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Sample records for lynx lynx lynx

  1. Lynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    (the Lynx; abbrev. Lyn, gen. Lyncis; area 545 sq. deg.) A northern constellation which lies between Ursa Major and Auriga, and culminates at midnight in late January. It was introduced by the astronomer Johannes Hevelius (1611-87) of Danzig (Gdansk), who included it in his atlas Firmamentum Sobiescianum sive Uranographia of 1687. An inconspicuous constellation, Hevelius (who distrusted telescopic...

  2. Lynx Special Section Assessment of Canada Lynx Research and Conservation

    E-print Network

    ABSTRACT The ecology of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) and their main prey, snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus the Endangered Species Act, accurate understanding of lynx and snowshoe hare ecology and conservation and important research needs related to lynx and hare ecology and conservation at the southern extent

  3. Genotyping success of historical Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) samples.

    PubMed

    Polanc, Primož; Sindi?i?, Magda; Jelen?i?, Maja; Gomer?i?, Tomislav; Kos, Ivan; Huber, Duro

    2012-03-01

    Historical samples, like tanned hides and trophy skulls, can be extremely important for genetic studies of endangered or elusive species. Selection of a sampling protocol that is likely to provide sufficient amount and quality of DNA with a minimum damage to the original specimen is often critical for a success of the study. We investigated microsatellite genotyping success of DNA isolated from three different types of Eurasian lynx historical samples. We analysed a total of 20 microsatellite loci in 106 historical samples from the endangered Dinaric lynx population, established from re-introduction of three pairs of lynx in 1973 from Slovakian Carpathians. Of the three tested sample types, turbinal bone and septum from the nasal cavity of the trophy skulls had the lowest percentage of samples successfully genotyped for all 20 microsatellite loci. Footpad samples, collected using a cork drill, exhibited better results in polymerase chain reaction amplification and genotyping than samples of footpad epidermis cut with a scalpel. We report simple and efficient sampling protocols, which could be widely applied for future studies utilizing historical samples. PMID:22040140

  4. Free-ranging Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) as host of Toxoplasma gondii in Finland.

    PubMed

    Jokelainen, Pikka; Deksne, Gunita; Holmala, Katja; Näreaho, Anu; Laakkonen, Juha; Kojola, Ilpo; Sukura, Antti

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the presence of Toxoplasma gondii infections in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) in Finland by analyzing samples from 337 lynx that were legally hunted during the 2010-2011 season and by performing a retrospective nationwide database search of postmortem toxoplasmosis diagnoses in this species. We detected specific anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies in 290 (86.1%) of the 337 lynx. The method used was a direct agglutination test, and samples positive at the used dilution 1:40 were defined as antibody positive. Older lynx had 14.3 times higher odds of being antibody-positive than did lynx of the presumed age of 7-10 mo, and lynx weighing >15 kg had 16.7 times higher odds of being antibody positive than did those ? 15 kg. Lynx from the southwest were more often antibody positive, with an odds ratio 6.3, than lynx from the northeast. None of the 332 fecal samples available was positive for the presence of T. gondii-like oocysts with a quantitative MgSO4 flotation technique, and none of the 167 free-ranging Eurasian lynx examined postmortem by veterinary pathologists from January 2000 to May 2010 had died from toxoplasmosis. Although Finnish lynx were confirmed to commonly encounter T. gondii, we found no evidence of an ongoing contribution to the environmental oocyst burden nor of the lynx dying from the infection. PMID:23778601

  5. Endoparasites of the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) in Finland.

    PubMed

    Deksne, Gunita; Laakkonen, Juha; Näreaho, Anu; Jokelainen, Pikka; Holmala, Katja; Kojola, Ilpo; Sukura, Antti

    2013-04-01

    We sampled 339 fecal samples, 296 intestines, and 82 lungs from 371 lynx hunted during the 2010-2011 season in Finland. The fecal samples were analyzed for endoparasites by a quantitative flotation method, and helminths from intestines were studied morphologically, while lungs were investigated for pulmonary parasites. From fecal samples, eggs and oocysts of at least 6 different endoparasite species were identified, with a mean of 1.5 (range 0-4) parasite species per host. In the intestines, at least 4 different helminth species were found, with the mean of 2.0 (range 1-4) species per infected host. The prevalence of eggs in feces and the prevalence of worms in intestines were 71% and 93% for Toxocara cati , 29% and 68% for Taenia spp., and 5% and 2% for Diphyllobothrium sp., respectively. Only eggs were detected for Capillaria sp. (46%) and Uncinaria sp. (0.6%) nematodes, and only adults were detected for Mesocestoides sp. cestodes (0.3%). Significant positive correlations were evident between the number of T. cati (r = 0.664; P = 0.01) and Diphyllobothrium sp. (r = 0.645; P = 0.01) eggs per gram of feces and adult worms detected in intestine. In addition to the metazoan parasites, protozoan Isospora sp. oocysts were also found (0.6%). Pulmonary samples were all negative for parasites. These data demonstrate that lynx commonly harbor various endoparasites, some of which are zoonotic. PMID:23016871

  6. [Social play in the development of sibling relations in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx)].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, G S; Antonevich, A L; Erofeeva, M N; Na?denko, S V

    2014-01-01

    Social play fulfills an important function in creating and maintaining relations between siblings. However, its relationship with the intralitter social processes is poorly understood. It was noticed that, in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) litters, sex differences in social play are absent in the first 2-3 months of life. Itwas found that the most intense periods of play behavior (at an age of 9 and 1-2 weeks) coincide with periods of aggression. Gradual change in play interactions, which require close physical contact by play elements with increased motor activity, are described. This reflects the changes in the relevance of certain skills of lynx cubs as they grow older. PMID:25735181

  7. New evidence for the occurrence of Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) in medieval Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, David A.; Lord, Tom C.; Jacobi, Roger M.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of Eurasian lynx as a former native species in Britain during the Holocene is known from bones recovered from several sites. AMS radiocarbon dating of lynx bone recovered from two sites in the Craven area of northern England gave 1842 +/- 35 14C yr BP and 1550 +/- 24 14C yr BP, together representing the youngest dates for lynx from England, and in the case of the latter, the youngest for Britain as a whole. These dates support the view that the game animal whose occurrence in the nearby Lake District is described in the early 7th century Cumbric text Pais Dinogad, and whose translation to date has been problematic, is a lynx. The occurrence of lynx in early medieval Britain shows that earlier periods of climate change, previously blamed for the species' extinction in Britain, were not responsible. Instead, anthropogenic factors such as severe deforestation, declining deer populations, and persecution, are likely to have caused the extirpation of lynx in Britain. Consequently, the lynx qualifies as a candidate for reintroduction. Large-scale reafforestation, the growth of deer populations, and more positive attitudes towards carnivores in modern society, could permit the restoration of lynx to Britain, particularly in Scotland.

  8. Disease threats to the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; Candela, Mónica G; Palomares, Francisco; Cubero, María José; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Barral, Marta; de la Fuente, José; Almería, Sonia; León-Vizcaíno, Luis

    2009-10-01

    The Iberian lynx, (Lynx pardinus), is the most endangered felid in the world. To determine whether sympatric carnivores are reservoirs of pathogens posing a disease risk for the lynx, evidence of exposure to 17 viral, bacterial and protozoan agents was investigated in 176 carnivores comprising 26 free-living lynx, 53 domestic cats, 28 dogs, 33 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 24 Egyptian mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon), 10 common genets (Genetta genetta) and 2 Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) in the areas inhabited by the last two populations of Iberian lynx, both in Andalusia (South-Western Spain). The results indicated that the lynx had low rates of contact with viral pathogens, with one seropositive finding each for feline leukemia virus, parvovirus and canine adenovirus-1, whereas contact with bacteria and protozoa appeared more frequent. Active infections with parvovirus, Ehrlichia spp., Mycobacterium bovis, Leptospira interrogans and Cytauxzoon spp. were confirmed. In contrast, 53% of the domestic cats were exposed to some infectious agent (prevalence range 4.5-11.4%). Antibodies to canine distemper virus and parvovirus were frequently found in dogs (32% and 42%, respectively) and foxes (30% and 12%). Past or present infections with parvovirus, Ehrlichia spp., Chlamydophila spp., M. bovis, Salmonella enterica, L. interrogans, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum were also detected in these and other species surveyed. Questionnaires to owners revealed that 14% of the dogs but none of the cats had been vaccinated, and no cat had been neutered. Based on the apparent absence of acquired immunity of the lynx against infectious agents, the frequent detection of agents among sympatric carnivores, and the reported lack of immunocompetence of the Iberian lynx, a disease outbreak among the local abundant carnivores may pose a serious disease risk for lynx conservation. PMID:18555712

  9. Pyloric trichobezoar in a Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Kottwitz, Jack; Munsterman, Amelia S

    2013-12-01

    An adult female Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) was presented with a 3-wk history of anorexia and lethargy. Initial examination and diagnostics did not provide a diagnosis. The lynx continued to demonstrate vague clinical signs, including anorexia and an abnormal gait. During follow-up immobilizations 2 wk later, a barium gastrointestinal study revealed a pyloric obstruction. Abdominal exploratory surgery was elected, and a gastrotomy and an enterotomy of the proximal duodenum were performed to remove the pyloric obstruction. The obstruction was determined to be a trichobezoar. Fleas, a likely cause of hair ingestion through grooming, were noted during surgical preparation. The lynx made a full recovery from surgery. Reoccurrence of the trichobezoar was prevented after surgery with the use of monthly flea control and three times a week hairball laxative. PMID:24450081

  10. Repetitive sequences in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) mitochondrial DNA control region.

    PubMed

    Sindi?i?, Magda; Gomer?i?, Tomislav; Galov, Ana; Polanc, Primož; Huber, Duro; Slavica, Alen

    2012-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (CR) of numerous species is known to include up to five different repetitive sequences (RS1-RS5) that are found at various locations, involving motifs of different length and extensive length heteroplasmy. Two repetitive sequences (RS2 and RS3) on opposite sides of mtDNA central conserved region have been described in domestic cat (Felis catus) and some other felid species. However, the presence of repetitive sequence RS3 has not been detected in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) yet. We analyzed mtDNA CR of 35 Eurasian lynx (L. lynx L.) samples to characterize repetitive sequences and to compare them with those found in other felid species. We confirmed the presence of 80 base pairs (bp) repetitive sequence (RS2) at the 5' end of the Eurasian lynx mtDNA CR L strand and for the first time we described RS3 repetitive sequence at its 3' end, consisting of an array of tandem repeats five to ten bp long. We found that felid species share similar RS3 repetitive pattern and fundamental repeat motif TACAC. PMID:22515208

  11. Molecular identification of Taenia spp. in the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) from Finland.

    PubMed

    Lavikainen, A; Haukisalmi, V; Deksne, G; Holmala, K; Lejeune, M; Isomursu, M; Jokelainen, P; Näreaho, A; Laakkonen, J; Hoberg, E P; Sukura, A

    2013-04-01

    Cestodes of the genus Taenia are parasites of mammals, with mainly carnivores as definitive and herbivores as intermediate hosts. Various medium-sized cats, Lynx spp., are involved in the life cycles of several species of Taenia. The aim of the present study was to identify Taenia tapeworms in the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) from Finland. In total, 135 tapeworms from 72 lynx were subjected to molecular identification based on sequences of 2 mtDNA regions, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 genes. Available morphological characters of the rostellar hooks and strobila were compared. Two species of Taenia were found: T. laticollis (127 samples) and an unknown Taenia sp. (5 samples). The latter could not be identified to species based on mtDNA, and the rostellar hooks were short relative to those described among other Taenia spp. recorded in felids from the Holarctic region. In the phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequences, T. laticollis was placed as a sister species of T. macrocystis, and the unknown Taenia sp. was closely related to T. hydatigena and T. regis. Our analyses suggest that these distinct taeniid tapeworms represent a putative new species of Taenia. The only currently recognized definitive host is L. lynx and the intermediate host is unknown. PMID:23347590

  12. Hormone-induced luteolysis on physiologically persisting corpora lutea in Eurasian and Iberian lynx (Lynx lynx and Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Painer, Johanna; Goeritz, Frank; Dehnhard, Martin; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Naidenko, Sergey V; Sánchez, Iñigo; Quevedo Muñoz, Miguel A; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2014-09-01

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is the most critically endangered felid. A high reproductive success within the Iberian Lynx Conservation Breeding Program is crucial to maintaining the goal of reintroducing captive born offspring to the wild and thus increasing the population. Lynx follow a unique reproductive strategy with a monoestrous cycle and persisting CLs over many years. These persistent CLs constantly produce progesterone (on average 5 ng/mL) and are hypothesized to hinder a polyestrous cyclicity in lynx. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether artificial luteolysis can be achieved with common luteolytic drugs and if luteolysis would induce a second estrus naturally. We observed a functional regression of lynx CLs after artificial luteolysis with 2.5 ?g/kg body weight PGF2? analogue (cloprostenol) administered three times every 16 hours. We could see a similar effect when combining cloprostenol with other drugs like an anti-gestagen (aglepristone) or a dopamin-agonist (prolactin-inhibitor, cabergolin) or by prolonging the cloprostenol administration to a total of 5 days. However, the sample size was too small to draw conclusions about which protocol is superior or if combining different drugs would result in a positive synergism. Neither structural regression of CLs nor subsequent spontaneous estrus induction was induced with any of these treatments. We suggest that a dose of 2.5 ?g/kg body weight cloprostenol administered once daily over 3 to 5 days is sufficient for functional luteolysis in lynx. The next step would be to compare the success of estrus induction with or without the preceding artificial luteolysis. PMID:24974257

  13. Butterfly Project Report LYNX Reference Manual

    E-print Network

    Scott, Michael L.

    Butterfly Project Report 7 LYNX Reference Manual Michael L. Scott Revised Version: August 1986 Computer Science Department University ofRochester Rochester, NY 14627 #12;LYNX Reference Manual Michael L. Scott March 1986 revised August 1986 ABSTRACT LYNX is a message-based distributed programming language

  14. Pioneer to Lynx Matt LaFary

    E-print Network

    Pioneer to Lynx Matt LaFary matt.lafary@adept.com Director of Software, Mobile Robots Adept PARTNER Adept, Lynx creation 6 Warehouse Logistics Manufacturing Semiconductor #12;YOUR INTELLIGENT on Lynx) · 2 Kinova arms · Kinect #12;YOUR INTELLIGENT ROBOTICS PARTNER Questions? 11 #12;

  15. Scent-marking behaviour and social dynamics in a wild population of Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Kristina; Zimmermann, Fridolin; Kölliker, Mathias; Breitenmoser, Urs

    2014-07-01

    Scent-marking is widespread among mammals and has been observed in many felid species. Although the behaviour is well-described, little is known about its function in wild felid populations. We investigated patterns of scent-marking and its role in intra- and intersexual communication among resident and non-resident Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx by observing interactions among wild lynx at natural marking sites by means of infrared camera traps. Marking activity of resident animals showed a peak during the mating season and was lowest during the time when females gave birth and lactated. Both sexes scent-marked, but male lynx visited marking sites much more often than females and marked relatively more often when visiting a site. Most visits to marking sites were by residents but we also observed scent-marking by non-residents. Juveniles were never observed marking. We found no evidence of lynx regularly renewing scent-marks after a certain 'expiry date' but the presence of a strange scent-mark triggered over-marking. Males responded similarly to the presence of another individual's scent-mark, irrespective of whether it was the top- or the underlying scent-mark in a mixture of scent-marks they encountered. Our results suggest that marking sites could serve as 'chemical bulletin boards', where male lynx advertise their presence and gain information on ownership relationships in a given area. Females placed their urine marks on top of the ones left by resident males, but further studies are needed to explain the functions of over-marking in females. PMID:24814909

  16. Collection of field reproductive data from carcasses of the female Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Axnér, E; Payan-Carreira, R; Setterlind, P; Åsbrink, J; Söderberg, A

    2013-11-01

    Information about reproductive physiology in the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) would generate knowledge that could be useful in the management of the Swedish lynx population based on the knowledge about their reproductive potential and population development. Age-related differences in ovulation and implantation rates would affect the reproductive output and the development of the population. The aims of this study were to evaluate a protocol for collection of reproductive data from carcasses by comparisons with published field data and to generate data about reproduction in the Swedish lynx. Reproductive organs from 120 females that were harvested between March 1 and April 9 from 2009 to 2011 were collected and evaluated macroscopically for placental scars. Females had their first estrus as yearlings but did not have their first litter until the next season. Pregnancy rates were lower in 2-year-old females than in females aged 3 to 7 years but did not differ significantly from females aged 8 to 13 years (54.5%, 95.6%, and 75.0%, respectively). CL from the present season were morphologically distinctly different from luteal bodies from previous cycles (LBPC). All females ?3 years had macroscopically visible LBPC, whereas only 67% of 22 to 23 months old females had one to three LBPC and no females <1 year of age had LBPC. Females aged 34 to 35 months had up to eight LPBC, whereas the highest number of LBPC counted in females ?3 years of age was 11. These data would be in agreement with only one estrus per season and LBPC from at least three previous reproductive seasons in older females. The number of LBPC was significantly correlated with the weight of the ovaries rs = 0.648, P < 0.001) and the age of the animals (rs = 0.572, P < 0.001). Uterine weight differed significantly with the stage of the reproductive cycle and was highest for mature females in the luteal phase of the cycle. The estrous period, defined as occurrence of ovarian follicles lasted from March 5 to April 1 in this material. In conclusion, this study confirms that useful information about lynx reproduction can be collected from reproductive organs retrieved after the death of the animals. Continuous monitoring of lynx reproductive organs would therefore make a valuable contribution to collection of field data, gathering information that can be useful for the management of lynx populations and potentially for the lynx as an indicator of environmental disturbances. PMID:23987987

  17. Occurrence of Thelazia callipaeda and Toxocara cati in an imported European lynx (Lynx lynx) in Japan.

    PubMed

    El-Dakhly, Khaled; Abo El-Hadid, Shawky; Shimizu, Hirofumi; El-Nahass, Shaymaa; Murai, Atsuko; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2012-09-01

    A necropsy was performed on an adult European lynx, Lynx lynx (Linnaeus, 1758), held in captivity until its death, to determine level of parasitism. Examination of the eyes revealed the oriental eyeworm, Thelazia callipaeda, in the conjunctival sac and the third eyelid of both eyes. The species was confirmed by location and morphology. Intact worms were fixed, mounted, and identified. Examination of the alimentary tract revealed the common ascaroid nematode, Toxocara cati. Species was confirmed by the arrow-like anterior end. One hundred and forty-one adult worms were collected. The presence of these nematodes indicated the importance of eliminating the contact of zoo animals with Amiota spp. vectors and to prevent contamination with the infective T. cati eggs. PMID:23082531

  18. Large-Scale Genetic Structuring of a Widely Distributed Carnivore - The Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx)

    PubMed Central

    Rueness, Eli K.; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables. PMID:24695745

  19. Large-scale genetic structuring of a widely distributed carnivore--the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Rueness, Eli K; Naidenko, Sergei; Trosvik, Pål; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades the phylogeography and genetic structure of a multitude of species inhabiting Europe and North America have been described. The flora and fauna of the vast landmasses of north-eastern Eurasia are still largely unexplored in this respect. The Eurasian lynx is a large felid that is relatively abundant over much of the Russian sub-continent and the adjoining countries. Analyzing 148 museum specimens collected throughout its range over the last 150 years we have described the large-scale genetic structuring in this highly mobile species. We have investigated the spatial genetic patterns using mitochondrial DNA sequences (D-loop and cytochrome b) and 11 microsatellite loci, and describe three phylogenetic clades and a clear structuring along an east-west gradient. The most likely scenario is that the contemporary Eurasian lynx populations originated in central Asia and that parts of Europe were inhabited by lynx during the Pleistocene. After the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) range expansions lead to colonization of north-western Siberia and Scandinavia from the Caucasus and north-eastern Siberia from a refugium further east. No evidence of a Berinigan refugium could be detected in our data. We observed restricted gene flow and suggest that future studies of the Eurasian lynx explore to what extent the contemporary population structure may be explained by ecological variables. PMID:24695745

  20. Molecular identification of Taenia spp. In the Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx) from Finland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cestodes of the genus Taenia are parasites of mammals, with mainly carnivores as definitive and herbivores as intermediate hosts. Various medium-sized cats, Lynx spp., are involved in the life cycles of several species of Taenia. The aim of the present study was to identify Taenia tapeworms in the E...

  1. Histological and endocrine characterisation of the annual luteal activity in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Carnaby, Kim; Painer, Johanna; Söderberg, Arne; Gavier-Widèn, Dolores; Göritz, Frank; Dehnhard, Martin; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2012-10-01

    Lynx presents a unique sexual cycle with persistent corpora lutea (CLs) and elevated serum progesterone (P?) throughout parturition and lactation. In other mammals, CLs normally disintegrate after parturition, therefore the aim of our study was to characterise the annual life cycle of lynx CLs. Ovaries from Eurasian lynxes were obtained from the National Veterinary Institute in Sweden, where tissues from killed lynx were stored at -20?°C. Ovaries from 66 animals were weighed; each corpus luteum was segmented for histology and hormone analysis. Ovary and CLs weights were constant throughout the year, peaking during pregnancy. In non-pregnant lynxes, the seasonal level of intraluteal steroids was steady for P? (3.2±1.9 s.d. ?g/g, n=53) and total oestrogens (18.3±15.5 s.d. ng/g, n=53). Within histology slides, structurally intact luteal cells were found throughout the year with the highest incidence in March/April; evidence of luteal regression was predominantly found in post-breeding season. Ovaries from pregnant animals contained two types of CLs. Group A was bigger in size with large luteal cells (P?, 72.3±65.4 s.d. ?g/g; oestrogen, 454.0±52.4 s.d. ng/g). In contrast, group B were smaller, with greater luteal regression and lower steroid concentrations (P?, 8.3±2.9 s.d. ?g/g; oestrogen, 31.5±20.4 s.d. ng/g). Our results suggest that structural luteolysis proceeds throughout the year and into next breeding cycle, resulting in two CLs types on the same ovary. PMID:22829688

  2. Physiologically persistent Corpora lutea in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) - longitudinal ultrasound and endocrine examinations intra-vitam.

    PubMed

    Painer, Johanna; Jewgenow, Katarina; Dehnhard, Martin; Arnemo, Jon M; Linnell, John D C; Odden, John; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Goeritz, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Felids generally follow a poly-estrous reproductive strategy. Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) display a different pattern of reproductive cyclicity where physiologically persistent corpora lutea (CLs) induce a mono-estrous condition which results in highly seasonal reproduction. The present study was based around a sono-morphological and endocrine study of captive Eurasian lynx, and a control-study on free-ranging lynx. We verified that CLs persist after pregnancy and pseudo-pregnancy for at least a two-year period. We could show that lynx are able to enter estrus in the following year, while CLs from the previous years persisted in structure and only temporarily reduced their function for the period of estrus onset or birth, which is unique among felids. The almost constant luteal progesterone secretion (average of 5 ng/ml serum) seems to prevent folliculogenesis outside the breeding season and has converted a poly-estrous general felid cycle into a mono-estrous cycle specific for lynx. The hormonal regulation mechanism which causes lynx to have the longest CL lifespan amongst mammals remains unclear. The described non-felid like ovarian physiology appears to be a remarkably non-plastic system. The lynx's reproductive ability to adapt to environmental and anthropogenic changes needs further investigation. PMID:24599348

  3. Physiologically Persistent Corpora lutea in Eurasian Lynx (Lynx lynx) – Longitudinal Ultrasound and Endocrine Examinations Intra-Vitam

    PubMed Central

    Painer, Johanna; Jewgenow, Katarina; Dehnhard, Martin; Arnemo, Jon M.; Linnell, John D. C.; Odden, John; Hildebrandt, Thomas B.; Goeritz, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Felids generally follow a poly-estrous reproductive strategy. Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) display a different pattern of reproductive cyclicity where physiologically persistent corpora lutea (CLs) induce a mono-estrous condition which results in highly seasonal reproduction. The present study was based around a sono-morphological and endocrine study of captive Eurasian lynx, and a control-study on free-ranging lynx. We verified that CLs persist after pregnancy and pseudo-pregnancy for at least a two-year period. We could show that lynx are able to enter estrus in the following year, while CLs from the previous years persisted in structure and only temporarily reduced their function for the period of estrus onset or birth, which is unique among felids. The almost constant luteal progesterone secretion (average of 5 ng/ml serum) seems to prevent folliculogenesis outside the breeding season and has converted a poly-estrous general felid cycle into a mono-estrous cycle specific for lynx. The hormonal regulation mechanism which causes lynx to have the longest CL lifespan amongst mammals remains unclear. The described non-felid like ovarian physiology appears to be a remarkably non-plastic system. The lynx's reproductive ability to adapt to environmental and anthropogenic changes needs further investigation. PMID:24599348

  4. Overview of Lynx. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.L.

    1989-08-01

    A programming language can provide much better support for interprocess communication than a library package can. Most message-passing languages limit this support to communication between the pieces of a single program, but this need not be the case. Lynx facilitates convenient, typesafe message passing not only within applications, but also between applications, and among distributed collections of servers. Specifically, it addresses issues of compiler statelessness, late binding, and protection that allow runtime interaction between processes that were developed independently and that do not trust each other. Implementation experience with Lynx has yielded important insights into the relationship between distributed operating systems and language run-time support packages, and into the inherent costs of high-level message-passing semantics.

  5. Polonium-210 and Caesium-137 in lynx (Lynx lynx), wolverine (Gulo gulo) and wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Gjelsvik, Runhild; Holm, Elis; Kålås, John Atle; Persson, Bertil; Asbrink, Jessica

    2014-12-01

    Wolves, lynx and wolverines are on the top of the food-chain in northern Scandinavia and Finland. (210)Po and (137)Cs have been analysed in samples of liver, kidney and muscle from 28 wolves from Sweden. In addition blood samples were taken from 27 wolves. In 9 of the wolves, samples of muscle, liver and blood were analysed for (210)Po. Samples of liver and muscle were collected from 16 lynx and 16 wolverines from Norway. The liver samples were analysed for (210)Po and (137)Cs. Only (137)Cs analyses were carried out for the muscle samples. The wolves were collected during the winter 2010 and 2011, while the samples for lynx and wolverines were all from 2011. The activity concentrations of (210)Po in wolves were higher for liver (range 20-523 Bq kg(-1) d.w.) and kidney (range 24-942 Bq kg(-1) d.w.) than muscle (range 1-43 Bq kg(-1) d.w.) and blood (range 2-54 Bq kg(-1) d.w.). Activity ratios, (210)Po/(210)Pb, in wolf samples of muscle, liver and blood were in the ranges 2-77, 9-56 and 2-54. Using a wet weight ratio of 3.8 the maximal absorbed dose from (210)Po to wolf liver was estimated to 3500 ?Gy per year. Compared to wolf, the ranges of (210)Po in liver samples were lower in lynx (range 22-211 Bq kg(-1) d.w.) and wolverine (range16-160 Bq kg(-1) d.w.). Concentration of (137)Cs in wolf samples of muscle, liver, kidney and blood were in the ranges 70-8410 Bq kg(-1) d.w., 36-4050 Bq kg(-1) d.w., 31-3453 Bq kg(-1) d.w. and 4-959 Bq kg(-1) d.w., respectively. (137)Cs in lynx muscle and liver samples were in the ranges 44-13393 Bq kg(-1) d.w. and 125-10260 Bq kg(-1) d.w. The corresponding values for (137)Cs in wolverine were 22-3405 Bq kg(-1) d.w. for liver and 53-4780 Bq kg(-1) d.w. for muscle. The maximal absorbed dose from (137)Cs to lynx was estimated to 3000 ?Gy per year. PMID:24811891

  6. Patterns of variation in reproductive parameters in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Erlend B; Linnell, John D C; Odden, John; Samelius, Gustaf; Andrén, Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Detailed knowledge of the variation in demographic rates is central for our ability to understand the evolution of life history strategies and population dynamics, and to plan for the conservation of endangered species. We studied variation in reproductive output of 61 radio-collared Eurasian lynx females in four Scandinavian study sites spanning a total of 223 lynx-years. Specifically, we examined how the breeding proportion and litter size varied among study areas and age classes (2-year-old vs. >2-year-old females). In general, the breeding proportion varied between age classes and study sites, whereas we did not detect such variation in litter size. The lack of differences in litter sizes among age classes is at odds with most findings in large mammals, and we argue that this is because the level of prenatal investment is relatively low in felids compared to their substantial levels of postnatal care. PMID:22707757

  7. Suckling behavior in Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx L.) cubs: characteristics and correlation with competitive interactions.

    PubMed

    Glukhova, Alla; Naidenko, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial evidence in the literature that the offspring of many mammal species prefer a particular pair of nipples. There is also a definite "nipple order" in individual litters in which each young predominantly uses one or two particular nipples. In combination with early competitive interactions, such "constancy" can play an important role in the social development of the young. In this study, we reveal an unequal use of different pairs of mothers' nipples by 42 Eurasian lynx cubs in 16 litters and investigate the relationship of this phenomenon with the early competitive interactions of the cubs and their physical development. For the lynx cubs, the most often used pair of nipples is the middle pair. There is also definite "nipple order" in each litter. We found a negative correlation between nipples use by the offspring and their competitive activity. No influence of "nipple order" on the cubs' growth rate was detected. PMID:25185866

  8. Canada lynx Lynx canadensis habitat and forest succession in northern Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoving, C.L.; Harrison, D.J.; Krohn, W.B.; Jakubas, W.J.; McCollough, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The contiguous United States population of Canada lynx Lynx canadensis was listed as threatened in 2000. The long-term viability of lynx populations at the southern edge of their geographic range has been hypothesized to be dependent on old growth forests; however, lynx are a specialist predator on snowshoe hare Lepus americanus, a species associated with early-successional forests. To quantify the effects of succession and forest management on landscape-scale (100 km2) patterns of habitat occupancy by lynx, we compared landscape attributes in northern Maine, USA, where lynx had been detected on snow track surveys to landscape attributes where surveys had been conducted, but lynx tracks had not been detected. Models were constructed a priori and compared using logistic regression and Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), which quantitatively balances data fit and parsimony. In the models with the lowest (i.e. best) AIC, lynx were more likely to occur in landscapes with much regenerating forest, and less likely to occur in landscapes with much recent clearcut, partial harvest and forested wetland. Lynx were not associated positively or negatively with mature coniferous forest. A probabilistic map of the model indicated a patchy distribution of lynx habitat in northern Maine. According to an additional survey of the study area for lynx tracks during the winter of 2003, the model correctly classified 63.5% of the lynx occurrences and absences. Lynx were more closely associated with young forests than mature forests; however, old-growth forests were functionally absent from the landscape. Lynx habitat could be reduced in northern Maine, given recent trends in forest management practices. Harvest strategies have shifted from clearcutting to partial harvesting. If this trend continues, future landscapes will shift away from extensive regenerating forests and toward landscapes dominated by pole-sized and larger stands. Because Maine presently supports the only verified populations of this federally threatened species in the eastern United States, changes in forest management practices could affect recovery efforts throughout that region.

  9. RESEARCH ARTICLE Dispersal promotes high gene flow among Canada lynx

    E-print Network

    Row, Jeffrey R.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Dispersal promotes high gene flow among Canada lynx populations across mainland structure of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) have been surprisingly equivocal, despite a large amount a large-scale genetic struc- turing assessment for Canada lynx, including most of its geographic range

  10. RESEARCH ARTICLE Dispersal promotes high gene flow among Canada lynx

    E-print Network

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Dispersal promotes high gene flow among Canada lynx populations across mainland studies addressing the population structure of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) have been surprisingly microsatellite loci to conduct a large-scale genetic struc- turing assessment for Canada lynx, including most

  11. RESEARCH ARTICLE Functional connectivity of lynx at their southern range

    E-print Network

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Functional connectivity of lynx at their southern range periphery in Ontario, we modeled occurrence of Canada lynx (Lynx canaden- sis) in relation to landscape characteristics of lynx habitat along the southern margins of the range. As observed in other studies, young coniferous

  12. Validation of an enzyme immunoassay for the measurement of faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in Eurasian (Lynx lynx) and Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Pribbenow, Susanne; Jewgenow, Katarina; Vargas, Astrid; Serra, Rodrigo; Naidenko, Sergey; Dehnhard, Martin

    2014-09-15

    Stress hormone levels are important indicator of an animal's well-being, as stress has harmful effects on reproduction, growth and immune function. The development of enzyme immunoassays (EIA) to monitor faecal glucocorticoid metabolites (fGM) contributes a powerful tool to assess an animal's adrenal status non-invasively. We aimed to identify a suitable EIA for monitoring fGM by assessing the suitability of six different EIAs for detecting quantitative changes in fGM concentrations in response to an ACTH challenge test in Eurasian lynx. FGM were characterised in a male Eurasian lynx that received an injection of (3)H-cortisol. Using HPLC analyses radiolabeled metabolites were compared with immunoreactive metabolites. The second aim was to biologically validate the established EIA for monitoring adrenocortical activity of captive Iberian lynxes after a translocation to new enclosures in relation to behaviour. Additionally faecal samples of ten pregnant Iberian lynxes from the peripartal period were analysed. The ACTH challenge revealed an 11?-hydroxyetiocholanolone EIA as the most sensitive assay to reflect acute fGM elevations in the Eurasian lynx. HPLC immunograms demonstrated that the 11?-hydroxyetiocholanolone EIA measured significant amounts of immunoreactivities corresponding to radiolabeled metabolites with strong similarities across both lynx species. Additionally, HPLC and GC-MS analyses confirmed the presence of 11?-hydroxyetiocholanolone in faeces of both, the Eurasian and the Iberian lynx. Longitudinal fGM profiles of Iberian lynx revealed increases in concentrations associated with management events. During the peripartal period, however, fGM concentrations were not significantly elevated. Our results show that the 11?-hydroxyetiocholanolone EIA is a reliable tool to assess fGM in both lynx species. PMID:25066418

  13. Ancient DNA evidence of Iberian lynx palaeoendemism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Varela, Ricardo; Tagliacozzo, Antonio; Ureña, Irene; García, Nuria; Crégut-Bonnoure, Evelyne; Mannino, Marcello A.; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Valdiosera, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    The Iberian lynx, endemic to the Iberian Peninsula, is the most threatened carnivore in Europe and the most endangered felid in the world. Widely distributed throughout Iberia during the Pleistocene and Holocene it is now confined to two small populations in southern Spain. Lynx species differentiation, based solely on morphological analysis from skeletal traits, is a difficult task and can potentially lead to misidentification. In order to verify whether Iberian lynx had a wider geographical distribution in the past, we successfully sequenced 152 base pairs (bp) of the cytochrome b gene and 183 bp of the mitochondrial control region in 20 Late Pleistocene and Holocene fossil remains of Lynx sp. from southern Europe. Our results confirm the presence of Iberian lynx outside the Iberian Peninsula demonstrating that this is a palaeoendemic species that had a wider distribution range in southern Europe during the Holocene and the Late Pleistocene. In addition, we documented the presence of both Palaearctic extant lynx species in the Arene Candide (north Italy) site during the Last Glacial Maximum.

  14. Importance of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in free-ranging Iberian lynxes (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Meli, Marina L; Simmler, Pascale; Cattori, Valentino; Martínez, Fernando; Vargas, Astrid; Palomares, Francisco; López-Bao, José V; Simón, Miguel A; López, Guillermo; León-Vizcaino, Luis; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Lutz, Hans

    2010-11-20

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a morbillivirus that is the etiological agent of one of the most important viral diseases affecting canids and an expanding range of other carnivores. Using real-time RT-PCR, CDV RNA was detected in organs of an Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) found dead in the Doñana National Park, Southwestern Andalusia, Spain. This finding may be of great importance for the conservation of the species; at present the Iberian lynx is the most critically endangered wild felid. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the significance of CDV for the Iberian lynx population. High viral loads were evident in the dead lynx, suggesting an etiological involvement of CDV in its death. When carnivores from the same region were analyzed by CDV RT-PCR, a stone marten (Martes foina) was positive. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated high identity of the two detected CDVs and a close relationship to the European dog lineage of CDV. Antibodies to CDV were detected in 14.8% of 88 tested free-ranging Iberian lynxes. The sample seroprevalence was significantly higher in lynxes from the Doñana Natural Space (22.9%) than Sierra Morena (5%). The stone marten and a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) also tested seropositive. In conclusion, CDV is present in the Iberian lynx population, especially in the Doñana region, with sporadic cases of disease. To reduce the infectious pressure of CDV on this endangered population, a mass dog vaccination should be considered. PMID:20570061

  15. The Lynx Distributed Programming Language: Motivation, Design, and Experience

    E-print Network

    Scott, Michael L.

    The Lynx Distributed Programming Language: Motivation, Design, and Experience Michael L. Scott Technical Report 308 August 1989; revised August 1990 #12;The Lynx Distributed Programming Language to communication between the pieces of a single program, but this need not be the case. Lynx facilitates convenient

  16. Macroscopic and microscopic evaluation of Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) female tubular reproductive organs in relation to ovarian structures.

    PubMed

    Axnér, E; Holm, D; Gavier-Widén, D; Söderberg, A; Bergqvist, A S

    2015-09-15

    Although monitoring wild animals in the field is essential for estimations of population size and development, there are pitfalls associated with field monitoring. In addition, some detailed data about reproductive physiology can be difficult to obtain in wild live animals. Studying reproductive organs from the Eurasian lynx killed at hunting or found dead could be used as a valuable addition to other field data. We evaluated reproductive organs from 39 Eurasian lynx females (Lynx lynx) killed in Sweden during the hunting seasons in 2009, 2010, and 2011. According to notes on ovarian structures, the animals were categorized as being in one of four different reproductive stages: juvenile (n = 10), follicular stage (n = 8), luteal stage (n = 11), and anestrus (n = 10). Corpora lutea were classified as fresh CL from the present season or as luteal bodies from previous cycles. Microscopic evaluations were blindly coded while the outer measurements of the vagina and uterus were taken at the time of organ retrieval. The width of the endometrium, myometrium, outer width of the uterine horns, and the diameter of the vagina differed significantly with the reproductive stage (P < 0.001) and were largest in the follicular and luteal phases. The number of endometrial glands evaluated blindly coded on a subjective scale was significantly associated with the reproductive stage (P < 0.0001) and was significantly higher in the luteal phase than that in any other reproductive stages (P < 0.05). Cornification of the vaginal epithelium was only observed in females in the follicular stage or in females with signs of a recent ovulation. In conclusion, both macroscopic and histologic measurements are useful for a correct classification of the reproductive stage when evaluating reproductive organs in the Eurasian lynx killed during the hunting season. Routine evaluation of reproductive organs has a potential to be a useful additional tool to field studies of live lynx to monitor their reproduction. PMID:26050610

  17. Spatiotemporal dynamics of Toxoplasma gondii infection in Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) in western Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Simon, Audrey; Bigras Poulin, Michel; Rousseau, Alain N; Dubey, Jitender P; Ogden, Nicholas H

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, one of the more common zoonotic parasites in the world, can cause serious illness in humans and other animals worldwide. Felids are the only known host that can shed T. gondii oocysts, which are essential to the perpetuation of the parasite. In much of boreal Canada, the Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) is the only wild felid host that could contribute to environmental contamination with T. gondii oocysts. We estimated the prevalence of T. gondii antibodies in Canadian lynx from western Québec and compared our results with earlier findings in the same region 12 yr earlier. We investigated factors associated with seroconversion, including age, sex, geographic location, and possible co-occurrence with domestic cats (Felis catus), and we assessed the proportion of lynx shedding T. gondii oocysts. Blood and fecal samples were collected from 84 lynx harvested by trappers in the eastern part of the study area during winter 2009-2010. Sera were tested for antibodies to T. gondii by the modified agglutination test (cutoff titer 1:50) and fecal samples for parasite eggs by fecal flotation. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in sera of 14% of 84 lynx. Numerous helminth ova and coccidian oocysts were found in feces, whereas T. gondii-like oocysts were not detected. Antibody prevalence increased with age class (odds ratio [OR]=4.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.57-11.99, P<0.01). Antibody prevalence (14%) in our study was significantly lower than in 84 lynx (36%) trapped in the western part of the study area during winter 1997-1998 (OR=0.18, 95% CI=0.08-0.44, P<0.001). Our results suggest there may be significant spatiotemporal dynamics of T. gondii infection in lynx in Canada, and we review possible abiotic and biotic ecologic factors supporting these findings. PMID:23307370

  18. Early development and growth in captive-born Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Yerga, Javier; Calzada, Javier; Manteca, Xavier; Vargas, Astrid; Rivas, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge on the growth and early development patterns of endangered species can become a useful conservation tool because it may allow detecting anomalous growth in newborns, both in captivity breeding and in the wild. We studied the growth and early development of 40 Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) cubs belonging to 21 litters born in captivity between 2005 and 2012 at "El Acebuche" Iberian Lynx Breeding Centre. This is the first study on growth in this critically endangered species. The Iberian lynx cubs were not fully developed at birth. During the first 3 weeks of life, cubs underwent many of the physical changes that allowed them to improve their interaction with the environment, such as the opening of eye and auditory channels, teeth eruptions, and the ability to walk. When the cubs were 1 month old, they were ready to leave the den and develop new behaviors such as the exploration of their environment, play, or hunt. Three different models had been fitted to the body mass growth of the Iberian lynx. The von Bertalanffy curve provided the best fit. The asymptotic adult mass was the only parameter that differed between males and females (males being 8% larger), due to the higher growth rate of males. The adult weight of hand-reared cubs (i.e., those abandoned at born) did not differ from that of cubs reared by their mothers. Both growth and development showed differences from other lynx species. PMID:25081419

  19. Sir --As director of the laboratory that analysed the samples for the National Lynx

    E-print Network

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    Sir -- As director of the laboratory that analysed the samples for the National Lynx Survey to the damaging yet unsubstantiated conclusions in your Opinion article "Lynch mob turns on lynx researchers"1 and News article "Fur flies over lynx survey's suspect samples"2 about sampling for Canada lynx (Lynx

  20. Lynx: a database and knowledge extraction engine for integrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Sulakhe, Dinanath; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Xie, Bingqing; Feng, Bo; Taylor, Andrew; Wang, Sheng; Berrocal, Eduardo; Dave, Utpal; Xu, Jinbo; Börnigen, Daniela; Gilliam, T Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    We have developed Lynx (http://lynx.ci.uchicago.edu)--a web-based database and a knowledge extraction engine, supporting annotation and analysis of experimental data and generation of weighted hypotheses on molecular mechanisms contributing to human phenotypes and disorders of interest. Its underlying knowledge base (LynxKB) integrates various classes of information from >35 public databases and private collections, as well as manually curated data from our group and collaborators. Lynx provides advanced search capabilities and a variety of algorithms for enrichment analysis and network-based gene prioritization to assist the user in extracting meaningful knowledge from LynxKB and experimental data, whereas its service-oriented architecture provides public access to LynxKB and its analytical tools via user-friendly web services and interfaces. PMID:24270788

  1. Fatal clostridium septicum myonecrosis in a captive canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Izer, Jenelle M; Wilson, Ronald P; Cooper, Timothy K

    2014-09-01

    A 1-yr-old female Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) presented for sudden onset of rapidly progressive bilateral pelvic limb paralysis. The lynx was chemically immobilized to perform a physical examination but expired shortly thereafter. On postmortem radiographs, there were myriad small irregular, round-to-spherical gas densities within the skeletal muscle of the right thigh and epaxial musculature. At gross necropsy, the muscles of the right thigh, right lateral abdominal wall, and epaxial region were emphysematous and necrohemorrhagic, with subcutaneous and muscular crepitant swelling. Multiple skin puncture wounds, consistent with bites, were present over the affected tissues. Clostridium septicum was isolated in pure anaerobic culture from the musculature of the right hind limb. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of acute, severe necrohemorrhagic and gangrenous myositis and cellulitis. Gram stains demonstrated large gram-positive bacilli with subterminal spores. This is the first known documented case of C. septicum myonecrosis in a nondomestic felid. PMID:25314833

  2. Competitive Asymmetries in the Use of Supplementary Food by the Endangered Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus)

    PubMed Central

    López-Bao, José V.; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Palomares, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Background As a conservation tool, supplementary feeding programs may be directed to specific individuals or sectors of the target population whose productivity or survival is thought to be limited by food scarcity. However, the use of supplemental food by different sex and age classes has received little attention. We studied individual variation in the access of the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) to supplementary food. Methodology/Principal Findings From 5349 pictures taken with automatic cameras placed in 25 feeding stations, we identified 28 individuals whose sex and age were known. All individuals known to live in areas subjected to supplementation regularly visited feeding stations. Food consumption was not proportional to expected variations in energy demand within sex and age classes. Food consumption by males was higher than by females, and increased with age, in agreement with a despotic distribution. Food consumption also increased with lynx body mass, and this pattern held for individuals sharing the same breeding territories. The access of inferior competitors increased with the number of feeding stations available within lynx territories. Conclusions/Significance All lynx exposed to food supplementation made a regular use of extra food but individuals predicted to be competitively dominant visited stations more frequently than subordinates of the same breeding territory. Our results suggest that insufficient provision of supplementary food could restrict the access of juveniles, or even adult females, to feeding stations. Limited consumption by these target individuals may compromise the efficiency of the supplementary feeding programme at the population level, in endangered species that, as the Iberian lynx, exhibit marked sexual dimorphism in body size. PMID:19898611

  3. Linking climate change to population cycles of hares and lynx.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chuan; Stenseth, Nils Chr; Krebs, Charles J; Zhang, Zhibin

    2013-11-01

    The classic 10-year population cycle of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus, Erxleben 1777) and Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis, Kerr 1792) in the boreal forests of North America has drawn much attention from both population and community ecologists worldwide; however, the ecological mechanisms driving the 10-year cyclic dynamic pattern are not fully revealed yet. In this study, by the use of historic fur harvest data, we constructed a series of generalized additive models to study the effects of density dependence, predation, and climate (both global climate indices of North Atlantic Oscillation index (NAO), Southern Oscillation index (SOI) and northern hemispheric temperature (NHT) and local weather data including temperature, rainfall, and snow). We identified several key pathways from global and local climate to lynx with various time lags: rainfall shows a negative, and snow shows a positive effect on lynx; NHT and NAO negatively affect lynx through their positive effect on rainfall and negative effect on snow; SOI positively affects lynx through its negative effect on rainfall. Direct or delayed density dependency effects, the prey effect of hare on lynx and a 2-year delayed negative effect of lynx on hare (defined as asymmetric predation) were found. The simulated population dynamics is well fitted to the observed long-term fluctuations of hare and lynx populations. Through simulation, we find density dependency and asymmetric predation, only producing damped oscillation, are necessary but not sufficient factors in causing the observed 10-year cycles; while extrinsic climate factors are important in producing and modifying the sustained cycles. Two recent population declines of lynx (1940-1955 and after 1980) were likely caused by ongoing climate warming indirectly. Our results provide an alternative explanation to the mechanism of the 10-year cycles, and there is a need for further investigation on links between disappearance of population cycles and global warming in hare-lynx system. PMID:23846828

  4. Assessment of a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine intended to protect Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) from plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfe, Lisa L.; Shenk, Tanya M.; Powell, Bradford; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an ongoing restoration program in Colorado, USA, we evaluated adverse reactions and seroconversion in captive Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) after vaccination with a recombinant F1-V fusion protein vaccine against Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes plague. Ten adult female lynx received the F1-V vaccine; 10 source- and age-matched lynx remained unvaccinated as controls. All of the vaccinated and control lynx remained apparently healthy throughout the confinement period. We observed no evidence of injection site or systemic reactions to the F1-V vaccine. Among vaccinated lynx, differences in log10 reciprocal antibody titers measured in sera collected before and after vaccination (two doses) ranged from 1.2 to 5.2 for anti-F1 antibodies and from 0.6 to 5.2 for anti-V antibodies; titers in unvaccinated lynx did not change appreciably over the course of confinement prior to release, and thus differences in anti-F1 (P=0.003) and anti-V (P=0.0005) titers were greater among vaccinated lynx than among controls. Although our findings suggest that the F1-V fusion protein vaccine evaluated here is likely to stimulate antibody responses that may help protect Canada lynx from plague, we observed no apparent differences in survival between vaccinated and unvaccinated subject animals. Retrospectively, 22 of 50 (44%; 95% confidence interval 29–59%) unvaccinated lynx captured or recaptured in Colorado during 2000–08 had passive hemagglutination antibody titers >1:16, consistent with exposure to Y. pestis; paired pre- and postrelease titers available for eight of these animals showed titer increases similar in magnitude to those seen in response to vaccination, suggesting at least some lynx may naturally acquire immunity to plague in Colorado habitats.

  5. Lynx: Authenticated Anonymous Real-Time Reporting of Electric Vehicle Information

    E-print Network

    Nahrstedt, Klara

    Lynx: Authenticated Anonymous Real-Time Reporting of Electric Vehicle Information Hongyang Li. In this paper we present Lynx, an authenticated anonymous real- time reporting protocol. Lynx allows an EV of the EV that sends the report. To encourage EV participation, Lynx allows the utility to issue anonymous

  6. Selective actions of Lynx proteins on different nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Bao, Haibo; Sun, Huahua; Zhang, Yixi; Fang, Jichao; Liu, Qinghong; Liu, Zewen

    2015-08-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are major neurotransmitter receptors and targets of neonicotinoid insecticides in the insect nervous system. The full function of nAChRs is often dependent on associated proteins, such as chaperones, regulators and modulators. Here, three Lynx (Ly-6/neurotoxin) proteins, Loc-lynx1, Loc-lynx2 and Loc-lynx3, were identified in the locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis. Co-expression with Lynx resulted in a dramatic increase in agonist-evoked macroscopic currents on nAChRs Loc?1/?2 and Loc?2/?2 in Xenopus oocytes, but no changes in agonist sensitivity. Loc-lynx1 and Loc-lynx3 only modulated nAChRs Loc?1/?2 while Loc-lynx2 modulated Loc?2/?2 specifically. Meanwhile, Loc-lynx1 induced a more significant increase in currents evoked by imidacloprid and epibatidine than Loc-lynx3, and the effects of Loc-lynx1 on imidacloprid and epibatidine were significantly higher than those on acetylcholine. Among three lynx proteins, only Loc-lynx1 significantly increased [(3) H]epibatidine binding on Loc?1/?2. The results indicated that Loc-lynx1 had different modulation patterns in nAChRs compared to Loc-lynx2 and Loc-lynx3. Taken together, these findings indicated that three Lynx proteins were nAChR modulators and had selective activities in different nAChRs. Lynx proteins might display their selectivities from three aspects: nAChR subtypes, various agonists and different modulation patterns. Insect Lynx (Ly-6/neurotoxin) proteins act as the allosteric modulators on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the important targets of insecticides. We found that insect lynx proteins showed their selectivities from at least three aspects: nAChR subtypes, various agonists and different modulation patterns. PMID:25951893

  7. Lynx: A High-Resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Pace, F.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I.; Walker, B.C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-03-08

    Lynx is a high resolution, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that has been designed and built by Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA). Although Lynx may be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, it is primarily intended to be fielded on unmanned aerial vehicles. In particular, it may be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, or Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA Aeronautical Systems, Inc. The Lynx production weight is less than 120 lb. and has a slant range of 30 km (in 4 mm/hr rain). It has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode. In ground moving target indicator mode, the minimum detectable velocity is 6 knots with a minimum target cross-section of 10 dBsm. In coherent change detection mode, Lynx makes registered, complex image comparisons either of 0.1 m resolution (minimum) spotlight images or of 0.3 m resolution (minimum) strip images. The Lynx user interface features a view manager that allows it to pan and zoom like a video camera. Lynx was developed under corporate finding from GA and will be manufactured by GA for both military and commercial applications. The Lynx system architecture will be presented and some of its unique features will be described. Imagery at the finest resolutions in both spotlight and strip modes have been obtained and will also be presented.

  8. Acquired antibiotic resistance among wild animals: the case of Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Sousa, Margarida; Gonçalves, Alexandre; Silva, Nuno; Serra, Rodrigo; Alcaide, Eva; Zorrilla, Irene; Torres, Carmen; Caniça, Manuela; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2014-01-01

    The selective pressure generated by the clinical misuse of antibiotics has been the major driving force leading to the emergence of antibiotic resistance among bacteria. Antibiotics or even resistant bacteria are released into the environment and contaminate the surrounding areas. Human and animal populations in contact with these sources are able to become reservoirs of these resistant organisms. Then, due to the convergence between habitats, the contact of wild animals with other animals, humans, or human sources is now more common and this leads to an increase in the exchange of resistance determinants between their microbiota. Indeed, it seems that wildlife populations living in closer proximity to humans have higher levels of antibiotic resistance. Now, the Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus) is a part of this issue, being suggested as natural reservoir of acquired resistant bacteria. The emerging public health concern regarding microbial resistance to antibiotics is becoming true: the bacteria are evolving and are now affecting unintentional hosts. PMID:25220796

  9. An Inverse Problem: Trappers Drove Hares to Eat Lynx Abstract: The Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare pelt data by the Hudson Bay Company did

    E-print Network

    Deng, Bo

    1 An Inverse Problem: Trappers Drove Hares to Eat Lynx Bo Deng1 Abstract: The Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare pelt data by the Hudson Bay Company did not fit the classical predator-prey theory. Rather than following the peak density of the hares,2 that of the lynx leads it, creating the hares

  10. A new pulsating variable star in Lynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiacconi, Davide; Tinelli, Luciano

    2012-02-01

    We report the discovery of a new variable star in the Lynx constellation. The star is catalogued as GSC 03409-00999 (07 33 08.6, +48 03 53.5). From analysis of the light curve we are induced to think the star may be a RRab Lyrae-type variable. We calculated the epoch HJD0 = 2455644.363 +/- 0.007 and the period P = 0.61971 +/- 0.00003 d, during which the star changes its brightness from a minimum magnitude m_min = 13.65 +/- 0.01 to a maximum one m_max = 13.11 +/- 0.01. The light curve shows the asymmetry 0.248 +/- 0.001, with a rise time tau_ RT = 0.1539 +/- 0.0007 d.

  11. Small passenger car transmission test: Mercury Lynx ATX transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bujold, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    The testing of a Mercury Lynx automatic transmission is reported. The transmission was tested in accordance with a passenger car automatic transmission test code (SAE J65lb) which required drive performance, coast performance, and no load test conditions. Under these conditions, the transmission attained maximum efficiencies in the mid-ninety percent range both for drive performance test and coast performance tests. The torque, speed, and efficiency curves are presented, which provide the complete performance characteristics for the Mercury Lynx automatic transmission.

  12. Enhancement in Motor Learning through Genetic Manipulation of the Lynx1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Julie M.; Walz, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The cholinergic system is a neuromodulatory neurotransmitter system involved in a variety of brain processes, including learning and memory, attention, and motor processes, among others. The influence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the cholinergic system are moderated by lynx proteins, which are GPI-anchored membrane proteins forming tight associations with nicotinic receptors. Previous studies indicate lynx1 inhibits nicotinic receptor function and limits neuronal plasticity. We sought to investigate the mechanism of action of lynx1 on nicotinic receptor function, through the generation of lynx mouse models, expressing a soluble version of lynx and comparing results to the full length overexpression. Using rotarod as a test for motor learning, we found that expressing a secreted variant of lynx leads to motor learning enhancements whereas overexpression of full-length lynx had no effect. Further, adult lynx1KO mice demonstrated comparable motor learning enhancements as the soluble transgenic lines, whereas previously, aged lynx1KO mice showed performance augmentation only with nicotine treatment. From this we conclude the motor learning is more sensitive to loss of lynx function, and that the GPI anchor plays a role in the normal function of the lynx protein. In addition, our data suggests that the lynx gene plays a modulatory role in the brain during aging, and that a soluble version of lynx has potential as a tool for adjusting cholinergic-dependent plasticity and learning mechanisms in the brain. PMID:23139735

  13. Detection of antibiotic resistant enterococci and Escherichia coli in free range Iberian Lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Alexandre; Igrejas, Gilberto; Radhouani, Hajer; Santos, Tiago; Monteiro, Ricardo; Pacheco, Rui; Alcaide, Eva; Zorrilla, Irene; Serra, Rodrigo; Torres, Carmen; Poeta, Patrícia

    2013-07-01

    Thirty fecal samples from wild specimens of Iberian lynx were collected and analyzed for Enterococcus spp. (27 isolates) and Escherichia coli (18 isolates) recovery. The 45 isolates obtained were tested for antimicrobial resistance, molecular mechanisms of resistance, and presence of virulence genes. Among the enterococci, Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus hirae were the most prevalent species (11 isolates each), followed by Enterococcus faecalis (5 isolates). High percentages of resistance to tetracycline and erythromycin (33% and 30%, respectively) were detected among enterococcal isolates. The tet(M) and/or tet(L), erm(B), aac(6')-Ie-aph(2?)-Ia, ant(6)-Ia, or aph(3')-IIIa genes were detected among resistant enterococci. Virulence genes were detected in one E. faecalis isolate (cpd, cylB, and cylL) and one E. hirae isolate (cylL). High percentages of resistance were detected in E. coli isolates to tetracycline (33%), streptomycin (28%), nalidixic acid (28%), and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT, 22%). Additionally, the blaTEM, tet(A), aadA, cmlA, and different combinations of sul genes were detected among most ampicillin, tetracycline, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and SXT-resistant isolates, respectively. Two isolates contained a class 1 integron with the gene cassette arrays dfrA1 + aadA1 and dfrA12 + aadA2. The E. coli isolates were ascribed to phylo-groups A (n=5); B1 (n=4); B2 (n=6), and D (n=3), with the virulence gene fimA present in all E. coli isolates. This study found resistance genes in wild specimens of Iberian lynx. Thus, it is important to notice that multiresistant bacteria have reached species as rare and completely non-synanthropic as the Iberian lynx. Furthermore, the susceptibility of this endangered species to bacterial infection may be affected by the presence of these virulence and resistance genes. PMID:23588135

  14. Lynx web services for annotations and systems analysis of multi-gene disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sulakhe, Dinanath; Taylor, Andrew; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Feng, Bo; Xie, Bingqing; Börnigen, Daniela; Dave, Utpal J.; Foster, Ian T.; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Lynx is a web-based integrated systems biology platform that supports annotation and analysis of experimental data and generation of weighted hypotheses on molecular mechanisms contributing to human phenotypes and disorders of interest. Lynx has integrated multiple classes of biomedical data (genomic, proteomic, pathways, phenotypic, toxicogenomic, contextual and others) from various public databases as well as manually curated data from our group and collaborators (LynxKB). Lynx provides tools for gene list enrichment analysis using multiple functional annotations and network-based gene prioritization. Lynx provides access to the integrated database and the analytical tools via REST based Web Services (http://lynx.ci.uchicago.edu/webservices.html). This comprises data retrieval services for specific functional annotations, services to search across the complete LynxKB (powered by Lucene), and services to access the analytical tools built within the Lynx platform. PMID:24948611

  15. Lynx web services for annotations and systems analysis of multi-gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Sulakhe, Dinanath; Taylor, Andrew; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Feng, Bo; Xie, Bingqing; Börnigen, Daniela; Dave, Utpal J; Foster, Ian T; Gilliam, T Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Lynx is a web-based integrated systems biology platform that supports annotation and analysis of experimental data and generation of weighted hypotheses on molecular mechanisms contributing to human phenotypes and disorders of interest. Lynx has integrated multiple classes of biomedical data (genomic, proteomic, pathways, phenotypic, toxicogenomic, contextual and others) from various public databases as well as manually curated data from our group and collaborators (LynxKB). Lynx provides tools for gene list enrichment analysis using multiple functional annotations and network-based gene prioritization. Lynx provides access to the integrated database and the analytical tools via REST based Web Services (http://lynx.ci.uchicago.edu/webservices.html). This comprises data retrieval services for specific functional annotations, services to search across the complete LynxKB (powered by Lucene), and services to access the analytical tools built within the Lynx platform. PMID:24948611

  16. Lynx: A Programmatic SAT Solver for the RNA-Folding Problem

    E-print Network

    Rinard, Martin

    Lynx: A Programmatic SAT Solver for the RNA-Folding Problem Vijay Ganesh1 , Charles W. O'Donnell1@srlabs.de Abstract. This paper introduces Lynx, an incremental programmatic SAT solver that allows non-expert users users to guide the behavior of the solver. The key idea of Lynx is a callback interface that enables non

  17. TREE vol. 14, no. 11 November 1999 0169-5347/99/$ see front matter 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. PII: S0169-5347(99)01717-6 417 The Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis),

    E-print Network

    Lloyd, Alun

    . All rights reserved. PII: S0169-5347(99)01717-6 417 The Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis), with its distant regions are synchronized. Elton's work on the lynx, together with studies of similar oscillations of the cycles. Al- though the period of oscillations in lynx numbers shows little variability about its mean

  18. Modeling the reintroduction of lynx to the southern portion of Todd D. Steury*, Dennis L. Murray1

    E-print Network

    populations of lynx (Lynx canadensis) and snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) to determine prey densities suggested that a density of 1.1­1.8 hares/h is required for lynx persistence; these densities are higher than those reported for most hare populations across the USA. We found that lynx dispersal and density

  19. Nuutuuyiglu Tuttuglu (The Lynx and the Two Caribou).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope, Mary L.; And Others

    This second grade elementary language text, designed for children in bilingual Inupiat-English programs in Ambler, Kobuk, Kiana, Noorvik, and Shungnak, contains a story about a lynx who tries to kill two caribou at one time but who is himself killed. Each page of text is illustrated with a black-and-white drawing. The English equivalent is given…

  20. Optimizing the size of the area surveyed for monitoring a Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) population in the Swiss Alps by means of photographic capture-recapture.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Fridolin; Breitenmoser-Würsten, Christine; Molinari-Jobin, Anja; Breitenmoser, Urs

    2013-09-01

    We studied the influence of surveyed area size on density estimates by means of camera-trapping in a low-density felid population (1-2 individuals/100 km(2) ). We applied non-spatial capture-recapture (CR) and spatial CR (SCR) models for Eurasian lynx during winter 2005/2006 in the northwestern Swiss Alps by sampling an area divided into 5 nested plots ranging from 65 to 760 km(2) . CR model density estimates (95% CI) for models M0 and Mh decreased from 2.61 (1.55-3.68) and 3.6 (1.62-5.57) independent lynx/100 km(2) , respectively, in the smallest to 1.20 (1.04-1.35) and 1.26 (0.89-1.63) independent lynx/100 km(2) , respectively, in the largest area surveyed. SCR model density estimates also decreased with increasing sampling area but not significantly. High individual range overlaps in relatively small areas (the edge effect) is the most plausible reason for this positive bias in the CR models. Our results confirm that SCR models are much more robust to changes in trap array size than CR models, thus avoiding overestimation of density in smaller areas. However, when a study is concerned with monitoring population changes, large spatial efforts (area surveyed ?760 km(2) ) are required to obtain reliable and precise density estimates with these population densities and recapture rates. PMID:24020463

  1. Recent and historical distributions of Canada lynx in Maine and the Northeast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoving, C.L.; Joseph, R.A.; Krohn, W.B.

