilliez, Céline; Watrelot-Virieux, Dorothée; Chanut, Franck; Fournel-Fleury, Corinne; Ponce, Frédérique; Marchal, Thierry

    2008-11-01

    A case of presumed primary muscular lymphoma in an 8-year-old, intact, male Newfoundland dog is reported. The dog was presented for evaluation of an infiltrating ventral cervical mass, respiratory distress, and anorexia of 1-month duration. Fine-needle aspiration of the mass revealed anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Despite chemotherapy, health status declined and the animal was euthanized a few weeks later. At necropsy, the mass infiltrated the cervical muscles and extended ventrally to the left forelimb and cranially to the tongue and laryngeal musculature. Other muscles were infiltrated by the same neoplasm (diaphragm and intercostal, abdominal, and gluteal muscles) indicating a probable multicentric origin. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, which showed a strong muscular tropism. Immunohistochemical staining revealed neoplastic cell reactivity for cluster of differentiation 3 (CD3) and Ki-67 antigens (70% and 90%, respectively). The neoplastic cells were negative for CD79a. The presumed histological diagnosis in this dog was primary muscular anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. PMID:18987239

  14. Lymphoma - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Spanish (español) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Communication with Your Healthcare Team English 如何與您的醫療小組溝通 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) Lymphoma Research Foundation ...

  15. PULMONARY ARTERY ACCELERATED FLOW REVEALING HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tony; Chehab, Ghassan; Saliba, Zakhia; Smayra, Tarek; Baz, Maria; Abdo, Lynn; Haddad, Fady; Abdel-Massih, Tony

    2016-01-01

    We present a case in which transthoracic echocardiography was the first diagnostic tool to suspect mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma by revealing a change in the hemodynamic of left pulmonary artery flow, and it was used as a follow-up method for monitoring treatment efficacy by demonstrating a normalization of pulmonary artery hemodynamics. PMID:27169170

  16. Can Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV is spread among adults mostly through unprotected sex and by injection drug users sharing contaminated needles. Blood transfusions are now an extremely rare source of HIV infection. Curbing the spread of HIV would prevent many deaths from non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Treating HIV with anti- ...

  17. Primary adrenal lymphoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Armin; Fisher, Stephen I

    2013-12-01

    Fewer than 200 cases of primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) have been reported. We have systematically reviewed all 187 cases of PAL reported in the English literature until June 2013, from which we drew the following conclusions: PAL is typically a highly symptomatic and aggressive, metabolically hyperactive, hypovascular, hypoechoic (and heterogeneous on ultrasound), hypodense (with slight to moderate enhancement on computed tomography), high-grade lymphoma, primarily affecting elderly males and presenting with large bilateral adrenal masses. Most cases have adrenal insufficiency, B-symptoms, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, concurrent or prior immune dysregulation, and bone marrow involvement are uncommon. Epstein-Barr virus positivity is observed in more than half of cases and the disease is disseminated at presentation in 18 % of cases. The two most common WHO 2008-defined PAL subtypes are diffuse large B cell lymphoma (78 %) and peripheral T cell lymphoma (7 %). The prognosis of PAL has improved with the advent of rituximab-containing chemotherapeutic regimens. According to our results, administration of chemotherapy and adrenal insufficiency are significant independent predictors of prognosis. PMID:23771429

  18. Cytological detection of lymphoma in Douglas aspirate.

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Nives; Sucić, Mirna; Vasilj, Ankica; Lang, Nada; Dominis, Mara; Batinica, Anita Grgurević; Jurković, Ljiljanka; Siftar, Zoran

    2008-10-01

    Except in primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), serous effusions with lymphomatous cells in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) are not frequently seen as first manifestation of disease. In NHL lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) the spleen, lymph nodes, and bone marrow are frequently sites of disease and this type of NHL is usually associated with a serum paraprotein of IgM type accompanied by the clinical syndrome of Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Our patient with NHL LPL type presented in this report had less frequently seen involvement of gastrointestinal tract and clinically was first manifested as effusion in Douglas space. Cytological evaluation as well immunoanalyses of effusion in such cases is essential, and various ancillary studies, because of differential diagnostic problems of lymphomas in serous effusions, first include reactive lymphocytoses and small round-cell tumors (SRCT). In our patient, cytology of effusion revealed cytomorphologically atypical lymphomatous cells with plasmocytoid differentiation. Immunocytochemical and flow cytometry analysis confirmed lymphoid cell differentiation and pathohistological diagnosis of CD20(+) LPL was set after pathohistological analysis of resected ileum. PMID:18773438

  19. Burkitt's lymphoma in a young Brazilian boy.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cláudio M; Lopes, Ana Paula M; Meneghini, Alexandre J; Silva, Geisa B L; Monteiro, Mariana C; Botelho, Tessa de L

    2010-06-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is not an uncommon malignancy in the paediatric population. It is a high-grade non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma which may present as endemic, sporadic and human immunodeficiency-associated subtypes. The African, or endemic, variant usually involves the maxilla and other facial bones while head and neck manifestations in sporadic Burkitt's lymphoma are rare. We described a case of oral Burkitt's lymphoma involving the right jaw in a 4-year-old boy. The patient presented with a rapidly-enlarging swelling of one month duration, toothache-like pain and radiographical appearance of 'floating teeth' in the right mandible. Incisional biopsy revealed small round tumour cells with scarce cytoplasm and multiple small nuclei interspersed by phagocytic macrophages. The tumour cells were immunopositivity for CD20 and CD10, expressed weak positivity for CD3, negative for CD5 and showed > 90% positivity for Ki-67. Tumour remission was achieved with six cycles of chemotherapy with the CHOP regime. PMID:20614728

  20. Combination Chemo, Rituximab, and Bevacizumab in Older Patients With Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-06

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  1. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. Oblimersen Sodium and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-10-11

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  3. Rituximab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated High- or High-Intermediate-Risk Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  4. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T

  5. Cutaneous lymphomas in European pet rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    Ritter, J M; von Bomhard, W; Wise, A G; Maes, R K; Kiupel, M