    2003-01-01

    The contiguous United States population of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis Kerr) is listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act. However, the historic distribution of lynx in the Northeast is poorly understood. We used museum records, bibliographic records, and interviews to reconstruct the past distribution of lynx in Maine, which is at the current southern limit of the species' distribution in the eastern United States. We found a total of 118 records, representing at least 509 lynx in Maine. Lynx were observed throughout Maine, 1833-1912, with the exception of coastal areas. After 1913, lynx were most common in the forests of western and northern Maine, and absent to rare along the coast, but had not returned to southern Maine by 1999. Thirty-nine kittens representing at least 21 litters were distributed throughout northern and western Maine, 1864-1999. Populations apparently fluctuated, and in some years 200-300 lynx were harvested in Maine. Prior to the 1900s, lynx were much more widely distributed in the Northeast, ranging from Pennsylvania north into Quebec. Because Canada lynx have had a long presence in northern New England, and at times were relatively common, this species merits serious consideration in conservation planning in this region.

  2. Novel modulation of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by association with the endogenous prototoxin lynx1.

    PubMed

    Ibañez-Tallon, Inés; Miwa, Julie M; Wang, Hai Long; Adams, Niels C; Crabtree, Gregg W; Sine, Steven M; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2002-03-14

    We previously identified lynx1 as a neuronal membrane molecule related to snake alpha-neurotoxins able to modulate nAChRs. Here, we show that lynx1 colocalizes with nAChRs on CNS neurons and physically associates with nAChRs. Single-channel recordings show that lynx1 promotes the largest of three current amplitudes elicited by ACh through alpha(4)beta(2) nAChRs and that lynx1 enhances desensitization. Macroscopic recordings quantify the enhancement of desensitization onset by lynx1 and further show that it slows recovery from desensitization and increases the EC(50). These experiments establish that direct interaction of lynx1 with nAChRs can result in a novel type of functional modulation and suggest that prototoxins may play important roles in vivo by modulating functional properties of their cognate CNS receptors. PMID:11906696

  3. Broad-scale predictors of canada lynx occurrence in eastern North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoving, C.L.; Harrison, D.J.; Krohn, W.B.; Joseph, R.A.; O'Brien, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is listed as a threatened species throughout the southern extent of its geographic range in the United States. Most research on lynx has been conducted in the western United States and Canada; little is known about the ecology of lynx in eastern North America. To fill critical knowledge gaps about this species, we modeled and mapped lynx occurrence using habitat and weather data from 7 eastern states and 3 Canadian provinces. Annual snowfall, road density, bobcat (L. rufus) harvest, deciduous forest, and coniferous forest were compared at 1,150 lynx locations and 1,288 random locations. Nineteen a priori models were developed using the information-theoretic approach, and logistic regression models were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) and by our ability to correctly classify reserved data (Kappa). Annual snowfall and deciduous forest predicted lynx presence and absence for a reserved dataset (n = 278) with 94% accuracy. A map of the probability of lynx occurrence throughout the region revealed that 92% of the potential habitat (i.e., >50% probability of occurrence) was concentrated in a relatively contiguous complex encompassing northern Maine, New Brunswick, and the Gaspe?? peninsula of Quebec. Most of the remaining potential habitat (5%) was on northern Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. Potential habitat in New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York was small (1,252 km2), fragmented, and isolated (>200 km) from known lynx populations. When federally listed as threatened in the contiguous United States in 2000, inadequate regulations on federal lands were cited as the primary threat to Canada lynx. However, the majority of potential lynx habitat in the eastern United States is on private lands and continuous with potential habitat in Canada. Therefore, lynx conservation in eastern North America will need to develop partnerships across national, state, and provincial boundaries as well as with private landowners.

  4. Lynx: a knowledge base and an analytical workbench for integrative medicine.

    PubMed

    Sulakhe, Dinanath; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; D'Souza, Mark; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Hashemifar, Somaye; White, Steven; Dave, Utpal J; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Wang, Sheng; Gilliam, T Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Lynx (http://lynx.ci.uchicago.edu) is a web-based database and a knowledge extraction engine. It supports annotation and analysis of high-throughput experimental data and generation of weighted hypotheses regarding genes and molecular mechanisms contributing to human phenotypes or conditions of interest. Since the last release, the Lynx knowledge base (LynxKB) has been periodically updated with the latest versions of the existing databases and supplemented with additional information from public databases. These additions have enriched the data annotations provided by Lynx and improved the performance of Lynx analytical tools. Moreover, the Lynx analytical workbench has been supplemented with new tools for reconstruction of co-expression networks and feature-and-network-based prioritization of genetic factors and molecular mechanisms. These developments facilitate the extraction of meaningful knowledge from experimental data and LynxKB. The Service Oriented Architecture provides public access to LynxKB and its analytical tools via user-friendly web services and interfaces. PMID:26590263

  5. Lynx: a knowledge base and an analytical workbench for integrative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sulakhe, Dinanath; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; D'Souza, Mark; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Hashemifar, Somaye; White, Steven; Dave, Utpal J.; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Wang, Sheng; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Lynx (http://lynx.ci.uchicago.edu) is a web-based database and a knowledge extraction engine. It supports annotation and analysis of high-throughput experimental data and generation of weighted hypotheses regarding genes and molecular mechanisms contributing to human phenotypes or conditions of interest. Since the last release, the Lynx knowledge base (LynxKB) has been periodically updated with the latest versions of the existing databases and supplemented with additional information from public databases. These additions have enriched the data annotations provided by Lynx and improved the performance of Lynx analytical tools. Moreover, the Lynx analytical workbench has been supplemented with new tools for reconstruction of co-expression networks and feature-and-network-based prioritization of genetic factors and molecular mechanisms. These developments facilitate the extraction of meaningful knowledge from experimental data and LynxKB. The Service Oriented Architecture provides public access to LynxKB and its analytical tools via user-friendly web services and interfaces. PMID:26590263

  6. Performance analysis and kernel size study of the Lynx real-time operating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Gibson, James S.; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper analyzes the Lynx real-time operating system (LynxOS), which has been selected as the operating system for the Space Station Freedom Data Management System (DMS). The features of LynxOS are compared to other Unix-based operating system (OS). The tools for measuring the performance of LynxOS, which include a high-speed digital timer/counter board, a device driver program, and an application program, are analyzed. The timings for interrupt response, process creation and deletion, threads, semaphores, shared memory, and signals are measured. The memory size of the DMS Embedded Data Processor (EDP) is limited. Besides, virtual memory is not suitable for real-time applications because page swap timing may not be deterministic. Therefore, the DMS software, including LynxOS, has to fit in the main memory of an EDP. To reduce the LynxOS kernel size, the following steps are taken: analyzing the factors that influence the kernel size; identifying the modules of LynxOS that may not be needed in an EDP; adjusting the system parameters of LynxOS; reconfiguring the device drivers used in the LynxOS; and analyzing the symbol table. The reductions in kernel disk size, kernel memory size and total kernel size reduction from each step mentioned above are listed and analyzed.

  7. Small passenger car transmission test: Mercury Lynx ATX transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Bujold, M P

    1981-09-01

    The small passenger car transmission test was initiated to supply electric vehicle manufacturers with technical information regarding the performance of commercially available transmissions. This information would enable EV manufacturers to design a more energy efficient vehicle. With this information the manufacturers would be able to estimate vehicle driving range as well as speed and torque requirements for specific road load performance characteristics. This report covers the 1981 Mercury Lynx ATX transaxle. This transmission was tested per a passenger car automatic transmission test code (SAE J65lb) which required drive performance, coast performance, and no load test conditions. Under these test conditions the transmission attained maximum efficiencies in the 93% range for drive performance tests. The major results of this test are the torque, speed and efficiency curves which are located in the data section of this report. These graphs map performance characteristics for the Mercury Lynx ATX transmission.

  8. Lynx maritime radar in USN experiment Trident Warrior 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, R.; Link, Z.; Verge, T.; Laue, J.

    2012-06-01

    General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc. (GA-ASI) participated in the joint naval experiment Trident Warrior 2011 at Combat Direction Systems Activity (CDSA), Dam Neck, Va., in July 2011. The goal was to introduce the Lynx® Multi-Mode Radar's new Maritime Wide Area Search (MWAS) mode and display a viable Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) full kill chain solution for the naval environment. GA-ASI presented a manned platform, a Beechcraft Super King Air 200 modified with an operators console, Lynx Multi-mode Radar, FLIR Star SAFIRE 380-HD EO/IR camera system, and an L-3 TCDL (aircraft data link system) as a surrogate for the Predator® B/ MQ-9 UAS.

  9. A new species, Toxocara lyncis, in the caracal (Lynx caracal).

    PubMed

    Macchioni, G

    1999-12-01

    Toxocara lyncis, sp. n. is described from Lynx caracal in Somalia. It most closely resembles T. cati, the only species of Toxocara reported from L. caracal. It differs from T. cati in the comparative length of the spicules and the esophagus, and in the shape of the cervical alae. Cervical alae have a nearly uniform width along their length in T. lyncis, while they are narrow anteriorly and broad posteriorly forming an arrow head shaped cephalic end in T. cati. PMID:10870554

  10. Role of Lynx1 and related Ly6 proteins as modulators of cholinergic signaling in normal and neoplastic bronchial epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao Wen; Song, Ping Fang; Spindel, Eliot R

    2015-11-01

    The ly-6 proteins are a large family of proteins that resemble the snake three finger alpha toxins such as ?-bungarotoxin and are defined by their multiple cysteine residues. Multiple members of the ly-6 protein family can modulate nicotinic signaling including lynx1, lynx2, slurp-1, slurp-2 and prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA). Consistent with the expression of multiple nicotinic receptors in bronchial epithelium, multiple members of the nicotinic-modulatory ly-6 proteins are expressed in lung including lynx1 and lynx2. We studied the role of lynx1 as an exemplar of the role of ly-6 proteins in lung. Our data demonstrates that lynx1 acts as a negative modulator of nicotinic signaling in normal and neoplastic lung. In normal lung lynx1 serves to limit the ability of chronic nicotine exposure to increase levels of nicotinic receptors and also serves to limit the ability of nicotine to upregulate levels of GABAA receptors in lung. In turn this allows lynx1 to limit the ability of nicotine to upregulate levels of mucin which is mediated by GABAergic signaling. This suggests that lynx1-mimetics may have potential for treatment of asthma and COPD. In that most lung cancer cells also express nicotinic receptor and lynx1 we examined the role of lynx-1 in lung cancer. Lynx1 levels are decreased in lung cancers compared to adjacent normal lung. Knockdown of lynx1 by siRNAs increased growth of lung cancer cells while expression of lynx1 in lung cancer cell decreased cell proliferation. This suggests that lynx1 is an endogenous regulator of lung cancer growth. Given that multiple small molecule negative and positive allosteric modulators of nicotinic receptors have already been developed, this suggests that lynx1 is a highly druggable target both for development of drugs that may limit lung cancer growth as well as for drugs that may be effective for asthma or COPD treatment. PMID:26025503

  11. Neuron, Vol. 23, 105114, May, 1999, Copyright 1999 by Cell Press lynx1, an Endogenous Toxin-like Modulator

    E-print Network

    Sali, Andrej

    Neuron, Vol. 23, 105­114, May, 1999, Copyright ©1999 by Cell Press lynx1, an Endogenous Toxin -bungarotoxin ( Btx), whichtransmitter receptors. A novel murine gene, lynx1, is binds to and inhibits n of neurotoxin and the mammalianreveal an evolutionary relationship between lynx1 and Ly-6 genes based

  12. lynx1 supports neuronal health in mouse dorsal striatum during aging: an ultrastructural investigation

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Parker, Rell L.; Wright, Ashley P.; Brahem, Hajer; Ku, Pauline; Oliver, Katherine M.; Walz, Andreas; Lester, Henry A.; Miwa, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been shown to participate in neuroprotection in the aging brain. Lynx protein modulators dampen the activity of the cholinergic system through direct interaction with nicotinic receptors. Although lynx1 null mutant mice exhibit augmented learning and plasticity, they also exhibit macroscopic vacuolation in the dorsal striatum as they age, detectable at the optical microscope level. Despite the relevance of the lynx1 gene to brain function, little is known about the cellular ultrastructure of these age-related changes. In this study, we assessed degeneration in the dorsal striatum in 1-, 3-, 7-, and 13-month-old mice, using optical and transmission electron microscopy. We observed a loss of nerve fibers, a breakdown in nerve fiber bundles, and loss of neuronal nuclei in the 13-month-old lynx1 null striatum. At higher magnification, these nerve fibers displayed intracellular vacuoles and disordered myelin sheaths. Few or none of these morphological alterations were present in younger lynx1 null mutant mice, or in heterozygous lynx1 null mutant mice at any age. These data indicate that neuronal health can be maintained by titrating lynx1 dosage, and that the lynx1 gene may participate in a trade-off between neuroprotection and augmented learning. PMID:25027556

  13. Lynx1 supports neuronal health in the mouse dorsal striatum during aging: an ultrastructural investigation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Parker, Rell L; Wright, Ashley P; Brahem, Hajer; Ku, Pauline; Oliver, Katherine M; Walz, Andreas; Lester, Henry A; Miwa, Julie M

    2014-07-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors have been shown to participate in neuroprotection in the aging brain. Lynx protein modulators dampen the activity of the cholinergic system through direct interaction with nicotinic receptors. Although lynx1 null mutant mice exhibit augmented learning and plasticity, they also exhibit macroscopic vacuolation in the dorsal striatum as they age, detectable at the optical microscope level. Despite the relevance of the lynx1 gene to brain function, little is known about the cellular ultrastructure of these age-related changes. In this study, we assessed degeneration in the dorsal striatum in 1-, 3-, 7-, and 13-month-old mice, using optical and transmission electron microscopy. We observed a loss of nerve fibers, a breakdown in nerve fiber bundles, and a loss of neuronal nuclei in the 13-month-old lynx1 null striatum. At higher magnification, these nerve fibers displayed intracellular vacuoles and disordered myelin sheaths. Few or none of these morphological alterations were present in younger lynx1 null mutant mice or in heterozygous lynx1 null mutant mice at any age. These data indicate that neuronal health can be maintained by titrating lynx1 dosage and that the lynx1 gene may participate in a trade-off between neuroprotection and augmented learning. PMID:25027556

  14. Large Impact of Eurasian Lynx Predation on Roe Deer Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Andrén, Henrik; Liberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    The effects of predation on ungulate populations depend on several factors. One of the most important factors is the proportion of predation that is additive or compensatory respectively to other mortality in the prey, i.e., the relative effect of top-down and bottom-up processes. We estimated Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) kill rate on roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) using radio-collared lynx. Kill rate was strongly affected by lynx social status. For males it was 4.85 ± 1.30 S.E. roe deer per 30 days, for females with kittens 6.23 ± 0.83 S.E. and for solitary females 2.71 ± 0.47 S.E. We found very weak support for effects of prey density (both for Type I (linear) and Type II (non-linear) functional responses) and of season (winter, summer) on lynx kill rate. Additionally, we analysed the growth rate in a roe deer population from 1985 to 2005 in an area, which lynx naturally re-colonized in 1996. The annual roe deer growth rate was lower after lynx re-colonized the study area, but it was also negatively influenced by roe deer density. Before lynx colonized the area roe deer growth rate was ? = 1.079 (± 0.061 S.E.), while after lynx re-colonization it was ? = 0.94 (± 0.051 S.E.). Thus, the growth rate in the roe deer population decreased by ?? = 0.14 (± 0.080 S.E.) after lynx re-colonized the study area, which corresponded to the estimated lynx predation rate on roe deer (0.11 ± 0.042 S.E.), suggesting that lynx predation was mainly additive to other mortality in roe deer. To conclude, this study suggests that lynx predation together with density dependent factors both influence the roe deer population dynamics. Thus, both top-down and bottom-up processes operated at the same time in this predator-prey system. PMID:25806949

  15. Large impact of Eurasian lynx predation on roe deer population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Andrén, Henrik; Liberg, Olof

    2015-01-01

    The effects of predation on ungulate populations depend on several factors. One of the most important factors is the proportion of predation that is additive or compensatory respectively to other mortality in the prey, i.e., the relative effect of top-down and bottom-up processes. We estimated Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) kill rate on roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) using radio-collared lynx. Kill rate was strongly affected by lynx social status. For males it was 4.85 ± 1.30 S.E. roe deer per 30 days, for females with kittens 6.23 ± 0.83 S.E. and for solitary females 2.71 ± 0.47 S.E. We found very weak support for effects of prey density (both for Type I (linear) and Type II (non-linear) functional responses) and of season (winter, summer) on lynx kill rate. Additionally, we analysed the growth rate in a roe deer population from 1985 to 2005 in an area, which lynx naturally re-colonized in 1996. The annual roe deer growth rate was lower after lynx re-colonized the study area, but it was also negatively influenced by roe deer density. Before lynx colonized the area roe deer growth rate was ? = 1.079 (± 0.061 S.E.), while after lynx re-colonization it was ? = 0.94 (± 0.051 S.E.). Thus, the growth rate in the roe deer population decreased by ?? = 0.14 (± 0.080 S.E.) after lynx re-colonized the study area, which corresponded to the estimated lynx predation rate on roe deer (0.11 ± 0.042 S.E.), suggesting that lynx predation was mainly additive to other mortality in roe deer. To conclude, this study suggests that lynx predation together with density dependent factors both influence the roe deer population dynamics. Thus, both top-down and bottom-up processes operated at the same time in this predator-prey system. PMID:25806949

  16. W ildlife Society Bulletin 36(3):567--571; 2012; D O I: 10.1002/w sb.l86 M issing Lynx and Trophic Cascades in

    E-print Network

    Hebblewhite, Mark

    W ildlife Society Bulletin 36(3):567--571; 2012; D O I: 10.1002/w sb.l86 Commentary M issing Lynx wolves {Canis lupus) may positively affect the viahility o f threatened Canada lynx {Lynx canadensis) proposed 2 key trophic linkages connecting w olf restoration w ith lynx recovery. First, recovering w olf

  17. Initial results from a ROSAT deep survey in Lynx

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, S. F.; Windhorst, R. A.; Maccacaro, T.; Burstein, D.; Franklin, B. E.; Griffiths, R. E.; Koo, D. C.; Mathis, D. F.; Morgan, W. A.; Neuschaefer, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results from a deep (70 ksec) Rosat survey of the high galactic latitude selected area Lynx.3A are presented. Lynx.3A sensitivity was previously studied in both the optical radio, with deep Westerbork surveys and deep multicolor Charge Couple Device (CCD) images form the Palomar 200 inch Four-Shooter. About 70 x-ray sources were detected within the central 40 foot diameter region of the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC), observed surface densities of approximately 200 x-ray sources/sq deg are suggested, and these x-ray sources alone account for approximately 30 percent of the cosmic x-ray background (0.9 to 2.2 keV). An initial look at the observed x-ray logN - logS curve is presented, but a detailed assessment requires further study. The 4 sigma limit of about 7 times 10 to the minus 15th power erg/s.sq cm (0.5 to 2.0 keV) is considerably deeper then the Einstein deep surveys, and of comparable sensitivity to the deepest current Rosat surveys. Cross correlation with our Four Shooter optical catalogs yields at least one likely optical candidate for nearly all of the Rosat x-ray sources; a number of the likely optical identifications have colors of quasi-stellar objects (and stellar PSF), but in other cases galaxies/groups are also viable candidates.

  18. Lynx Mobile Mapper for Surveying City Centers and Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, D.; Zampa, F.

    2011-09-01

    In the last two years the Lynx Mobile Mapper has become the new lidar solution developed for surveying large areas that are impractical with static lidar sensors and require an accuracy and resolution that exceed airborne technologies. The system allows the scanning at a speed up to 100 km/h, obtaining accuracy better than 5 cm with an up to 7 mm resolution. Therefore, this solution proves to be an excellent tool for surveying city centers, highways, railways, thanks also to a very fast, safe and accurate data collection. This paper will present two applications: 1- The survey of the entire ancient city center of Brescia (Italy) with it medieval castle, the narrows streets and the main squares. It also has been run a test to survey with the Lynx the tunnel that go underneath the castle and compare the result with a static laser scanner survey, 2- The survey of the Calatrava Bridge on the A1 highway. The central bridge, which crosses over the high-speed rail line and the A1 motorway is composed as a single symmetrical arch, placed longitudinally, which rises to a height of 46m. During the survey the two A1 motorway carriageways have been scanned and the upper part of the bridge for a complete 3D model of this structure.

  19. Accuracy verification of the Lynx Mobile Mapper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, I.; González-Jorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2013-02-01

    LiDAR technology is one of the most effective and reliable means of data collection. Given the increasing use of LiDAR data for close range metrology applications such as deformation monitoring and infrastructure inspection, it becomes necessary to test the relative accuracy, boresight calibration of both LiDAR sensors and performance of navigation solution (or absolute accuracy) of any mobile laser scanning system employed for this purpose. Therefore, the paper's primary contribution is a set of tests for the characterization and evaluation of any mobile laser scanning system based on two LiDAR sensors. We present experimental results of the Lynx Mobile Mapper system from Optech Inc. Employing a low-cost calibration standard, we demonstrated sub-cm accuracy of targets at distances up to 10 m. Also, we introduce boresighting results derived from the Lynx system. Moreover, the global system's accuracy is tested with a series of rigorous experiments operated at a maximum scan frequency of 200 Hz, pulse repetition frequency of 500 kHz per sensor and a 360° scanning field of view. Assuring good GPS conditions, we proved a good global performance of the system, which makes it suitable for very accurate applications.

  20. Age, sex, reproduction, and spatial organization of lynxes colonizing northeastern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mech, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    From 1972 through 1978, lynxes (Felis lynx) emigrating from Canada were studied in northeastern Minnesota. Fourteen individuals were radio-tracked, 8 wefe ear-tagged, and 49 carcasses were examined. Sex ratios of the samples were equal during the first years of the study, but females predominated later. At least half of the radiotagged lynxes were killed by humans; no natural mortality was detected. Home range sizes ranged from 51 to 122 km2 for females and 145 to 243 km2 for males, up to 10 times the sizes of those reported by other workers. Ranges of females tended to overlap. Males and females appeared to be segregated in the population.

  1. HELICOBACTER-LIKE ORGANISMS IN GASTRIC MUCOSA OF BOBCATS (LYNX RUFUS) AND GREY FOXES (UROCYON CINEREOARGENTEUS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microscopic examination of gastric mucosa of raccoons (Procyon lotor), porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum), gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), bobcats (Lynx rufus), skunks (Mephitis mephitis), and black bears (Ursus amaricanus) was done on archival tissue blocks for evidence of Helicobacter-like org...

  2. Lynx: A Programmatic SAT Solver for the RNA-folding Problem

    E-print Network

    Ganesh, Vijay

    This paper introduces Lynx, an incremental programmatic SAT solver that allows non-expert users to introduce domain-specific code into modern conflict-driven clause-learning (CDCL) SAT solvers, thus enabling users to guide ...

  3. Metallicities of galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void

    E-print Network

    Kniazev, A; Tepliakova, A; Burenkov, A

    2010-01-01

    Does the void environment have a sizable effect on the evolution of dwarf galaxies? If yes, the best probes should be the most fragile least massive dwarfs. We compiled a sample of about one hundred dwarfs with M_B in the range -12 to -18 mag, falling within the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. The goal is to study their evolutionary parameters -- gas metallicity and gas mass-fraction, and to address the epoch of the first substantial episode of Star Formation. Here we present and discuss the results of O/H measurements in 38 void galaxies, among which several the most metal-poor galaxies are found with the oxygen abundances of 12+log(O/H)=7.12-7.3 dex.

  4. Evidence for large-scale effects of competition: niche displacement in Canada lynx and bobcat.

    PubMed

    Peers, Michael J L; Thornton, Daniel H; Murray, Dennis L

    2013-12-22

    Determining the patterns, causes and consequences of character displacement is central to our understanding of competition in ecological communities. However, the majority of competition research has occurred over small spatial extents or focused on fine-scale differences in morphology or behaviour. The effects of competition on broad-scale distribution and niche characteristics of species remain poorly understood but critically important. Using range-wide species distribution models, we evaluated whether Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) or bobcat (Lynx rufus) were displaced in regions of sympatry. Consistent with our prediction, we found that lynx niches were less similar to those of bobcat in areas of sympatry versus allopatry, with a stronger reliance on snow cover driving lynx niche divergence in the sympatric zone. By contrast, bobcat increased niche breadth in zones of sympatry, and bobcat niches were equally similar to those of lynx in zones of sympatry and allopatry. These findings suggest that competitively disadvantaged species avoid competition at large scales by restricting their niche to highly suitable conditions, while superior competitors expand the diversity of environments used. Our results indicate that competition can manifest within climatic niche space across species' ranges, highlighting the importance of biotic interactions occurring at large spatial scales on niche dynamics. PMID:24174116

  5. The relationship between wolverine and larger predators, lynx and wolf, in a historical ecosystem context.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hussein; Pasanen-Mortensen, Marianne; Elmhagen, Bodil

    2014-06-01

    Apex predators play an important role in shaping ecosystem structure. They may suppress smaller predators (mesopredators) but also subsidize scavengers via carrion provisioning. However, the importance of these interactions can change with ecosystem context. The wolverine (Gulo gulo) is a cold-adapted carnivore and facultative scavenger. It has a circumboreal distribution, where it could be either suppressed or subsidized by larger predators. In Scandinavia, the wolverine might interact with two larger predators, wolf (Canis lupus) and lynx (Lynx lynx), but human persecution decimated the populations in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. We investigated potential relationships between wolverine and the larger predators using hunting bag statistics from 15 Norwegian and Swedish counties in 1846-1922. Our best models showed a positive association between wolverine and lynx trends, taking ecological and human factors into account. There was also a positive association between year-to-year fluctuations in wolverine and wolf in the latter part of the study period. We suggest these associations could result from positive lynx-wolverine interactions through carrion provisioning, while wolves might both suppress wolverine and provide carrion with the net effect becoming positive when wolf density drops below a threshold. Wolverines could thus benefit from lynx presence and low-to-intermediate wolf densities. PMID:24652527

  6. Lynx reproduction--long-lasting life cycle of corpora lutea in a feline species.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, Katarina; Painer, Johanna; Amelkina, Olga; Dehnhard, Martin; Goeritz, Frank

    2014-04-01

    A review of lynxes' reproductive biology and comparison between the reproductive cycles of the domestic cat and lynxes is presented. Three of the four lynx species (the bobcat excluded) express quite similar reproductive pattern (age at sexual maturity, estrus and pregnancy length, litter size). Similarly to the domestic cat, the bobcat is polyestric and can have more than one litter per year. Domestic cats and many other felid species are known to express anovulatory, pregnant and pseudo-pregnant reproductive cycles in dependence on ovulation induction and fertilization. The formation of corpora lutea (CLs) occurs after ovulation. In pregnant animals, luteal function ends with parturition, whereas during pseudo-pregnancy a shorter life span and lower hormone secretion are observed. The life cycle of corpora lutea in Eurasian lynxes is different from the pattern described in domestic cats. Lynx CLs produce progestagens in distinctive amounts permanently for at least two years, regardless of their origin (pregnancy or pseudo-pregnancy). It is suggested that long-lasting CLs induce a negative feedback to inactivate folliculogenesis, turning a normally polyestric cycle observed in most felids into a monoestric cycle in lynxes. PMID:24856466

  7. Patterns of Lynx Predation at the Interface between Protected Areas and Multi-Use Landscapes in Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Belotti, Elisa; Weder, Nicole; Bufka, Lud?k; Kaldhusdal, Arne; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Seibold, Heidi; Woelfing, Benno; Heurich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In Central Europe, protected areas are too small to ensure survival of populations of large carnivores. In the surrounding areas, these species are often persecuted due to competition with game hunters. Therefore, understanding how predation intensity varies spatio-temporally across areas with different levels of protection is fundamental. We investigated the predation patterns of Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) on roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) in both protected areas and multi-use landscapes of the Bohemian Forest Ecosystem. Based on 359 roe and red deer killed by 10 GPS-collared lynx, we calculated the species-specific annual kill rates and tested for effects of season and lynx age, sex and reproductive status. Because roe and red deer in the study area concentrate in unprotected lowlands during winter, we modeled spatial distribution of kills separately for summer and winter and calculated-the probability of a deer killed by lynx and-the expected number of kills for areas with different levels of protection. Significantly more roe deer (46.05–74.71/year/individual lynx) were killed than red deer (1.57–9.63/year/individual lynx), more deer were killed in winter than in summer, and lynx family groups had higher annual kill rates than adult male, single adult female and subadult female lynx. In winter the probability of a deer killed and the expected number of kills were higher outside the most protected part of the study area than inside; in summer, this probability did not differ between areas, and the expected number of kills was slightly larger inside than outside the most protected part of the study area. This indicates that the intensity of lynx predation in the unprotected part of the Bohemian Forest Ecosystem increases in winter, thus mitigation of conflicts in these areas should be included as a priority in the lynx conservation strategy. PMID:26379142

  8. Patterns of Lynx Predation at the Interface between Protected Areas and Multi-Use Landscapes in Central Europe.

    PubMed

    Belotti, Elisa; Weder, Nicole; Bufka, Lud?k; Kaldhusdal, Arne; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Seibold, Heidi; Woelfing, Benno; Heurich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In Central Europe, protected areas are too small to ensure survival of populations of large carnivores. In the surrounding areas, these species are often persecuted due to competition with game hunters. Therefore, understanding how predation intensity varies spatio-temporally across areas with different levels of protection is fundamental. We investigated the predation patterns of Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) on roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) in both protected areas and multi-use landscapes of the Bohemian Forest Ecosystem. Based on 359 roe and red deer killed by 10 GPS-collared lynx, we calculated the species-specific annual kill rates and tested for effects of season and lynx age, sex and reproductive status. Because roe and red deer in the study area concentrate in unprotected lowlands during winter, we modeled spatial distribution of kills separately for summer and winter and calculated-the probability of a deer killed by lynx and-the expected number of kills for areas with different levels of protection. Significantly more roe deer (46.05-74.71/year/individual lynx) were killed than red deer (1.57-9.63/year/individual lynx), more deer were killed in winter than in summer, and lynx family groups had higher annual kill rates than adult male, single adult female and subadult female lynx. In winter the probability of a deer killed and the expected number of kills were higher outside the most protected part of the study area than inside; in summer, this probability did not differ between areas, and the expected number of kills was slightly larger inside than outside the most protected part of the study area. This indicates that the intensity of lynx predation in the unprotected part of the Bohemian Forest Ecosystem increases in winter, thus mitigation of conflicts in these areas should be included as a priority in the lynx conservation strategy. PMID:26379142

  9. Reproductive traits in captive and free-ranging males of the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    Gañán, Natalia; Sestelo, Adrián; Garde, J Julián; Martínez, Fernando; Vargas, Astrid; Sánchez, Iñigo; Pérez-Aspa, María José; López-Bao, José Vicente; Palomares, Francisco; Gomendio, Montserrat; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2010-01-01

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is the most endangered felid in the world. Adequate genetic management of in situ and ex situ populations, and linkage between both, require knowledge on male reproductive biology and factors influencing it. We examined the influence of age, free-ranging versus captive conditions and seasonality on phenotypic, endocrine and semen traits, and links between reproductive traits and male fertility. Males had relatively small testes, produced low sperm numbers, a low proportion of normal sperm, and a high proportion of motile sperm. Young (2-year-old) males had lower testosterone levels, fewer sperm, and a lower proportion of motile and normal sperm than > or =4-year-old males. No major differences were found in semen traits before and after the mating season or between free-ranging and captive males, although the latter had better sperm motility. Males with larger relative testes weight and more sperm copulated more frequently, whereas males that produced more sperm with higher motility produced more cubs per female. In conclusion, small relative testes size and low sperm quality could indicate either low levels of sperm competition or high levels of inbreeding. Young males are probably subfertile; there is a slight trend for males in the captive breeding programme to have better semen quality than wild males, and males with higher sperm production are sexually more active and more fertile. These findings have major implications for decisions regarding which males should breed, provide samples for the genetic resource bank, or participate in programmes involving the use of assisted reproductive techniques. PMID:19736256

  10. Different cryopreservation requirements in foetal versus adult skin cells from an endangered mammal, the Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus).

    PubMed

    León-Quinto, Trinidad; Simón, Miguel A; Cadenas, Rafael; Martínez, Africa; Serna, Arturo

    2014-04-01

    Cryobanking somatic foetal cells acquire much relevance in endangered species for biodiversity conservation purposes. Such cells could be later used to reintroduce the lost genes into the breeding pool, by inducing pluripotency and/or nuclear transfer if necessary. Since requirements for preserving foetal cells are not always the same as for adult ones, we evaluated the cryosensitivity of foetal skin cells in comparison with adult ones from the critically endangered Iberian lynx. Responses to cryoinjury were analyzed in both thawed cell types by means of cell viability and functionality (by analyzing their membrane integrity, metabolic activity, glycosaminoglycan content and proliferative activity). Freezing media included the permeating cryoprotectant Me2SO, either alone or along with the non-permeating cryoprotectant sucrose at 0.1 or 0.2M. When Me2SO was the only cryoprotectant, survival rate fell in thawed foetal cells to 54±4% (against 89±6% for thawed adult ones) and both proliferative and metabolic activities remained significantly lower than values for thawed adult cells. However, the combination of sucrose (both 0.1 as 0.2) and Me2SO in foetal cells significantly increased their survival rates (to 71±4% and 73±5%, respectively), proliferative activities (partially at day 7 and completely at day 14 after thawing) and metabolic activities. Our findings clearly show a difference between foetal and adult cells concerning their cryopreservation sensitivity and requirements, as well as their recovery time after thawing. These results are of relevance for the cryopreservation of foetal and adult cells from the Iberian lynx and could be also useful for other mammals. PMID:24530371

  11. One size fits all: Eurasian lynx females share a common optimal litter size.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Nilsen, Erlend B; Odden, John; Andrén, Henrik; Linnell, John D C

    2014-01-01

    Lack proposed that the average clutch size of altricial species should be determined by the average maximum number of young the parents can raise such that all females in a given population should share a common optimal clutch size. Support for this model remains equivocal and recent studies have suggested that intra-population variation in clutch size is adaptive because each female has its own optimal clutch size associated with its intrinsic ability to raise offspring. Although Lack litter size and condition-dependent litter size are presented as two competing models, both are based on the concept of individual optimization. We propose a unified optimal litter size model (called 'adaptive litter size') and identify a set of conditions under which a common vs. a state-dependent optimal litter size should be observed. We test whether females of Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) have a common optimal litter size, or whether they adjust their litter size according to their state. We used a detailed individual-based data set collected from contrasting populations of Eurasian lynx in Scandinavia. Observed reproductive patterns in female lynx provide strong support for the existence of a common optimal litter size. Litter size did not vary according to female body mass or reproductive category, or among contrasted populations and years. A litter size of 2 was associated with a higher fitness than both smaller and larger litters, and thus corresponded to the 'adaptive litter size' for female lynx. We suggest that the reproductive pattern of female lynx might correspond to a risk avoidance tactic common to all individuals, which has evolved in response to strong environmental constraints generated by a highly unpredictable food supply during lactation. PMID:23859302

  12. Density of Wild Prey Modulates Lynx Kill Rates on Free-Ranging Domestic Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Odden, John; Nilsen, Erlend B.; Linnell, John D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors shaping the dynamics of carnivore–livestock conflicts is vital to facilitate large carnivore conservation in multi-use landscapes. We investigated how the density of their main wild prey, roe deer Capreolus capreolus, modulates individual Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep Ovis aries across a range of sheep and roe deer densities. Lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep were collected in south-eastern Norway from 1995 to 2011 along a gradient of different livestock and wild prey densities using VHF and GPS telemetry. We used zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) models including lynx sex, sheep density and an index of roe deer density as explanatory variables to model observed kill rates on sheep, and ranked the models based on their AICc values. The model including the effects of lynx sex and sheep density in the zero-inflation model and the effect of lynx sex and roe deer density in the negative binomial part received most support. Irrespective of sheep density and sex, we found the lowest sheep kill rates in areas with high densities of roe deer. As roe deer density decreased, males killed sheep at higher rates, and this pattern held for both high and low sheep densities. Similarly, females killed sheep at higher rates in areas with high densities of sheep and low densities of roe deer. However, when sheep densities were low females rarely killed sheep irrespective of roe deer density. Our quantification of depredation rates can be the first step towards establishing fairer compensation systems based on more accurate and area specific estimation of losses. This study demonstrates how we can use ecological theory to predict where losses of sheep will be greatest, and can be used to identify areas where mitigation measures are most likely to be needed. PMID:24278123

  13. Habitat loss, not fragmentation, drives occurrence patterns of Canada lynx at the southern range periphery.

    PubMed

    Hornseth, Megan L; Walpole, Aaron A; Walton, Lyle R; Bowman, Jeff; Ray, Justina C; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral populations often experience more extreme environmental conditions than those in the centre of a species' range. Such extreme conditions include habitat loss, defined as a reduction in the amount of suitable habitat, as well as habitat fragmentation, which involves the breaking apart of habitat independent of habitat loss. The 'threshold hypothesis' predicts that organisms will be more affected by habitat fragmentation when the amount of habitat on the landscape is scarce (i.e., less than 30%) than when habitat is abundant, implying that habitat fragmentation may compound habitat loss through changes in patch size and configuration. Alternatively, the 'flexibility hypothesis' predicts that individuals may respond to increased habitat disturbance by altering their selection patterns and thereby reducing sensitivity to habitat loss and fragmentation. While the range of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) has contracted during recent decades, the relative importance of habitat loss and habitat fragmentation on this phenomenon is poorly understood. We used a habitat suitability model for lynx to identify suitable land cover in Ontario, and contrasted occupancy patterns across landscapes differing in cover, to test the 'threshold hypothesis' and 'flexibility hypothesis'. When suitable land cover was widely available, lynx avoided areas with less than 30% habitat and were unaffected by habitat fragmentation. However, on landscapes with minimal suitable land cover, lynx occurrence was not related to either habitat loss or habitat fragmentation, indicating support for the 'flexibility hypothesis'. We conclude that lynx are broadly affected by habitat loss, and not specifically by habitat fragmentation, although occurrence patterns are flexible and dependent on landscape condition. We suggest that lynx may alter their habitat selection patterns depending on local conditions, thereby reducing their sensitivity to anthropogenically-driven habitat alteration. PMID:25401737

  14. Density of wild prey modulates lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep.

    PubMed

    Odden, John; Nilsen, Erlend B; Linnell, John D C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the factors shaping the dynamics of carnivore-livestock conflicts is vital to facilitate large carnivore conservation in multi-use landscapes. We investigated how the density of their main wild prey, roe deer Capreolus capreolus, modulates individual Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep Ovis aries across a range of sheep and roe deer densities. Lynx kill rates on free-ranging domestic sheep were collected in south-eastern Norway from 1995 to 2011 along a gradient of different livestock and wild prey densities using VHF and GPS telemetry. We used zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB) models including lynx sex, sheep density and an index of roe deer density as explanatory variables to model observed kill rates on sheep, and ranked the models based on their AICc values. The model including the effects of lynx sex and sheep density in the zero-inflation model and the effect of lynx sex and roe deer density in the negative binomial part received most support. Irrespective of sheep density and sex, we found the lowest sheep kill rates in areas with high densities of roe deer. As roe deer density decreased, males killed sheep at higher rates, and this pattern held for both high and low sheep densities. Similarly, females killed sheep at higher rates in areas with high densities of sheep and low densities of roe deer. However, when sheep densities were low females rarely killed sheep irrespective of roe deer density. Our quantification of depredation rates can be the first step towards establishing fairer compensation systems based on more accurate and area specific estimation of losses. This study demonstrates how we can use ecological theory to predict where losses of sheep will be greatest, and can be used to identify areas where mitigation measures are most likely to be needed. PMID:24278123

  15. Defining space use and movements of Canada lynx with global positioning system telemetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdett, C.L.; Moen, R.A.; Niemi, G.J.; Mech, L.D.

    2007-01-01

    Space use and movements of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) are difficult to study with very-high-frequency radiocollars. We deployed global positioning system (GPS) collars on 11 lynx in Minnesota to study their seasonal space-use patterns. We estimated home ranges with minimum-convex-polygon and fixed-kernel methods and estimated core areas with area/probability curves. Fixed-kernel home ranges of males (range = 29-522 km2) were significantly larger than those of females (range = 5-95 km2) annually and during the denning season. Some male lynx increased movements during March, the month most influenced by breeding activity. Lynx core areas were predicted by the 60% fixed-kernel isopleth in most seasons. The mean core-area size of males (range = 6-190 km2) was significantly larger than that of females (range = 1-19 km2) annually and during denning. Most female lynx were reproductive animals with reduced movements, whereas males often ranged widely between Minnesota and Ontario. Sensitivity analyses examining the effect of location frequency on home-range size suggest that the home-range sizes of breeding females are less sensitive to sample size than those of males. Longer periods between locations decreased home-range and core-area overlap relative to the home range estimated from daily locations. GPS collars improve our understanding of space use and movements by lynx by increasing the spatial extent and temporal frequency of monitoring and allowing home ranges to be estimated over short periods that are relevant to life-history characteristics. ?? 2007 American Society of Mammalogists.

  16. Habitat Loss, Not Fragmentation, Drives Occurrence Patterns of Canada Lynx at the Southern Range Periphery

    PubMed Central

    Hornseth, Megan L.; Walpole, Aaron A.; Walton, Lyle R.; Bowman, Jeff; Ray, Justina C.; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Murray, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral populations often experience more extreme environmental conditions than those in the centre of a species' range. Such extreme conditions include habitat loss, defined as a reduction in the amount of suitable habitat, as well as habitat fragmentation, which involves the breaking apart of habitat independent of habitat loss. The ‘threshold hypothesis’ predicts that organisms will be more affected by habitat fragmentation when the amount of habitat on the landscape is scarce (i.e., less than 30%) than when habitat is abundant, implying that habitat fragmentation may compound habitat loss through changes in patch size and configuration. Alternatively, the ‘flexibility hypothesis’ predicts that individuals may respond to increased habitat disturbance by altering their selection patterns and thereby reducing sensitivity to habitat loss and fragmentation. While the range of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) has contracted during recent decades, the relative importance of habitat loss and habitat fragmentation on this phenomenon is poorly understood. We used a habitat suitability model for lynx to identify suitable land cover in Ontario, and contrasted occupancy patterns across landscapes differing in cover, to test the ‘threshold hypothesis’ and ‘flexibility hypothesis’. When suitable land cover was widely available, lynx avoided areas with less than 30% habitat and were unaffected by habitat fragmentation. However, on landscapes with minimal suitable land cover, lynx occurrence was not related to either habitat loss or habitat fragmentation, indicating support for the ‘flexibility hypothesis’. We conclude that lynx are broadly affected by habitat loss, and not specifically by habitat fragmentation, although occurrence patterns are flexible and dependent on landscape condition. We suggest that lynx may alter their habitat selection patterns depending on local conditions, thereby reducing their sensitivity to anthropogenically-driven habitat alteration. PMID:25401737

  17. Germ cell survival and differentiation after xenotransplantation of testis tissue from three endangered species: Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), Cuvier's gazelle (Gazella cuvieri) and Mohor gazelle (G. dama mhorr).

    PubMed

    Arregui, Lucía; Dobrinski, Ina; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    The use of assisted reproductive techniques for endangered species is a major goal for conservation. One of these techniques, testis tissue xenografting, allows for the development of spermatozoa from animals that die before reaching sexual maturity. To assess the potential use of this technique with endangered species, testis tissue from six Iberian lynxes (one fetus, two perinatal cubs, two 6-month-old and one 2-year-old lynx), two Cuvier's gazelle fetuses and one 8-month-old Mohor gazelle were transplanted ectopically into nude mice. Tissue from the lynx fetus, perinatal cubs and 2-year-old donors degenerated, whereas spermatogonia were present in 15% of seminiferous tubules more than 70 weeks after grafting in transplanted testis tissue from 6-month-old donors. Seminal vesicle weights (indicative of testosterone production) increased over time in mice transplanted with tissue from 6-month-old lynxes. Progression of spermatogenesis was observed in xenografts from gazelles and was donor age dependent. Tissue from Cuvier's gazelle fetuses contained spermatocytes 40 weeks after grafting. Finally, round spermatids were found 28 weeks after transplantation in grafts from the 8-month-old Mohor gazelle. This is the first time that xenotransplantation of testicular tissue has been performed with an endangered felid and the first successful xenotransplantation in an endangered species. Our results open important options for the preservation of biological diversity. PMID:23763851

  18. EVOLUTION OF THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATION IN HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUSTERS: EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES IN THE LYNX SUPERCLUSTER AT z $ 1.26

    E-print Network

    IN THE LYNX SUPERCLUSTER AT z $ 1.26 Simona Mei,1 Brad P. Holden,2 John P. Blakeslee,1,3 Piero Rosati,4 Marc in the highest redshift cluster superstructure known today, the Lynx Supercluster. The CMR was determined from. INTRODUCTION The Lynx Supercluster is the highest redshift supercluster known today (Rosati et al. 1999; Nakata

  19. GeneLynx: A Gene-Centric Portal to the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Lenhard, Boris; Hayes, William S.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2001-01-01

    GeneLynx is a meta-database providing an extensive collection of hyperlinks to human gene-specific information in diverse databases available on the Internet. The GeneLynx project is based on the simple notion that given any gene-specific identifier (accession number, gene name, text, or sequence), scientists should be able to access a single location that provides a set of links to all the publicly available information pertinent to the specified human gene. GeneLynx was implemented as an extensible relational database with an intuitive and user-friendly Web interface. The data are automatically extracted from more than 40 external resources, using appropriate approaches to maximize coverage of the available data. Construction and curation of the system is mediated by a custom set of software tools. An indexing utility is provided to facilitate the establishment of hyperlinks in external databases. A unique feature of the GeneLynx system is a communal curation system for user-aided annotation. GeneLynx can be accessed freely at http://www.genelynx.org. PMID:11731507

  20. Adapted conservation measures are required to save the Iberian lynx in a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordham, D. A.; Akçakaya, H. R.; Brook, B. W.; Rodríguez, A.; Alves, P. C.; Civantos, E.; Triviño, M.; Watts, M. J.; Araújo, M. B.

    2013-10-01

    The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) has suffered severe population declines in the twentieth century and is now on the brink of extinction. Climate change could further threaten the survival of the species, but its forecast effects are being neglected in recovery plans. Quantitative estimates of extinction risk under climate change have so far mostly relied on inferences from correlative projections of species' habitat shifts. Here we use ecological niche models coupled to metapopulation simulations with source-sink dynamics to directly investigate the combined effects of climate change, prey availability and management intervention on the persistence of the Iberian lynx. Our approach is unique in that it explicitly models dynamic bi-trophic species interactions in a climate change setting. We show that anticipated climate change will rapidly and severely decrease lynx abundance and probably lead to its extinction in the wild within 50 years, even with strong global efforts to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. In stark contrast, we also show that a carefully planned reintroduction programme, accounting for the effects of climate change, prey abundance and habitat connectivity, could avert extinction of the lynx this century. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, why considering prey availability, climate change and their interaction in models is important when designing policies to prevent future biodiversity loss.

  1. Optimizing cholinergic tone through lynx modulators of nicotinic receptors: implications for plasticity and nicotine addiction.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Julie M; Lester, Henry A; Walz, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    The cholinergic system underlies both adaptive (learning and memory) and nonadaptive (addiction and dependency) behavioral changes through its ability to shape and regulate plasticity. Protein modulators such as lynx family members can fine tune the activity of the cholinergic system and contribute to the graded response of the cholinergic system, stabilizing neural circuitry through direct interaction with nicotinic receptors. Release of this molecular brake can unmask cholinergic-dependent mechanisms in the brain. Lynx proteins have the potential to provide top-down control over plasticity mechanisms, including addictive propensity. If this is indeed the case, then, what regulates the regulator? Transcriptional changes of lynx genes in response to pharmacological, physiological, and pathological alterations are explored in this review. PMID:22875450

  2. Molecular evidence of shared hookworm Ancylostoma tubaeforme haplotypes between the critically endangered Iberian lynx and sympatric domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Millán, Javier; Blasco-Costa, Isabel

    2012-05-25

    Hookworms of the genus Ancylostoma are the most pathogenic parasites of young cats, and A. tubaeforme may cause morbidity or mortality in young individuals of the most endangered felid species in the world, the Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). Since the transmission of monoxenous parasites is related to host density and remaining lynx populations are currently very small, the presence of reservoir hosts may be necessary for the maintenance of the hookworm life-cycle, the domestic cat being the most likely reservoir of A. tubaeforme. In order to confirm this hypothesis, the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (Cox I) sequences of three A. tubaeforme specimens from a road-killed Iberian lynx from Doñana were compared with 14 specimens retrieved from five sympatric free-roaming cats from the same area, and with six specimens from three free-roaming cats from the Mediterranean island of Mallorca. Gene fragments (300 bp) from 23 A. tubaeforme individuals representing 16 different haplotypes were obtained. A statistical parsimony haplotype network analysis showed that the three specimens infecting an Iberian lynx corresponded to two different haplotypes, one of which was identical to a specimen in a cat found only 10 km from the lynx. Specimens from the Iberian lynx and those from cats in Doñana were only 1.03% genetically divergent, whereas specimens from Mallorca cats and those from Doñana cats and the lynx diverged by 1.33% and 1.36%, respectively. The existence of shared haplotypes of hookworms between lynx and cat reinforces the hypothesis that the abundant sympatric domestic cat population is acting as a reservoir for A. tubaeforme infection in the endangered Iberian lynx. PMID:22136770

  3. Genes and evolution of two-domain toxins from lynx spider venom.

    PubMed

    Sachkova, Maria Y; Slavokhotova, Anna A; Grishin, Eugene V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2014-03-01

    Spiderines are comparatively long polypeptide toxins (?110 residues) from lynx spiders (genus Oxyopes). They are built of an N-terminal linear cationic domain (?40 residues) and a C-terminal knottin domain (?60 residues). The linear domain empowers spiderines with strong cytolytic activity. In the present work we report 16 novel spiderine sequences from Oxyopes takobius and Oxyopes lineatus classified into two subfamilies. Strikingly, negative selection acts on both linear and knottin domains. Genes encoding Oxyopes two-domain toxins were sequenced and found to be intronless. We further discuss a possible scenario of lynx spider modular toxin evolution. PMID:24462682

  4. Influence of adrenocorticotrophin hormone challenge and external factors (age, sex, and body region) on hair cortisol concentration in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Terwissen, C V; Mastromonaco, G F; Murray, D L

    2013-12-01

    Land use changes are a significant factor influencing the decline of felid populations. However, additional research is needed to better understand how these factors influence populations in the wild. Hormone analysis can provide valuable information on the basic physiology and overall health of an animal, and enzyme immunoassays (EIA) are generally used for hair hormone analysis but must first be validated for the substrate of choice and species of interest. To date, hormone assays from hair have not been validated for Felidae, despite that the method holds considerable promise for non-invasive sampling of free-ranging animals. We sought to: (1) evaluate whether increased adrenocorticotrophin hormone (ACTH) during the period of hair growth results in elevated hair cortisol; (2) validate the enzyme immunoassay used; and (3) identify any variations in hair cortisol between age, sex and body regions, using Canada lynx. We quantified hair cortisol concentrations in captive animals through an ACTH challenge and collected samples from legally harvested lynx to compare variability between body regions. An EIA was validated for the analysis of hair cortisol. Lynx (n=3) had a qualitative increase in hair cortisol concentration following an ACTH challenge in captive animals (20 IU/kg of body weight weekly for 5 weeks), thereby supporting the use of an EIA to quantify cortisol values in hair. Based on our analysis of sampled lynx pelts, we found that hair cortisol did not vary between age and sex, but varied within the foot/leg region to a greater extent than between individuals. We recommend that future studies identify a standardized location for hair cortisol sampling. PMID:24080086

  5. Coyotes and Lynx MARK O'DONOGHUE, STAN BOUTIN, DENNIS L MURRAY,

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    #12;Coyotes and lynx are the two most important mammalian predators of snowshoe hares throughout much of the hare's geographic range. Between them, these two predators killed approximately 60% of all depredated radio-collared hares at Kluane from 1986 through 1996 (Krebs et al. 1995), and predation accounted

  6. 50,000 years of genetic uniformity in the critically endangered Iberian lynx

    E-print Network

    ), classi- fied as a Critically Endangered species (IUCN 2010), is the most endangered carnivore in Europe50,000 years of genetic uniformity in the critically endangered Iberian lynx RICARDO RODRI´GUEZ,*1-11, PO Box 50007, SE-10405 Stockholm, Sweden. Abstract Low genetic diversity in the endangered Iberian

  7. VIDEO ARTICLE Patterns in bobcat (Lynx rufus) scent marking and communication

    E-print Network

    Wilmers, Chris

    VIDEO ARTICLE Patterns in bobcat (Lynx rufus) scent marking and communication behaviors Maximilian organization. We used motion-trig- gered video cameras to study the use of communication behaviors in bobcats and spring. Our results add to the current knowledge of bobcat communi- cation behaviors, and suggest

  8. Male reproductive traits, semen cryopreservation, and heterologous in vitro fertilization in the bobcat (Lynx rufus)

    E-print Network

    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

    in the bobcat (Lynx rufus) N. Gan~a´n a , R. Gonza´lez a , A. Sestelo b , J.J. Garde c , I. Sa´nchez d , J 2009 Abstract There is limited information on bobcat ejaculate traits and sperm cryopreservation and fertilizing ability. Bobcats were electroejaculated under general anesthesia in November (autumn) and April

  9. Pleistocene and ecological effects on continental-scale genetic differentiation in the bobcat (Lynx rufus)

    E-print Network

    Bronikowski, Anne

    Pleistocene and ecological effects on continental-scale genetic differentiation in the bobcat (Lynx--remain largely unexplored for these species. Bobcats occur across North America and possess many characteristics. Thus, the data distinguished bobcats in the eastern USA from those in the western half, with no obvious

  10. HABITAT SELECTION AND POPULATION ECOLOGY OF BOBCATS (LYNX RUFUS) IN SOUTH DAKOTA, USA

    E-print Network

    HABITAT SELECTION AND POPULATION ECOLOGY OF BOBCATS (LYNX RUFUS) IN SOUTH DAKOTA, USA BY CORY E Crownover; your knowledge of bobcat habits and local expertise in the field was a major aspect bobcat stomach contents for what felt like a better part of a lifetime! Thank you for the great help

  11. The origin of the critically endangered Iberian lynx: Speciation, diet and adaptive changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscaini, Alberto; Madurell-Malapeira, Joan; Llenas, Manel; Martínez-Navarro, Bienvenido

    2015-09-01

    A new cranial fossil attributable to the species Lynx pardinus (Temminck, 1827) attests to the presence of this felid in the late Early Pleistocene of the Iberian Peninsula. Certain diagnostic features, such as the confluence of the lacerum posterius and anterior condyloid foramina, and the long and lyre-shaped temporal ridges, allow this find to be established as the first occurrence of the Iberian lynx in Europe. The fossil described here was found in the Avenc Marcel cave (Vallirana, Barcelona, Spain) in association with many other Late Villafranchian faunal remains. The combined presence of the bovid genera Capra and Soergelia, and the rodent species Mimomys medasensis and Mimomys tornensis, allows the age of this deposit to be placed at about 1.6-1.7 Ma. Consequently, the appearance of Lynx pardinus is related here to the faunal turnover that occurred between the Middle and Late Villafranchian, considered to be one of the major changes in the European macromammal fauna. Such an early divergence is in accordance with the evolutionary split proposed by both the molecular data and with the glacial-interglacial dynamics that affected the European region during the Early Pleistocene. Under these circumstances, the Iberian lynx could have originated in isolation in the Iberian Peninsula (a recognized southern European refugium for several species), during one or more glacial episodes. In this time period, this species may also have developed a dependence on small-sized animal prey, such as the lagomorphs of the genus Prolagus and Oryctolagus, already widespread throughout the Iberian Peninsula by that point. In the present work, several topics regarding the earliest evolutionary history of Lynx pardinus are discussed. Understanding the events that took place surrounding the origins of this lineage can shed new light on the future conservation of this extremely threatened felid.

  12. Activity Patterns of Eurasian Lynx Are Modulated by Light Regime and Individual Traits over a Wide Latitudinal Range

    PubMed Central

    Heurich, Marco; Hilger, Anton; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Andrén, Henrik; Bufka, Lud?k; Krofel, Miha; Mattisson, Jenny; Odden, John; Persson, Jens; Rauset, Geir R.; Schmidt, Krzysztof; Linnell, John D. C.

    2014-01-01

    The activity patterns of most terrestrial animals are regarded as being primarily influenced by light, although other factors, such as sexual cycle and climatic conditions, can modify the underlying patterns. However, most activity studies have been limited to a single study area, which in turn limit the variability of light conditions and other factors. Here we considered a range of variables that might potentially influence the activity of a large carnivore, the Eurasian lynx, in a network of studies conducted with identical methodology in different areas spanning latitudes from 49°7?N in central Europe to 70°00?N in northern Scandinavia. The variables considered both light conditions, ranging from a day with a complete day–night cycle to polar night and polar day, as well as individual traits of the animals. We analysed activity data of 38 individual free-ranging lynx equipped with GPS-collars with acceleration sensors, covering more than 11,000 lynx days. Mixed linear additive models revealed that the lynx activity level was not influenced by the daily daylight duration and the activity pattern was bimodal, even during polar night and polar day. The duration of the active phase of the activity cycle varied with the widening and narrowing of the photoperiod. Activity varied significantly with moonlight. Among adults, males were more active than females, and subadult lynx were more active than adults. In polar regions, the amplitude of the lynx daily activity pattern was low, likely as a result of the polycyclic activity pattern of their main prey, reindeer. At lower latitudes, the basic lynx activity pattern peaked during twilight, corresponding to the crepuscular activity pattern of the main prey, roe deer. Our results indicated that the basic activity of lynx is independent of light conditions, but is modified by both individual traits and the activity pattern of the locally most important prey. PMID:25517902

  13. Activity patterns of Eurasian lynx are modulated by light regime and individual traits over a wide latitudinal range.

    PubMed

    Heurich, Marco; Hilger, Anton; Küchenhoff, Helmut; Andrén, Henrik; Bufka, Lud?k; Krofel, Miha; Mattisson, Jenny; Odden, John; Persson, Jens; Rauset, Geir R; Schmidt, Krzysztof; Linnell, John D C

    2014-01-01

    The activity patterns of most terrestrial animals are regarded as being primarily influenced by light, although other factors, such as sexual cycle and climatic conditions, can modify the underlying patterns. However, most activity studies have been limited to a single study area, which in turn limit the variability of light conditions and other factors. Here we considered a range of variables that might potentially influence the activity of a large carnivore, the Eurasian lynx, in a network of studies conducted with identical methodology in different areas spanning latitudes from 49°7'N in central Europe to 70°00'N in northern Scandinavia. The variables considered both light conditions, ranging from a day with a complete day-night cycle to polar night and polar day, as well as individual traits of the animals. We analysed activity data of 38 individual free-ranging lynx equipped with GPS-collars with acceleration sensors, covering more than 11,000 lynx days. Mixed linear additive models revealed that the lynx activity level was not influenced by the daily daylight duration and the activity pattern was bimodal, even during polar night and polar day. The duration of the active phase of the activity cycle varied with the widening and narrowing of the photoperiod. Activity varied significantly with moonlight. Among adults, males were more active than females, and subadult lynx were more active than adults. In polar regions, the amplitude of the lynx daily activity pattern was low, likely as a result of the polycyclic activity pattern of their main prey, reindeer. At lower latitudes, the basic lynx activity pattern peaked during twilight, corresponding to the crepuscular activity pattern of the main prey, roe deer. Our results indicated that the basic activity of lynx is independent of light conditions, but is modified by both individual traits and the activity pattern of the locally most important prey. PMID:25517902

  14. Robotically assisted ventricular tachycardia substrate modification ablation with the novel Lynx(TM) integrated sheath and RF ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Lorgat, Faizel; Pudney, Evan; van Deventer, Helena

    2013-04-01

    Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) is demanding and time consuming. Robotically controlled catheter ablation reduces operator fatigue and exposure to X-rays, and provides greater precision and stability of the catheter. A new flexible, integrated robotic sheath and ablation catheter has recently been introduced (Lynx(TM)) and used in atrial ablation procedures. We describe the first VT substrate modification ablation in the world with the Lynx(TM) robotic radio frequency ablation catheter. PMID:23728128

  15. Habitat selection and risk of predation: re-colonization by lynx had limited impact on habitat selection by roe deer.

    PubMed

    Samelius, Gustaf; Andrén, Henrik; Kjellander, Petter; Liberg, Olof

    2013-01-01

    Risk of predation is an evolutionary force that affects behaviors of virtually all animals. In this study, we examined how habitat selection by roe deer was affected by risk of predation by Eurasian lynx - the main predator of roe deer in Scandinavia. Specifically, we compared how habitat selection by roe deer varied (1) before and after lynx re-established in the study area and (2) in relation to habitat-specific risk of predation by lynx. All analyses were conducted at the spatial and temporal scales of home ranges and seasons. We did not find any evidence that roe deer avoided habitats in which the risk of predation by lynx was greatest and information-theoretic model selection showed that re-colonization by lynx had limited impact on habitat selection by roe deer despite lynx predation causing 65% of known mortalities after lynx re-colonized the area. Instead we found that habitat selection decreased when habitat availability increased for 2 of 5 habitat types (a pattern referred to as functional response in habitat selection). Limited impact of re-colonization by lynx on habitat selection by roe deer in this study differs from elk in North America altering both daily and seasonal patterns in habitat selection at the spatial scales of habitat patches and home ranges when wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park. Our study thus provides further evidence of the complexity by which animals respond to risk of predation and suggest that it may vary between ecosystems and predator-prey constellations. PMID:24069419

  16. Non cat-like ovarian cycle in the Eurasian and the Iberian lynx - ultrasonographical and endocrinological analysis.

    PubMed

    Göritz, F; Dehnhard, M; Hildebrandt, T B; Naidenko, S V; Vargas, A; Martinez, F; López-Bao, J V; Palomares, F; Jewgenow, K

    2009-07-01

    The Iberian lynx is considered the most endangered felid species. Therefore, an ex situ conservation program was initiated to protect this species from extinction. Additional knowledge on lynx reproduction biology and reliable methods for reproductive monitoring are important for developing a captive breeding program. The aim of this study in lynx was to implement transrectal ultrasonography to visualize ovarian structures (follicles, corpora lutea) and to assess ovarian activity in addition to analysis of serum progesterone and oestradiol. Because of limited access to Iberian lynxes, the less-endangered Eurasian lynx and bobcat were also studied in this comparative study. Recent endocrinological studies based on faecal and urinary progesterone and oestrogen metabolites revealed that steroid profiles in both these species were alike and did not follow the typical pattern of other felids. Pregnancy diagnosis was not possible, since progesterone concentrations did not differ between pregnant and pseudopregnant animals. Progesterone was also detected after parturition as well as after weaning until the onset of a new oestrous cycle. In the present study, the presence of corpora lutea during the non-breeding season was confirmed by ultrasonography and by elevated serum levels of progesterone averaging 3.56 +/- 1.3 ng/ml in Eurasian and 6.1 +/- 0.26 ng/ml in Iberian lynx, respectively. The ultrasonographical findings on the ovarian structures suggest strongly that corpora lutea developed after ovulation stay active until November and regress before the onset of the next oestrus. PMID:19754543

  17. Lynx1 Shifts ?4?2 Nicotinic Receptor Subunit Stoichiometry by Affecting Assembly in the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Weston A.; Henderson, Brandon J.; Yu, Caroline; Parker, Rell L.; Richards, Christopher I.; Lester, Henry A.; Miwa, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neurotoxin-like receptor binding proteins, such as lynx modulators, are topologically positioned to exert pharmacological effects by binding to the extracellular portion of nAChRs. These actions are generally thought to proceed when both lynx and the nAChRs are on the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate that lynx1 also exerts effects on ?4?2 nAChRs within the endoplasmic reticulum. Lynx1 affects assembly of nascent ?4 and ?2 subunits and alters the stoichiometry of the receptor population that reaches the plasma membrane. Additionally, these data suggest that lynx1 shifts nAChR stoichiometry to low sensitivity (?4)3(?2)2 pentamers primarily through this interaction in the endoplasmic reticulum, rather than solely via direct modulation of activity on the plasma membrane. To our knowledge, these data represent the first test of the hypothesis that a lynx family member, or indeed any glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, could act within the cell to alter assembly of a multisubunit protein. PMID:25193667

  18. Lynx1 shifts ?4?2 nicotinic receptor subunit stoichiometry by affecting assembly in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Weston A; Henderson, Brandon J; Yu, Caroline; Parker, Rell L; Richards, Christopher I; Lester, Henry A; Miwa, Julie M

    2014-11-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored neurotoxin-like receptor binding proteins, such as lynx modulators, are topologically positioned to exert pharmacological effects by binding to the extracellular portion of nAChRs. These actions are generally thought to proceed when both lynx and the nAChRs are on the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate that lynx1 also exerts effects on ?4?2 nAChRs within the endoplasmic reticulum. Lynx1 affects assembly of nascent ?4 and ?2 subunits and alters the stoichiometry of the receptor population that reaches the plasma membrane. Additionally, these data suggest that lynx1 shifts nAChR stoichiometry to low sensitivity (?4)3(?2)2 pentamers primarily through this interaction in the endoplasmic reticulum, rather than solely via direct modulation of activity on the plasma membrane. To our knowledge, these data represent the first test of the hypothesis that a lynx family member, or indeed any glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, could act within the cell to alter assembly of a multisubunit protein. PMID:25193667

  19. Performance and rotor loads measurements of the Lynx XZ170 helicopter with rectangular blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Benton H.; Louie, Alexander W.; Griffiths, Nicholas; Sotiriou, Costantinos P.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the results of a series of flight tests on the Lynx XZ170 helicopter with rectangular blades. The test objectives were to explore the flight envelope and to measure the performance and structural loads of the Lynx main-rotor system. The tests were conducted as part of the British Experimental Rotor Program (BERP) under a contract with the Ministry of Defense in England. Data were acquired for steady-level flights at five weight coefficients. Some flight conditions were tested at beyond the retreating-blade stall boundary, which was defined by a predetermined limit on the pitchlink vibratory load. In addition to documenting the flight conditions and data, this report describes the aircraft, particularly the rotor system, in detail.

  20. Dwarf galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void: photometry, colours and ages

    E-print Network

    Pustilnik, S; Lyamina, Y; Tepliakova, A

    2010-01-01

    The nearby Lynx-Cancer void is a good laboratory to study the effect of very rarefied environment on the evolution of the least massive dwarf galaxies. A recently compiled sample of this void's galaxies includes about one hundred objects with M_B in the range -12 to -18 mag. Good quality images are available in the SDSS database for ~80% of the sample. Their u,g,r,i,z photometry allows one to derive galaxy stellar mass (and, incorporating HI data, gas mass-fraction) and ages of visible stellar populations, and hence, the epoch of their formation (first SF episode). We present the first photometric results of the ongoing study of the Lynx-Cancer void.

  1. Dwarf Galaxies in the Nearby Lynx-Cancer Void: Photometry, Colours and Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, Simon; Kniazev, Alexei; Lyamina, Yulia; Tepliakova, Arina

    The nearby Lynx-Cancer void is a good laboratory to study the effect of very rarefied environment on the evolution of the least massive dwarf galaxies. A recently compiled sample of this void's galaxies includes about one hundred objects with MB in the range -12 to -18 mag. Good quality images are available in the SDSS database for ˜80% of the sample. Their u, g, r, i, z photometry allows one to derive galaxy stellar mass (and, incorporating HI data, gas mass-fraction) and ages of visible stellar populations, and hence, the epoch of their formation (first SF episode). We present the first photometric results of the ongoing study of the Lynx-Cancer void.

  2. Characterization of regionally associated feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Lagana, Danielle M; Lee, Justin S; Lewis, Jesse S; Bevins, Sarah N; Carver, Scott; Sweanor, Linda L; McBride, Roy; McBride, Caleb; Crooks, Kevin R; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) classically infects felid species with highly divergent species-specific FIVs. However, recent studies have detected an FIV strain infecting both bobcats (Lynx rufus) and pumas (Puma concolor) in California and Florida. To further investigate this observation, we evaluated FIV from bobcats in Florida (n=25) and Colorado (n=80) between 2008 and 2011. Partial viral sequences from five Florida bobcats cluster with previously published sequences from Florida panthers. We did not detect FIV in Colorado bobcats. PMID:23778629

  3. The subtle role of climate change on population genetic structure in Canada lynx.

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Wilson, Paul J; Gomez, Celine; Koen, Erin L; Bowman, Jeff; Thornton, Daniel; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-07-01

    Anthropogenically driven climatic change is expected to reshape global patterns of species distribution and abundance. Given recent links between genetic variation and environmental patterns, climate change may similarly impact genetic population structure, but we lack information on the spatial and mechanistic underpinnings of genetic-climate associations. Here, we show that current genetic variability of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is strongly correlated with a winter climate gradient (i.e. increasing snow depth and winter precipitation from west-to-east) across the Pacific-North American (PNO) to North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) climatic systems. This relationship was stronger than isolation by distance and not explained by landscape variables or changes in abundance. Thus, these patterns suggest that individuals restricted dispersal across the climate boundary, likely in the absence of changes in habitat quality. We propose habitat imprinting on snow conditions as one possible explanation for this unusual phenomenon. Coupling historical climate data with future projections, we also found increasingly diverging snow conditions between the two climate systems. Based on genetic simulations using projected climate data (2041-2070), we predicted that this divergence could lead to a threefold increase in genetic differentiation, potentially leading to isolated east-west populations of lynx in North America. Our results imply that subtle genetic structure can be governed by current climate and that substantive genetic differentiation and related ecological divergence may arise from changing climate patterns. PMID:24415466

  4. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void. II. The element abundances

    E-print Network

    Pustilnik, S A; Kniazev, A Y

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the study of the evolutionary status of galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void, we present the results of the SAO RAS 6-m telescope spectroscopy for 20 objects in this region. The principal faint line [OIII]4363A, used to determine the electron temperature and oxygen abundance (O/H) by the classical method, is clearly detected in only about 2/3 of the studied objects. For the remaining galaxies this line is either faint or undetected. To obtain the oxygen abundances in these galaxies we as well apply the semi-empirical method by Izotov and Thuan, and/or the empirical methods of Pilyugin et al., which are only employing the intensities of sufficiently strong lines. We also present our O/H measurements for 22 Lynx-Cancer void galaxies, for which the suitable Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra are available. In total, we present the combined O/H data for 48 Lynx-Cancer void galaxies, including the data adopted from the literature and our own earlier results. We make a comparison of thei...

  5. WEAK-LENSING DETECTION AT z $ 1.3: MEASUREMENT OF THE TWO LYNX CLUSTERS WITH THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS

    E-print Network

    WEAK-LENSING DETECTION AT z $ 1.3: MEASUREMENT OF THE TWO LYNX CLUSTERS WITH THE ADVANCED CAMERA are separated by $40 from each other and appear to form a supercluster in the Lynx field. Using our deep ACS i

  6. Retrospective study of morbidity and mortality of captive Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) in the ex situ conservation programme (2004-June 2010).

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando; Manteca, Xavier; Pastor, Josep

    2013-12-01

    Medical records of 120 Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) from the captive breeding population (CBP), 96 of which were older than 1 wk old, were studied from January 2004 to June 2010. From a total of 413 clinical signs recorded, it was possible to obtain a diagnosis in 258 (62.5%). Inappetence, skin wound, and vomiting had the highest incidence. Adult (2 to 6 yr old) and juvenile (1 wk to 1 yr old) animals accounted for most of the clinical signs. Vitamin D toxicosis and intraspecific trauma accounted for 55.4% and 15.1% of the clinical signs, respectively. Renal toxicosis due to the administration of supplements with an excess of vitamin D occurred in 2009 and affected a total of 39 individuals. Intraspecific trauma cases were predominantly observed from sibling aggression. Diet-related conditions consisted of sporadic cases of fatal salmonellosis, dermatophytosis, and gastrointestinal episodes. Suspected idiopathic epilepsy and femoral neck metaphyseal osteopathy were also observed. A total of 15 animals older than 1 wk old died including five vitamin D toxicosis cases and three juveniles due to intraspecific trauma. Mycobacterium bovis was found as a secondary infection in two animals that died from vitamin D toxicosis. Abortions, premature births, and stillbirths accounted for 12 mortalities, and 13 neonatal deaths due to maternal neglect or bacterial sepsis were observed. Data show that improvement of diet-related conditions is a key factor in preserving the health of animals in the CBP. Thus, the control of food and supplement composition, rabbit farm suppliers, and hygiene should be standardized and improved. Furthermore, data recording and diagnostic protocols should be standardized. PMID:24450042

  7. Genetics at the verge of extinction: insights from the Iberian lynx.

    PubMed

    Casas-Marce, M; Soriano, L; López-Bao, J V; Godoy, J A

    2013-11-01

    Population viability might become compromised by the loss of genetic diversity and the accumulation of inbreeding resulting from population decline and fragmentation. The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) provides a paradigmatic example of a species at the verge of extinction, and because of the well-documented and different demographic histories of the two remaining populations (Doñana and Andújar), it provides the opportunity to evaluate the performance of analytical methods commonly applied to recently declined populations. We used mitochondrial sequences and 36 microsatellite markers to evaluate the current genetic status of the species and to assess the genetic signatures of its past history. Mitochondrial diversity was extremely low with only two haplotypes, alternatively fixed in each population. Both remnant populations have low levels of genetic diversity at microsatellite markers, particularly the population from Doñana, and genetic differentiation between the two populations is high. Bayesian coalescent-based methods suggest an earlier decline starting hundreds of years ago, while heterozygosity excess and M-ratio tests did not provide conclusive and consistent evidence for recent bottlenecks. Also, a model of gene flow received overwhelming support over a model of pure drift. Results that are in conflict with the known recent demography of the species call for caution in the use of these methods, especially when no information on previous demographic history is available. Overall, our results suggest that current genetic patterns in the Iberian lynx are mainly the result of its recent decline and fragmentation and alerts on possible genetic risks for its persistence. Conservation strategies should explicitly consider this threat and incorporate an integrated genetic management of wild, captive and re-introduced populations, including genetic restoration through translocations. PMID:24128177

  8. Possible extinction vortex for a population of Iberian lynx on the verge of extirpation.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Francisco; Godoy, José Antonio; López-Bao, José Vicente; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Roques, Severine; Casas-Marce, Mireia; Revilla, Eloy; Delibes, Miguel

    2012-08-01

    Theory suggests that demographic and genetic traits deteriorate (i.e., fitness and genetic diversity decrease) when populations become small, and that such deterioration could precipitate positive feedback loops called extinction vortices. We examined whether demographic attributes and genetic traits have changed over time in one of the 2 remaining small populations of the highly endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) in Doñana, Spain. From 1983 to 2008, we recorded nontraumatic mortality rates, litter size, offspring survival, age at territory acquisition, and sex ratio. We combined these demographic attributes with measures of inbreeding and genetic diversity at neutral loci (microsatellites) and genes subjected to selection (major histocompatibility complex). Data on demographic traits were obtained through capture and radio tracking, checking dens during breeding, track surveys, and camera trapping. For genetic analyses, we obtained blood or tissue samples from captured or necropsied individuals or from museum specimens. Over time a female-biased sex ratio developed, age of territory acquisition decreased, mean litter size decreased, and rates of nontraumatic mortality increased, but there were no significant changes in overall mortality rates, standardized individual heterozygosity declined steadily, and allelic diversity of exon 2 of class II major histocompatibility complex DRB genes remained constant (2 allelic variants present in all individuals analyzed). Changes in sex ratio and age of territory acquisition may have resulted from demographic stochasticity, whereas changes in litter size and nontraumatic mortality may be related to observed increases in inbreeding. Concomitant deterioration of both demographic attributes and genetic traits is consistent with an extinction vortex. The co-occurrence, with or without interaction, of demographic and genetic deterioration may explain the lack of success of conservation efforts with the Doñana population of Iberian lynx. PMID:22731698

  9. Suivi d'une nouvelle UG du Lynx : MASTER OT J072948.66+593824.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillon, E.

    2012-03-01

    Suite à la détection, par nos collègues russes, d'une nouvelle variable dans le Lynx mi- février 2012, et à la diffusion de l'alerte sur internet, j'ai pu pointer cette nouvelle cataclysmique de type UGSU, pendant 4h, avant qu'elle ne retourne à son état de repos. Après un rappel sur sa découverte, j'exposerai la façon dont je l'ai suivie 4 jours après la découverte et les quelques résultats que l'on peut en extraire.

  10. Home range size and choice of management strategy for lynx in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Linnell, J D; Andersen, R; Kvam, T; Andrén, H; Liberg, O; Odden, J; Moa, P F

    2001-06-01

    Annual and seasonal home ranges were calculated for 47 Eurasian lynx in four Scandinavian study sites (two in Sweden and two in Norway). The observed home ranges were the largest reported for the species, with study site averages ranging from 600 to 1,400 km2 for resident males and from 300 to 800 km2 for resident females. When home range sizes were compared to the size of protected areas (national parks and nature reserves) in Scandinavia, it was concluded that very few protected areas contained sufficient forest to provide space for more than a few individuals. As a direct consequence of this, most lynx need to be conserved in the multiuse semi-natural forest habitats that cover large areas in Scandinavia. This conservation strategy leads to a number of conflicts with some land uses (sheep and semidomestic reindeer herding, and roe deer hunters), but not all (forestry and moose harvest). Accordingly research must be aimed at understanding the ecology of these conflicts, and finding solutions. PMID:11393321

  11. Photometric Properties of Kiso Ultraviolet-Excess Galaxies in the Lynx-Ursa Major Region

    E-print Network

    Tsutomu T. Takeuchi; Akihiko Tomita; Kouichiro Nakanishi; Takako T. Ishii; Ikuru Iwata; Mamoru Sait?

    1998-10-15

    We have performed a systematic study of several regions in the sky where the number of galaxies exhibiting star formation (SF) activity is greater than average. We used Kiso ultraviolet-excess galaxies (KUGs) as our SF-enhanced sample. By statistically comparing the KUG and non-KUG distributions, we discovered four KUG-rich regions with a size of $\\sim 10^\\circ \\times 10^\\circ$. One of these regions corresponds spatially to a filament of length $\\sim 60 h^{-1}$ Mpc in the Lynx-Ursa Major region ($\\alpha \\sim 9^{\\rm h} - 10^{\\rm h}, \\delta \\sim 42^\\circ - 48^\\circ$). We call this ``the Lynx-Ursa Major (LUM) filament''. We obtained $V(RI)_{\\rm C}$ surface photometry of 11 of the KUGs in the LUM filament and used these to investigate the integrated colors, distribution of SF regions, morphologies, and local environments. We found that these KUGs consist of distorted spiral galaxies and compact galaxies with blue colors. Their star formation occurs in the entire disk, and is not confined to just the central regions. The colors of the SF regions imply that active star formation in the spiral galaxies occurred $10^{7 - 8}$ yr ago, while that of the compact objects occurred $10^{6-7}$ yr ago. Though the photometric characteristics of these KUGs are similar to those of interacting galaxies or mergers, most of these KUGs do not show direct evidence of merger processes.

  12. Lynx multi-mode SAR in support of NATO Unified Vision 2012 trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, R.; Verge, T.; Linnehan, R.; Doerry, A.

    2013-05-01

    In June 2012, General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI) Reconnaissance Systems Group participated in the NATO Unified Vision 2012 (UV12) Joint ISR (JISR) Trial at Orland Main Air Station in Brekstad, Norway. GA-ASI supplied a modified King Air 200 as a Predator B/MQ-9 Reaper Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) surrogate outfitted with a Lynx Block 30 Multi-mode Synthetic Aperture Radar/Ground Moving Target Indicator (SAR/GMTI), a FLIR Star SAFIRE 3800HD Electro-optical/Infrared (EO/IR) sensor, and a L-3 Tactical Common Data Link. This airborne platform was combined with GA-ASI's new System for Tactical Archival, Retrieval, and Exploitation (STARE) for full integration into the NATO ISR exploitation community. UV12 was an event sponsored by the NATO Joint Capability Group on Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) to focus on the interoperability of national ISR assets and improving JISR concept of operations. The Predator B RPA surrogate flew alongside multiple NATO ISR assets in nine missions that showcased the platform's all-weather ISR capabilities focusing on the Lynx SAR/GMTI and Maritime Wide Area Search (MWAS) modes. The inclusion of the STARE technology allowed GA-ASI's radar and Full Motion Video (FMV) data to be seamlessly processed and passed to joint networks where the data was fused with other NATO ISR products, resulting in a full battlefield reconnaissance picture.

  13. Discovery of a Large Scale Clumpy Structure around the Lynx Supercluster at z~1.27

    E-print Network

    Fumiaki Nakata; Tadayuki Kodama; Kazuhiro Shimasaku; Mamoru Doi; Hisanori Furusawa; Masaru Hamabe; Masahiko Kimura; Yutaka Komiyama; Satoshi Miyazaki; Sadanori Okamura; Masami Ouchi; Maki Sekiguchi; Yoshihiro Ueda; Masafumi Yagi; Naoki Yasuda

    2004-12-17

    We report the discovery of a probable large scale structure composed of many galaxy clumps around the known twin clusters at z=1.26 and z=1.27 in the Lynx region. Our analysis is based on deep, panoramic, and multi-colour imaging (26.4'x24.1') in VRi'z'-bands with the Suprime-Cam on the 8.2m Subaru telescope. This unique, deep and wide-field imaging data-set allows us for the first time to map out the galaxy distribution in the highest redshift supercluster known. We apply a photometric redshift technique to extract plausible cluster members at z~1.27 down to i'=26.15 (5sigma) corresponding to \\~M*+2.5 at this redshift. From the 2-D distribution of these photometrically selected galaxies, we newly identify seven candidates of galaxy groups or clusters where the surface density of red galaxies is significantly high (>5sigma), in addition to the two known clusters. These candidates show clear red colour-magnitude sequences consistent with a passive evolution model, which suggests the existence of additional high density regions around the Lynx superclusters.

  14. Sustainably Harvesting a Large Carnivore? Development of Eurasian Lynx Populations in Norway During 160 Years of Shifting Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnell, John D. C.; Broseth, Henrik; Odden, John; Nilsen, Erlend Birkeland

    2010-05-01

    The management of large carnivores in multiuse landscapes is always controversial, and managers need to balance a wide range of competing interests. Hunter harvest is often used to limit population size and distribution but is proving to be both controversialand technically challenging. Eurasian lynx ( Lynx lynx) are currently managed as a game species in Norway. We describe an adaptive management approach where quota setting is based on an annual census and chart the population development through the period 1996-2008, as management has become significantly more sophisticated and better informed by the increased availability of scientific data. During this period the population has been through a period of high quotas and population decline caused by fragmented management authority and overoptimistic estimates of lynx reproduction, followed by a period of recovery due to quota reductions. The modern management regime is placed in the context of shifting policy during the last 160 years, during which management goals have moved from extermination stimulated by bounties, through a short phase of protection, and now to quota-regulated harvest. Much management authority has also been delegated from central to local levels. We conclude that adaptive management has the potential to keep the population within some bounded limits, although there will inevitably be fluctuation.

  15. mLynx: Relational Mutual Information Nicola Di Mauro, Teresa M.A. Basile, Stefano Ferilli, and Floriana Esposito

    E-print Network

    Di Mauro, Nicola

    mLynx: Relational Mutual Information Nicola Di Mauro, Teresa M.A. Basile, Stefano Ferilli Orabona,4, 70125 Bari, Italy {ndm,basile,ferilli,esposito}@di.uniba.it Abstract. This paper represents, Teresa M.A. Basile, Stefano Ferilli, and Floriana Esposito 2 Feature construction and classification

  16. Gene Sets for Utilization of Primary and Secondary Nutrition Supplies in the Distal Gut of Endangered Iberian Lynx

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, María; Messina, Enzo; Richter, Michael; Bargiela, Rafael; Peplies, Jörg; Huws, Sharon A.; Newbold, Charles J.; Golyshin, Peter N.; Simón, Miguel A.; López, Guillermo; Yakimov, Michail M.; Ferrer, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of an extensive trans-genomic trans-mural co-metabolism between gut microbes and animal hosts that is diet-, host phylogeny- and provenance-influenced. Here, we analyzed the biodiversity at the level of small subunit rRNA gene sequence and the metabolic composition of 18 Mbp of consensus metagenome sequences and activity characteristics of bacterial intra-cellular extracts, in wild Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) fecal samples. Bacterial signatures (14.43% of all of the Firmicutes reads and 6.36% of total reads) related to the uncultured anaerobic commensals Anaeroplasma spp., which are typically found in ovine and bovine rumen, were first identified. The lynx gut was further characterized by an over-representation of ‘presumptive’ aquaporin aqpZ genes and genes encoding ‘active’ lysosomal-like digestive enzymes that are possibly needed to acquire glycerol, sugars and amino acids from glycoproteins, glyco(amino)lipids, glyco(amino)glycans and nucleoside diphosphate sugars. Lynx gut was highly enriched (28% of the total glycosidases) in genes encoding ?-amylase and related enzymes, although it exhibited low rate of enzymatic activity indicative of starch degradation. The preponderance of ?-xylosidase activity in protein extracts further suggests lynx gut microbes being most active for the metabolism of ?-xylose containing plant N-glycans, although ?-xylosidases sequences constituted only 1.5% of total glycosidases. These collective and unique bacterial, genetic and enzymatic activity signatures suggest that the wild lynx gut microbiota not only harbors gene sets underpinning sugar uptake from primary animal tissues (with the monotypic dietary profile of the wild lynx consisting of 80–100% wild rabbits) but also for the hydrolysis of prey-derived plant biomass. Although, the present investigation corresponds to a single sample and some of the statements should be considered qualitative, the data most likely suggests a tighter, more coordinated and complex evolutionary and nutritional ecology scenario of carnivore gut microbial communities than has been previously assumed. PMID:23251564

  17. Gene sets for utilization of primary and secondary nutrition supplies in the distal gut of endangered Iberian lynx.

    PubMed

    Alcaide, María; Messina, Enzo; Richter, Michael; Bargiela, Rafael; Peplies, Jörg; Huws, Sharon A; Newbold, Charles J; Golyshin, Peter N; Simón, Miguel A; López, Guillermo; Yakimov, Michail M; Ferrer, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of an extensive trans-genomic trans-mural co-metabolism between gut microbes and animal hosts that is diet-, host phylogeny- and provenance-influenced. Here, we analyzed the biodiversity at the level of small subunit rRNA gene sequence and the metabolic composition of 18 Mbp of consensus metagenome sequences and activity characteristics of bacterial intra-cellular extracts, in wild Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) fecal samples. Bacterial signatures (14.43% of all of the Firmicutes reads and 6.36% of total reads) related to the uncultured anaerobic commensals Anaeroplasma spp., which are typically found in ovine and bovine rumen, were first identified. The lynx gut was further characterized by an over-representation of 'presumptive' aquaporin aqpZ genes and genes encoding 'active' lysosomal-like digestive enzymes that are possibly needed to acquire glycerol, sugars and amino acids from glycoproteins, glyco(amino)lipids, glyco(amino)glycans and nucleoside diphosphate sugars. Lynx gut was highly enriched (28% of the total glycosidases) in genes encoding ?-amylase and related enzymes, although it exhibited low rate of enzymatic activity indicative of starch degradation. The preponderance of ?-xylosidase activity in protein extracts further suggests lynx gut microbes being most active for the metabolism of ?-xylose containing plant N-glycans, although ?-xylosidases sequences constituted only 1.5% of total glycosidases. These collective and unique bacterial, genetic and enzymatic activity signatures suggest that the wild lynx gut microbiota not only harbors gene sets underpinning sugar uptake from primary animal tissues (with the monotypic dietary profile of the wild lynx consisting of 80-100% wild rabbits) but also for the hydrolysis of prey-derived plant biomass. Although, the present investigation corresponds to a single sample and some of the statements should be considered qualitative, the data most likely suggests a tighter, more coordinated and complex evolutionary and nutritional ecology scenario of carnivore gut microbial communities than has been previously assumed. PMID:23251564

  18. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void. II. Element abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Tepliakova, A. L.; Kniazev, A. Yu.

    2011-07-01

    In the framework of study of the evolutionary status of galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void, we present the results of the SAO RAS 6-m telescope spectroscopy for 20 objects in this region. The principal faint line [O iii]?4363 Å, used to determine the electron temperature and oxygen abundance (O/H) by the classicalmethod, is clearly detected in only about 2/3 of the studied objects. For the remaining galaxies this line is either faint or undetected. To obtain the oxygen abundances in these galaxies we as well apply the semi-empirical method by Izotov and Thuan, and/or the empirical methods of Pilyugin et al., which are only employing the intensities of sufficiently strong lines. We also present our O/H measurements for 22 Lynx-Cancer void galaxies, for which the suitable Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra are available. In total, we present the combined O/H data for 48 Lynx-Cancer void galaxies, including the data adopted from the literature and our own earlier results. We make a comparison of their locations on the (O/H)-MB diagram with those of the dwarf galaxies of the Local Volume in the regions with denser environment. We infer that the majority of galaxies from this void on the average reveal an about 30% lower metallicity. In addition, a substantial fraction (not less than 10%) of the void dwarf galaxies have a much larger O/H deficiency (up to a factor of 5). Most of them belong to the tiny group of objects with the gas metallicity Z

  19. Scavenging behavior of Lynx rufus on human remains during the winter months of Southeast Texas.

    PubMed

    Rippley, Angela; Larison, Nicole C; Moss, Kathryn E; Kelly, Jeffrey D; Bytheway, Joan A

    2012-05-01

    Animal-scavenging alterations on human remains can be mistaken as human criminal activity. A 32-day study, documenting animal scavenging on a human cadaver, was conducted at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science facility, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas. A Stealth Cam Rogue IR was positioned near the cadaver to capture scavenging activity. An atypical scavenger, the bobcat, Lynx rufus, was recorded feeding on the cadaver. Scavenging by bobcats on human remains is not a predominant behavior and has minimal documentation. Scavenging behaviors and destruction of body tissues were analyzed. Results show that the bobcat did not feed on areas of the body that it does for other large animal carcasses. Results also show the bobcat feeds similarly during peak and nonpeak hours. Understanding the destruction of human tissue and covering of the body with leaf debris may aid forensic anthropologists and pathologists in differentiating between nefarious human activity and animal scavenging. PMID:22236440

  20. Performance and loads data from an outdoor hover test of a Lynx tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signor, David B.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Smith, Charles A.; Hagen, Martin J.

    1989-01-01

    A Lynx tail rotor was tested in hover at the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The test objectives were to measure the isolated rotor performance to provide a baseline for subsequent testing, and to operate the rotor throughout the speed and collective envelope before testing in the NFAC 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel. Rotor forces and blade bending moments were measured at ambient wind conditions from zero to 6.23 m/sec. The test envelope was limited to rotor speeds of 1550 to 1850 rpm and minus 13 deg to plus 20 deg of blade collective pitch. The isolated rotor performance and blade loads data are presented.

  1. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 134 (2002) Printed 15 June 2007 (MN LATEX style file v2.2) A sample of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules

    E-print Network

    Best, Philip

    2002-01-01

    of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - I. Radio imaging, multicolour of the Leiden­Berkeley Deep Survey. These fields, Hercules.1 and Lynx.2, contain a complete sample of 81 radio unidentified at a level of r 25.2 mag (Hercules; 4 sources) or r 24.4 mag (Lynx; 7 sources) or K>20 mag

  2. Individual identification of endangered species using mosquito blood meals: a proof-of-concept study in Iberian lynx.

    PubMed

    Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Méndez, María; Ruiz, Santiago; Godoy, José A; Soriguer, Ramón C; Figuerola, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    Host identification from mosquito blood meals has been routinely used to identify the feeding preferences of insects in studies on transmission of vector-borne pathogens. Here, we identified for the first time the susceptibility of the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) to the attack of a wild mosquito female, the mosquito Anopheles atroparvus. Furthermore, we used 11 microsatellite markers to test for the utility of vertebrate DNA isolated from insect blood meals for individual identification of wildlife. Only the three smallest markers were successfully amplified; however, this genotype did not match with any of the previously genotyped individuals in southern Spain. These results support the use of DNA from mosquito blood meals as a non-invasive source of DNA and a powerful tool on epidemiological and conservation biology studies. However, as may be the case of other non-invasive sampling methods, the utility of this technique is probably limited by the quantity and quality of vertebrate DNA. PMID:25656463

  3. LYNX: An unattended sensor system for detection of gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Kiff, Scott D.; Sidor, Daniel E.; Morris, Scott J.; Rohrer, John S.; Jarman, Kenneth D.; Pfund, David M.; Todd, Lindsay C.; Bowler, Ryan S.; Mullen, Crystal A.

    2009-01-21

    This manuscript profiles an unattended and fully autonomous detection system sensitive to gamma-ray and neutron emissions from special nuclear material. The LYNX design specifically targets applications that require radiation detection capabilities but possess little or no infrastructure. In these settings, users need the capability to deploy sensors for extended periods of time that analyze whatever signal-starved data can be captured, since little or no control may be exerted over measurement conditions. The fundamental sensing elements of the LYNX system are traditional NaI(Tl) and 3He detectors. The new developments reported here center on two themes: low-power electronics and computationally simple analysis algorithms capable of discriminating gamma-ray signatures indicative of special nuclear materials from those of naturally occurring radioactive material. Incorporating tripwire-detection algorithms based on gamma-ray spectral signatures into a low-power electronics package significantly improves performance in environments where sensors encounter nuisance sources.

  4. Levels of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls in the critically endangered Iberian lynx and other sympatric carnivores in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Rafael; Millán, Javier; Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime; Camarero, Pablo R; Palomares, Francisco; Ortiz-Santaliestra, Manuel E

    2012-02-01

    Accumulation of organochlorine compounds is well studied in aquatic food chains whereas little information is available from terrestrial food chains. This study presents data of organochlorine levels in tissue and plasma samples of 15 critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) and other 55 wild carnivores belonging to five species from three natural areas of Spain (Doñana National Park, Sierra Morena and Lozoya River) and explores their relationship with species diet. The Iberian lynx, with a diet based on the consumption of rabbit, had lower PCB levels (geometric means, plasma: <0.01 ng mL(-1), liver: 0.4ngg(-1) wet weight, fat: 87 ng g(-1)lipid weight) than other carnivores with more anthropic and opportunistic foraging behavior, such as the red fox (Vulpes vulpes; plasma: 1.11 ng mL(-1), liver: 459 ng g(-1), fat: 1984 ng g(-1)), or with diets including reptiles at higher proportion, such as the Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon; plasma: 7.15 ng mL(-1), liver: 216 ng g(-1), fat: 540 ng g(-1)), or the common genet (Genetta genetta; liver: 466 ng g(-1), fat: 3854 ng g(-1)). Chlorinated pesticides showed interspecific variations similar to PCBs. Organochlorine levels have declined since the 80s in carnivores from Doñana National Park, but PCB levels are still of concern in Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra; liver: 3873-5426 ng g(-1)) from the industrialized region of Madrid. PMID:22099537

  5. Identification of Novel Gammaherpesviruses in Ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) and Bobcats (Lynx rufus) in Panama and Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Caitlin C; Sweanor, Linda L; Wilson-Henjum, Grete; Kays, Roland W; Moreno, Ricardo; VandeWoude, Sue; Troyer, Ryan M

    2015-10-01

    Gammaherpesviruses (GHVs) have been identified in many species and are often associated with disease. Recently, we characterized three novel felid GHVs in domestic cats (Felis catus), bobcats (Lynx rufus), and pumas (Puma concolor). We investigated whether free-ranging ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) and bobcats are infected with additional GHVs. We screened DNA samples from ocelots on Barro Colorado Island, Panama, and bobcats in western Colorado, US, by using a degenerate nested PCR that targets the GHV glycoprotein B gene. We identified a novel GHV glycoprotein B sequence in two ocelots and a second novel sequence in a bobcat, which is distinct from the previously characterized bobcat GHV (Lynx rufus GHV 1). Utilizing additional degenerate and virus-specific PCRs, we extended these sequences to include 3.4 kilobases of the GHV glycoprotein B and DNA polymerase genes. These sequences identify the first GHV detected in ocelots and the second GHV in bobcats. These viruses were provisionally named L. pardalis GHV 1 and Lynx rufus GHV 2, respectively. The viruses are most closely related to recently identified GHVs of the Percavirus genus found in domestic cats (F. catus GHV 1) and bobcats (L. rufus GHV 1), suggesting that a cluster of felid GHVs exists within the Percavirus genus. PMID:26280877

  6. Long-range gene flow and the effects of climatic and ecological factors on genetic structuring in a large, solitary carnivore: the Eurasian lynx.

    PubMed

    Ratkiewicz, Miros?aw; Matosiuk, Maciej; Saveljev, Alexander P; Sidorovich, Vadim; Ozolins, Janis; Männil, Peep; Balciauskas, Linas; Kojola, Ilpo; Okarma, Henryk; Kowalczyk, Rafa?; Schmidt, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high mobility, large terrestrial predators are potentially capable of maintaining high connectivity, and therefore low genetic differentiation among populations. However, previous molecular studies have provided contradictory findings in relation to this. To elucidate patterns of genetic structure in large carnivores, we studied the genetic variability of the Eurasian lynx, Lynx lynx throughout north-eastern Europe using microsatellite, mitochondrial DNA control region and Y chromosome-linked markers. Using SAMOVA we found analogous patterns of genetic structure based on both mtDNA and microsatellites, which coincided with a relatively little evidence for male-biased dispersal. No polymorphism for the cytochrome b and ATP6 mtDNA genes and Y chromosome-linked markers were found. Lynx inhabiting a large area encompassing Finland, the Baltic countries and western Russia formed a single genetic unit, while some marginal populations were clearly divergent from others. The existence of a migration corridor was suggested to correspond with distribution of continuous forest cover. The lowest variability (in both markers) was found in lynx from Norway and Bia?owie?a Primeval Forest (BPF), which coincided with a recent demographic bottleneck (Norway) or high habitat fragmentation (BPF). The Carpathian population, being monomorphic for the control region, showed relatively high microsatellite diversity, suggesting the effect of a past bottleneck (e.g. during Last Glacial Maximum) on its present genetic composition. Genetic structuring for the mtDNA control region was best explained by latitude and snow cover depth. Microsatellite structuring correlated with the lynx's main prey, especially the proportion of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in its diet. Eurasian lynx are capable of maintaining panmictic populations across eastern Europe unless they are severely limited by habitat continuity or a reduction in numbers. Different correlations of mtDNA and microsatellite population divergence patterns with climatic and ecological factors may suggest separate selective pressures acting on males and females in this solitary carnivore. PMID:25551216

  7. Long-Range Gene Flow and the Effects of Climatic and Ecological Factors on Genetic Structuring in a Large, Solitary Carnivore: The Eurasian Lynx

    PubMed Central

    Ratkiewicz, Miros?aw; Matosiuk, Maciej; Saveljev, Alexander P.; Sidorovich, Vadim; Ozolins, Janis; Männil, Peep; Balciauskas, Linas; Kojola, Ilpo; Okarma, Henryk; Kowalczyk, Rafa?; Schmidt, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high mobility, large terrestrial predators are potentially capable of maintaining high connectivity, and therefore low genetic differentiation among populations. However, previous molecular studies have provided contradictory findings in relation to this. To elucidate patterns of genetic structure in large carnivores, we studied the genetic variability of the Eurasian lynx, Lynx lynx throughout north-eastern Europe using microsatellite, mitochondrial DNA control region and Y chromosome-linked markers. Using SAMOVA we found analogous patterns of genetic structure based on both mtDNA and microsatellites, which coincided with a relatively little evidence for male-biased dispersal. No polymorphism for the cytochrome b and ATP6 mtDNA genes and Y chromosome-linked markers were found. Lynx inhabiting a large area encompassing Finland, the Baltic countries and western Russia formed a single genetic unit, while some marginal populations were clearly divergent from others. The existence of a migration corridor was suggested to correspond with distribution of continuous forest cover. The lowest variability (in both markers) was found in lynx from Norway and Bia?owie?a Primeval Forest (BPF), which coincided with a recent demographic bottleneck (Norway) or high habitat fragmentation (BPF). The Carpathian population, being monomorphic for the control region, showed relatively high microsatellite diversity, suggesting the effect of a past bottleneck (e.g. during Last Glacial Maximum) on its present genetic composition. Genetic structuring for the mtDNA control region was best explained by latitude and snow cover depth. Microsatellite structuring correlated with the lynx's main prey, especially the proportion of red deer (Cervus elaphus) in its diet. Eurasian lynx are capable of maintaining panmictic populations across eastern Europe unless they are severely limited by habitat continuity or a reduction in numbers. Different correlations of mtDNA and microsatellite population divergence patterns with climatic and ecological factors may suggest separate selective pressures acting on males and females in this solitary carnivore. PMID:25551216

  8. Gene flow and pathogen transmission among bobcats (Lynx rufus) in a fragmented urban landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Justin S.; Ruell, Emily W.; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Alonso, Robert S.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Urbanization can result in the fragmentation of once contiguous natural landscapes into a patchy habitat interspersed within a growing urban matrix. Animals living in fragmented landscapes often have reduced movement among habitat patches because of avoidance of intervening human development, which potentially leads to both reduced gene flow and pathogen transmission between patches. Mammalian carnivores with large home ranges, such as bobcats (Lynx rufus), may be particularly sensitive to habitat fragmentation. We performed genetic analyses on bobcats and their directly transmitted viral pathogen, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), to investigate the effects of urbanization on bobcat movement. We predicted that urban development, including major freeways, would limit bobcat movement and result in genetically structured host and pathogen populations. We analysed molecular markers from 106 bobcats and 19 FIV isolates from seropositive animals in urban southern California. Our findings indicate that reduced gene flow between two primary habitat patches has resulted in genetically distinct bobcat subpopulations separated by urban development including a major highway. However, the distribution of genetic diversity among FIV isolates determined through phylogenetic analyses indicates that pathogen genotypes are less spatially structured--exhibiting a more even distribution between habitat fragments. We conclude that the types of movement and contact sufficient for disease transmission occur with enough frequency to preclude structuring among the viral population, but that the bobcat population is structured owing to low levels of effective bobcat migration resulting in gene flow. We illustrate the utility in using multiple molecular markers that differentially detect movement and gene flow between subpopulations when assessing connectivity.

  9. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void - I. Sample description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Tepliakova, A. L.

    2011-08-01

    The evolution of galaxies is influenced by the environment in which they reside. This effect should be strongest for the lowest-mass and -luminosity galaxies. To study dwarf galaxies in extremely low density environments, we have compiled a deep catalogue of dwarf galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. This void hosts some of the most metal-poor dwarfs known to date. It borders the Local Volume at negative supergalactic Z(SGZ) coordinates and has a size of more than 16 Mpc. With a distance to its centre of only 18 Mpc, it is close enough to allow a search for the faintest dwarfs. Within the void 75 dwarf (-11.9 > MB > -18.0) and four subluminous (-18.0 > MB > -18.4) galaxies have been identified. We present the parameters of the void galaxies and a detailed analysis of the completeness of the catalogue as a function of magnitude and surface brightness. The catalogue appears almost complete to MB < -14 mag, but misses part of the fainter low surface brightness (LSB) face-on galaxies. This sample of void galaxies builds the basis of forthcoming observational studies that will provide insight into the main stellar population, H I mass-to-light ratio, metallicity and age for comparison with dwarfs in higher density regions. We briefly summarize the information on the unusual objects in the void and conclude that their concentration hints that voids are environments that are favourable for finding and studying unevolved dwarf galaxies.

  10. Pre-layout AC decoupling analysis with Mentor Graphics HyperLynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hnatiuc, Mihaela; Iov, C?t?lin J.

    2015-02-01

    Considerable resources have been used since the humans got interested to discover the world around. Any discovery and science advance was taken tremendously amount of time, money, sometimes lives. All of these define the cost of a discovery, developing process. Getting back to electronics, this field faced in the last 20-30 years, a big boom in terms of technologies and opportunities. Thousands of equipment were developed and placed on the market. The big difference between various competitors is made at the moment by that we call the time to market. A mobile, for instance, has a time to market of around 6 months and the tendency is to have it smaller than that. That means between the concept and the first model sale, no more than 6 months should be passing. That is why new approaches are needed. The one extensively used now is the simulation. We call the simulation virtual prototyping. The virtual prototyping takes into account more than the components only. It takes into account some other project parameters that would affect the final product. Certified tools can handle such analysis. In our paper we present the case of HyperLynx, a concept developed by Mentor Graphics Company, assisting the hardware designer throughout the designing process, from thermal point of view. A test case board was analyzed at the pre-layout stage and the results presented.

  11. Evolution of puma lentivirus in bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Justin S.; Bevins, Sarah N.; Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Vickers, Winston; Logan, Ken A.; Aldredge, Mat; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; McBride, Roy; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Riley, Seth P.; Boyce, Walter M.; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Mountain lions (Puma concolor) throughout North and South America are infected with puma lentivirus clade B (PLVB). A second, highly divergent lentiviral clade, PLVA, infects mountain lions in southern California and Florida. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) in these two geographic regions are also infected with PLVA, and to date, this is the only strain of lentivirus identified in bobcats. We sequenced full-length PLV genomes in order to characterize the molecular evolution of PLV in bobcats and mountain lions. Low sequence homology (88% average pairwise identity) and frequent recombination (1 recombination breakpoint per 3 isolates analyzed) were observed in both clades. Viral proteins have markedly different patterns of evolution; sequence homology and negative selection were highest in Gag and Pol and lowest in Vif and Env. A total of 1.7% of sites across the PLV genome evolve under positive selection, indicating that host-imposed selection pressure is an important force shaping PLV evolution. PLVA strains are highly spatially structured, reflecting the population dynamics of their primary host, the bobcat. In contrast, the phylogeography of PLVB reflects the highly mobile mountain lion, with diverse PLVB isolates cocirculating in some areas and genetically related viruses being present in populations separated by thousands of kilometers. We conclude that PLVA and PLVB are two different viral species with distinct feline hosts and evolutionary histories.

  12. Study of the Lynx-Cancer void galaxies. - V. The extremely isolated galaxy UGC 4722

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Makarov, D. I.; Perepelitsyna, Y. A.; Safonova, E. S.; Karachentsev, I. D.

    2015-04-01

    We present a detailed study of the extremely isolated Sdm galaxy UGC 4722 (MB = -17.4) located in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. UGC 4722 is a member of the Catalogue of Isolated Galaxies, and has also been identified as one of the most isolated galaxies in the Local Supercluster. Optical images of the galaxy however show that it has a peculiar morphology with an elongated ˜14 kpc-long plume. New observations with the Russian 6-m telescope (BTA) and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) of the ionized and neutral gas in UGC 4722 reveal the second component responsible for the disturbed morphology of the system. This is a small, almost completely destroyed, very gas-rich dwarf (MB = -15.2, M(H I)/LB ˜ 4.3) We estimate the oxygen abundance for both galaxies to be 12 + log (O/H) ˜ 7.5-7.6 which is two to three times lower than what is expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation for similar galaxies in denser environments. The ugr colours of the plume derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images are consistent with a simple stellar population with a post starburst age of 0.45-0.5 Gyr. This system hence appears to be the first known case of a minor merger with a prominent tidal feature consisting of a young stellar population.

  13. Stellar populations in the Lynx Super Cluster at redshift 1.26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgensen, Inger; Bergmann, Marcel; Chiboucas, Kristin; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew; Gruetzbauch, Ruth; Schiavon, Richardo

    2013-08-01

    We propose to continue our investigation of stellar populations in rich galaxy clusters at z>1.2 by obtaining deep optical spectroscopy of 25 member galaxies in the cluster Lynx E (z=1.26). This proposal is part of our larger project aimed at constraining models for galaxy evolution in dense environments from observations of stellar populations in rich z=1.2-2 galaxy clusters. The main objective is to establish the star formation (SF) history over this epoch during which large changes in SF rates and galaxy structure are expected to take place in cluster galaxies. The proposed observations will reach S/N=20 for galaxies 2 mag fainter than the brightest cluster galaxy. The spectra will be used to determine SF rates, ages and metallicities as well as measure the velocity dispersions. Combining the spectroscopy with available HST/ACS imaging, we will test models for evolution of the Fundamental Plane and of galaxy size. The analysis will also utilize data from the Gemini/HST Cluster Galaxy Project, which covers rich clusters at z=0.2-1.0. The E2V DD CCDs in GMOS make possible this unprecedented probe of distant cluster galaxies, as no prior stellar population studies based on high S/N spectra exist for clusters at z>1.

  14. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void. I. Sample description

    E-print Network

    Pustilnik, Simon A

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of galaxies is influenced by the environment in which they reside. This effect should be strongest for the least-mass and -luminosity galaxies. To study dwarf galaxies in extremely low density environments we have compiled a deep catalogue of dwarf galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. This void hosts some of the most metal-poor dwarfs known to date. It borders the Local Volume at the negative supergalactic Z (SGZ) coordinates and has the size of more than 16 Mpc. With a distance to its centre of only 18 Mpc it is close enough to allow the search for the faintest dwarfs. Within the void 75 dwarf (-11.9 > M_B > -18.0) and 4 subluminous (-18.0 > M_B > -18.4) galaxies have been identified. We present the parameters of the void galaxies and give a detailed analysis of the completeness of the catalogue as a function of magnitude and surface brightness. The catalogue appears almost complete to M_B < -14 mag, but misses part of the fainter low surface brightness (LSB) face-on galaxies. This sampl...

  15. Discovery of a Large Scale Clumpy Structure around the Lynx Supercluster at z~1.27

    E-print Network

    Nakata, F; Shimasaku, K; Doi, M; Furusawa, H; Hamabe, M; Kimura, M; Komiyama, Yu; Miyazaki, S; Okamura, S; Ouchi, M; Sekiguchi, M; Ueda, Y; Yagi, M; Yasuda, N; Nakata, Fumiaki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Doi, Mamoru; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hamabe, Masaru; Kimura, Masahiko; Komiyama, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Okamura, Sadanori; Ouchi, Masami; Sekiguchi, Maki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yagi, Masafumi; Yasuda, Naoki

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of a probable large scale structure composed of many galaxy clumps around the known twin clusters at z=1.26 and z=1.27 in the Lynx region. Our analysis is based on deep, panoramic, and multi-colour imaging (26.4'x24.1') in VRi'z'-bands with the Suprime-Cam on the 8.2m Subaru telescope. This unique, deep and wide-field imaging data-set allows us for the first time to map out the galaxy distribution in the highest redshift supercluster known. We apply a photometric redshift technique to extract plausible cluster members at z~1.27 down to i'=26.15 (5sigma) corresponding to \\~M*+2.5 at this redshift. From the 2-D distribution of these photometrically selected galaxies, we newly identify seven candidates of galaxy groups or clusters where the surface density of red galaxies is significantly high (>5sigma), in addition to the two known clusters. These candidates show clear red colour-magnitude sequences consistent with a passive evolution model, which suggests the existence of additional hig...

  16. Study of the Lynx-Cancer void galaxies-V. The extremely isolated galaxy UGC4722

    E-print Network

    Chengalur, J N; Makarov, D I; Perepelitsyna, Y A; Safonova, E S; Karachentsev, I D

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the extremely isolated Sdm galaxy UGC4722 (M_B = -17.4) located in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. UGC4722 is a member of the catalogue of isolated galaxies, and has also been identified as one of the most isolated galaxies in the Local Supercluster. Optical images of the galaxy however show that it has a peculiar morphology with an elongated ~ 14 kpc long plume. New observations with the Russian 6-m telescope (BTA) and the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) of the ionised and neutral gas in UGC4722 reveal the second component responsible for the disturbed morphology of the system. This is a small, almost completely destroyed, very gas-rich dwarf (M_B = -15.2, M_HI/L_B ~4.3). We estimate the oxygen abundance for both galaxies to be 12+log(O/H) ~ 7.5-7.6, which is 2-3 times lower than what is expected from the luminosity-metallicity relation for similar galaxies in denser environments. The ugr colours of the plume derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images are consisten...

  17. Study of Galaxies in the Lynx--Cancer Void. IV. Photometric Properties

    E-print Network

    Perepelitsyna, Yu A; Kniazev, A Yu

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of a photometric study of 85 objects from the updated sample of galaxies residing in the nearby Lynx--Cancer void. We perform our photometry on u, g, r, and i-band images of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine model-independent galaxy parameters such as the integrated magnitudes and colors, effective radii and the corresponding surface brightness values, optical radii and Holmberg radii. We analyze the radial surface brightness profiles to determine the central brightness values and scale lengths of the model discs. We analyze the colors of the outer parts of the galaxies and compare them with model evolutionary tracks computed using the PEGASE2 software package. This allowed us to estimate the time T_SF elapsed since the onset of star formation, which turned out to be on the order of the cosmological time T_0 for the overwhelming majority of the galaxies studied. However, for 13 galaxies of the sample the time T_SF does not exceed T_0/2 ~ 7 Gyr, and for 7 of them T_SF -13.2. We...

  18. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void. -- III. New extreme LSB dwarf galaxies

    E-print Network

    Pustilnik, S A; Tepliakova, A L; Kniazev, A Y

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) We present the results of the complex study of the low surface brightness dwarf (LSBD) gas-rich galaxies J0723+3621, J0737+4724 and J0852+1350, which reside in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. Their ratios M(HI)/L_B, according to HI data obtained with the NRT, are respectively ~3.9, ~2, ~2.6. For the two latter galaxies, we derived oxygen abundance corresponding to the value of 12+log(O/H) <~7.3, using spectra from the Russian 6m telescope and from the SDSS database. We found two additional blue LSB dwarfs, J0723+3622 and J0852+1351, which appear to be physical companions of J0723+3621 and J0852+1350 situated at the projected distances of ~12--13 kpc. The companion relative velocities, derived from the BTA spectra, are dV = +89 km/s and +30 km/s respectively. The geometry and the relative orientation of orbits and spins in these pairs indicate, respectively, prograde and polar encounters for J0723+3621 and J0852+1350. The NRT HI profiles of J0723+3621 and J0723+3622 indicate a sizable gas flow in th...

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void (Pustilnik+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Tepliakova, A. L.

    2012-02-01

    The evolution of galaxies is influenced by the environment in which they reside. This effect should be strongest for the lowest-mass and lowest-luminosity galaxies. To study dwarf galaxies in extremely low density environments, we have compiled a deep catalogue of dwarf galaxies in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. This void hosts some of the most metal-poor dwarfs known to date. It borders the Local Volume at negative supergalactic Z(SGZ) coordinates and has a size of more than 16Mpc. With a distance to its centre of only 18Mpc, it is close enough to allow a search for the faintest dwarfs. Within the void 75 dwarf (-11.9>MB>-18.0) and four subluminous (-18.0>MB>-18.4) galaxies have been identified. We present the parameters of the void galaxies and a detailed analysis of the completeness of the catalogue as a function of magnitude and surface brightness. (3 data files).

  20. The molecular detection of relaxin and its receptor RXFP1 in reproductive tissue of Felis catus and Lynx pardinus during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Braun, Beate C; Vargas, Astrid; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2012-03-01

    Relaxin acts as a pregnancy-specific signal in feline species, but specific information about protein structure and binding is essential for the improvement of pregnancy diagnosis in endangered feline species, like the Iberian lynx. To generate a felid-specific relaxin antibody, the DNA and protein sequences of lynx and cat were determined and peptides were chosen for antibody generation. In addition, relaxin and relaxin receptor (RXFP1) mRNA expressions were measured in uteri and ovaries of pregnant domestic cats and lynx placentae. Using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, it was established that feline placenta is the main source of relaxin during pregnancy. In other tested tissues, relaxin mRNA expression was weak. The RXFP1 mRNA expression was found mainly in cat uterine tissue and feline placentae. It was assumed that these tissues were main targets for relaxin. In the ovary, relaxin immunostaining was associated with blood vessels, signifying its role in vascularization. PMID:22187673

  1. Gene flow and pathogen transmission among bobcats (Lynx rufus) in a fragmented urban landscape.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin S; Ruell, Emily W; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; Alonso, Robert S; Troyer, Jennifer L; Crooks, Kevin R; Vandewoude, Sue

    2012-04-01

    Urbanization can result in the fragmentation of once contiguous natural landscapes into a patchy habitat interspersed within a growing urban matrix. Animals living in fragmented landscapes often have reduced movement among habitat patches because of avoidance of intervening human development, which potentially leads to both reduced gene flow and pathogen transmission between patches. Mammalian carnivores with large home ranges, such as bobcats (Lynx rufus), may be particularly sensitive to habitat fragmentation. We performed genetic analyses on bobcats and their directly transmitted viral pathogen, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), to investigate the effects of urbanization on bobcat movement. We predicted that urban development, including major freeways, would limit bobcat movement and result in genetically structured host and pathogen populations. We analysed molecular markers from 106 bobcats and 19 FIV isolates from seropositive animals in urban southern California. Our findings indicate that reduced gene flow between two primary habitat patches has resulted in genetically distinct bobcat subpopulations separated by urban development including a major highway. However, the distribution of genetic diversity among FIV isolates determined through phylogenetic analyses indicates that pathogen genotypes are less spatially structured-exhibiting a more even distribution between habitat fragments. We conclude that the types of movement and contact sufficient for disease transmission occur with enough frequency to preclude structuring among the viral population, but that the bobcat population is structured owing to low levels of effective bobcat migration resulting in gene flow. We illustrate the utility in using multiple molecular markers that differentially detect movement and gene flow between subpopulations when assessing connectivity. PMID:22335296

  2. Population and genetic outcomes 20 years after reintroducing bobcats (Lynx rufus) to Cumberland Island, Georgia USA.

    PubMed

    Diefenbach, Duane; Hansen, Leslie; Bohling, Justin; Miller-Butterworth, Cassandra

    2015-11-01

    In 1988-1989, 32 bobcats Lynx rufus were reintroduced to Cumberland Island (CUIS), Georgia, USA, from which they had previously been extirpated. They were monitored intensively for 3 years immediately post-reintroduction, but no estimation of the size or genetic diversity of the population had been conducted in over 20 years since reintroduction. We returned to CUIS in 2012 to estimate abundance and effective population size of the present-day population, as well as to quantify genetic diversity and inbreeding. We amplified 12 nuclear microsatellite loci from DNA isolated from scats to establish genetic profiles to identify individuals. We used spatially explicit capture-recapture population estimation to estimate abundance. From nine unique genetic profiles, we estimate a population size of 14.4 (SE = 3.052) bobcats, with an effective population size (N e) of 5-8 breeding individuals. This is consistent with predictions of a population viability analysis conducted at the time of reintroduction, which estimated the population would average 12-13 bobcats after 10 years. We identified several pairs of related bobcats (parent-offspring and full siblings), but ~75% of the pairwise comparisons were typical of unrelated individuals, and only one individual appeared inbred. Despite the small population size and other indications that it has likely experienced a genetic bottleneck, levels of genetic diversity in the CUIS bobcat population remain high compared to other mammalian carnivores. The reintroduction of bobcats to CUIS provides an opportunity to study changes in genetic diversity in an insular population without risk to this common species. Opportunities for natural immigration to the island are limited; therefore, continued monitoring and supplemental bobcat reintroductions could be used to evaluate the effect of different management strategies to maintain genetic diversity and population viability. The successful reintroduction and maintenance of a bobcat population on CUIS illustrates the suitability of translocation as a management tool for re-establishing felid populations. PMID:26640668

  3. Evolution of puma lentivirus in bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in North America.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin S; Bevins, Sarah N; Serieys, Laurel E K; Vickers, Winston; Logan, Ken A; Aldredge, Mat; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; McBride, Roy; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Troyer, Jennifer L; Riley, Seth P; Boyce, Walter M; Crooks, Kevin R; VandeWoude, Sue

    2014-07-01

    Mountain lions (Puma concolor) throughout North and South America are infected with puma lentivirus clade B (PLVB). A second, highly divergent lentiviral clade, PLVA, infects mountain lions in southern California and Florida. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) in these two geographic regions are also infected with PLVA, and to date, this is the only strain of lentivirus identified in bobcats. We sequenced full-length PLV genomes in order to characterize the molecular evolution of PLV in bobcats and mountain lions. Low sequence homology (88% average pairwise identity) and frequent recombination (1 recombination breakpoint per 3 isolates analyzed) were observed in both clades. Viral proteins have markedly different patterns of evolution; sequence homology and negative selection were highest in Gag and Pol and lowest in Vif and Env. A total of 1.7% of sites across the PLV genome evolve under positive selection, indicating that host-imposed selection pressure is an important force shaping PLV evolution. PLVA strains are highly spatially structured, reflecting the population dynamics of their primary host, the bobcat. In contrast, the phylogeography of PLVB reflects the highly mobile mountain lion, with diverse PLVB isolates cocirculating in some areas and genetically related viruses being present in populations separated by thousands of kilometers. We conclude that PLVA and PLVB are two different viral species with distinct feline hosts and evolutionary histories. Importance: An understanding of viral evolution in natural host populations is a fundamental goal of virology, molecular biology, and disease ecology. Here we provide a detailed analysis of puma lentivirus (PLV) evolution in two natural carnivore hosts, the bobcat and mountain lion. Our results illustrate that PLV evolution is a dynamic process that results from high rates of viral mutation/recombination and host-imposed selection pressure. PMID:24741092

  4. Modelling potential presence of metazoan endoparasites of bobcats (Lynx rufus) using verified records.

    PubMed

    Hiestand, Shelby J; Nielsen, Clayton K; Jiménez, F Agustín

    2014-10-01

    Helminth parasites of wild and domestic felines pose a direct or potential threat to human health. Since helminths depend on multiple environmental factors that make their transmission possible, it is imperative to predict the areas where these parasites may complete the transmission to potential hosts. Bobcats, Lynx rufus (Schreberer), are the most abundant and widely-distributed wild felid species in North America. The increase of population densities of bobcats raises concerns about their importance as reservoirs of pathogens and parasites that may affect wildlife, domestic animals and humans. Our objective was to predict the potential presence of the tapeworm Taenia rileyi Loewen, 1929, the fluke Alaria marcianae (La Rue, 1917) and the roundworm Toxocara cati (Schrank, 1788) in southern Illinois. The empirical presence of these parasites in localities across the region was analysed in combination with a sampling bias layer (i.e. bobcat presence) and with environmental data: layers of water, soil, land cover, human density and climate variables in MAXENT to create maps of potential presence for these three species in an area of 46436 km2. All climatic variables were low contributors (0.0-2.0% contribution to model creation) whereas land cover surfaced as an important variable for the presence of A. marcianae (7.6%) and T. cati (6.3%); human density (4.8%) was of secondary importance for T. rileyi. Variables of importance likely represent habitat requirements necessary for the completion of parasite life cycles. Larger areas of potential presence were found for the feline specialist T. rileyi (85%) while potential presence was less likely for A. marcianae (73%), a parasite that requires multiple aquatic intermediate hosts. This study provides information to wildlife biologists and health officials regarding the potential impacts of growing bobcat populations in combination with complex and changing environmental factors. PMID:25549497

  5. Quantifying home range habitat requirements for bobcats (Lynx rufus) in Vermont, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donovan, T.M.; Freeman, M.; Abouelezz, H.; Royar, K.; Howard, A.; Mickey, R.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate how home range and habitat use analysis can inform landscape-scale conservation planning for the bobcat, Lynx rufus, in Vermont USA. From 2005 to 2008, we outfitted fourteen bobcats with GPS collars that collected spatially explicit locations from individuals every 4. h for 3-4. months. Kernel home range techniques were used to estimate home range size and boundaries, and to quantify the utilization distribution (UD), which is a spatially explicit, topographic mapping of how different areas within the home range are used. We then used GIS methods to quantify both biotic (e.g. habitat types, stream density) and abiotic (e.g. slope) resources within each bobcat's home range. Across bobcats, upper 20th UD percentiles (core areas) had 18% less agriculture, 42% less development, 26% more bobcat habitat (shrub, deciduous, coniferous forest, and wetland cover types), and 33% lower road density than lower UD percentiles (UD valleys). For each bobcat, we used Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to evaluate and compare 24 alternative Resource Utilization Functions (hypotheses) that could explain the topology of the individual's UD. A model-averaged population-level Resource Utilization Function suggested positive responses to shrub, deciduous, coniferous forest, and wetland cover types within 1. km of a location, and negative responses to roads and mixed forest cover types within 1. km of a location. Applying this model-averaged function to each pixel in the study area revealed habitat suitability for bobcats across the entire study area, with suitability scores ranging between -1.69 and 1.44, where higher values were assumed to represent higher quality habitat. The southern Champlain Valley, which contained ample wetland and shrub habitat, was a concentrated area of highly suitable habitat, while areas at higher elevation areas were less suitable. Female bobcat home ranges, on average, had an average habitat suitability score of near 0, indicating that home ranges consisted of both beneficial and detrimental habitat types. We discuss the application of habitat suitability mapping and home range requirements for bobcat conservation and landscape scale management. ?? 2011.