    2012-09-01

    Cutaneous lymphoma is a common skin neoplasm of pet rabbits in Europe but is rarely reported in pet rabbits in North America. These neoplasms have not been previously characterized, nor has the cause for the apparent predilection for cutaneous lymphoma in European pet rabbits compared with North American pet rabbits been investigated. In this retrospective study, the authors morphologically and immunohistochemically characterized 25 cutaneous lymphomas in European pet rabbits according to the World Health Organization classification. Tumors were classified as diffuse large B cell lymphomas, with 14 lymphomas exhibiting a centroblastic/centrocytic subtype and 11 tumors exhibiting a T cell-rich B cell subtype. To investigate a potential viral etiology of these lymphomas, 3 diffuse large B cell and 3 T cell-rich B cell lymphomas were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction for retroviral and herpesviral genes. Neither virus was detected. In contrast to other domestic animals, cutaneous lymphomas in European pet rabbits were highly pleomorphic and frequently contained multinucleated giant cells. Unexpectedly, the second most common subtype was T cell-rich B cell lymphoma, a subtype that is rare in species other than horses. Based on a limited number of samples, there was no support for a viral etiology that would explain the higher incidence of lymphoma in European pet rabbits compared with American pet rabbits. Further investigation into genetic and extrinsic factors associated with the development of these tumors is warranted. PMID:22308233

  6. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Akhter, A; Saleheen, M S; Hussain, M; Majid, N; Rahman, M R; Shermin, S; Rajib, R C; Huda, M M; Haque, N

    2015-01-01

    Non Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasm of the lymphoid system. There are many histological subtype of NHL based on WHO classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasm. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from January 2009 to December 2010 to observe the different subtypes of NHL using immunohistochemistry (IHC) with CD3. A total of 50 microscopically diagnosed case of NHL irrespective of age and sex were included in the study. The diagnostic morphologic criteria of each lymphoma subcategory were compiled and diagnosis was made. Mean age of the study subjects were 42.0±19.7 years with range 3-75 years and male female ratio was 1.8:1. Nodal NHL was 66% and extranodal cases were 34%. Maximum number of histolgic subtypes belonged to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and male was predominant in all histological subtypes, except peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). DLBCL was predominant in all B-cell NHL whereas PTCL was predominant in all T-cell NHL. The most childhood patients belonged to lymphoblastic lymphoma. Regarding cell lineage B-cell NHL was more common than T-cell NHL (88% vs. 12%), but high grade pattern was more predominant in T-cell type (83.3% vs. 65.9%). Among 50 study subjects histological (H & E) diagnosis reveals 46 cases as B-cell NHL and 4 as T-cell NHL but IHC confirms 6 cases as T-cell NHL. PMID:25725676

  7. Combination Chemotherapy and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Peripheral T-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-02

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Negative; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma, ALK-Positive; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage II Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage II Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage III Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma

  8. [Specifics of histopathological and genetical diagnosis and classification of lymphomas in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Klapper, W; Oschlies, I

    2012-04-01

    Malignant lymphoma along with leukemias account for nearly half of all malignancies arising in childhood and adolescence. The correct tissue-based histopathological diagnosis of lymphomas results from a close interdisciplinary exchange between pediatric oncologists and hematopathologists. We describe here relevant features of lymphoma subtypes arising in the young age group, Burkitt lymphoma, precursor/lymphoblastic lymphomas, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma as well as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma and the rare pediatric follicular lymphomas. Special focus is put on specific diagnostic difficulties as well as new insights into biological features of pediatric lymphomas in comparison with their adult counterpart. In addition the relevance of newly defined lymphoma entities of the WHO-classification 2008, e.g. greyzone lymphomas, will be discussed for the young age group. PMID:22513791

  9. Carfilzomib, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-01

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma

  10. Combination Chemotherapy and Rituximab in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; L3 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma

  11. R-ICE and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With First-Relapse/Primary Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Cell Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  12. Ibrutinib Before and After Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-13

    Activated B-Cell-Like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

  13. Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis masking the diagnosis of lymphoma in an adolescent male.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Natarajan; Uppuluri, Ramya; Geetha, J; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Scott, Julius Xavier

    2014-09-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) association with an underlying lymphoma is an uncommon entity in paediatrics. It may precede lymphoma diagnosis by several years or may occur at the time of remission or relapse of lymphoma. Simultaneous occurrence of HLH & lymphoma is rare. We here with report a case where HLH was the initial presentation which masked the diagnosis of lymphoma, however tissue biopsy revealed the underlying non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:25332560

  14. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  15. Effects of lymphoma on the peripheral nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, R A; Britton, T; Richards, M

    1994-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system abnormalities occur in 5% of patients with lymphoma and have a wide differential diagnosis. Herpes zoster is the commonest cause. Vinca alkaloids are the only drugs used in lymphoma which commonly cause neuropathy. Compression or infiltration of nerve roots by lymphoma is a rare presenting feature but becomes more common with advanced disease. Radiation plexopathy does not usually develop until at least 6 months after irradiation and can be difficult to distinguish from neoplastic infiltration. Either multifocal infiltration of nerves or lymphoma-associated vasculitis may present as a peripheral neuropathy. The incidence of Guillain-Barré (GBS) syndrome, and possibly chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, appears to be increased in association with lymphoma, especially Hodgkin's disease. Subacute sensory neuronopathy and subacute lower motor neuronopathy have both been reported as paraneoplastic syndromes associated with Hodgkin's disease. Treatment of the underlying lymphoma is only rarely followed by recovery of the associated neuropathy. PMID:7932460

  16. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Warrick, Joshua I; Owens, Scott R; Tomlins, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we review prostatic lymphomas and discuss the differential diagnosis of high-grade malignant neoplasms of the prostate. We illustrate this with a case of a 46-year-old man seen with lower urinary tract obstruction who had diffuse involvement by a high-grade malignancy on prostate biopsy. Morphologic evaluation and immunohistochemistry were consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the prostate. Workup with positron emission tomography-computed tomography demonstrated intensely hypermetabolic lymph nodes in the mediastinum, as well as widespread osseous involvement and involvement of the pancreatic tail, prostate, and urinary bladder, suggesting secondary prostatic involvement by a nodal lymphoma. Lymphomas of the prostate are uncommon in surgical pathology practice and usually represent secondary involvement from leukemia/lymphoma at a more typical site. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma is the most common subtype. PMID:25268190

  17. Genetically Modified T-cell Infusion Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or High-Risk Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Review of the clinical research conducted by the Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma of the Korean Society of Hematology Lymphoma Working Party

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Seog; Kim, Jin Seok; Park, Byeong-Bae

    2013-01-01

    The Consortium for Improving Survival of Lymphoma (CISL) in Korean Society of Hematology Lymphoma Working Party had first meeting in February, 2006 with 10 institutions and 12 members. Now CISL comprised of 64 centers. CISL has concentrated research activity on lymphomas which are relatively frequent in Korea and has tried to give favors for the Korean lymphoma patients. CISL has conducted more than 30 retrospective studies to evaluate Korean peculiar lymphoma subtypes. More than 30 prospective trials have been being performed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, and so on. The first prospective trial for advanced marginal zone lymphoma has led to use Rituximab containing chemotherapy with the re-imbursement of health insurance in Korea. The multi-center trials of the CISL with new therapeutic modalities will improve further the survival of lymphoma patients not only quantitatively but also qualitatively. PMID:24086936