  6. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void. IV. Photometrical properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelitsyna, Y. A.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    We present the results of a photometric study of 85 objects from the updated sample of galaxies residing in the nearby Lynx--Cancer void. We perform our photometry on u, g, r, and i-band images of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine model-independent galaxy parameters such as the integrated magnitudes and colors, effective radii and the corresponding surface brightness values, optical radii and Holmberg radii. We analyze the radial surface brightness profiles to determine the central brightness values and scale lengths of the model discs. We analyze the colors of the outer parts of the galaxies and compare them with model evolutionary tracks computed using the PEGASE2 software package. This allowed us to estimate the time T_SF elapsed since the onset of star formation, which turned out to be on the order of the cosmological time T_0 for the overwhelming majority of the galaxies studied. However, for 13 galaxies of the sample the time T_SF does not exceed T_0/2 ~ 7 Gyr, and for 7 of them T_SF < 3.5 Gyr. The latter are mostly unevolved objects dominated by low-luminosity galaxies with M_B > -13.2. We use the integrated magnitudes and colors to estimate the stellar masses of the galaxies. We estimate the parameter M(HI)/L_B and the gas mass fractions for void galaxies with known HI-line fluxes. A small subgroup (about 10%) of the gas-richest void galaxies with M(HI)/L_B > 2.5 has gas mass fractions that reach 94-99%. The outer regions of many of these galaxies show atypically blue colors. To test various statistical differences between void galaxies and galaxies from the samples selected using more general criteria, we compare some of the parameters of void galaxies with similar data for the sample of 195 galaxies from the Equatorial Survey (ES) based on a part of the HIPASS blind HI survey. abridged

  7. Detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci from faecal samples of Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx, including Enterococcus faecium strains of CC17 and the new singleton ST573.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Alexandre; Igrejas, Gilberto; Radhouani, Hajer; López, María; Guerra, Ana; Petrucci-Fonseca, Francisco; Alcaide, Eva; Zorrilla, Irene; Serra, Rodrigo; Torres, Carmen; Poeta, Patrícia

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to perform the molecular characterization of vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) within the faecal flora of Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx. The association with other resistance genes and the detection of virulence genes were also analysed. From 2008 to 2010, 365 faecal samples from Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx were collected and tested for VRE recovery. Mechanisms of resistance to vancomycin and other antibiotics, as well as genes encoding virulence factors were detected through PCR. Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) was performed for Enterococcus faecium strains. VRE were recovered in 8 of the 365 analysed samples. The vanA gene was identified in two E. faecium isolates recovered from Iberian wolf faecal samples and the remaining six showed intrinsic resistance (3 vanC1-E. gallinarum and 3 vanC2-E. casseliflavus, from Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx faecal samples, respectively). One vanA-containing isolate showed tetracycline and erythromycin resistance [with erm(B) and tet(L) genes] and the other one also exhibited ampicillin and kanamycin resistance [with erm(B), tet(M) and aph(3')-III genes]. One of the vanA-isolates revealed a new sequence type named ST573 and the other one belonged to the CC17 clonal complex (ST18). The hyl gene was detected in one E. casseliflavus and three E. gallinarum but not among vanA-positive isolates, and the occurrence of cylA and cylL genes was confirmed in two E. casseliflavus isolates. A low prevalence of VRE has been detected in faecal samples of Iberian wolf and Iberian lynx and strains with an acquired mechanism of resistance to vancomycin have not been detected among Iberian lynx. PMID:22018960

  8. SPICES II. Optical and Near-Infrared Identifications of Faint X-Ray Sources from Deep Chandra Observations of Lynx

    E-print Network

    Daniel Stern; Paolo Tozzi; S. A. Stanford; Piero Rosati; Brad Holden; Peter Eisenhardt; Richard Elston; K. L. Wu; Andrew Connolly; Hyron Spinrad; Steve Dawson; Arjun Dey; Frederic H. Chaffee

    2002-03-22

    We present our first results on field X-ray sources detected in a deep, 184.7 ks observation with the ACIS-I camera on Chandra. The observations target the Lynx field of SPICES, and contains three known X-ray-emitting clusters out to z=1.27. Not including the known clusters, in the 17'x17' ACIS-I field we detect 132 sources in the 0.5-2 keV (soft) X-ray band down to a limiting flux of \\~1.7e-16 erg/cm2/s and 111 sources in the 2-10 keV (hard) X-ray band down to a limiting flux of ~1.3e-15 erg/cm2/s. The combined catalog contains a total of 153 sources, of which 42 are detected only in the soft band and 21 are detected only in the hard band. Confirming previous Chandra results, we find that the fainter sources have harder X-ray spectra, providing a consistent solution to the long-standing `spectral paradox'. From deep optical and near-infrared follow-up data, 77% of the X-ray sources have optical counterparts to I=24 and 71% of the X-ray sources have near-infrared counterparts to K=20. Four of the 24 sources in the near-IR field are associated with extremely red objects (EROs; I-K>4). We have obtained spectroscopic redshifts with the Keck telescopes of 18 of the Lynx Chandra sources. These sources comprise a mix of broad-lined active galaxies, apparently normal galaxies, and two late-type Galactic dwarfs. Intriguingly, one Galactic source is identified with an M7 dwarf exhibiting non-transient, hard X-ray emission. We review non-AGN mechanisms to produce X-ray emission and discuss properties of the Lynx Chandra sample in relation to other samples of X-ray and non-X-ray sources.

  9. Observation of Helicobacter-like organisms in gastric mucosa of grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) and bobcats (Lynx rufus)

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Archival specimens of gastric mucosa of 10 raccoons (Procyon lotor), 9 porcupines (Erethizon dorsatum), 6 grey foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), 6 bobcats (Lynx rufus), 4 skunks (Mephitis mephitis), and 3 black bears (Ursus americanus) were microscopically examined for evidence of Helicobacter-like organisms. Such organisms were seen in the specimens from the grey foxes and bobcats only. Histochemical stains (modified Steiner and carbol fuchsin methods) revealed long spiral organisms within lumina of gastric glands; however, neither gross nor microscopic lesions were observed. By electron microscopy (EM), the organisms were found to be free in the glandular lumina and were seen occasionally in the cytoplasm of gastric epithelial cells. Morphologically, 2 different phenotypes of spiral organisms were identified by EM. The organisms associated with bobcats appeared to be more tightly coiled than those seen in grey foxes. The presence of Helicobacter-like organisms in the gastric mucosa of grey foxes has not previously been described. PMID:15188962

  10. Further studies on Toxascaris leonina (Linstow, 1902) (Ascaridida: Ascarididae) from Felis lynx (Linnaeus) and Panthera leo (Linnaeus) (Carnivora: Felidae).

    PubMed

    Xue, Li-Mei; Chai, Jing-Bo; Guo, Yan-Ning; Zhang, Lu-Ping; Li, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Toxascaris leonina (Linstow, 1902) is a most common intestinal parasite of various animals in Felidae and Canidae. In the present paper, light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to study the morphological aspects of adult worms of this nematode in detail, based on the material collected from Panthera leo (Linnaeus) and Felis lynx (Linnaeus) (Carnivora: Felidae) in China. The results showed that there were some morphometric differences between the present material and the previous studies, including the body size, the width and length of cervical alae, the number of denticles on each lip and the tail length of the female. Previously unreported morphological features were also revealed. These supplementary morphological and morphometric data contributed to a more accurate identification of this worldwide distributed ascarid nematode. PMID:26204033

  11. Weak-Lensing Detection at z~1.3: Measurement of the Two Lynx Clusters with Advanced Camera for Surveys

    E-print Network

    M. J. Jee; R. L. White; H. C. Ford; G. D. Illingworth; J. P. Blakeslee; B. Holden; S. Mei

    2006-01-16

    (Abridged) We present a HST/ACS weak-lensing study of RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453, the two most distant (at z=1.26 and z=1.27, respectively) clusters yet measured with weak-lensing. The two clusters are separated by ~4' from each other and appear to form a supercluster in the Lynx field. Using our deep ACS F775W and F850LP imaging, we detected weak-lensing signals around both clusters at ~4 sigma levels. The mass distribution indicated by the reconstruction map is in good spatial agreement with the cluster galaxies. From the SIS fitting, we determined that RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 have similar projected masses of ~2.0x10^14 solar mass and ~2.1x10^14 solar mass, respectively, within a 0.5 Mpc (~60") aperture radius.

  12. Weak-Lensing Detection at z~1.3: Measurement of the Two Lynx Clusters with Advanced Camera for Surveys

    E-print Network

    Jee, M J; Ford, H C; Holden, B; Illingworth, G D; Mei, S; White, R L

    2006-01-01

    (Abridged) We present a HST/ACS weak-lensing study of RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453, the two most distant (at z=1.26 and z=1.27, respectively) clusters yet measured with weak-lensing. The two clusters are separated by ~4' from each other and appear to form a supercluster in the Lynx field. Using our deep ACS F775W and F850LP imaging, we detected weak-lensing signals around both clusters at ~4 sigma levels. The mass distribution indicated by the reconstruction map is in good spatial agreement with the cluster galaxies. From the SIS fitting, we determined that RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 have similar projected masses of ~2.0x10^14 solar mass and ~2.1x10^14 solar mass, respectively, within a 0.5 Mpc (~60") aperture radius.

  13. Optical Identification of the ASCA Lynx Deep Survey: An Association of QSOs and a Supercluster at z=1.3?

    E-print Network

    Ohta, K; Ueda, Y; Yamada, T; Nakanishi, K; Dalton, G B; Ogasaka, Y; Kii, T; Hayashida, K; Ohta, Kouji; Akiyama, Masayuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Toru; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Dalton, Gavin B.; Ogasaka, Yasushi; Kii, Tsuneo; Hayashida, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    Results of optical identification of the ASCA Lynx deep survey are presented. Six X-ray sources are detected in the 2-7 keV band using the SIS in a 20'x20' field of view with fluxes larger than ~4x10^{-14} erg s-1 cm-2 in the band. Follow-up optical spectroscopic observations were made, and five out of six sources are identified with AGNs/QSOs at redshifts of 0.5-1.3. We also identify two more additional X-ray sources detected in a soft X-ray band with AGNs/QSOs. It is found that three QSOs identified are located at z~1.3. Two rich clusters and several groups of galaxies are also placed at the same redshift in the surveyed field, and projected separations between the QSOs and the clusters are 3-8 Mpc at the redshift.

  14. Optical Identification of the ASCA Lynx Deep Survey: An Association of QSOs and a Supercluster at z=1.3?

    E-print Network

    Kouji Ohta; Masayuki Akiyama; Yoshihiro Ueda; Toru Yamada; Kouichiro Nakanishi; Gavin B. Dalton; Yasushi Ogasaka; Tsuneo Kii; Kiyoshi Hayashida

    2003-08-05

    Results of optical identification of the ASCA Lynx deep survey are presented. Six X-ray sources are detected in the 2-7 keV band using the SIS in a 20'x20' field of view with fluxes larger than ~4x10^{-14} erg s-1 cm-2 in the band. Follow-up optical spectroscopic observations were made, and five out of six sources are identified with AGNs/QSOs at redshifts of 0.5-1.3. We also identify two more additional X-ray sources detected in a soft X-ray band with AGNs/QSOs. It is found that three QSOs identified are located at z~1.3. Two rich clusters and several groups of galaxies are also placed at the same redshift in the surveyed field, and projected separations between the QSOs and the clusters are 3-8 Mpc at the redshift.

  15. FF-LYNX: Fast and flexible electrical links for data acquisition and distribution of Timing, Trigger and Control signals in future High Energy Physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, G.; Castaldi, R.; Fanucci, L.; Magazzú, G.; Saponara, S.; Tongiani, C.; Verdini, P. G.

    2010-05-01

    The FF-LYNX project aims at the definition of a flexible protocol that can handle both the distribution of Timing, Trigger and Control (TTC) signals and the data acquisition in future High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. The implementation of this protocol in digital interfaces designed and produced in standard CMOS technologies (130 and/or 90 nm) and available as "IP cores" is also foreseen.

  16. Apoptosis-Related Factors in the Luteal Phase of the Domestic Cat and Their Involvement in the Persistence of Corpora Lutea in Lynx

    PubMed Central

    Amelkina, Olga; Zschockelt, Lina; Painer, Johanna; Serra, Rodrigo; Villaespesa, Francisco; Braun, Beate C.; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient gland formed in the ovary after ovulation and is the major source of progesterone. In the Iberian and Eurasian lynx, CL physiologically persist after parturition and retain their capacity to produce progesterone, thus suppressing the ovarian activity. This unique reproductive characteristic has a big impact on the success of assisted reproduction techniques in the endangered Iberian lynx. The mechanisms behind CL persistence are not yet understood and require extensive studies on potential luteotropic and luteolytic factors in felids. Because the apoptosis system has been shown to be involved in structural regression of CL in many species, we aimed to investigate the capacity of perCL to undergo apoptosis. In addition, we performed initial studies on the apoptosis system in the luteal phase of the domestic cat. No previous research on this system has been made in this species. Our factors of interest included agents of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, i.e., pro-survival B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), the executioner caspase-3 (CASP3), as well as of the extrinsic pathway, i.e., pro-apoptotic receptor FAS, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors (pro-apoptotic TNFRSF1A and pro-survival TNFRSF1B). We analyzed the relative mRNA levels of these factors, as well as protein localization of CASP3 and TNF during stages of pregnancy and the non-pregnant luteal phase in CL of domestic cats. The same factors were investigated in freshly ovulated CL (frCL) and perCL of Iberian and Eurasian lynx, which were histologically analyzed. All factors were present in the CL tissue of both domestic cat and lynx throughout all analyzed stages. The presence of pro-apoptotic factors BAX, CASP3, FAS and TNFRSF1A in perCL of the Eurasian and Iberian lynx might indicate the potential sensitivity of perCL to apoptotic signals. The expression of pro-survival factors BCL2 and TNFRSF1B was significantly higher in perCL compared to frCL of studied Iberian lynx, suggesting the potential involvement of these factors in the structural integrity of perCL. In both Iberian lynx and pregnant and non-pregnant domestic cats, the expression of TNFRSF1A was significantly higher in forming CL compared to other stages, suggesting the conserved involvement of this factor in the tissue reorganization during formation of the feline CL. The mRNA levels of CASP3 and TNFRSF1B were highest during regression stages of domestic cat CL. The current study provides initial results on the possible involvement of the apoptosis system in the structure and function of the feline CL and in its physiological persistence. PMID:26599641

  17. Comparative analysis of intraluteal steroidogenic enzymes emphasises the functionality of fresh and persistent corpora lutea during pro-and metoestrus in the lynx.

    PubMed

    Zschockelt, Lina; Amelkina, Olga; Koster, Stefanie; Painer, Johanna; Okuyama, Minami W; Serra, Rodrigo; Vargas, Astrid; Jewgenow, Katarina; Braun, Beate C

    2015-11-01

    European lynx species demonstrate an atypical ovarian cycle compared to other felids. The physiological persistence of corpora lutea (CLs), reflected in constantly elevated progesterone (P4) concentrations in serum, is thought to ensure a seasonal monooestrus. Moreover, the coexistence of CLs from a recent ovulation (freshCLs) and persistent CLs from previous years (perCLs) on the same ovary has been proven. We assume that perCLs in lynxes occur due to fundamentally different mechanisms of luteal regression. Our study presents a detailed analysis of steroidogenic enzymes and steroids in fresh and perCLs obtained from Iberian lynxes during metoestrus, and in perCLs obtained from Eurasian lynxes during prooestrus. By quantitative PCR we measured relative mRNA amounts of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 oxidases (CYPs), hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) and a steroid reductase (SRD). Protein expression in CLs was investigated for CYP11A1, CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and HSD3B. Additionally, the intraluteal and serum steroid content was determined. During metoestrus, mRNA amounts of STAR, CYP11A1, CYP19A1, HSD17B7 and SRD5A1 were significantly higher in perCLs compared to freshCLs. Protein of CYP11A1 was detected independently of the CL age in metoestrus, but expression was less evident in prooestrous perCLs. The protein signal of CYP17A1 was strong in freshCLs and perCLs of metoestrus, but weak at prooestrus. The presence of CYP19A1 protein was confirmed in each stage of the CL. These findings contribute to the hypothesis that CLs from previous years might support freshly developed CLs for pregnancy maintenance. However, initiation of ovulation might require a functional down-regulation of perCLs prior to breeding. It is noteworthy that the HSD3B1 mRNA amount was significantly elevated in fresh compared to perCLs (metoestrus). Accordingly, HSD3B protein was substantially present in freshCLs, whereas signals were literally absent in all perCLs. Elevated expression of HSD3B coincided with high intraluteal oestrogen concentrations in freshCLs; however, the enzyme pattern was less concordant with intraluteal P4 and androgen concentrations. Serum P4 concentrations of Iberian lynxes were constant between prooestrus and prolonged dioestrus. Moreover, constantly high serum oestrogen concentrations were measured during pro-, met- and prolonged dioestrus. The physiology of exceptionally high serum oestrogen concentrations outside the breeding season of lynxes merits further investigation. In conclusion our study supports the concept that the unique reproductive strategy of lynxes is directly linked to sustained intraluteal steroid biogenesis in persistent CLs. PMID:26170243

  18. Apoptosis-Related Factors in the Luteal Phase of the Domestic Cat and Their Involvement in the Persistence of Corpora Lutea in Lynx.

    PubMed

    Amelkina, Olga; Zschockelt, Lina; Painer, Johanna; Serra, Rodrigo; Villaespesa, Francisco; Braun, Beate C; Jewgenow, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient gland formed in the ovary after ovulation and is the major source of progesterone. In the Iberian and Eurasian lynx, CL physiologically persist after parturition and retain their capacity to produce progesterone, thus suppressing the ovarian activity. This unique reproductive characteristic has a big impact on the success of assisted reproduction techniques in the endangered Iberian lynx. The mechanisms behind CL persistence are not yet understood and require extensive studies on potential luteotropic and luteolytic factors in felids. Because the apoptosis system has been shown to be involved in structural regression of CL in many species, we aimed to investigate the capacity of perCL to undergo apoptosis. In addition, we performed initial studies on the apoptosis system in the luteal phase of the domestic cat. No previous research on this system has been made in this species. Our factors of interest included agents of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, i.e., pro-survival B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) and pro-apoptotic BCL2-associated X protein (BAX), the executioner caspase-3 (CASP3), as well as of the extrinsic pathway, i.e., pro-apoptotic receptor FAS, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its receptors (pro-apoptotic TNFRSF1A and pro-survival TNFRSF1B). We analyzed the relative mRNA levels of these factors, as well as protein localization of CASP3 and TNF during stages of pregnancy and the non-pregnant luteal phase in CL of domestic cats. The same factors were investigated in freshly ovulated CL (frCL) and perCL of Iberian and Eurasian lynx, which were histologically analyzed. All factors were present in the CL tissue of both domestic cat and lynx throughout all analyzed stages. The presence of pro-apoptotic factors BAX, CASP3, FAS and TNFRSF1A in perCL of the Eurasian and Iberian lynx might indicate the potential sensitivity of perCL to apoptotic signals. The expression of pro-survival factors BCL2 and TNFRSF1B was significantly higher in perCL compared to frCL of studied Iberian lynx, suggesting the potential involvement of these factors in the structural integrity of perCL. In both Iberian lynx and pregnant and non-pregnant domestic cats, the expression of TNFRSF1A was significantly higher in forming CL compared to other stages, suggesting the conserved involvement of this factor in the tissue reorganization during formation of the feline CL. The mRNA levels of CASP3 and TNFRSF1B were highest during regression stages of domestic cat CL. The current study provides initial results on the possible involvement of the apoptosis system in the structure and function of the feline CL and in its physiological persistence. PMID:26599641

  19. Variability in assays used for detection of lentiviral infection in bobcats (Lynx rufus), pumas (Puma concolor), and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franklin, S.P.; Troyer, J.L.; TerWee, J.A.; Lyren, L.M.; Kays, R.W.; Riley, S.P.D.; Boyce, W.M.; Crooks, K.R.; VandeWoude, S.

    2007-01-01

    Although lentiviruses similar to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are known to infect numerous felid species, the relative utility of assays used for detecting lentiviral infection has not been compared for many of these hosts. We tested bobcats (Lynx rufus), pumas (Felis concolor), and ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) for exposure to lentivirus using five different assays: puma lentivirus (PLV), African lion lentivirus (LLV), and domestic cat FIV-based immunoblots, a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Puma lentivirus immunoblots identified more seropositive individuals than the other antibody-detection assays. The commercial ELISA provided a fair ability to recognize seropositive samples when compared with PLV immunoblot for screening bobcats and ocelots, but not pumas. Polymerase chain reaction identified fewer positive samples than PLV immunoblot for all three species. Immunoblot results were equivalent whether the sample tested was serum, plasma, or whole blood. The results from this study and previous investigations suggest that the PLV immunoblot has the greatest ability to detect reactive samples when screening wild felids of North America and is unlikely to produce false positive results. However, the commercial ELISA kit may provide ap adequate alternative for screening of some species and is more easily adapted to field conditions. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2007.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LBDS-Lynx region GMRT 150-MHz obs. (Ishwara-Chandra+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sirothia, S. K.; Wadadekar, Y.; Pal, S.; Windhorst, R.

    2011-08-01

    It has been known for nearly three decades that high-redshift radio galaxies exhibit steep radio spectra, and hence ultrasteep spectrum radio sources provide candidates for high-redshift radio galaxies. Nearly all radio galaxies with z>3 have been found using this redshift-spectral index correlation. We have started a programme with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to exploit this correlation at flux density levels about 10 to 100 times deeper than the known high-redshift radio galaxies which were identified primarily using the already available radio catalogues. In our programme, we have obtained deep, high-resolution radio observations at 150MHz with GMRT for several "deep" fields which are well studied at higher radio frequencies and in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum, with an aim to detect candidate high-redshift radio galaxies. In this paper we present results from the deep 150-MHz observations of the LBDS-Lynx field (Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey), which has been already imaged at 327, 610 and 1412MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and at 1400 and 4860MHz with the Very Large Array. (2 data files).

  1. Bobcats ( Lynx rufus) as a Model Organism to Investigate the Effects of Roads on Wide-Ranging Carnivores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvaitis, John A.; Reed, Gregory C.; Carroll, Rory P.; Litvaitis, Marian K.; Tash, Jeffrey; Mahard, Tyler; Broman, Derek J. A.; Callahan, Catherine; Ellingwood, Mark

    2015-06-01

    We are using bobcats ( Lynx rufus) as a model organism to examine how roads affect the abundance, distribution, and genetic structure of a wide-ranging carnivore. First, we compared the distribution of bobcat-vehicle collisions to road density and then estimated collision probabilities for specific landscapes using a moving window with road-specific traffic volume. Next, we obtained incidental observations of bobcats from the public, camera-trap detections, and locations of bobcats equipped with GPS collars to examine habitat selection. These data were used to generate a cost-surface map to investigate potential barrier effects of roads. Finally, we have begun an examination of genetic structure of bobcat populations in relation to major road networks. Distribution of vehicle-killed bobcats was correlated with road density, especially state and interstate highways. Collision models suggested that some regions may function as demographic sinks. Simulated movements in the context of the cost-surface map indicated that some major roads may be barriers. These patterns were supported by the genetic structure of bobcats. The sharpest divisions among genetically distinct demes occurred along natural barriers (mountains and large lakes) and in road-dense regions. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated the utility of using bobcats as a model organism to understand the variety of threats that roads pose to a wide-ranging species. Bobcats may also be useful as one of a group of focal species while developing approaches to maintain existing connectivity or mitigate the negative effects of roads.

  2. Protein secondary structure of Green Lynx spider dragline silk investigated by solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dian; Shi, Xiangyan; Thompson, Forrest; Weber, Warner S; Mou, Qiushi; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the secondary structure of the major ampullate silk from Peucetia viridans (Green Lynx) spiders is characterized by X-ray diffraction and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. From X-ray diffraction measurement, ?-sheet nanocrystallites were observed and found to be highly oriented along the fiber axis, with an orientational order, fc?0.98. The size of the nanocrystallites was determined to be on average 2.5nm×3.3nm×3.8nm. Besides a prominent nanocrystalline region, a partially oriented amorphous region was also observed with an fa?0.89. Two-dimensional (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments were employed to elucidate structure details of P. viridans silk proteins. It reveals that ?-sheet nanocrystallites constitutes 40.0±1.2% of the protein and are dominated by alanine-rich repetitive motifs. Furthermore, based upon the NMR data, 18±1% of alanine, 60±2% glycine and 54±2% serine are incorporated into helical conformations. PMID:26226457

  3. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) as a Model Organism to Investigate the Effects of Roads on Wide-Ranging Carnivores.

    PubMed

    Litvaitis, John A; Reed, Gregory C; Carroll, Rory P; Litvaitis, Marian K; Tash, Jeffrey; Mahard, Tyler; Broman, Derek J A; Callahan, Catherine; Ellingwood, Mark

    2015-06-01

    We are using bobcats (Lynx rufus) as a model organism to examine how roads affect the abundance, distribution, and genetic structure of a wide-ranging carnivore. First, we compared the distribution of bobcat-vehicle collisions to road density and then estimated collision probabilities for specific landscapes using a moving window with road-specific traffic volume. Next, we obtained incidental observations of bobcats from the public, camera-trap detections, and locations of bobcats equipped with GPS collars to examine habitat selection. These data were used to generate a cost-surface map to investigate potential barrier effects of roads. Finally, we have begun an examination of genetic structure of bobcat populations in relation to major road networks. Distribution of vehicle-killed bobcats was correlated with road density, especially state and interstate highways. Collision models suggested that some regions may function as demographic sinks. Simulated movements in the context of the cost-surface map indicated that some major roads may be barriers. These patterns were supported by the genetic structure of bobcats. The sharpest divisions among genetically distinct demes occurred along natural barriers (mountains and large lakes) and in road-dense regions. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated the utility of using bobcats as a model organism to understand the variety of threats that roads pose to a wide-ranging species. Bobcats may also be useful as one of a group of focal species while developing approaches to maintain existing connectivity or mitigate the negative effects of roads. PMID:25832342

  4. SPICES II. Optical and Near-Infrared Identifications of Faint X-Ray Sources from Deep Chandra Observations of Lynx

    E-print Network

    Stern, D; Stanford, S A; Rosati, P; Holden, B; Eisenhardt, P; Elston, R; Wu, K L; Connolly, A; Spinrad, H; Dawson, S; Dey, A; Chaffee, F H; Stern, Daniel; Tozzi, Paolo; Rosati, Piero; Holden, Brad; Eisenhardt, Peter; Elston, Richard; Connolly, Andrew; Spinrad, Hyron; Dawson, Steve; Dey, Arjun; Chaffee, Frederic H.

    2002-01-01

    We present our first results on field X-ray sources detected in a deep, 184.7 ks observation with the ACIS-I camera on Chandra. The observations target the Lynx field of SPICES, and contains three known X-ray-emitting clusters out to z=1.27. Not including the known clusters, in the 17'x17' ACIS-I field we detect 132 sources in the 0.5-2 keV (soft) X-ray band down to a limiting flux of \\~1.7e-16 erg/cm2/s and 111 sources in the 2-10 keV (hard) X-ray band down to a limiting flux of ~1.3e-15 erg/cm2/s. The combined catalog contains a total of 153 sources, of which 42 are detected only in the soft band and 21 are detected only in the hard band. Confirming previous Chandra results, we find that the fainter sources have harder X-ray spectra, providing a consistent solution to the long-standing `spectral paradox'. From deep optical and near-infrared follow-up data, 77% of the X-ray sources have optical counterparts to I=24 and 71% of the X-ray sources have near-infrared counterparts to K=20. Four of the 24 sources i...

  5. Deep GMRT 150 MHz observations of the LBDS-Lynx region: Ultra-Steep Spectrum Radio Sources

    E-print Network

    Ishwara-Chandra, C H; Wadadekar, Y; Pal, S; Windhorst, R

    2010-01-01

    It has been known for nearly three decades that high redshift radio galaxies exhibit steep radio spectra, and hence ultra-steep spectrum radio sources provide candidates for high-redshift radio galaxies. Nearly all radio galaxies with z > 3 have been found using this redshift-spectral index correlation. We have started a programme with GMRT to exploit this correlation at flux density levels about 10 to 100 times deeper than the known high-redshift radio galaxies which were identified primarily using the already available radio catalogues. In our programme, we have obtained deep, high resolution radio observations at 150 MHz with GMRT for several 'deep' fields which are well studied at higher radio frequencies and in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum, with an aim to detect candidate high redshift radio galaxies. In this paper we present results from the deep 150 MHz observations of LBDS-Lynx field, which has been already imaged at 327, 610 and 1412 MHz with the WSRT and at 1400 and 4860 MHz with the ...

  6. Discovery of an extremely gas rich dwarf triplet near the centre of the Lynx-Cancer void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H i observations, done as part of an ongoing study of dwarf galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void, resulted in the discovery of a triplet of extremely gas rich galaxies located near the centre of the void. The triplet members SDSS J0723+3621, SDSS J0723+3622 and SDSS J0723+3624 have absolute magnitudes MB of -14.2, -11.9 and -9.7 and M(H i)/LB of ˜2.9, ˜10 and ˜25, respectively. The gas mass fractions, as derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and the GMRT data, are 0.93, 0.997 and 0.997, respectively. The faintest member of this triplet, SDSS J0723+3624, is one of the most gas rich galaxies known. We find that all three galaxies deviate significantly from the Tully-Fisher relation, but follow the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. All three galaxies also have a baryon fraction that is significantly smaller than the cosmic baryon fraction. For the largest galaxy in the triplet, this is in contradiction to numerical simulations. The discovery of this very unique dwarf triplet lends further support to the idea that the void environment is conducive to the formation of galaxies with unusual properties. These observations provide further motivation to do deep searches of voids for a `hidden' very gas rich galaxy population with MB ? -11.

  7. Discovery of an extremely gas-rich dwarf triplet near the center of the Lynx-Cancer void

    E-print Network

    Chengalur, Jayaram N

    2012-01-01

    Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) HI observations, done as part of an ongoing study of dwarf galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void, resulted in the discovery of a triplet of extremely gas rich galaxies located near the centre of the void.The triplet members SDSS J0723+3621, J0723+3622 and J0723+3624 have absolute magnitudes M_B of -14.2, -11.9 and -9.7 and M(HI)/L_B of \\sim 2.9, ~10 and ~25, respectively. The gas mass fractions, as derived from the SDSS photometry and the GMRT data are 0.93, 0.997, 0.997 respectively. The faintest member of this triplet SDSS J0723+3624 is one of the most gas rich galaxies known. We find that all three galaxies deviate significantly from the Tully-Fisher relation, but follow the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. All three galaxies also have a baryon fraction that is significantly smaller than the cosmic baryon fraction. For the largest galaxy in the triplet, this is in contradiction to numerical simulations. The discovery of this very unique dwarf triplet lends support to the id...

  8. Serum chemistry, hematologic, and post-mortem findings in free-ranging bobcats (Lynx rufus) with notoedric mange.

    PubMed

    Serieys, Laurel E K; Foley, Janet; Owens, Sean; Woods, Leslie; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; Poppenga, Robert H; Clifford, Deana L; Stephenson, Nicole; Rudd, Jaime; Riley, Seth P D

    2013-12-01

    Notoedric mange was responsible for a population decline of bobcats ( Lynx rufus ) in 2 Southern California counties from 2002-2006 and is now reported to affect bobcats in Northern and Southern California. With this study we document clinical laboratory and necropsy findings for bobcats with mange. Bobcats in this study included free-ranging bobcats with mange (n = 34), a control group of free-ranging bobcats without mange (n = 11), and a captive control group of bobcats without mange (n = 19). We used 2 control groups to evaluate potential anomalies due to capture stress or diet. Free-ranging healthy and mange-infected bobcats were trapped or salvaged. Animals were tested by serum biochemistry, complete blood count, urine protein and creatinine, body weight, necropsy, and assessment for anticoagulant rodenticide residues in liver tissue. Bobcats with severe mange were emaciated, dehydrated, and anemic with low serum creatinine, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia, and sometimes septicemic when compared to control groups. Liver enzymes and leukocyte counts were elevated in free-ranging, recently captured bobcats whether or not they were infested with mange, suggesting capture stress. Bobcats with mange had lower levels of serum cholesterol, albumin, globulin, and total protein due to protein loss likely secondary to severe dermatopathy. Renal insufficiency was unlikely in most cases, as urine protein:creatinine ratios were within normal limits. A primary gastrointestinal loss of protein or blood was possible in a few cases, as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, intestinal parasitism, colitis, gastric hemorrhage, and melena. The prevalence of exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides was 100% (n = 15) in bobcats with mange. These findings paint a picture of debilitating, multisystemic disease with infectious and toxic contributing factors that can progress to death in individuals and potential decline in populations. PMID:23957865

  9. Serum chemistry, hematologic, and post-mortem findings in free-ranging bobcats (Lynx rufus) with notoedric mange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Foley, Janet; Owens, Sean; Woods, Leslie; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Poppenga, Robert H.; Clifford, Deana L.; Stephenson, Nicole; Rudd, Jaime; Riley, Seth P.D.

    2013-01-01

    Notoedric mange was responsible for a population decline of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in 2 Southern California counties from 2002–2006 and is now reported to affect bobcats in Northern and Southern California. With this study we document clinical laboratory and necropsy findings for bobcats with mange. Bobcats in this study included free-ranging bobcats with mange (n = 34), a control group of free-ranging bobcats without mange (n = 11), and a captive control group of bobcats without mange (n = 19). We used 2 control groups to evaluate potential anomalies due to capture stress or diet. Free-ranging healthy and mange-infected bobcats were trapped or salvaged. Animals were tested by serum biochemistry, complete blood count, urine protein and creatinine, body weight, necropsy, and assessment for anticoagulant rodenticide residues in liver tissue. Bobcats with severe mange were emaciated, dehydrated, and anemic with low serum creatinine, hyperphosphatemia, hypoglycemia, hypernatremia, and hyperchloremia, and sometimes septicemic when compared to control groups. Liver enzymes and leukocyte counts were elevated in free-ranging, recently captured bobcats whether or not they were infested with mange, suggesting capture stress. Bobcats with mange had lower levels of serum cholesterol, albumin, globulin, and total protein due to protein loss likely secondary to severe dermatopathy. Renal insufficiency was unlikely in most cases, as urine protein:creatinine ratios were within normal limits. A primary gastrointestinal loss of protein or blood was possible in a few cases, as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen, anemia, intestinal parasitism, colitis, gastric hemorrhage, and melena. The prevalence of exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides was 100% (n = 15) in bobcats with mange. These findings paint a picture of debilitating, multisystemic disease with infectious and toxic contributing factors that can progress to death in individuals and potential decline in populations.

  10. Valuing the chances of survival of two distinct Eurasian lynx populations in Poland - do people want to keep the doors open?

    PubMed

    Bartczak, Anna; Meyerhoff, Jürgen

    2013-11-15

    This study investigates individuals' preferences toward protection programs aimed at increasing the chances of survival of the two distinct Eurasian lynx populations in Poland. Those two groups, the Lowland and the Carpathian population, are exposed to different risks of extinction as they have different numbers, different-sized areas of occupation and different migration possibilities. Using a discrete choice experiment we examine the influence of the initial degree of endangerment on the allocation of respondents' funds. The results show that people prefer to invest in the conservation of the lynx population, which has initially lower chances of survival. The main driver of respondents' choices seems to be loss aversion rather than the urge to invest in an option with an expected higher outcome. This observation can be interpreted as people trying to keep all the options - doors - open by devoting more funds to the more vulnerable population than to the more stable one. Employing a scale-extended latent class model allowed us to detect segments among individuals showing different types of response behavior, including a form of serial non-participation. PMID:23811031

  11. A sample of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - I. Radio imaging, multicolour photometry and spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    E. E. Rigby; I. A. Snellen; P. N. Best

    2007-06-15

    With the goal of identifying high redshift radio galaxies with FRI classification, here are presented high resolution, wide-field radio observations, near infra-red and optical imaging and multi-object spectroscopy of two fields of the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey. These fields, Hercules.1 and Lynx.2, contain a complete sample of 81 radio sources with S(1.4 GHz) > 0.5 mJy within 0.6 square degrees. This sample will form the basis for a study of the population and cosmic evolution of high redshift, low power, FRI radio sources which will be presented in Paper II. Currently, the host galaxy identification fraction is 86% with 11 sources remaining unidentified at a level of r > 25.2 mag (Hercules; 4 sources) or r > 24.4 mag (Lynx; 7 sources) or K > 20 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts have been determined for 49% of the sample and photometric redshift estimates are presented for the remainder of the sample.

  12. A sample of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - I. Radio imaging, multicolour photometry and spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Rigby, E E; Best, P N

    2007-01-01

    With the goal of identifying high redshift radio galaxies with FRI classification, here are presented high resolution, wide-field radio observations, near infra-red and optical imaging and multi-object spectroscopy of two fields of the Leiden-Berkeley Deep Survey. These fields, Hercules.1 and Lynx.2, contain a complete sample of 81 radio sources with S(1.4 GHz) > 0.5 mJy within 0.6 square degrees. This sample will form the basis for a study of the population and cosmic evolution of high redshift, low power, FRI radio sources which will be presented in Paper II. Currently, the host galaxy identification fraction is 86% with 11 sources remaining unidentified at a level of r > 25.2 mag (Hercules; 4 sources) or r > 24.4 mag (Lynx; 7 sources) or K > 20 mag. Spectroscopic redshifts have been determined for 49% of the sample and photometric redshift estimates are presented for the remainder of the sample.

  13. Experimental transmission of Cystoisospora felis-like coccidium from bobcat (Lynx rufus) to the domestic cat (Felis catus).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Houk, A E; Verma, S K; Calero-Bernal, R; Humphreys, J G; Lindsay, D S

    2015-06-30

    Cystoisospora felis is an ubiquitous coccidian of cats. The domestic cat (Felis catus) is its definitive host and several mammalian and avian species are its optional intermediate/transport hosts. Nothing is known if it is transmissible to wild felids. In the present study C. felis-like oocysts were found in two naturally infected bobcats (Lynx rufus) from Pennsylvania. To study transmission of C. felis-like parasite from bobcats to domestic cats, sporulated oocysts of C. felis-like from one bobcat were orally inoculated into interferon gamma gene knockout (KO) mice, and 56 days later tissues of KO mice were fed to two coccidian-free cats; two littermate cats were uninoculated controls. The inoculated cats and controls were euthanized five and seven days later, and their small intestines were studied histologically. One inoculated cat excreted C. felis-like oocysts seven days post inoculation (p.i.) and was immediately euthanized. Mature schizonts, mature male and female gamonts, and unsporulated oocysts were found in the lamina propria of small intestine; these stages were morphologically similar to C. felis of domestic cats. No parasites were seen in histological sections of small intestines of the remaining three cats. The experiment was terminated at seven days p.i. (minimum prepatent period for C. felis) to minimize spread of this highly infectious parasite to other cats. Although oocysts of the parasite in bobcats were morphologically similar to C. felis of domestic cats, the endogenous stages differed in their location of development. The bobcat derived parasite was located in the lamina propria of ileum whereas all endogenous stages of C. felis of domestic cats are always located in enterocytes of intestinal epithelium. Characterization of DNA isolated from C. felis-like oocysts from the donor bobcat revealed that sequences of the ITS1 region was only 87% similar to the ITS1 region of C. felis from domestic cats. These results indicate that the parasite in bobcat is likely different than C. felis of cats. PMID:25964236

  14. Study of galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void - III. New extreme low surface brightness dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, S. A.; Martin, J.-M.; Tepliakova, A. L.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of a complex study of the low surface brightness dwarf (LSBD) gas-rich galaxies J0723+3621, J0737+4724 and J0852+1350, which reside in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. Their ratios M(H I)/LB, according to H I data obtained with the Nançay Radio Telescope (NRT), are respectively ˜3.9, ˜2 and ˜2.6. For the two latter galaxies, we derived an oxygen abundance corresponding to the value of 12+log (O/H) ? 7.3, using spectra from the Russian 6-m telescope (BTA) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data base. We found two additional blue LSBDs, J0723+3622 and J0852+1351, which appear to be physical companions of J0723+3621 and J0852+1350 situated at projected distances of ˜12-13 kpc. The companion relative velocities, derived from the BTA spectra, are ?V=+89 km s-1 and +30 km s-1 respectively. The geometry and relative orientation of orbits and spins in these pairs indicate, respectively, prograde and polar encounters for J0723+3621 and J0852+1350. The NRT H I profiles of J0723+3621 and J0723+3622 indicate a sizeable gas flow in this system. The SDSS u, g, r, i images of the five dwarfs are used to derive photometric parameters and exponential or Sersic disc model fits. For three of them, the (u-g), (g-r), (r-i) colours of the outer parts, when compared with PEGASE evolutionary tracks, provide evidence for the dominance of old stellar populations with ages of T˜ (8-10) ± 3 Gyr. For J0723+3622 and J0737+4724 the outer region colours appear rather blue, implying ages of the oldest visible stars of ? Gyr. The new LSB galaxies complement the list of known most metal-poor and 'unevolved' dwarfs in this void, including DDO 68, SDSS J0812+4836, SDSS J0926+3343 and SAO 0822+3545. This unique concentration of 'unevolved' dwarf galaxies in a small cell of the nearby Universe implies a physical relationship between slow galaxy evolution and a void-type global environment. We also compare the baryonic content of these LSBDs with predictions from the most updated cosmological simulations.

  15. "Ears of the lynx" sign in a marchiafava-bignami patient: structural basis and fiber-tracking DTI contribution to the understanding of this imaging abnormality.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Felipe Torres; Rego, Milena Morais; do Rego, Jose Iram Mendonça; da Rocha, Antonio J

    2014-01-01

    The "ears of the lynx" sign was previously reported as a neuroimaging finding observed in patients with autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia in association with a thin corpus callosum (ARHSP-TCC). We report a patient with a chronic form of Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) that presented with this imaging feature. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fiber-tracking data support that this finding is a consequence of the structural derangement, which enlarges a preexisting border zone of the bundles of fibers from the corpus callosum (CC) genu to the forceps minor and anterior corona radiata. Therefore, we assume that despite their pathological differences, damage to the anterior portion of the CC is responsible for the imaging similarities between MBD and ARHSP-TCC. PMID:23216703

  16. Characterization of the Commercially-Available Fluorescent Chloroquine-BODIPY Conjugate, LynxTag-CQGREEN, as a Marker for Chloroquine Resistance and Uptake in a 96-Well Plate Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kitti W. K.; Choy, Kit-Ying; Rénia, Laurent; Russell, Bruce; Lear, Martin J.; Nosten, François H.; Tan, Kevin S. W.; Chow, Larry M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroquine was a cheap, extremely effective drug against Plasmodium falciparum until resistance arose. One approach to reversing resistance is the inhibition of chloroquine efflux from its site of action, the parasite digestive vacuole. Chloroquine accumulation studies have traditionally relied on radiolabelled chloroquine, which poses several challenges. There is a need for development of a safe and biologically relevant substitute. We report here a commercially-available green fluorescent chloroquine-BODIPY conjugate, LynxTag-CQGREEN, as a proxy for chloroquine accumulation. This compound localized to the digestive vacuole of the parasite as observed under confocal microscopy, and inhibited growth of chloroquine-sensitive strain 3D7 more extensively than in the resistant strains 7G8 and K1. Microplate reader measurements indicated suppression of LynxTag-CQGREEN efflux after pretreatment of parasites with known reversal agents. Microsomes carrying either sensitive- or resistant-type PfCRT were assayed for uptake; resistant-type PfCRT exhibited increased accumulation of LynxTag-CQGREEN, which was suppressed by pretreatment with known chemosensitizers. Eight laboratory strains and twelve clinical isolates were sequenced for PfCRT and Pgh1 haplotypes previously reported to contribute to drug resistance, and pfmdr1 copy number and chloroquine IC50s were determined. These data were compared with LynxTag-CQGREEN uptake/fluorescence by multiple linear regression to identify genetic correlates of uptake. Uptake of the compound correlated with the logIC50 of chloroquine and, more weakly, a mutation in Pgh1, F1226Y. PMID:25343249

  17. Early-type galaxies at z = 1.3. I. The Lynx supercluster: cluster and groups at z=1.3. Morphology and color-magnitude relation

    E-print Network

    Mei, Simona; Holden, Brad P; Raichoor, Anand; Postman, Marc; Nakata, Fumiaki; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ford, Holland C; Illingworth, Garth D; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rosati, Piero; Tanaka, Masayuki; Huertas-Company, Marc; Rettura, Alessandro; Shankar, Francesco; Carrasco, E Rodrigo; Demarco, Ricardo; Eisenhardt, Peter; Jee, Myungkook J; Koyama, Yusei; White, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    We confirm the detection of 3 groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z~1.3, and give their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies as compared to the central clusters, RXJ0849+4452 and RXJ0848+4453, selecting 89 galaxies in the clusters and 74 galaxies in the groups. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30% -40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g. based on Sersic index). In luminosity selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of Sa galaxies. The ETG fractions never rise above ~50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in clusters at z~1. However, ETG plus Sa fractions are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z~1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as Sas might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star ...

  18. Use of stratigraphic models as soft information to constrain stochastic modeling of rock properties: Development of the GSLIB-Lynx integration module

    SciTech Connect

    Cromer, M.V.; Rautman, C.A.

    1995-10-01

    Rock properties in volcanic units at Yucca Mountain are controlled largely by relatively deterministic geologic processes related to the emplacement, cooling, and alteration history of the tuffaceous lithologic sequence. Differences in the lithologic character of the rocks have been used to subdivide the rock sequence into stratigraphic units, and the deterministic nature of the processes responsible for the character of the different units can be used to infer the rock material properties likely to exist in unsampled regions. This report proposes a quantitative, theoretically justified method of integrating interpretive geometric models, showing the three-dimensional distribution of different stratigraphic units, with numerical stochastic simulation techniques drawn from geostatistics. This integration of soft, constraining geologic information with hard, quantitative measurements of various material properties can produce geologically reasonable, spatially correlated models of rock properties that are free from stochastic artifacts for use in subsequent physical-process modeling, such as the numerical representation of ground-water flow and radionuclide transport. Prototype modeling conducted using the GSLIB-Lynx Integration Module computer program, known as GLINTMOD, has successfully demonstrated the proposed integration technique. The method involves the selection of stratigraphic-unit-specific material-property expected values that are then used to constrain the probability function from which a material property of interest at an unsampled location is simulated.

  19. Spider toxins comprising disulfide-rich and linear amphipathic domains: a new class of molecules identified in the lynx spider Oxyopes takobius.

    PubMed

    Vassilevski, Alexander A; Sachkova, Maria Y; Ignatova, Anastasija A; Kozlov, Sergey A; Feofanov, Alexei V; Grishin, Eugene V

    2013-12-01

    In addition to the conventional neurotoxins and cytotoxins, venom of the lynx spider Oxyopes takobius was found to contain two-domain modular toxins named spiderines: OtTx1a, 1b, 2a and 2b. These toxins show both insecticidal activity (a median lethal dose against flesh fly larvae of 75 ?g·g(-1)) and potent antimicrobial effects (minimal inhibitory concentrations in the range 0.1-10 ?m). Full sequences of the purified spiderines were established by a combination of Edman degradation, mass spectrometry and cDNA cloning. They are relatively large molecules (~ 110 residues, 12.0-12.5 kDa) and consist of two distinct modules separated by a short linker. The N-terminal part (~ 40 residues) contains no cysteine residues, is highly cationic, forms amphipathic ?-helical structures in a membrane-mimicking environment, and shows potent cytolytic effects on cells of various origins. The C-terminal part (~ 60 residues) is disulfide-rich (five S-S bonds), and contains the inhibitor cystine knot (ICK/knottin) signature. The N-terminal part of spiderines is very similar to linear cytotoxic peptides found in various organisms, whereas the C-terminal part corresponds to the usual spider neurotoxins. We synthesized the modules of OtTx1a and compared their activity to that of full-length mature toxin produced recombinantly, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal part, which retained full-length toxin activity in both insecticidal and antimicrobial assays. The unique structure of spiderines completes the range of two-domain spider toxins. PMID:24118933

  20. Development and validation of a fecal PCR assay for Notoedres cati and application to notoedric mange cases in bobcats (Lynx rufus) in Northern California, USA.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Nicole; Clifford, Deana; Worth, S Joy; Serieys, Laurel E K; Foley, Janet

    2013-04-01

    Notoedric mange in felids is a devastating disease caused by a hypersensitivity reaction to the mite Notoedres cati. The burrowing of the mite causes intense pruritis resulting in self-mutilation, secondary bacterial infection, and often death of affected felids if left untreated. Our understanding of how notoedric mange is maintained in felid populations, and the true geographic extent of infestations, has been hampered because wild felids are elusive and, thus, traditional diagnostic methods are difficult to implement. To create a noninvasive diagnostic test, we developed and validated a novel PCR assay to detect N. cati DNA in fecal samples of bobcats (Lynx rufus) and used this assay to investigate a recent outbreak of mange in northern California, United States. Although the fecal PCR assay was 100% specific and could detect as few as 1.9 mites/200 ?g of feces, it had a moderate sensitivity of 52.6%, potentially due to intermittent shedding of mites in feces or fecal PCR inhibitors. In a field investigation, 12% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.06, 0.23) of fecal samples (n=65) collected from Rancho San Antonia County Park and Open Space Preserve in Santa Clara County, California were PCR-positive for N. cati. When this estimate was adjusted for test sensitivity, the corrected proportion for fecal samples containing N. cati was 23% (95% CI: 0.14, 0.36), suggesting widespread mange in this area. This novel PCR assay will be an important tool to assess the distribution and spread of notoedric mange in bobcats and could be validated to test other wild felids such as mountain lions (Puma concolor). The assay could also be used to detect notoedric mange in domestic cats (Felis catus), particularly feral cats, which may also suffer from mange and could represent an important contributor to mange in periurban bobcat populations. PMID:23568905

  1. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from Black Bears (Ursus americanus), Bobcats (Lynx rufus), and Feral Cats (Felis catus) from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Jitender P; Verma, Shiv K; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Cassinelli, Ana B; Kwok, Oliver C H; Van Why, Kyle; Su, Chunlei; Humphreys, Jan G

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infects virtually all warm-blooded hosts worldwide. Recently, attention has been focused on the genetic diversity of the parasite to explain its pathogenicity in different hosts. It has been hypothesized that interaction between feral and domestic cycles of T. gondii may increase unusual genotypes in domestic cats and facilitate transmission of potentially more pathogenic genotypes to humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. In the present study, we tested black bear (Ursus americanus), bobcat (Lynx rufus), and feral cat (Felis catus) from the state of Pennsylvania for T. gondii infection. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 32 (84.2%) of 38 bears, both bobcats, and 2 of 3 feral cats tested by the modified agglutination test (cut off titer 1:25). Hearts from seropositive animals were bioassayed in mice, and viable T. gondii was isolated from 3 of 32 bears, 2 of 2 bobcats, and 2 of 3 feral cats. DNA isolated from culture-derived tachyzoites of these isolates was characterized using multilocus PCR-RFLP markers. Three genotypes were revealed, including ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype #1 or #3 (Type II, 1 isolate), #5 (Type 12, 3 isolates), and #216 (3 isolates), adding to the evidence of genetic diversity of T. gondii in wildlife in Pennsylvania. Pathogenicity of 3 T. gondii isolates (all #216, 1 from bear, and 2 from feral cat) was determined in outbred Swiss Webster mice; all three were virulent causing 100% mortality. Results indicated that highly mouse pathogenic strains of T. gondii are circulating in wildlife, and these strains may pose risk to infect human through consuming of game meat. PMID:25393429

  2. Early-type Galaxies at z = 1.3. I. The Lynx Supercluster: Cluster and Groups at z = 1.3. Morphology and Color-Magnitude Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Simona; Stanford, S. Adam; Holden, Brad P.; Raichoor, Anand; Postman, Marc; Nakata, Fumiaki; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ford, Holland C.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rosati, Piero; Tanaka, Masayuki; Huertas-Company, Marc; Rettura, Alessandro; Shankar, Francesco; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Demarco, Ricardo; Eisenhardt, Peter; Jee, Myungkook J.; Koyama, Yusei; White, Richard L.

    2012-08-01

    We confirm the detection of three groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z ? 1.3, through spectroscopic follow-up and X-ray imaging, and we give estimates for their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies compared to the two central clusters, RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453. Using spectroscopic follow-up and multi-wavelength photometric redshifts, we select 89 galaxies in the clusters, of which 41 are spectroscopically confirmed, and 74 galaxies in the groups, of which 25 are spectroscopically confirmed. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30%-40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g., based on Sérsic index). In luminosity-selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of bulge-dominated galaxies with a diffuse component that we visually identified as a disk and which we classified as bulge-dominated spirals, e.g., Sas. The ETG fractions never rise above ?50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in other massive clusters at z ? 1. In the groups, ETG fractions never exceed ?25%. However, overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions (ETG plus Sas) are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z ~ 1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as spirals might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star formation seems to have been quenched before experiencing a morphological transformation. Because their fraction is smaller at lower redshifts, they might be the spiral population that evolves into ETGs. For mass-selected samples of galaxies with masses M > 1010.6 M ? within ? > 500 Mpc-2, the ETG and overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions show no significant evolution with respect to local clusters, suggesting that morphological transformations might occur at lower masses and densities. The ETG mass-size relation shows evolution toward smaller sizes at higher redshift in both clusters and groups, while the late-type mass-size relation matches that observed locally. When compared to the clusters, the group ETG red sequence shows lower zero points (at ~2?) and larger scatters, both expected to be an indication of a younger galaxy population. However, we show that any allowed difference between the age in groups and clusters would be small when compared to the differences in age in galaxies of different masses.

  3. Toxoplasmosis in Canadian lynx (Lynx canadensis) in Québec, Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii, one of the more common zoonotic parasites in the world, can cause serious illness in humans and other animals worldwide. Felids are the only host that can shed T. gondii oocysts, which are essential to the perpetuation of the parasite cycle. In much of Boreal Canada, the Canadian ...

  4. EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES AT z = 1.3. I. THE LYNX SUPERCLUSTER: CLUSTER AND GROUPS AT z = 1.3. MORPHOLOGY AND COLOR-MAGNITUDE RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Simona; Raichoor, Anand; Huertas-Company, Marc; Adam Stanford, S.; Rettura, Alessandro; Jee, Myungkook J.; Holden, Brad P.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Nakata, Fumiaki; Kodama, Tadayuki; Finoguenov, Alexis; Ford, Holland C.; Rosati, Piero; Tanaka, Masayuki; Koyama, Yusei; Shankar, Francesco; Carrasco, Eleazar R.; Demarco, Ricardo; Eisenhardt, Peter; and others

    2012-08-01

    We confirm the detection of three groups in the Lynx supercluster, at z Almost-Equal-To 1.3, through spectroscopic follow-up and X-ray imaging, and we give estimates for their redshifts and masses. We study the properties of the group galaxies compared to the two central clusters, RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453. Using spectroscopic follow-up and multi-wavelength photometric redshifts, we select 89 galaxies in the clusters, of which 41 are spectroscopically confirmed, and 74 galaxies in the groups, of which 25 are spectroscopically confirmed. We morphologically classify galaxies by visual inspection, noting that our early-type galaxy (ETG) sample would have been contaminated at the 30%-40% level by simple automated classification methods (e.g., based on Sersic index). In luminosity-selected samples, both clusters and groups show high fractions of bulge-dominated galaxies with a diffuse component that we visually identified as a disk and which we classified as bulge-dominated spirals, e.g., Sas. The ETG fractions never rise above Almost-Equal-To 50% in the clusters, which is low compared to the fractions observed in other massive clusters at z Almost-Equal-To 1. In the groups, ETG fractions never exceed Almost-Equal-To 25%. However, overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions (ETG plus Sas) are similar to those observed for ETGs in clusters at z {approx} 1. Bulge-dominated galaxies visually classified as spirals might also be ETGs with tidal features or merger remnants. They are mainly red and passive, and span a large range in luminosity. Their star formation seems to have been quenched before experiencing a morphological transformation. Because their fraction is smaller at lower redshifts, they might be the spiral population that evolves into ETGs. For mass-selected samples of galaxies with masses M > 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun} within {Sigma} > 500 Mpc{sup -2}, the ETG and overall bulge-dominated galaxy fractions show no significant evolution with respect to local clusters, suggesting that morphological transformations might occur at lower masses and densities. The ETG mass-size relation shows evolution toward smaller sizes at higher redshift in both clusters and groups, while the late-type mass-size relation matches that observed locally. When compared to the clusters, the group ETG red sequence shows lower zero points (at {approx}2{sigma}) and larger scatters, both expected to be an indication of a younger galaxy population. However, we show that any allowed difference between the age in groups and clusters would be small when compared to the differences in age in galaxies of different masses.

  5. A coupling pair of dwarfs in Lynx

    E-print Network

    Makarov, D; Chengalur, J N; Uklein, R; Marchuk, A

    2013-01-01

    We report on discovery of unique binary system of dIr galaxies which looks like a low surface brightness tidal stream in the halo of another dwarf galaxy. Both the galaxies are detected in the HI line with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The pair components have absolute blue magnitudes -16.0 and -13.2, heliocentric radial velocities 1799 and 1842 km/s, and hydrogen masses-to-luminosity ratios 0.4 and 1.6 in solar units, respectively. The binary system is characterized by a high orbital mass-to-luminosity ratio of 49 in solar units and a short crossing time of 0.22 Gyr.

  6. Factors affecting seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii in the endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild felids are considered important in maintaining the sylvatic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii. Although, T. gondii antibodies have been reported in several species of wild felids, little is known of the epidemiology and risk factors associated with T. gondii infection in wild cats. In the present stud...

  7. Detection of Sarcocystis spp. infection in bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Verma, S K; Calero-Bernal, R; Lovallo, M J; Sweeny, A R; Grigg, M E; Dubey, J P

    2015-09-15

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of severe clinical disease of horses (called equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, EPM), marine mammals, companion animals, and several species of wildlife animals in the Americas. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is its definitive host in the USA and other animals act as intermediate or aberrant hosts. Samples of tongue and heart from 35 bobcats hunted for fur and food from Mississippi State, USA in February, 2014 were used for the present study. Muscles were examined for Sarcocystis infection by microscopic examination of either unfixed muscle squash preparations or pepsin digests, by histopathology of fixed samples, and by molecular methods. Sarcocystis-like bradyzoites were found in digests of 14 hearts and 10 tongues of 35 bobcats. In histological sections, sarcocysts were found in 26 of 35 bobcats; all appeared relatively thin-walled similar to S. felis sarcocysts under light microscope at 1000× magnification. S. neurona-like sarcocysts having thickened villar tips were seen in unstained muscle squash of tongue of two bobcats and PCR-DNA sequencing identified them definitively as S. neurona-like parasites. DNA extracted from bradyzoites obtained from tongue and heart muscle digests was analyzed by PCR-DNA sequencing at the ITS1 locus. Results indicated the presence of S. neurona-like parasite in 26 of 35 samples. ITS1 sequences identical to S. dasypi were identified in 3 bobcats, 2 of which were also co-infected with S. neurona-like parasite. The high prevalence of sarcocysts in bobcat tissues suggested an efficient sylvatic cycle of Sarcocystis spp. in the remote regions of Mississippi State with the bobcat as a relevant intermediate host. PMID:26138150

  8. Galemys 19 (n especial): 3-15, 2007 ISSN: 1137-8700

    E-print Network

    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

    IBÉRICO (Lynx pardinus), LINCE BOREAL (L. lynx) Y LINCE ROJO (L. rufus) PARA EL ESTABLECIMIENTO DE UN and cells from Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), Eurasian lynx (L. lynx) and bobcats (L. rufus) to establish natural conditions. This is the case of the Iberian lynx, the most endangered felid in the world. Despite

  9. 76 FR 69758 - Draft Environmental Assessment, Incidental Take Plan, and Application for an Incidental Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ...take of the federally threatened Canada lynx incidental to otherwise lawful activities...Send comments by U.S. mail to Attn: Lynx HCP, Laury Zicari, Field Supervisor...to take the federally threatened Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) in conjunction...

  10. Pleistocene and ecological effects on continental-scale genetic differentiation in the bobcat (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Reding, Dawn M; Bronikowski, Anne M; Johnson, Warren E; Clark, William R

    2012-06-01

    The potential for widespread, mobile species to exhibit genetic structure without clear geographic barriers is a topic of growing interest. Yet the patterns and mechanisms of structure--particularly over broad spatial scales--remain largely unexplored for these species. Bobcats occur across North America and possess many characteristics expected to promote gene flow. To test whether historical, topographic or ecological factors have influenced genetic differentiation in this species, we analysed 1 kb mtDNA sequence and 15 microsatellite loci from over 1700 samples collected across its range. The primary signature in both marker types involved a longitudinal cline with a sharp transition, or suture zone, occurring along the Great Plains. Thus, the data distinguished bobcats in the eastern USA from those in the western half, with no obvious physical barrier to gene flow. Demographic analyses supported a scenario of expansion from separate Pleistocene refugia, with the Great Plains representing a zone of secondary contact. Substructure within the two main lineages likely reflected founder effects, ecological factors, anthropogenic/topographic effects or a combination of these forces. Two prominent topographic features, the Mississippi River and Rocky Mountains, were not supported as significant genetic barriers. Ecological regions and environmental correlates explained a small but significant proportion of genetic variation. Overall, results implicate historical processes as the primary cause of broad-scale genetic differentiation, but contemporary forces seem to also play a role in promoting and maintaining structure. Despite the bobcat's mobility and broad niche, large-scale landscape changes have contributed to significant and complex patterns of genetic structure. PMID:22548482

  11. Bobcat (Lynx rufus) as a new natural intermediate host for Sarcocystis neurona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of severe clinical disease of horses (called equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, EPM), marine mammals, companion animals, and several species of wildlife animals in the Americas. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is its definitive hos...

  12. The effect of illumination and time of day on movements of bobcats (Lynx rufus).

    PubMed

    Rockhill, Aimee P; DePerno, Christopher S; Powell, Roger A

    2013-01-01

    Understanding behavioral changes of prey and predators based on lunar illumination provides insight into important life history, behavioral ecology, and survival information. The objectives of this research were to determine if bobcat movement rates differed by period of day (dark, moon, crepuscular, day), lunar illumination (<10%, 10 - <50%, 50 - <90%, >90%), and moon phase (new, full). Bobcats had high movement rates during crepuscular and day periods and low movement rates during dark periods with highest nighttime rates at 10-<50% lunar illumination. Bobcats had highest movement rates during daytime when nighttime illumination was low (new moon) and higher movement rates during nighttime when lunar illumination was high (full moon). The behaviors we observed are consistent with prey availability being affected by light level and by limited vision by bobcats during darkness. PMID:23861963

  13. The Effect of Illumination and Time of Day on Movements of Bobcats (Lynx rufus)

    PubMed Central

    Rockhill, Aimee P.; DePerno, Christopher S.; Powell, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding behavioral changes of prey and predators based on lunar illumination provides insight into important life history, behavioral ecology, and survival information. The objectives of this research were to determine if bobcat movement rates differed by period of day (dark, moon, crepuscular, day), lunar illumination (<10%, 10 - <50%, 50 - <90%, >90%), and moon phase (new, full). Bobcats had high movement rates during crepuscular and day periods and low movement rates during dark periods with highest nighttime rates at 10-<50% lunar illumination. Bobcats had highest movement rates during daytime when nighttime illumination was low (new moon) and higher movement rates during nighttime when lunar illumination was high (full moon). The behaviors we observed are consistent with prey availability being affected by light level and by limited vision by bobcats during darkness. PMID:23861963

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of striped lynx spider Oxyopes sertatus (Araneae: Oxyopidae).

    PubMed

    Pan, Wen-Jian; Fang, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Peng; Pan, Hong-Chun

    2014-09-10

    Abstract The complete mitochondrial genome of Oxyopes sertatus is a circular molecule of 14,442?bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and a control region. The A?+?T content of the overall base composition of H-strand is 75.9% (T: 42.9%; C: 8.2%; A: 33.0%; G: 15.9%). COII, COIII and ND4 genes begin with TTG as start codon; ATP6, COI, ND1 and ND5 genes begin with ATA as start codon, ATP8, Cyt b, ND2 and ND3 genes begin with ATT as start codon, ND6 gene begins with GTG as start codon, while ND4L gene start with a typical ATG initiation codon. ND2 gene is terminated with TAG as stop codon, Cyt b and ND5 end with TA, COI, ND1 and ND4L end with T, ATP6, ATP8, COII, COIII, ND3, ND4 and ND6 end with TAA. PMID:25208169

  15. Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) EXEN 550, Management Information

    E-print Network

    Kimbrough, Steven Orla

    's mode of addressing 2. Lynx---exploring the Web with a simple text­based browser \\Lambda File: internet; 2 Lynx Lynx is a text­oriented Web browser (client) from the University of Kansas. Log into your Unix account and launch Lynx by typing lynx at the prompt. When you see a page, you may use the arrow

  16. Introduction Many studies of herbivore and predator dynamics have estimated

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    and Sibly 2002).A different form of numerical response of lynx (Lynx canadensis) to snowshoe hares (Lepus described a relationship between lynx density and hare density, not between lynx r and hare density. It is the latter approach that is investigated here. Predators such as lynx and prey such as snowshoe hares

  17. REPRODUCTIONRESEARCH Reproductive traits in captive and free-ranging males of the

    E-print Network

    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

    endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) Natalia Gan~a´n1 , Adria´n Sestelo2 , J Julia´n Garde3 , Fernando@mncn.csic.es Abstract The Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is the most endangered felid in the world. Adequate genetic­285 Introduction The Iberian lynx is regarded as the world's most endangered felid and the most threatened

  18. Original Article Using Population Genetics for Management of

    E-print Network

    Clark, William R.

    are recognized as distinct subspecies, with Lynx rufus fasciatus west and Lynx rufus pallescens east, Lynx rufus, Oregon, population genetics, subspecies, trapping. The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is the most international regulation of listed Lynx species. This CITES classification requires state wildlife agencies

  19. 75 FR 57059 - Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Final Habitat Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ...take of grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis), Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis), and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus...public comment period; (2) information from Canada lynx researcher, Dr. John Squires, U.S. Forest...

  20. pestplant cycles or even single-species dynamics with second-order delays such as maternal effects, which lead to periods of over 6T (ref. 24). The last would increase the

    E-print Network

    Sereno, Martin

    period in years exceeded 4TC þ 2TR; in series involving lynx (average maturation time ¼ 1.5 years in snowshoe hare and Canadian lynx: Asymmetric food web configurations between hare and lynx. Proc. Natl Acad

  1. Status and Ecological Effects of the World's Largest Carnivores

    E-print Network

    Wilmers, Chris

    ­306 (2011). Sea otter (Enhydra lutris) Lion (Panthera leo) Dingo (Canis dingo) Puma (Puma concolor) Leopard (Panthera pardus) Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) Gray wolf (Canis lupus) A B C Ecologically important carnivores

  2. Control Systems Design, SC4026 SC4026 Fall 2010, dr. A. Abate, DCSC, TU Delft

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    . The photograph on the left shows a Canadian lynx an a snowshoe hare, the lynx's primary prey. The graph on the right shows the populations o hares and lynxes between 1845 and 1935 in a section of the Canadian

  3. Anatomy of a population cycle: the role of density dependence and demographic variability on numerical

    E-print Network

    Row, Jeffrey R.

    and species-specific (Canada lynx: Lynx canadensis; small rodents: Microtus, Lemmus and Clethrionomys spp models, reductions in reproductive potential in both the lynx and small rodent systems led to notably

  4. Estimating occupancy using spatially and temporally replicated snow surveys

    E-print Network

    Hebblewhite, Mark

    and Conservation, University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA Keywords detection probability; lynx; multi and Canadian lynx Lynx canadensis. We surveyed thirty-nine 100-km2 cells and used 1-km trail segments within

  5. Autoregressive dynamics deduced from noisy, categorical ecological data

    E-print Network

    Bølviken, Erik

    the oscillations of hare and lynx (the main predator). Independent data for the lynx is available and could and other voles as well as for hare and lynx. These periodic phenomena remains a central theme in ecology

  6. UN CASO PARA DESARROLLAR EN PRCTICAS EN AULA: EL LINCE IBRICO

    E-print Network

    Seoane, Javier

    .seoane@uam.es)] El lince ibérico (Lynx pardinus) es una especie de mamífero que solo se puede encontrar en zonas de ibérico, el lince boreal (Lynx lynx), es de mayor tamaño, consume una mayor variedad de presas

  7. a Hat Trick in the Lynx Field: the Intracluster Medium at 0.6 < Z < 1.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanford, Spencer

    1999-09-01

    We propose to obtain a deep image with ACIS-I of a field containing three galaxy clusters at 0.6 < z < 1.3, including the highest-redshift non-AGN cluster. The AXAF image will determine if the known X-ray source at the z=1.3 cluster is extended, resolving the question of whether an intracluster medium is present. The detection of the Fe-K line and the measurement of the temperature in all three clusters will provide unprecedented insight into the metal enrichment and thermal history of the ICM at z > 1. Existing and scheduled observations of this field, including our NICMOS and WFPC2 imaging and Keck spectroscopy, make it ideal for multi-wavelength studies of the distant universe. We waive proprietary rights so as to make a deep AXAF image available to the community during A01.

  8. Experimental transmission of Cystoisospora felis- like coccidium from bobcat (Lynx rufus) to the domestic cat (Felis catus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cystoisospora felis is an ubiquitous coccidian of cats. The domestic cat (Felis catus) is its definitive host and several mammalian and avian species are its optional intermediate/transport hosts. Nothing is known if it is transmissible to wild felids. In the present study C. felis-like oocysts were...

  9. Lynx: A Programmatic SAT Solver for the RNA-folding Problem Vijay Ganesh, Charles W. O'Donnell,

    E-print Network

    Devadas, Srinivas

    -to-solve for even the best of solvers. Even though standard translations may not be efficient, SAT solver users'Donnell, Mate Soos , Srinivas Devadas, Martin C. Rinard and Armando Solar-Lezama Massachusetts Institute in response. While the power of incremental SAT solvers has been amply demonstrated in the SAT literature

  10. Playing the Lynx: Creating The Writer's Complex as a Virtual Writing Center for Students at a Distance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handley, Elaine; Oaks, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the planning and implementation of an online writing center for adult students of SUNY Empire State College, a non-residential, independent-study distance-learning institution. Highlights informational and facilitative properties of hypertext and the need for a personalized instructor "voice." Components of the program included a "file…

  11. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 94, pp. 51475152, May 1997

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    in snowshoe hare and Canadian lynx: Asymmetric food web configurations between hare and lynx (statistical Kingdom, March 3, 1997 (received for review May 30, 1996) ABSTRACT The snowshoe hare and the Canadian lynx to be linked to each other because lynx are specialist predators on hares. Based on time series data for hare

  12. Ecology, 88(11), 2007, pp. 27362743 2007 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-print Network

    . Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) and snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus) populations undergo cyclic, estimating the contribution of hares to lynx diet across their range, and correlating this degree of specialization to the strength of their population cycles. Hares dominated the lynx diet across their range

  13. Reconsidering the Specialist-Generalist Paradigm in Niche Breadth Dynamics: Resource Gradient Selection by

    E-print Network

    Selection by Canada Lynx and Bobcat Michael J. L. Peers1 *, Daniel H. Thornton1,2 , Dennis L. Murray1 1 by developing range-wide species distribution models for Canada lynx, Lynx canadensis, and bobcat, Lynx rufus and altitude, while bobcat had higher total performance across most variables. Unlike predictions generated

  14. In the early 1800s, Canadian fur traders began to notice dramatic fluctuations in snowshoe hare (Lepus ameri-

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Maggi

    (Lepus ameri- canus) and Canadian lynx populations (Lynx canadensis) (Winterhalder 1980). Almost 100 Company to document an interrelated rise and fall in hare and lynx populations (Elton and Nicholson 1942 in regulating these populations and their interactions (Krebs et al. 2001). The case of the lynx and the hare

  15. 76 FR 69758 - Draft Environmental Assessment, Incidental Take Plan, and Application for an Incidental Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... the applicant that would authorize take of the federally threatened Canada lynx incidental to... Attn: Lynx HCP, Laury Zicari, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Maine Field Office, 17... an incidental take permit to take the federally threatened Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis)...

  16. Ecological Applications, 13(5), 2003, pp. 13101324 2003 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    IDENTIFYING BREEDING HABITAT FOR THE IBERIAN LYNX: INFERENCES FROM A FINE-SCALE SPATIAL ANALYSIS NE´ STOR- viduals' habitat use and landscape patterns. Here, we modeled breeding habitat for the Iberian lynx (Lynx over an areal extent encompassing an entire lynx metapopulation. In addition, we restricted the study

  17. TP machines no 1 (groupes MASS 4 et Math Info 2)

    E-print Network

    Lagache, Thibault

    commandes > airmiles > ?airmiles > lynx > ?lynx > LakeHuron > ?LakeHuron > min(LakeHuron) > max(LakeHuron), boxplot(airlines), boxplot(lynx). Il y a plusieurs façons de définir la boîte à moustaches. Quelle est la méthode utilisée par R ? 9. Représentation d'une suite. Examiner la suite statistique (= le vecteur) lynx

  18. SPECIES PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan A-261

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    (Lynx rufus) occupy wooded habitats that provide cover and allow for stalking or ambush (Anderson [lynx (Lynx canadensis)]. In recent decades, bobcat populations in New Hampshire have declined pre modeled with GIS using two approaches, empirical and mechanistic or process oriented. Bobcat Lynx rufus

  19. UnitedStates Department of

    E-print Network

    #12;UnitedStates Department of American Marten, Fisher, Lynx, and Wolverine: Survey Methods. 1995.American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine: survey methods for their detection. Gen. Tech. Rep of Agriculture; 163p. The status of the American marten (Martes americana), fisher (Martespennanti), lynx (Lynx

  20. 80 THE CANADIAN FIELD-NATURALIST Vol. 128 Introduction

    E-print Network

    - mals, such as Coyotes (Canis latrans) and Canada Lynx (Lynx canadensis). The only published report of a Canada Lynx cross- ing an open river describes an individual that swam across a 3.2 km wide section of the Yukon River (Koba- lenko 1997). There are several unpublished reports of Canada Lynx crossing open

  1. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 95, pp. 1543015435, December 1998

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    to processes: Phase and density dependencies in the Canadian lynx cycle (statistical modeling nonlinearity America, lynx populations undergo 10-year cycles. Analysis of 21 time series from 1821 to the present interactions between lynx and hares cause delayed density-dependent regulation of lynx population growth

  2. P.O. Box 161990 Orlando, Florida 32816-1990 (407) 823-2251 FAX (407) 823-5156 An Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Institution

    E-print Network

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    and LYNX, UCF students, faculty, and staff have a number of transit options. Three bus routes serve UCF at the Millican Hall Information kiosk or by calling LYNX at (407) 841-8240. For more information visit http://www.golynx.com/riding-lynx/knight-lynx

  3. Epizootic and zoonotic helminths of the bobcat (Lynx rufus) in Illinois and a comparison of its helminth component communities across the American Midwest.

    PubMed

    Hiestand, Shelby J; Nielsen, Clayton K; Jiménez, F Agustín

    2014-01-01

    A total of 6257 helminths of 19 taxa were recovered from the digestive tract and lungs of 67 bobcats in Illinois. Infections caused by Alaria mustelae, Diphyllobothrium latum, and Macracanthorhynchus ingens are reported for the first time in bobcats. From all the taxa recovered, only three species occurred in high prevalence and caused intense infections: Taenia rileyi, Alaria marcianae, and Toxocara cati, with prevalence and mean intensity of 70% and 6; 42% and 193, and 25% and 14 individuals, respectively. Prevalence lower than 15% of 14 helminth species suggests bobcats are not continuously exposed to infective stages of a single parasite, and may be exposed to a large variety of generalists during their lifespan. No significant difference in parasite species according to host sex or age was detected, except for Diphyllobothrium spp., which were found more frequently in females and in trapped bobcats, and the hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum, which infected juveniles more frequently. Average species richness per infracommunity was 2.4 (±1.2), and the parasite component community showed low qualitative similarity with neighbor communities. The taxa A. caninum, Alaria spp., Diphyllobothrium spp., Paragonimus kellicotti, and T. cati are etiological agents of epizootic and zoonotic diseases. PMID:24521984

  4. Epizootic and zoonotic helminths of the bobcat (Lynx rufus) in Illinois and a comparison of its helminth component communities across the American Midwest

    PubMed Central

    Hiestand, Shelby J.; Nielsen, Clayton K.; Jiménez, F. Agustín

    2014-01-01

    A total of 6257 helminths of 19 taxa were recovered from the digestive tract and lungs of 67 bobcats in Illinois. Infections caused by Alaria mustelae, Diphyllobothrium latum, and Macracanthorhynchus ingens are reported for the first time in bobcats. From all the taxa recovered, only three species occurred in high prevalence and caused intense infections: Taenia rileyi, Alaria marcianae, and Toxocara cati, with prevalence and mean intensity of 70% and 6; 42% and 193, and 25% and 14 individuals, respectively. Prevalence lower than 15% of 14 helminth species suggests bobcats are not continuously exposed to infective stages of a single parasite, and may be exposed to a large variety of generalists during their lifespan. No significant difference in parasite species according to host sex or age was detected, except for Diphyllobothrium spp., which were found more frequently in females and in trapped bobcats, and the hookworm, Ancylostoma caninum, which infected juveniles more frequently. Average species richness per infracommunity was 2.4 (±1.2), and the parasite component community showed low qualitative similarity with neighbor communities. The taxa A. caninum, Alaria spp., Diphyllobothrium spp., Paragonimus kellicotti, and T. cati are etiological agents of epizootic and zoonotic diseases. PMID:24521984

  5. Evolution of the Color-Magnitude relation in High-Redshift Clusters: Early-type Galaxies in the Lynx Supercluster at z~1.26

    E-print Network

    Mei, S; Demarco, R; Ford, H C; Franx, M; Holden, B P; Homeier, N L; Illingworth, G D; Jee, M J; Postman, M; Rettura, A; Rosati, P; Sirianni, M; Blakeslee, John P.; Demarco, Ricardo; Ford, Holland C.; Franx, Marijn; Holden, Brad P.; Homeier, Nicole L.; Illingworth, Garth D.; Jee, Myungkook J.; Mei, Simona; Postman, Marc; Rettura, Alessandro; Rosati, Piero; Sirianni, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Color-magnitude relations have been derived in the clusters RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 at z~1.26. The color-magnitude relation was determined from Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging in the WFC F775W (i_775) and F850LP (z_850) filters combined with ground-based spectroscopy. Early-type cluster candidates have been identified according to the Postman et al. morphological classification. In both clusters the bright red early-type population defines a tight color-magnitude relation very similar in color, although the two clusters present different X-ray luminosities and shapes, with RX J0849+4452 being three times more X-ray luminous and more compact, and having a temperature two times higher. The elliptical galaxy color-magnitude relations (CMR) in RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 show an intrinsic (i_775-z_850) color scatter of 0.026 +/- 0.012 mag and 0.024 +/- 0.015 mag, respectively, within 2 arcminutes (~1Mpc at z=1.26) from the cluster X-ray emission centers. Simple modeling of the scatters using stell...

  6. Evolution of the Color-Magnitude relation in High-Redshift Clusters: Early-type Galaxies in the Lynx Supercluster at z~1.26

    E-print Network

    Simona Mei; Brad P. Holden; John P. Blakeslee; Piero Rosati; Marc Postman; Myungkook J. Jee; Alessandro Rettura; Marco Sirianni; Ricardo Demarco; Holland C. Ford; Marijn Franx; Nicole L. Homeier; Garth D. Illingworth

    2006-04-04

    Color-magnitude relations have been derived in the clusters RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 at z~1.26. The color-magnitude relation was determined from Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging in the WFC F775W (i_775) and F850LP (z_850) filters combined with ground-based spectroscopy. Early-type cluster candidates have been identified according to the Postman et al. morphological classification. In both clusters the bright red early-type population defines a tight color-magnitude relation very similar in color, although the two clusters present different X-ray luminosities and shapes, with RX J0849+4452 being three times more X-ray luminous and more compact, and having a temperature two times higher. The elliptical galaxy color-magnitude relations (CMR) in RX J0849+4452 and RX J0848+4453 show an intrinsic (i_775-z_850) color scatter of 0.026 +/- 0.012 mag and 0.024 +/- 0.015 mag, respectively, within 2 arcminutes (~1Mpc at z=1.26) from the cluster X-ray emission centers. Simple modeling of the scatters using stellar population models from Bruzual and Charlot, gives a mean luminosity-weighted age t > 2.5 Gyr (z_f > 2.75). S0 galaxies follow the elliptical CMR; they show larger scatters about the CMR. The intrinsic scatter decreases and the CMR slopes are steeper at smaller radii, within both clusters. We conclude that old stellar populations in cluster elliptical galaxies are already in place at z=1.26, both in the more evolved cluster RX J0849+4452, and in its less evolved companion RX J0848+4453. Even at a lookback time of 9 Gyr, in the early merging and buildup of massive clusters, the bulk of the stellar content of the bright elliptical galaxy population was in place - apparently formed some 2.5~Gyr earlier at z~3

  7. 50 CFR 23.69 - How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...river otter (Lontra canadensis ), and Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis ), and the Alaskan populations of gray wolf (Canis lupus ), and brown bear (Ursus arctos ). These species are included in Appendix II based on Article II(2)(b) of...

  8. 78 FR 25410 - Safety Zone; Tall Ship Safety Zones; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration, Great Lakes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-01

    ...JEANNE, FRIENDS GOOD WILL, HINDU, KAJAMA, LA REVENANTE, LYNX, MADELINE, NIAGARA, PATHFINDER, PEACEMAKER, PLAYFAIR, PRIDE...JEANNE, FRIENDS GOOD WILL, HINDU, KAJAMA, LA REVENANTE, LYNX, MADELINE, NIAGARA, PATHFINDER, PEACEMAKER, PLAYFAIR,...

  9. Introduction MCQMC computations of Gaussian integrals

    E-print Network

    the maximum of random processes and series Introduction A toy example : The lynx data 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 Annual record of the number of the Canadian lynx "trapped

  10. 77 FR 322 - Notice of Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...Entrance, dated November 2011. 2. Project name and location: LYNX Blue Line Extension Northeast Corridor Light Rail Project, Charlotte...of Decision, dated December 2011. Supporting documentation: LYNX Blue Line Extension Northeast Corridor Light Rail Project...

  11. 78 FR 44014 - Safety Zones; Tall Ship Safety Zones; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemoration, Great Lakes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ...HALIE & MATTHEW, HINDU, KAJAMA, LA REVENANTE, LIANAS RANSON, LYNX, MADELINE, MIST OF AVALON, NIAGARA, PATHFINDER, PEACEMAKER...JEANNE, FRIENDS GOOD WILL, HINDU, KAJAMA, LA REVENANTE, LYNX, MADELINE, NIAGARA, PATHFINDER, PEACEMAKER, PLAYFAIR,...

  12. Track Plates William 1;:Zielinski'

    E-print Network

    wolverine or lynx has been detected at these stations (M. Raphael, pers. comm.). In 1991 the technique that is capable of detecting all four species, although neither lynx nor wolverine has been detected. However

  13. Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 letters to nature

    E-print Network

    Newsome, William

    . The statistical analysis of the Canadian lynx cycle: II syhchronisation and meteorology. Aust. J. Zool. 1, 291. Population regulation in snowshoe hare and Canadian lynx: asymmetric food web configurations between hare and lynx. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 94, 5147­5152 (1997). 24. Tong, H. Non-linear Time Series: a Dynamical

  14. 78 FR 66061 - Notice of Hunting and Trapping Restrictions Within the Skilak Wildlife Recreation Area (Skilak...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ...in the area, fur animals would include lynx, coyote, beaver, red fox and squirrel...adopted a proposal that would allow taking of lynx, coyote, and wolf within the area under...Loop Management Area) to allow taking of lynx, coyote and wolf directly conflicts...

  15. Travaux Pratiques Initiation la programmation avec le shell Bash

    E-print Network

    Loddo, Jean-Vincent

    ) suivante : lynx --dump -image_links "http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portail:Arts" \\ | grep -o "http choix pour zenity. (Commentaire : lynx est un naviga- teur en modalité texte ; la commande grep permet de selectionner les lignes contenant une adresse d'image JPEG parmi les lignes de la sortie de lynx

  16. 78 FR 76710 - Notice of Buy America Waiver for a Video Ready Access Device Cabinet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...the Charlotte Area Transit System's (CATS) LYNX Blue Line Extension project. This...the Charlotte Area Transit System's (CATS or City of Charlotte) LYNX Blue Line Extension...the utility relocation performed for the CATS LYNX BLE project. In an August 8,...

  17. In 1831 the manager of a Hudson's Bay Company post in northern Ontario wrote to the head office in London.

    E-print Network

    Seoane, Javier

    snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus),and their 10-year cycle is one of the most intriguing features lynx (Elton and Nicholson 1942; Figure 1). The lynx is a specialist preda- tor of snowshoe hares, and the rise and fall in lynx numbers mirrors, with a slight time lag, the rise and fall of snowshoe hare

  18. How to write a good report? A good report of your project is like a short scientific paper. It should therefore have a title,

    E-print Network

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    don't know, you may pose as a question, or write "it is tempting to speculate". Example: The hare in the densities of hares and lynxes can be explained by a saturated functional response [reference]. · Divide up shows that hares and lynxes oscillate due to", but write "Hares and lynxes oscillate due to ... (Fig. 3

  19. Global Climate Autumn 2014

    E-print Network

    Brown, Sally

    as adults · Generalist ­ broad diet (small mammals to deer) ­ but, an effective snowshoe hare predator ­ ambushes hares · Competes with lynx ­ exploitation: competes for hares ­ interference: will kill lynx #12 Predictions · During winter ­ Lynx should hunt hares where snow is deep ­ Coyotes should hunt hares where snow

  20. 77 FR 24673 - Grand Mesa, Uncompahgre and Gunnison National Forests; Colorado; Federal Coal Lease Modifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... identified for the protection of visual resources Canada lynx. In accordance with Forest Service Manual (FSM... borne by the Lessee/Operator. Canada Lynx--To comply with the GMUG Forest Plan 2008 amendment, the following special constraints will apply if surface use on the lease is proposed in lynx habitat:...

  1. Patterns Formation:Patterns Formation: Appendix IAppendix I ZoltnZoltn RczRcz

    E-print Network

    Rácz, Zoltán

    (fixed) points of the equations: 21 , nn #12;Lotka-Volterra systems: Hare-lynx problem Lotka 1925 (osc (rabbits) - conc. of lynx (foxes) 1n 2n- 21nn- 1n - rabbits eat grass and multiply 1=( sets the time == nn 1, 21 == nn #12;Hare-lynx problem: Fixed point structure 2212 2111 nnnn nnnn -= -= & & 0,0 21

  2. Ilntmduction to Detection and Survey Methods William I. Zielinski' and Thomas E. Kucera2

    E-print Network

    that we address in this manual, the American marten (Martes americana), fisher (Martes pennanti), lynx (Lynx canadensis), and wolverine (Gulo gulo) (henceforth collectively referred to as MFLW), are no less.S. Department of Interior. The lynx is a C2 species in nine states and either SE or ST in two states. The fisher

  3. 78 FR 17632 - Caribou-Targhee National Forest; Idaho and Wyoming; Amendment to the Targhee Revised Forest Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... Forest Plan--Canada Lynx Habitat AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... Revised Forest Plan (1997) to include a map identifying specific areas where the Northern Rockies Lynx... Notice to: Targhee Lynx Analysis, Caribou-Targhee National Forest, 1405 Hollipark Drive, Idaho Falls,...

  4. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 298 1 NOVEMBER 2002 973 CREDIT:WERNERBALTENSWEILER

    E-print Network

    ) in snowshoe hare and Cana- dian lynx. Following Elton's paper, Butler (6) envisioned (on a rather weak empirical basis) hare-lynx periodic fluctuations as waves sweeping across Canada and the northern United underlying the cyclic population fluctuations seen in lemmings, Canadian lynx, snowshoe hare, and the larch

  5. Proe {q~tt Iw/-eI'VIf,'t;Oi CG-rrt. Parallel Process/v

    E-print Network

    Scott, Michael L.

    Proe · {q~tt Iw/-eI'VI«f,'t»;Oi CG-rrt. Parallel Process/v::] rf 3QS-1t01 LYNX: A DYNAMIC are provided by server processes that run on top of the kernel. This paper discusses LYNX, a language Concepts The three most important concepts in LYNX are the module, the entry, and the link. A module

  6. A sample of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - II. Cosmic evolution of the space density of FRI radio sources

    E-print Network

    Rigby, E E; Snellen, I A G

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the cosmic evolution of the space density of Fanaroff & Riley Class I (FRI) radio sources is investigated out to z ~ 1, in order to understand the origin of the differences between these and the more powerful FRIIs. High resolution radio images are presented of the best high redshift FRI candidate galaxies, drawn from two fields of the Leiden Berkeley Deep Survey, and previously defined in Rigby, Snellen & Best (2007, Paper I). Together with lower resolution radio observations (both previously published in Paper I and, for a subset of sources, also presented here) these are used to morphologically classify the sample. Sources which are clearly resolved are classified by morphology alone, whereas barely or unresolved sources were classified using a combination of morphology and flux density loss in the higher resolution data, indicative of resolved out extended emission. The space densities of the FRIs are then calculated as a function of redshift, and compared to both measurements of the...

  7. A sample of mJy radio sources at 1.4 GHz in the Lynx and Hercules fields - II. Cosmic evolution of the space density of FRI radio sources

    E-print Network

    E. E. Rigby; P. N. Best; I. A. G. Snellen

    2007-12-10

    In this paper the cosmic evolution of the space density of Fanaroff & Riley Class I (FRI) radio sources is investigated out to z ~ 1, in order to understand the origin of the differences between these and the more powerful FRIIs. High resolution radio images are presented of the best high redshift FRI candidate galaxies, drawn from two fields of the Leiden Berkeley Deep Survey, and previously defined in Rigby, Snellen & Best (2007, Paper I). Together with lower resolution radio observations (both previously published in Paper I and, for a subset of sources, also presented here) these are used to morphologically classify the sample. Sources which are clearly resolved are classified by morphology alone, whereas barely or unresolved sources were classified using a combination of morphology and flux density loss in the higher resolution data, indicative of resolved out extended emission. The space densities of the FRIs are then calculated as a function of redshift, and compared to both measurements of the local value and the behaviour of the more powerful FRIIs. The space density of FRI radio sources with luminosities (at 1.4 GHz) > 10^25 W/Hz is enhanced by a factor of 5-9 by z ~ 1, implying moderately strong evolution of this population; this enhancement is in good agreement with models of FRII evolution at the same luminosity. There are also indications that the evolution is luminosity dependent, with the lower powered sources evolving less strongly.

  8. #!/bin/awk -f for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++)

    E-print Network

    Ooi, Wei Tsang

    =http://www.google.com/search pattern=' Web Results 1 - 10 ' var1=$(lynx -source ${url}?q=$(echo $1 | sed 's/ /+/g') \\ | sed 's/]*>//g' | grep "$pattern" | awk '{print $7}') var2=$(lynx -source ${url}?q=$(echo $2 | sed 's ]; then echo $1 wins else echo $2 wins fi May 26, 04 18:53 Page 1/1eg18-googlewar.sh #!/bin/bash lynx -source

  9. "UNH Sport Clubs...Catch The Spirit!" In this issue we highlight Baseball and

    E-print Network

    -3. The Seawolves of SMCC advanced past the NHTI Lynx 7-1 in the semi-final to position themselves for a shot and beat the top seeded NHTI Lady Lynx in a 2-0 shutout for the championship title. SMCC couldn't compete and 3 runs against SMCC to end the game with a 3-1victory. When UNH took on the Lynx

  10. Helpful Minneapolis/St. Paul Websites City Pages: http://www.citypages.com/calendar/

    E-print Network

    Dahlberg, E. Dan

    Field (Twins Baseball), Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome (Vikings football), TCF Bank Stadium (Gophers college sports), Mariucci Arena (Gophers Hockey), Target Center (Timberwolves and Lynx Basketball) #12

  11. 76 FR 13228 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ...Division, Bristol, TN........... February 2, 2010. Advantage XPO. 75,176..................... Lynx Medical Systems, Bellevue, WA.......... February 3, 2010. Coding Services Div., Ingenix, Wages Previously...

  12. 78 FR 61390 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ...Rosemount Analytical, Inc., Emerson Solon, OH........... July 31, 2012. 82,954............... Blue Lynx Media, Tribune Company, Lewisville, TX...... August 1, 2012. Addison Group and Robert Half Accounting....

  13. 50 CFR 23.69 - How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? 23.69... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? (a) U.S. and... Article II(2)(b) of the Treaty (see § 23.89). The import, export, or re-export of fur skins and fur...

  14. 50 CFR 23.69 - How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? 23.69... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? (a) U.S. and... Article II(2)(b) of the Treaty (see § 23.89). The import, export, or re-export of fur skins and fur...

  15. 50 CFR 23.69 - How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? 23.69... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? (a) U.S. and... Article II(2)(b) of the Treaty (see § 23.89). The import, export, or re-export of fur skins and fur...

  16. 50 CFR 23.69 - How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? 23.69... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear? (a) U.S. and... Article II(2)(b) of the Treaty (see § 23.89). The import, export, or re-export of fur skins and fur...

  17. 50 CFR 23.69 - How can I trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf, and brown bear harvested in... trade internationally in fur skins and fur skin products of bobcat, river otter, Canada lynx, gray wolf...). The import, export, or re-export of fur skins and fur skin products must meet the requirements of...

  18. Life Tracks Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brynildson, Inga

    Presented are descriptions of and information about various endangered species in Wisconsin. They include: the timber wolf (Canis lupus lycaon); Forester's tern (Sterna forsteri); the Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis); Higgins' eye pearly mussel (Lampsilis higginsii); the piping plover (Charadrius melodus); the osprey (Pandion haliaetus); the…

  19. General Introduction CHARLES j . KREBS

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    region, and snowshoe hares and red squirrels predominate among the mid-sized vertebrates. Canada lynx, coyotes, wolves, red foxes, and wolverine are the main mammal predators. Red-backed voles and deer mice hares and the two squirrels are major herbivores, while lynx, coyotes, wolves, and great horned owls

  20. Common and Scientific Names Table D1 Common and scientific names as referred to in document.

    E-print Network

    chipmunk Tamias minimus Long-tailed weasel Mustela frenata Lynx Felis lynx Mink Mustela vison Mountain goats Oreamnos americanus Otters Lutra canadensis Raccoon Procyon lotor Rocky Mountain elk Cervus canadensis Rocky Mountain mule deer Odocoileus hemionus Townsend's ground squirrel Spermophilus townsendii

  1. SHORT COMMUNICATION Taxonomic status and conservation strategy of the endangered

    E-print Network

    Conservation Á Hybridization Á Wolves Kyle et al. (2006) evaluated hypotheses related to the ori- gin and taxonomic status of eastern wolves (Canis lycaon) and suggested that C. lycaon is conspecific with C. rufus, gray wolves, Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis), and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) receive protection under

  2. 50 CFR 100.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hunting license may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and... Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day. Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx Dec. 1..., Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr....

  3. 36 CFR 242.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and individuals in... Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day. Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx Dec. 1..., Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr....

  4. 50 CFR 100.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hunting license may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and... Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx Dec. 1..., Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr....

  5. 50 CFR 100.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and, individuals... Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx... (including Cross, Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept....

  6. 36 CFR 242.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and, individuals in... Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx... (including Cross, Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept....

  7. 36 CFR 242.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and, individuals in... Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx... (including Cross, Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept....

  8. 36 CFR 242.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and individuals in... Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day. Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx Dec. 1..., Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr....

  9. 50 CFR 100.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hunting license may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and... Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day. Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx Dec. 1..., Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr....

  10. 36 CFR 242.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and individuals in... Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx Dec. 1..., Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr....

  11. Generalists and Specialists: The Case

    E-print Network

    Brown, Sally

    typically consists of > 60%, and up to 100%, snowshoe hares* · Other prey: red squirrels, ground squirrels, grouse ­ but lynx can t last without hares ­ especially during winter · Lynx are effective hare predators in winter ­ Can pursue hares through deep snow (low footload) ­ Unlike competing mesocarnivores (bobcats

  12. 50 CFR 100.26 - Subsistence taking of wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... may use nets and snares to take unclassified wildlife, ptarmigan, grouse, or hares; and, individuals... Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept. 1-Apr. 30. Lynx: 2 lynx... (including Cross, Black, and Silver Phases): 2 foxes Nov. 1-Feb. 15. Hare (Snowshoe): 5 hares per day Sept....

  13. 16 CFR 301.0 - Fur products name guide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Ungulata Bovidae Bos taurus. Cat, Caracal Carnivora Felidae Caracal caracal. Cat, Domestic ......do ......do Felis catus. Cat, Lynx ......do ......do Lynx refus. Cat, Manul ......do ......do Felis manul. Cat, Margay ......do ......do Felis wiedii. Cat, Spotted ......do ......do Felis sp. (South America)....

  14. 78 FR 76710 - Notice of Buy America Waiver for a Video Ready Access Device Cabinet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... cabinet needed for an AT&T utility relocation associated with the Charlotte Area Transit System's (CATS... Transit System's (CATS or City of Charlotte) LYNX Blue Line Extension (BLE) project, which is an FTA... interpretation of FTA's Buy America rules with respect to the utility relocation performed for the CATS LYNX...

  15. Camera Trap Success Among Carnivores and Prey Animals in Tazewell County, Virginia

    E-print Network

    Vance, James A.

    , including: Ursus americanus (black bear), Lynx rufus (bobcat), Canis latrans (coyote), Vulpes vulpes (red.26/100 TN), and bobcats (0.76/100 TN). Overall trap success significantly varied across all target species americanus (black bear), Lynx rufus (bobcat), Canis latrans (c

  16. PRIMATES,16(3): 335-349, September 1975 335 SHORT COMMUNICATION

    E-print Network

    Fedigan, Linda M.

    of Japanese Macaques (Macaca fuscata) to Bobcat (Lynx rufus) Predation HAROLD GOUZOULES, University or more bobcats (Lynx rufus) is described. One incident of pre- dation was observed and four additional, behavior of the bobcat, and the structure of the south Texas environment are explored. After the observed

  17. , 20132495, published 30 October 20132802013Proc. R. Soc. B Michael J. L. Peers, Daniel H. Thornton and Dennis L. Murray

    E-print Network

    and Dennis L. Murray displacement in Canada lynx and bobcat Evidence for large-scale effects of competition. 2013 Evidence for large-scale effects of competition: niche displacement in Canada lynx and bobcat, bobcat, species distribution models, competition, niche displacement Author for correspondence: Michael J

  18. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in wild carnivores from Spain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serum samples from 282 wild carnivores from different regions of Spain were tested for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the modified agglutination test using a cut-off value of 1:25. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 22 of 27 (81.5%) of Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), three of six European wildc...

  19. First evidence of hemoplasma infection in free-ranging Namibian cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Krengel, Annika; Meli, Marina L; Cattori, Valentino; Wachter, Bettina; Willi, Barbara; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jörg; Hofer, Heribert; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2013-03-23

    Infections with feline hemotropic mycoplasmas (hemoplasmas) have been documented in domestic cats and free-ranging feline species with high prevalences in Iberian lynxes (Lynx pardinus), Eurasian lynxes (Lynx lynx), European wildcats (Felis silvestris silvestris), African lions (Panthera leo) in Tanzania and domestic cats in South Africa. The prevalence of hemoplasmas has not yet been investigated in free-ranging felids in southern Africa. In this study we screened 73 blood samples from 61 cheetahs in central Namibia for the presence of hemoplasmas using quantitative real-time PCR. One of the cheetahs tested PCR-positive. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA and RNAse P genes revealed that the isolate belongs to the Mycoplasma haemofelis/haemocanis group. This is the first molecular evidence of a hemoplasma infection in a free-ranging cheetah. PMID:23123173

  20. Enhancing species distribution modeling by characterizing predator-prey interactions.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Anne M; Schmitz, Oswald J; Ivan, Jacob S; Shenk, Tanya M

    2014-01-01

    Niche theory is a well-established concept integrating a diverse array of environmental variables and multispecies interactions used to describe species geographic distribution. It is now customary to employ species distribution models (SDMs) that use environmental variables in conjunction with species location information to characterize species' niches and map their geographic ranges. The challenge remains, however, to account for the biotic interactions of species with other community members on which they depend. We show here how to connect species spatial distribution and their dependence with other species by modeling spatially explicit predator-prey interactions, which we call a trophic interaction distribution model (TIDM). To develop the principles, we capitalized on data from Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) reintroduced into Colorado. Spatial location information for lynx obtained from telemetry was used in conjunction with environmental data to construct an SDM. The spatial locations of lynx-snowshoe hare encounters obtained from snow-tracking in conjunction with environmental data were used to construct a TIDM. The environmental conditions associated with lynx locations and lynx-hare encounters identified through both SDM and TIDM revealed an initial transient phase in habitat use that settled into a steady state. Nevertheless, despite the potential for the SDM to broadly encompass all lynx hunting and nonhunting spatial locations, the spatial extents of the SDM and TIDM differed; about 40% of important lynx-snowshoe hare locations identified in the TIDM were not identified in the lynx-only SDM. Our results encourage greater effort to quantify spatial locations of trophic interactions among species in a community and the associated environmental conditions when attempting to construct models aimed at projecting current and future species geographic distributions. PMID:24640545

  1. Comparison of properties of digital spectrometer systems.

    PubMed

    Mazanova, Monika; Dryak, Pavel; Kovar, Petr; Auerbach, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    We have tested two digital spectrometer systems, the DSP 9660 and Lynx(®) modules, connected to a HPGe detector. Lynx(®) is a fully integrated 32K channel signal analyzer based on digital signal processing techniques, which offers advanced digital stabilization. The model DSP 9660 digitalizes the signal directly at a very high sampling rate. The evaluated properties were integral nonlinearity, differential linearity, channel profiles, resolution and throughput. We found that the DSP system has slightly inferior resolution and throughput in comparison with the Lynx(®) system. PMID:24342559

  2. Understanding Arizona's Riparian Areas

    E-print Network

    Crimmins, Michael A.

    projects include an evaluation of livestock grazing on willow and cottonwood growth on the Verde River; monitoring and evaluation of restoration efforts at Lynx Creek; a health assessment of willows trees

  3. Guideline and Recommended Standard for

    E-print Network

    of Geography, Graduate School of Geography, Clark University JAMES R. HERTWIG, President, CSX Intermodal, Chicago MICHAEL D. MEYER, Professor, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute, Austin LINDA S. WATSON, Executive Director, LYNX--Central Florida Regional Transportation Authority

  4. 78 FR 2710 - Applications for Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity and Foreign Air Carrier Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-14

    ...Conforming Applications, or Motion to Modify Scope: January 7, 2013. Description: Application of SmartLynx Airlines Estonia OU requesting a foreign air carrier permit and exemption authority authorizing the carrier to operate charter foreign air...

  5. 76 FR 78007 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License; Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ...NJ 07080, Officer: Hsiang (Rita) Y. Hsiao, Member, (Qualifying Individual), Application Type: Add OFF Service. Lynx Global Corp. (NVO & OFF), 2000 NW 62nd Avenue, Building 711, Miami, FL 33122, Officers: Eugenio J. Clur,...

  6. 76 FR 19097 - Ocean Transportation Intermediary License Applicants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ...Jacqueline Benabe, Chief Financial Officer (Qualifying Individual), Daniel Lerner, Manager, Application Type: New NVO License. Lynx Global Corp. (NVO & OFF), 2000 NW 62nd Avenue, Building 711, Miami, FL 33122, Officers: George T. Ackler,...

  7. 78 FR 47272 - Notice of Intent to Grant Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ...grant to Central Washington Grain Growers, Inc. of Waterville, Washington, an exclusive license to the pea variety named ``Lynx''. DATES: Comments must be received on or before September 4, 2013. ADDRESS: Send comments to: USDA, ARS, Office...

  8. 77 FR 43046 - Lolo National Forest; Montana; Center Horse Landscape Restoration EIS

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ...controversial; (2) Proposed activities could affect wildlife and wildlife habitat. Portions of the analysis area are within Lynx Analysis Units and the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem Grizzly Bear Recovery Area; and, (3) The analysis area...

  9. 76 FR 70955 - Helena Nation Forest: Dalton Mountain Forest Restoration & Fuels Reduction Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ...necessary as a result of the decision for this project. Preliminary Issues Proposed activities reducing wildlife habitat e.g. lynx. Configuration of treatment and control units that effectively meets or moves the project area toward the purpose and...

  10. Peer-reviewed journal papers 1. Dinanath Sulakhe, Sandhya Balasubramanian, BingqingXie, Bo Feng, Andrew Taylor, Sheng

    E-print Network

    Xu, Jinbo

    and Natalia Maltsev. Lynx: a database and knowledge extraction engine for integrative medicine. Nucleic Acids Conditional Neural Fields. Proteomics, 2011 Oct; 11(19):3786-92. Early version appears in the Proceedings

  11. 78 FR 53002 - Notice of Proposed Buy America Waiver for a Video Ready Access Device Cabinet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ...SUMMARY: The Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) requested a waiver of the Federal Transit Administration...This utility relocation will be performed in connection with the CATS LYNX Blue Line Extension (BLE) project, which is an...

  12. An Integrated Study of Ecosystem Processes B-Bar Ranch,Montana

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ,bighorn sheep, mountain lion,lynx,porcupine,badger,beaver,coyote,marmot,fish and bird species. Besides and the threat of whirling disease. Each of these topics is connected within the ecosystem. Pine beetle attacks

  13. A Cellular Model for Spatial Population Dynamics Chu Yue (Stella) Donga

    E-print Network

    Reiter, Clifford A.

    Department. Figure 1 shows lynx population data from [1] with muskrat population data from [2] from 1821 roughly correspond to troughs of the muskrat population. This observation provides motivation for studying

  14. Nocturnal Movements and Distributions of Bobcats, Coyotes and Raccoons during Quail Nesting Season 

    E-print Network

    Jhala, Shesh

    2013-04-16

    the habitat selection, nocturnal movement and potential rate of encounter with quail nesting locations by coyotes (Canis latrans), bobcats (Lynx rufus), and raccoons (Procyon lotor) at the Rolling Plains Quail Research Ranch, a private 19 km2 ranch...

  15. 50 CFR 23.36 - What are the requirements for an export permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Eggs/Meat of Paddlefish or Sturgeon, From an Aquaculture Facility 3-200-80 Caviar/Meat of Paddlefish or Sturgeon, Removed from the Wild 3-200-76 Export of Skins of Bobcat, Canada Lynx, River Otter, Brown...

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Can invasive Burmese pythons inhabit temperate regions

    E-print Network

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    variety of avian and mammalian prey including wading birds, bobcats (Lynx rufus), and white-tailed deer, and behavior of Burmese pythons from South Florida in a semi-natural enclosure in South Carolina, where winters

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Can invasive Burmese pythons inhabit temperate regions

    E-print Network

    Willson. J.D.

    wading birds, bobcats (Lynx rufus), and white-tailed deer (Odocoi- leus virginianus; Reed and Rodda 2009 United States. We examined survivorship, thermal biology, and behavior of Burmese pythons from South

  18. Using automatically-triggered cameras to monitor and estimate bobcat abundance 

    E-print Network

    Heilbrun, Richard David

    2002-01-01

    and estimate the number of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in a population might be more useful to managers and researchers than traditional methods involving scent stations and physical capture. This study evaluated whether bobcats could be surveyed using automatically...

  19. 76 FR 74805 - Draft Environmental Assessment, Incidental Take Plan, and Application for an Incidental Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... application from the MDIFW for an incidental take permit in a November 9, 2011, Federal Register notice (76 FR.... ADDRESSES: Send comments by U.S. mail to Attn: Lynx HCP, Laury Zicari, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish...

  20. 75 FR 28587 - Taking and Importing Marine Mammals; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Missile Launch...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ..., were issued on June 2, 2009, and remain in effect until June 2, 2014 (74 FR 26580, June 3, 2009). For... the Airborne Laser (ABL) testing program. A single Terrier-Lynx was launched on each of two days,...

  1. TARGET SPECIES Table 1. Terrestrial target species.

    E-print Network

    -naped Sapsucker Grizzly Bear CFLS Calliope Hummingbird Ruffed Grouse Lynx FS Canada Goose CFLS Rufous Hummingbird Canada Goose Black-bellied Plover Moose Mute Swan Semipalmated Plover American Dipper Trumpeter Swan

  2. Selecting habitat to survive: the impact of road density on survival in a large carnivore.

    PubMed

    Basille, Mathieu; Van Moorter, Bram; Herfindal, Ivar; Martin, Jodie; Linnell, John D C; Odden, John; Andersen, Reidar; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Habitat selection studies generally assume that animals select habitat and food resources at multiple scales to maximise their fitness. However, animals sometimes prefer habitats of apparently low quality, especially when considering the costs associated with spatially heterogeneous human disturbance. We used spatial variation in human disturbance, and its consequences on lynx survival, a direct fitness component, to test the Hierarchical Habitat Selection hypothesis from a population of Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx in southern Norway. Data from 46 lynx monitored with telemetry indicated that a high proportion of forest strongly reduced the risk of mortality from legal hunting at the home range scale, while increasing road density strongly increased such risk at the finer scale within the home range. We found hierarchical effects of the impact of human disturbance, with a higher road density at a large scale reinforcing its negative impact at a fine scale. Conversely, we demonstrated that lynx shifted their habitat selection to avoid areas with the highest road densities within their home ranges, thus supporting a compensatory mechanism at fine scale enabling lynx to mitigate the impact of large-scale disturbance. Human impact, positively associated with high road accessibility, was thus a stronger driver of lynx space use at a finer scale, with home range characteristics nevertheless constraining habitat selection. Our study demonstrates the truly hierarchical nature of habitat selection, which aims at maximising fitness by selecting against limiting factors at multiple spatial scales, and indicates that scale-specific heterogeneity of the environment is driving individual spatial behaviour, by means of trade-offs across spatial scales. PMID:23874381

  3. Selecting Habitat to Survive: The Impact of Road Density on Survival in a Large Carnivore

    PubMed Central

    Basille, Mathieu; Van Moorter, Bram; Herfindal, Ivar; Martin, Jodie; Linnell, John D. C.; Odden, John; Andersen, Reidar; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Habitat selection studies generally assume that animals select habitat and food resources at multiple scales to maximise their fitness. However, animals sometimes prefer habitats of apparently low quality, especially when considering the costs associated with spatially heterogeneous human disturbance. We used spatial variation in human disturbance, and its consequences on lynx survival, a direct fitness component, to test the Hierarchical Habitat Selection hypothesis from a population of Eurasian lynx Lynx lynx in southern Norway. Data from 46 lynx monitored with telemetry indicated that a high proportion of forest strongly reduced the risk of mortality from legal hunting at the home range scale, while increasing road density strongly increased such risk at the finer scale within the home range. We found hierarchical effects of the impact of human disturbance, with a higher road density at a large scale reinforcing its negative impact at a fine scale. Conversely, we demonstrated that lynx shifted their habitat selection to avoid areas with the highest road densities within their home ranges, thus supporting a compensatory mechanism at fine scale enabling lynx to mitigate the impact of large-scale disturbance. Human impact, positively associated with high road accessibility, was thus a stronger driver of lynx space use at a finer scale, with home range characteristics nevertheless constraining habitat selection. Our study demonstrates the truly hierarchical nature of habitat selection, which aims at maximising fitness by selecting against limiting factors at multiple spatial scales, and indicates that scale-specific heterogeneity of the environment is driving individual spatial behaviour, by means of trade-offs across spatial scales. PMID:23874381

  4. Responses of a top and a meso predator and their prey to moon phases.

    PubMed

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Kuparinen, Anna; del Mar Delgado, Maria; Palomares, Francisco; López-Bao, José Vicente; Fedriani, José María; Calzada, Javier; Moreno, Sacramento; Villafuerte, Rafael; Campioni, Letizia; Lourenço, Rui

    2013-11-01

    We compared movement patterns and rhythms of activity of a top predator, the Iberian lynx Lynx pardinus, a mesopredator, the red fox Vulpes vulpes, and their shared principal prey, the rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus, in relation to moon phases. Because the three species are mostly nocturnal and crepuscular, we hypothesized that the shared prey would reduce its activity at most risky moon phases (i.e. during the brightest nights), but that fox, an intraguild prey of lynx, would avoid lynx activity peaks at the same time. Rabbits generally moved further from their core areas on darkest nights (i.e. new moon), using direct movements which minimize predation risk. Though rabbits responded to the increased predation risk by reducing their activity during the full moon, this response may require several days, and the moon effect we observed on the rabbits had, therefore, a temporal gap. Lynx activity patterns may be at least partially mirroring rabbit activity: around new moons, when rabbits moved furthest and were more active, lynxes reduced their travelling distances and their movements were concentrated in the core areas of their home ranges, which generally correspond to areas of high density of rabbits. Red foxes were more active during the darkest nights, when both the conditions for rabbit hunting were the best and lynxes moved less. On the one hand, foxes increased their activity when rabbits were further from their core areas and moved with more discrete displacements; on the other hand, fox activity in relation to the moon seemed to reduce dangerous encounters with its intraguild predator. PMID:23579570

  5. Isolation and characterisation of an Aujeszky's disease virus naturally infecting a wild boar (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Capua, I; Fico, R; Banks, M; Tamba, M; Calzetta, G

    1997-04-01

    Isolation of Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) from an injured, female wild boar (Sus scrofa), shot dead by hunters, in an area adjacent to the Abruzzo National Park is reported. The brain was submitted for attempted virus isolation following episodes of mortality in several dogs and cats fed with meat from the wild boar. Virus was isolated on first passage from the brain of the wild boar. The restriction fragment length polymorphism profile of the isolate was assessed as a type I. The role of stress in reactivating latent ADV in wild boars, the possibility of transmitting infection to endangered species such as bears (Ursus arctos), wolves (Canis lupus), wild cats (Felis silvestris) and lynx (Lynx lynx), present in the Abruzzo National Park and the possible role of wild boars as reservoirs for ADV is discussed. PMID:9220606

  6. Recovery of large carnivores in Europe's modern human-dominated landscapes.

    PubMed

    Chapron, Guillaume; Kaczensky, Petra; Linnell, John D C; von Arx, Manuela; Huber, Djuro; Andrén, Henrik; López-Bao, José Vicente; Adamec, Michal; Álvares, Francisco; Anders, Ole; Bal?iauskas, Linas; Balys, Vaidas; Bed?, Péter; Bego, Ferdinand; Blanco, Juan Carlos; Breitenmoser, Urs; Brøseth, Henrik; Bufka, Lud?k; Bunikyte, Raimonda; Ciucci, Paolo; Dutsov, Alexander; Engleder, Thomas; Fuxjäger, Christian; Groff, Claudio; Holmala, Katja; Hoxha, Bledi; Iliopoulos, Yorgos; Ionescu, Ovidiu; Jeremi?, Jasna; Jerina, Klemen; Kluth, Gesa; Knauer, Felix; Kojola, Ilpo; Kos, Ivan; Krofel, Miha; Kubala, Jakub; Kunovac, Saša; Kusak, Josip; Kutal, Miroslav; Liberg, Olof; Maji?, Aleksandra; Männil, Peep; Manz, Ralph; Marboutin, Eric; Marucco, Francesca; Melovski, Dime; Mersini, Kujtim; Mertzanis, Yorgos; Mys?ajek, Robert W; Nowak, Sabina; Odden, John; Ozolins, Janis; Palomero, Guillermo; Paunovi?, Milan; Persson, Jens; Poto?nik, Hubert; Quenette, Pierre-Yves; Rauer, Georg; Reinhardt, Ilka; Rigg, Robin; Ryser, Andreas; Salvatori, Valeria; Skrbinšek, Tomaž; Stojanov, Aleksandar; Swenson, Jon E; Szemethy, László; Trajçe, Aleksandër; Tsingarska-Sedefcheva, Elena; Vá?a, Martin; Veeroja, Rauno; Wabakken, Petter; Wölfl, Manfred; Wölfl, Sybille; Zimmermann, Fridolin; Zlatanova, Diana; Boitani, Luigi

    2014-12-19

    The conservation of large carnivores is a formidable challenge for biodiversity conservation. Using a data set on the past and current status of brown bears (Ursus arctos), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), gray wolves (Canis lupus), and wolverines (Gulo gulo) in European countries, we show that roughly one-third of mainland Europe hosts at least one large carnivore species, with stable or increasing abundance in most cases in 21st-century records. The reasons for this overall conservation success include protective legislation, supportive public opinion, and a variety of practices making coexistence between large carnivores and people possible. The European situation reveals that large carnivores and people can share the same landscape. PMID:25525247

  7. The influence of snowmobile trails on coyote movements during winter in high-elevation landscapes.

    PubMed

    Gese, Eric M; Dowd, Jennifer L B; Aubry, Lise M

    2013-01-01

    Competition between sympatric carnivores has long been of interest to ecologists. Increased understanding of these interactions can be useful for conservation planning. Increased snowmobile traffic on public lands and in habitats used by Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) remains controversial due to the concern of coyote (Canis latrans) use of snowmobile trails and potential competition with lynx. Determining the variables influencing coyote use of snowmobile trails has been a priority for managers attempting to conserve lynx and their critical habitat. During 2 winters in northwest Wyoming, we backtracked coyotes for 265 km to determine how varying snow characteristics influenced coyote movements; 278 km of random backtracking was conducted simultaneously for comparison. Despite deep snow (>1 m deep), radio-collared coyotes persisted at high elevations (>2,500 m) year-round. All coyotes used snowmobile trails for some portion of their travel. Coyotes used snowmobile trails for 35% of their travel distance (random: 13%) for a mean distance of 149 m (random: 59 m). Coyote use of snowmobile trails increased as snow depth and penetrability off trails increased. Essentially, snow characteristics were most influential on how much time coyotes spent on snowmobile trails. In the early months of winter, snow depth was low, yet the snow column remained dry and the coyotes traveled off trails. As winter progressed and snow depth increased and snow penetrability increased, coyotes spent more travel distance on snowmobile trails. As spring approached, the snow depth remained high but penetrability decreased, hence coyotes traveled less on snowmobile trails because the snow column off trail was more supportive. Additionally, coyotes traveled closer to snowmobile trails than randomly expected and selected shallower snow when traveling off trails. Coyotes also preferred using snowmobile trails to access ungulate kills. Snow compaction from winter recreation influenced coyote movements within an area containing lynx and designated lynx habitat. PMID:24367565

  8. Native predators reduce harvest of reindeer by Sámi pastoralists.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, N Thompson; Andrén, Henrik; Persson, Jens; Aronsson, Malin; Chapron, Guillaume

    2012-07-01

    Contemporary efforts to protect biological diversity recognize the importance of sustaining traditional human livelihoods, particularly uses of the land that are compatible with intact landscapes and ecologically complete food webs. However, these efforts often confront conflicting goals. For example, conserving native predators may harm pastoralist economies because predators consume domestic livestock that sustain people. This potential conflict must be reconciled by policy, but such reconciliation requires a firm understanding of the effects of predators on the prey used by people. We used a long-term, large-scale database and Bayesian models to estimate the impacts of lynx (Lynx lynx), wolverine (Gulo gulo), and brown bear (Ursus arctos) on harvest of semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) by Sami pastoralists in Sweden. The average annual harvest of reindeer averaged 25% of the population (95% credible interval = 19, 31). Annual harvest declined by 96.6 (31, 155) reindeer for each lynx family group (the surveyed segment of the lynx population) in a management unit and by 94.3 (20, 160) for each wolverine reproduction (the surveyed segment of the wolverine population). We failed to detect effects of predation by brown bear. The mechanism for effects of predation on harvest was reduced population growth rate. The rate of increase of reindeer populations declined with increasing abundance of lynx and wolverine. The density of reindeer, latitude, and weather indexed by the North Atlantic Oscillation also influenced reindeer population growth rate. We conclude that there is a biological basis for compensating the Sámi reindeer herders for predation on reindeer. PMID:22908719

  9. Worldwide Occurrence of Feline Hemoplasma Infections in Wild Felid Species?

    PubMed Central

    Willi, Barbara; Filoni, Claudia; Catão-Dias, José L.; Cattori, Valentino; Meli, Marina L.; Vargas, Astrid; Martínez, Fernando; Roelke, Melody E.; Ryser-Degiorgis, Marie-Pierre; Leutenegger, Christian M.; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2007-01-01

    While hemoplasma infections in domestic cats are well studied, almost no information is available on their occurrence in wild felids. The aims of the present study were to investigate wild felid species as possible reservoirs of feline hemoplasmas and the molecular characterization of the hemoplasma isolates. Blood samples from the following 257 wild felids were analyzed: 35 Iberian lynxes from Spain, 36 Eurasian lynxes from Switzerland, 31 European wildcats from France, 45 lions from Tanzania, and 110 Brazilian wild felids, including 12 wild felid species kept in zoos and one free-ranging ocelot. Using real-time PCR, feline hemoplasmas were detected in samples of the following species: Iberian lynx, Eurasian lynx, European wildcat, lion, puma, oncilla, Geoffroy's cat, margay, and ocelot. “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum” was the most common feline hemoplasma in Iberian lynxes, Eurasian lynxes, Serengeti lions, and Brazilian wild felids, whereas “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis” was the most prevalent in European wildcats; hemoplasma coinfections were frequently observed. Hemoplasma infection was associated with species and free-ranging status of the felids in all animals and with feline leukemia virus provirus-positive status in European wildcats. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and the partial RNase P gene revealed that most hemoplasma isolates exhibit high sequence identities to domestic cat-derived isolates, although some isolates form different subclusters within the phylogenetic tree. In conclusion, 9 out of 15 wild felid species from three different continents were found to be infected with feline hemoplasmas. The effect of feline hemoplasma infections on wild felid populations needs to be further investigated. PMID:17301277

  10. The Influence of Snowmobile Trails on Coyote Movements during Winter in High-Elevation Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Gese, Eric M.; Dowd, Jennifer L. B.; Aubry, Lise M.