  19. Malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in children.

    PubMed

    Magrath, I T

    1987-12-01

    The spectrum of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) that occurs in children differs markedly from that in adults. This is probably a consequence of differences in the proportions of precursor and mature lymphoid cells in the immune systems of children and adults, and the greater emphasis on the development of an immunologic repertoire in the child. Childhood NHL can be classified into three main types based on histology, all of them diffuse: lymphoblastic, small noncleaved cell, and large cell. The majority of lymphoblastic lymphomas are of immature T cell (thymocyte) origin, although a few have a B cell precursor phenotype. All express the enzyme terminal transferase. Small noncleaved lymphomas express B cell characteristics, as do the majority do the majority of large cell lymphomas, although a small proportion of the latter express T cell characteristics. Very few are of true histiocytic origin. Little is known of the epidemiology of lymphoblastic and large cell lymphomas. However, using histology as a diagnostic criterion, both occur throughout the world and occur primarily, as do all childhood NHL, in the first two decades of life. There appear to be at least two types of small noncleaved cell lymphomas, both of which are associated with specific chromosomal translocations. An endemic form occurs at high frequency in equatorial Africa, and a sporadic form occurs at low frequency throughout the world. The endemic tumor is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus, it has a high incidence of jaw tumors, and has a breakpoint on chromosome 8 that is usually some distance upstream of the c-myc oncogene. The sporadic tumor is only occasionally associated with EBV, it often involves the bone marrow, particularly at relapse, and has a breakpoint on chromosome 8 that is usually very close to or within the c-myc oncogene. Childhood NHL is rarely truly localized, and treatment regimens are always based on chemotherapy. There is no evidence that radiation is beneficial when modern

  20. Uncommon Presentation of Isolated Jejunal Lymphoma Masquerading as Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sattavan, Swati; Aggarwal, Lalit; Dikshit, Priyadarshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma is a rare entity, commonly involving stomach, small bowel, and colorectum. The usual location for small bowel B cell lymphoma is distal ileum due to abundant lymphoid tissue. We are reporting the case of a 53-year-old lady presumptively diagnosed as Crohn's disease on clinical and radiological grounds but histopathologically proven to be an unusual variant of isolated primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:27313941

  1. Primary Hepatic Burkitt Lymphoma: A Bizarre Site and Triumph Tale

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Gaurang; Madabhavi, Irappa; Patel, Apurva; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Anand, Asha; Panchal, Harsha; Parikh, Sonia; Baldaniya, Krunal

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic Burkitt lymphoma (PHBL) is an extremely rare form extra nodal lymphoma and till now only 11 case reports have been found in the literature. We are reporting an adult female with primary hepatic Burkitt's lymphoma, who achieved complete remission after 5 months of combination chemotherapy containing vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, methotrexate, prednisolone and intrathecal chemotherapy. She is under regular follow up at our institute. PMID:26155044

  2. Primary B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma of the testis.

    PubMed

    Tombolini, Flavia; Lacetera, Vito; Gini, Guido; Capelli, Debora; Leoni, Pietro; Montironi, Rodolfo; Galosi, Andrea Benedetto; Muzzonigro, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    We present a rare case of primary lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma of the testis focusing on ultrasonographic and pathological features and clinical implications. Pathological examination revealed primary testicular lymphoblastic B-cell lymphoma which was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, including rachicentesis with administration of chemotherapy and with radiotherapy of contralateral testis. Primary testicular lymphoblastic B cell lymphoma is an aggressive disease and it is necessary a multimodal therapy (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) to prevent metastasis. PMID:25641484

  3. Burkitt-type lymphoma in France among non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas in Caucasian children.

    PubMed

    Philip, T; Lenoir, G M; Bryon, P A; Gerard-Marchant, R; Souillet, G; Philippe, N; Freycon, F; Brunat-Mentigny, M

    1982-05-01

    In a retrospective analysis of 87 cases of Caucasian childhood non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma (NHML) from Lyon, France, all the case were diffuse lymphomas, but 47 were diagnosed as monomorphic small non-cleaved NHML, pathologically indistinguishable from Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). BL could then be the most frequent childhood lymphoma in France. This homogeneous series allows better definition of the characteristics of BL within NHML. Age distribution is similar to that of endemic BL, with a sex ratio of 3.7/1. Abdominal masses are initially present in 68% of the cases, whereas jaw is involved in only 4%. The disease is characterized by its overwhelming evolution in the absence of therapy. However, complete remission (CR) is usually obtained after the first chemtherapy regimen. Most relapses occur at 3-8 months. Death could be related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) involvement, local recurrence or secondary marrow involvement. Ninety per cent of the patients alive with no evidence of disease (NED) 8 months after CR can be considered as definitely cured. Our study on Caucasian children with NHML indicates that, from histological and clinical criteria, nearly half the cases are very similar to African BL. Even though EBV rarely associated with our cases, BL could be a worldwide lymphoma. PMID:7082553

  4. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim; Wilson, Lynn D.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  5. T-Cell/Histiocyte-Rich Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as a Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Pooja; Starr, Jason; Swaika, Abhisek; Jiang, Liuyan; Qiu, Yushi; Li, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Primary central nervous system (PCNSL) lymphoma is an aggressive extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and most cases are classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by histology. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma (TCRLBCL) represents a distinct subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and is characterized by the presence of scattered large neoplastic B-cells in a background of abundant T-cells and histiocytes. This is in contrast to the dense perivascular cuffing of neoplastic B-cells in classic DLBCL. T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma should be considered in PCNSL cases in which neoplastic B-cells are sparse and scattered. Immunohistochemistry will help identify the B-cells and surrounding infiltrate rich in Tlymphocytes and histiocytes. Future studies exploring the biology of TCRLBCL and the crosstalk between the neoplastic cells and the surrounding inflammatory infiltrate may provide exciting prospects for future therapies for TCRLBCL. PMID:26788280

  6. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors.

  7. Distribution of ABO blood groups in acute leukaemias and lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Vadivelu, Murali K; Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Solomon, John; Rajaseharan, Annabelle

    2004-09-01

    We studied the distribution of ABO blood groups in Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, in children up to the age of 12 years, in a hospital-based retrospective study. Blood group data were recorded from the case records of all the patients in a tertiary care centre with the diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, during the period 1987-1997. There were 63 Hodgkin's lymphoma, 78 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 116 acute myeloid leukaemia and 522 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia patients. We assessed the distribution of ABO blood groups and the difference in the distribution from the source population. In Hodgkin's lymphoma, there were 45.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.8-84.5] more patients with B blood group. In acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, there were 14.3% (95% CI: 3.2-25.2) more patients with O blood group. In Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, there were 56.5% (95% CI: 19.9-85.4) and 52.9% (95% CI: 18.1-82.6) less patients with A blood group, respectively. This shows that the relationship between the ABO blood groups and haematological malignancies merits further investigation in a population-based prospective study. This is the first study of its kind in any Indian population. PMID:15175895

  8. Texture analysis on MRI images of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harrison, L; Dastidar, P; Eskola, H; Järvenpää, R; Pertovaara, H; Luukkaala, T; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, P-L; Soimakallio, S

    2008-04-01

    The aim here is to show that texture parameters of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data changes in lymphoma tissue during chemotherapy. Ten patients having non-Hodgkin lymphoma masses in the abdomen were imaged for chemotherapy response evaluation three consecutive times. The analysis was performed with MaZda texture analysis (TA) application. The best discrimination in lymphoma MRI texture was obtained within T2-weighted images between the pre-treatment and the second response evaluation stage. TA proved to be a promising quantitative means of representing lymphoma tissue changes during medication follow-up. PMID:18342845

  9. Burkitt lymphoma and the discovery of Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    The chance germinal encounter with the first lecture outside Africa on Burkitt lymphoma is described together with the hypothesis of a viral cause. Repeated virological investigations on lymphoma biopsies proved negative, leading to the idea that a latent virus might be activated if lymphoma cells could be cultured, although no human lymphoid cell had at that time ever been maintained in vitro. A chance event reminding of the need for suspension culture with mouse lymphomas led to success. The cultured cells carried a morphologically unequivocal, strangely inert, herpesvirus shown later to be immunologically, biologically and biochemically unique. How this new agent acquired its name, Epstein-Barr virus, is explained. PMID:22233499

  10. Non-Hodgkin's Malignant Lymphoma with Aggressive Development

    PubMed Central

    DANCIU, Cezara Elisabeta; HEROIU (CATALOIU), Adriana-Daniela; POPESCU, Cristian Radu

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma is a hematologic malignant disease which usually responds to the polychemotherapy. We present a clinical case report of a 50 years old patient who develops an aggressive type of lymphoma. Patient develops a nodal Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma who present at hospital admission as a huge tumor at the right side of the neck. Any type of treatment was a failure, the patient having a particularly aggressive form of lymphoma, resistant to all three chemotherapy regimens tested. Death occurs quickly, about one year after diagnosis and initiation of therapy. PMID:25553129

  11. Primary Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma involving the Mandible.

    PubMed

    Alshahrani, Faleh Ali A; Aljabab, Abdulsalam S; Motabi, Ibraheem Hm; Alrashed, Abdullah; Anil, Sukumaran

    2015-10-01

    Lymphomas of the oral cavity are rare and typically present as intraosseous lesions that are most commonly diffuse large B-cell type. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma histologically characterized by diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B-lymphoid cells with a nuclear size equal to or exceeding normal histiocytic nuclei. A case of DLBCL of the mandible in an 18 years old male patient is presented. This report discusses this rare malignancy, including clinical presentation, histopathologic features, immunologic profile, treatment and prognosis. Though lymphoma of mandible is rare, it must be considered in differential diagnosis of swellings arising in the region. PMID:26581467

  12. Ultrasonic diagnosis of oral and neck malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ishii, J; Fujii, E; Suzuki, H; Shinozuka, K; Kawase, N; Amagasa, T

    1992-12-01

    A series of 14 patients with nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the oral and neck region was analyzed by ultrasonogram evaluation. Eight nodal lymphomas and six extranodal lymphomas commonly exhibited almost completely similar ultrasonographic findings, specifically, clear delineation of the boundary echo and a homogeneous, weak internal echo, the so-called pseudo-liquid-like images. The results derived from our study suggest that ultrasonic diagnosis is also helpful in evaluating patients with lymphoma during the initial diagnosis and initial treatment like other diagnostic imaging modalities. PMID:1458552

  13. The management of adult aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Couderc, B; Dujols, J P; Mokhtari, F; Norkowski, J L; Slawinski, J C; Schlaifer, D

    2000-07-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphona include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphona, and different peripheral T-cell lymphomas. An international prognostic index has been developed including age, serum LDH, performance status, and extranodal involvement. For localized aggressive lymphoma, the preferred treatment is 3-4 CHOP and radiation therapy, with a cure rate of 70-80%. For disseminated aggressive lymphoma, current regimens have a cure rate of less than 40%. Innovative strategies, including dose escalation, autologus stem cell support, new drugs, and immunotherapy are being explored to improve these results. PMID:10863150

  14. Autoimmune/Inflammatory Arthritis Associated Lymphomas: Who Is at Risk?

    PubMed

    Yadlapati, Sujani; Efthimiou, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Specific autoimmune and inflammatory rheumatic diseases have been associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphomas. Conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), dermatomyositis, and celiac disease have been consistently linked to malignant lymphomas. Isolated cases of lymphomas associated with spondyloarthropathies and autoinflammatory diseases have also been reported. Direct association between autoimmunity and lymphomagenesis has been reinforced by large epidemiological studies. It is still uncertain whether disease specific determinants or phenotypic or treatment related characteristics increase likelihood of lymphomagenesis in these patients. For example, recent literature has indicated a positive correlation between severity of inflammation and risk of lymphomas among RA and Sjögren's syndrome patients. It is also debated whether specific lymphoma variants are more commonly seen in accordance with certain chronic autoimmune arthritis. Previous studies have revealed a higher incidence of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in RA and SLE patients, whereas pSS has been linked with increased risk of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. This review summarizes recent literature evaluating risk of lymphomas in arthritis patients and disease specific risk determinants. We also elaborate on the association of autoimmune arthritis with specific lymphoma variants along with genetic, environmental, and therapeutic risk factors. PMID:27429984