    2013-01-01

    Competition between sympatric carnivores has long been of interest to ecologists. Increased understanding of these interactions can be useful for conservation planning. Increased snowmobile traffic on public lands and in habitats used by Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) remains controversial due to the concern of coyote (Canis latrans) use of snowmobile trails and potential competition with lynx. Determining the variables influencing coyote use of snowmobile trails has been a priority for managers attempting to conserve lynx and their critical habitat. During 2 winters in northwest Wyoming, we backtracked coyotes for 265 km to determine how varying snow characteristics influenced coyote movements; 278 km of random backtracking was conducted simultaneously for comparison. Despite deep snow (>1 m deep), radio-collared coyotes persisted at high elevations (>2,500 m) year-round. All coyotes used snowmobile trails for some portion of their travel. Coyotes used snowmobile trails for 35% of their travel distance (random: 13%) for a mean distance of 149 m (random: 59 m). Coyote use of snowmobile trails increased as snow depth and penetrability off trails increased. Essentially, snow characteristics were most influential on how much time coyotes spent on snowmobile trails. In the early months of winter, snow depth was low, yet the snow column remained dry and the coyotes traveled off trails. As winter progressed and snow depth increased and snow penetrability increased, coyotes spent more travel distance on snowmobile trails. As spring approached, the snow depth remained high but penetrability decreased, hence coyotes traveled less on snowmobile trails because the snow column off trail was more supportive. Additionally, coyotes traveled closer to snowmobile trails than randomly expected and selected shallower snow when traveling off trails. Coyotes also preferred using snowmobile trails to access ungulate kills. Snow compaction from winter recreation influenced coyote movements within an area containing lynx and designated lynx habitat. PMID:24367565

  11. Linking climate change to population cycles of hares and C H U A N Y A N * , N I L S C H R . S T E N S E T H , C H A R L E S J . K R E B S and ZHIBIN ZHANG*

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    Linking climate change to population cycles of hares and lynx C H U A N Y A N * , N I L S C H R, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z4 Abstract The classic 10-year population cycle, are necessary but not sufficient factors in causing the observed 10-year cycles; while extrinsic climate factors

  12. Trace elements in tissues of wild carnivores and omnivores in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Bilandži?, Nina; Dež?ek, Danko; Sedak, Marija; Doki?, Maja; Simi?, Branimir; Rudan, Nevenka; Brstilo, Mate; Lisicin, Tea

    2012-01-01

    The differences in metal exposure (As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Hg) in the muscle, liver and kidney tissues of brown bears (Ursus arctos), grey wolfs (Canis lupus), Eurasian lynxs (Lynx lynx), Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) and pine martens (Martes martes) from Croatia were observed. The highest mean Cd levels were found in kidney and liver of Eurasian badger (3.05 and 0.537 mg/kg). The highest Cu concentrations (mg/kg) measured in liver tissue were obtained in order: Eurasian badger (15.2) > brown bear (12.1) > pine marten (10.3) > Eurasian lynx (8.43) > grey wolf (6.44). Result presented that Eurasian badger accumulated the highest levels of elements: As, Cu and Pb in muscle; As, Cd, Cu and Pb in liver; Cd and Pb in kidney. Kidney of pine marten accumulated the highest concentrations of As, Cu and Hg. Omnivorous species observed present an important bioindicator for the accumulation of toxic elements indicating an enhanced vulnerability for response to ecological changes in forested terrain. Generally, element concentrations found in five species observed were lower in comparison to levels reported in previous studies and below levels related to toxicosis in mammals. PMID:22037661

  13. Mathieu Basille University of Florida

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    ://ase-research.org/basille landscape ecology, movement ecology, habitat, global change, conservation, vertebrates Education 2008 Ph on survival in a large carnivore. PLOS ONE, 8:e65493. 11. Van Moorter B., Visscher D., Herfindal I., Basille M growth and lynx predation along a gradient of environmental productivity and climate in Norway

  14. 36 CFR 13.40 - Taking of fish and wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...airborne to use a firearm or any other weapon to take or assist in taking any species of bear, caribou, Sitka black-tailed deer, elk, coyote, arctic and red fox, mountain goat, moose, Dall sheep, lynx, bison, musk ox, wolf and wolverine until...

  15. 36 CFR 13.40 - Taking of fish and wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...airborne to use a firearm or any other weapon to take or assist in taking any species of bear, caribou, Sitka black-tailed deer, elk, coyote, arctic and red fox, mountain goat, moose, Dall sheep, lynx, bison, musk ox, wolf and wolverine until...

  16. 36 CFR 13.40 - Taking of fish and wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...airborne to use a firearm or any other weapon to take or assist in taking any species of bear, caribou, Sitka black-tailed deer, elk, coyote, arctic and red fox, mountain goat, moose, Dall sheep, lynx, bison, musk ox, wolf and wolverine until...

  17. 36 CFR 13.40 - Taking of fish and wildlife.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...airborne to use a firearm or any other weapon to take or assist in taking any species of bear, caribou, Sitka black-tailed deer, elk, coyote, arctic and red fox, mountain goat, moose, Dall sheep, lynx, bison, musk ox, wolf and wolverine until...

  18. 78 FR 4382 - Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone-Northwest Iowa; Under Alternative Site Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... would include one ``magnet'' site: Proposed Site 1 (417.4 acres)--City of Le Mars Industrial Park in the southwest corner of Le Mars bounded by the CN rail line to the west, Industrial Road/Lynx Road to the...

  19. A Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM Publication

    E-print Network

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    -feeding mites, caterpillars, and chinch bugs. Often you will spot evi- dence of a pest's activity before you see small insects and mites can be difficult. One method that works well is to flick the leaves of small IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT Assassin bug. Green lynx spider. Ladybug. Big-eyed bug. Green lacewing

  20. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...from the access and amendment provisions of subsection (d). (m) The Worksite Enforcement Activity and Records Index (LYNX) (JUSTICE/INS-025) system of records is exempt under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a (j)(2) from...

  1. 75 FR 52736 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ...Comment Period Ends: 10/12/2010, Contact: Patricia A. KurKul 978-281-9250. EIS No. 20100336, Draft EIS, FTA, NC, LYNX--Blue Line Extension Northeast Corridor Light Rail Project, Proposed Light Rail Extension from Center City Charlotte to...

  2. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...from the access and amendment provisions of subsection (d). (m) The Worksite Enforcement Activity and Records Index (LYNX) (JUSTICE/INS-025) system of records is exempt under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a (j)(2) from...

  3. 28 CFR 16.99 - Exemption of the Immigration and Naturalization Service Systems-limited access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...from the access and amendment provisions of subsection (d). (m) The Worksite Enforcement Activity and Records Index (LYNX) (JUSTICE/INS-025) system of records is exempt under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 552a (j)(2) from...

  4. 76 FR 74805 - Draft Environmental Assessment, Incidental Take Plan, and Application for an Incidental Take...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ...consideration, we must receive your written comments by February 7, 2012. ADDRESSES: Send comments by U.S. mail to Attn: Lynx HCP, Laury Zicari, Field Supervisor, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Maine Field Office, 17 Godfrey Drive, Suite...

  5. 78 FR 4382 - Proposed Foreign-Trade Zone-Northwest Iowa; Under Alternative Site Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ...City of Le Mars Industrial Park in the southwest corner of Le Mars bounded by the CN rail line to the west, Industrial Road/Lynx Road to the east and County Route 38 to the south in Plymouth County. The proposed zone would also include two initial...

  6. Distribution and Abundance Patterns of Spiders Inhabiting Cotton in Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Dean, D.A.; Sterling, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    Walckenaer. Southwest. Entomol. 11: 195-201. NyfI'eler, M., D. A. Dean, and W. L. Sterling. 1987a. Predation by green lynx spider, Peucetia viridans (Araneae: Oxyopidae), inhabiting cotton and woolly croton plants in east Texas. Environ. Entomol. 16: 355...

  7. Pathogen exposure varies widely among sympatric populations of wild and domestic felids1 across the United States2

    E-print Network

    Lewison, Rebecca

    as urbanization. We screened >1,000 samples from sympatric populations of puma (Puma41 concolor), bobcat (Lynx for puma and48 lowest for domestic cat) and was greater for indirectly transmitted pathogens. Sex was49 divergent between the wild felid species. For puma, suburban landuse52 predicted increased exposure

  8. 75 FR 29361 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Competitive Geothermal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... regarding the presence of Gunnison sage-grouse and Canada lynx habitat that was not analyzed in the existing... stipulations designed to protect other resources, in particular Gunnison sage-grouse (a BLM special status... not been formally adopted into the RMP. The nominated BLM lands are within occupied...

  9. Zoonotic parasites of bobcats around human landscapes.

    PubMed

    Carver, Scott; Scorza, Andrea V; Bevins, Sarah N; Riley, Seth P D; Crooks, Kevin R; Vandewoude, Sue; Lappin, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    We analyzed Lynx rufus fecal parasites from California and Colorado, hypothesizing that bobcats shed zoonotic parasites around human landscapes. Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium, Ancylostoma, Uncinaria, and Toxocara cati were shed. Toxoplasma gondii serology demonstrated exposure. Giardia and Cryptosporidium shedding increased near large human populations. Genotyped Giardia may indicate indirect transmission with humans. PMID:22718941

  10. CSIRO PUBLISHING Reproduction, Fertility and Development, 2009, 21, 848859 www.publish.csiro.au/journals/rfd

    E-print Network

    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

    of captive breeding is to conserve 85% of the genetic variability existing at the beginning of the programme IVF of in vitro- matured domestic cat oocytes was used to test the fertilising ability acrosomes between the two diluents. Iberian lynx spermatozoa fertilised domestic cat oocytes in vitro

  11. Int. Zoo Yb. (2008) 42: 190198 DOI:10.1111/j.1748-1090.2007.00036.x

    E-print Network

    Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales

    2008-01-01

    -introduction. To achieve the first goal, the Conservation Breeding Program aims to maintain 85% of the genetic diversity-words: adaptive management; applied research; conservation breeding; ex situ; genetics; husbandry; Iberian lynx Conservation Breeding Program A. VARGAS1 , I. SA´ NCHEZ2 , F. MARTI´NEZ1 , A. RIVAS1 , J. A. GODOY3 , E. ROLDA

  12. Zoonotic Parasites of Bobcats around Human Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Scorza, Andrea V.; Bevins, Sarah N.; Riley, Seth P. D.; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue; Lappin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed Lynx rufus fecal parasites from California and Colorado, hypothesizing that bobcats shed zoonotic parasites around human landscapes. Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium, Ancylostoma, Uncinaria, and Toxocara cati were shed. Toxoplasma gondii serology demonstrated exposure. Giardia and Cryptosporidium shedding increased near large human populations. Genotyped Giardia may indicate indirect transmission with humans. PMID:22718941

  13. Indices of population size are commonly used in ecological studies because obtaining actual abun-

    E-print Network

    Krebs, Charles J.

    as a population index for snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus), as the relationship between pellet counts and hare snowshoe hare densities over large areas because hares are the primary food source for lynx (Kloor 1999 per plot and hares per hectare may not be consistent across large geographical areas. Krebs et al

  14. The behavioral manipulation hypothesis Life cycle of

    E-print Network

    Mitchell, Randall J.

    of exploitation- Snowshoe Hares (Fig 14.15 Molles) · Hares in boreal N. A. ­ Eat twigs of shrubs and trees · Lynx eat mostly hares · Linked cycles? Predator-Prey Cycles? · Think and then discuss: · Under the hypothesis that predators cause this cycle, what would you expect for the following when hare populations

  15. Dog-eat-dog stress found in animals National Post

    E-print Network

    Zanette, Liana

    of sparrows builds on an earlier study of snowshoe hares, revealing a pattern of stress that likely crosses many species, including humans. When birds and hares go through stressed-out times, they cannot snowshoe hare, a common animal throughout the boreal forest, and the main diet of foxes, coyotes, lynx

  16. Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    variables are the time-dependent population level for lynxes (l(t), t 0) and that of hares (h(t), t 0). Assume that the control Input b(u) (hare birth rate), a function of food, is kept constant: b(u) = b > 0

  17. 78 FR 41036 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... Communication Systems 40 General Atomics Lynx (exportable) Synthetic Aperture Radar/Ground Moving Target... (exportable) Synthetic Aperture Radar/Ground Moving Target Indicator (SAR/GMTI) Systems 40 AN/DAS-1 Multi...-Optical/Infrared (EO/ IR), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), and laser designators. The MQ-9 systems...

  18. 78 FR 53002 - Notice of Proposed Buy America Waiver for a Video Ready Access Device Cabinet

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Register published April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477), or you may visit http://www.regulations.gov . FOR FURTHER... request for comment. SUMMARY: The Charlotte Area Transit System (CATS) requested a waiver of the Federal... CATS LYNX Blue Line Extension (BLE) project, which is an FTA-funded project. With certain...

  19. Cytauxzoonosis: A tick-transmitted parasite of domestic and wild

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    · Affects wild & domestic felines · Serious illness, often fatal southeastern US · Transmitted by ticks #12­4/25/2009 ­1 Cytauxzoonosis: A tick-transmitted parasite of domestic and wild cats (Felis catus ) Bobcats (Lynx rufus) Transmission: Ticks Dermacentor variabilis (American Dog Tick

  20. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in 3 zoos in Mexico City, Mexico using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus...

  1. AGGRESSIVE DEFENSIVE BEHAVIOR BY FREE-RANGING WHITE-TAILED DEER

    E-print Network

    . JENKS, CHRISTOPHER N. JACQUES, ROBERT W. KLAVER, AND CHRISTOPHER C. SWANSON Department of Wildlife. virginianus--Garner and Morrison 1980; Richardson et al. 1983). Defensive behavior of ungulates normally and Schweitzer 1979; Marion and Sexton 1979), wolves (C. lupus--Co^te´ et al. 1997), bobcats (Lynx rufus

  2. 78 FR 47272 - Notice of Intent to Grant Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ..., Washington, an exclusive license to the pea variety named ``Lynx''. DATES: Comments must be received on or.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Federal Government's rights in this plant variety are assigned to the United... license this plant variety as Central Washington Grain Growers, Inc. of Waterville, Washington...

  3. Wildlife Report Roger L. Di Silvestro

    E-print Network

    DeStefano, Stephen

    . Although similar to the bobcat ( E rufus),the lynx can be distin- guished by its longer legs, larger feet, and longer ear tufts. It lacks the bobcat's more definite markings over the body, and its tail is black- tipped above and below, while the stubby tail of the bobcat is black only on the upperside of the tip

  4. Management and Conservation Article Space Use and Habitat Selection by Bobcats in the

    E-print Network

    Clark, William R.

    Management and Conservation Article Space Use and Habitat Selection by Bobcats in the Fragmented, IA 50049, USA ABSTRACT Historically, bobcats (Lynx rufus) were found throughout the Corn Belt region the century after European settlement. Reports of bobcat occurrences have been increasing in Iowa, USA

  5. Tracking Cats: Problems with Placing Feline Carnivores O, dD Isoscapes

    E-print Network

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    /Findings: We used coupled dDh and d18 Oh measurements from the North American bobcat (Lynx rufus) and puma analyzed. Bobcat and puma lacked a significant correlation between H/O isotopes in hair and local waters (Odocoileus virginianus; collagen, bone phosphate). Conclusions/Significance: Puma and bobcat hairs do

  6. Prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii and Neosport caninum antibodies in Spanish ibex (Capra pryenaica hispanica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild felids are considered important in maintaining the sylvatic cycle of Toxoplasma gondii. Although, T. gondii antibodies have been reported in several species of wild felids, little is known of the epidemiology and risk factors associated with T. gondii infection in wild cats. The Iberian lynx (L...

  7. Massive star formation in a gravitationally-lensed H II galaxy at z=3.357

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauch, G.; Stanford, M.; Holden, S. A.; Stern, B. P.; Rosati, D.; Lombardi, P.; Humphrey, M.; Villar-Martin, A.; Hook, M.; Fosbury, R. N.; Squires, R. A. E.

    2003-01-01

    The Lynx arc, with a redshift of 3.357, was discovered during spectroscopic follow-up of the z=0.570 cluster RX J0848+4456 from the ROSAT Deep Cluster Survey. The arc is characterized by a very red R - K color and strong, narrow emission lines.

  8. How a Picture Book Happens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonners, Susan

    1994-01-01

    The author and illustrator of a picture book about the life cycle of the lynx describes the research and development process she used to create the book. Contacts with wildlife biologists, presenting the predator/prey relationship, creating pictures and text, drawing from life, and creating the book jacket are among the topics covered. (KRN)

  9. Design Issues in a Hypertext-Based Information System for Bibliographic Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitroff, Alexandra; Wolfram, Dietmar

    1993-01-01

    Describes initial design considerations and implementation issues for a hypertext retrieval system for structured bibliographic data. Previous research on information retrieval and hypertext is reviewed; HyperLynx, a hypertext prototype information retrieval system that emphasized ease of use and browsing capabilities, is explained; and further…

  10. Making It Their Own: Severn Ojibwe Communicative Practices. Anthropological Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Lisa Philips

    Using a discourse-centered approach to ethnography, this book provides an empirically based, contemporary overview of a rapidly changing First Nations village in northern Ontario (Canada). Data were collected in the 1980s during a 2-year residence and follow-up visits in the Severn Ojibwa community of Lynx Lake, a remote subarctic village in which…

  11. Searcher Response in a Hypertext-Based Bibliographic Information Retrieval System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitroff, Alexandra; Wolfram, Dietmar

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study of graduate students that examined search behavior and affective response to a hypertext-based bibliographic information retrieval system called HyperLynx for searchers with different search skills and backgrounds. Previous experience with hypertext or Boolean searching is examined, and search times are discussed. (21 references)…

  12. Revisiting food-based models of territoriality in solitary predators.

    PubMed

    López-Bao, José V; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Delibes, Miguel; Fedriani, José M; Calzada, Javier; Ferreras, Pablo; Palomares, Francisco

    2014-07-01

    Food availability is considered a major factor determining spacing behaviour in territorial species, especially for females. Theoretically, spatial overlap (considered the opposite of territoriality) and food availability are related in a nonlinear manner (hypothesized inverted-U function), with high overlap levels at the extremes of a food availability gradient and low overlap at intermediate levels of this gradient. Similar patterns are expected for encounter frequencies owing to its expected correlation with spatial overlap. However, these predictions have rarely been tested in highly structured social systems on a broad gradient of food availability, which implicitly requires experimental manipulation. We test these predictions in a solitary, territorial and trophic specialist, the Iberian lynx Lynx pardinus, taking advantage of a three-decade data set of spatial behaviour in different scenarios of food availability (i.e. rabbit density). In contrast with expectations, home range overlap among resident females was low (median overlap index = 0.08, range 0-0.57) and core area overlap was nearly nil (median overlap index = 0, range 0-0.22) throughout the entire gradient of prey availability. Furthermore, spatial associations between pairs of females were negligible regardless marked variation in prey availability. Therefore, we did not find support for a model of flexible lynx territoriality driven by food availability. Our results suggest that the exclusive use of space in the Iberian lynx was not related to food. Lack of influence of prey availability on lynx territoriality may be adaptive to cope with the consequences of frequent drought-induced periods of prey scarcity or other disturbance typically affecting wild rabbit populations in Mediterranean environments. Thus, lynx would adopt an obstinate strategy of territoriality that consists in defending exclusive areas across a broad range of resource availability ensuring an exclusive access to the minimum amount of prey necessary for survival and eventually reproduction even during periods of prey scarcity. However, we found signs that territoriality was influenced by lynx density in a nonlinear fashion. Our results suggest the occurrence of population regulation through territoriality in this species. PMID:24720673

  13. In situ Analysis of North American Diamond: Implications for Diamond Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, D. J.; Van Rythoven, A. D.; Hauri, E.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    Diamond crystals from three North American kimberlite occurrences were investigated with cathodoluminescence (CL) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to determine their growth history, carbon isotope composition and nitrogen content. Samples analyzed include sixteen from Lynx (Quebec), twelve from Kelsey Lake (Colorado) and eighteen from A154 South (Diavik mine, Northwest Territories). Growth histories for the samples vary from simple to highly complex based on their CL images and depending on the individual stone. Deformation lamellae are evident in CL images of the Lynx crystals which typically are brownish in color. Two to five points per diamond were analyzed by SIMS for carbon isotope composition (?13CPDB) and three to seven points for nitrogen content. The results for the A154 South (?13CPDB = -6.76 to -1.68 ‰) and Kelsey Lake (?13CPDB = -11.81 to -2.43 ‰) stones (mixed peridotitic and eclogitic suites) are similar to earlier reported values. The Lynx kimberlite stones have anomalously high carbon isotope ratios and range from -3.58 to +1.74 ‰. The Lynx diamond suite is almost entirely peridotitic. The unusually high (i.e. >-5‰) ?13C values of the Lynx diamonds, as well as those from Wawa, Ontario and Renard, Quebec, may indicate an anomalous carbon reservoir for the Superior cratonic mantle relative to other cratons. In addition to the heavier carbon isotope values, the Lynx samples have very low nitrogen contents (<100 ppm). Nitrogen contents for Kelsey Lake and Diavik samples are more typical and range to ~1100 ppm. Comparison of observed core to rim variations in nitrogen content and carbon isotopes with modeled Rayleigh fractionation trends for published diamond growth mechanisms allows for evaluation of carbon speciation and other parent fluid conditions. Observed trends that closely follow modeled data are rare, but appear to suggest diamond growth from carbonate-bearing fluids at Lynx and Diavik, and growth from a methane-bearing fluid at Kelsey Lake. However the majority of crystals appear to have very complex growth histories that are clearly the result of multiple growth and resorption events. Trends observed in most of the samples from this study are chaotic and no consistent patterns are seen.

  14. When species' ranges meet: assessing differences in habitat selection between sympatric large carnivores.

    PubMed

    Rauset, Geir Rune; Mattisson, Jenny; Andrén, Henrik; Chapron, Guillaume; Persson, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Differentiation in habitat selection among sympatric species may depend on niche partitioning, species interactions, selection mechanisms and scales considered. In a mountainous area in Sweden, we explored hierarchical habitat selection in Global Positioning System-collared individuals of two sympatric large carnivore species; an obligate predator, the Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), and a generalist predator and scavenger, the wolverine (Gulo gulo). Although the species' fundamental niches differ widely, their ranges overlap in this area where they share a prey base and main cause of mortality. Both lynx and wolverines selected for steep and rugged terrain in mountainous birch forest and in heaths independent of scale and available habitats. However, the selection of lynx for their preferred habitats was stronger when they were forming home ranges and they selected the same habitats within their home ranges independent of home range composition. Wolverines displayed a greater variability when selecting home ranges and habitat selection also varied with home range composition. Both species selected for habitats that promote survival through limited encounters with humans, but which also are rich in prey, and selection for these habitats was accordingly stronger in winter when human activity was high and prey density was low. We suggest that the observed differences between the species result primarily from different foraging strategies, but may also depend on differences in ranging and resting behaviour, home range size, and relative density of each species. Our results support the prediction that sympatric carnivores with otherwise diverging niches can select for the same resources when sharing main sources of food and mortality. PMID:23242426

  15. Prey switching as a means of enhancing persistence in predators at the trailing southern edge.

    PubMed

    Peers, Michael J L; Wehtje, Morgan; Thornton, Daniel H; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the effects of climate change on species' persistence is a major research interest; however, most studies have focused on responses at the northern or expanding range edge. There is a pressing need to explain how species can persist at their southern range when changing biotic interactions will influence species occurrence. For predators, variation in distribution of primary prey owing to climate change will lead to mismatched distribution and local extinction, unless their diet is altered to more extensively include alternate prey. We assessed whether addition of prey information in climate projections restricted projected habitat of a specialist predator, Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis), and if switching from their primary prey (snowshoe hare; Lepus americanus) to an alternate prey (red squirrel; Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) mitigates range restriction along the southern range edge. Our models projected distributions of each species to 2050 and 2080 to then refine predictions for southern lynx on the basis of varying combinations of prey availability. We found that models that incorporated information on prey substantially reduced the total predicted southern range of lynx in both 2050 and 2080. However, models that emphasized red squirrel as the primary species had 7-24% lower southern range loss than the corresponding snowshoe hare model. These results illustrate that (i) persistence at the southern range may require species to exploit higher portions of alternate food; (ii) selection may act on marginal populations to accommodate phenotypic changes that will allow increased use of alternate resources; and (iii) climate projections based solely on abiotic data can underestimate the severity of future range restriction. In the case of Canada lynx, our results indicate that the southern range likely will be characterized by locally varying levels of mismatch with prey such that the extent of range recession or local adaptation may appear as a geographical mosaic. PMID:24353147

  16. Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicles as an Opportunity to Consolidate and Calibrate Ground Based and Satellite Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.

    2014-12-01

    XCOR Aerospace, a commercial space company, is planning to provide frequent, low cost access to near-Earth space on the Lynx suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle (sRLV). Measurements in the external vacuum environment can be made and can launch from most runways on a limited lead time. Lynx can operate as a platform to perform suborbital in situ measurements and remote sensing to supplement models and simulations with new data points. These measurements can serve as a quantitative link to existing instruments and be used as a basis to calibrate detectors on spacecraft. Easier access to suborbital data can improve the longevity and cohesiveness of spacecraft and ground-based resources. A study of how these measurements can be made on Lynx sRLV will be presented. At the boundary between terrestrial and space weather, measurements from instruments on Lynx can help develop algorithms to optimize the consolidation of ground and satellite based data as well as assimilate global models with new data points. For example, current tides and the equatorial electrojet, essential to understanding the Thermosphere-Ionosphere system, can be measured in situ frequently and on short notice. Furthermore, a negative-ion spectrometer and a Faraday cup, can take measurements of the D-region ion composition. A differential GPS receiver can infer the spatial gradient of ionospheric electron density. Instruments and optics on spacecraft degrade over time, leading to calibration drift. Lynx can be a cost effective platform for deploying a reference instrument to calibrate satellites with a frequent and fast turnaround and a successful return of the instrument. A calibrated reference instrument on Lynx can make collocated observations as another instrument and corrections are made for the latter, thus ensuring data consistency and mission longevity. Aboard a sRLV, atmospheric conditions that distort remotely sensed data (ground and spacecraft based) can be measured in situ. Moreover, an active instrument can be deployed in a sRLV under a satellite track, and serve as a "standard candle" for instruments on satellites. Yearly calibrations of the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Experiment (SEE) instrument aboard the TIMED orbiter using sounding rockets depict the necessity of calibrations and illustrates calibration frequency.

  17. Predator-prey systems depend on a prey refuge.

    PubMed

    Chivers, W J; Gladstone, W; Herbert, R D; Fuller, M M

    2014-11-01

    Models of near-exclusive predator-prey systems such as that of the Canadian lynx and snowshoe hare have included factors such as a second prey species, a Holling Type II predator response and climatic or seasonal effects to reproduce sub-sets of six signature patterns in the empirical data. We present an agent-based model which does not require the factors or constraints of previous models to reproduce all six patterns in persistent populations. Our parsimonious model represents a generalised predator and prey species with a small prey refuge. The lack of the constraints of previous models, considered to be important for those models, casts doubt on the current hypothesised mechanisms of exclusive predator-prey systems. The implication for management of the lynx, a protected species, is that maintenance of an heterogeneous environment offering natural refuge areas for the hare is the most important factor for the conservation of this species. PMID:25058806

  18. Modeling population dynamics: A quantile approach.

    PubMed

    Chavas, Jean-Paul

    2015-04-01

    The paper investigates the modeling of population dynamics, both conceptually and empirically. It presents a reduced form representation that provides a flexible characterization of population dynamics. It leads to the specification of a threshold quantile autoregression (TQAR) model, which captures nonlinear dynamics by allowing lag effects to vary across quantiles of the distribution as well as with previous population levels. The usefulness of the model is illustrated in an application to the dynamics of lynx population. We find statistical evidence that the quantile autoregression parameters vary across quantiles (thus rejecting the AR model as well as the TAR model) as well as with past populations (thus rejecting the quantile autoregression QAR model). The results document the nature of dynamics and cycle in the lynx population over time. They show how both the period of the cycle and the speed of population adjustment vary with population level and environmental conditions. PMID:25661501

  19. Mechanisms of Inhibition and Potentiation of ?4?2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Members of the Ly6 Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meilin; Puddifoot, Clare A; Taylor, Palmer; Joiner, William J

    2015-10-01

    ?4?2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are abundantly expressed throughout the central nervous system and are thought to be the primary target of nicotine, the main addictive substance in cigarette smoking. Understanding the mechanisms by which these receptors are regulated may assist in developing compounds to selectively interfere with nicotine addiction. Here we report previously unrecognized modulatory properties of members of the Ly6 protein family on ?4?2 nAChRs. Using a FRET-based Ca(2+) flux assay, we found that the maximum response of ?4?2 receptors to agonist was strongly inhibited by Ly6h and Lynx2 but potentiated by Ly6g6e. The mechanisms underlying these opposing effects appear to be fundamentally distinct. Receptor inhibition by Lynx2 was accompanied by suppression of ?4?2 expression at the cell surface, even when assays were preceded by chronic exposure of cells to an established chaperone, nicotine. Receptor inhibition by Lynx2 also was resistant to pretreatment with extracellular phospholipase C, which cleaves lipid moieties like those that attach Ly6 proteins to the plasma membrane. In contrast, potentiation of ?4?2 activity by Ly6g6e was readily reversible by pretreatment with phospholipase C. Potentiation was also accompanied by slowing of receptor desensitization and an increase in peak currents. Collectively our data support roles for Lynx2 and Ly6g6e in intracellular trafficking and allosteric potentiation of ?4?2 nAChRs, respectively. PMID:26276394

  20. Exercise Session 1 Alessandro Abate

    E-print Network

    Abate, Alessandro

    for lynxes (l(t), t 0) and that of hares (h(t), t 0). Assume that the control Input b(u) (hare birth rate.haber@tudelft.nl Delft Center for Systems and Control, TU Delft September 9, 2010 ­ Ac.Yr. 2010/11, 1e Sem. Q1 ­ Exercise = Ax + Bu, y = Cx. Relate the new variable x with q. 2. Fix a control input u(t). What conditions

  1. Spiders Associated with Lemon Horsemint (Monarda citriodora Cervants) in East Central Texas. 

    E-print Network

    Nyfferler, M.; Dean, D.A.; Sterling, W.L.

    1992-01-01

    of the cotton fleahopper on woolly croton. Southwest. Entomol. 13: 177-183. Breene, R. G., A. W. Hartstack, W. L. Sterling, and M. Nyffeler. 1989a. Natural control of the cotton fleahop per, Pseudatomoscelis seriatus (Reuter) (Hemiptera, Miridae), in Texas.... Sterling. 1987a. Preda tion by green lynx spider, Peucetia viridans (Araneae: Oxyopidae), inhabiting cotton and woolly croton plants in east Texas. Environ. Entomol. 16: 355-359. Nyffeler, M., D. A. Dean, and W. L. Sterling. 1987b. Evalu ation...

  2. Heterozygosity-fitness correlations and inbreeding depression in two critically endangered mammals.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, María José; Gañan, Natalia; Godoy, José Antonio; Del Olmo, Ana; Garde, Julian; Espeso, Gerardo; Vargas, Astrid; Martinez, Fernando; Roldán, Eduardo R S; Gomendio, Montserrat

    2012-12-01

    The relation among inbreeding, heterozygosity, and fitness has been studied primarily among outbred populations, and little is known about these phenomena in endangered populations. Most researchers conclude that the relation between coefficient of inbreeding estimated from pedigrees and fitness traits (inbreeding-fitness correlations) better reflects inbreeding depression than the relation between marker heterozygosity and fitness traits (heterozygosity-fitness correlations). However, it has been suggested recently that heterozygosity-fitness correlations should only be expected when inbreeding generates extensive identity disequilibrium (correlations in heterozygosity and homozygosity across loci throughout the genome). We tested this hypothesis in Mohor gazelle (Gazella dama mhorr) and Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). For Mohor gazelle, we calculated the inbreeding coefficient and measured heterozygosity at 17 microsatellite loci. For Iberian lynx, we measured heterozygosity at 36 microsatellite loci. In both species we estimated semen quality, a phenotypic trait directly related to fitness that is controlled by many loci and is affected by inbreeding depression. Both species showed evidence of extensive identity disequilibrium, and in both species heterozygosity was associated with semen quality. In the Iberian lynx the low proportion of normal sperm associated with low levels of heterozygosity was so extreme that it is likely to limit the fertility of males. In Mohor gazelle, although heterozygosity was associated with semen quality, inbreeding coefficient was not. This result suggests that when coefficient of inbreeding is calculated on the basis of a genealogy that begins after a long history of inbreeding, the coefficient of inbreeding fails to capture previous demographic information because it is a poor estimator of accumulated individual inbreeding. We conclude that among highly endangered species with extensive identity disequilibrium, examination of heterozygosity-fitness correlations may be an effective way to detect inbreeding depression, whereas inbreeding-fitness correlations may be poor indicators of inbreeding depression if the pedigree does not accurately reflect the history of inbreeding. PMID:22897325

  3. Gastric spiral bacteria in small felids.

    PubMed

    Kinsel, M J; Kovarik, P; Murnane, R D

    1998-06-01

    Nine small cats, including one bobcat (Felis rufus), one Pallas cat (F. manul), one Canada lynx (F. lynx canadensis), two fishing cats (F. viverrina), two margays (F. wiedii), and two sand cats (F. margarita), necropsied between June 1995 and March 1997 had large numbers of gastric spiral bacteria, whereas five large cats, including one African lion (Panthera leo), two snow leopards (P. uncia), one Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica), and one jaguar (P. onca), necropsied during the same period had none. All of the spiral organisms from the nine small cats were histologically and ultrastructurally similar. Histologically, the spiral bacteria were 5-14 microm long with five to nine coils per organism and were located both extracellularly within gastric glands and surface mucus, and intracellularly in parietal cells. Spiral bacteria in gastric mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx, one fishing cat, and the two sand cats were gram negative and had corkscrewlike to tumbling motility when viewed with phase contrast microscopy. The bacteria were 0.5-0.7 microm wide, with a periodicity of 0.65-1.1 microm in all cats. Bipolar sheathed flagella were occasionally observed, and no periplasmic fibrils were seen. The bacteria were extracellular in parietal cell canaliculi and intracellular within parietal cells. Culture of mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx and sand cats was unsuccessful. Based on morphology, motility, and cellular tropism, the bacteria were probably Helicobacter-like organisms. Although the two margays had moderate lymphoplasmacytic gastritis, the other cats lacked or had only mild gastric lymphoid infiltrates, suggesting that these organisms are either commensals or opportunistic pathogens. PMID:9732040

  4. Basic haematological values in carnivores--II. The Felidae.

    PubMed

    Pospísil, J; Kase, F; Váhala, J

    1987-01-01

    1. Basic haematological values in 34 animals of eight carnivorous species are reported. 2. In four Northern lynxs (Lynx lynx lynx), two male and two female animals, the mean values are given: erythrocyte counts 8.51 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.392/l, haemoglobin content 148.0 g/l and leukocyte count 7.92 X 10(9)/l. 3. In six male pumas (Puma concolor missolensis) the mean values estimated are: erythrocyte count 9.35 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.43/l, haemoglobin content 163.9 g/l and leukocyte count 7.73 X 10(9)/l. Individual values in one female puma are also given. 4. In six jaguars (Panthera onca), three male and three female animals, the mean values are given: erythrocyte count 8.27 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.37/l, haemoglobin content 137.1 g/l and leukocyte count 15.15 X 10(9)/l. 5. Only individual values are reported in one clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa), in one leopard (Panthera pardus saxicolor), in one Corbett's tiger (Panthera tigris Corbetti) and in one Altaic tiger (Panthera tigris Altaica). 6. In four lions (Panthera leo leo), two male and two female animals, the mean estimated values are: erythrocyte count 10.14 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.462/l, haemoglobin content 159.0 g/l and leukocyte count 11.05 X 10(9)/l. In six female cheetahs (Acinonox jubatus jubatus) the mean values estimated are: erythrocyte count 7.86 X 10(12)/l, haematocrit 0.373/l, haemoglobin content 142.8 g/l and leukocyte count 8.65 X 10(9)/l. For three male cheetahs only individual values are reported. 8. All results achieved are compared with those abstracted from the literature and discussed. PMID:2886279

  5. New Platforms for Suborbital Astronomical Observations and In Situ Atmospheric Measurements: Spacecraft, Instruments, and Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodway, K.; DeForest, C. E.; Diller, J.; Vilas, F.; Sollitt, L. S.; Reyes, M. F.; Filo, A. S.; Anderson, E.

    2014-12-01

    Suborbital astronomical observations have over 50 years' history using NASA's sounding rockets and experimental space planes. The new commercial space industry is developing suborbital reusable launch vehicles (sRLV's) to provide low-cost, flexible, and frequent access to space at ~100 km altitude. In the case of XCOR Aerospace's Lynx spacecraft, the vehicle design and capabilities work well for hosting specially designed experiments that can be flown with a human-tended researcher or alone with the pilot on a customized mission. Some of the first-generation instruments and facilities that will conduct solar observations on dedicated Lynx science missions include the SwRI Solar Instrument Pointing Platform (SSIPP) and Atsa Suborbital Observatory, as well as KickSat sprites, which are picosatellites for in situ atmospheric and solar phenomena measurements. The SSIPP is a demonstration two-stage pointed solar observatory that operates inside the Lynx cockpit. The coarse pointing stage includes the pilot in the feedback loop, and the fine stage stabilizes the solar image to achieve arcsecond class pointing. SSIPP is a stepping-stone to future external instruments that can operate with larger apertures and shorter wavelengths in the solar atmosphere. The Planetary Science Institute's Atsa Suborbital Observatory combines the strengths of ground-based observatories and space-based observing to create a facility where a telescope is maintained and used interchangeably with either in-house facility instruments or user-provided instruments. The Atsa prototype is a proof of concept, hand-guided camera that mounts on the interior of the Lynx cockpit to test target acquisition and tracking for human-operated suborbital astronomy. KickSat sprites are mass-producible, one inch printed circuit boards (PCBs) populated by programmable off the shelf microprocessors and radios for real time data transmission. The sprite PCBs can integrate chip-based radiometers, magnetometers, accelerometers, etc. This low-cost, customizable platform provides researchers the ability to design immediately responsive, repeatable, high resolution experiments.

  6. Use of object-oriented techniques in a beam-line control system

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.; Rueden, W. von; Butler, H.; Yang, J.

    1994-12-31

    The authors describe the use of object-oriented programming in the control and data-acquisition system for the upgraded CERN neutrino beam-line. C++ in conjunction with Posix threads running under Lynx-OS have been used in several front-end PCs. These communicate using Remote Procedure Calls over ethernet with a workstation running the commercial supervisory package, FactoryLink.

  7. A strategy for screening and identifying mycotoxins in herbal medicine using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lian-xiang; Xiong, Ai-zhen; Wang, Rui; Ji, Shen; Yang, Li; Wang, Zheng-tao

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an effective strategy for screening and identifying mycotoxins in herbal medicine (HM). Here, Imperatae Rhizoma, a commonly used Chinese herb, was selected as a model HM. A crude drug contaminated with fungi was analyzed by comparing with uncontaminated ones. Ultra-performance LC coupled to tandem quadrupole TOF-MS (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) with collision energy function was applied to analyze different samples from Imperatae Rhizoma. Then, MarkerLynx(TM) software was employed to screen the excess components in analytes, compared with control samples, and those selected markers were likely to be the metabolites of fungi. Furthermore, each of the accurate masses of the markers obtained from MarkerLynx(TM) was then searched in a mycotoxins/fungal metabolites database established in advance. The molecular formulas with relative mass error between the measured and theoretical mass within 5 ppm were chosen and then applied to MassFragment(TM) analysis for further confirmation of their structures. With the use of this approach, five mycotoxins that have never been reported in HM were identified in contaminated Imperatae Rhizoma. The results demonstrate the potential of UPLC-Q-TOF-MS coupled with the MarkerLynx(TM) software and MassFragment(TM) tool as an efficient and convenient method to screen and identify mycotoxins in herbal materials and aid in the quality control of HM. PMID:23873590

  8. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting.

    PubMed

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  9. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in wild carnivores from Spain.

    PubMed

    Sobrino, R; Cabezón, O; Millán, J; Pabón, M; Arnal, M C; Luco, D F; Gortázar, C; Dubey, J P; Almeria, S

    2007-09-30

    Serum samples from 282 wild carnivores from different regions of Spain were tested for antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii by the modified agglutination test using a cut-off value of 1:25. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 22 of 27 (81.5%) of Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus), 3 of 6 European wildcats (Felis silvestris), 66 of 102 (64.7%) red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 15 of 32 (46.9%) wolves (Canis lupus), 26 of 37 (70.3%) Eurasian badgers (Meles meles), 17 of 20 (85.0%) stone martens (Martes foina), 4 of 4 pine martens (Martes martes), 6 of 6 Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra), 4 of 4 polecats (Mustela putorius), 1 of 1 ferret (Mustela putorius furo), 13 of 21 (61.9%) European genets (Genetta genetta), and 13 of 22 (59.1%) Egyptian mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon). Serological results indicated a widespread exposure to T. gondii among wild carnivores in Spain. The high T. gondii seroprevalence in Iberian lynx and the European wildcat reported here may be of epidemiologic significance because seropositive cats might have shed oocysts. PMID:17689869

  10. Emergence of canine distemper virus strains with modified molecular signature and enhanced neuronal tropism leading to high mortality in wild carnivores.

    PubMed

    Origgi, F C; Plattet, P; Sattler, U; Robert, N; Casaubon, J; Mavrot, F; Pewsner, M; Wu, N; Giovannini, S; Oevermann, A; Stoffel, M H; Gaschen, V; Segner, H; Ryser-Degiorgis, M-P

    2012-11-01

    An ongoing canine distemper epidemic was first detected in Switzerland in the spring of 2009. Compared to previous local canine distemper outbreaks, it was characterized by unusually high morbidity and mortality, rapid spread over the country, and susceptibility of several wild carnivore species. Here, the authors describe the associated pathologic changes and phylogenetic and biological features of a multiple highly virulent canine distemper virus (CDV) strain detected in and/or isolated from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), Eurasian badgers (Meles meles), stone (Martes foina) and pine (Martes martes) martens, from a Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), and a domestic dog. The main lesions included interstitial to bronchointerstitial pneumonia and meningopolioencephalitis, whereas demyelination--the classic presentation of CDV infection--was observed in few cases only. In the brain lesions, viral inclusions were mainly in the nuclei of the neurons. Some significant differences in brain and lung lesions were observed between foxes and mustelids. Swiss CDV isolates shared together with a Hungarian CDV strain detected in 2004. In vitro analysis of the hemagglutinin protein from one of the Swiss CDV strains revealed functional and structural differences from that of the reference strain A75/17, with the Swiss strain showing increased surface expression and binding efficiency to the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM). These features might be part of a novel molecular signature, which might have contributed to an increase in virus pathogenicity, partially explaining the high morbidity and mortality, the rapid spread, and the large host spectrum observed in this outbreak. PMID:22362965

  11. Mega starbirth cluster is biggest, brightest and hottest ever seen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-10-01

    Artist’s impression of the Lynx Arc hi-res Size hi-res: 4519 kb Credits: European Space Agency, NASA and Robert A.E. Fosbury (European Space Agency/Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility, Germany) Artist’s impression of the Lynx Arc This illustration shows an artist’s impression of the so-called Lynx arc, a newly identified distant super-cluster that contains a million blue-white stars twice as hot as similar stars in our Milky Way galaxy. The Lynx arc is one million times brighter than the well-known Orion Nebula, a nearby prototypical ‘starbirth’ region visible with small telescopes. The stars in the Lynx arc are more than twice as hot as the Orion Nebula’s central stars, with surface temperatures up to 80 000°C. Though there are much bigger and brighter star-forming regions than the Orion Nebula in our local Universe, none are as bright as the Lynx arc, nor do they contain such large numbers of hot stars. The stars are so hot that a very large fraction of their light is emitted in the ultraviolet that makes the gas glow with the green and red colours illustrated here. The so-called Lynx Arc is one million times brighter than the well-known Orion Nebula, a nearby prototypical 'starbirth' region visible with small telescopes. The newly identified super-cluster contains a million blue-white stars that are twice as hot as similar stars in our Milky Way galaxy. It is a rarely glimpsed example of the early days of the Universe where furious firestorms of starbirth blazed across the skies. The spectacular cluster's opulence is dimmed when seen from Earth only by the fact that it is 12 000 million light years away. The discovery of this unique and tantalising object was the result of a systematic study of distant clusters of galaxies carried out with major X-ray, optical and infrared telescopes, including the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, ROSAT and the Keck Telescopes. Bob Fosbury, of the European Space Agency's Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility in Germany, and a team of international co-authors report the discovery in the 20 October 2003 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. The mega-cluster of stars appears as a puzzling red arc behind a distant galaxy cluster 5400 million light-years away in the northern constellation of Lynx. The arc is the stretched and magnified image of a mysterious celestial object about 12 000 million light-years away (at a redshift of 3.36), far beyond the cluster of galaxies. This means that the remote source existed when the Universe was less than 2000 million years old. Fosbury and colleagues first tried to identify the arc by analysing the light from the object, but the team was not able to recognise the pattern of colours in the spectral signature of the remote object. While looking for matches with the colour spectrum, Fosbury realised that the light was related to that of the nearby Orion Nebula, a star-forming region in our own Milky Way. However where the Orion Nebula is powered by only four hot and bright blue stars, the Lynx Arc must contain around a million such stars! Furthermore, the spectrum shows that the stars in the Lynx Arc are more than twice as hot as the Orion Nebula's central stars, with surface temperatures up to 80 000°C. Though there are much bigger and brighter star-forming regions than the Orion Nebula in our local Universe, none are as bright as the Lynx Arc, nor do they contain such large numbers of hot stars. Even the most massive, normal nearby stars are no hotter than around 40 000°C. However, stars forming from the original, pristine gas in the early Universe can be more massive and consequently much hotter - perhaps up to 120 000°C. The earliest stars may have been as much as several hundred solar masses, but the chemical make-up of the Universe today prevents stars from forming beyond about 100 solar masses. Such 'primordial' super-hot stars are thought to be the first luminous objects to condense after the Big Bang cooled. Astronomers believe that these first 'monster' stars formed considerably earlier than the Lynx Arc - up

  12. Using PGFM (13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin F2?) as a non-invasive pregnancy marker for felids.

    PubMed

    Dehnhard, M; Finkenwirth, C; Crosier, A; Penfold, L; Ringleb, J; Jewgenow, K

    2012-04-01

    Understanding the complex endocrine interactions that control reproduction in felids is essential for captive breeding management. The most important demand is a quick and reliable pregnancy diagnosis. However, the occurrence of pseudopregnancies in felids complicates matters. We investigated whether the fecal prostaglandin metabolite (PGFM) recently suggested for pregnancy diagnosis in the lynx is suitable for all felid species. We found that increased levels of PGFM during the last trimester indicate pregnancy in seven of the eight main lineages of the carnivore family Felidae. PGFM levels in a sand cat (domestic cat lineage) were basal at mating and remained so until Day 40 post-mating. Day 41 marked the beginning of a distinct increase culminating in peak levels of 6.5 ?g/g before parturition and decreasing again to baseline thereafter. Similar pregnancy profiles were obtained from the domestic cat, the leopard cat, the lynx, the ocelot and the caracal lineage, whereas in pseudopregnant individuals (sand cat, Iberian and Eurasian lynx) fecal PGFM remained at basal levels. In pregnant cheetahs (puma lineage) PGFM increased above basal following day ?48 peaking before pregnancy but remained at baseline in pseudopregnant females. Discrepancies existed in the Panthera lineage. While Chinese leopard, Sumatran tiger, and the black panther showed marked increases of PGFM during the last weeks of pregnancy, only moderate increases in PGFM levels were found in the Indochinese tiger and the Persian leopard. Altogether, PGFM as tool for pregnancy diagnosis has been proven to be useful in breeding management of felids. PMID:22192399

  13. A Fall fur-hunt from Maine to New Brunswick, Canada: The 1858 journal of Manly Hardy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krohn, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    Ecologists, conservationists, and others increasingly ask questions that require a reliable understanding of natural conditions in the past. For example, when the US Fish and Wildlife Service proposed to list the Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) under the Federal Endangered Species Act, there was a need to know the historical status of this species in the northeastern US. The natural history writings of Manly Hardy, a successful, nineteenth-century businessman and respected amateur naturalist from Brewer, ME, proved useful in assessing the lynx's historical status. Because of the wide array of potential uses of Hardy's writings, the objective of this paper is to make biologists and other scholars aware of Hardy, especially his 15 surviving journals, 1852-1899. Hardy left the most extensive published record of any of the naturalists who wrote about wildlife in Maine from the late 1800s through the early 1900s. His articles and essays covered a wide range of subjects about a variety of bird and mammal species. A recently published biographical sketch of Hardy contains an annotated bibliography of his publications along with the republication of 14 of his mammalian works. In contrast, this article contains an example of his unpublished journal writing with significant wildlife observations.

  14. Chromosomal rearrangements and karyotype evolution in carnivores revealed by chromosome painting

    PubMed Central

    Nie, W; Wang, J; Su, W; Wang, D; Tanomtong, A; Perelman, P L; Graphodatsky, A S; Yang, F

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal evolution in carnivores has been revisited extensively using cross-species chromosome painting. Painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of the domestic dog, which has one of the most rearranged karyotypes in mammals and the highest dipoid number (2n=78) in carnivores, are a powerful tool in detecting both evolutionary intra- and inter-chromosomal rearrangements. However, only a few comparative maps have been established between dog and other non-Canidae species. Here, we extended cross-species painting with dog probes to seven more species representing six carnivore families: Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), the stone marten (Martes foina), the small Indian civet (Viverricula indica), the Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphrodites), Javan mongoose (Hepestes javanicas), the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). The numbers and positions of intra-chromosomal rearrangements were found to differ among these carnivore species. A comparative map between human and stone marten, and a map among the Yangtze finless porpoise (Neophocaena phocaenoides asiaeorientalis), stone marten and human were also established to facilitate outgroup comparison and to integrate comparative maps between stone marten and other carnivores with such maps between human and other species. These comparative maps give further insight into genome evolution and karyotype phylogenetic relationships among carnivores, and will facilitate the transfer of gene mapping data from human, domestic dog and cat to other species. PMID:22086079

  15. Defining the potential repository siting block Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Elayer, R.W.; Nolting, R.M. III

    1996-12-01

    Siting activities for the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain focused on locating a suitable host geologic horizon above the water table. The Topopah Spring Tuff of the Paintbrush Group was identified as the most suitable geologic unit. Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) identified six areas as potential repository sites. Area known as the Primary Area, is the site of the present characterization and design activities. To support current repository Advanced Conceptual Design, a reevaluation of the Primary Area was conducted by the Yucca Mountain Project`s Management and Operating Contractor (M&O). The purpose of the study was to more precisely define the block volume that would be suitable for siting the repository. The Lynx Geoscience Modeling software (Lynx) was selected to be used in this work because of its three-dimensional modeling and visualization capability for geology and underground excavation design. The Lynx model YMP.MO2 was developed in the study. The model includes surfaces that were constructed to represent each of the following limiting criteria: faults, overburden, repository host horizon, and groundwater. The resulting potential repository siting block is the useable volume within these limiting criteria.

  16. A High Resolution, Light-Weight, Synthetic Aperture Radar for UAV Application

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.; Hensley, W.H.; Stence, J.; Tsunoda, S.I. Pace, F.; Walker, B,C.; Woodring, M.

    1999-05-27

    (U) Sandia National Laboratories in collaboration with General Atomics (GA) has designed and built a high resolution, light-weight, Ku-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) known as "Lynx". Although Lynx can be operated on a wide variety of manned and unmanned platforms, its design is optimized for use on medium altitude Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVS). In particular, it can be operated on the Predator, I-GNAT, and Prowler II platforms manufactured by GA. (U) The radar production weight is less than 120 lb and operates within a 3 GHz band from 15.2 GHz to 18.2 GHz with a peak output power of 320 W. Operating range is resolution and mode dependent but can exceed 45 km in adverse weather (4 mm/hr rain). Lynx has operator selectable resolution and is capable of 0.1 m resolution in spotlight mode and 0.3 m resolution in stripmap mode, over substantial depression angles (5 to 60 deg) and squint angles (broadside ±45 deg). Real-time Motion Compensation is implemented to allow high-quality image formation even during vehicle turns and other maneuvers.

  17. The Atsa Suborbital Observatory: An Observatory for a Commercial Suborbital Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilas, F.; Sollitt, L. S.

    2012-12-01

    The advantages of astronomical observations made above Earth's atmosphere have long been understood: free access to spectral regions inaccessible from Earth (e.g., UV) or affected by the atmosphere's content (e.g., IR). Most robotic, space-based telescopes maintain large angular separation between the Sun and an observational target in order to avoid accidental damage to instruments from the Sun. For most astronomical targets, this possibility is easily avoided by waiting until objects are visible away from the Sun. For the Solar System objects inside Earth's orbit, this is never the case. Suborbital astronomical observations have over 50 years' history using NASA's sounding rockets and experimental space planes. Commercial suborbital spacecraft are largely expected to go to ~100 km altitude above Earth, providing a limited amount of time for astronomical observations. The unique scientific advantage to these observations is the ability to point close to the Sun: if a suborbital spacecraft accidentally turns too close to the Sun and fries an instrument, it is easy to land the spacecraft and repair the hardware for the next flight. Objects uniquely observed during the short observing window include inner-Earth asteroids, Mercury, Venus, and Sun-grazing comets. Both open-FOV and target-specific observations are possible. Despite many space probes to the inner Solar System, scientific questions remain. These include inner-Earth asteroid size and bulk density informing Solar System evolution studies and efforts to develop methods of mitigation against imminent impactors to Earth; chemistry and dynamics of Venus' atmosphere addressing physical phenomena such as greenhouse effect, atmospheric super-rotation and global resurfacing on Venus. With the Atsa Suborbital Observatory, we combine the strengths of both ground-based observatories and space-based observing to create a facility where a telescope is maintained and used interchangeably with both in-house facility instruments or user-provided instruments. Rapid turnaround will depend only on flight frequency. Data are stored on-board for retrieval when the spacecraft lands. We provide robust instrumentation that can survive suborbital spaceflight, assessment of the feasibility of the requested observations, rigorous scripting of the telescope operation, integration of the telescope plus instrument in a provider spacecraft, and periodic preventive maintenance for the telescope and instrument suite. XCOR Aerospace's Lynx III spacecraft is the best candidate vehicle to host a suborbital astronomical observatory. Unlike other similar vehicles, the Lynx will operate with only 1 or 2 people onboard (the pilot and an operator), allowing for each mission to be totally dedicated to the observation (no tourists will be bumping about; no other experiments will affect spacecraft pointing). A stable platform, the Lynx can point to an accuracy of ± 0.5o. Fine pointing is done by the telescope system. Best of all, the Lynx has a dorsal pod that opens directly to space. For astronomical observations, the best window is NO window. Currently, we plan to deploy a 20" diameter telescope in the Lynx III dorsal pod. XCOR Aerospace has the goal of eventually maintaining a Lynx flight frequency capability of 4 times/day. As with any observatory, Atsa will be available for observations by the community at large.

  18. Characterization of widespread canine leishmaniasis among wild carnivores from Spain.

    PubMed

    Sobrino, R; Ferroglio, E; Oleaga, A; Romano, A; Millan, J; Revilla, M; Arnal, M C; Trisciuoglio, A; Gortázar, C

    2008-08-17

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is an emerging zoonotic parasitic disease caused by Leishmania infantum in Mediterranean countries, with sand flies (Phlebotomus spp.) as vectors and dogs as the main domestic reservoir. The role of wild carnivores in the epidemiology of leishmaniasis is still controversial. In order to determine the prevalence of natural infection with L. infantum in wild carnivores from Spain, we analyzed 217 samples by PCR and western blotting and used restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to compare the patterns present in wild carnivores with those of domestic dogs from the same areas. DNA of the parasite was detected in spleen or blood samples from 35 (16.12%) analyzed wild carnivores, including 8 of 39 (20.5%) wolves (Canis lupus), 23 of 162 (14.1%) foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 2 of 7 (28.6%) Egyptian mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon), 1 of 4 genets (Geneta geneta), and 1 of 4 Iberian lynxes (Lynx pardinus). No significant sex or age differences in prevalence were observed in wolves and foxes (P>0.05), but there was a significant difference among regions in foxes (P<0.05). A total of 12 PCR-RFLP patterns were found in foxes, 6 in wolves, 4 in dogs, 2 in Egyptian mongooses and 1 in lynx and genet. RFLP patterns differed between dogs and foxes in the two areas where they could be compared. This is the first study of canine leishmaniasis in wild canids and other carnivores from different regions of Spain by PCR. The prevalence of infection indicates the existence of natural infection in apparently healthy wild carnivore populations, and our results are suggestive of a sylvatic cycle independent of dogs. PMID:18579311

  19. Quantification of the humoral immune response and hemoplasma blood and tissue loads in cats coinfected with 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' and feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A; Cattori, Valentino; Geret, Catrina P; Novacco, Marilisa; Meli, Marina L; Riond, Barbara; Boretti, Felicitas S; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2012-08-01

    'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' (CMhm) is a hemotropic mycoplasma (aka hemoplasma) of domestic cats and wild felids. In a transmission study, we exposed eight specified pathogen-free cats to blood from Iberian lynxes (Lynx pardinus) infected with CMhm. The cats were coinfected with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) from an Iberian lynx or with a prototype FeLV. The goal of the present study was to quantify the humoral immune response to CMhm and to identify potential target tissues and sequestration sites. Antibodies were measured by a recombinant antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and blood and tissue loads were quantified using real-time PCR. Seven out of eight cats became CMhm-infected; all of these cats seroconverted between 3 and 13 weeks after inoculation. Antibody levels correlated with the CMhm blood loads. The peak CMhm blood loads were inversely correlated with the incubation period. PCR-positive results were found in all 24 tissues tested but not for all samples. Although all tissues were PCR-positive in one cat euthanized ten weeks after infection, many tissues tested negative in six cats euthanized at week 20 after infection. In several cats, the spleen, lung, liver, heart and aorta contained more copies than expected given the tissue's blood supply, but most tissues contained fewer copies than expected. In conclusion, this is the first study to quantify the humoral immune response and tissue loads in CMhm-FeLV-coinfected cats. The tissue loads appeared to correlate with the duration of infection and with the blood loads, but no evidence of significant CMhm tissue sequestration was found. PMID:22588083

  20. Implementation uncertainty when using recreational hunting to manage carnivores.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Richard; Nilsen, Erlend B; Brøseth, Henrik; Männil, Peep; Ozoli?š, Ja?nis; Linnell, John D C; Bode, Michael

    2012-08-01

    1. Wildlife managers often rely on resource users, such as recreational or commercial hunters, to achieve management goals. The use of hunters to control wildlife populations is especially common for predators and ungulates, but managers cannot assume that hunters will always fill annual quotas set by the authorities. It has been advocated that resource management models should account for uncertainty in how harvest rules are realized, requiring that this implementation uncertainty be estimated.2. We used a survival analysis framework and long-term harvest data from large carnivore management systems in three countries (Estonia, Latvia and Norway) involving four species (brown bear, grey wolf, Eurasian lynx and wolverine) to estimate the performance of hunters with respect to harvest goals set by managers.3. Variation in hunter quota-filling performance was substantial, ranging from 40% for wolverine in Norway to nearly 100% for lynx in Latvia. Seasonal and regional variation was also high within country-species pairs. We detected a positive relationship between the instantaneous potential to fill a quota slot and the relative availability of the target species for both wolverine and lynx in Norway.4. Survivor curves and hazards - with survival time measured as the time from the start of a season until a quota slot is filled - can indicate the extent to which managers can influence harvest through adjustments of season duration and quota limits.5.Synthesis and applications. We investigated seven systems where authorities use recreational hunting to manage large carnivore populations. The variation and magnitude of deviation from harvest goals was substantial, underlining the need to incorporate implementation uncertainty into resource management models and decisions-making. We illustrate how survival analysis can be used by managers to estimate the performance of resource users with respect to achieving harvest goals set by managers. The findings in this study come at an opportune time given the growing popularity of management strategy evaluation (MSE) models in fisheries and a push towards incorporating MSE into terrestrial harvest management. PMID:23197878

  1. Implementation uncertainty when using recreational hunting to manage carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Richard; Nilsen, Erlend B; Brøseth, Henrik; Männil, Peep; Ozoli?š, Ja?nis; Linnell, John D C; Bode, Michael

    2012-01-01

    1. Wildlife managers often rely on resource users, such as recreational or commercial hunters, to achieve management goals. The use of hunters to control wildlife populations is especially common for predators and ungulates, but managers cannot assume that hunters will always fill annual quotas set by the authorities. It has been advocated that resource management models should account for uncertainty in how harvest rules are realized, requiring that this implementation uncertainty be estimated. 2. We used a survival analysis framework and long-term harvest data from large carnivore management systems in three countries (Estonia, Latvia and Norway) involving four species (brown bear, grey wolf, Eurasian lynx and wolverine) to estimate the performance of hunters with respect to harvest goals set by managers. 3. Variation in hunter quota-filling performance was substantial, ranging from 40% for wolverine in Norway to nearly 100% for lynx in Latvia. Seasonal and regional variation was also high within country–species pairs. We detected a positive relationship between the instantaneous potential to fill a quota slot and the relative availability of the target species for both wolverine and lynx in Norway. 4. Survivor curves and hazards – with survival time measured as the time from the start of a season until a quota slot is filled – can indicate the extent to which managers can influence harvest through adjustments of season duration and quota limits. 5. Synthesis and applications. We investigated seven systems where authorities use recreational hunting to manage large carnivore populations. The variation and magnitude of deviation from harvest goals was substantial, underlining the need to incorporate implementation uncertainty into resource management models and decisions-making. We illustrate how survival analysis can be used by managers to estimate the performance of resource users with respect to achieving harvest goals set by managers. The findings in this study come at an opportune time given the growing popularity of management strategy evaluation (MSE) models in fisheries and a push towards incorporating MSE into terrestrial harvest management. PMID:23197878

  2. Prostate stem cell antigen interacts with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and is affected in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Majbrit M; Arvaniti, Maria; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Michalski, Dominik; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Thomsen, Morten S

    2015-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving impaired cholinergic neurotransmission and dysregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ly-6/neurotoxin (Lynx) proteins have been shown to modulate cognition and neural plasticity by binding to nAChR subtypes and modulating their function. Hence, changes in nAChR regulatory proteins such as Lynx proteins could underlie the dysregulation of nAChRs in AD. Using Western blotting, we detected bands corresponding to the Lynx proteins prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and Lypd6 in human cortex indicating that both proteins are present in the human brain. We further showed that PSCA forms stable complexes with the ?4 nAChR subunit and decreases nicotine-induced extracellular-signal regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells. In addition, we analyzed protein levels of PSCA and Lypd6 in postmortem tissue of medial frontal gyrus from AD patients and found significantly increased PSCA levels (approximately 70%). In contrast, no changes in Lypd6 levels were detected. In concordance with our findings in AD patients, PSCA levels were increased in the frontal cortex of triple transgenic mice with an AD-like pathology harboring human transgenes that cause both age-dependent ?-amyloidosis and tauopathy, whereas Tg2576 mice, which display ?-amyloidosis only, had unchanged PSCA levels compared to wild-type animals. These findings identify PSCA as a nAChR-binding protein in the human brain that is affected in AD, suggesting that PSCA-nAChR interactions may be involved in the cognitive dysfunction observed in AD. PMID:25680266

  3. Production and characterization of ion beams from magnetically insulated diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Neri, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The operation of magnetically insulated diodes and the characteristics of the resulting ion beams have been investigated using two pulsed power generators, LYNX at the 10/sup 9/W power level, and Neptune at the 10/sup 11/W power level. LYNX is a small magnetically insulated diode driven directly by a Marx bank. By changing the material used as the surface flashover ion source, the majority ion species generated by the diode could be chosen. Ion beams produced so far by this device are: protons, lithium, boron, carbon, sodium, strontium, and barium. Typical beam parameters for the ion beams are peak energies of 300 keV, current densities of 40 to 60 A/cm/sup 2/, and pulse durations of 300 to 400 nsec. The ion beam uniformity, divergence, and reproducibility were shown to be a function of the surface flashover source geometry. Finally, the LYNX ion beam was also used to anneal silicon crystals and other materials science experiments. The diode used on the Neptune generator was designed to study virtual cathode formation in a high power magnetically insulated diode. The physical cathode was replaced by electrons that ExB drift on the applied magnetic field lines. It was found that the best electrode configuration is one in which the electrons are required to only undergo the Hall drift to form the cathode. The divergence of the ion beam was examined with time-dependent and time-integrated shadowbox diagnostics. It was found that the intrinsic divergence of the ion beam does not have a strong directional dependence.

  4. Suborbital Research and Education Missions with Commercial Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodway, K.; Nelson, A.; Voigt, J.

    2012-12-01

    Suborbital reusable launch vehicles (sRLV) will provide low-cost, flexible, and frequent access to space. In the case of XCOR's Lynx, the vehicle design and capabilities work well for hosting specially designed experiments that can be flown with a human-tended researcher or alone with the pilot on a unique mission on a customized flight trajectory. This new manned, reusable commercial platform will allow for repeated observations with a single instrument, but without the need to refurbish the vehicle between flights. In addition, the short turn-around means a researcher can do multiple observations, measurements, or targets. The vehicle is designed for multi-mission primary and secondary payload capabilities, including: in-cockpit experiments and instrumentation testing, externally mounted experiments, upper atmospheric sampling, and microsatellite launch. This vehicle takes off horizontally from a runway and will go into a powered ascent attaining Mach 2.9 maximum airspeed. After about three minutes and at approximately 58 km (190,000 ft) the engines are shutdown and the RLV then coasts upwards. The low gravity period (at or below 0.001go) begins soon after at 3.35 minutes and the microgravity period (at or below 10-6go) starts at 4.25 minutes. At approximately four and half minutes the vehicle reaches apogee of 100 km (328, 000 ft). After reentry and a Max-G force pullout of 4 g, the Lynx touches down on the takeoff runway after approximately 30 minutes.Typical Lynx Mark II flight profile

  5. Wilderness: the history, significance and promise of an American value 

    E-print Network

    Henderson, David Graham

    2009-05-15

    and presence, thus they signify places of solitude; the wildest animals seek out where people are not. Aldo Leopold calls the crane ?wildness incarnate? because of its love of solitude.10 The suffix ?en, though now indistinguishable in the modern spelling..., ?although everything else remains visibly the same, the intensity of the sense of wilderness is diminished.?12 He cites Thoreau?s delight in the New England Lynx, Theodore Roosevelt?s equivocating wilderness with big game ranges and Leopold?s discussion...

  6. The Lyncis Two for One Special (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joner, M.; Hintz, E.

    2015-12-01

    (Abstract only) The pulsating delta Scuti star AN Lyn and the near contact binary UU Lyn are conveniently located at high declination in the northern constellation of Lynx. These variable stars are about 15 arc minutes apart in the sky and differ in average brightness by roughly one magnitude. This combination makes it fairly straightforward to secure photometric data on both stars at the same time using a common set of comparison stars. We present observations made at the BYU West Mountain Observatory during the spring of 2015 and outline some preliminary conclusions that can be drawn about these distinctly different variable stars.

  7. Synthetic aperture radar for disaster monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, R.; Saddler, R.; Doerry, A. W.

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is well known to afford imaging in darkness and through clouds, smoke, and other obscurants. As such, it is particularly useful for mapping and monitoring a variety of natural and man-made disasters. A portfolio of SAR image examples has been collected using General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.'s (GA-ASI's) Lynx® family of Ku-Band SAR systems, flown on both operational and test-bed aircraft. Images are provided that include scenes of flooding, ice jams in North Dakota, agricultural field fires in southern California, and ocean oil slicks from seeps off the coast of southern California.

  8. Sensors Locate Radio Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    After receiving a NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from Kennedy Space Center, Soneticom Inc., based in West Melbourne, Florida, created algorithms for time difference of arrival and radio interferometry, which it used in its Lynx Location System (LLS) to locate electromagnetic interference that can disrupt radio communications. Soneticom is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to install and test the LLS at its field test center in New Jersey in preparation for deploying the LLS at commercial airports. The software collects data from each sensor in order to compute the location of the interfering emitter.

  9. Bobcat attack on a cottontail rabbit

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biggins, D.E.; Biggins, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    We observed an attack by a bobcat (Lynx rufus) on a cottontail rabbit (Sylvilagus) that involved stealthy approach by the cat for >1 h, followed by a 12.3-s chase covering 116.0 m for the cat and 128.4 m for the rabbit. During the chase, the route of the cat from starting point to kill site was more direct than the semi-circular route of the rabbit. Stride lengths for the cat and total distance covered by the chase were longer than those previously reported for bobcats.

  10. Properties of unusual void LSBDs versus cosmological simulations predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J.-M.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Kniazev, A. Y.

    2011-12-01

    We present the study of several unusual galaxies - low-mass, Low Surface Brightness Dwarfs (LSBD) (M_{bary} ˜ 3× 10^7 to ˜ 3× 10^9 M_{?}, and M_{B} ˜ -(12-14.5)) which reside in the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. We confront their properties with the results from recent cosmological simulations, predicting both dynamical properties of low-mass objects and connecting their formation and evolution. In particular, we compare the rotational velocity, the baryonic mass and total dynamical mass with the predictions of Hoeft & Gottloeber (2010), which take into account the suppression of gas accretion onto the low-mass DM halos.

  11. Food habits of bobcats in eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Story, J.D.; Galbraith, W.J.; Kitchings, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Food habits of bobcats (Lynx rufus) in eastern Tennessee were determined from analyzing 176 cat samples collected on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park. Remains of cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) were the most frequently occurring food item. White-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and pine vole (Microtus pinetorum) remains also were found frequently in samples. Data obtained from this study indicated that food preferences for bobcats in eastern Tennessee are similar to those in other southeastern states where the habitat is similar to the Oak Ridge area and somewhat different from those with significantly different habitat.

  12. Test plan for performance testing of the Eaton AC-3 electric vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Crumley, R.L.; Heiselmann, H.W.

    1985-04-01

    An alternating current (ac) propulsion system for an electric vehicle has been developed and tested by the Eaton Corporation. The test bed vehicle is a modified 1981 Mercury Lynx. The test plan has been prepared specifically for the third modification to this test bed and identified as the Eaton AC-3. The scope of the EG and G testing at INEL to be done on the Eaton AC-3 will include coastdown and dynamometer tests but will not include environmental, on-road, or track testing. Coastdown testing will be performed in accordance with SAE J-1263 (SAE Recommended Practice for Road Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques).

  13. ac powertrain for an electric vehicle. Phase 2 and Phase 3 final report

    SciTech Connect

    Slicker, J.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report describes work relating to Phases 2 and 3 development and testing of an ac powertrain for a 25 hp four-passenger electric vehicle. The system, which consists of a two-speed automatic mechanical transaxle, 18.6 kW ac induction traction motor, 33.6 kW inverter and overall logic controller, was installed and evaluated in a converted Mercury Lynx rolling test bed vehicle. An on-board charger and an auxiliary dc-to-dc converter were integrated into the inverter/controller package.

  14. Evaluating the operations capability of Freedom's Data Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sowizral, Henry A.

    1990-01-01

    Three areas of Data Management System (DMS) performance are examined: raw processor speed, the subjective speed of the Lynx OS X-Window system, and the operational capacity of the Runtime Object Database (RODB). It is concluded that the proposed processor will operate at its specified rate of speed and that the X-Window system operates within users' subjective needs. It is also concluded that the RODB cannot provide the required level of service, even with a two-order of magnitude (100 fold) improvement in speed.

  15. Performances of new green sensitive liquid photopolymers for volume phase holographic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanutta, Alessio; Bianco, Andrea; Zerbi, Filippo M.

    2012-03-01

    Liquid photopolymers produced by Polygrama-Lynx (SM-532TR and SM-532TRF) have been studied to determine their performances in terms of refractive index modulation, transparency and overall optical quality. Volume phase holographic gratings (VPHGs) based on these materials have been obtained using a 532 DPSS laser and the grating efficiency has been measured at different angles and wavelengths. Using the Kogelnik model and/or the RCWA approach, the thickness and the refractive index modulation has been determined for gratings as function of light exposure, line density, etc. Index modulations up to 0.03 together with good optical quality were obtained.

  16. UPLC-QTOF-MS with chemical profiling approach for rapidly evaluating chemical consistency between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In the present study, chemical consistency between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction was rapidly evaluated by UPLC-QTOF-MS coupled with the MarkerLynx software. Two different kinds of decoctions, namely traditional decoction: water extract of mixed six constituent herbs of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, and dispensing granules decoction: mixed water extract of each individual herbs of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, were prepared. Results Chemical difference was found between traditional and dispensing granule decoctions, and albiflorin, paeoniflorin, gallic acid, amygdalin, and hydroxysafflor yellow A were identified as the significantly changed components during decocting Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction. All the peaks of mass spectrum from Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction and each herb were extracted and integration by using QuanLynx™. And the optimized data was used for linear regression analysis. The contribution of each herb in Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction, and the optimal compatibility proportion of dispensing granule decoction were derived from the linear regression equation. Conclusions The optimal dosage proportionality of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu dispensing granule decoction was obtained as 2.5:0.2:1:0.5:0.6:0.1 (DG : CX : BS : SD : TR : HH), which guided better clinic application of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction as dispensing granule decoctions usage, and it also provided some experimental data to reveal the compatibility rule of the relative TCM formulae. PMID:23176049

  17. Extraordinary Genetic Diversity in a Wood Decay Mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Baranova, Maria A.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B.; Safonova, Yana Y.; Naumenko, Sergey A.; Klepikova, Anna V.; Gerasimov, Evgeny S.; Bazykin, Georgii A.; James, Timothy Y.; Kondrashov, Alexey S.

    2015-01-01

    Populations of different species vary in the amounts of genetic diversity they possess. Nucleotide diversity ?, the fraction of nucleotides that are different between two randomly chosen genotypes, has been known to range in eukaryotes between 0.0001 in Lynx lynx and 0.16 in Caenorhabditis brenneri. Here, we report the results of a comparative analysis of 24 haploid genotypes (12 from the United States and 12 from European Russia) of a split-gill fungus Schizophyllum commune. The diversity at synonymous sites is 0.20 in the American population of S. commune and 0.13 in the Russian population. This exceptionally high level of nucleotide diversity also leads to extreme amino acid diversity of protein-coding genes. Using whole-genome resequencing of 2 parental and 17 offspring haploid genotypes, we estimate that the mutation rate in S. commune is high, at 2.0 × 10?8 (95% CI: 1.1 × 10?8 to 4.1 × 10?8) per nucleotide per generation. Therefore, the high diversity of S. commune is primarily determined by its elevated mutation rate, although high effective population size likely also plays a role. Small genome size, ease of cultivation and completion of the life cycle in the laboratory, free-living haploid life stages and exceptionally high variability of S. commune make it a promising model organism for population, quantitative, and evolutionary genetics. PMID:26163667

  18. In vivo metabolite identification of bakuchiol in rats by UPLC/ESI-PDA-QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chao; Liang, Qiande; Tang, Xianglin; Wang, Yuguang; Ma, Zengchun; Xiao, Chengrong; Tan, Hongling; Gao, Yue; Huang, Xianju

    2015-10-01

    Psoralea corylifolia L. is a traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of various skin diseases such as psoriasis, vitiligo and chronic graft-versus-host. Bakuchiol, isolated from the seeds of P. corylifolia L., is one of the most important active compounds. To study the metabolic fate of bakuchiol in rats, an ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-photo diode array-quadrupole time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-PDA-QTOF-MS) combined with MetaboLynx XS software was used, peak area-time curves of major metabolites in plasma from bakuchiol were determined. A total of 11 metabolites were identified after a single oral administration of bakuchiol, including 6 in plasma, 10 in bile, 8 in urine and 2 in feces, the metabolic transformation pathways of bakuchiol in rats included oxidation, hydroxylation, methylation, O-glucuronide conjugation and O-sulfate conjugation. In conclusion, this study expands our knowledge about the metabolism of bakuchiol which will be conducive to reveal its in vivo pharmacological and toxicological material basis, in addition, UPLC/ESI-PDA-QTOF-MS coupled with MetaboLynx XS software can be adopted as a useful tool for quick detection and identification of metabolites from medicine in vivo. PMID:26347955

  19. Use of predator odors as repellents to reduce feeding damage by herbivores : I. Snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus).

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T P; Nordstrom, L O; Sullivan, D S

    1985-07-01

    The effectiveness of predator odors (fecal, urine, and anal scent gland) in suppressing feeding damage by snowshoe hares was investigated in pen bioassays at the University of British Columbia Research Forest, Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada. A total of 28 bioassay trials tested the effects of these odors on hare consumption of willow browse and coniferous seedlings. Lynx and bobcat feces, weasel anal gland secretion, and lynx, bobcat, wolf, coyote, fox, and wolverine urines resulted in the most effective suppression of hare feeding damage. Novel odors of domestic dog urine and 2-methylbutyric acid did not reduce feeding. A field bioassay with lodgepole pine seedlings and weasel scent provided significant results comparable to the pen bioassays. The short-term (up to seven days) effectiveness of these treatments was more likely due to evaporative loss of the active repellent components of a given odor than habituation of hares to the stimulus. Predator odors as repellents have a biological basis compared with the anthropomorphic origins of commercial repellents. When encapsulated in weather-proof controlled-release devices, these odors could provide long-term protection for forestry plantations and agricultural crops which experience hare/rabbit feeding damage. PMID:24310275

  20. Influence of different stimuli on electromyographic variables of the biceps brachii.

    PubMed

    Guirro, R R J; Forti, F; Brambila, A C; Groff, K A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of different stimuli on the muscular response of 30 young sedentary male and female subjects. A conditioning module with A/D 16/32 signals of 12 bits (LYNX), with band-pass filter of 10-500 Hz and sampling frequency of 1000 Hz was used. A bipolar active surface electrode (LYNX), a load cell (MM-100 KRATOS) and a pressure cuff were also used. The volunteers were submitted to four conditions: Without stimulus (WS), auditive stimulus (AS), visual stimulus (VS), and auditive + visual stimuli (AVS). Matlab 6.5.1 software was used to process the signals for analyzing RMS and median frequency (MF), as well as muscular force (F) and cuff pressure (P). Statistical analysis consisted of the Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney test with a critical level of 5%. As to RMS, females presented a significant increase in all types of stimuli compared to WS. As to MF there was no significant difference between the different groups for either sex. P in both sexes presented a significant increase when submitted to VS and AVS. F was higher for AVS in males and for any of the stimuli in females when compared to WS. In all the variables analyzed, males presented significantly higher values than females for all types of stimuli. PMID:17191731

  1. Dietary items as possible sources of (137)Cs in large carnivores in the Gorski Kotar forest ecosystem, Western Croatia.

    PubMed

    Šprem, Nikica; Piria, Marina; Bariši?, Domagoj; Kusak, Josip; Bariši?, Delko

    2016-01-15

    The mountain forest ecosystem of Gorski Kotar is distant from any significant sources of environmental pollution, though recent findings have revealed that this region is among the most intense (137)Cs contaminated area in Croatia. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate (137)Cs and (40)K load in three large predator species in the mountain forest ecosystem. Radionuclides mass activities were determined by the gamma-spectrometric method in the muscle tissue of brown bear (47), wolf (7), lynx (1) and golden jackal (2). The highest (137)Cs mass activity was found in lynx (153Bqkg(-1)), followed by brown bear (132Bqkg(-1)), wolf (22.2Bqkg(-1)), and golden jackal (2.48Bqkg(-1)). Analysis of 63 samples of dietary items suggests that they are not all potentially dominant sources of (137)Cs for wildlife. The most important source of radionuclides for the higher parts of the food-chain from the study area were found to be the mushroom species wood hedgehog (Hydnum repandum), with a transfer factor TF of 5.166, and blueberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) as a plant species (TF=2.096). Food items of animal origin indicated higher mass activity of radionuclides and therefore are possible moderate bioindicators of environmental pollution. The results also revealed that possible unknown wild animal food sources are a caesium source in the study region, and further study is required to illuminate this issue. PMID:26556746

  2. Polymorphism of CAG repeats in androgen receptor of carnivores.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qin; Zhang, Xiuyue; Wang, Xiaofang; Zeng, Bo; Jia, Xiaodong; Hou, Rong; Yue, Bisong

    2012-03-01

    Androgen effect is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR). The polymorphism of CAG triplet repeat (polyCAG), in the N-terminal transactivation domain of the AR protein, has been involved either in endocrine or neurological disorders in human. We obtained partial sequence of AR exon 1 in 10 carnivore species. In most carnivore species, polyglutamine length polymorphism presented in all three CAG repeat regions of AR, in contrast, only CAG-I site polymorphism presented in primate species, and CAG-I and CAG-III sites polymorphism presented in Canidae. Therefore, studies focusing on disease-associated polymorphism of poly(CAG) in carnivore species AR should investigate all three CAG repeats sites, and should not only consider CAG-I sites as the human disease studies. The trinucleotide repeat length in carnivore AR exon 1 had undergone from expansions to contractions during carnivores evolution, unlike a linear increase in primate species. Furthermore, the polymorphisms of the triplet-repeats in the same tissue (somatic mosaicism) were demonstrated in Moutain weasel, Eurasian lynx, Clouded leopard, Chinese tiger, Black leopard and Leopard AR. And, the abnormal stop codon was found in the exon 1 of three carnivore species AR (Moutain weasel, Eurasian lynx and Black leopard). It seemed to have a high frequency presence of tissue-specific somatic in carnivores AR genes. Thus the in vivo mechanism leading to such highly variable phenotypes of the described mutations, and their impact on these animals, are worthwhile to be further elucidated. PMID:21643744

  3. A framework for quantitative assessment of impacts related to energy and mineral resource development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Diffendorfer, James; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Berger, Byron R.; Cook, Troy A.; Gautier, Donald L.; Gallegos, Tanya J.; Gerritsen, Margot; Graffy, Elisabeth; Hawkins, Sarah; Johnson, Kathleen; Macknick, Jordan; McMahon, Peter; Modde, Tim; Pierce, Brenda; Schuenemeyer, John H.; Semmens, Darius; Simon, Benjamin; Taylor, Jason; Walton-Day, Katie

    2013-01-01

    Natural resource planning at all scales demands methods for assessing the impacts of resource development and use, and in particular it requires standardized methods that yield robust and unbiased results. Building from existing probabilistic methods for assessing the volumes of energy and mineral resources, we provide an algorithm for consistent, reproducible, quantitative assessment of resource development impacts. The approach combines probabilistic input data with Monte Carlo statistical methods to determine probabilistic outputs that convey the uncertainties inherent in the data. For example, one can utilize our algorithm to combine data from a natural gas resource assessment with maps of sage grouse leks and piñon-juniper woodlands in the same area to estimate possible future habitat impacts due to possible future gas development. As another example: one could combine geochemical data and maps of lynx habitat with data from a mineral deposit assessment in the same area to determine possible future mining impacts on water resources and lynx habitat. The approach can be applied to a broad range of positive and negative resource development impacts, such as water quantity or quality, economic benefits, or air quality, limited only by the availability of necessary input data and quantified relationships among geologic resources, development alternatives, and impacts. The framework enables quantitative evaluation of the trade-offs inherent in resource management decision-making, including cumulative impacts, to address societal concerns and policy aspects of resource development.

  4. A rapid field test for sylvatic plague exposure in wild animals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbott, Rachel C.; Hudak, Robert; Mondesire, Roy; Baeten, Laurie A.; Russell, Robin E.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2014-01-01

    Plague surveillance is routinely conducted to predict future epizootics in wildlife and exposure risk for humans. The most common surveillance method for sylvatic plague is detection of antibodies to Yersinia pestis F1 capsular antigen in sentinel animals, such as coyotes (Canis latrans). Current serologic tests for Y. pestis, hemagglutination (HA) test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are expensive and labor intensive. To address this need, we developed a complete lateral flow device for the detection of specific antibodies to Y. pestis F1 and V antigens. Our test detected anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies in serum and Nobuto filter paper samples from coyotes, and in serum samples from prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), lynx (Lynx canadensis), and black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes). Comparison of cassette results for anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies with results of ELISA or HA tests showed correlations ranging from 0.68 to 0.98. This device provides an affordable, user-friendly tool that may be useful in plague surveillance programs and as a research tool.

  5. Evaluating noninvasive genetic sampling techniques to estimate large carnivore abundance.

    PubMed

    Mumma, Matthew A; Zieminski, Chris; Fuller, Todd K; Mahoney, Shane P; Waits, Lisette P

    2015-09-01

    Monitoring large carnivores is difficult because of intrinsically low densities and can be dangerous if physical capture is required. Noninvasive genetic sampling (NGS) is a safe and cost-effective alternative to physical capture. We evaluated the utility of two NGS methods (scat detection dogs and hair sampling) to obtain genetic samples for abundance estimation of coyotes, black bears and Canada lynx in three areas of Newfoundland, Canada. We calculated abundance estimates using program capwire, compared sampling costs, and the cost/sample for each method relative to species and study site, and performed simulations to determine the sampling intensity necessary to achieve abundance estimates with coefficients of variation (CV) of <10%. Scat sampling was effective for both coyotes and bears and hair snags effectively sampled bears in two of three study sites. Rub pads were ineffective in sampling coyotes and lynx. The precision of abundance estimates was dependent upon the number of captures/individual. Our simulations suggested that ~3.4 captures/individual will result in a < 10% CV for abundance estimates when populations are small (23-39), but fewer captures/individual may be sufficient for larger populations. We found scat sampling was more cost-effective for sampling multiple species, but suggest that hair sampling may be less expensive at study sites with limited road access for bears. Given the dependence of sampling scheme on species and study site, the optimal sampling scheme is likely to be study-specific warranting pilot studies in most circumstances. PMID:25693632

  6. [New evidence for the spread of Thelazia callipaeda in the Far East].

    PubMed

    Khrustalev, A V; Sha?tanov, M V; Seredkin, I V

    2015-01-01

    Thelazia callipaeda nematodes parasitize in the eyes of domestic and wild carnivorous mammals (more often in Canidae). Numerous cases of human infestation are also known. The nematode spreads in South and East Asia although in the last decade this has been reported from dogs, cats and wolves in South and Central Europe as well. In the Russian Federation, T. callipaeda was earlier observed in dogs, cats, foxes and raccoon dogs in some regions of the Russian Far East. Two cases of human infestation were also reported. There has been no evidence of T. callipaeda in Russia in the past 50 years. Postmortem parasitological surveys of various wild carnivores were performed in the Primorsky Territory of Russia in the winter of 2012 to the summer of 2014. Conjunctival sac including the space under the nictitating membrane was sought for nematodes. T. callipaeda was detected in 28 sables of the 492 examined ones, in 5 out of the 11 raccoon dogs, in 2 out of the 3 foxes, and in one lynx. The examination of 25 kolinskies, 4 American minks, 3 Amur leopard cats, 2 yellow-throated martens and one badger provided negative results. The sable and the wild lynx are firstly reported as hosts of T. callipaeda. The findings suggest that there is a persisting natural reservoir of zoonotic thelaziosis in the Russian Far East. The epidemiological importance of this fact should not be underestimated. PMID:25850318

  7. A rapid field test for sylvatic plague exposure in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Rachel C; Hudak, Robert; Mondesire, Roy; Baeten, Laurie A; Russell, Robin E; Rocke, Tonie E

    2014-04-01

    Plague surveillance is routinely conducted to predict future epizootics in wildlife and exposure risk for humans. The most common surveillance method for sylvatic plague is detection of antibodies to Yersinia pestis F1 capsular antigen in sentinel animals, such as coyotes (Canis latrans). Current serologic tests for Y. pestis, hemagglutination (HA) test and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are expensive and labor intensive. To address this need, we developed a complete lateral flow device for the detection of specific antibodies to Y. pestis F1 and V antigens. Our test detected anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies in serum and Nobuto filter paper samples from coyotes, and in serum samples from prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), lynx (Lynx canadensis), and black-footed ferrets (Mustela nigripes). Comparison of cassette results for anti-F1 and anti-V antibodies with results of ELISA or HA tests showed correlations ranging from 0.68 to 0.98. This device provides an affordable, user-friendly tool that may be useful in plague surveillance programs and as a research tool. PMID:24484483

  8. Extraordinary Genetic Diversity in a Wood Decay Mushroom.

    PubMed

    Baranova, Maria A; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Seplyarskiy, Vladimir B; Safonova, Yana Y; Naumenko, Sergey A; Klepikova, Anna V; Gerasimov, Evgeny S; Bazykin, Georgii A; James, Timothy Y; Kondrashov, Alexey S

    2015-10-01

    Populations of different species vary in the amounts of genetic diversity they possess. Nucleotide diversity ?, the fraction of nucleotides that are different between two randomly chosen genotypes, has been known to range in eukaryotes between 0.0001 in Lynx lynx and 0.16 in Caenorhabditis brenneri. Here, we report the results of a comparative analysis of 24 haploid genotypes (12 from the United States and 12 from European Russia) of a split-gill fungus Schizophyllum commune. The diversity at synonymous sites is 0.20 in the American population of S. commune and 0.13 in the Russian population. This exceptionally high level of nucleotide diversity also leads to extreme amino acid diversity of protein-coding genes. Using whole-genome resequencing of 2 parental and 17 offspring haploid genotypes, we estimate that the mutation rate in S. commune is high, at 2.0 × 10(-8) (95% CI: 1.1 × 10(-8) to 4.1 × 10(-8)) per nucleotide per generation. Therefore, the high diversity of S. commune is primarily determined by its elevated mutation rate, although high effective population size likely also plays a role. Small genome size, ease of cultivation and completion of the life cycle in the laboratory, free-living haploid life stages and exceptionally high variability of S. commune make it a promising model organism for population, quantitative, and evolutionary genetics. PMID:26163667

  9. Design exploration and verification platform, based on high-level modeling and FPGA prototyping, for fast and flexible digital communication in physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magazzù, G.; Borgese, G.; Costantino, N.; Fanucci, L.; Incandela, J.; Saponara, S.

    2013-02-01

    In many research fields as high energy physics (HEP), astrophysics, nuclear medicine or space engineering with harsh operating conditions, the use of fast and flexible digital communication protocols is becoming more and more important. The possibility to have a smart and tested top-down design flow for the design of a new protocol for control/readout of front-end electronics is very useful. To this aim, and to reduce development time, costs and risks, this paper describes an innovative design/verification flow applied as example case study to a new communication protocol called FF-LYNX. After the description of the main FF-LYNX features, the paper presents: the definition of a parametric SystemC-based Integrated Simulation Environment (ISE) for high-level protocol definition and validation; the set up of figure of merits to drive the design space exploration; the use of ISE for early analysis of the achievable performances when adopting the new communication protocol and its interfaces for a new (or upgraded) physics experiment; the design of VHDL IP cores for the TX and RX protocol interfaces; their implementation on a FPGA-based emulator for functional verification and finally the modification of the FPGA-based emulator for testing the ASIC chipset which implements the rad-tolerant protocol interfaces. For every step, significant results will be shown to underline the usefulness of this design and verification approach that can be applied to any new digital protocol development for smart detectors in physics experiments.

  10. Three-dimensional geologic modeling to determine the spatial attributes of hydrocarbon contamination, Noval Facility Fuel Farm, El Centro, California

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.; Mutch, S.; Padgett, D.; Roche, L. )

    1994-04-01

    An investigation was conducted at the Naval Air Facility located in El Centro (NAFEC), to determine the vertical and horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the facilities fuel farm. The fuel products are the result of tank and pipeline leakage, past tank cleaning, and past disposal of fuel dispensing and filter cleaning practices. Subsurface soil and groundwater data was collected via soil borings, monitoring wells, and CPT probes. Soil, groundwater, and analytical data were integrated using the LYNX geoscience modeling system (GMS). Interactive sessions with the data visualizer helped guide the modeling and identify data gaps. Modeling results indicate a continuous surface confining clay layer to a depth of about 12 to 15 ft. Groundwater is confined beneath this clay layer and monitoring wells indicate about 3 to 5 ft of artesian head. Hydrocarbon contamination is concentrated within this clay layer from about 5 to 12 ft below the ground surface. Residual fuel products located in the groundwater are attributed to slow leakage through the confirming clay layer. LYNX was also used to compute volumes of contaminated soil to aid in remediation cost analysis. Preliminary figures indicate about 60,000 yards[sup 3] of contaminated soil. Since the contamination is primarily confined to relatively impermeable clayey soils, site remediation will likely be ex-situ land farming.

  11. Citizen Science and Citizen Space Exploration: Potentials for Professional Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E.

    2012-12-01

    Citizens in Space is a project of the United States Rocket Academy, with the goal of promoting citizen science and citizen space exploration. This goal is enabled by the new reusable suborbital spacecraft now under development by multiple companies in the US. For the first phase of this project, we have acquired a contract for 10 flights on the Lynx suborbital spacecraft, which is under construction by XCOR Aerospace in Mojave, CA. This represents, to the best of our knowledge, the largest single bulk purchase of suborbital flights to date. Citizens in Space has published an open call for experiments to fly on these missions, which we expect will begin in late 2013 or early 2014. We will be selecting approx. 100 small experiments and 10 citizen astronauts to fly as payload operators. Although our primary goal is to encourage citizen science, these flight opportunities are also open to professional researchers who have payloads that meet our criteria. We believe that the best citizen-science projects are collaborations between professional and citizen scientists. We will discuss various ways in which professional scientists can collaborate with citizen scientists to take advantage of the flight opportunities provided by our program. We will discuss the capabilities of the Lynx vehicle, the 1u- and 2u-CubeSat form factor we are using for our payloads, and general considerations for payload integration. As an example of the payloads we can accommodate, we will discuss a NASA-inspired experiment to collect particles from the upper atmosphere.;

  12. Polyolefin catalyst manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Inkrott, K.E.; Scinta, J.; Smith, P.D. )

    1989-10-16

    Statistical process control (SPC) procedures are absolutely essential for making new-generation polyolefin catalysts with the consistent high quality required by modern polyolefin processes. Stringent quality assurance is critical to the production of today's high-performance catalysts. Research and development efforts during the last 20 years have led to major technological improvements in the polyolefin industry. New generation catalysts, which once were laboratory curiosities, must now be produced commercially on a regular and consistent basis to meet the increasing requirements of the plastics manufacturing industry. To illustrate the more stringent requirements for producing the new generation polyolefin catalysts, the authors compare the relatively simple, first-generation polypropylene catalyst production requirements with some of the basic requirements of manufacturing a more complex new-generation catalyst, such as Catalyst Resources Inc.'s LYNX 900. The principles which hold true for the new-generation catalysts such as LYNX 900 are shown to apply equally to the scale-up of other advanced technology polyolefin catalysts.

  13. Evaluation of candidate rain gages for upgrading precipitation measurement tools for the National Atmospheric Deposition Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) was established in 1977 to investigate atmospheric deposition and its effects on the environment. Since its establishment, precipitation records have been obtained at all NADP sites using a gage developed approximately 50 years ago-the Belfort 5-780 mechanical rain gage. In 1998 and 1999, a study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey to evaluate four recently developed, technologically advanced rain gages as possible replacement candidates for the mechanical gage currently (2002) in use by the NADP. The gage types evaluated were the Belfort 3200, Geonor T-200, ETI Noah II, and the OTT PLUVIO. The Belfort 5-780 was included in the study to compare the performance of the rain gage currently (2002) used by NADP to the performance of the more recently developed gages. As a reference gage, the NovaLynx Model 260-2510 National Weather Service type stick gage also was included in the study. Two individual gages of each type were included in the study to evaluate precision between gages of the same type. A two-phase evaluation was completed. Phase I consisted of indoor bench tests with known amounts of simulated rainfall applied in 20 individual tests. Phase II consisted of outdoor testing by collecting precipitation during a 26-week period near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The ETI Noah II, OTT PLUVIO, and NovaLynx stick gages consistently recorded depths more commensurate with the amounts of applied simulated rainfall in Phase I testing than the Geonor T-200, Belfort 5-780, and Belfort 3200 gages. Gages where both the median difference between the measured and applied simulated rainfall and the interquartile range of all of their measured minus applied simulated rainfall differences were small (less than or equal to 0.01 inch) were judged to have performed very well in Phase I testing. The median and interquartile-range values were 0.01 inch or less for each of the ETI Noah II gages, OTT PLUVIO gages, and NovaLynx stick gages. The performance of the Geonor T-200 and Belfort 3200 gages was affected by technical problems during Phase I testing. As part of the evaluation of Phase II results, the average weekly precipitation totals obtained from the Belfort 5-780 gages and from each of the gages under consideration as possible replacements for the Belfort 5-780 gage were all compared with the average precipitation weekly totals obtained from two NovaLynx stick gages. The median absolute differences between a particular gage model and the NovaLynx stick reference gage for the 26 weeks of outdoor testing ranged from 0.04 inch for the ETI Noah II and OTT PLUVIO gages to 0.06 inch for the Geonor T-200. The total absolute difference between a particular gage type and the reference gage ranged from 1.23 inches for the Belfort 5-780 to 1.83 inches for the Geonor T-200 gages. Because the Belfort 3200 gages were inoperable for most of the Phase II testing, it is not meaningful to include the results from that gage type in a calculation of median or total absolute differences. The OTT PLUVIO proved to be the most reliable gage in Phase I and II testing, operating trouble free over the duration of the study.

  14. Predicting the potential demographic impact of predators on their prey: a comparative analysis of two carnivore-ungulate systems in Scandinavia.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Vincenzo; Nilsen, Erlend B; Sand, Håkan; Panzacchi, Manuela; Rauset, Geir R; Pedersen, Hans C; Kindberg, Jonas; Wabakken, Petter; Zimmermann, Barbara; Odden, John; Liberg, Olof; Swenson, Jon E; Linnell, John D C

    2012-03-01

    1. Understanding the role of predation in shaping the dynamics of animal communities is a fundamental issue in ecological research. Nevertheless, the complex nature of predator-prey interactions often prevents researchers from modelling them explicitly. 2. By using periodic Leslie-Usher matrices and a simulation approach together with parameters obtained from long-term field projects, we reconstructed the underlying mechanisms of predator-prey demographic interactions and compared the dynamics of the roe deer-red fox-Eurasian lynx-human harvest system with those of the moose-brown bear-gray wolf-human harvest system in the boreal forest ecosystem of the southern Scandinavian Peninsula. 3. The functional relationship of both roe deer and moose ? to changes in predation rates from the four predators was remarkably different. Lynx had the strongest impact among the four predators, whereas predation rates by wolves, red foxes, or brown bears generated minor variations in prey population ?. Elasticity values of lynx, wolf, fox and bear predation rates were -0·157, -0·056, -0·031 and -0·006, respectively, but varied with both predator and prey densities. 4. Differences in predation impact were only partially related to differences in kill or predation rates, but were rather a result of different distribution of predation events among prey age classes. Therefore, the age composition of killed individuals emerged as the main underlying factor determining the overall per capita impact of predation. 5. Our results confirm the complex nature of predator-prey interactions in large terrestrial mammals, by showing that different carnivores preying on the same prey species can exert a dramatically different demographic impact, even in the same ecological context, as a direct consequence of their predation patterns. Similar applications of this analytical framework in other geographical and ecological contexts are needed, but a more general evaluation of the subject is also required, aimed to assess, on a broader systematic and ecological range, what specific traits of a carnivore are most related to its potential impact on prey species. PMID:22077484

  15. Anatomy of a population cycle: the role of density dependence and demographic variability on numerical instability and periodicity.

    PubMed

    Row, Jeffrey R; Wilson, Paul J; Murray, Dennis L

    2014-07-01

    Determining the causes of cyclic fluctuations in population size is a central tenet in population ecology and provides insights into population regulatory mechanisms. We have a firm understanding of how direct and delayed density dependence affects population stability and cyclic dynamics, but there remains considerable uncertainty in the specific processes contributing to demographic variability and consequent change in cyclic propensity. Spatiotemporal variability in cyclic propensity, including recent attenuation or loss of cyclicity among several temperate populations and the implications of habitat fragmentation and climate change on this pattern, highlights the heightened need to understand processes underlying cyclic variation. Because these stressors can differentially impact survival and productivity and thereby impose variable time delays in density dependence, there is a specific need to elucidate how demographic vital rates interact with the type and action of density dependence to contribute to population stability and cyclic variation. Here, we address this knowledge gap by comparing the stability of time series derived from general and species-specific (Canada lynx: Lynx canadensis; small rodents: Microtus, Lemmus and Clethrionomys spp.) matrix population models, which vary in their demographic rates and the direct action of density dependence. Our results reveal that density dependence acting exclusively on survival as opposed to productivity is destabilizing, suggesting that a shift in the action of population regulation toward reproductive output may decrease cyclic propensity and cycle amplitude. This result was the same whether delayed density dependence was pulsatile and acted on a single time period (e.g. t-1, t-2 or t-3) vs. more constant by affecting a successive range of years (e.g. t-1,…, t-3). Consistent with our general models, reductions in reproductive potential in both the lynx and small rodent systems led to notably large drops in cyclic propensity and amplitude, suggesting that changes in this vital rate may contribute to the spatial or temporal variability observed in the cyclic dynamics of both systems. Collectively, our results reveal that the type of density dependence and its effect on different demographic parameters can profoundly influence numeric stability and cyclic propensity and therefore may shift populations across the cyclic-to-noncyclic boundary. PMID:24438480

  16. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical modeling of insensitive explosives in thermal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A.L. III

    1996-05-01

    The ability to predict the response of a weapon system that contains insensitive explosives to elevated temperatures is important in understanding its safety characteristics. To model such a system at elevated temperatures in a finite element computer code requires a variety of capabilities. These modeling capabilities include thermal diffusion and convection to transport the heat to the explosives in the weapon system, temperature based chemical reaction modeling of the decomposition of the explosive materials, and mechanical modeling of both the metal casing and the unreacted and decomposed explosive. The Chemical TOPAZ code has been developed to model coupled thermal/chemical problems where we do not need to model the mass motion. We have also developed the LYNX2D code, based on PALM2D and Chemical TOPAZ, which is an implicit, two-dimensional coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical finite element model computer code. Some representative examples are shown. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. A simple, inexpensive video camera setup for the study of avian nest activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabine, J.B.; Meyers, J.M.; Schweitzer, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-lapse video photography has become a valuable tool for collecting data on avian nest activity and depredation; however, commercially available systems are expensive (>USA $4000/unit). We designed an inexpensive system to identify causes of nest failure of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) and assessed its utility at Cumberland Island National Seashore, Georgia. We successfully identified raccoon (Procyon lotor), bobcat (Lynx rufus), American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), and ghost crab (Ocypode quadrata) predation on oystercatcher nests. Other detected causes of nest failure included tidal overwash, horse trampling, abandonment, and human destruction. System failure rates were comparable with commercially available units. Our system's efficacy and low cost (<$800) provided useful data for the management and conservation of the American Oystercatcher.

  18. Metabolite profiling on apple volatile content based on solid phase microextraction and gas-chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aprea, Eugenio; Gika, Helen; Carlin, Silvia; Theodoridis, Georgios; Vrhovsek, Urska; Mattivi, Fulvio

    2011-07-15

    A headspace SPME GC-TOF-MS method was developed for the acquisition of metabolite profiles of apple volatiles. As a first step, an experimental design was applied to find out the most appropriate conditions for the extraction of apple volatile compounds by SPME. The selected SPME method was applied in profiling of four different apple varieties by GC-EI-TOF-MS. Full scan GC-MS data were processed by MarkerLynx software for peak picking, normalisation, alignment and feature extraction. Advanced chemometric/statistical techniques (PCA and PLS-DA) were used to explore data and extract useful information. Characteristic markers of each variety were successively identified using the NIST library thus providing useful information for variety classification. The developed HS-SPME sampling method is fully automated and proved useful in obtaining the fingerprint of the volatile content of the fruit. The described analytical protocol can aid in further studies of the apple metabolome. PMID:21641602

  19. Forensic scatology: preliminary experimental study of the preparation and potential for identification of captive carnivore scat.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Rebecca J; Skinner, Mark F

    2012-01-01

    Carnivore scats recovered from animal attack and/or scavenging contexts frequently contain forensic evidence such as human bone fragments. Forensic cases with carnivore involvement are increasingly prevalent, necessitating a methodology for the recovery and analysis of scat evidence. This study proposes a method for the safe preparation of carnivore scat, recovery of bone inclusions, and quantification and comparison of scat variables. Fourteen scats (lion, jaguar, lynx, wolf, and coyote) were prepared with sodium-acetate-formalin fixative; analytical variables included carnivore individual, species, body size, and taxonomic family. Scat variables, particularly bone fragment inclusions, were found to vary among carnivore individuals, families, species, and sizes. The methods in this study facilitate safe scat processing, the complete recovery of digested evidence, and the preliminary identification of involved animals. This research demonstrates that scat collected from forensic contexts can yield valuable information concerning both the victim and the carnivore involved. PMID:21923796

  20. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects on tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Martin J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Signor, David B.; Mosher, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of atmospheric turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. In contradiction to current theories, increasing rotor inflow and rotor thrust were found to increase turbulence ingestion noise. This is the final report of Task 13A--Helicopter Tail Rotor Noise, of the NASA/United Kingdom Defense Research Agency cooperative Aeronautics Research Program.

  1. "Zoom-ln"--A targeted database search for identification of glycation modifications analyzed by untargeted tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bhonsle, Hemangi S; Korwar, Arvind M; Kesavan, Suresh K; Bhosale, Santosh D; Bansode, Sneha B; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are very important to biological function, however their identification and characterization is technically challenging. In this study, we have identified glycation modifications by nano LC-MSE, a data independent acquisition work flow, followed by database search using the Protein Lynx Global Server (PLGSJ). PLGS search with a complete human protein database hardly identified glycation modifications in a glycated human serum albumin (HSA), which was detected to be glycated by western blotting with advanced glycation end products (AGE) antibody and fluorescence spectroscopy. To overcome this difficulty, "Zoom-In" approach, a targeted database search was used to identify glycation modifications in a glycated HSA, which were further manually validated. This approach was useful for identification of glycation modifications from untargeted tandem mass spectrometryworkflow such as MSE, but may require the development of a new algorithm or an upgrade of the existing software. PMID:23654192

  2. Behavioral profiles of the captive juvenile whooping crane as an indicator of post-release survival

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreger, M.D.; Hatfield, J.S.; Estevez, I.; Gee, G.F.; Clugston, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    Predation by bobcats (Lynx rufus) is the major cause of mortality in captive-reared whooping cranes (Grus americana) released into the wild to establish a nonmigratory flock in Florida. This study investigated whether rearing methods (parent-rearing, hand-rearing, or hand-rearing with exercise) of cranes, and behaviors observed in birds either before or shortly after release in the wild, are associated with survival after release. Rearing methods did not affect survival first year post-release, which was 55 ? 8% in 2 yr (1999 and 2000). Logistic regression revealed, however, that foraging bouts (+), walking bouts (-), and body weight (-) before release, and nonvigilant bouts (-) after release were significantly associated with survival. These results suggest that post-release survival of whooping cranes might be increased by rearing techniques that promote foraging.

  3. Disseminated coccidioidomycosis in a captive Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) with chronic renal disease.

    PubMed

    Helmick, Kelly E; Koplos, Peter; Raymond, James

    2006-12-01

    A 19-yr-old, 78.2-kg captive female Indochinese tiger (Panthera tigris corbetti) from the El Paso Zoo (El Paso, Texas, USA) with chronic renal disease was euthanized after a 10-day course of anorexia, depression, progressive rear limb weakness, muscle fasciculations, and head tremors. Postmortem findings included pericardial effusion, generalized lymphadenopathy, glomerulosclerosis, glomerular atrophy with membranous glomerulonephropathy, and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Pyogranulomatous pneumonia, pericarditis, and lymphadenitis were associated with fungal spherules histomorphologically consistent with Coccidioides immitis. Rising antibodies to C. immitis were detected on samples obtained perimortem and 2 mo before euthanasia. Retrospective serology was negative for two additional Indochinese tigers, two Iranian leopards (Panthera pardus saxicolor), two jaguars (Panthera onca), two bobcats (Lynx rufus texensis), two ocelots (Leopardus pardalis), and three Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) housed at the zoo over an 8-yr period. Despite being located within the endemic region for C. immitis, this is only the second case of coccidioidomycosis reported from this institution. PMID:17315442

  4. Genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in wildlife from Alabama, USA.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Shen, Jilong; Su, Chunlei; Sundermann, Christine A

    2013-03-01

    The genetic diversity of Toxoplasma gondii circulating in wildlife is of interest to understand the transmission of this parasite in the environment. In the present study, we genetically characterized five T. gondii isolates from different wild animals including two isolates from a bobcat (Lynx rufus), one from a red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus), one from a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and one from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). Genotyping of these samples using 11 PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism markers (SAG1, 5'- and 3'-SAG2, alt.SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico) revealed two types, including type I (ToxoDB#10) and type 12 (ToxoDB#5). This is the first report of genetic characterization of T. gondii strains in wildlife from Alabama and from a red-shouldered hawk. PMID:23160892

  5. Increasing frequency of feline cytauxzoonosis cases diagnosed in western Kentucky from 2001 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jean; Davis, Cheryl D

    2013-11-15

    Feline cytauxzoonosis is a rapidly progressing and usually fatal disease in domestic cats caused by the tick-borne pathogen, Cytauxzoon felis. The primary reservoir host for this protozoan parasite is the bobcat (Lynx rufus). In this retrospective study, we have examined the positive cases of feline cytauxzoonosis identified at Murray State University's Breathitt Veterinary Center, a regional diagnostic facility located in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, between January 2001 and December 2011. Center records reveal that there has been an increase in the rate of diagnosis of domestic feline infection with C. felis over that 10-year span with the majority of cases (75%) occurring between 2006 and 2011. The infection was diagnosed from March through October and showed a single peak in May, corresponding well with the questing period for the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, a known vector of C. felis. PMID:24035030

  6. The importance of pesticide exposure duration and mode on the foraging of an agricultural pest predator.

    PubMed

    Brown, Caitlyn; Hanna, Chadwick J; Hanna, Catherine J B

    2015-02-01

    The striped lynx spider (Oxyopes salticus), is a natural predator of crop pests and therefore frequently encounters pesticides on its substrate and its prey. While pesticide exposure may negatively impact the lifespan of spiders, sublethal effects can also alter their normal behaviors. This study examined how prey capture was affected when spiders and their prey were exposed to bifenthrin and malathion. When spiders were continually exposed to bifenthrin residues, prey capture decreased over time, but mortality was not affected. Malathion exposed spiders, however, showed increased mortality, but their ability to catch prey was unaltered. When spiders encountered pesticide dosed prey, predation was unaffected, implying that spiders are unable to detect residues on prey. These results improve the understanding of how pesticides affect natural pest control and raise questions about the functional roles that spiders play when exposed to different chemicals. PMID:25413219

  7. High-Redshift Radio Galaxies from Deep Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Sirothia, S. K.; Wadadekar, Y.; Pal, S.

    2011-12-01

    Most of the radio galaxies with z > 3 have been found using the red-shift spectral index correlation. We have started a programme with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to exploit this correlation at flux density levels about 100 times deeper than the known high-redshift radio galaxies, with an aim to detect candidate high-redshift radio galaxies. Here we present results from the deep 150 MHz observations of LBDS-Lynx field, which has been imaged at 327, 610 and 1412 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) and at 1400 and 4860 MHz with the Very Large Array (VLA). We find about 150 radio sources with spectra steeper than 1. About two-thirds of these are not detected in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), hence are strong candidate high-redshift radio galaxies, which need to be further explored with deep infra-red imaging and spectroscopy to estimate the red-shift.

  8. Early-type galaxies: mass-size relation at z ˜ 1.3 for different environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raichoor, A.; Mei, S.; Stanford, S. A.; Holden, B. P.; Nakata, F.; Rosati, P.; Shankar, F.; Tanaka, M.; Ford, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Illingworth, G.; Kodama, T.; Postman, M.; Rettura, A.; Blakeslee, J. P.; Demarco, R.; Jee, M. J.; White, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    We combine multi-wavelength data of the Lynx superstructure and GOODS/CDF-S to build a sample of 75 visually selected early-type galaxies (ETGs), spanning different environments (cluster/group/field) at z ˜ 1.3. By estimating their mass, age (SED fitting, with a careful attention to the stellar population model used) and size, we are able to probe the dependence on the environment of the mass-size relation. We find that, for ETGs with 10^{10} < M / M_? < 10^{11.5}, (1) the mass-size relation in the field did not evolve overall from z ˜ 1.3 to present; (2) the mass-size relation in cluster/group environments at z ˜ 1.3 lies at smaller sizes than the local mass-size relation (R_{e,z ˜ 1.3}/R_{e,z = 0} ˜ 0.6-0.8).

  9. Effects of ingested atmospheric turbulence on measured tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signor, David B.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Mosher, Marianne; Hagen, Martin J.; George, Albert R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. Turbulence ingestion noise is found to be the dominant noise mechanism at locations near the rotor axis. At these locations, the sound radiated by the hovering rotor increases with both increasing atmospheric wind speed and ingested rms turbulent velocity.

  10. Searching the SOHO online catalogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, William; Yurow, Ron

    1994-01-01

    The SOHO on-line catalogs will contain information about the observations from several made or planned campaigns, that must be available to scientists who wish to use SOHO data. The World Wide Web (WWW) was chosen as the interface to the SOHO on-line catalogs, because it is easy to use, well suited to a geographically distributed user community, and freely available. Through the use of a forms-capable WWW client such as Mosaic or Lynx, a scientist will be able to browse through the catalogs of observations in a very simple, self explanatory way. Data files can then be selected from the returned lists for either immediate transferring or sending on tape by mail, with appropriate checks for whether data is in the public domain or not.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of the British Experimental Rotor Programme blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brocklehurst, Alan; Duque, Earl P. N.

    1990-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests on the British Experimental Rotor Programme (BERP) tip are described, and the results are compared with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results. The test model was molded using the Lynx-BERP blade tooling to provide a semispan, cantilever wing comprising the outboard 30 percent of the rotor blade. The tests included both surface-pressure measurements and flow visualization to obtain detailed information of the flow over the BERP tip for a range of angles of attack. It was observed that, outboard of the notch, favorable pressure gradients exist which ensure attached flow, and that the tip vortex also remains stable to large angles of attack. On the rotor, these features yield a very gradual break in control loads when the retreating-blade limit is eventually reached. Computational and experimental results were generally found to be in good agreement.

  12. Advanced ac powertrain for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Slicker, J.M.; Kalns, L.

    1985-01-01

    The design of an ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle includes a three-phase induction motor, transistorized PWM inverter/battery charger, microprocessor-based controller, and two-speed automatic transaxle. This system was built and installed in a Mercury Lynx test bed vehicle as part of a Department of Energy propulsion system development program. An integral part of the inverter is a 4-kw battery charger which utilizes one of the bridge transistors. The overall inverter strategy for this configuration is discussed. The function of the microprocessor-based controller is described. Typical test results of the total vehicle and each of its major components are given, including system efficiencies and test track performance results.

  13. Modular real-time PCR screening assay for common European animal families.

    PubMed

    Naue, J; Lutz-Bonengel, S; Sänger, T; Schlauderer, N; Schmidt, U

    2014-01-01

    A screening assay based on real-time PCR and melt curve analysis was developed to detect DNA from nine common European animal families/species and human. The assay consists of a 10-cycle universal pre-amplification followed by specific nested PCR and was designed to exploit the different melting temperatures (T m) of family/species-specific 12S ribosomal ribonucleic acid and cytochrome b fragments, which are amplified in duplex reactions. Case-related modular application is possible. Beyond determination of the animal family and discrimination from human DNA, evaluation of the melt curve in some cases additionally allows for species determination (e.g. cat vs. lynx). The method presents a quick, flexible and sample-saving approach to assess non-human DNA at low expenses, and it is especially useful in resolution of DNA mixtures. PMID:23613031

  14. 6 centimeter radio source counts and spectral index studies down to 0. 1 millijansky

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, R.H.; Partridge, R.B.; Windhorst, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    Results are reported from radio observations of three fields in the Lynx.2 area of the Leiden Berkeley Deep Survey (Windhorst et al., 1984), obtained at 6 cm with sensitivity about 15 microJy using the D configuration of the VLA on January 22, 23, and 26, 1986. The data are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail, and optical identifications and photometry based on the observations of Kron et al. (1985) are included. Consideration is given to the spectral index distribution, possible biases in this distribution, the relationship between the spectral index distribution and the 6-cm and 21-cm flux densities, and the possible nature of the sub-mJy radio sources. 28 references.

  15. Faint quasi-stellar-object candidates in selected areas 28 and 68 identified from multicolor photometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, J.C.; Koo, D.C.; Kron, R.C.; California Univ., Berkeley; Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA; Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI )

    1989-04-01

    Forty-five QSO candidates over a total area of 0.53 square degree in two fields at high Galactic latitudes have been identified. These candidates reached B of about 21.5 for field Lynx.3 in SA 28 and B of about 22 for field SA68.2, and were selected from a subset of objects in catalogs generated from multicolor photometry (UBV) of deep Kitt Peak 4-m plates with limits of B of about 24. This subset consists of all objects which appeared stellar-like in size but which did not have the UBV colors of common Galactic stars. Besides several probable high-redshift QSOs, this study yields faint QSO counts consistent with those from other surveys, and thus provides further support to models that include mainly the luminosity evolution of QSOs. 29 refs.

  16. [Reference relationships between human and animal in Hildegard von Bingen].

    PubMed

    Riethe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In "De animalibus", the 7th book in the "Liber simplicis medicinae", Hildegard von Bingen describes the characteristics of four-footed land animals. Some of these have a special relationship with humans in that they embody moral qualities. An explanation for this is already given in the preface, which states that human intelligence recognizes these qualities, declaring that "You are this or that sort of creature". Since the relationship that animals have with nature shares a degree of similarity with that of man's, they can be regarded as symbolic representatives for particular human traits and characteristics. The article at hand presents Hildegard von Bingen's descriptions of the monkey, the lion, the bear, the rabbit, the dog, the cat, the wolf, the lynx, and the donkey. While the monkey just mimics man's behaviour and is imperfect in both settings, the lion embodies will power. The bear on the other hand stands for unbridled sexual desire, while in the rabbit the gentleness of a sheep is united with the bounce of a deer. The lynx is regarded as hedonistic, the donkey as stupid, and the wolf as surrounded by dangerous sylphs. In Hildegard's depictions, exotic and native animal species display rather extraordinary behavioural traits, and the medieval Christian world view of the author conveys unexpected relationships between humans and animals. In addition to empirical observation and experience, Hildegard also relies on folkloristic beliefs and magical practices related to explanatory models of her time. She allows largely unknown sources into her animal lore but never strays from her ultimate goal of having it serve to instruct people. In doing so, Hildegard removed herself far from the common tradition of medieval animal portraits. PMID:23155757

  17. Modelling Landscape-Level Numerical Responses of Predators to Prey: The Case of Cats and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Jennyffer; Glen, Alistair S.; Pech, Roger P.

    2013-01-01

    Predator-prey systems can extend over large geographical areas but empirical modelling of predator-prey dynamics has been largely limited to localised scales. This is due partly to difficulties in estimating predator and prey abundances over large areas. Collection of data at suitably large scales has been a major problem in previous studies of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and their predators. This applies in Western Europe, where conserving rabbits and predators such as Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is important, and in other parts of the world where rabbits are an invasive species supporting populations of introduced, and sometimes native, predators. In pastoral regions of New Zealand, rabbits are the primary prey of feral cats (Felis catus) that threaten native fauna. We estimate the seasonal numerical response of cats to fluctuations in rabbit numbers in grassland–shrubland habitat across the Otago and Mackenzie regions of the South Island of New Zealand. We use spotlight counts over 1645 km of transects to estimate rabbit and cat abundances with a novel modelling approach that accounts simultaneously for environmental stochasticity, density dependence and varying detection probability. Our model suggests that cat abundance is related consistently to rabbit abundance in spring and summer, possibly through increased rabbit numbers improving the fecundity and juvenile survival of cats. Maintaining rabbits at low abundance should therefore suppress cat numbers, relieving predation pressure on native prey. Our approach provided estimates of the abundance of cats and rabbits over a large geographical area. This was made possible by repeated sampling within each season, which allows estimation of detection probabilities. A similar approach could be applied to predator-prey systems elsewhere, and could be adapted to any method of direct observation in which there is no double-counting of individuals. Reliable estimates of numerical responses are essential for managing both invasive and threatened predators and prey. PMID:24039978

  18. Identification, characterization, and application of a recombinant antigen for the serological investigation of feline hemotropic Mycoplasma infections.