  15. Rationale and Design of the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Cerhan, James R.; Turner, Jennifer J.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Wang, Sophia S.; Smedby, Karin E.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Monnereau, Alain; Benavente, Yolanda; Bracci, Paige M.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Skibola, Christine F.; Zhang, Yawei; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Spriggs, Michael; Robinson, Dennis; Norman, Aaron D.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Spinelli, John J.; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Vecchia, Carlo La; Dal Maso, Luigino; Maynadié, Marc; Kadin, Marshall E.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Clarke, Christina A.; Roman, Eve; Miligi, Lucia; Colt, Joanne S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Mannetje, Andrea; de Roos, Anneclaire J.; Kricker, Anne; Nieters, Alexandra; Franceschi, Silvia; Melbye, Mads; Boffetta, Paolo; Clavel, Jacqueline; Linet, Martha S.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Slager, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the most common hematologic malignancy, consists of numerous subtypes. The etiology of NHL is incompletely understood, and increasing evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by NHL subtype. However, small numbers of cases have made investigation of subtype-specific risks challenging. The International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium therefore undertook the NHL Subtypes Project, an international collaborative effort to investigate the etiologies of NHL subtypes. This article describes in detail the project rationale and design. Methods We pooled individual-level data from 20 case-control studies (17471 NHL cases, 23096 controls) from North America, Europe, and Australia. Centralized data harmonization and analysis ensured standardized definitions and approaches, with rigorous quality control. Results The pooled study population included 11 specified NHL subtypes with more than 100 cases: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (N = 4667), follicular lymphoma (N = 3530), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (N = 2440), marginal zone lymphoma (N = 1052), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (N = 584), mantle cell lymphoma (N = 557), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (N = 374), mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome (N = 324), Burkitt/Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia (N = 295), hairy cell leukemia (N = 154), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (N = 152). Associations with medical history, family history, lifestyle factors, and occupation for each of these 11 subtypes are presented in separate articles in this issue, with a final article quantitatively comparing risk factor patterns among subtypes. Conclusions The International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium NHL Subtypes Project provides the largest and most comprehensive investigation of potential risk factors for a broad range of common and rare NHL subtypes to date. The analyses contribute to our understanding of the multifactorial nature of NHL

  16. Surgery for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Orock, George Enow

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are a diverse group of blood cancers derived from lymphocytes that vary significantly in their severity. Surgery is not often used as a treatment because of the efficacy of chemotherapy, biological therapy, radiotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We reviewed the natural history and possible role of surgery for NHL. Surgery may be useful in confirming or refuting an equivocal radiological diagnosis through biopsy, removing symptomatic limited disease from an affected organ and in splenectomy for primary splenic lymphoma. Emergency abdominal surgery for acute complications of NHL provides palliation and diagnosis. There is as yet no consensus as to the optimum treatment for symptomatic limited disease affecting an organ and timing of chemotherapy perioperatively. Prospective randomized trials are required. PMID:26779310

  17. Gallbladder lymphoma in a miniature dachshund.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Nao; Shibata, Sanae; Sakai, Hiroki; Konno, Hiroaki; Takashima, Satoshi; Kawabe, Mifumi; Mori, Takashi; Kitagawa, Hitoshi; Washizu, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old, miniature dachshund was referred for examination and treatment of persistent anorexia, deep yellow-coloured urine and leucocytosis. The clinical sign of jaundice, results from a serum biochemistry profile and ultrasonographic images suggested a biliary tract obstruction. A cholecystectomy was performed to remove the obstruction. Histopathological assessment of the resected gallbladder and partial common bile duct indicated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twelve days after the initial operation, a second procedure was performed due to bile leakage into the abdominal cavity. Chemotherapy was administered twice after the second operation but discontinued, because the dog showed adverse effects. The dog is still alive 24 months after the surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of canine gallbladder lymphoma. PMID:25311915

  18. Uroradiographic manifestations of Burkitt's lymphoma in children

    SciTech Connect

    Fernbach, S.K.; Glass, R.B.

    1986-05-01

    The radiological studies of 18 children with biopsy proved Burkitt's lymphoma were analyzed retrospectively. Before therapy the genitourinary tract was evaluated in 15 children by excretory urography, sonography, computerized tomography and/or gallium citrate scintigraphy. Genitourinary abnormalities were detected in 9 children. Changes due to tumor included renal or ureteral displacement in 4 children, hydronephrosis in 3 and intraparenchymal masses in 4. Extrinsic compression of the bladder causing no compromise of function was seen in only 2 children. Gonadal involvement occurred in 2 boys and 1 girl. The modality of choice for evaluating the genitourinary tract in patients with Burkitt's lymphoma has been excretory urography. Since ultrasound and computerized tomography provide more direct information about tumor deposits within the kidney and retroperitoneum, either should be performed in this population before initiation of chemotherapy.

  19. Treatment strategies for aggressive lymphomas: what works?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wyndham H

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many treatment platforms have been developed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but none proved better than CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, vincristine, prednisone/prednisolone). In the immunochemotherapy era, however, there is convincing evidence for superior chemotherapy platforms. A randomized study from the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte showed that R-ACVBP (rituximab plus doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) was superior to rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP) in patients under 60 years of age, but toxicity limits its use to younger patients. Studies also suggest that DA-EPOCH-R (dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, rituximab) is more effective in some subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and a randomized comparison with R-CHOP is now nearing completion. The simplicity and safety of R-CHOP and the long history of failed contenders, however, has set a high bar for new approaches. PMID:24319235

  20. Treatment approaches to asymptomatic follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Salles, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    Follicular lymphoma is a heterogeneous disease in which some patients present an indolent evolution for decades and others, a rather aggressive form of the disease requiring immediate therapy. While immunochemotherapy has emerged as a standard of care for symptomatic patients, treatment of the asymptomatic population remains controversial. Since the disease is still considered incurable, delayed initiation of therapy is an acceptable option. However, four single injections of rituximab can result in an acceptable clinical response and can improve the duration of the interval without cytotoxic therapy. With recent therapeutic approaches that enable substantial improvements in life expectancy for follicular lymphoma patients, limiting short- or long-term treatment toxicities appears as a new concern in the asymptomatic population. Based on these options, the challenge is to preserve patient quality of life and prolong survival: from the patient's perspective, his/her opinion is therefore of significant importance. PMID:24219551

  1. [Current therapeutic strategies for mantle cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Dreyling, M; Schnaiter, A; Schmidt, C; Hoster, E

    2016-03-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is a subtype of B‑cell lymphoma with a mostly aggressive behavior and poor long-term prognosis. The choice of therapy depends on the age, performance status and risk profile of the patient. Randomized trials have confirmed the superiority of a dose-intensified induction therapy containing cytarabine followed by autologous stem cell transplantation in the first-line treatment of younger patients with a good general condition. Elderly patients benefit from a rituximab maintenance therapy after immunochemotherapy. Novel targeted therapies of the B‑cell receptor pathway with the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) antagonist temsirolimus as well as immunomodulatory drugs (lenalidomide) have shown promising results in relapsed disease. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has been approved for first-line treatment in combination with conventional chemotherapy. PMID:26886710