    PubMed

    Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A; Jäckel, Christian; Museux, Kristina; Hoelzle, Katharina; Tasker, Séverine; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2010-12-01

    In felids, three hemotropic mycoplasma species (hemoplasmas) have been described: Mycoplasma haemofelis, "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum," and "Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis." In particular, M. haemofelis may cause severe, potentially life-threatening hemolytic anemia. No routine serological assays for feline hemoplasma infections are available. Thus, the goal of our project was to identify and characterize an M. haemofelis antigen (DnaK) that subsequently could be applied as a recombinant antigen in a serological assay. The gene sequence of this protein was determined using consensus primers and blood samples from two naturally M. haemofelis-infected Swiss pet cats, an experimentally M. haemofelis-infected specific-pathogen-free cat, and a naturally M. haemofelis-infected Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). The M. haemofelis DnaK gene sequence showed the highest identity to an analogous protein of a porcine hemoplasma (72%). M. haemofelis DnaK was expressed recombinantly in an Escherichia coli DnaK knockout strain and purified using Ni affinity, size-exclusion, and anion-exchange chromatography. It then was biochemically and functionally characterized and showed characteristics typical for DnaKs (secondary structure profile, thermal denaturation, ATPase activity, and DnaK complementation). Moreover, its immunogenicity was assessed using serum samples from experimentally hemoplasma-infected cats. In Western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, it was recognized by sera from cats infected with M. haemofelis, "Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum," and "Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis," respectively, but not from uninfected cats. This is the first description of a full-length purified recombinant feline hemoplasma antigen that can readily be applied in future pathogenesis studies and may have potential for application in a diagnostic serological test. PMID:20876820

  19. Identification, Characterization, and Application of a Recombinant Antigen for the Serological Investigation of Feline Hemotropic Mycoplasma Infections ? ‡

    PubMed Central

    Wolf-Jäckel, Godelind A.; Jäckel, Christian; Museux, Kristina; Hoelzle, Katharina; Tasker, Séverine; Lutz, Hans; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2010-01-01

    In felids, three hemotropic mycoplasma species (hemoplasmas) have been described: Mycoplasma haemofelis, “Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum,” and “Candidatus Mycoplasma turicensis.” In particular, M. haemofelis may cause severe, potentially life-threatening hemolytic anemia. No routine serological assays for feline hemoplasma infections are available. Thus, the goal of our project was to identify and characterize an M. haemofelis antigen (DnaK) that subsequently could be applied as a recombinant antigen in a serological assay. The gene sequence of this protein was determined using consensus primers and blood samples from two naturally M. haemofelis-infected Swiss pet cats, an experimentally M. haemofelis-infected specific-pathogen-free cat, and a naturally M. haemofelis-infected Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). The M. haemofelis DnaK gene sequence showed the highest identity to an analogous protein of a porcine hemoplasma (72%). M. haemofelis DnaK was expressed recombinantly in an Escherichia coli DnaK knockout strain and purified using Ni affinity, size-exclusion, and anion-exchange chromatography. It then was biochemically and functionally characterized and showed characteristics typical for DnaKs (secondary structure profile, thermal denaturation, ATPase activity, and DnaK complementation). Moreover, its immunogenicity was assessed using serum samples from experimentally hemoplasma-infected cats. In Western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, it was recognized by sera from cats infected with M. haemofelis, “Ca. Mycoplasma haemominutum,” and “Ca. Mycoplasma turicensis,” respectively, but not from uninfected cats. This is the first description of a full-length purified recombinant feline hemoplasma antigen that can readily be applied in future pathogenesis studies and may have potential for application in a diagnostic serological test. PMID:20876820

  20. Enhanced understanding of predator-prey relationships using molecular methods to identify predator species, individual and sex.

    PubMed

    Mumma, Matthew A; Soulliere, Colleen E; Mahoney, Shane P; Waits, Lisette P

    2014-01-01

    Predator species identification is an important step in understanding predator-prey interactions, but predator identifications using kill site observations are often unreliable. We used molecular tools to analyse predator saliva, scat and hair from caribou calf kills in Newfoundland, Canada to identify the predator species, individual and sex. We sampled DNA from 32 carcasses using cotton swabs to collect predator saliva. We used fragment length analysis and sequencing of mitochondrial DNA to distinguish between coyote, black bear, Canada lynx and red fox and used nuclear DNA microsatellite analysis to identify individuals. We compared predator species detected using molecular tools to those assigned via field observations at each kill. We identified a predator species at 94% of carcasses using molecular methods, while observational methods assigned a predator species to 62.5% of kills. Molecular methods attributed 66.7% of kills to coyote and 33.3% to black bear, while observations assigned 40%, 45%, 10% and 5% to coyote, bear, lynx and fox, respectively. Individual identification was successful at 70% of kills where a predator species was identified. Only one individual was identified at each kill, but some individuals were found at multiple kills. Predator sex was predominantly male. We demonstrate the first large-scale evaluation of predator species, individual and sex identification using molecular techniques to extract DNA from swabs of wild prey carcasses. Our results indicate that kill site swabs (i) can be highly successful in identifying the predator species and individual responsible; and (ii) serve to inform and complement traditional methods. PMID:23957886

  1. Snapshot of viral infections in wild carnivores reveals ubiquity of parvovirus and susceptibility of Egyptian mongoose to feline panleukopenia virus.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Margarida D; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Barros, Sílvia Carla; Fagulha, Teresa; Mendonça, Paula; Carvalho, Paulo; Monteiro, Madalena; Fevereiro, Miguel; Basto, Mafalda P; Rosalino, Luís Miguel; Barros, Tânia; Bandeira, Victor; Fonseca, Carlos; Cunha, Mónica V

    2013-01-01

    The exposure of wild carnivores to viral pathogens, with emphasis on parvovirus (CPV/FPLV), was assessed based on the molecular screening of tissue samples from 128 hunted or accidentally road-killed animals collected in Portugal from 2008 to 2011, including Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon, n?=?99), red fox (Vulpes vulpes, n?=?19), stone marten (Martes foina, n?=?3), common genet (Genetta genetta, n?=?3) and Eurasian badger (Meles meles, n?=?4). A high prevalence of parvovirus DNA (63%) was detected among all surveyed species, particularly in mongooses (58%) and red foxes (79%), along with the presence of CPV/FPLV circulating antibodies that were identified in 90% of a subset of parvovirus-DNA positive samples. Most specimens were extensively autolysed, restricting macro and microscopic investigations for lesion evaluation. Whenever possible to examine, signs of active disease were not present, supporting the hypothesis that the parvovirus vp2 gene fragments detected by real-time PCR possibly correspond to viral DNA reminiscent from previous infections. The molecular characterization of viruses, based on the analysis of the complete or partial sequence of the vp2 gene, allowed typifying three viral strains of mongoose and four red fox's as feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and one stone marten's as newCPV-2b type. The genetic similarity found between the FPLV viruses from free-ranging and captive wild species originated in Portugal and publicly available comparable sequences, suggests a closer genetic relatedness among FPLV circulating in Portugal. Although the clinical and epidemiological significance of infection could not be established, this study evidences that exposure of sympatric wild carnivores to parvovirus is common and geographically widespread, potentially carrying a risk to susceptible populations at the wildlife-domestic interface and to threatened species, such as the wildcat (Felis silvestris) and the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). PMID:23527182

  2. Neospora caninum antibodies in wild carnivores from Spain.

    PubMed

    Sobrino, R; Dubey, J P; Pabón, M; Linarez, N; Kwok, O C; Millán, J; Arnal, M C; Luco, D F; López-Gatius, F; Thulliez, P; Gortázar, C; Almería, S

    2008-08-17

    Serum samples from 251 wild carnivores from different regions of Spain were tested for antibodies to Neospora caninum by the commercial competitive screening enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (c-ELISA) and confirmed by Neospora agglutination test (NAT) and/or by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Samples with antibodies detected by at least two serological tests were considered seropositive. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 3.2% of 95 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes); in 21.4% of 28 wolves (Canis lupus); in 12.0% of 25 Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus); in 16.7% of 6 European wildcats (Felis silvestris); in 6.4% of 31 Eurasian badgers (Meles meles); in 21.4% of 14 stone martens (Martes foina); in 66.7% of 3 pine martens (M. martes) and in 50% of 2 polecats (Mustela putorius). Antibodies to N. caninum in common genets (Genetta genetta) and Egyptian mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon) were only observed by c-ELISA but were not confirmed by IFAT and/or NAT. No antibodies were detected in 5 Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra) by any technique. Statistically significant differences were observed among species and among geographical areas. The highest seroprevalence of N. caninum infection was observed in the Cantabric Coastal region characterized by high humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first report of antibodies to N. caninum in free ranging wild carnivores, other than wild canids, in Europe. The existence of a possible sylvatic cycle could have important implications in both sylvatic and domestic cycles since they might influence the prevalence of infection in cattle farms in those areas. PMID:18556128

  3. Modelling landscape-level numerical responses of predators to prey: the case of cats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Jennyffer; Glen, Alistair S; Pech, Roger P

    2013-01-01

    Predator-prey systems can extend over large geographical areas but empirical modelling of predator-prey dynamics has been largely limited to localised scales. This is due partly to difficulties in estimating predator and prey abundances over large areas. Collection of data at suitably large scales has been a major problem in previous studies of European rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and their predators. This applies in Western Europe, where conserving rabbits and predators such as Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is important, and in other parts of the world where rabbits are an invasive species supporting populations of introduced, and sometimes native, predators. In pastoral regions of New Zealand, rabbits are the primary prey of feral cats (Felis catus) that threaten native fauna. We estimate the seasonal numerical response of cats to fluctuations in rabbit numbers in grassland-shrubland habitat across the Otago and Mackenzie regions of the South Island of New Zealand. We use spotlight counts over 1645 km of transects to estimate rabbit and cat abundances with a novel modelling approach that accounts simultaneously for environmental stochasticity, density dependence and varying detection probability. Our model suggests that cat abundance is related consistently to rabbit abundance in spring and summer, possibly through increased rabbit numbers improving the fecundity and juvenile survival of cats. Maintaining rabbits at low abundance should therefore suppress cat numbers, relieving predation pressure on native prey. Our approach provided estimates of the abundance of cats and rabbits over a large geographical area. This was made possible by repeated sampling within each season, which allows estimation of detection probabilities. A similar approach could be applied to predator-prey systems elsewhere, and could be adapted to any method of direct observation in which there is no double-counting of individuals. Reliable estimates of numerical responses are essential for managing both invasive and threatened predators and prey. PMID:24039978

  4. In vivo molecular markers for pro-inflammatory cytokine M1 stage and resident microglia in trimethyltin-induced hippocampal injury.

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, CA; Merrick, BA; Harry, GJ

    2013-01-01

    Microglia polarization to the classical M1 activation state is characterized by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, a full profile has not been generated in the early stages of a sterile inflammatory response recruiting only resident microglia. We characterized the initial M1 state in a hippocampal injury model dependent upon tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor signaling for dentate granule cell death. Twenty-one-day-old CD1 male mice were injected with trimethyltin (TMT 2.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and the hippocampus was examined at an early stage (24-h post-dosing) of neuronal death. Glia activation was assessed using a custom quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA). We report elevated mRNA levels for glia response such as ionizing calcium-binding adapter molecule-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, (Gfap); Fas, hypoxia inducible factor alpha, complement component 1qb, TNF-related genes (Tnf, Tnfaip3, Tnfrsfla); interleukin -1 alpha, Cd44, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (Ccl)2, Cc14, integrin alpha M, lipocalin (Lcn2), and secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1). These changes occurred in the absence of changes in matrix metalloproteinase 9 and 12, neural cell adhesion molecule, metabotropic glutamate receptor (Grm)3, and Ly6/neurotoxin 1 (Lynx1), as well as, a decrease in neurotrophin 3, glutamate receptor subunit epsilon (Grin)-2b, and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3. The M2 anti-inflammatory marker, transforming growth factor beta-1 (Tgfb1) was elevated. mRNAs associated with early stage of injury-induced neurogenesis including fibroblast growth factor 21 and Mki67 were elevated. In the “non-injured” temporal cortex receiving projections from the hippocampus, Lynx1, Grm3, and Grin2b were decreased and Gfap increased. Formalin fixed-paraffin-embedded tissue did not generate a comparable profile. PMID:24002884

  5. In vivo molecular markers for pro-inflammatory cytokine M1 stage and resident microglia in trimethyltin-induced hippocampal injury.

    PubMed

    McPherson, C A; Merrick, B A; Harry, G J

    2014-01-01

    Microglia polarization to the classical M1 activation state is characterized by elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, a full profile has not been generated in the early stages of a sterile inflammatory response recruiting only resident microglia. We characterized the initial M1 state in a hippocampal injury model dependent upon tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor signaling for dentate granule cell death. Twenty-one-day-old CD1 male mice were injected with trimethyltin (TMT 2.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and the hippocampus was examined at an early stage (24-h post-dosing) of neuronal death. Glia activation was assessed using a custom quantitative nuclease protection assay. We report elevated mRNA levels for glia response such as ionizing calcium-binding adapter molecule-1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap); Fas, hypoxia inducible factor alpha, complement component 1qb, TNF-related genes (Tnf, Tnfaip3, Tnfrsfla); interleukin-1 alpha, Cd44, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (Ccl)2, Cc14, integrin alpha M, lipocalin (Lcn2), and secreted phosphoprotein 1 (Spp1). These changes occurred in the absence of changes in matrix metalloproteinase 9 and 12, neural cell adhesion molecule, metabotropic glutamate receptor (Grm)3, and Ly6/neurotoxin 1 (Lynx1), as well as, a decrease in neurotrophin 3, glutamate receptor subunit epsilon (Grin)-2b, and neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3. The M2 anti-inflammatory marker, transforming growth factor beta-1 (Tgfb1) was elevated. mRNAs associated with early stage of injury-induced neurogenesis including fibroblast growth factor 21 and Mki67 were elevated. In the "non-injured" temporal cortex receiving projections from the hippocampus, Lynx1, Grm3, and Grin2b were decreased and Gfap increased. Formalin fixed-paraffin-embedded tissue did not generate a comparable profile. PMID:24002884

  6. Sinks without borders: Snowshoe hare dynamics in a complex landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, P.C.; Scott, Mills L.

    2009-01-01

    A full understanding of population dynamics of wide-ranging animals should account for the effects that movement and habitat use have on individual contributions to population growth or decline. Quantifying the per-capita, habitat-specific contribution to population growth can clarify the value of different patch types, and help to differentiate population sources from population sinks. Snowshoe hares, Lepus americanus, routinely use various habitat types in the landscapes they inhabit in the contiguous US, where managing forests for high snowshoe hare density is a priority for conservation of Canada lynx, Lynx canadensis. We estimated density and demographic rates via mark-recapture live trapping and radio-telemetry within four forest stand structure (FSS) types at three study areas within heterogeneous managed forests in western Montana. We found support for known fate survival models with time-varying individual covariates representing the proportion of locations in each of the FSS types, with survival rates decreasing as use of open young and open mature FSS types increased. The per-capita contribution to overall population growth increased with use of the dense mature or dense young FSS types and decreased with use of the open young or open mature FSS types, and relatively high levels of immigration appear to be necessary to sustain hares in the open FSS types. Our results support a conceptual model for snowshoe hares in the southern range in which sink habitats (open areas) prevent the buildup of high hare densities. More broadly, we use this system to develop a novel approach to quantify demographic sources and sinks for animals making routine movements through complex fragmented landscapes. ?? 2009 Oikos.

  7. Linking Hydrology, Shrub Habitat, and Novel Wildlife in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tape, K. D.; O'Donnell, J. A.; Christie, K.

    2014-12-01

    Warming during the 20th century changed the Arctic landscape, including aspects of vegetation, permafrost, and glaciers, but effects on wildlife have been difficult to detect. We explored linkages between components of the riparian ecosystem in Arctic Alaska since the 1970s, including streamflow timing, temperature, floodplain shrub habitat, and shrub herbivore distributions. Streamflow records showed that the peak spring snowmelt discharge has occurred 3.4 days per decade earlier, and consistent fall temperatures and snow arrival dates over the same period suggest that earlier peak discharge has prolonged the ensuing period of reduced flow in the floodplain. We used empirical correlations between cumulative summer warmth and riparian shrub height to estimate that the longer and warmer growing seasons since the 1970s have stimulated a 63% increase in the height of riparian shrubs. Earlier spring discharge and the estimated increase in riparian shrub height are consistent with the observed riparian shrub expansion in the region. Our measurements showed that snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) require a mean riparian shrub height of at least 1.05 to 1.35 m, a threshold which our hindcasting indicates was met between 1977 and 2002. This generally coincides with observational evidence we present suggesting that snowshoe hares became established in 1977 or 1978. Similar relationships are shown for moose, which colonized the region in the 1940s. We also show that Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) inhabited the region in 1998, probably due in part to increasing availability of snowshoe hares. The novel appearance in the Arctic during the 20th century of terrestrial herbivores such as snowshoe hares and moose in response increased shrub habitat is a contrasting terrestrial counterpart to the decline in marine mammals reliant on decreasing sea ice.

  8. Snapshot of Viral Infections in Wild Carnivores Reveals Ubiquity of Parvovirus and Susceptibility of Egyptian Mongoose to Feline Panleukopenia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Margarida D.; Henriques, Ana Margarida; Barros, Sílvia Carla; Fagulha, Teresa; Mendonça, Paula; Carvalho, Paulo; Monteiro, Madalena; Fevereiro, Miguel; Basto, Mafalda P.; Rosalino, Luís Miguel; Barros, Tânia; Bandeira, Victor; Fonseca, Carlos; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2013-01-01

    The exposure of wild carnivores to viral pathogens, with emphasis on parvovirus (CPV/FPLV), was assessed based on the molecular screening of tissue samples from 128 hunted or accidentally road-killed animals collected in Portugal from 2008 to 2011, including Egyptian mongoose (Herpestes ichneumon, n?=?99), red fox (Vulpes vulpes, n?=?19), stone marten (Martes foina, n?=?3), common genet (Genetta genetta, n?=?3) and Eurasian badger (Meles meles, n?=?4). A high prevalence of parvovirus DNA (63%) was detected among all surveyed species, particularly in mongooses (58%) and red foxes (79%), along with the presence of CPV/FPLV circulating antibodies that were identified in 90% of a subset of parvovirus-DNA positive samples. Most specimens were extensively autolysed, restricting macro and microscopic investigations for lesion evaluation. Whenever possible to examine, signs of active disease were not present, supporting the hypothesis that the parvovirus vp2 gene fragments detected by real-time PCR possibly correspond to viral DNA reminiscent from previous infections. The molecular characterization of viruses, based on the analysis of the complete or partial sequence of the vp2 gene, allowed typifying three viral strains of mongoose and four red fox’s as feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV) and one stone marten’s as newCPV-2b type. The genetic similarity found between the FPLV viruses from free-ranging and captive wild species originated in Portugal and publicly available comparable sequences, suggests a closer genetic relatedness among FPLV circulating in Portugal. Although the clinical and epidemiological significance of infection could not be established, this study evidences that exposure of sympatric wild carnivores to parvovirus is common and geographically widespread, potentially carrying a risk to susceptible populations at the wildlife-domestic interface and to threatened species, such as the wildcat (Felis silvestris) and the critically endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). PMID:23527182

  9. Effects of anionic polyacrylamide products on gill histopathology in juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jennifer L; Lumsden, John S; Russell, Spencer K; Jasinska, Edyta J; Goss, Greg G

    2014-07-01

    Anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) products are commonly used to remove suspended materials from turbid waters and to help mitigate soil erosion. In the present study, juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to 3?mg/L to 300?mg/L of 10 commercially available PAM products (Clearflow Water Lynx Polymer Log and Clearflow Soil Lynx Granular Polymer; Clearflow Enviro Systems Group), and gill histological parameters were measured following either 7 d or 30 d of polymer exposure. A cationic polymer product (?0.38?mg/L MagnaFloc 368; Ciba Specialty Chemical) was also tested for comparison. Mild gill lesions were observed in fish exposed to polymer products. Lamellar fusion, interlamellar hyperplasia, epithelial lifting, mucous cell metaplasia, and cell counts of epithelial swelling and necrosis/apoptosis were minimal in fish exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of anionic polymer (?30?mg/L). Gill morphology was largely unaffected by exposure to concentrations up to 300?mg/L of many PAM products. Several anionic polymer products noticeably affected gill tissue by increasing epithelial hypertrophy, interlamellar hyperplasia, mucous cell metaplasia, and the frequency of necrotic cells. The severity of the lesions lessened with time, suggesting that fish may have experienced a short-term irritant effect. Similar levels of gill pathology were frequently observed in fish exposed to cationic polymer MagnaFloc 368 despite the concentration being 1000-fold lower than that of the PAM products. These observations highlight the increased toxicity of cationic polymers to aquatic life compared with anionic PAMs. PMID:24648306

  10. SU-E-CAMPUS-T-04: Measurement of Proton Pencil Beam Spot Profile Using Cherenkov Radiation in Two Dimensional Optical Fiber Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M; SHIN, D; Park, J; Lim, Y; Lee, S; Kim, J; Son, J; Hwang, U

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy aims to deliver a high dose in a well-defined target volume while sparing the healthy surrounding tissues thanks to their inherent depth dose characteristic (Bragg peak). In proton therapy, several techniques can be used to deliver the dose into the target volume. The one that allows the best conformity with the tumor, is called PBS (Pencil Beam Scanning). The measurement of the proton pencil beam spot profile (spot size) and position is very important for the accurate delivery of dose to the target volume with a good conformity. Methods: We have developed a fine segmented detector array to monitor the PBS. A prototype beam monitor using Cherenkov radiation in clear plastic optical fibers (cPOF) has been developed for continuous display of the pencil beam status during the therapeutic proton Pencil Beam Scanning mode operation. The benefit of using Cherenkov radiation is that the optical output is linear to the dose. Pedestal substraction and the gain adjustment between channels are performed. Spot profiles of various pencil beam energies(100 MeV to 226 MeV) are measured. Two dimensional gaussian fit is used to analyze the beam width and the spot center. The results are compared with that of Lynx(Scintillator-based sensor with CCD camera) and EBT3 Film. Results: The measured gaussian widths using fiber array system changes from 13 to 5 mm for the beam energies from 100 to 226 MeV. The results agree well with Lynx and Film within the systematic error. Conclusion: The results demonstrate good monitoring capability of the system. Not only measuing the spot profile but also monitoring dose map by accumulating each spot measurement is available. The x-y monitoing system with 128 channel readout will be mounted to the snout for the in-situ real time monitoring.

  11. Novel Gammaherpesviruses in North American Domestic Cats, Bobcats, and Pumas: Identification, Prevalence, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Julia A.; Stutzman-Rodriguez, Kathryn R.; Carver, Scott; Lozano, Caitlin C.; Lee, Justin S.; Lappin, Michael R.; Riley, Seth P. D.; Serieys, Laurel E. K.; Logan, Kenneth A.; Sweanor, Linda L.; Boyce, Walter M.; Vickers, T. Winston; McBride, Roy; Crooks, Kevin R.; Lewis, Jesse S.; Cunningham, Mark W.; Rovnak, Joel; Quackenbush, Sandra L.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gammaherpesviruses (GHVs) are a diverse and rapidly expanding group of viruses associated with a variety of disease conditions in humans and animals. To identify felid GHVs, we screened domestic cat (Felis catus), bobcat (Lynx rufus), and puma (Puma concolor) blood cell DNA samples from California, Colorado, and Florida using a degenerate pan-GHV PCR. Additional pan-GHV and long-distance PCRs were used to sequence a contiguous 3.4-kb region of each putative virus species, including partial glycoprotein B and DNA polymerase genes. We identified three novel GHVs, each present predominantly in one felid species: Felis catus GHV 1 (FcaGHV1) in domestic cats, Lynx rufus GHV 1 (LruGHV1) in bobcats, and Puma concolor GHV 1 (PcoGHV1) in pumas. To estimate infection prevalence, we developed real-time quantitative PCR assays for each virus and screened additional DNA samples from all three species (n = 282). FcaGHV1 was detected in 16% of domestic cats across all study sites. LruGHV1 was detected in 47% of bobcats and 13% of pumas across all study sites, suggesting relatively common interspecific transmission. PcoGHV1 was detected in 6% of pumas, all from a specific region of Southern California. The risk of infection for each host varied with geographic location. Age was a positive risk factor for bobcat LruGHV1 infection, and age and being male were risk factors for domestic cat FcaGHV1 infection. Further characterization of these viruses may have significant health implications for domestic cats and may aid studies of free-ranging felid ecology. IMPORTANCE Gammaherpesviruses (GHVs) establish lifelong infection in many animal species and can cause cancer and other diseases in humans and animals. In this study, we identified the DNA sequences of three GHVs present in the blood of domestic cats (Felis catus), bobcats (Lynx rufus), and pumas (Puma concolor; also known as mountain lions, cougars, and panthers). We found that these viruses were closely related to, but distinct from, other known GHVs of animals and represent the first GHVs identified to be native to these feline species. We developed techniques to rapidly and specifically detect the DNA of these viruses in feline blood and found that the domestic cat and bobcat viruses were widespread across the United States. In contrast, puma virus was found only in a specific region of Southern California. Surprisingly, the bobcat virus was also detected in some pumas, suggesting relatively common virus transmission between these species. Adult domestic cats and bobcats were at greater risk for infection than juveniles. Male domestic cats were at greater risk for infection than females. This study identifies three new viruses that are widespread in three feline species, indicates risk factors for infection that may relate to the route of infection, and demonstrates cross-species transmission between bobcats and pumas. These newly identified viruses may have important effects on feline health and ecology. PMID:24453374

  12. RX J0848.6+4453: The evolution of galaxy sizes and stellar populations in A z = 1.27 cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Jørgensen, Inger; Chiboucas, Kristin; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Toft, Sune; Zirm, Andrew; Bergmann, Marcel; Grützbauch, Ruth E-mail: kchiboucas@gemini.edu E-mail: sune@dark-cosmology.dk E-mail: marcelbergmann@gmail.com

    2014-12-01

    RX J0848.6+4453 (Lynx W) at redshift 1.27 is part of the Lynx Supercluster of galaxies. We present an analysis of the stellar populations and star formation history for a sample of 24 members of the cluster. Our study is based on deep optical spectroscopy obtained with Gemini North combined with imaging data from Hubble Space Telescope. Focusing on the 13 bulge-dominated galaxies for which we can determine central velocity dispersions, we find that these show a smaller evolution with redshift of sizes and velocity dispersions than reported for field galaxies and galaxies in poorer clusters. Our data show that the galaxies in RX J0848.6+4453 populate the fundamental plane (FP) similar to that found for lower-redshift clusters. The zero-point offset for the FP is smaller than expected if the cluster's galaxies are to evolve passively through the location of the FP we established in our previous work for z = 0.8-0.9 cluster galaxies and then to the present-day FP. The FP zero point for RX J0848.6+4453 corresponds to an epoch of last star formation at z{sub form}=1.95{sub ?0.15}{sup +0.22}. Further, we find that the spectra of the galaxies in RX J0848.6+4453 are dominated by young stellar populations at all galaxy masses and in many cases show emission indicating low-level ongoing star formation. The average age of the young stellar populations as estimated from the strength of the high-order Balmer line H? is consistent with a major star formation episode 1-2 Gyr prior, which in turn agrees with z {sub form} = 1.95. These galaxies dominated by young stellar populations are distributed throughout the cluster. We speculate that low-level star formation has not yet been fully quenched in the center of this cluster, possibly because the cluster is significantly poorer than other clusters previously studied at similar redshifts, which appear to have very little ongoing star formation in their centers. The mixture in RX J0848.6+4453 of passive galaxies with young stellar populations and massive galaxies still experiencing some star formation appears similar to the galaxy populations recently identified in two z ? 2 clusters.

  13. Seasonal Effects of Habitat on Sources and Rates of Snowshoe Hare Predation in Alaskan Boreal Forests.

    PubMed

    Feierabend, Dashiell; Kielland, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Survival and predation of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) has been widely studied, yet there has been little quantification of the changes in vulnerability of hares to specific predators that may result from seasonal changes in vegetation and cover. We investigated survival and causes of mortalities of snowshoe hares during the late increase, peak, and decline of a population in interior Alaska. From June 2008 to May 2012, we radio-tagged 288 adult and older juvenile hares in early successional and black spruce (Picea mariana) forests and, using known-fate methods in program MARK, evaluated 85 survival models that included variables for sex, age, and body condition of hares, as well as trapping site, month, season, year, snowfall, snow depth, and air temperature. We compared the models using Akaike's information criterion with correction for small sample size. Model results indicated that month, capture site, and body condition were the most important variables in explaining survival rates. Survival was highest in July, and more generally during summer, when alternative prey was available to predators of hares. Low survival rates coincided with molting periods, breeding activity in the spring, and the introduction of juveniles to the sample population in the fall. We identified predation as the cause of mortality in 86% of hare deaths. When the source of predation could be determined, hares were killed more often by goshawks (Accipiter gentilis) than other predators in early successional forest (30%), and more often by lynx (Lynx canadensis) than other predators in black spruce forest (31%). Great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and coyotes (Canis latrans) represented smaller proportions of hare predation, and non-predatory causes were a minor source (3%) of mortality. Because hares rely on vegetative cover for concealment from predators, we measured cover in predation sites and habitats that the hares occupied and concluded that habitat type had a greater influence on the sources of predation than the amount of cover in any given location within a habitat. Our observations illustrate the vulnerability of hares to predators in even the densest coniferous habitat available in the boreal forest, and indicate strong seasonal changes in the rates and sources of predation. PMID:26717577

  14. RX J0848.6+4453: The Evolution of Galaxy Sizes and Stellar Populations in a z = 1.27 Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, Inger; Chiboucas, Kristin; Toft, Sune; Bergmann, Marcel; Zirm, Andrew; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Grützbauch, Ruth

    2014-12-01

    RX J0848.6+4453 (Lynx W) at redshift 1.27 is part of the Lynx Supercluster of galaxies. We present an analysis of the stellar populations and star formation history for a sample of 24 members of the cluster. Our study is based on deep optical spectroscopy obtained with Gemini North combined with imaging data from Hubble Space Telescope. Focusing on the 13 bulge-dominated galaxies for which we can determine central velocity dispersions, we find that these show a smaller evolution with redshift of sizes and velocity dispersions than reported for field galaxies and galaxies in poorer clusters. Our data show that the galaxies in RX J0848.6+4453 populate the fundamental plane (FP) similar to that found for lower-redshift clusters. The zero-point offset for the FP is smaller than expected if the cluster's galaxies are to evolve passively through the location of the FP we established in our previous work for z = 0.8-0.9 cluster galaxies and then to the present-day FP. The FP zero point for RX J0848.6+4453 corresponds to an epoch of last star formation at z_form= 1.95+0.22-0.15. Further, we find that the spectra of the galaxies in RX J0848.6+4453 are dominated by young stellar populations at all galaxy masses and in many cases show emission indicating low-level ongoing star formation. The average age of the young stellar populations as estimated from the strength of the high-order Balmer line H? is consistent with a major star formation episode 1-2 Gyr prior, which in turn agrees with z form = 1.95. These galaxies dominated by young stellar populations are distributed throughout the cluster. We speculate that low-level star formation has not yet been fully quenched in the center of this cluster, possibly because the cluster is significantly poorer than other clusters previously studied at similar redshifts, which appear to have very little ongoing star formation in their centers. The mixture in RX J0848.6+4453 of passive galaxies with young stellar populations and massive galaxies still experiencing some star formation appears similar to the galaxy populations recently identified in two z ? 2 clusters.

  15. Evaluation of road expansion and connectivity mitigation for wildlife in southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alonso, Robert S.; Lyren, Lisa M.; Boydston, Erin E.; Haas, Christopher D.; Crooks, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    We designed a remote-camera survey to study how the expansion of California State Route 71 (CA-71) and implementation of connectivity mitigation affected the use of underpasses by large mammals in southern California. Based on detections by cameras, the use of underpasses by bobcats (Lynx rufus) was higher within the area of expansion and mitigation after construction than before, but there was no difference in use of underpasses in the impact zone compared to the control zone before or after construction. Use of underpasses by coyotes (Canis latrans) was higher in the control zone than in the impact zone, but there was no difference in use before and after construction. Small numbers of detections of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) at only a few underpasses precluded comparison between control and impact zones. However, a comparison of use before and after construction revealed that use of underpasses by mule deer was slightly higher post-construction. We cannot fully attribute increased detections post-construction to mitigative efforts, because other factors, such as availability of habitat, urbanization, or demography, also may have influenced use of underpasses along CA-71. Nonetheless, even with the expansion of the freeway and subsequent increase in volume of traffic, mitigative structures along CA-71 did allow for continued movement and, hence, connectivity across the roadway for large mammals.

  16. The potential and flux landscape theory of ecology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Kun; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The species in ecosystems are mutually interacting and self sustainable stable for a certain period. Stability and dynamics are crucial for understanding the structure and the function of ecosystems. We developed a potential and flux landscape theory of ecosystems to address these issues. We show that the driving force of the ecological dynamics can be decomposed to the gradient of the potential landscape and the curl probability flux measuring the degree of the breaking down of the detailed balance (due to in or out flow of the energy to the ecosystems). We found that the underlying intrinsic potential landscape is a global Lyapunov function monotonically going down in time and the topology of the landscape provides a quantitative measure for the global stability of the ecosystems. We also quantified the intrinsic energy, the entropy, the free energy and constructed the non-equilibrium thermodynamics for the ecosystems. We studied several typical and important ecological systems: the predation, competition, mutualism and a realistic lynx-snowshoe hare model. Single attractor, multiple attractors and limit cycle attractors emerge from these studies. We studied the stability and robustness of the ecosystems against the perturbations in parameters and the environmental fluctuations. We also found that the kinetic paths between the multiple attractors do not follow the gradient paths of the underlying landscape and are irreversible because of the non-zero flux. This theory provides a novel way for exploring the global stability, function and the robustness of ecosystems. PMID:24497975

  17. Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew. MJ

    2009-12-01

    The Distromet disdrometer model RD-80 and NovaLynx tipping bucket rain gauge model 260-2500E-12 are two devices deployed a few meters apart to measure the character and amount of liquid precipitation. The main purpose of the disdrometer is to measure drop size distribution, which it does over 20 size classes from 0.3 mm to 5.4 mm. The data from both instruments can be used to determine rain rate. The disdrometer results can also be used to infer several properties including drop number density, radar reflectivity, liquid water content, and energy flux. Two coefficients, N0 and ?, from an exponential fit between drop diameter and drop number density, are routinely calculated. Data are collected once a minute. The instruments make completely different kinds of measurements. Rain that falls on the disdrometer sensor moves a plunger on a vertical axis. The disdrometer transforms the plunger motion into electrical impulses whose strength is proportional to drop diameter. The rain gauge is the conventional tipping bucket type. Each tip collects an amount equivalent to 0.01 in. of water, and each tip is counted by a data acquisition system anchored by a Campbell CR1000 data logger.

  18. Assessing transmissible spongiform encephalopathy species barriers with an in vitro prion protein conversion assay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Carlson, Christina M.; Morawski, Aaron R.; Manthei, Alyson; Cashman, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Studies to understanding interspecies transmission of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are challenging in that they typically rely upon lengthy and costly in vivo animal challenge studies. A number of in vitro assays have been developed to aid in measuring prion species barriers, thereby reducing animal use and providing quicker results than animal bioassays. Here, we present the protocol for a rapid in vitroprion conversion assay called the conversion efficiency ratio (CER) assay. In this assay cellular prion protein (PrPC) from an uninfected host brain is denatured at both pH 7.4 and 3.5 to produce two substrates. When the pH 7.4 substrate is incubated with TSE agent, the amount of PrPC that converts to a proteinase K (PK)-resistant state is modulated by the original host’s species barrier to the TSE agent. In contrast, PrPC in the pH 3.5 substrate is misfolded by any TSE agent. By comparing the amount of PK-resistant prion protein in the two substrates, an assessment of the host’s species barrier can be made. We show that the CER assay correctly predicts known prion species barriers of laboratory mice and, as an example, show some preliminary results suggesting that bobcats (Lynx rufus) may be susceptible to white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) chronic wasting disease agent.

  19. Serum Pharmacochemistry Analysis Using UPLC-Q-TOF/MS after Oral Administration to Rats of Shenfu Decoction

    PubMed Central

    He, Jia-le; Zhao, Jia-wei; Ma, Zeng-chun; Wang, Yu-guang; Liang, Qian-de; Tan, Hong-ling; Xiao, Cheng-rong; Tang, Xiang-lin; Gao, Yue

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the serum pharmacochemistry of SFD as well as the material basis through analyzing the constituents absorbed in blood. The SFD was orally administrated to Wistar rats at 20?g·kg?1, and Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) fingerprints of SFD were created. Serum samples were collected for analysis, and further data processing used MarkerLynx XS software. 19 ginsenosides and 16 alkaloids were detected in SFD. The absorption of alkaloids (mainly monoester diterpenoid alkaloids) increased when Aconitum carmichaeli Debx. was combined with Panax ginseng, while the ginsenosides remained stable. Diester diterpenoid alkaloids were not present in the serum samples. A suitable serum pharmacochemistry method was successfully established to study pharmacological effects and potential improvements in formulation. This may also be useful for toxicity reduction. We suspect that the increased absorption of the monoester diterpenoid alkaloids from the mixture of Panax and Radix, compared to the Panax only extract, may be the reason for the combination of the two herbs in popular medicine formulas in China. PMID:26273317

  20. Disease and freeways drive genetic change in urban bobcat populations

    PubMed Central

    Serieys, Laurel E K; Lea, Amanda; Pollinger, John P; Riley, Seth P D; Wayne, Robert K

    2015-01-01

    Urbanization profoundly impacts animal populations by causing isolation, increased susceptibility to disease, and exposure to toxicants. Genetic effects include reduced effective population size, increased population substructure, and decreased adaptive potential. We investigated the influence that urbanization and a disease epizootic had on the population genetics of bobcats (Lynx rufus) distributed across a highly fragmented urban landscape. We genotyped more than 300 bobcats, sampled from 1996 to 2012, for variation at nine neutral and seven immune gene-linked microsatellite loci. We found that two freeways are significant barriers to gene flow. Further, a 3-year disease epizootic, associated with secondary anticoagulant rodenticide exposure, caused a population bottleneck that led to significant genetic differentiation between pre- and post-disease populations that was greater than that between populations separated by major freeways for >60 years. However, balancing selection acted on immune-linked loci during the epizootic, maintaining variation at functional regions. Conservation assessments need to assay loci that are potentially under selection to better preserve the adaptive potential of populations at the urban–wildland interface. Further, interconnected regions that contain appropriate habitat for wildlife will be critical to the long-term viability of animal populations in urban landscapes. PMID:25667604

  1. An integrative computational approach for prioritization of genomic variants

    SciTech Connect

    Dubchak, Inna; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Wang, Sheng; Meydan, Cem; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Poliakov, Alexander; Börnigen, Daniela; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; Ma, Jianzhu; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Dave, Paul; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mason, Christopher E.; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Maltsev, Natalia; Gilliam, T. Conrad; Huang, Qingyang

    2014-12-15

    An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB), and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidate genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest.

  2. Rapid identification of erythrocyte phospholipids in Sprague-Dawley rats by ultra high performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pi, Juanjuan; Wu, Xia; Yang, Shitian; Zeng, Pingyan; Feng, Yifan

    2015-03-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and reliable approach for analyzing five kinds of erythrocyte phospholipids in Sprague-Dawley rats was provided by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry with MassLynx(TM) MassFragment. Improving conventional high performance liquid chromatography techniques, ultra high performance liquid chromatography integrated with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry offers high sensitivity and increased analytical speed by using columns packed with sub-2 ?m particles (1.7 ?m), which allows a faster separation to be achieved. Through this method, 83 phospholipids were tentatively characterized based on their mass spectra and tandem mass spectra, as well as by matching the in-house formula database within a mass error of 5 ppm, including 40 phosphatidylcholines, 24 phosphatidyl ethanolamines, three phosphatidylinositols, six phosphatidylserines, and ten sphingomyelins. Our present results proved that the established method could be used to qualitatively analyze complex erythrocyte phospholipids in Sprague-Dawley rats and provide a useful data base for pharmacology and phospholipidomics to seek potential biomarkers of disease prediction. PMID:25564825

  3. Anthropogenic influences on macro-level mammal occupancy in the Appalachian Trail corridor.

    PubMed

    Erb, Peter L; McShea, William J; Guralnick, Robert P

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic effects on wildlife are typically assessed at the local level, but it is often difficult to extrapolate to larger spatial extents. Macro-level occupancy studies are one way to assess impacts of multiple disturbance factors that might vary over different geographic extents. Here we assess anthropogenic effects on occupancy and distribution for several mammal species within the Appalachian Trail (AT), a forest corridor that extends across a broad section of the eastern United States. Utilizing camera traps and a large volunteer network of citizen scientists, we were able to sample 447 sites along a 1024 km section of the AT to assess the effects of available habitat, hunting, recreation, and roads on eight mammal species. Occupancy modeling revealed the importance of available forest to all species except opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and coyotes (Canis latrans). Hunting on adjoining lands was the second strongest predictor of occupancy for three mammal species, negatively influencing black bears (Ursus americanus) and bobcats (Lynx rufus), while positively influencing raccoons (Procyon lotor). Modeling also indicated an avoidance of high trail use areas by bears and proclivity towards high use areas by red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Roads had the lowest predictive power on species occupancy within the corridor and were only significant for deer. The occupancy models stress the importance of compounding direct and indirect anthropogenic influences operating at the regional level. Scientists and managers should consider these human impacts and their potential combined influence on wildlife persistence when assessing optimal habitat or considering management actions. PMID:22880038

  4. [UPLC-Q-TOF/MS analysis of phospholipids metabolite profiling in plasma of type 2 diabetes mellitus rat].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ping-yan; Zhang, Yu; Rui, Wen; Wu, Xia; Feng, Yi-fan

    2015-07-01

    This study reported the analysis of plasma phospholipid metabolism of the rats and the pathological biomarkers between the type 2 diabetes model control group (MC) and the normal control group (NC). SD rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: NC and MC. To investigate state of plasma metabolite profiling in normal body, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) model group using UPLC-Q-TOF/MS which was used as analysis tool in this research. The compounds were identified by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS based on MS/MS fragment ions information, element composition in MassLynx 4.1 and the Lipid Maps database. The sign of two groups of samples in specific markers for screening was through a software package in R software (BioMark software). The results show that the pathological markers were mainly phosphatidylcholine (PC) and triglycerides (TG); the 2-acyl PC in the MC group was less more obviously than that in the NC group; high carbon number and high degree of unsaturation of the TG was reduced under the condition of type 2 diabetes. In the state of type 2 diabetes, metabolic changes occurred in rat plasma phospholipids obviously, which had a close relationship with the occurrence and development of T2DM. PMID:26552151

  5. An integrative computational approach for prioritization of genomic variants.

    PubMed

    Dubchak, Inna; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Wang, Sheng; Cem, Meydan; Meyden, Cem; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Poliakov, Alexander; Börnigen, Daniela; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; Ma, Jianzhu; Paciorkowski, Alex R; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Dave, Paul; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mason, Christopher E; Ross, M Elizabeth; Maltsev, Natalia; Gilliam, T Conrad

    2014-01-01

    An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB), and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidate genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest. PMID:25506935

  6. Use of predator odors as repellents to reduce feeding damage by herbivores : II. Black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus).

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T P; Nordstrom, L O; Sullivan, D S

    1985-07-01

    The effectiveness of predator odors (fecal and urine) in suppressing feeding damage by black-tailed deer was investigated in pen bioassays at the University of British Columbia Research Forest, Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada. A total of eight bioassay trials tested the effects of these odors on deer consumption of salal leaves and coniferous seedlings. Cougar, coyote,and wolf feces as well as coyote, wolf, fox, wolverine, lynx, and bobcat urines provided the most effective suppression of deer feeding damage. Novel odors of ammonia and human urine did not reduce feeding. Predator fecal odor formulations in direct foliar application, adhesive application, and in plastic vials were all effective in suppressing deer feeding. Of all urines tested, coyote provided the most consistent suppression of deer browsing on salal. Deer consumed significantly more untreated Douglas fir and western red cedar seedlings than those protected by coyote urine odor. The active repellent components of predator odors which suppress deer feeding may be suitable for encapsulation in controlled-release devices which could provide long-term protection for forest and agricultural crops. PMID:24310276

  7. Anthropogenic Influences on Macro-Level Mammal Occupancy in the Appalachian Trail Corridor

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Peter L.; McShea, William J.; Guralnick, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic effects on wildlife are typically assessed at the local level, but it is often difficult to extrapolate to larger spatial extents. Macro-level occupancy studies are one way to assess impacts of multiple disturbance factors that might vary over different geographic extents. Here we assess anthropogenic effects on occupancy and distribution for several mammal species within the Appalachian Trail (AT), a forest corridor that extends across a broad section of the eastern United States. Utilizing camera traps and a large volunteer network of citizen scientists, we were able to sample 447 sites along a 1024 km section of the AT to assess the effects of available habitat, hunting, recreation, and roads on eight mammal species. Occupancy modeling revealed the importance of available forest to all species except opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and coyotes (Canis latrans). Hunting on adjoining lands was the second strongest predictor of occupancy for three mammal species, negatively influencing black bears (Ursus americanus) and bobcats (Lynx rufus), while positively influencing raccoons (Procyon lotor). Modeling also indicated an avoidance of high trail use areas by bears and proclivity towards high use areas by red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Roads had the lowest predictive power on species occupancy within the corridor and were only significant for deer. The occupancy models stress the importance of compounding direct and indirect anthropogenic influences operating at the regional level. Scientists and managers should consider these human impacts and their potential combined influence on wildlife persistence when assessing optimal habitat or considering management actions. PMID:22880038

  8. TTCPR : A PMC receiver for TTC.

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J. W.; Francis, D. J.; Haberichter, W. N.; Schlereth, J. L.; High Energy Physics; CERN Lab.

    2001-01-01

    The TTCPR receiver is a mezzanine card intended for use in distributing TTC information to Data Acquisition and Trigger Crates in the ATLAS Prototype Integration activities. An original prototype run of these cards was built for testbeam and integration studies, implemented in both the PMC and PCI form factors, using the TTCrx chips from the previous manufacture. When the new TTCrx chips became available, the TTCPR was redesigned to take advantage of the availability and enhanced features of the new TTCRX(1), and a run of 20 PMC cards was manufactured, and has since been used in integration studies and the testbeam. The TTCPR uses the AMCC 5933(2) to manage the PCI port, an Altera 10K30A(3) to provide all the logic so that the functionality may be easily altered, and provides a 4K deep FIFO to retain TTC data for subsequent DMA through the PCI port. In addition to DMA's which are mastered by the Add On logic, communication through PCI is accomplished via mailboxes, interrupts, and the pass-through feature of the 5933. An interface to the I2C bus of the TTCRX is provided so that internal registers may be accessed, and the card supports reinitialization of the TTCRX from PCI. Software has been developed to support operation of the TTCPR under both LynxOS and Linux.

  9. Scat removal: A source of bias in feces-related studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Livingston, T.R.; Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.; Sanchez, D.M.; Krausman, P.R.

    2005-01-01

    Consumption of feces (coprophagy) may alter findings of dietary studies and population estimates based on fecal analyses, but its magnitude is poorly understood. We investigated seasonal incidence of scat removal on Fort Riley, Kansas, from January through December 2000. We placed feces from captive bobcats (Lynx rufus), captive coyotes (Canis latrans), and free-ranging coyotes randomly on tracking stations in forest and prairie landscapes to determine rates of scat removal by local wildlife. Rates of removal of feces from captive bobcats, captive coyotes, and free-ranging coyotes varied from 7% during spring to 50% during summer. We identified opossums (Didelphis virginiana) as the most common species present at stations where scat removal occurred. Feces may be an important seasonal source of food for opossums and may provide seasonal dietary supplements for other species. Other factors responsible for disturbance of feces included a woodrat (Neotoma floridana) caching coyote feces, removal of captive coyote feces by free-ranging coyotes accompanied by deposition of fresh feces, a bobcat burying a captive bobcat sample and depositing fresh feces, and rain storms. Dietary studies based on fecal analyses could be biased by scat removal, assuming that contents in feces are representative of the proportion of foods consumed.

  10. The response of terrestrial ecosystems to climate variability associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysterud, Alte; Stenseth, Nils Chr.; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Ottersen, Geir; Langvatn, Rolf

    Climatic factors influence a variety of ecological processes determining patterns of species density and distribution in a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems. We review the effects of the NAO on processes and patterns of terrestrial ecosystems, including both plants and animals. In plants, the NAO index correlates with date of first flowering, tree ring growth and with quality of agricultural crops (wheat and wine grapes). Also, breeding dates are earlier after high NAO index winters for amphibians and birds in Europe. Population dynamical consequences of the NAO have also been reported for birds, and the differential impact of the NAO on two similar species may prevent competitive exclusion. Different effects of the NAO on large herbivore populations have been reported for different regions, depending on limiting factors and the correlation with local weather parameters. The NAO synchronizes population dynamics of lynx and some other carnivore populations in the eastern U.S. Most effects are on an ecological time scale; the evolutionary consequences of long term trends in the NAO are poorly documented. Important for predator and prey dynamics is (1) the disruption of phenology (the match-mismatch hypothesis), (2) that there may be delayed effects (cohort-effects), and (3) that effects of the NAO may interact with other factors such as density. We discuss the challenges related to nonlinearity, of using different climate indices, and how we can progress using these pattern-oriented NAO studies at coarse scales to conduct better process-oriented small-scale experiments.

  11. Population synchrony in small-world networks

    PubMed Central

    Ranta, Esa; Fowler, Mike S; Kaitala, Veijo

    2007-01-01

    Network topography ranges from regular graphs (linkage between nearest neighbours only) via small-world graphs (some random connections between nodes) to completely random graphs. Small-world linkage is seen as a revolutionary architecture for a wide range of social, physical and biological networks, and has been shown to increase synchrony between oscillating subunits. We study small-world topographies in a novel context: dispersal linkage between spatially structured populations across a range of population models. Regular dispersal between population patches interacting with density-dependent renewal provides one ecological explanation for the large-scale synchrony seen in the temporal fluctuations of many species, for example, lynx populations in North America, voles in Fennoscandia and grouse in the UK. Introducing a small-world dispersal kernel leads to a clear reduction in synchrony with both increasing dispersal rate and small-world dispersal probability across a variety of biological scenarios. Synchrony is also reduced when populations are affected by globally correlated noise. We discuss ecological implications of small-world dispersal in the frame of spatial synchrony in population fluctuations. PMID:18055385

  12. West Foster Creek Expansion Project 2007 HEP Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-02-01

    During April and May 2007, the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's (CBFWA) Regional HEP Team (RHT) conducted baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (USFWS 1980, 1980a) analyses on five parcels collectively designated the West Foster Creek Expansion Project (3,756.48 acres). The purpose of the HEP analyses was to document extant habitat conditions and to determine how many baseline/protection habitat units (HUs) to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for funding maintenance and enhancement activities on project lands as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. HEP evaluation models included mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), sharp-tailed grouse, (Tympanuchus phasianellus), Bobcat (Lynx rufus), mink (Neovison vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and black-capped chickadee (Parus atricapillus). Combined 2007 baseline HEP results show that 4,946.44 habitat units were generated on 3,756.48 acres (1.32 HUs per acre). HEP results/habitat conditions were generally similar for like cover types at all sites. Unlike crediting of habitat units (HUs) on other WDFW owned lands, Bonneville Power Administration received full credit for HUs generated on these sites.

  13. Comparing scat detection dogs, cameras, and hair snares for surveying carnivores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, Robert A.; Donovan, T.M.; MacKay, Paula; Zielinski, William J.; Buzas, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    Carnivores typically require large areas of habitat, exist at low natural densities, and exhibit elusive behavior - characteristics that render them difficult to study. Noninvasive survey methods increasingly provide means to collect extensive data on carnivore occupancy, distribution, and abundance. During the summers of 2003-2004, we compared the abilities of scat detection dogs, remote cameras, and hair snares to detect black bears (Ursus americanus), fishers (Martes pennanti), and bobcats (Lynx rufus) at 168 sites throughout Vermont. All 3 methods detected black bears; neither fishers nor bobcats were detected by hair snares. Scat detection dogs yielded the highest raw detection rate and probability of detection (given presence) for each of the target species, as well as the greatest number of unique detections (i.e., occasions when only one method detected the target species). We estimated that the mean probability of detecting the target species during a single visit to a site with a detection dog was 0.87 for black bears, 0.84 for fishers, and 0.27 for bobcats. Although the cost of surveying with detection dogs was higher than that of remote cameras or hair snares, the efficiency of this method rendered it the most cost-effective survey method.

  14. Diversity Array Technology Markers: Genetic Diversity Analyses and Linkage Map Construction in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N.; Aslam, M.N.; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A.; Kilian, A.; Sharpe, Andrew G.; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines ‘Lynx-037DH’ and ‘Monty-028DH’. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed. PMID:22193366

  15. Rapidly deteriorating course in Dutch hereditary spastic paraplegia type 11 patients.

    PubMed

    de Bot, Susanne T; Burggraaff, Rogier C; Herkert, Johanna C; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Post, Bart; Diekstra, Adinda; van Vliet, Reinout O; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Scheffer, Hans; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, Corien C; Kremer, Hubertus P H

    2013-11-01

    Although SPG11 is the most common complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia, our knowledge of the long-term prognosis and life expectancy is limited. We therefore studied the disease course of all patients with a proven SPG11 mutation as tested in our laboratory, the single Dutch laboratory providing SPG11 mutation analysis, between 1 January 2009 and 1 January 2011. We identified nine different SPG11 mutations, four of which are novel, in nine index patients. Eighteen SPG11 patients from these nine families were studied by means of a retrospective chart analysis and additional interview/examination. Ages at onset were between 4 months and 14 years; 39% started with learning difficulties rather than gait impairment. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a thin corpus callosum and typical periventricular white matter changes in the frontal horn region (known as the 'ears-of the lynx'-sign) in all. Most patients became wheelchair bound after a disease duration of 1 to 2 decades. End-stage disease consisted of loss of spontaneous speech, severe dysphagia, spastic tetraplegia with peripheral nerve involvement and contractures. Several patients died of complications between ages 30 and 48 years, 3-4 decades after onset of gait impairment. Other relevant features during the disease were urinary and fecal incontinence, obesity and psychosis. Our study of 18 Dutch SPG11-patients shows the potential serious long-term consequences of SPG11 including a possibly restricted life span. PMID:23443022

  16. Seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in captive mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Gayosso-Dominguez, Edgar Arturo; Villena, Isabelle; Dubey, J P

    2013-09-01

    Antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii were determined in 167 mammals in three zoos in Mexico City, Mexico, using the modified agglutination test (MAT). Overall, antibodies to T. gondii were found in 89 (53.3%) of the 167 animals tested. Antibodies were found in 35 of 43 wild Felidae: 2 of 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus); 4 of 4 cougars (Puma concolor); 10 of 13 jaguars (Panthera onca); 5 of 5 leopards (Panthera pardus); 7 of 7 lions (Panthera leo); 2 of 3 tigers (Panthera tigris); 2 of 3 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis); 2 of 2 Sumatran tigers (Panthera tigris sumatrae); lof 2 Jaguarundi (Herpailurus jagouaroundi); but not in 0 of 2 oncillas (Leopardus tigrinus). Such high seroprevalence in wild felids is of public health significance because of the potential of oocyst shedding. Four of 6 New World primates (2 of 2 Geoffroy's spider monkeys [Ateles geoffroyi], 1 of 3 Patas monkeys [Erythrocebus patas], and 1 of 1 white-headed capuchin [Cebus capucinus]) had high MAT titers of 3,200, suggesting recently acquired infection; these animals are highly susceptible to clinical toxoplasmosis. However, none of these animals were ill. Seropositivity to T. gondii was found for the first time in a number of species. PMID:24063119

  17. Virological Survey in free-ranging wildcats (Felis silvestris) and feral domestic cats in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Duarte, A; Fernandes, M; Santos, N; Tavares, L

    2012-08-17

    To determine the presence of viral pathogens in natural areas a survey was conducted on an opportunistic sample of fifty eight wild (Felis silvestris silvestris) and feral cats (F. s. catus). The biological materials included serum, lung tissue extract and stool. Feline leukemia virus p27 antigen was detected in 13/50 serum/lung tissue extract samples (26%), canine distemper virus antibodies were detected in 2/26 serum/lung tissue extract samples (7.7%), feline coronavirus RNA was present in 6/29 stool samples (20.7%) and feline parvovirus DNA in 2/29 stool samples (6.9%). Canine distemper virus RNA was not detected. Feline immunodeficiency virus and feline coronavirus antibodies were not detected. Evidence of exposure to feline leukemia virus, canine distemper virus, feline coronavirus and feline parvovirus was found in wild and feral cats raising the importance of performing a comprehensive survey to correctly evaluate the potential threat of infectious diseases to endangered species, namely to the wildcat and to the Iberian lynx, which is meant to be reintroduced after 2012 in Portugal. PMID:22424865

  18. Diversity array technology markers: genetic diversity analyses and linkage map construction in rapeseed (Brassica napus L.).

    PubMed

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Nelson, Matthew N; Aslam, M N; Rajasekaran, Ravikesavan; Wratten, Neil; Cowling, Wallace A; Kilian, A; Sharpe, Andrew G; Schondelmaier, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    We developed Diversity Array Technology (DArT) markers for application in genetic studies of Brassica napus and other Brassica species with A or C genomes. Genomic representation from 107 diverse genotypes of B. napus L. var. oleifera (rapeseed, AACC genomes) and B. rapa (AA genome) was used to develop a DArT array comprising 11 520 clones generated using PstI/BanII and PstI/BstN1 complexity reduction methods. In total, 1547 polymorphic DArT markers of high technical quality were identified and used to assess molecular diversity among 89 accessions of B. napus, B. rapa, B. juncea, and B. carinata collected from different parts of the world. Hierarchical cluster and principal component analyses based on genetic distance matrices identified distinct populations clustering mainly according to their origin/pedigrees. DArT markers were also mapped in a new doubled haploid population comprising 131 lines from a cross between spring rapeseed lines 'Lynx-037DH' and 'Monty-028DH'. Linkage groups were assigned on the basis of previously mapped simple sequence repeat (SSRs), intron polymorphism (IP), and gene-based markers. The map consisted of 437 DArT, 135 SSR, 6 IP, and 6 gene-based markers and spanned 2288 cM. Our results demonstrate that DArT markers are suitable for genetic diversity analysis and linkage map construction in rapeseed. PMID:22193366

  19. Regulating critical period plasticity: insight from the visual system to fear circuitry for therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Nabel, Elisa M; Morishita, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Early temporary windows of heightened brain plasticity called critical periods developmentally sculpt neural circuits and contribute to adult behavior. Regulatory mechanisms of visual cortex development - the preeminent model of experience-dependent critical period plasticity-actively limit adult plasticity and have proved fruitful therapeutic targets to reopen plasticity and rewire faulty visual system connections later in life. Interestingly, these molecular mechanisms have been implicated in the regulation of plasticity in other functions beyond vision. Applying mechanistic understandings of critical period plasticity in the visual cortex to fear circuitry may provide a conceptual framework for developing novel therapeutic tools to mitigate aberrant fear responses in post traumatic stress disorder. In this review, we turn to the model of experience-dependent visual plasticity to provide novel insights for the mechanisms regulating plasticity in the fear system. Fear circuitry, particularly fear memory erasure, also undergoes age-related changes in experience-dependent plasticity. We consider the contributions of molecular brakes that halt visual critical period plasticity to circuitry underlying fear memory erasure. A major molecular brake in the visual cortex, perineuronal net formation, recently has been identified in the development of fear systems that are resilient to fear memory erasure. The roles of other molecular brakes, myelin-related Nogo receptor signaling and Lynx family proteins - endogenous inhibitors for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, are explored in the context of fear memory plasticity. Such fear plasticity regulators, including epigenetic effects, provide promising targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24273519

  20. XRD, LPF and FTIR investigation of Mn-Bi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Ashutosh; Patil, Harsha; Jain, Garima

    2014-09-01

    High purity MnBi low temperature phase has been prepared and analyzed using X- ray diffraction, Lorentz-Polarization Factor and Fourier transforms infrared measurement. After synthesis of samples structural characterization has done on samples by X-ray diffraction, which shows that after making the bulk sample is in no single phase MnBi has been prepared by sintering Mn and Bi powder. The X-ray diffraction measurements were carried out using Bruker D8 Advance X-ray diffractometer. The X-rays were produced using a sealed tube and the wavelength of x-ray was 0.154nm (Cu K-alpha).and x-rays were detected using a fast counting detector based on Silicon strip technology (Bruker LynxEye detector). By Lorentz- Polarization Factor is affecting the relative intensity of diffraction lines on a powder form. The infrared absorption spectra of the alloys and intermetallic compound were measured at room temperature, in the wave number range 4000 to 400 cm-1 by a computerized spectrometer type Jasco FTIR-300 (JAPAN) using the KBr pellet technique. And by FTIR which shows absorption peaks of MnBi alloys.