  2. Ileal follicular lymphoma with atypical endoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Satoshi; Koshikawa, Yorimitsu; Minami, Naoki; Honzawa, Yusuke; Matsuura, Minoru; Nakase, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    A 72-year-old woman presented with symptomatic anemia without abdominal symptoms. She had no history of abdominal surgery or use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Enhanced computed tomography of the abdomen revealed swelling of multiple intraperitoneal lymph nodes and a high density of mesenteric adipose tissue. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-) positron emission tomography showed high FDG accumulation at the intraperitoneal lymph nodes. Double-balloon enteroscopy detected severe stenosis with an annular ulcer in the lower ileum. She was diagnosed with ileal follicular lymphoma based on histologic examination and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the biopsy specimen. The ileal ulcer was successfully treated by chemotherapy with rituximab and bendamustine for 1 year. We strongly recommend consideration of gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma in the differential diagnosis of annular ulcers in the small intestine. PMID:27004251

  3. Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphomas That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-30

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Localized Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult

  4. Cell of origin of transformed follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kridel, Robert; Mottok, Anja; Farinha, Pedro; Ben-Neriah, Susana; Ennishi, Daisuke; Zheng, Yvonne; Chavez, Elizabeth A.; Shulha, Hennady P.; Tan, King; Chan, Fong Chun; Boyle, Merrill; Meissner, Barbara; Telenius, Adele; Sehn, Laurie H.; Marra, Marco A.; Shah, Sohrab P.; Steidl, Christian; Connors, Joseph M.; Scott, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent disease but transforms in 2% to 3% of patients per year into aggressive, large cell lymphoma, a critical event in the course of the disease associated with increased lymphoma-related mortality. Early transformation cannot be accurately predicted at the time of FL diagnosis and the biology of transformed FL (TFL) is poorly understood. Here, we assembled a cohort of 126 diagnostic FL specimens including 40 patients experiencing transformation (<5 years) and 86 patients not experiencing transformation for at least 5 years. In addition, we assembled an overlapping cohort of 155 TFL patients, including 114 cases for which paired samples were available, and assessed temporal changes of routinely available biomarkers, outcome after transformation, as well as molecular subtypes of TFL. We report that the expression of IRF4 is an independent predictor of early transformation (Hazard ratio, 13.3; P < .001). We also show that composite histology at the time of transformation predicts favorable prognosis. Moreover, applying the Lymph2Cx digital gene expression assay for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell-of-origin determination to 110 patients with DLBCL-like TFL, we demonstrate that TFL is of the germinal-center B-cell–like subtype in the majority of cases (80%) but that a significant proportion of cases is of the activated B-cell–like (ABC) subtype (16%). These latter cases are commonly negative for BCL2 translocation and arise preferentially from BCL2 translocation-negative and/or IRF4-expressing FLs. Our study demonstrates the existence of molecular heterogeneity in TFL as well as its relationship to the antecedent FL. PMID:26307535

  5. Cell of origin of transformed follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kridel, Robert; Mottok, Anja; Farinha, Pedro; Ben-Neriah, Susana; Ennishi, Daisuke; Zheng, Yvonne; Chavez, Elizabeth A; Shulha, Hennady P; Tan, King; Chan, Fong Chun; Boyle, Merrill; Meissner, Barbara; Telenius, Adele; Sehn, Laurie H; Marra, Marco A; Shah, Sohrab P; Steidl, Christian; Connors, Joseph M; Scott, David W; Gascoyne, Randy D

    2015-10-29

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an indolent disease but transforms in 2% to 3% of patients per year into aggressive, large cell lymphoma, a critical event in the course of the disease associated with increased lymphoma-related mortality. Early transformation cannot be accurately predicted at the time of FL diagnosis and the biology of transformed FL (TFL) is poorly understood. Here, we assembled a cohort of 126 diagnostic FL specimens including 40 patients experiencing transformation (<5 years) and 86 patients not experiencing transformation for at least 5 years. In addition, we assembled an overlapping cohort of 155 TFL patients, including 114 cases for which paired samples were available, and assessed temporal changes of routinely available biomarkers, outcome after transformation, as well as molecular subtypes of TFL. We report that the expression of IRF4 is an independent predictor of early transformation (Hazard ratio, 13.3; P < .001). We also show that composite histology at the time of transformation predicts favorable prognosis. Moreover, applying the Lymph2Cx digital gene expression assay for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell-of-origin determination to 110 patients with DLBCL-like TFL, we demonstrate that TFL is of the germinal-center B-cell-like subtype in the majority of cases (80%) but that a significant proportion of cases is of the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype (16%). These latter cases are commonly negative for BCL2 translocation and arise preferentially from BCL2 translocation-negative and/or IRF4-expressing FLs. Our study demonstrates the existence of molecular heterogeneity in TFL as well as its relationship to the antecedent FL. PMID:26307535

  6. Tacrolimus and Mycophenolate Mofetil With or Without Sirolimus in Preventing Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-14

    Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Stage II Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 3 Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Contiguous Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Contiguous Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Non-Contiguous Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 1 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage II Grade 2 Non-Contiguous Follicular Lymphoma; Stage

  7. Pediatric B-Cell Lymphoma With Lymphoblastic Morphology, TdT Expression, MYC Rearrangement, and Features Overlapping With Burkitt Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Meznarich, Jessica; Miles, Rodney; Paxton, Christian N; Afify, Zeinab

    2016-05-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) and B-lymphoblastic lymphoma are subtypes of pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma with different presenting features, treatment, and outcomes. This case report documents a 5-year-old female who presented with B-cell lymphoma with lymphoblastic morphology, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase expression, MYC rearrangement, and features overlapping with BL. Genomic microarray analysis identified a gain on the long arm of chromosome 1 without other definitive changes. She was treated according to a BL protocol and remains in remission 16-months after initial diagnosis. PMID:26785246

  8. Lenalidomide as Maintenance Therapy After Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma That is Resistant to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  9. Lymphoma of the skeleton: scintigraphic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Orzel, J.A.; Sawaf, N.W.; Richardson, M.L.

    1988-05-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the 99mTc-diphosphonate scans of 980 patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma to define the typical appearance and distribution of skeletal lesions. The results were compared with the presence of skeletal symptoms and the findings on 67Ga-citrate scintigraphy, when available. Forty (4%) of the 980 patients had 77 scintigrams showing osseous involvement; there was an average of 3.5 lesions per study. Compared with patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, patients with Hodgkin disease had significantly fewer axial lesions (44% vs 82%, p less than .000001, two-tailed test) and more frequent involvement of the extremities. Subtle lesions were common. Of the lesions detected by scintigraphy, significantly more were detected by 99mTc-diphosphonate imaging (95%) than were detected by 67Ga-citrate (44%) (p less than .00001, two-tailed test), and most of these were far less apparent on the 67Ga-citrate study. Skeletal pain was an insensitive but specific indicator of skeletal disease. These results show that skeletal scintigraphy in patients with lymphoma typically reveals multiple subtle and asymptomatic lesions with frequent extremity involvement. Diffusely increased calvarial activity is commonly seen and often persists in proved remission. Increased juxtaarticular activity is specific for malignant skeletal involvement.

  10. Cutaneous presentation of Double Hit Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Khelfa, Yousef; Lebowicz, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), representing approximately 25% of diagnosed NHL. DLBCL is heterogeneous disease both clinically and genetically. The 3 most common chromosomal translocations in DLBCL involve the oncogenes BCL2, BCL6, and MYC. Double hit (DH) DLBCL is an aggressive form in which MYC rearrangement is associated with either BCL2 or BCL6 rearrangement. Patients typically present with a rapidly growing mass, often with B symptoms. Extranodal disease is often present. Though there is a paucity of prospective trials in this subtype, double hit lymphoma (DHL) has been linked to very poor outcomes when patients are treated with standard R-CHOP. There is, therefore, a lack of consensus regarding the standard treatment for DHL. Several retrospective analyses have been conducted to help guide treatment of this disease. These suggest that DA EPOCH-R may be the most promising regimen and that achievement of complete resolution predicts better long-term outcomes. PMID:27115017

  11. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN 13 HORSES WITH LYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    Janvier, Valentin; Evrard, Laurence; Cerri, Simona; Gougnard, Alexandra; Busoni, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography and radiography are commonly used for staging of lymphoma in horses, however there is little published information on imaging characteristics for horses with confirmed disease. The purpose of this retrospective, case series study was to describe ultrasonographic and radiographic findings for a group of horses with a confirmed diagnosis of lymphoma. A total of 13 horses were sampled. Lymphadenopathy (8/13), peritoneal effusion (6/13), splenic (6/13), and hepatic (5/13) lesions were the most frequently identified. The predominant splenic and hepatic ultrasonographic lesions were hypoechoic nodules, organomegaly, and changes in echogenicity. Digestive tract lesions were detected in three horses and these included focal thickening and decreased echogenicity of the small (2/13) and large intestinal (2/13) wall. Thoracic lesions were predominantly pleural effusion (4/13), lymphadenopathy (4/13), and lung parenchymal changes (3/13). Enlarged lymph nodes were detected radiographically (4/13) and/or ultrasonographically (2/13) in the thorax and ultrasonographically in the abdomen (7/13) and in the caudal cervical region (4/13). Findings supported the use of abdominal and thoracic ultrasonography for lymphoma staging in horses. Ultrasound landmarks for localizing cecal and caudal deep cervical lymph nodes were also provided. PMID:26456541

  12. Treatment of cutaneous lymphomas: an update.

    PubMed

    Izu-Belloso, R M; García-Ruiz, J C

    2012-10-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas (PCLs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoid tumors that originate primarily in the skin. Most PCLs (75%) are T-cell lymphomas and only 20% to 25% involve B cells. It is important to differentiate between cutaneous lymphomas and lymph node tumors given the differences in their molecular biology and clinical, histopathologic, and immunophenotypic features. Moreover, PCLs generally follow a more indolent course and require different treatments. Many treatment options are available for managing PLC's. The choice should be based primarily on the clinical stage of disease but must also take into consideration other factors, such as the patient's age and general health, the availability and accessibility of the treatment, and the cost-benefit ratio. It will be important to use a multidisciplinary approach, involving a team of expert dermatologists, hematologist-oncologists, and radiotherapists who are familiar with this rare disease. Recent years have seen the emergence of many new therapies, particularly for advanced stages of the disease and for patients whose tumors have proven refractory to treatment. The objective of this article is to review all the treatment options available to us. PMID:22575363

  13. ALLOGENEIC NATURAL KILLER CELLS FOR REFRACTORY LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; McKenna, David H.; Curtsinger, Julie; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Lindgren, Bruce R.; Cooley, Sarah; Weisdorf, Daniel; Miller, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    We reported that IL-2 activated autologous NK cells can induce, but not maintain durable remissions in lymphoma patients. We hypothesized that allogeneic NK cells may overcome class I MHC-mediated inhibition of NK cell killing. In a pilot study we evaluated infusion of haploidentical donor NK cells for anti-tumor efficacy. Six patients with advanced B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) received rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and fludarabine as immunosupression to permit homeostatic NK cell expansion, followed by CD3-depleted NK cell enriched cell products followed by subcutaneous IL-2 administration (10×106 units every other day × 6 doses). At 2 months, four patients showed an objective clinical response. We observed early donor cell persistence in 2 patients (blood and in tumor-bearing node), but this was not detectable beyond 7 days. All patients demonstrated substantial increases in host regulatory T cells (Treg) after NK cell and IL-2 therapy (180±80 cells/μl vs baseline: 58±24 cells/μl, p=0.04) which may have limited donor cell expansion in vivo. These findings suggest safety and feasibility of allogeneic NK cell therapy in patients with lymphoma; however host Treg and inadequate immunodepletion may contribute to a hostile milieu for NK cell survival and expansion. Cell therapy trials should incorporate novel strategies to limit Treg expansion. PMID:20680271

  14. Protein kinase inhibitors against malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are intimately involved in multiple signal transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation and differentiation of lymphoid cells. Deregulation or overexpression of specific oncogenic TKs is implicated in maintaining the malignant phenotype in B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Several novel targeted TK inhibitors (TKIs) have recently emerged as active in the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphomas that inhibit critical signaling pathways, promote apoptotic mechanisms or modulate the tumor microenvironment. Areas covered In this review, the authors summarize the clinical outcomes of newer TKIs in various B-cell lymphomas from published and ongoing clinical studies and abstracts from major cancer and hematology conferences. Expert opinion Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that robust antitumor activity can be obtained with TKIs directed toward specific oncogenic TKs that are genetically deregulated in various subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Clinical success of targeting TKIs is dependent upon on identifying reliable molecular and clinical markers associated with select cohorts of patients. Further understanding of the signaling pathways should stimulate the identification of novel molecular targets and expand the development of new therapeutic options and individualized therapies. PMID:23496343

  15. Masitinib monotherapy in canine epitheliotropic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Holtermann, N; Kiupel, M; Kessler, M; Teske, E; Betz, D; Hirschberger, J

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated efficacy and side effects of masitinib in canine epitheliotropic lymphoma. Complete remission occurred in 2 of 10 dogs and lasted for median 85 days. Five dogs went into partial remission for median 60.5 days. Three pretreated dogs did not respond to therapy. Side effects occurred in six dogs and were mostly mild to moderate. Immunohistochemistry was available for eight dogs. KIT receptor was negative in all of them, six of eight lymphomas stained strongly positive for stem cell factor (SCF). platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA was weakly positive in two and negative in six. PDGF-BB was negative in four tumours, weakly positive in one and strongly positive in three. One was strongly positive for PDGF receptor (PDGFR)-β, seven were negative for that receptor. Five showed strong expression of PDGFR-α, two showed weak expression, one was negative. In conclusion, masitinib is effective in treating canine epitheliotropic lymphoma. But its effects are most likely not generated through the KIT receptor. PMID:26364581

  16. Canine Lymphoma as a Comparative Model for Human Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Recent Progress and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Frantz, Aric M.; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2016-01-01

    The term “lymphoma” describes a heterogeneous group of disorders involving monoclonal proliferation of malignant lymphocytes. As a group, lymphomas are among the most common tumors of dogs. Yet our enumeration and understanding of the many subtypes of lymphoma have been relatively slow, perhaps in part because for many years lymphoma was treated as a singular entity rather than a group of distinct diseases. The recognition that the full spectrum of lymphoid malignancies seen in humans also occurs in dogs, and that these tumors retain not only morphologic similarities and biological behavior but also synonymous driver molecular abnormalities, sets an ideal stage for dual-purpose research that can accelerate progress for these diseases in both species. Specifically, dogs represent exceptional models for defining causality, understanding progression, and developing new treatments for lymphoma in comparatively brief windows of time. Unique advantages of canine models include (1) spontaneous disease occurring without an isogenic background or genetic engineering; (2) chronology of disease adapted to lifespan, (3) shared environment and societal status that allows dogs to be treated as “patients,” while at the same time being able to ethically explore translational innovations that are not possible in human subjects; and (4) organization of dogs into breeds with relatively homogeneous genetic backgrounds and distinct predisposition for lymphomas. Here, we will review recent studies describing intrinsic and extrinsic factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of canine and human lymphomas, as well as newly developed tools that will enhance the fidelity of these models to improve diagnosis and develop new treatments. PMID:24642290

  17. Detection of Hodgkin Transformation in a Case of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia by PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Sabire; Özhan, Meftune; Asa, Sertaç; Sağer, M. Sait; Biricik, Fatih Selçuk; Halaç, Metin; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2014-01-01

    Richter’s transformation (RT) represents the development of high grade lymphoma, most commonly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL). CLL/SLL may convert also to Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the so-called Hodgkin’s variant of Richter transformation. Histopathological proof is needed to confirm a definitive diagnosis. Patients with RT generally have a poor prognosis, with prompt recognition optimise clinical management. Whole-body PET scan with 18F-FDG can be used for detection of RT of CLL/SLL. We describe the case of 64-year-old woman with CLL/SLL who developed Hodgkin lymphoma detected with PET/CT. PMID:24963449

  18. Oral Lymphoma Prevalence in Iranian Population: A Multicenter Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil; Bastani, Zahra; Mokhtari, Sepideh; Atarbashi Moghadam, Saede

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oral lymphoma is the second most common malignancy of the head and neck region after malignant epithelial tumors. Objectives: Considering the lack of a multicenter study on the frequency of oral lymphoma in Iran, this study aimed to assess the relative frequency of oral lymphomas in Iran during a 6-year period. Materials and Methods: This multicenter, retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, cases of oral lymphoma registered in the cancer research center (CRC) of Shahid Beheshti university of medical sciences were extracted. The patient records and pathology reports of these patients were retrieved from the archives and age, sex and microscopic type site of the lesions were evaluated. Results: Oral lymphoma accounts for 1% of head and neck malignancies and 8% of all lymphomas. From 2003 to 2008, a total of 437 new cases of oral lymphomas had been registered in the CRC. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was found to be the most common form of oral lymphoma in the 6-year period with 240 (54.9%) registered cases. The majority of detected cases were in the 6th and 7th decades of life with a male to female ratio of 1:84. Tonsils were the most common site of occurrence of lymphoma in the oral cavity (77.8%). Conclusions: The age of onset, site of involvement, sex of patients, and histopathological subtype of oral lymphomas in the Iranian population were found to be similar to those of most other countries. PMID:26855724

  19. Lymphoma stem cells: enough evidence to support their existence?

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Climent, Jose A.; Fontan, Lorena; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Siebert, Reiner; Prosper, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    While leukemia-originating stem cells are critical in the initiation and maintenance of leukemias, the existence of similar cell populations that may generate B-cell lymphoma upon mutation remains uncertain. Here we propose that committed lymphoid progenitor/precursor cells with an active V-D-J recombination program are the initiating cells of follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma when targeted by immunoglobulin (IG)- gene translocations in the bone marrow. However, these pre-malignant lymphoma-initiating cells cannot drive complete malignant transformation, requiring additional cooperating mutations in specific stem-cell programs to be converted into the lymphoma-originating cells able to generate and sustain lymphoma development. Conversely, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma derive from B lymphocytes that acquire translocations through IG-hyper-mutation or class-switching errors within the germinal center. Although secondary reprogramming mutations are generally required, some cells such as centroblasts or memory B cells that have certain stem cell-like features, or lymphocytes with MYC rearrangements that deregulate self-renewal pathways, may bypass this need and directly function as the lymphoma-originating cells. An alternative model supports an aberrant epigenetic modification of gene sets as the first occurring hit, which either leads to retaining stem-cell features in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells, or reprograms stemness into more committed lymphocytes, followed by secondary chromosomal translocations that eventually drive lymphoma development. Isolation and characterization of the cells that are at the origin of the different B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas will provide critical insights into the disease pathogenesis and will represent a step towards the development of more effective therapies. PMID:20139392

  20. TLR9 Agonist SD-101, Ipilimumab, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Recurrent B-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma