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Sample records for lyral quantitative aspects

  1. Quantitative Aspects of Single Molecule Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ober, Raimund J.; Tahmasbi, Amir; Ram, Sripad; Lin, Zhiping; Ward, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule microscopy is a relatively new optical microscopy technique that allows the detection of individual molecules such as proteins in a cellular context. This technique has generated significant interest among biologists, biophysicists and biochemists, as it holds the promise to provide novel insights into subcellular processes and structures that otherwise cannot be gained through traditional experimental approaches. Single molecule experiments place stringent demands on experimental and algorithmic tools due to the low signal levels and the presence of significant extraneous noise sources. Consequently, this has necessitated the use of advanced statistical signal and image processing techniques for the design and analysis of single molecule experiments. In this tutorial paper, we provide an overview of single molecule microscopy from early works to current applications and challenges. Specific emphasis will be on the quantitative aspects of this imaging modality, in particular single molecule localization and resolvability, which will be discussed from an information theoretic perspective. We review the stochastic framework for image formation, different types of estimation techniques and expressions for the Fisher information matrix. We also discuss several open problems in the field that demand highly non-trivial signal processing algorithms. PMID:26167102

  2. Fragrance chemicals lyral and lilial decrease viability of HaCat cells' by increasing free radical production and lowering intracellular ATP level: protection by antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Usta, Julnar; Hachem, Yassmine; El-Rifai, Omar; Bou-Moughlabey, Yolla; Echtay, Karim; Griffiths, David; Nakkash-Chmaisse, Hania; Makki, Rajaa Fakhoury

    2013-02-01

    We investigate in this study the biochemical effects on cells in culture of two commonly used fragrance chemicals: lyral and lilial. Whereas both chemicals exerted a significant effect on primary keratinocyte(s), HaCat cells, no effect was obtained with any of HepG2, Hek293, Caco2, NIH3T3, and MCF7 cells. Lyral and lilial: (a) decreased the viability of HaCat cells with a 50% cell death at 100 and 60 nM respectively; (b) decreased significantly in a dose dependant manner the intracellular ATP level following 12-h of treatment; (c) inhibited complexes I and II of electron transport chain in liver sub-mitochondrial particles; and (d) increased reactive oxygen species generation that was reversed by N-acetyl cysteine and trolox and the natural antioxidant lipoic acid, without influencing the level of free and/or oxidized glutathione. Lipoic acid protected HaCat cells against the decrease in viability induced by either compound. Dehydrogenation of lyral and lilial produce α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, that reacts with lipoic acid requiring proteins resulting in their inhibition. We propose lyral and lilial as toxic to mitochondria that have a direct effect on electron transport chain, increase ROS production, derange mitochondrial membrane potential, and decrease cellular ATP level, leading thus to cell death. PMID:22940465

  3. Quantitative aspects of L-type Ca2+ currents.

    PubMed

    Tuckwell, Henry C

    2012-01-01

    Ca(2+) currents in neurons and muscle cells have been classified as being one of 5 types, of which four, L, N, P/Q and R were said to be high threshold and one, T, was designated low threshold. This review focuses on quantitative aspects of L-type currents. L-type channels are now distinguished according to their structure as one of four main subtypes Ca(v)1.1-Ca(v)1.4. L-type calcium currents play many fundamental roles in cellular dynamical processes including control of firing rate and pacemaking in neurons and cardiac cells, the activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity and in immune cells. The half-activation potentials of L-type currents (I(CaL)) have been ascribed values as low as -50mV and as high as near 0mV. The inactivation of I(CaL) has been found to be both voltage (VDI) and calcium-dependent (CDI) and the latter component may involve calcium-induced calcium release. CDI is often an important aspect of dynamical models of cell electrophysiology. We describe the basic components in modeling I(CaL) including activation and both voltage and calcium dependent inactivation and the two main approaches to determining the current. We review, by means of tables of values from over 65 representative studies, the various details of the dynamical properties associated with I(CaL) that have been found experimentally or employed in the last 25 years in deterministic modeling in various nervous system and cardiac cells. Distributions and statistics of several parameters related to activation and inactivation are obtained. There are few reliable complete experimental data on L-type calcium current kinetics for cells at physiological calcium ion concentrations. Neurons are divided approximately into two groups with experimental half-activation potentials that are high, ≈ -18.3mV, or low, ≈ -36.4mV, which correspond closely with those for Ca(v)1.2 and Ca(v)1.3 channels in physiological solutions. There are very few complete experimental

  4. Food intake of very obese persons: quantitative and qualitative aspects.

    PubMed

    Strain, G W; Hershcopf, R J; Zumoff, B

    1992-02-01

    To document the caloric intake of very obese persons and investigate the food choices and dietary composition that maintain severe obesity, we studied the self-selected food intake required to maintain stable weight in two groups of very obese subjects: 11 inpatients with a mean weight 181% above desirable body weight and 35 outpatients with a mean weight 125% above desirable body weight. Qualitative and quantitative food intake were evaluated using records obtained on the hospital metabolic ward for the inpatients and using self-recorded food records for the outpatients. Absolute caloric intake in both groups was greater in proportion to the degree of obesity (deviation from desirable body weight); caloric intake per unit of lean body mass (kilocalories per gram urinary creatinine) was constant regardless of the degree of obesity and was essentially the same as that of normal nonobese persons. Food records indicated that the obese subjects maintained their high caloric intake by consuming mostly foods of high caloric density, with occasional binge eating. They largely avoided foods of low intrinsic energy density and modified-calorie foods, ie, foods with decreased fat, nonnutritive sweeteners, or fillers. By substituting foods of lower caloric density for usual food choices from the same food group, obese persons could decrease caloric intake by 20% and increase potential for notable weight loss. PMID:1737901

  5. Photogrammetric and image processing aspects in quantitative flow visualization.

    PubMed

    Machacek, Matthias; Rosgen, Thomas

    2002-10-01

    The development of a measurement system for the visualization, topological classification, and quantitative analysis of complex flows in large-scale wind tunnel experiments is described. A new approach was sought in which the topological features of the flow (e.g., stream lines, separation and reattachment regions, stagnation points, and vortex lines) were extracted directly and preferably visualized in real-time in a virtual wind tunnel environment. The system was based on a stereo arrangement of two CCD cameras. A frame rate of 120 fps allowed measurements at high flow velocities. The paper focuses on the problem of fast and accurate reconstruction of path lines of helium filled soap bubbles in three dimensions (3D). A series of simple algorithmic steps was employed to ensure fast data processing. These included fast image segmentation, a spline approximation of the path lines, a camera model, point correspondence building, calculation of path line points in 3D and creation of a three-dimensional spline representation. The path lines, which contained both velocity and topological information, were analyzed to extract the relevant information. PMID:12495995

  6. Quantitative aspects of chemical carcinogenesis and tumor promotion in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, H W; Tennekes, H A; Port, R E; Schwartz, M; Lorke, D; Schaude, G

    1983-01-01

    Chronic exposure of rodents to high dose levels of drugs, food additives and environmental chemicals frequently results in liver enlargement. Several of these compounds have been found to enhance the incidence of liver tumors in animals briefly exposed previously to hepatocarcinogens. Accordingly, it has been advanced that these agents act as tumor promoters. This contention has remained subject of controversy following reports that these substances may also cause liver tumors in noncarcinogen-treated rodents, particularly in those characterized by a relatively high incidence of "spontaneous" liver tumors. Since many of these chemicals are in common use, a crucial question would seem to be whether such effects are due to facilitation of the expression of pre-existing oncogenic potential, i.e., to tumor promotion, or to the synergistic action of weakly carcinogenic agents. As a result of mechanistic differences tumor promotion and syn-carcinogenesis must exhibit different dose-time-response characteristics, and, accordingly, it should be possible, in principle, to discriminate between these phenomena. However, since tumor manifestation periods in low-dose groups frequently exceed the animals average lifespan, this approach may not always yield conclusive data, unless a sensitive early marker of carcinogenic activity can be employed. There is evidence that enzyme-deficient preneoplastic areas in liver can be used for this purpose. A strong quantitative correlation between carcinogen dose, the extent of ATPase deficient areas, and the subsequent appearance of tumors has now been established for a number of hepatocarcinogens. Experimental data are consistent with the concept that two critical events (hits) are required for induction of ATPase deficiency in hepatocytes. The first hit is carcinogen-dependent, whereas the second hit would seem to be due to time-dependent event(s). Tumor-promoters, such as phenobarbital, were found to accelerate and increase formation of

  7. Cerebral Blood Volume ASPECTS Is the Best Predictor of Clinical Outcome in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Retrospective, Combined Semi-Quantitative and Quantitative Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Padroni, Marina; Bernardoni, Andrea; Tamborino, Carmine; Roversi, Gloria; Borrelli, Massimo; Saletti, Andrea; De Vito, Alessandro; Azzini, Cristiano; Borgatti, Luca; Marcello, Onofrio; d’Esterre, Christopher; Ceruti, Stefano; Casetta, Ilaria; Lee, Ting-Yim; Fainardi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The capability of CT perfusion (CTP) Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score (ASPECTS) to predict outcome and identify ischemia severity in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients is still questioned. Methods 62 patients with AIS were imaged within 8 hours of symptom onset by non-contrast CT, CT angiography and CTP scans at admission and 24 hours. CTP ASPECTS was calculated on the affected hemisphere using cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) maps by subtracting 1 point for any abnormalities visually detected or measured within multiple cortical circular regions of interest according to previously established thresholds. MTT-CBV ASPECTS was considered as CTP ASPECTS mismatch. Hemorrhagic transformation (HT), recanalization status and reperfusion grade at 24 hours, final infarct volume at 7 days and modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 3 months after onset were recorded. Results Semi-quantitative and quantitative CTP ASPECTS were highly correlated (p<0.00001). CBF, CBV and MTT ASPECTS were higher in patients with no HT and mRS≤2 and inversely associated with final infarct volume and mRS (p values: from p<0.05 to p<0.00001). CTP ASPECTS mismatch was slightly associated with radiological and clinical outcomes (p values: from p<0.05 to p<0.02) only if evaluated quantitatively. A CBV ASPECTS of 9 was the optimal semi-quantitative value for predicting outcome. Conclusions Our findings suggest that visual inspection of CTP ASPECTS recognizes infarct and ischemic absolute values. Semi-quantitative CBV ASPECTS, but not CTP ASPECTS mismatch, represents a strong prognostic indicator, implying that core extent is the main determinant of outcome, irrespective of penumbra size. PMID:26824672

  8. Developmental modeling effects on the quantitative and qualitative aspects of motor performance.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, P; Stiehl, J; Weiss, M R

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to replicate and extend previous developmental modeling research by examining the qualitative as well as quantitative aspects of motor performance. Eighty females of two age groups (5-0 to 6-6 and 7-6 to 9-0 years) were randomly assigned to conditions within a 2 x 2 x 2 (Age x Model Type x Rehearsal) factorial design. Children received either verbal instructions only (no model) or a visual demonstration with experimenter-given verbal cues (verbal model) of a five-part dance skill sequence. Children were either prompted to verbally rehearse before skill execution or merely asked to reproduce the sequence without prompting. Both quantitative (order) and qualitative (form) performances were assessed. Results revealed a significant age main effect for both order and form performance, with older children performing better than younger children. A model type main effect was also found for both order and form performance. The verbal model condition produced better qualitative performance, whereas the no model condition resulted in better quantitative scores. These results are discussed in terms of differential coding strategies that may influence task components in modeling. PMID:2132893

  9. Quantitative and qualitative aspects of fish crop in relation to environmental quality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.K.; He, X.Q.

    1987-02-01

    The effects of environmental quality on the quantitative and qualitative aspects of fish crop are reviewed with reference to fisheries in rivers, lakes, reservoirs, and coastal waters ranging from the temperate zone to subtropical areas in mainland China. The mechanism of these effects is discussed, and the insidiousness of long-term exposure to low-concentration pollutants to fish stock is stressed. Regarding the assessment of the effect of pollution on fish, most of our information has been derived from laboratory studies, in which the antagonistic or synergistic action between multiple pollutants was scarcely taken into consideration. One has to be cautious when the results of laboratory experiments are extrapolated to the realistic natural environment. It is advocated that surveys and tests concerning the relation between environmental quality and fish life be made on natural waters in addition to laboratory studies, and the effects be elucidated at the individual level, population level, and the ecosystem level.

  10. Quantitative aspects of digital microscopy applied to cellular localization of heparin in smooth muscle cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Richard F.; Hanzel, David K.; Stack, Bob; Brandley, Brian; Castellot, John

    1995-04-01

    High Resolution digital acquisition allows a great deal of flexibility in the types of questions that can be directed to microscopic samples. To eliminate subjective bias and provide quantitative results we have approached microscopy with an automated digital format. This mode can return quantitative data at high resolution over large fields. The digital format makes accessible data including [data segmentation]: multispectral colocalization, seeding and connectivity, particle size and shape distribution and population analysis. We have begun a program to investigate this approach using the confocal microscope. Scanning larger fields-of-view at lower spatial resolutions (e.g., low magnification objective) defines large maps that allow alignment of high spatial resolution (diffraction limited) sampling. The [objective] selection of the field-of-view with low spatial resolution reduces the subjective nature of the selection of a 'typical staining pattern'. High resolution digital scanning in three dimensions contribute both to the 'objective' nature of the analysis and allow for quantitation of characteristics not historically available/accessible. The complex carbohydrate heparin is implicated in tumor growth and wound healing by affecting angiogenesis, cell proliferation and motility. The internal localization of heparin within vascular cells appears to be a good predictor of the sensitivity of those cells to the action of heparin. Cells resistant to the antiproliferative action of heparin are able to sequester the heparin in large vacuoles whereas those cells sensitive to the carbohydrate do not exhibit these structures. We have applied our approach to QUANTITATIVE DIGITAL MICROSCOPY to the analysis of intracellular heparin distribution.

  11. Quantitative aspects of drug permeation across in vitro and in vivo barriers.

    PubMed

    Krämer, Stefanie D

    2016-05-25

    The kinetics of permeation across epithelial and endothelial cell sheets and across cell membranes is determinant for the pharmacokinetics of a drug. In vitro transport experiments with cultured cells or artificial barriers have tremendously improved the predictability of the in vivo behaviour of tested compounds. This article focuses on the parameters and calculation methods that are used to describe permeation quantitatively, with a focus on in vitro experiments and the prediction of intestinal absorption and blood-brain barrier passage. It shows under which in vitro experimental conditions standard calculations are adequate and under which conditions equations should be adapted to the experimental details. The impact of volume differences between donor and receiver compartments, pH gradients, addition of albumin, accumulation in the barrier and unidirectional transport by an efflux transporter on the results is shown in simulations. The article should make researchers aware of experimental factors that affect the outcome of a permeation experiment and how to account for this during data analysis. Finally, strategies to predict the in vivo behaviour of a compound based on the in vitro data are discussed. The goal of the article is to support researchers in choosing experimental conditions and calculation methods that deliver appropriate and reproducible results in permeation studies in vitro. PMID:26493585

  12. A minimally invasive micro sampler for quantitative sampling with an ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedle and a PDMS actuator.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Wang, Yan; Yao, Jinyuan; Yang, Cuijun; Ding, Guifu

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a novel micro sampler consisting of an ultrahigh-aspect-ratio microneedle and a PDMS actuator. The microneedle was fabricated by a new method which introduced reshaped photoresist technology to form a flow channel inside. The microneedle includes two parts: shaft and pedestal. In this study, the shaft length is 1500 μm with a 45° taper angle on the tip and pedestal is 1000 μm. Besides, the shaft and pedestal are connected by an arc connection structure with a length of 600 μm. The microneedles have sufficient mechanical strength to insert into skin with a wide safety margin which was proved by mechanics tests. Moreover, a PDMS actuator with a chamber inside was designed and fabricated in this study. The chamber, acting as a reservoir in sampling process as well as providing power, was optimized by finite element analysis (FEA) to decrease dead volume and improve sampling precision. The micro sampler just needs finger press to activate the sampling process as well as used for quantitative micro injection to some extent. And a volume of 31.5 ± 0.8 μl blood was successfully sampled from the ear artery of a rabbit. This micro sampler is suitable for micro sampling for diagnose or therapy in biomedical field. PMID:27372944

  13. Quantitative Content Analysis Procedures to Analyse Students' Reflective Essays: A Methodological Review of Psychometric and Edumetric Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poldner, E.; Simons, P. R. J.; Wijngaards, G.; van der Schaaf, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Reflective essays are a common way to develop higher education students' reflection ability. Researchers frequently analyse reflective essays based on quantitative content analysis procedures (QCA). However, the quality criteria that should be met in QCA are not straightforward. This article aims to: (1) develop a framework of quality requirements…

  14. Quantitative Aspects about the Interactions of Professors in the Learning Management System during a Final Undergraduate Project Distance Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cechinel, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a quantitative study of the use of a Learning Management System (LMS) by the professors of a distance learning course, focused on the guidance given for the students' Final Undergraduate Project. Data taken from the logs of 34 professors in two distinct virtual rooms were collected. After pre-processing the data, a series of…

  15. [Quantitative aspects of the percutaneous uptake of wool wax alcohols (cetyl alcohol) and paraffins (octadecane) from different ointment bases].

    PubMed

    Zesch, A; Bauer, E

    1985-01-01

    Since topical vehicles are partly responsible for the effects of active agents--both the wanted and the unwanted effects--attempt was made to obtain quantitative data on the possible penetration of cetyl alcohol contained in an aqueous hydrophilie cream (DAB 8) and in a wool fat alcohol ointment (lanoline) (DAB 8). Also the behaviour of the long-chained hydrocarbon, paraffin (octadecan), in these vehicles and in petrolatum (DAB 8) was studied. We found that the emulsifying agent in a W/O emulsion was detectable in the epidermis in low concentrations after 100 min, but the same agent in O/W emulsions only after 1000 min. It is, therefore, unlikely that cetyl alcohol penetrates the intact skin in allergicologically relevant concentrations. However, with diseased skin, a marked percutaneous absorption of cetyl alcohol, but not with paraffin, must be expected. PMID:3987517

  16. Laser under ultrastrong light-matter interaction: Qualitative aspects and quantitative influences by level and mode truncations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, Motoaki; Ogawa, Tetsuo

    2016-03-01

    We investigate theoretically the light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) in the ultrastrong light-matter interaction regime under the two-level and single-mode approximations. The conventional picture of the laser is broken under the ultrastrong interaction. Instead, we must explicitly discuss the dynamics of the electric field and of the magnetic one distinctively, which make the "laser" qualitatively different from the conventional laser. We found that the laser generally accompanies odd-order harmonics of the electromagnetic fields both inside and outside the cavity and a synchronization with an oscillation of atomic population. A bistability is also demonstrated. However, since our model is quite simplified, we got quantitatively different results from the Hamiltonians in the velocity and length forms of the light-matter interaction, while the appearance of the multiple harmonics and the bistability is qualitatively reliable.

  17. Quantitative Aspects of the Interfacial Catalytic Oxidation of Dithiothreitol by Dissolved Oxygen in the Presence of Carbon Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Rossi, Michel J

    2016-01-19

    The catalytic nature of particulate matter is often advocated to explain its ability to generate reactive oxygen species, but quantitative data are lacking. We have performed molecular characterization of three different carbonaceous nanoparticles (NP) by 1. identifying and quantifying their surface functional groups based on probe gas-particle titration; 2. studying the kinetics of dissolved oxygen consumption in the presence of suspended NP's and dithiothreitol (DTT). We show that these NP's can reversibly change their oxidation state between oxidized and reduced functional groups present on the NP surface. By comparing the amount of O2 consumed and the number of strongly reducing sites on the NP, its average turnover ranged from 35 to 600 depending on the type of NP. The observed quadratic rate law for O2 disappearance points to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood surface-based reaction mechanism possibly involving semiquinone radical. In the proposed model, the strongly reducing surface site is assumed to be a polycyclic aromatic hydroquinone whose oxidation to the corresponding conjugated quinone is rate-limiting in the catalytic chain reaction. The presence and strength of the reducing surface functional groups are important for explaining the catalytic activity of NP in the presence of oxygen and a reducing agent like DTT. PMID:26683500

  18. A Degree Is Not Enough: A quantitative study of aspects of pre-service science teachers' chemistry content knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, Vanessa

    2014-05-01

    Aspects of chemistry content knowledge held by 265 UK-based pre-service teachers (PSTs) were probed using 28 diagnostic questions in five chemistry concept areas, Particle theory and changes of state, Mass conservation (taught to 11-14-year-olds), and Chemical bonding, Mole calculations and Combustion reactions (taught to 14-16-year-olds). Data were collected over six years from academically able science graduates starting a full-time, university-based teacher education programme of one academic year duration. PSTs in three sub-cohorts ('chemists', 'physicists' and 'biologists' on the basis of their undergraduate degrees) demonstrated similar levels of content knowledge (CK) for Particle theory and changes of state and Mass conservation. Biologists demonstrated statistically significantly weaker understanding than chemists and physicists in Chemical bonding, Mole calculations and Combustion reactions. Forty-four 'triads' each comprising one chemist, physicist and biologist, matched by academic and personal backgrounds, showed that chemists outperformed biologists and physicists in Chemical bonding and Combustion reactions. The findings suggest that non-chemists' CK is insufficient for teaching these chemistry concepts in high schools, despite their possession of 'good' Bachelor of Science degrees. These data have implications for science teacher education, including how best to prepare science graduates from diverse backgrounds for teaching specialist science subjects to 11-16-year-olds.

  19. Quantitative aspects of highly emanating geologic materials and their role in creating high indoor radon. Final report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, L.C.S.; Schumann, R.R.; Gates, A.E.; Price, P.

    1996-12-31

    Indoor radon hot spots, areas where indoor radon commonly exceeds 20 pCi/L, are often caused by unusually highly emanating soils or rock and their interaction with ambient climatic conditions and a building`s architecture. Highly emanating soils and rocks include glacial deposits; dry fractured clays; black shales; limestone-derived soils; karst and cave areas, fractured or sheared granitic crystalline rocks; mine tailings; uraniferous backfill; and most uranium deposits. The above list probably accounts for 90% of the Nation`s indoor radon over 20 pCi/L. In several of these high indoor radon areas, there appears to be a link between the nature of the radon source in the ground, the architecture of the home, and the relative magnitude and ease of mitigation of the indoor air problem. Quantification of geologic materials in terms of their radon potential with respect to climatic and architectural considerations has never been accomplished. Recent studies have attempted semi-quantitative rankings but rigorous analysis has not been done. In this investigation the authors have attempted to develop the quantitative aspects of geologic materials for prediction of very high indoor radon at several scales of observation from national to census tract.

  20. Method development aspects for the quantitation of pharmaceutical compounds in human plasma with a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization source in the multiple reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Peter; Grivet, Chantal; Bourgogne, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2007-01-01

    The present work investigates various method development aspects for the quantitative analysis of pharmaceutical compounds in human plasma using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and multiple reaction monitoring (MALDI-MRM). Talinolol was selected as a model analyte. Liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and protein precipitation were evaluated regarding sensitivity and throughput for the MALDI-MRM technique and its applicability without and with chromatographic separation. Compared to classical electrospray liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) method development, with MALDI-MRM the tuning of the analyte in single MS mode is more challenging due to interfering matrix background ions. An approach is proposed using background subtraction. With LLE and using a 200 microL human plasma aliquot acceptable precision and accuracy could be obtained in the range of 1 to 1000 ng/mL without any LC separation. Approximately 3 s were required for one analysis. A full calibration curve and its quality control samples (20 samples) can be analyzed within 1 min. Combining LC with the MALDI analysis allowed improving the linearity down to 50 pg/mL, while reducing the throughput potential only by two-fold. Matrix effects are still a significant issue with MALDI but can be monitored in a similar way to that used for LC/ESI-MS analysis. PMID:17295425

  1. [Audit of histopathological activities in the laboratories of 7 general hospitals. 1. Types of resources and quantitative aspects of the workload].

    PubMed

    Andrion, A; Feyles, E; Langè, A; Giudici, M; Grasso, G; Amore, M; Bondi, A; Cristofori, E; Pezzotta, M G; Bellomi, A; Anghinoni, E; Barbazza, R; Magnani, C; Ciccone, G

    1996-02-01

    Following a major reorganization of the National Health Service, competition for resources will depend to a great extent on the quality of the service offered, and audit will be of increasing importance. The present investigation deals with the quantitative aspects of the histopathology workload. A retrospective analysis of the biopsy handling of 1,000 consecutive cases was conducted in each histopathology lab of seven general hospitals. The data collected included information on specimen type, diagnosis, block/section/stain details for each specimen, as well as information about human resources, total workload and technical equipment. Among the seven labs, the histopathology workload ranged between 6,600 and 15,600 cases/year. The workload per person/year ranged between 1,400 and 2,600 (mean 1,900) for pathologists, between 800 and 3,000 (mean 1,500) for technicians, and between 2,200 and 8,300 (mean 4,400) for secretarial staff. The prevalence of biopsy fragments (endoscopic, endometrial curettage , etc.), "small" surgery (skin, appendix, gallbladder, etc.) and surgery was, respectively, between 42 and 50%, 34 and 47%, 9 and 21%. In all labs but one, 80% of cases were within 1-3 blocks; the seven labs had a mean of blocks/case ranging from 1.8 to 4.0 (total mean = 2.8). Differences in performing special stains were astonishing: one lab performed special stains in about 40%, and another in only 0.6% of cases (mean of the seven labs = 15%). Finally, the labs performed immunohistochemical stains within a range of 2.7-8% of cases (mean of the seven labs = 4.6%). The data we have collected provided baseline information on the laboratory running, and this is likely to be an integral part of laboratory administration in the near future. PMID:8767388

  2. A Degree Is Not Enough: A Quantitative Study of Aspects of Pre-Service Science Teachers' Chemistry Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kind, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of chemistry content knowledge held by 265 UK-based pre-service teachers (PSTs) were probed using 28 diagnostic questions in five chemistry concept areas, "Particle theory and changes of state", "Mass conservation" (taught to 11-14-year-olds), and "Chemical bonding", "Mole calculations" and…

  3. Quantitative Aspects of Cyclosis in Plant Cells.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howells, K. F.; Fell, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an exercise which is currently used in a course in cell physiology at Oxford Polytechnic in England. This exercise can give students some idea of the molecular events involved in bringing about movement of chloroplasts (and other organelles) in plant cells. (HM)

  4. Legal aspects.

    PubMed

    Escher, A

    1975-01-01

    The manufacture, application, use and disposal of fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) may give rise to legal questions relating mainly to environmental protection and the effects on man and animals. In addition to legal aspects, certain commercial aspects such as the law of competition and the obligations of industry, including compensation for damage caused by FWAs, are discussed. PMID:1064546

  5. QUANTITATIVE 15N NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Line intensities in 15N NMR spectra are strongly influenced by spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation times, relaxation mechanisms and experimental conditions. Special care has to be taken in using 15N spectra for quantitative purposes. Quantitative aspects are discussed for the 1...

  6. Regulatory aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Arthur M.

    1986-07-01

    At this time, there is no US legislation that is specifically aimed at regulating the environmental release of genetically engineered organisms or their modified components, either during the research and development stage or during application. There are some statutes, administered by several federal agencies, whose language is broad enough to allow the extension of intended coverage to include certain aspects of biotechnology. The one possible exception is FIFRA, which has already brought about the registration of several natural microbial pesticides but which also has provision for requiring the registration of “strain improved” microbial pesticides. Nevertheless, there may be gaps in coverage even if all pertinent statutes were to be actively applied to the control of environmental release of genetically modified substances. The decision to regulate biotechnology under TSCA was justified, in part, on the basis of its intended role as a gap-filling piece of environmental legislation. The advantage of regulating biotechnology under TSCA is that this statute, unlike others, is concerned with all media of exposure (air, water, soil, sediment, biota) that may pose health and environmental hazards. Experience may show that extending existing legislation to regulate biotechnology is a poor compromise compared to the promulgation of new legislation specifically designed for this purpose. It appears that many other countries are ultimately going to take the latter course to regulate biotechnology.

  7. Quantitative Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBridge, Lee A.

    An appeal for more research to determine how to educate children as effectively as possible is made. Mathematics teachers can readily examine the educational problems of today in their classrooms since learning progress in mathematics can easily be measured and evaluated. Since mathematics teachers have learned to think in quantitative terms and…

  8. On Quantitizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Knafl, George

    2009-01-01

    "Quantitizing", commonly understood to refer to the numerical translation, transformation, or conversion of qualitative data, has become a staple of mixed methods research. Typically glossed are the foundational assumptions, judgments, and compromises involved in converting disparate data sets into each other and whether such conversions advance…

  9. QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: In toxicology, the role of quantitative assessment of brain morphology can be understood in the context of two types of treatment-related alterations. One type of alteration is specifically associated with treatment and is not observed in control animals. Measurement ...

  10. Quantitative biomedical mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leenheer, Andrép; Thienpont, Linda M.

    1992-09-01

    The scope of this contribution is an illustration of the capabilities of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) for quantification of target substances in the biomedical field. After a brief discussion of the general principles of quantitative MS in biological samples, special attention will be paid to new technological developments or trends in IDMS from selected examples from the literature. The final section will deal with the use of IDMS for accuracy assessment in clinical chemistry. Methodological aspects considered crucial for avoiding sources of error will be discussed.

  11. [Quantitative ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Barkmann, R; Glüer, C-C

    2006-10-01

    Methods of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) can be used to obtain knowledge about bone fragility. Comprehensive study results exist showing the power of QUS for the estimation of osteoporotic fracture risk. Nevertheless, the variety of technologies, devices, and variables as well as different degrees of validation of the single devices have to be taken into account. Using methods to simulate ultrasound propagation, the complex interaction between ultrasound and bone could be understood and the propagation could be visualized. Preceding widespread clinical use, it has to be clarified if patients with low QUS values will profit from therapy, as it has been shown for DXA. Moreover, the introduction of quality assurance measures is essential. The user should know the limitations of the methods and be able to interpret the results correctly. Applied in an adequate manner QUS methods could then, due to lower costs and absence of ionizing radiation, become important players in osteoporosis management. PMID:16896637

  12. Affinity for Quantitative Tools: Undergraduate Marketing Students Moving beyond Quantitative Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasi, Crina O.; Wilson, J. Holton; Puri, Cheenu; Divine, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing students are known as less likely to have an affinity for the quantitative aspects of the marketing discipline. In this article, we study the reasons why this might be true and develop a parsimonious 20-item scale for measuring quantitative affinity in undergraduate marketing students. The scale was administered to a sample of business…

  13. Another Curriculum Requirement? Quantitative Reasoning in Economics: Some First Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Patrick B.; Flynn, David T.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we describe first steps toward focusing on quantitative reasoning in an intermediate microeconomic theory course. We find student attitudes toward quantitative aspects of economics improve over the duration of the course (as we would hope). Perhaps more importantly, student attitude toward quantitative reasoning improves, in…

  14. Qualitative and Quantitative Aspects of Commitment Development in Psychology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunnen, E. Saskia

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the development of study- and work-related commitments in 28 psychology students during their bachelor years. Based on seven measurements of exploration and commitments (over a period of three-and-a-half years) we found the theoretically expected information-oriented, normative and diffuse trajectories. In addition, the…

  15. A Lifespan Study of Cooperative Education Graduates: Quantitative Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Patricia L.; Ferguson, Jane

    1999-01-01

    Career histories of 73 graduates of Antioch College's liberal arts co-op program, 1946-55, showed an average of 6.5 jobs before retirement and high rates of self-employment. Those with low performance in cooperative education were much more likely to have earned graduate degrees. Self-employed graduates had more varied jobs and retired later. (SK)

  16. Qualitative and quantitative aspects of recent research on helminth parasites.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Robert

    2002-12-01

    Relationships between the species diversity of different taxa, the mean number of articles published per year on each taxon, and the mean impact factor of the journals in which they appear, were examined across six taxa of helminths: Nematomorpha, Acanthocephala, Monogenea, Trematoda, Cestoda and Nematoda, the latter including only animal parasitic nematodes. The mean annual output of scientific articles per taxon was not related to the species diversity of these taxa or, at least, not significantly. Thus, the large volume of publications on nematodes is not merely a reflection of their estimated diversity. There were significant differences among taxa in the mean impact factor of the journals in which papers on each taxon appeared, with nematodes having the highest mean score, followed by trematodes and cestodes. In addition, across the six taxa, the mean journal impact factor correlated positively and significantly with the mean annual number of papers published: not only are there more papers published on nematodes and trematodes than on nematomorphs or acanthocephalans, but they are also generally published in higher-ranking journals. These results suggest that there is an increasing gap in the quantity and general importance of the research carried out on different helminth taxa. PMID:12498645

  17. Analytical aspects of hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Engen, John R.; Wales, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical aspects of measuring hydrogen exchange by mass spectrometry are reviewed. The nature of analytical selectivity in hydrogen exchange is described followed by review of the analytical tools required to accomplish fragmentation, separation, and the mass spectrometry measurements under restrictive exchange quench conditions. In contrast to analytical quantitation that relies on measurements of peak intensity or area, quantitation in hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry depends on measuring a mass change with respect to an undeuterated or deuterated control, resulting in a value between zero and the maximum amount of deuterium that could be incorporated. Reliable quantitation is a function of experimental fidelity and to achieve high measurement reproducibility, a large number of experimental variables must be controlled during sample preparation and analysis. The method also reports on important qualitative aspects of the sample, including conformational heterogeneity and population dynamics. PMID:26048552

  18. Display considerations for quantitative radiology.

    PubMed

    Badano, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    The early prediction of the response to treatment using quantitative imaging holds great promise for streamlining the development, assessment, approval and personalization of new therapies. However, to realize this potential, quantitative radiology needs to develop an understanding of several limitations that might hinder the application of quantitation tools and techniques. Among these limitations, the fidelity of the display device used to interpret the image data is a significant factor that affects the accuracy and precision of quantitative visual tasks, particularly those involving large, volumetric, multi-dimensional and multi-modality image sets. This paper reviews several aspects of display performance and display image quality that are likely to contribute negatively to the robustness of quantitative imaging methods. Display characteristics that will be addressed include the grayscale and color performance of different classes of display devices, the angular distribution of the emissions of liquid crystal technologies, and the temporal response for stack mode viewing. The paper will also summarize current efforts for the metrology, standardization and image quality assessment methods for display devices.: PMID:24980719

  19. Quantitative Decision Support Requires Quantitative User Guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Is it conceivable that models run on 2007 computer hardware could provide robust and credible probabilistic information for decision support and user guidance at the ZIP code level for sub-daily meteorological events in 2060? In 2090? Retrospectively, how informative would output from today’s models have proven in 2003? or the 1930’s? Consultancies in the United Kingdom, including the Met Office, are offering services to “future-proof” their customers from climate change. How is a US or European based user or policy maker to determine the extent to which exciting new Bayesian methods are relevant here? or when a commercial supplier is vastly overselling the insights of today’s climate science? How are policy makers and academic economists to make the closely related decisions facing them? How can we communicate deep uncertainty in the future at small length-scales without undermining the firm foundation established by climate science regarding global trends? Three distinct aspects of the communication of the uses of climate model output targeting users and policy makers, as well as other specialist adaptation scientists, are discussed. First, a brief scientific evaluation of the length and time scales at which climate model output is likely to become uninformative is provided, including a note on the applicability the latest Bayesian methodology to current state-of-the-art general circulation models output. Second, a critical evaluation of the language often employed in communication of climate model output, a language which accurately states that models are “better”, have “improved” and now “include” and “simulate” relevant meteorological processed, without clearly identifying where the current information is thought to be uninformative and misleads, both for the current climate and as a function of the state of the (each) climate simulation. And thirdly, a general approach for evaluating the relevance of quantitative climate model output

  20. Modeling the Effect of Polychromatic Light in Quantitative Absorbance Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel; Cantrell, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory experiment is conducted to give the students practical experience with the principles of electronic absorbance spectroscopy. This straightforward approach creates a powerful tool for exploring many of the aspects of quantitative absorbance spectroscopy.

  1. High Aspect Ratio Wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Crosby, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Buckling-induced surface undulations are widely found in living creatures, for instance, gut villi and the surface of flower petal cells. These undulations provide unique functionalities with their extremely high aspect ratios. For the synthetic systems, sinusoidal wrinkles that are induced by buckling a thin film attached on a soft substrate have been proposed to many applications. However, the impact of the synthetic wrinkles have been restricted by limited aspect ratios, ranging from 0 to 0.35. Within this range, wrinkle aspect ratio is known to increase with increasing compressive strain until a critical strain is reached, at which point wrinkles transition to localizations, such as folds or period doublings. Inspired by the living creatures, we propose that wrinkles can be stabilized in high aspect ratio by manipulating the strain energy in the substrate. We experimentally demonstrate this idea by forming a secondary crosslinking network in the wrinkled surface and successfully achieve aspect ratio as large as 0.8. This work not only provides insights for the mechanism of high aspect ratio structures seen in living creatures, but also demonstrates significant promise for future wrinkle-based applications.

  2. Metstoich--Teaching Quantitative Metabolism and Energetics in Biochemical Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Kelvin W. W.; Barford, John P.

    2010-01-01

    Metstoich, a metabolic calculator developed for teaching, can provide a novel way to teach quantitative metabolism to biochemical engineering students. It can also introduce biochemistry/life science students to the quantitative aspects of life science subjects they have studied. Metstoich links traditional biochemistry-based metabolic approaches…

  3. Cognitive aspects of color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derefeldt, Gunilla A. M.; Menu, Jean-Pierre; Swartling, Tiina

    1995-04-01

    This report surveys cognitive aspects of color in terms of behavioral, neuropsychological, and neurophysiological data. Color is usually defined as psychophysical color or as perceived color. Behavioral data on categorical color perception, absolute judgement of colors, color coding, visual search, and visual awareness refer to the more cognitive aspects of color. These are of major importance in visual synthesis and spatial organization, as already shown by the Gestalt psychologists. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological findings provide evidence for an interrelation between cognitive color and spatial organization. Color also enhances planning strategies, as has been shown by studies on color and eye movements. Memory colors and the color- language connections in the brain also belong among the cognitive aspects of color.

  4. [Pulmonary Echinococcosis: Surgical Aspects].

    PubMed

    Eichhorn, M E; Hoffmann, H; Dienemann, H

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary cystic echinococcosis is a very rare disease in Germany. It is caused by the larvae of the dog tapeworm (echinococcus granulosus). The liver is the most affected organ, followed by the lungs. Surgery remains the main therapeutic approach for pulmonary CE. Whenever possible, parenchyma-preserving lung surgery should be preferred over anatomic lung resections. To ensure best therapeutic results, surgery needs to be performed under precise consideration of important infectiological aspects and patients should be treated in specialised centres based on interdisciplinary consensus. In addition to surgical aspects, this review summarises special infectiological features of this disease, which are crucial to the surgical approach. PMID:26351761

  5. Optimal aspect ratio of endocytosed spherocylindrical nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Bing; Liu, Yan-Hui; Zeng, Yan; Mao, Wei; Hu, Lin; Mao, Zong-Liang; Xu, Hou-Qiang

    2015-02-01

    Recent simulations have demonstrated that bioparticle size and shape modulate the process of endocytosis, and studies have provided more quantitative information that the endocytosis efficiency of spherocylindrical bioparticles is decided by its aspect ratio. At the same time, the dimensions of the receptor-ligand complex have strong effects on the size-dependent exclusion of proteins within the cellular environment. However, these earlier theoretical works including simulations did not consider the effects of ligand-receptor complex dimension on the endocytosis process. Thus, it is necessary to resolve the effects of ligand-receptor complex dimension and determine the optimal aspect ratio of spherocylindrical bioparticles in the process of endocytosis. Accordingly, we proposed a continuum elastic model, of which the results indicate that the aspect ratio depends on the ligand-receptor complex dimension and the radius of the spherocylindrical bioparticle. This model provides a phase diagram of the aspect ratio of endocytosed spherocylindrical bioparticles, the larger aspect ratio of which appears in the phase diagram with increasing ligand density, and highlights the bioparticle design.

  6. Aspects of Marine Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awkerman, Gary L.

    This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations to impart ocean science understanding, specifically, aspects of marine ecology, to high school students. The course objectives include the ability of…

  7. Psychological Aspects of Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Craig M.

    1980-01-01

    Psychological aspects of aging, based on gerontological hypotheses and research, are presented under three headings: intellectual abilities; emotional capacities; and motor capabilities. Consequences are discussed. Well-being throughout life depends on fulfillment of fundamental human needs; existential needs for nourishment, stimulation, rest,…

  8. Medical Aspects of Surfing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renneker, Mark

    1987-01-01

    The medical aspects of surfing include ear and eye injuries and sprains and strains of the lower back and neck, as well as skin cancer from exposure to the sun. Treatment, rehabilitation, and prevention of these problems are discussed. Surfing is recommended as part of an exercise program for reasonably healthy people. (Author/MT)

  9. Sociological Aspects of Deafness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Federation of the Deaf, Rome (Italy).

    Nine conference papers treat the sociological aspects of deafness. Included are "Individuals Being Deaf and Blind and Living with a Well Hearing Society" by A. Marx (German Federal Republic), "A Deaf Man's Experiences in a Hearing World" by A. B. Simon(U.S.A.), "Problem of Text Books and School Appliances for Vocational Education of Deaf Adults"…

  10. Aspects of Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolinger, Dwight

    A survey of the substance of linguistics and of the activities of linguists is presented in an attempt to acquaint ordinary readers with the various aspects of la"guage. A discussion of the human tendency toward speech, of the traits of language, and of phonetic elements prepares the way for an analysis of the structure of languag e in terms of…

  11. Quantitative autoradiography of neurochemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Rainbow, T.C.; Biegon, A.; Bleisch, W.V.

    1982-05-24

    Several new methods have been developed that apply quantitative autoradiography to neurochemistry. These methods are derived from the 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) technique of Sokoloff (1), which uses quantitative autoradiography to measure the rate of glucose utilization in brain structures. The new methods allow the measurement of the rate of cerbral protein synthesis and the levels of particular neurotransmitter receptors by quantitative autoradiography. As with the 2DG method, the new techniques can measure molecular levels in micron-sized brain structures; and can be used in conjunction with computerized systems of image processing. It is possible that many neurochemical measurements could be made by computerized analysis of quantitative autoradiograms.

  12. Aspects of sleep in centenarians.

    PubMed

    Spadafora, F L; Curti, A; Teti, R; Belmonte, M; Castagna, A; Mercurio, M; Infusino, P; Tavernese, G; Iannazzo, P S; Iorio, C; Mattace, R

    1996-01-01

    Sleeping habits of 48 Calabrian centenarians (12 males, 36 females) were evaluated. Their average age was 102 +/- 1.87 years (range 100-107 years). Quantitative and qualitative aspects of sleep were recorded, such as the length of sleeping (hrs), the time of falling asleep (regular or variable) and the time of awakening (regular or variable). Moreover, we recorded and included in the global hours an eventual afternoon sleeping, during a 24-hour-period. The quality of sleeping was classified as: night sleeping, and morning sleeping; and for the subjects were grouped as short sleepers (subjects that fall asleep easily), and long sleepers (subjects with problems to fall asleep). We also considered if sleeping was uninterrupted or interrupted during the night and if the subjects followed particular habits to facilitate the sleeping (sleeping pills, alcohol, etc.). This study demonstrated that all the examined centenarians go to sleep early in the evening, have no problems in falling asleep, wake up early in the morning, take a nap in the afternoon and do not take pills before going to bed. Among the environmental factors, the quality, the quantity and the habits of sleeping might have great influence for longevity. PMID:18653070

  13. Psychosocial Aspects of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Beck, Amy R

    2016-01-01

    This article is the sixth in a series of the comorbidities of childhood obesity and reviews psychosocial aspects with a focus on weight-based victimization and discrimination stemming from weight bias and stigma. Outcomes from these bullying and discriminatory experiences are pervasive and impact youth across all settings, including school. Lastly, this article provides recommendations on how to reduce bias and stigma to better serve these students in the school environment. PMID:26739931

  14. Aspects of B physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1987-10-14

    Various aspects of weak decays are commented on. Probing of the standard model and of phenomena beyond the standard model are discussed, followed by a theoretical view of B mesons and some experimental observations on B mesons. The point is made that any data on B decay would be interesting in that it would provide powerful new constraints in analyses of the standard model and extensions thereof. (LEW)

  15. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  16. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  17. The quantitative modelling of human spatial habitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    A model for the quantitative assessment of human spatial habitability is presented in the space station context. The visual aspect assesses how interior spaces appear to the inhabitants. This aspect concerns criteria such as sensed spaciousness and the affective (emotional) connotations of settings' appearances. The kinesthetic aspect evaluates the available space in terms of its suitability to accommodate human movement patterns, as well as the postural and anthrometric changes due to microgravity. Finally, social logic concerns how the volume and geometry of available space either affirms or contravenes established social and organizational expectations for spatial arrangements. Here, the criteria include privacy, status, social power, and proxemics (the uses of space as a medium of social communication).

  18. Ceramics with decorative aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voica, Cezara

    2009-08-01

    The last decades brought the development of bone china techniques used for producing the decorative articles. These products can be glazed with a transparent and thin glaze layer, even with more special (decorative) ones which gives new aesthetic aspect. The present article presents the results obtained after the studies performed for matte glazes for decorative bone china. As microcrystalization agent were used zinc oxide; the content of this oxide bring some changes of the basic glaze thus the chemical composition must be adjusted as the fluxes would present the desired properties after the heating process.

  19. Aspects of emergent symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Pedro R. S.

    2016-03-01

    These are intended to be review notes on emergent symmetries, i.e. symmetries which manifest themselves in specific sectors of energy in many systems. The emphasis is on the physical aspects rather than computation methods. We include some background material and go through more recent problems in field theory, statistical mechanics and condensed matter. These problems illustrate how some important symmetries, such as Lorentz invariance and supersymmetry, usually believed to be fundamental, can arise naturally in low-energy regimes of systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The aim is to discuss how these examples could help us to face other complex and fundamental problems.

  20. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: microradiographic aspects.

    PubMed

    Dhem, A; Nyssen-Behets, C; Coppens, J

    1998-01-01

    A comparative microradiographic and histologic analysis of undecalcified bone samples was performed in men and women aged 18-98 years. These morphological methods showed that besides usual lamellar bone remodelling, all the so-called inert surfaces, namely both haversian and vascular canals as well as trabecular surfaces, were involved in weathering alterations of the superficial lamellae, resulting in eroded outlines devoid of osteoclast. These aspects, recorded in all pieces of our material, were visible from the earliest adult age and were randomly distributed. Except the grade of osteoporosis at a given age, the microradiographic and histologic aspects were similar in both aged men and women and did not allow sex distinction. These observations were consistent with the hypothesis of a particular destructive process affecting all the quiescent lamellar bone surfaces without osteoclast or cell participation. This kind of erosion, termed delitescence, could be at least partially responsible for the age-related and postmenopausal bone loss. In order to explain the increasing osteoporosis after menopause, it has been suggested that the estrogen deficiency could increase the percentage of dead osteocytes. Thereby the reduced cellular control on the bone surface could impair the remodeling process and fail to adapt the bone structure by repairing the microscopic lesions. PMID:11315966

  1. Regulatory aspects on nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Vanessa; Conniot, João; Matos, Ana I; Peres, Carina; Zupancic, Eva; Moura, Liane; Silva, Liana C; Florindo, Helena F; Gaspar, Rogério S

    2015-12-18

    Nanomedicines have been in the forefront of pharmaceutical research in the last decades, creating new challenges for research community, industry, and regulators. There is a strong demand for the fast development of scientific and technological tools to address unmet medical needs, thus improving human health care and life quality. Tremendous advances in the biomaterials and nanotechnology fields have prompted their use as promising tools to overcome important drawbacks, mostly associated to the non-specific effects of conventional therapeutic approaches. However, the wide range of application of nanomedicines demands a profound knowledge and characterization of these complex products. Their properties need to be extensively understood to avoid unpredicted effects on patients, such as potential immune reactivity. Research policy and alliances have been bringing together scientists, regulators, industry, and, more frequently in recent years, patient representatives and patient advocacy institutions. In order to successfully enhance the development of new technologies, improved strategies for research-based corporate organizations, more integrated research tools dealing with appropriate translational requirements aiming at clinical development, and proactive regulatory policies are essential in the near future. This review focuses on the most important aspects currently recognized as key factors for the regulation of nanomedicines, discussing the efforts under development by industry and regulatory agencies to promote their translation into the market. Regulatory Science aspects driving a faster and safer development of nanomedicines will be a central issue for the next years. PMID:26260323

  2. Aspects of Gond astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahia, M. N.; Halkare, Ganesh

    2013-03-01

    The Gond community is considered to be one of the most ancient tribes of India with a continuing history of several thousand years. They are also known for their largely isolated history which they have retained through the millennia. Several of their intellectual traditions therefore are a record of parallel aspects of human intellectual growth, and still preserve their original flavour and have not been homogenised by the later traditions of India. In view of this, the Gonds provide a special window to the different currents that constitute contemporary India. In the present study, we summarise their mythology, genetics and script. We then investigate their astronomical traditions and try to understand this community through a survey of 15 Gond villages spread over Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh. We show that they have a distinctly different view of the sky from the conventional astronomical ideas encountered elsewhere in India, which is both interesting and informative. We briefly comment on other aspects of their life as culled from our encounters with different members of the Gond community.

  3. On Quantitative Rorschach Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haggard, Ernest A.

    1978-01-01

    Two types of quantitative Rorschach scales are discussed: first, those based on the response categories of content, location, and the determinants, and second, global scales based on the subject's responses to all ten stimulus cards. (Author/JKS)

  4. Recapturing Quantitative Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernezny, Ken; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents a classroom activity on estimating animal populations. Uses shoe boxes and candies to emphasize the importance of mathematics in biology while introducing the methods of quantitative ecology. (JRH)

  5. Quantitative film radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Devine, G.; Dobie, D.; Fugina, J.; Hernandez, J.; Logan, C.; Mohr, P.; Moss, R.; Schumacher, B.; Updike, E.; Weirup, D.

    1991-02-26

    We have developed a system of quantitative radiography in order to produce quantitative images displaying homogeneity of parts. The materials that we characterize are synthetic composites and may contain important subtle density variations not discernible by examining a raw film x-radiograph. In order to quantitatively interpret film radiographs, it is necessary to digitize, interpret, and display the images. Our integrated system of quantitative radiography displays accurate, high-resolution pseudo-color images in units of density. We characterize approximately 10,000 parts per year in hundreds of different configurations and compositions with this system. This report discusses: the method; film processor monitoring and control; verifying film and processor performance; and correction of scatter effects.

  6. Quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Boast, C.A.; Snowhill, E.W.; Altar, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography addresses the topic of technical and scientific advances in the sphere of quantitative autoradiography. The volume opens with a overview of the field from a historical and critical perspective. Following is a detailed discussion of in vitro data obtained from a variety of neurotransmitter systems. The next section explores applications of autoradiography, and the final two chapters consider experimental models. Methodological considerations are emphasized, including the use of computers for image analysis.

  7. RECENT ADVANCES IN QUANTITATIVE NEUROPROTEOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Craft, George E; Chen, Anshu; Nairn, Angus C

    2014-01-01

    The field of proteomics is undergoing rapid development in a number of different areas including improvements in mass spectrometric platforms, peptide identification algorithms and bioinformatics. In particular, new and/or improved approaches have established robust methods that not only allow for in-depth and accurate peptide and protein identification and modification, but also allow for sensitive measurement of relative or absolute quantitation. These methods are beginning to be applied to the area of neuroproteomics, but the central nervous system poses many specific challenges in terms of quantitative proteomics, given the large number of different neuronal cell types that are intermixed and that exhibit distinct patterns of gene and protein expression. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in quantitative neuroproteomics, with a focus on work published over the last five years that applies emerging methods to normal brain function as well as to various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and drug addiction as well as of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. While older methods such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide electrophoresis continued to be used, a variety of more in-depth MS-based approaches including both label (ICAT, iTRAQ, TMT, SILAC, SILAM), label-free (label-free, MRM, SWATH) and absolute quantification methods, are rapidly being applied to neurobiological investigations of normal and diseased brain tissue as well as of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While the biological implications of many of these studies remain to be clearly established, that there is a clear need for standardization of experimental design and data analysis, and that the analysis of protein changes in specific neuronal cell types in the central nervous system remains a serious challenge, it appears that the quality and depth of the more recent quantitative proteomics studies is beginning to

  8. Recent advances in quantitative neuroproteomics.

    PubMed

    Craft, George E; Chen, Anshu; Nairn, Angus C

    2013-06-15

    The field of proteomics is undergoing rapid development in a number of different areas including improvements in mass spectrometric platforms, peptide identification algorithms and bioinformatics. In particular, new and/or improved approaches have established robust methods that not only allow for in-depth and accurate peptide and protein identification and modification, but also allow for sensitive measurement of relative or absolute quantitation. These methods are beginning to be applied to the area of neuroproteomics, but the central nervous system poses many specific challenges in terms of quantitative proteomics, given the large number of different neuronal cell types that are intermixed and that exhibit distinct patterns of gene and protein expression. This review highlights the recent advances that have been made in quantitative neuroproteomics, with a focus on work published over the last five years that applies emerging methods to normal brain function as well as to various neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and drug addiction as well as of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. While older methods such as two-dimensional polyacrylamide electrophoresis continued to be used, a variety of more in-depth MS-based approaches including both label (ICAT, iTRAQ, TMT, SILAC, SILAM), label-free (label-free, MRM, SWATH) and absolute quantification methods, are rapidly being applied to neurobiological investigations of normal and diseased brain tissue as well as of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). While the biological implications of many of these studies remain to be clearly established, that there is a clear need for standardization of experimental design and data analysis, and that the analysis of protein changes in specific neuronal cell types in the central nervous system remains a serious challenge, it appears that the quality and depth of the more recent quantitative proteomics studies is beginning to shed

  9. Nuclear physics: Macroscopic aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    A systematic macroscopic, leptodermous approach to nuclear statics and dynamics is described, based formally on the assumptions {h_bar} {yields} 0 and b/R << 1, where b is the surface diffuseness and R the nuclear radius. The resulting static model of shell-corrected nuclear binding energies and deformabilities is accurate to better than 1 part in a thousand and yields a firm determination of the principal properties of the nuclear fluid. As regards dynamics, the above approach suggests that nuclear shape evolutions will often be dominated by dissipation, but quantitative comparisons with experimental data are more difficult than in the case of statics. In its simplest liquid drop version the model exhibits interesting formal connections to the classic astronomical problem of rotating gravitating masses.

  10. Aspects of hadron physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Hoell, A.; Roberts, C. D.; Wright, S. V.; Physics; Univ. Rostock

    2007-01-01

    Detailed investigations of the structure of hadrons are essential for understanding how matter is constructed from the quarks and gluons of Quantum chromodynamics (QCD), and amongst the questions posed to modern hadron physics, three stand out. What is the rigorous, quantitative mechanism responsible for confinement? What is the connection between confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking? And are these phenomena together sufficient to explain the origin of more than 98% of the mass of the observable universe? Such questions may only be answered using the full machinery of nonperturbative relativistic quantum field theory. This contribution provides a perspective on progress toward answering these key questions. In so doing it will provide an overview of the contemporary application of Dyson-Schwinger equations in Hadron Physics, additional information on which may be found in Refs. [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. The presentation assumes that the reader is familiar with the concepts and notation of relativistic quantum mechanics, with the functional integral formulation of quantum field theory and with regularization and renormalization in its perturbative formulation. For these topics, in order of appearance, Refs. [7, 8, 9, 10] are useful. In addition, Chaps. 1 and 2 of Ref. [5] review the bulk of the necessary concepts. Hadron physics is a key part of the international effort in basic science. For example, in the USA we currently have the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) while in Europe hadron physics is studied at the Frascati National Laboratory and is an important part of a forthcoming pan-European initiative; namely, the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI-Darmstadt. Progress in this field is gauged via the successful completion of precision measurements of fundamental properties of hadrons; e.g., the pion, proton and neutron, and simple nuclei, for comparison with

  11. Immunotherapy in all aspects.

    PubMed

    Hanci, Deniz; Şahin, Ethem; Muluk, Nuray Bayar; Cingi, Cemal

    2016-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a form of long-term treatment that decreases symptoms for many people with allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, conjunctivitis (eye allergy) or stinging insect allergy. In this review, we presented the important topics in immunotherapy. The important aspects of immunotherapy are considered to be "Immunologıcal responses to immunotherapy"; "The principal types of immunotherapy"; "Effectiveness"; "Indications"; "Contraindications"; "Allergen immunotherapy in children"; "Safety"; and "Anaphylactic reactions after immunotherapy". The principal types of immunotherapy are subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy. Both of them can be used in indicated cases. When using SCIT, physicians must be more careful because of reported rare fatal cases. The risks and benefits of continuing allergen immunotherapy in patients who have experienced severe systemic reactions should be carefully considered. PMID:25673026

  12. Various aspects of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankiewicz, Marcin

    2007-12-01

    This thesis summarizes research projects that I have been involved in during my graduate studies at Vanderbilt University. My research spanned different areas of theoretical high energy physics with gravity as a common denominator. I explore both fundamental and phenomenological aspects of: (i) mathematical physics where I have studied relations between partition functions of certain class of conformal field theories and Fischer-Griess Monster group; (ii) cosmology, where I performed a numerical study of a horizon size modes of scalar field; (iii) a black hole physics project involving possible extensions of the non-hair theorem in a presence of exotic types of scalar field; and (iv) a study of phenomenological space-time foam models and their relation to Planck scale physics.

  13. Aspects of Plant Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    TREWAVAS, ANTHONY

    2003-01-01

    Intelligence is not a term commonly used when plants are discussed. However, I believe that this is an omission based not on a true assessment of the ability of plants to compute complex aspects of their environment, but solely a reflection of a sessile lifestyle. This article, which is admittedly controversial, attempts to raise many issues that surround this area. To commence use of the term intelligence with regard to plant behaviour will lead to a better understanding of the complexity of plant signal transduction and the discrimination and sensitivity with which plants construct images of their environment, and raises critical questions concerning how plants compute responses at the whole‐plant level. Approaches to investigating learning and memory in plants will also be considered. PMID:12740212

  14. Geometrical aspects of entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Leinaas, Jon Magne; Myrheim, Jan; Ovrum, Eirik

    2006-07-15

    We study geometrical aspects of entanglement, with the Hilbert-Schmidt norm defining the metric on the set of density matrices. We focus first on the simplest case of two two-level systems and show that a 'relativistic' formulation leads to a complete analysis of the question of separability. Our approach is based on Schmidt decomposition of density matrices for a composite system and nonunitary transformations to a standard form. The positivity of the density matrices is crucial for the method to work. A similar approach works to some extent in higher dimensions, but is a less powerful tool. We further present a numerical method for examining separability and illustrate the method by a numerical study of bound entanglement in a composite system of two three-level systems.

  15. Aspects, Wrappers and Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on Object Infrastructure Framework (OIF), an Aspect-Oriented Programming (AOP) system. The presentation begins with an introduction to the difficulties and requirements of distributed computing, including functional and non-functional requirements (ilities). The architecture of Distributed Object Technology includes stubs, proxies for implementation objects, and skeletons, proxies for client applications. The key OIF ideas (injecting behavior, annotated communications, thread contexts, and pragma) are discussed. OIF is an AOP mechanism; AOP is centered on: 1) Separate expression of crosscutting concerns; 2) Mechanisms to weave the separate expressions into a unified system. AOP is software engineering technology for separately expressing systematic properties while nevertheless producing running systems that embody these properties.

  16. The Quantitative Preparation of Future Geoscience Graduate Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; Hancock, G. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modern geoscience is a highly quantitative science. In February, a small group of faculty and graduate students from across the country met to discuss the quantitative preparation of geoscience majors for graduate school. The group included ten faculty supervising graduate students in quantitative areas spanning the earth, atmosphere, and ocean sciences; five current graduate students in these areas; and five faculty teaching undergraduate students in the spectrum of institutions preparing students for graduate work. Discussion focused in four key ares: Are incoming graduate students adequately prepared for the quantitative aspects of graduate geoscience programs? What are the essential quantitative skills are that are required for success in graduate school? What are perceived as the important courses to prepare students for the quantitative aspects of graduate school? What programs/resources would be valuable in helping faculty/departments improve the quantitative preparation of students? The participants concluded that strengthening the quantitative preparation of undergraduate geoscience majors would increase their opportunities in graduate school. While specifics differed amongst disciplines, a special importance was placed on developing the ability to use quantitative skills to solve geoscience problems. This requires the ability to pose problems so they can be addressed quantitatively, understand the relationship between quantitative concepts and physical representations, visualize mathematics, test the reasonableness of quantitative results, creatively move forward from existing models/techniques/approaches, and move between quantitative and verbal descriptions. A list of important quantitative competencies desirable in incoming graduate students includes mechanical skills in basic mathematics, functions, multi-variate analysis, statistics and calculus, as well as skills in logical analysis and the ability to learn independently in quantitative ways

  17. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  18. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, several algorithms that allow for quantitative photoacoustic reconstruction of tissue optical, acoustic and physiological properties are described in a finite-element method based framework. These quantitative reconstruction algorithms are compared, and the merits and limitations associated with these methods are discussed. In addition, a multispectral approach is presented for concurrent reconstructions of multiple parameters including deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and water concentrations as well as acoustic speed. Simulation and in vivo experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithms presented. PMID:19581254

  19. Psychosocial aspects of abortion

    PubMed Central

    Illsley, Raymond; Hall, Marion H.

    1976-01-01

    The literature on psychosocial aspects of abortion is confusing. Individual publications must be interpreted in the context of cultural, religious, and legal constraints obtaining in a particular society at a given time, with due attention to the status and availability of alternatives to abortion that might be chosen by a woman with an “unwanted” pregnancy. A review of the literature shows that, where careful pre- and post-abortion assessments are made, the evidence is that psychological benefit commonly results, and serious adverse emotional sequelae are rare. The outcome of refused abortion seems less satisfactory, with regrets and distress frequently occurring. Research on the administration of abortion services suggests that counselling is often of value, that distress is frequently caused by delays in deciding upon and in carrying out abortions, and by unsympathetic attitudes of service providers. The phenomenon of repeated abortion seeking should be seen in the context of the availability and cost of contraception and sterilization. The place of sterilization with abortion requires careful study. A recommendation is made for observational descriptive research on populations of women with potentially unwanted pregnancies in different cultures, with comparisons of management systems and an evaluation of their impact on service users. PMID:1085671

  20. Strategic Aspects of Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Edward; Hammerstein, Peter; Hess, Nicole

    Rarely do human behavioral scientists and scholars study language, music, and other forms of communication as strategies—a means to some end. Some even deny that communication is the primary function of these phenomena. Here we draw upon selections of our earlier work to briefly define the strategy concept and sketch how decision theory, developed to explain the behavior of rational actors, is applied to evolved agents. Communication can then be interpreted as a strategy that advances the "fitness interests" of such agents. When this perspective is applied to agents with conflicts of interest, deception emerges as an important aspect of communication. We briefly review costly signaling, one solution to the problem of honest communication among agents with conflicts of interest. We also explore the subversion of cooperative signals by parasites and by plants defending themselves against herbivores, and we touch on biases in human gossip. Experiments with artificial embodied and communicating agents confirm that when there are conflicts of interest among agents, deception readily evolves. Finally, we consider signaling among super-organisms and the possible implications for understanding human music and language.

  1. Electrical aspects of rainout

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenkilde, C.E.

    1981-11-23

    Rainout commonly denotes the aggregate of phenomena associated with precipitation scavenging of radioactivity from a cloud of nuclear debris that is within a natural rain cloud. (In contrast, the term, washout, is applicable when the nuclear cloud is below the rain cloud and the term, fallout, commonly denotes the direct gravitational settling of contaminated solid material from a nuclear cloud.) Nuclear debris aerosols may be scavenged within natural clouds by a variety of different physical processes which may involve diffusion, convection, impaction, nucleation, phoresis, turbulence, and/or electricity among others. Processes which involve electrical aspects are scrutinized for their susceptibility to the intimate presence of the radioactive-cloud environment. This particular choice of electrical processes is not accidental. Nearly all of the listed processes were examined earlier by Williams. His rough estimates suggested that electrical effects, and to a lesser extent turbulence, could enhance the scavenging of those submicron aerosols which reside in the size-range that bridges the minimum in the scavenging rate coefficient which is commonly called the Greenfield gap. This minimum in the scavenging-rate coefficient is created by the simultaneous reduction of scavenging via diffusion and the reduction of scavenging via inertial impaction. However, Williams omitted the specific influence of a radioactive environment. This report aims to remedy this omission.

  2. Quantitative Simulation Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Černý, Pavol; Henzinger, Thomas A.; Radhakrishna, Arjun

    While a boolean notion of correctness is given by a preorder on systems and properties, a quantitative notion of correctness is defined by a distance function on systems and properties, where the distance between a system and a property provides a measure of "fit" or "desirability." In this article, we explore several ways how the simulation preorder can be generalized to a distance function. This is done by equipping the classical simulation game between a system and a property with quantitative objectives. In particular, for systems that satisfy a property, a quantitative simulation game can measure the "robustness" of the satisfaction, that is, how much the system can deviate from its nominal behavior while still satisfying the property. For systems that violate a property, a quantitative simulation game can measure the "seriousness" of the violation, that is, how much the property has to be modified so that it is satisfied by the system. These distances can be computed in polynomial time, since the computation reduces to the value problem in limit average games with constant weights. Finally, we demonstrate how the robustness distance can be used to measure how many transmission errors are tolerated by error correcting codes.

  3. Quantitative Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Grover H.

    The use of quantitative decision making tools provides the decision maker with a range of alternatives among which to decide, permits acceptance and use of the optimal solution, and decreases risk. Training line administrators in the use of these tools can help school business officials obtain reliable information upon which to base district…

  4. Quantitative Graphics in Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tankard, James W., Jr.

    The use of quantitative graphics in newspapers requires achieving a balance between being accurate and getting the attention of the reader. The statistical representations in newspapers are drawn by graphic designers whose key technique is fusion--the striking combination of two visual images. This technique often results in visual puns,…

  5. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  6. Cultural aspects of suicide.

    PubMed

    Maharajh, Hari D; Abdool, Petal S

    2005-09-01

    Undefined cultural factors cannot be dismissed and significantly contribute to the worldwide incidence of death by suicide. Culture is an all embracing term and defines the relationship of an individual to his environment. This study seeks to investigate the effect of culture on suicide both regionally and internationally. Culture-bound syndrome with suicidal behaviours specific to a particular culture or geographical region are discussed. Opinions are divided as to the status of religious martyrs. The law itself is silent on many aspects of suicidal behaviour and despite decriminalization of suicide as self-murder, the latter remains on the statutes of many developing countries. The Caribbean region is of concern due to its steady rise in mean suicide rate, especially in Trinidad and Tobago where socio-cultural factors are instrumental in influencing suicidal behaviour. These include transgenerational cultural conflicts, psycho-social problems, media exposure, unemployment, social distress, religion and family structure. The methods used are attributed to accessibility and lethality. Ingestion of poisonous substances is most popular followed by hanging. The gender differences seen with regard to suicidality can also be attributed to gender related psychopathology and psychosocial differences in help-seeking behaviour. These are influenced by the cultural environment to which the individual is exposed. Culture provides coping strategies to individuals; as civilization advances many of these coping mechanisms are lost unclothing the genetic predisposition of vulnerable groups. In the management of suicidal behaviour, a system of therapeutic re-culturation is needed with an emphasis on relevant culture- based therapies. PMID:16155688

  7. [Psychosomatic aspects of endometriosis].

    PubMed

    Lütje, W; Brandenburg, U

    2003-01-01

    Endometriosis is a varied and unspecific disorder, which can be detected by way of subtle diagnostics in almost every woman. In one case it is a minor accidental finding, in another case it is a cancer-like, mostly incurable, chronic painful a disease, which often has sterility and aggressive therapies as subsequence. For the origin of endometriosis many causes are discussed. The theory of retrograde menstruation through an hyperperistaltic-dystocic uterus presents on one hand an organic explanation-concept. From the psychosomatic point of view this unphysiological menstruation could also be seen as the result of an unsolved conflict, which might be connected with the gender-role or personal, familiar and social attitudes about menstruation. The exo- and endogenic supply with hormones in a time with less pregnancies and therefore more menstruation is also a contributing factor to the origin and development of this disturbance. Beside the theory of endometriosis as an autoimmune disease also implicates psychosomatic thoughts. Though there is always a repeatedly talk the "cancer of the career-woman", there are however very few psychosomatic research projects regarding endometriosis. Therefore it is a characteristic of this disease, that finding and feeling are very often controversial. This emphasizes the importance of psychosomatic, psychosexual, social and biographical aspects in connection with endometriosis. This point of view makes a relative plausible and comfortable explanation for the CPPS and sterility uncertain. Without question diagnosis and therapy of endometriosis followed on one hand by stigmatization and on the other hand by often restriction of quality of life leads to a lot of subsequent psychosocial problems. PMID:14505264

  8. What Are We Doing When We Translate from Quantitative Models?

    PubMed Central

    Critchfield, Thomas S; Reed, Derek D

    2009-01-01

    Although quantitative analysis (in which behavior principles are defined in terms of equations) has become common in basic behavior analysis, translational efforts often examine everyday events through the lens of narrative versions of laboratory-derived principles. This approach to translation, although useful, is incomplete because equations may convey concepts that are difficult to capture in words. To support this point, we provide a nontechnical introduction to selected aspects of quantitative analysis; consider some issues that translational investigators (and, potentially, practitioners) confront when attempting to translate from quantitative models; and discuss examples of relevant translational studies. We conclude that, where behavior-science translation is concerned, the quantitative features of quantitative models cannot be ignored without sacrificing conceptual precision, scientific and practical insights, and the capacity of the basic and applied wings of behavior analysis to communicate effectively. PMID:22478533

  9. [Medical aspects of fasting].

    PubMed

    Gavrankapetanović, F

    1997-01-01

    Fasting (arabic-savm) was proclaimed through islam, and thus it is an obligation for Holly Prophet Muhammad s.a.v.s.-Peace be to Him-in the second year after Hijra (in 624 after Milad-born of Isa a.s.). There is a month of fasting-Ramadan-each lunar (hijra) year. So, it was 1415th fasting this year. Former Prophets have brought obligative messages on fasting to their people; so there are also certain forms of fasting with other religions i.e. with Catholics, Jews, Orthodox. These kinds of fasting above differ from muslim fasting, but they also appear obligative. All revelations have brought fasting as obligative. From medical point of view, fasting has two basical components: psychical and physical. Psychical sphere correlate closely with its fundamental ideological message. Allah dz.s. says in Quran: "... Fasting is obligative for you, as it was obligative to your precedents, as to avoid sins; during very few days (II, II, 183 & 184)." Will strength, control of passions, effort and self-discipline makes a pure faithfull person, who purify its mind and body through fasting. Thinking about The Creator is more intensive, character is more solid; and spirit and will get stronger. We will mention the hadith saying: "Essaihune humus saimun!" That means: "Travellers at the Earth are fasters (of my ummet)." The commentary of this hadith, in the Collection of 1001 hadiths (Bin bir hadis), number 485, says: "There are no travelling dervishs or monks in islam; thus there is no such a kind of relligousity in islam. In stead, it is changed by fasting and constant attending of mosque. That was proclaimed as obligation, although there were few cases of travelling in the name of relligousity, like travelling dervishs and sheichs." In this paper, the author discusses medical aspects of fasting and its positive characteristics in the respect of healthy life style and prevention of many sicks. The author mentions positive influence of fasting to certain system and organs of human

  10. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  11. Differential Classroom Interactions by Ethnicity: A Quantitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennant, Geoff

    2004-01-01

    Concerns regarding differentials in classroom experience and academic attainment by ethnicity have been expressed for some time. This study explores, from a quantitative viewpoint based on fieldwork in 10 London schools, one particular aspect of this, namely classroom interactions between teachers and pupils from different ethnic origins. It was…

  12. Analyzing the Students' Academic Integrity using Quantitative Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teodorescu, Daniel; Andrei, Tudorel; Tusa, Erika; Herteliu, Claudiu; Stancu, Stelian

    2007-01-01

    The transition period in Romania has generated a series of important changes, including the reforming of the Romanian tertiary education. This process has been accelerated after the signing of the Bologna treaty. Important changes were recorded in many of the quantitative aspects (such as number of student enrolled, pupil-student ratio etc) as…

  13. Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-02-29

    The Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser provides graphical browsing functionality for genomic data organized, at a minimum, by sequence and position. While supporting the annotation browsing features typical of many other genomic browsers, additional emphasis is placed on viewing and utilizing quantitative data. Data may be read from GFF, SGR, FASTA or any column delimited format. Once the data has been read into the browser's buffer, it may be searched. filtered or subjected to mathematical transformation.more » The browser also supplies some graphical design manipulation functionality geared towards preparing figures for presentations or publication. A plug-in mechanism enables development outside the core functionality that adds more advanced or esoteric analysis capabilities. BBrowse's development and distribution is open-source and has been built to run on Linux, OSX and MS Windows operating systems.« less

  14. Energy & Climate: Getting Quantitative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Richard

    2011-11-01

    A noted environmentalist claims that buying an SUV instead of a regular car is energetically equivalent to leaving your refrigerator door open for seven years. A fossil-fuel apologist argues that solar energy is a pie-in-the-sky dream promulgated by na"ive environmentalists, because there's nowhere near enough solar energy to meet humankind's energy demand. A group advocating shutdown of the Vermont Yankee nuclear plant claims that 70% of its electrical energy is lost in transmission lines. Around the world, thousands agitate for climate action, under the numerical banner ``350.'' Neither the environmentalist, the fossil-fuel apologist, the antinuclear activists, nor most of those marching under the ``350'' banner can back up their assertions with quantitative arguments. Yet questions about energy and its environmental impacts almost always require quantitative answers. Physics can help! This poster gives some cogent examples, based on the newly published 2^nd edition of the author's textbook Energy, Environment, and Climate.

  15. Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser

    SciTech Connect

    Hechmer, Aaron

    2008-02-29

    The Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser provides graphical browsing functionality for genomic data organized, at a minimum, by sequence and position. While supporting the annotation browsing features typical of many other genomic browsers, additional emphasis is placed on viewing and utilizing quantitative data. Data may be read from GFF, SGR, FASTA or any column delimited format. Once the data has been read into the browser's buffer, it may be searched. filtered or subjected to mathematical transformation. The browser also supplies some graphical design manipulation functionality geared towards preparing figures for presentations or publication. A plug-in mechanism enables development outside the core functionality that adds more advanced or esoteric analysis capabilities. BBrowse's development and distribution is open-source and has been built to run on Linux, OSX and MS Windows operating systems.

  16. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  17. A Quantitative Literacy Course for Humanities and Law Students: The Challenges of a Context-Based Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Vera

    2012-01-01

    This article examines some aspects of the effectiveness of a first-year course in quantitative literacy for Humanities and Law students at a South African university. This intervention is necessary to assist students in developing the appropriate quantitative competencies because there is an articulation gap between the quantitative literacy of…

  18. Computational vaccinology: quantitative approaches.

    PubMed

    Flower, Darren R; McSparron, Helen; Blythe, Martin J; Zygouri, Christianna; Taylor, Debra; Guan, Pingping; Wan, Shouzhan; Coveney, Peter V; Walshe, Valerie; Borrow, Persephone; Doytchinova, Irini A

    2003-01-01

    The immune system is hierarchical and has many levels, exhibiting much emergent behaviour. However, at its heart are molecular recognition events that are indistinguishable from other types of biomacromolecular interaction. These can be addressed well by quantitative experimental and theoretical biophysical techniques, and particularly by methods from drug design. We review here our approach to computational immunovaccinology. In particular, we describe the JenPep database and two new techniques for T cell epitope prediction. One is based on quantitative structure-activity relationships (a 3D-QSAR method based on CoMSIA and another 2D method based on the Free-Wilson approach) and the other on atomistic molecular dynamic simulations using high performance computing. JenPep (http://www.jenner.ar.uk/ JenPep) is a relational database system supporting quantitative data on peptide binding to major histocompatibility complexes, TAP transporters, TCR-pMHC complexes, and an annotated list of B cell and T cell epitopes. Our 2D-QSAR method factors the contribution to peptide binding from individual amino acids as well as 1-2 and 1-3 residue interactions. In the 3D-QSAR approach, the influence of five physicochemical properties (volume, electrostatic potential, hydrophobicity, hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor abilities) on peptide affinity were considered. Both methods are exemplified through their application to the well-studied problem of peptide binding to the human class I MHC molecule HLA-A*0201. PMID:14712934

  19. Robots in Space -Psychological Aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, Walter E.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the psychological aspects of developing robots to perform routine operations associated with monitoring, inspection, maintenance and repair in space is shown. The topics include: 1) Purpose; 2) Vision; 3) Current Robots in Space; 4) Ground Based Robots; 5) AERCam; 6) Rotating Bladder Robot (ROBLR); 7) DART; 8) Robonaut; 9) Full Immersion Telepresence Testbed; 10) ERA; and 11) Psychological Aspects

  20. Using quantitative phase petrology to understand metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative phase petrology has become one of the mainstay methods for interpreting metamorphic rocks and processes. Its increased utility has been driven by improvements to end-member thermodynamics, activity-composition relationships and computer programs to undertake calculations. Such improvements now allow us to undertake calculations in increasingly complex chemical systems that more closely reflect those of rocks. Recent progress in activity-composition (a-x) relationships is aimed at developing suites of a-x relationships in large chemical systems that are calibrated together, which will allow a more direct application of the method to metamorphic rocks. In addition, considerable progress has been made in how quantitative phase diagrams can be used to understand features, including chemical potential diagrams for reaction textures, methods for fractionating bulk compositions and methods for modelling open system processes. One feature of calculated phase diagrams is that they present us with a great amount of information, such as mineral assemblages, mineral proportions, phase compositions, volume or density etc. An important aspect to using this information is to understand the potential uncertainties associated with these, which are significant. These uncertainties require that calculated phase diagrams be used with caution to interpret observed features in rocks. Features such as mineral zoning and reaction textures should still be interpreted in a semi-quantitative way, even if based on a fully quantitative diagram. Exercises such as the interpretation of reaction overstepping based on relating phase diagrams to observed mineral core compositions are likely to give spurious results given the infelicities in existing a-x models. Despite these limitations, quantitative phase petrology remains the most useful approach to interpreting the metamorphic history of rocks in that it provides a theoretical framework in which to interpret observed features rather

  1. Aspect-Oriented Design with Reusable Aspect Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienzle, Jörg; Al Abed, Wisam; Fleurey, Franck; Jézéquel, Jean-Marc; Klein, Jacques

    The idea behind Aspect-Oriented Modeling (AOM) is to apply aspect-oriented techniques to (software) models with the aim of modularizing crosscutting concerns. This can be done within different modeling notations, at different levels of abstraction, and at different moments during the software development process. This paper demonstrates the applicability of AOM during the software design phase by presenting parts of an aspect-oriented design of a crisis management system. The design solution proposed in this paper is based on the Reusable Aspect Models (RAM) approach, which allows a modeler to express the structure and behavior of a complex system using class, state and sequence diagrams encapsulated in several aspect models. The paper describes how the model of the "create mission" functionality of the server backend can be decomposed into 23 inter-dependent aspect models. The presentation of the design is followed by a discussion on the lessons learned from the case study. Next, RAM is compared to 8 other AOM approaches according to 6 criteria: language, concern composition, asymmetric and symmetric composition, maturity, and tool support. To conclude the paper, a discussion section points out the features of RAM that specifically support reuse.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Glaciated Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta, A. D.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of glaciated mountains is at the heart of the debate over Late Cenozoic linkages between climate and tectonics. Traditionally, the development of high summit elevations is attributed to tectonic processes. However, much of the high elevation of the Transantarctic Mountains can be attributed solely to uplift in response to glacial erosion (Stern et al., 2005). The Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) provide an unparalleled opportunity to study glacial erosion. The mountain range has experienced glacial conditions since Oligocene time. In the higher and dryer regions of the TAM there is only a thin veneer of ice and snow draping the topography. In these regions landforms that were shaped during earlier climatic conditions are preserved. In fact, both glacial and fluvial landforms dating as far back as 18 Ma are preserved locally. In addition, the TAM are ideal for studying glacial erosion since the range has experienced minimal tectonic uplift since late Oligocene time, thus isolating the erosion signal from any tectonic signal. With the advent of digital data sets and GIS methodologies, quantitative analysis can identify key aspects of glaciated landscape morphology, and thus develop powerful analytical techniques for objective study of glaciation. Inspection of USGS topographic maps of the TAM reveals that mountain tops display an extreme range of glacial modification. For example, in the Mt. Rabot region (83°-84° S), mountain peaks are strongly affected by glaciation; cirque development is advanced with cirque diameters on the range of several kilometers, and cirque confluence has resulted in the formation of ``knife-edge'' arêtes up to 10 km long. In contrast, in the Mt. Murchison area (73°-74° S) cirque development is youthful, and there is minimal development of arêtes. Preliminary work indicates that analysis of DEM's and contour lines can be used to distinguish degree of glaciation. In particular, slope, curvature, and power spectrum analysis

  3. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Marvin E.; Aalderink, Bernard J.; Padoan, Roberto; de Bruin, Gerrit; Steemers, Ted A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared). By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands) to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  4. Topological Aspects of Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, Leo; Rousseau, Ronald

    1998-01-01

    Discusses topological aspects of theoretical information retrieval, including retrieval topology; similarity topology; pseudo-metric topology; document spaces as topological spaces; Boolean information retrieval as a subsystem of any topological system; and proofs of theorems. (LRW)

  5. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  6. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF VETERINARY LISTERIOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This invited presentation updates the clinical aspects of Listeria monocytogenes in food animals. It summarizes the epidemiology and diagnostic methods. Virtually all domesticated animal species are susceptible to listeric infection, with a large proportion of healthy asymptomatic animals shedding...

  7. A Digital Solar Aspect Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albus, James S.

    1961-01-01

    The solar aspect sensor described herein performs the analog-to-digital conversion of data optically. To accomplish this, it uses a binary "Gray code" light mask to produce a digital indication, in vehicle-fixed coordinates, of the elevation and azimuth angles of incident light from the sun. This digital solar aspect sensor system, in Explorer X, provided measurements of both elevation and azimuth angles to +/- 2 degrees at a distance of over 140,000 statute miles.

  8. Quantitative resilience analysis through control design.

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderland, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Camphouse, Russell Chris

    2009-09-01

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. Few quantitative resilience methods exist, and those existing approaches tend to be rather simplistic and, hence, not capable of sufficiently assessing all aspects of critical infrastructure resilience. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the development of quantitative resilience through application of control design methods. Specifically, we conducted a survey of infrastructure models to assess what types of control design might be applicable for critical infrastructure resilience assessment. As a result of this survey, we developed a decision process that directs the resilience analyst to the control method that is most likely applicable to the system under consideration. Furthermore, we developed optimal control strategies for two sets of representative infrastructure systems to demonstrate how control methods could be used to assess the resilience of the systems to catastrophic disruptions. We present recommendations for future work to continue the development of quantitative resilience analysis methods.

  9. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hodges, James N; McCall, Benjamin J

    2016-05-14

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined. PMID:27179476

  10. Quantitative velocity modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (VMS) is arguably the most important development in the 20th century for spectroscopic study of molecular ions. For decades, interpretation of VMS lineshapes has presented challenges due to the intrinsic covariance of fit parameters including velocity modulation amplitude, linewidth, and intensity. This limitation has stifled the growth of this technique into the quantitative realm. In this work, we show that subtle changes in the lineshape can be used to help address this complexity. This allows for determination of the linewidth, intensity relative to other transitions, velocity modulation amplitude, and electric field strength in the positive column of a glow discharge. Additionally, we explain the large homogeneous component of the linewidth that has been previously described. Using this component, the ion mobility can be determined.

  11. Quantitative evolutionary design

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Jared

    2002-01-01

    The field of quantitative evolutionary design uses evolutionary reasoning (in terms of natural selection and ultimate causation) to understand the magnitudes of biological reserve capacities, i.e. excesses of capacities over natural loads. Ratios of capacities to loads, defined as safety factors, fall in the range 1.2-10 for most engineered and biological components, even though engineered safety factors are specified intentionally by humans while biological safety factors arise through natural selection. Familiar examples of engineered safety factors include those of buildings, bridges and elevators (lifts), while biological examples include factors of bones and other structural elements, of enzymes and transporters, and of organ metabolic performances. Safety factors serve to minimize the overlap zone (resulting in performance failure) between the low tail of capacity distributions and the high tail of load distributions. Safety factors increase with coefficients of variation of load and capacity, with capacity deterioration with time, and with cost of failure, and decrease with costs of initial construction, maintenance, operation, and opportunity. Adaptive regulation of many biological systems involves capacity increases with increasing load; several quantitative examples suggest sublinear increases, such that safety factors decrease towards 1.0. Unsolved questions include safety factors of series systems, parallel or branched pathways, elements with multiple functions, enzyme reaction chains, and equilibrium enzymes. The modest sizes of safety factors imply the existence of costs that penalize excess capacities. Those costs are likely to involve wasted energy or space for large or expensive components, but opportunity costs of wasted space at the molecular level for minor components. PMID:12122135

  12. 1, 2, 3, 4: infusing quantitative literacy into introductory biology.

    PubMed

    Speth, Elena Bray; Momsen, Jennifer L; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Ebert-May, Diane; Long, Tammy M; Wyse, Sara; Linton, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Biology of the twenty-first century is an increasingly quantitative science. Undergraduate biology education therefore needs to provide opportunities for students to develop fluency in the tools and language of quantitative disciplines. Quantitative literacy (QL) is important for future scientists as well as for citizens, who need to interpret numeric information and data-based claims regarding nearly every aspect of daily life. To address the need for QL in biology education, we incorporated quantitative concepts throughout a semester-long introductory biology course at a large research university. Early in the course, we assessed the quantitative skills that students bring to the introductory biology classroom and found that students had difficulties in performing simple calculations, representing data graphically, and articulating data-driven arguments. In response to students' learning needs, we infused the course with quantitative concepts aligned with the existing course content and learning objectives. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by significant improvement in the quality of students' graphical representations of biological data. Infusing QL in introductory biology presents challenges. Our study, however, supports the conclusion that it is feasible in the context of an existing course, consistent with the goals of college biology education, and promotes students' development of important quantitative skills. PMID:20810965

  13. 1, 2, 3, 4: Infusing Quantitative Literacy into Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Momsen, Jennifer L.; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Ebert-May, Diane; Long, Tammy M.; Wyse, Sara; Linton, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Biology of the twenty-first century is an increasingly quantitative science. Undergraduate biology education therefore needs to provide opportunities for students to develop fluency in the tools and language of quantitative disciplines. Quantitative literacy (QL) is important for future scientists as well as for citizens, who need to interpret numeric information and data-based claims regarding nearly every aspect of daily life. To address the need for QL in biology education, we incorporated quantitative concepts throughout a semester-long introductory biology course at a large research university. Early in the course, we assessed the quantitative skills that students bring to the introductory biology classroom and found that students had difficulties in performing simple calculations, representing data graphically, and articulating data-driven arguments. In response to students' learning needs, we infused the course with quantitative concepts aligned with the existing course content and learning objectives. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated by significant improvement in the quality of students' graphical representations of biological data. Infusing QL in introductory biology presents challenges. Our study, however, supports the conclusion that it is feasible in the context of an existing course, consistent with the goals of college biology education, and promotes students' development of important quantitative skills. PMID:20810965

  14. Dynamic aspects of musical imagery.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Andrea R

    2012-04-01

    Auditory imagery can represent many aspects of music, such as the starting pitches of a tune or the instrument that typically plays it. In this paper, I concentrate on more dynamic, or time-sensitive aspects of musical imagery, as demonstrated in two recently published studies. The first was a behavioral study that examined the ability to make emotional judgments about both heard and imagined music in real time. The second was a neuroimaging study on the neural correlates of anticipating an upcoming tune, after hearing a cue tune. That study found activation of several sequence-learning brain areas, some of which varied with the vividness of the anticipated musical memory. Both studies speak to the ways in which musical imagery allows us to judge temporally changing aspects of the represented musical experience. These judgments can be quite precise, despite the complexity of generating the rich internal representations of imagery. PMID:22524360

  15. Robust quantitative scratch assay

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Andrea; Angeli, Marc; Pastrello, Chiara; McQuaid, Rosanne; Li, Han; Jurisicova, Andrea; Jurisica, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The wound healing assay (or scratch assay) is a technique frequently used to quantify the dependence of cell motility—a central process in tissue repair and evolution of disease—subject to various treatments conditions. However processing the resulting data is a laborious task due its high throughput and variability across images. This Robust Quantitative Scratch Assay algorithm introduced statistical outputs where migration rates are estimated, cellular behaviour is distinguished and outliers are identified among groups of unique experimental conditions. Furthermore, the RQSA decreased measurement errors and increased accuracy in the wound boundary at comparable processing times compared to previously developed method (TScratch). Availability and implementation: The RQSA is freely available at: http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RQSA_Scripts.zip. The image sets used for training and validation and results are available at: (http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/trainingSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/validationSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSetResults.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/ValidationSet_H1975Results.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip, http://ophid.utoronto.ca/RQSA/RobustnessSet.zip). Supplementary Material is provided for detailed description of the development of the RQSA. Contact: juris@ai.utoronto.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:26722119

  16. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology. PMID:27058370

  17. Quantitative environmental risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klovning, J.; Nilsen, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    According to regulations relating to implementation and rise of risk analysis in the petroleum activities issued by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, it is mandatory for an operator on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to establish acceptance criteria for environmental risk in the activities and carry out environmental risk analysis. This paper presents a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} method for environmental risk analysis developed by the company. The objective has been to assist the company to meet rules and regulations and to assess and describe the environmental risk in a systematic manner. In the environmental risk analysis the most sensitive biological resource in the affected area is used to assess the environmental damage. The analytical method is based on the methodology for quantitative risk analysis related to loss of life. In addition it incorporates the effect of seasonal fluctuations in the environmental risk evaluations. The paper is describing the function of the main analytical sequences exemplified through an analysis of environmental risk related to exploration drilling in an environmental sensitive area on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  18. Quantitative Electron Nanodiffraction.

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, John

    2015-01-30

    This Final report summarizes progress under this award for the final reporting period 2002 - 2013 in our development of quantitive electron nanodiffraction to materials problems, especially devoted to atomistic processes in semiconductors and electronic oxides such as the new artificial oxide multilayers, where our microdiffraction is complemented with energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) and aberration-corrected STEM imaging (9). The method has also been used to map out the chemical bonds in the important GaN semiconductor (1) used for solid state lighting, and to understand the effects of stacking sequence variations and interfaces in digital oxide superlattices (8). Other projects include the development of a laser-beam Zernike phase plate for cryo-electron microscopy (5) (based on the Kapitza-Dirac effect), work on reconstruction of molecular images using the scattering from many identical molecules lying in random orientations (4), a review article on space-group determination for the International Tables on Crystallography (10), the observation of energy-loss spectra with millivolt energy resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution from individual point defects in an alkali halide, a review article for the Centenary of X-ray Diffration (17) and the development of a new method of electron-beam lithography (12). We briefly summarize here the work on GaN, on oxide superlattice ELNES, and on lithography by STEM.

  19. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  20. [Functional and orthopaedic aspects of dystrophinopathies].

    PubMed

    Boulay, C; Finidori, G

    2015-12-01

    Although the clinical picture and the natural progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) differ, borderline forms exist. Classical orthopaedic treatment is based on self-rehabilitation (by the parents and the patient), physical therapy, posture alignment with orthotics, ergotherapy to set up technical aides, notably positioning in an electric wheelchair to provide more satisfactory autonomy. The functional aspect predominates over pure orthopaedics. Although surgical indications have evolved for the lower limbs, pelvic-spinal arthrodesis for treatment of scoliosis remains the reference treatment, but the methods have evolved since the advent of corticotherapy for DMD. Corticotherapy slows the progression of motor deficits, the age at which walking ability is lost is delayed (shifting from 10 years to 13-14 years depending on the studies), scoliosis progresses later, respiratory insufficiency is better controlled, and therefore survival is prolonged (between 20 and 40 years). However, although this functional aspect seems to respond better to the progress in overall treatment, it also results from a multidisciplinary approach to the disease. Nevertheless, assessment is required, not at a time t as reflected by the scales currently in use, but during daily activities as proposed by qualitative and quantitative monitoring seeking to model nyctohemeral functional motor skills. The principle is to characterize the type of activity (sitting, standing, lying down, walking), its duration, its intensity (walking speed), its frequency (number of activity changes, number of walking episodes), and their sequence (temporal sequence, organization of activity variation). The goal is to identify the variety of functional motor skills and their occurrence over time to determine whether treatment contributes a functional benefit and whether this benefit is put into practice daily. PMID:26773586

  1. Quantitative Rheological Model Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan; Ewoldt, Randy

    2014-11-01

    The more parameters in a rheological the better it will reproduce available data, though this does not mean that it is necessarily a better justified model. Good fits are only part of model selection. We employ a Bayesian inference approach that quantifies model suitability by balancing closeness to data against both the number of model parameters and their a priori uncertainty. The penalty depends upon prior-to-calibration expectation of the viable range of values that model parameters might take, which we discuss as an essential aspect of the selection criterion. Models that are physically grounded are usually accompanied by tighter physical constraints on their respective parameters. The analysis reflects a basic principle: models grounded in physics can be expected to enjoy greater generality and perform better away from where they are calibrated. In contrast, purely empirical models can provide comparable fits, but the model selection framework penalizes their a priori uncertainty. We demonstrate the approach by selecting the best-justified number of modes in a Multi-mode Maxwell description of PVA-Borax. We also quantify relative merits of the Maxwell model relative to powerlaw fits and purely empirical fits for PVA-Borax, a viscoelastic liquid, and gluten.

  2. Behavioral Aspects of Marijuana Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulson, Patricia

    This paper examines the behavioral aspects of marijuana use. The focus of the study was to investigate the attitudes and practices toward drugs by users and non-users and the relationship of these attitudes and practices to selected psychosocial factors. A survey instrument in the form of an anonymous questionnaire was developed and administered…

  3. Legal Aspects of the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrull, Alexandre Lopez; Oppenheim, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to legal aspects of the Web: copyright; domain names and trademarks; linking, framing, caching, and spamdexing; patents; pornography and censorship on the Internet; defamation; liability; conflict of laws and jurisdiction; legal deposit; and spam, i.e., unsolicited mails.…

  4. Aspects of Spirituality in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussing, Arndt; Foller-Mancini, Axel; Gidley, Jennifer; Heusser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses which aspects of spirituality are valued by adolescents, and how they are interconnected with youths' life satisfaction and "self-centeredness". The participants were 254 adolescents (11th grade) of four different high schools from west Germany. After re-validation of the 6-factorial student's version of the ASP questionnaire…

  5. Computational aspects of multibody dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.

    1989-01-01

    Computational aspects are addressed which impact the requirements for developing a next generation software system for flexible multibody dynamics simulation which include: criteria for selecting candidate formulation, pairing of formulations with appropriate solution procedures, need for concurrent algorithms to utilize computer hardware advances, and provisions for allowing open-ended yet modular analysis modules.

  6. Language Arts Scenarios Using "Aspects."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamstra, Diane

    1993-01-01

    Outlines how the computer groupware program for Macintosh computers called "Aspects" was used at every level of a K-12 school system to enhance collaborative writing and writing skills. Imagines possible future uses of the program in linking classrooms from different areas of the world. (HB)

  7. Linguistic Aspects of Sociopolitical Keywords.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahane, Henry; Kahane, Renee

    1984-01-01

    Four aspects of sociopolitical language are: (1) keywords are defined by a movement; (2) a movement, realized in its language, must be analyzed as having both surface and hidden meanings; (3) the propagandistic function of sociopolitical language forces "value" on the keyword; and (4) a movement creates its linguistic field. (MSE)

  8. Gender Aspects of Human Security

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moussa, Ghada

    2008-01-01

    The chapter deals with the gender dimensions in human security through focusing on the relationship between gender and human security, first manifested in international declarations and conventions, and subsequently evolving in world women conferences. It aims at analysing the various gender aspects in its relation to different human security…

  9. Quantitative Literacy: Geosciences and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, R. M.; McCallum, W. G.

    2002-12-01

    Quantitative literacy seems like such a natural for the geosciences, right? The field has gone from its origin as a largely descriptive discipline to one where it is hard to imagine failing to bring a full range of mathematical tools to the solution of geological problems. Although there are many definitions of quantitative literacy, we have proposed one that is analogous to the UNESCO definition of conventional literacy: "A quantitatively literate person is one who, with understanding, can both read and represent quantitative information arising in his or her everyday life." Central to this definition is the concept that a curriculum for quantitative literacy must go beyond the basic ability to "read and write" mathematics and develop conceptual understanding. It is also critical that a curriculum for quantitative literacy be engaged with a context, be it everyday life, humanities, geoscience or other sciences, business, engineering, or technology. Thus, our definition works both within and outside the sciences. What role do geoscience faculty have in helping students become quantitatively literate? Is it our role, or that of the mathematicians? How does quantitative literacy vary between different scientific and engineering fields? Or between science and nonscience fields? We will argue that successful quantitative literacy curricula must be an across-the-curriculum responsibility. We will share examples of how quantitative literacy can be developed within a geoscience curriculum, beginning with introductory classes for nonmajors (using the Mauna Loa CO2 data set) through graduate courses in inverse theory (using singular value decomposition). We will highlight six approaches to across-the curriculum efforts from national models: collaboration between mathematics and other faculty; gateway testing; intensive instructional support; workshops for nonmathematics faculty; quantitative reasoning requirement; and individual initiative by nonmathematics faculty.

  10. Quantitative Spectroscopy of Deneb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Florian; Przybilla, N.

    We use the visually brightest A-type supergiant Deneb (A2 Ia) as benchmark for testing a spectro- scopic analysis technique developed for quantitative studies of BA-type supergiants. Our NLTE spectrum synthesis technique allows us to derive stellar parameters and elemental abundances with unprecedented accuracy. The study is based on a high-resolution and high-S/N spectrum obtained with the Echelle spectrograph FOCES on the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope. Practically all inconsistencies reported in earlier studies are resolved. A self-consistent view of Deneb is thus obtained, allowing us to discuss its evolutionary state in detail by comparison with the most recent generation of evolution models for massive stars. The basic atmospheric parameters Teff = 8525 ± 75 K and log g = 1.10 ± 0.05 dex (cgs) and the distance imply the following fundamental parameters for Deneb: M spec = 17 ± 3 M⊙ , L = 1.77 ± 0.29 · 105 L⊙ and R = 192 ± 16 R⊙ . The derived He and CNO abundances indicate mixing with nuclear processed matter. The high N/C ratio of 4.64 ± 1.39 and a N/O ratio of 0.88 ± 0.07 (mass fractions) could in principle be explained by evolutionary models with initially very rapid rotation. A mass of ˜ 22 M⊙ is implied for the progenitor on the zero-age main se- quence, i.e. it was a late O-type star. Significant mass-loss has occurred, probably enhanced by pronounced centrifugal forces. The observational constraints favour a scenario for the evolu- tion of Deneb where the effects of rotational mixing may be amplified by an interaction with a magnetic field. Analogous analyses of such highly luminous BA-type supergiants will allow for precision studies of different galaxies in the Local Group and beyond.

  11. Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.; Fecht, B.A.

    1992-12-31

    The goal of the MEASUREMENT OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  12. Isoniazid: metabolic aspects and toxicological correlates.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, Paolo

    2007-12-01

    For over half a century, pyridine-4-carboxy hydrazide (isonicotinyl hydrazide; isoniazid - INH) has been a front-line weapon in the battle against tuberculosis. Its metabolism has been the subject of important research, much of which has focused on the pharmacodynamic and toxicological aspects of certain INH metabolites. Since 1952, when the drug was first introduced, multiple INH metabolites have been identified, including hydrazine (HZ), isonicotinic acid (INA), ammonia, the acetylated derivative N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-isonicotinylhydrazide (AcINH), hydrazones with pyruvic and ketoglutaric acids (INH-PA and INH-KA, respectively), monoacetylhydrazine (AcHZ), diacetylhydrazine (DiAcHZ), and oxidizing free radicals. Their formation is the result of hydrolysis (INA, HZ), cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent oxidation (HZ, NH(3), oxidizing free radicals), and N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity (AcINH, AcHZ, DiAcHZ). Doubts remain about isonicotinamide (INAAM) as an INH metabolite in mammals. Quantitatively speaking, one of the major metabolites is AcINH, which is produced by the enzyme NAT. It has virtually no antitubercular activity and is far less toxic than INH. Its formation and elimination are genetically controlled, and its elimination profile is trimodal (rapid, intermediate, and slow acetylation). Slow acetylation, which is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait, increases the risk for peripheral neurotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in INH users. Thus far, there is no conclusive pharmacogenetic evidence that the formation of HZ and oxidizing radicals are linked to CYP polymorphisms. This article examines INH, HZ and its mono- and diacetylated metabolites, and ammonia (which in vitro and in vivo studies indicate as another derivative of HZ) in terms of their potential to cause neurotoxic and hepatotoxic effects (the two major forms of INH toxicity observed in animals and humans). INH hepatotoxicity seems to be related mainly to HZ, AcHZ, and other HZ metabolites that are

  13. Helping Students Become Quantitatively Literate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piatek-Jimenez, Katrina; Marcinek, Tibor; Phelps, Christine M.; Dias, Ana

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the term "quantitative literacy" has become a buzzword in the mathematics community. But what does it mean, and is it something that should be incorporated into the high school mathematics classroom? In this article, the authors will define quantitative literacy (QL), discuss how teaching for QL differs from teaching a traditional…

  14. Workshop on quantitative dynamic stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, T.A.

    1988-04-01

    This document discusses the development of quantitative simulation models for the investigation of geologic systems. The selection of variables, model verification, evaluation, and future directions in quantitative dynamic stratigraphy (QDS) models are detailed. Interdisciplinary applications, integration, implementation, and transfer of QDS are also discussed. (FI)

  15. Statistical genetics and evolution of quantitative traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neher, Richard A.; Shraiman, Boris I.

    2011-10-01

    The distribution and heritability of many traits depends on numerous loci in the genome. In general, the astronomical number of possible genotypes makes the system with large numbers of loci difficult to describe. Multilocus evolution, however, greatly simplifies in the limit of weak selection and frequent recombination. In this limit, populations rapidly reach quasilinkage equilibrium (QLE) in which the dynamics of the full genotype distribution, including correlations between alleles at different loci, can be parametrized by the allele frequencies. This review provides a simplified exposition of the concept and mathematics of QLE which is central to the statistical description of genotypes in sexual populations. Key results of quantitative genetics such as the generalized Fisher’s “fundamental theorem,” along with Wright’s adaptive landscape, are shown to emerge within QLE from the dynamics of the genotype distribution. This is followed by a discussion under what circumstances QLE is applicable, and what the breakdown of QLE implies for the population structure and the dynamics of selection. Understanding the fundamental aspects of multilocus evolution obtained through simplified models may be helpful in providing conceptual and computational tools to address the challenges arising in the studies of complex quantitative phenotypes of practical interest.

  16. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Studying Phosphotyrosine Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-02-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a fundamental mechanism for controlling many aspects of cellular processes, as well as aspects of human health and diseases. Compared to phosphoserine (pSer) and phosphothreonine (pThr), phosphotyrosine (pTyr) signaling is more tightly regulated, but often more challenging to characterize due to significantly lower level of tyrosine phosphorylation (a relative abundance of 1800:200:1 was estimated for pSer/pThr/pTyr in vertebrate cells[1]). In this review, we outline the recent advances in analytical methodologies for enrichment, identification, and accurate quantitation of tyrosine phosphorylated proteins and peptides using antibody-based technologies, capillary liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), and various stable isotope labeling strategies, as well as non-MS-based methods such as protein or peptide array methods. These proteomic technological advances provide powerful tools for potentially understanding signal transduction at the system level and provide a basis for discovering novel drug targets for human diseases. [1] Hunter, T. (1998) The Croonian Lecture 1997. The phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine: its role in cell growth and disease. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci. 353, 583–605

  17. Personality aspects in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Diana, R; Grosz, A; Mancini, E

    1985-12-01

    To test the claim that peculiar personality bias is detectable in multiple sclerosis (MS) we used the Szondi test to investigate the psychodynamic aspects of 110 MS patients in comparison with 200 healthy subjects. MS patients appeared to have a greater need for love in a passive form than normal people, rigid defense mechanisms, difficulty in resolving their inner conflicts either by sublimation or by internalization of satisfactory new emotional experiences, feelings of autoaggressiveness, and many symptoms of depression. Some of these aspects correlate with the severity of the disease, others seem to date back to early childhood as peculiar personality patterns. An investigation of childhood events in 110 controls confirmed that MS patients had had many more unhappy experiences in childhood than might commonly be expected. Further, the oft-reported psychiatric troubles preceding MS clinical onset suggest that at least in some MS patients there are specific gaps in personality structure dating back to early phases of their development. PMID:4086262

  18. [Medical decision making: some aspects].

    PubMed

    Steurer, J

    2004-09-22

    Three main aspects of medical decision making will be shortly described in this article. Comprehensible information is required to make decisions. The question is, how much information is needed to make decisions, and a third aspect in this article concerns the decision maker. Research in the field of information transfer has shown that medical information, as presented in most journals, is difficult to understand. According to the classic decision theory, decisions are taken after collecting all available information. More recent research in decision making proves the hypothesis that human beings are able to decide correctly with much less information than presumed earlier. In medicine the patient is the decision maker, and the primary task of physicians is to inform the patient about his health status and enable him to reach a conclusion. PMID:15500244

  19. [Current aspects of quality assurance].

    PubMed

    Hartung, K

    2016-05-01

    The regulations for quality management in the rheumatology laboratory are demanding and on a qualitatively high level. They are the result of continuously more detailed quality requirements and their implementation. Not only the process of correctly measuring analytes but also aspects of preanalytics, postanalytics and interpretation of the results as well as validation of new test methods are becoming increasingly more important for the diagnostic process. PMID:27125945

  20. Legal aspects of satellite teleconferencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The application of satellite communications for teleconferencing purposes is discussed. The legal framework within which such a system or series of systems could be developed is considered. The analysis is based on: (1) satellite teleconferencing regulation, (2) the options available for such a system, (3) regulatory alternatives, and (4) ownership and management aspects. The system is designed to provide a capability for professional education, remote medical diagnosis, business conferences, and computer techniques.

  1. Ecological aspects of indanthrone production

    SciTech Connect

    Sadchenko, L.S.; Zinchenko, Yu.Ya.; Bobrovskaya, T.D.; Rogovik, V.I.

    1986-12-10

    The authors develop and describe an ecologically acceptable technology for the production of indanthrone from aminoanthraquinone through the action of potassium hydroxide and an organic solvent. The technology not only reduces the harmful environmental effects of current production methods but also eliminates those aspects of the process whose energy efficiency is low and allows for the recovery of valuable reagents and other materials from the resulting wastes.

  2. Precision digital solar aspect sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, H. P.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a digital solar aspect sensor with a resolution of approximately 14 arc-seconds is discussed. An interpolation technique was used to generate the fine angle measurements. The sensor and its mode of operation are described. The electronic and mechanical design of the sensor were completed, and two flight units, one for the OAO 4 and the other for determining the attitude of a spinning spacecraft, are being fabricated.

  3. Functions: Historical and pedagogical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, Israel

    1993-06-01

    This paper has two related objectives: to describe various aspects of the evolution of the notion of function and, based on the historical account, to make suggestions about teaching and learning related to functionality. In its formative stages, the concept of function was intimately related to analysis, and it is this aspect of its history that we recount here. We begin with a brief sketch of the prehistory of the function concept, then turn to its emergence and consolidation in the 18th century, and to the use in that century of power series for representing functions. Of 19th-century developments we single out the description of functions by integrals, their definition as solutions of differential equations, and their representation by Fourier series. The next three sections, which cut across historical time periods, deal respectively with continuity, conceptual aspects of functionality, and representability of functions by formulas. The concluding section touches on the definition of a function as a set of ordered pairs. The historical account in each of the ten sections is followed by pedagogical comments. These refer to such issues as what a formula is, when and how to introduce functions, calculus without functions, functions defined on a “split domain”, the desirability of the early introduction of power series into the calculus, the distinction between a function and its description(s), mathematical honesty and mathematical rigor.

  4. Extreme Low Aspect Ratio Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul

    1997-11-01

    Recently proposed Spherical Stellarator (SS) concept [1] includes the devices with stellarator features and low aspect ratio, A <= 3.5, which is very unusual for stellarators (typical stellarators have A ≈ 7-10 or above). Strong bootstrap current and high-β equilibria are two distinguished elements of the SS concept leading to compact, steady-state, and efficient fusion reactor. Different coil configurations advantageous for the SS have been identified and analyzed [1-6]. In this report, we will present results on novel stellarator configurations which are unusual even for the SS approach. These are the extreme-low-aspect-ratio-stellarators (ELARS), with the aspect ratio A ≈ 1. We succeeded in finding ELARS configurations with extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform (ι ≈ 0.1 - 0.15), large plasma volume, and good particle transport characteristics. [1] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 651 (1996); [2] P.E. Moroz, Phys. Plasmas 3, 3055 (1996); [3] P.E. Moroz, D.B. Batchelor et al., Fusion Tech. 30, 1347 (1996); [4] P.E. Moroz, Stellarator News 48, 2 (1996); [5] P.E. Moroz, Plasma Phys. Reports 23, 502 (1997); [6] P.E. Moroz, Nucl. Fusion 37, No. 8 (1997). *Supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-97ER54395.

  5. Psychosocial aspects of cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Stiefel, F

    1993-05-01

    Pain, and especially cancer pain, is not a pure nociceptive, physical experience, but involves different dimensions of man, such as personality, affect, cognition, behavior and social relations. Cancer pain is best conceptualized as the convergence of multiple activated systems with feedback mechanisms to a complex, multidimensional model. The psychosocial aspects of this multidimensional model will be analyzed with special emphasis on results from recent research. Although most research has been conducted on the role of affect and cognition in cancer pain, data on other factors such as personality, behavior or social aspects exist and will be presented. In the second part of this paper the implications of these results for therapeutic strategies in clinical work will be discussed. Although a considerable body of knowledge exists to support the hypothesis of a multidimensional model of cancer pain, where psychosocial variables play an important role, only a few studies address the issue of to what degree different factors exercise their influence. This may be different from patient to patient and may change over the course of the disease. Whatever importance these single variables in the multidimensional model of cancer pain may have, the patient is best treated when none of these aspects is neglected in the assessment and all are taken care of in the treatment. A multidisciplinary team, with a psychiatrist as one of the team members, is often best prepared to fulfill this task. PMID:8149139

  6. Understanding quantitative research: part 1.

    PubMed

    Hoe, Juanita; Hoare, Zoë

    This article, which is the first in a two-part series, provides an introduction to understanding quantitative research, basic statistics and terminology used in research articles. Critical appraisal of research articles is essential to ensure that nurses remain up to date with evidence-based practice to provide consistent and high-quality nursing care. This article focuses on developing critical appraisal skills and understanding the use and implications of different quantitative approaches to research. Part two of this article will focus on explaining common statistical terms and the presentation of statistical data in quantitative research. PMID:23346707

  7. Liability aspects of home energy-rating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1983-10-01

    Liability aspects of home energy rating systems are discussed. An introduction to the rating system concept, including types of rating systems, implementation efforts to date, and possible groups to conduct ratings, is also included. The home energy rating system concept involves the periodic rating of the energy efficiency of residential buildings. The rating can provide a relative indication of a home's energy efficiency and also a quantitative estimate of consumption, fuel cost, or both. Primary attention is given to liability issues associated with developing and performing ratings. Secondary attention is given to possible liability associated with misuse of a rating once it has been performed.

  8. Quantitative Aspects of Space Weathering: Implications for Regolith Breccia Meteorites and Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.; Keller, L. P.

    2004-01-01

    Space weathering is defined as the physical and optical changes incurred by material exposed to the space environment. Through studies of lunar soils, these changes are becoming well understood. However, the effects of space weathering are dependent on the physical environment to which the host materials are exposed, and thus, the effects will likely vary from body to body. The optical effects of space weathering result from nanophase iron (npFe(sup 0)) created during micrometeorite bombardment and solar wind sputtering. In the asteroid belt, bodies are farther from the sun than our Moon, and are widely known to incur less solar wind implantation and sputtering. The velocity of impacts is smaller resulting in less melting and vaporization, and therefore fewer space weathering products. The impact rate in the asteroid belt is greater, which will result in more comminution, further diluting any weathering products. Ergo, asteroidal regoliths should contain fewer space weathering products than lunar soils. However, even very small degrees of space weathering can have dramatic consequences for the optical properties of soils. A discussion on the optical effects of space weathering is presented.

  9. Fundamental aspects in quantitative ultrasonic determination of fracture toughness: The scattering of a single ellipsoidal inhomogeneity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, L. S. W.

    1982-01-01

    The scattering of a single ellipsoidal inhomogeneity is studied via an eigenstrain approach. The displacement field is given in terms of volume integrals that involve eigenstrains that are related to mismatch in mass density and that in elastic moduli. The governing equations for these unknown eigenstrains are derived. Agreement with other approaches for the scattering problem is shown. The formulation is general and both the inhomogeneity and the host medium can be anisotrophic. The axisymmetric scattering of an ellipsoidal inhomogeneity in a linear elastic isotropic medium is given as an example. The angular and frequency dependence of the scattered displacement field, the differential and total cross sections are formally given in series expansions for the case of uniformly distributed eigenstrains.

  10. Occurrence of Protein A in Staphylococcal Strains: Quantitative Aspects and Correlation to Antigenic and Bacteriophage Types

    PubMed Central

    Kronvall, Göran; Dossett, John H.; Quie, Paul G.; Williams, Ralph C.

    1971-01-01

    Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus can be detected on cell walls of intact bacteria by use of radioactively labeled myeloma globulin. Of 156 strains of S. aureus, 141 (90%) contained protein A. None of 47 S. epidermidis strains was positive for protein A. The production of protein A was influenced by incubation temperature but not by differences in incubation time or inoculum size. A medium containing a high concentration of NaCl suppressed the production of protein A by 90%. Formalin treatment of protein A-containing strains caused a decrease in the amount detected, but no further decrease was detected after storage at 4 C. No correlation was found between absence or presence of protein A and phage type or phage group. Sixteen S. aureus strains were studied extensively. There was no correlation between protein A and any of the 26 antigenic characteristics which have been previously described in these strains. Images PMID:16557923

  11. Some qualitative and quantitative aspects of the fast-rotating clinostat as a research tool.

    PubMed

    Briegleb, W

    1992-10-01

    In 1958 the geneticist H.J. Muller proposed an extension of the principle of the (slow) plant clinostat which --to a certain extent--abolishes g effects on plant growth (geotropism). Muller predicted that a feeling of weightlessness would be experienced by a human being attached to a clinostat platform, the rotation speed of which is enhanced compared to that of the plant clinostat. This method (called fast-rotating or fast clinostat) was developed by the author in the mid 1960s to investigate the effects of weightlessness on small living objects. This chapter describes the method qualitatively on the basis of a macroscopic functional model and of empirical results obtained using a fast-rotating clinostat microscope. Some practical hints in using the slow and fast clinostat principles are given. PMID:11537638

  12. Vocabulary Development in Italian Children: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Odorico, Laura; Carubbi, Stefania; Salerni, Nicoletta; Calvo, Vicenzo

    2001-01-01

    Vocabulary development of a sample of 42 Italian children was evaluated through monthly administration of the Italian version of the CDI. Data collection started at age one for 32 children and a few moths later for the remaining subjects and continued until children's vocabulary reached 200 words. At fixed stages of vocabulary size, individual…

  13. Quantitative aspects of informed consent: considering the dose response curve when estimating quantity of information.

    PubMed

    Lynöe, N; Hoeyer, K

    2005-12-01

    Information is usually supposed to be a prerequisite for people making decisions on whether or not to participate in a clinical trial. Previously conducted studies and research ethics scandals indicate that participants have sometimes lacked important pieces of information. Over the past few decades the quantity of information believed to be adequate has increased significantly, and in some instances a new maxim seems to be in place: the more information, the better the ethics in terms of respecting a participant's autonomy. The authors hypothesise that the dose-response curve from pharmacology or toxicology serves as a model to illustrate that a large amount of written information does not equal optimality. Using the curve as a pedagogical analogy when teaching ethics to students in clinical sciences, and also in engaging in dialogue with research institutions, may promote reflection on how to adjust information in relation to the preferences of individual participants, thereby transgressing the maxim that more information means better ethics. PMID:16319241

  14. The relationship between urban airborne pollution and short-term mortality: quantitative and qualitative aspects.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, A; Parodi, S; Quaglia, A; Farè, C; Vercelli, M

    2000-01-01

    The influence of airborne pollution on mortality rates has been examined since the well known severe pollution episodes of Pennsylvania (1948) and London (1952). Three main epidemiological approaches are available: transversal studies, time series studies, prospective studies. The most frequently used method is the time series analysis, which retrospectively determines daily mortality rates as compared to daily pollution levels in a defined period. The vast majority of studies applying this approach confirm the existence of a positive correlation between mortality and airborne pollution. The relative risk of death during the most severely polluted days as compared to the least polluted days ranges between 1.02 and 1.13. Airborne pollution affects mortality as related to cardiovascular and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases mainly in subjects previously affected by these pathologies. The dose-response mortality-pollution curve shows linear increments of mortality at low pollution levels, weak increments at high pollution levels. This phenomenon is attributed to the existence of subjects highly susceptible to pollution induced adverse health effects. These subjects, dying at low pollution levels, are not available to increase mortality rates at high pollution levels. Mortality is mainly related to the concentration of single pollutants, such as suspended particle matter, sulfur oxides, nitric oxides and ozone. Elderly are highly susceptible to pollution-induced mortality increases. Therefore, the study of mortality-pollution correlation is of particular interest in cities characterized by a relative prevalence of the elderly in the population. The latency period between pollution increases and related mortality increases falls in the 1-3 days interval range. The pollution-mortality relationship is influenced by many factors, such as the occurrence of exceedingly high or low environmental temperatures, influenza epidemics, etc. Many hypotheses has been raised to support the causality of the mortality-pollution association, including a direct effect of pollutants on cardiovascular and respiratory apparatus, and the release of inflammatory mediators affecting blood viscosity and pneumocytes homeostasis. On the whole, available data suggest that pollution is able to increase mortality only if associated to other risk factors determining an increased susceptibility in the exposed population. PMID:11421471

  15. Aspect ratio effect on shock-accelerated elliptic gas cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Liyong; Liao, Shenfei; Liu, Cangli; Wang, Yanping; Zhai, Zhigang

    2016-03-01

    The evolution of an elliptic heavy-gas (SF6) cylinder accelerated by a planar weak shock wave is investigated experimentally using particle image velocimetry (PIV) diagnostics, and the emphasis is on the aspect ratio effect on shock-elliptic cylinder interaction. Experiments are conducted at five different aspect ratios (the ratio of length in streamwise and spanwise directions) varied from 0.25 to 4.0. PIV raw images and quantitative flow field data are obtained at t = 0.6 ms after the shock impact. As the aspect ratio increases, the interface morphology develops faster owing to more vorticity produced along the interface and smaller vortex spacing between the two vortex cores. For each case in this study, the maximal fluctuating velocity locates at the middle point of the two counter-vortices. The histograms of fluctuating velocity reveal that a distinct double-peak structure appears in the largest aspect ratio case in comparison with a single-peak structure in the smallest aspect ratio case. The vortex velocities predicted by the theoretical model [G. Rudinger and L. M. Somers, "Behaviour of small regions of different gases carried in accelerated gas flows," J. Fluid Mech. 7, 161-176 (1960)] agree well with the experimental ones. With the increase of aspect ratio, the maximal value of vorticity increases as well as the circulation, and more low-magnitude quantities are generated, which indicates the formation of multi-scale flow structure in the late mixing process. It is found that the experimental circulation of the vortex motion is reasonably estimated by the ideal point vortex-pair model.

  16. Histological aspects of cervical ripening.

    PubMed

    Ichijo, M; Shimizu, T; Sasai, Y

    1976-02-01

    There is a close relationship between the rate of the uterine cervix opening during parturition and the presence or absence of a completely ripened cervix. In order to learn the basic pattern of the ripening of cervix, histological and histochemical studies were performed on the human uterine cervix during pregnancy. It was noted that the collagen bundles disintegrated into fine fibers and also underwent quantitative changes during the ripening process of the cervix. During pregnancy, the number of connective tissue cells was increased, but that of mast cells was decreased. Acid mucopolysaccharides in the cervical ground substance were found to increase in late pregnancy. PMID:136067

  17. Learning to Relate Qualitative and Quantitative Problem Representations in a Model-Based Setting for Collaborative Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ploetzner, Rolf; Fehse, Eric; Kneser, Cornelia; Spada, Hans

    1999-01-01

    Investigates how 10th-grade students acquire, extend, and successively relate knowledge about qualitative and quantitative aspects of classical mechanics. Analysis of the multicomponent tests revealed that qualitative, as well as quantitative, knowledge can be taught successfully using concept maps. (Author/CCM)

  18. Nutritional aspects related to endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Gabriela; Schor, Eduardo; Kopelman, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This literature review analyzed the evidence on nutritional aspects related to the pathogenesis and progression of endometriosis. Diets deficient in nutrients result in changes in lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and promote epigenetic abnormalities, that may be involved in the genesis and progression of the disease. Foods rich in omega 3 with anti-inflammatory effects, supplementation with N-acetylcysteine, vitamin D and resveratrol, in addition to the increased consumption of fruits, vegetables (preferably organic) and whole grains exert a protective effect, reducing the risk of development and possible regression of disease. Dietary re-education seems to be a promising tool in the prevention and treatment of endometriosis. PMID:26841161

  19. [Inflammation and bone : Osteoimmunological aspects].

    PubMed

    Frommer, K W; Neumann, E; Lange, U

    2016-06-01

    Microscopic fractures (so-called microcracks) or traumatic macrofractures require bone, as the basic scaffold of the human body, to have a high regenerative capability. In order to be able to provide this regenerative capability, bone is in a constant process of remodeling. This finely tuned homeostasis of bone formation and degradation can become disrupted, which leads to osteoporosis or other bone disorders. It has been shown that the immune system is substantially involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and that chronic inflammation in particular can disturb this balance; therefore, this article reviews the osteoimmunological aspects contributing to osteoporosis and other diseases associated with bone degradation. PMID:27250491

  20. Medical Aspects of Scuba Diving

    PubMed Central

    Suke, Ralph

    1985-01-01

    Scuba divers may encounter dangerous levels of stress, due to increased ambient pressures and hostile environments. Divers therefore require a high level of mental and cardiorespiratory fitness. They must be informed of specific contraindications to diving. Family physicians with a basic knowledge of the medical aspects of scuba diving are in a very good position to examine and advise sports divers. Screening mainly involves an assessment of emotional stability and cardiorespiratory fitness, and an ear, nose and throat examination. Common problems suffered by scuba divers are discussed, as are temporary and permanent contraindications to diving. PMID:21274131

  1. [Clinical aspects of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Laurent, B; Keravel, Y; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Primary trigeminal neuralgia, termed "classical" in the international nomenclature, is an epilepsy-like disease. Diagnosis is easy when the disorder typical in presentation, based on clinical features and responsiveness to anticonvulsants. However, diagnosis can be difficult when atypical and/or in the long-duration forms. Furthermore, trigeminal neuralgia - even if typical in its clinical aspects - may be caused by a specific lesion and reveal a pathology. In other words, it may be symptomatic (secondary). Imaging, especially MRI, is of prime importance in identifying the cause and guiding the appropriate treatment. PMID:19328503

  2. [Legal aspects of sports injuries].

    PubMed

    Allard, R H B

    2005-05-01

    Victims of sports injuries have to be advised about aspects of legal liablity, especially in case of luxation or avulsion of teeth, since there still may be dental consequences years later. The transference of information by the first-aid-dentist to the sportsman's own dentist should take place with care. If the patient has no family dentist, the first-aid-dentist should at least keep the sportsman free of pain, for example by starting endodontic treatment. Because sports injuries mostly occur beyond normal practice-hours, there may be reasons to deviate from the clinical guideline. PMID:15932047

  3. [Hospital infection--ethical aspects].

    PubMed

    Hossne, W S

    1995-01-01

    The author focuses the question of hospital infection, analysing the background on which the control committees were created. The hospital infection is discussed under bioethical principles and the Medical Ethics Code, examining the aspects related to the government, the Hospital Directorship, the Committee and the Control Service of Hospital Infection, and the assisting physician. A closer integration between the activities of the Program of Control of Hospital Infections and those of the Medical Ethics Committee is proposed, aiming at the patient and at the community, "targets of total medical attention". PMID:7550409

  4. Which Aspects of the English Language Do Distance Learners Find Difficult?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teoh, George Boon Sai; Lin, Agnes Liau Wei; Belaja, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the findings of a research carried out on distance learners at the School of Distance Education (SDE), University Sains Malaysia (USM). The study was explorative in nature with the purpose identifying the aspects of the English language which distance learners found difficult to learn. A quantitative survey questionnaire design…

  5. Developmental Differences in the Use of Tense Aspect Modality in Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehmet, Ozcan

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates how/whether the emergence and function of Turkish Tense Aspect Modality (TAM) markers that are used in narratives by children from 3 to 9 plus 13-year-olds show differences relative to the age of the narrator both quantitatively and qualitatively. The data were collected, by using Mayer's (1969) wordless picture book "Frog,…

  6. Is Judgement of Biotechnological Ethical Aspects Related to High School Students' Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crne-Hladnik, Helena; Hladnik, Ales; Javornik, Branka; Kosmelj, Katarina; Peklaj, Cirila

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative studies of various aspects of the perception of biotechnology were conducted among 469 Slovenian high school students of average age 17 years. Our research aimed to explore relationships among students' pre-knowledge of molecular and human genetics, and their attitudes to four specific biotechnological applications.…

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Selected Mechanical Aspects of the Ice Skating Stride.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, G. Wayne

    This study quantitatively analyzes selected aspects of the skating strides of above-average and below-average ability skaters. Subproblems were to determine how stride length and stride rate are affected by changes in skating velocity, to ascertain whether the basic assumption that stride length accurately approximates horizontal movement of the…

  8. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J.; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H.; Lagreze, Wolf A.; Schuman, Joel S.; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J.; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. Conclusions: The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. PMID:27225223

  9. Investigating legal aspects of cyberbullying.

    PubMed

    Paul, Simone; Smith, Peter K; Blumberg, Herbert H

    2012-11-01

    In the UK schools are required by law to protect students from bullying; the responsibility of teachers to govern such behaviour has been extended outside the school setting to include cyberbullying. In this investigation, cyberbullying in secondary education is explored from the student perspective using a qualitative method of enquiry. Reported awareness and understanding about the legal aspects of cyberbullying are investigated; consideration is given to legislation, cybercrime, children's rights, school sanctions and safeguarding responsibilities. A total of 197 male and female students aged between 11 and 14 years old participated. Despite the availability of information on guidelines and legislation at national, local, and school level, this does not appear to have reached ground level of the individual student. There is a considerable gap between what students should know and what they report to be aware of with regard to legal aspects of cyberbullying. To address concerns of keeping up with the pace of change in cyberbullying, a collaborative approach is required with young people and adults sharing expertise. PMID:23079364

  10. RHESSI imager and aspect systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehnder, Alex; Bialkowski, Jacek; Burri, F.; Fivian, Martin; Henneck, Reinhold; Mchedlishvili, A.; Ming, P.; Welte, J.; Thomsen, Knud; Clark, David; Dennis, Brian R.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Curtis, David W.; Harvey, Peter R.; Pankow, David H.

    2003-02-01

    RHESSI uses nine Rotating Modulation Collimators (RMCs) for imaging, each consisting of a pair of grids mounted on the rotating spacecraft. The angular resolutions range from 2.3 arcsec to 3arcmin. The relative twist between the two grids of each pair is the most critical parameter. It must be less than 20 arcsec for the finest grid. After precision alignment, it is monitored by the Twist Monitoring System (TMS) to a few arcsec. The Sun-pointing must be known better than 0.4 arcsec for the image reconstruction. This is achieved by the Solar Aspect System (SAS), which consists of a set of three Sun sensors. Each sensor is focusing the filtered Sun light onto a linear CCD. The onboard Aspect Data Processor (ADP) selects the 6 limb positions, which over-define the pointing offset of the Sun center in respect to the imaging axis of the imager. The Roll Angle System (RAS) continuously measures the roll angle of RHESSI within arcmin accuracy. The RAS is a continuously operating CCD star scanner. The time of the passage of a star image over the CCD is recorded and defines the roll angle, comparing its pixel position and amplitude with a star map.

  11. Nanocrystal-based biomimetic system for quantitative flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Peter; Dobrovolskaia, Marina; Kang, HyeongGon; Clarke, Matthew; Patri, Anil K.; Hwang, Jeeseong

    2007-02-01

    fluorescence detection. Quantitative aspects of the proposed flow cytometery-based approach for measurement of the QD-based biomimetic samples are discussed.

  12. Biophysical Aspects of Spindle Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza; Baer, Charlie; Needleman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    The continual propagation of genetic material from one generation to the next is one of the most basic characteristics of all organisms. In eukaryotes, DNA is segregated into the two daughter cells by a highly dynamic, self-organizing structure called the mitotic spindle. Mitotic spindles can show remarkable variability between tissues and organisms, but there is currently little understanding of the biophysical and evolutionary basis of this diversity. We are studying how spontaneous mutations modify cell division during nematode development. By comparing the mutational variation - the raw material of evolution - with the variation present in nature, we are investigating how the mitotic spindle is shaped over the course of evolution. This combination of quantitative genetics and cellular biophysics gives insight into how the structure and dynamics of the spindle is formed through selection, drift, and biophysical constraints.

  13. Ergonomical aspects of anaesthetic practice

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendra Rao, RS

    2016-01-01

    Anaesthesiologist's service begins as a general physician, goes on as an investigator cum data analyser leading to the architectural planning of a forthcoming surgical event, but only after articulately convincing the subject along with his kith and kin. In the era of rapid developments in the field of medicine which includes relevant developments in anaesthetic care, an adequate work environment has to be provided to the anaesthesia team so that all anaesthetic procedures can be carried out safely and efficiently and an optimal workflow can be established in the operating room environment. Such ecological state demands an updated knowledge and ergonomics to aid him. Unfortunately, ergonomics is an area of anaesthesia that has received little attention and should be addressed through more education and training for workplace well-ness. Hence, an attempt is made to discuss few aspects on ergonomics for the interface between anaesthesiologist-machine-patient systems regarded as human-machine-system. PMID:27212716

  14. [Modern psychosomatic aspects of dermatology].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, M; Duran, V; Poljacki, M; Misić-Pavkov, G; Matović, L; Subotić, M; Golub, R

    1994-01-01

    Concerning their origin most diseases are multifactorial and that goes for skin diseases too. Emphasizing just one must not exclude further research and other aspects of etiopathogenetic mechanisms. It has been known for along time that psychological factors have a certain influence on the start, aggravation and maintenance on skin changes and that cosmetic defects of this kind disturb the psychological peace of the sick person and his capacity of establishing satisfactory social relations. Psychosomatic approach in dermatology cannot be reduced to investigation of specific etiology in the field of psyche without physical or social spheres. It unites all of them and in that way the old question what cause and what the consequence is has no importance, because there is no time or distance limit among them. They act simultaneously, holistically. PMID:7739438

  15. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brazdova, Andrea; Senechal, Helene; Peltre, Gabriel; Poncet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility. PMID:27123194

  16. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G.; Desousa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical transplantation of human organs from deceased as well as living donors to sick and dying patients began after the Second World War. Over the past 50 years the transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells has become a worldwide practice which has extended, and greatly enhanced the quality of hundreds of thousands of lives. The field of transplantation medicine provides an important chance for liaison between psychiatric professionals and other transplant physicians and surgeons. The discrepancy between the ever-increasing demand for organs but the decreasing supply makes it important to evaluate and prioritize individuals who are in dire need of the organ. However, this also gives rise to certain ethical questions. The following paper discusses various psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation in general. PMID:25013589

  17. Institutional aspects of lake management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Stephen M.; Rumery, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    The major barriers to successful lake management are institutional. However, in contrast to the technical and limnological dimensions of lake management, the institutional aspects of managing lakes have received little attention. The institutional factors that are important for successful lake management outcomes are: overlapping areal jurisdiction among governmental units, fragmented functional program responsibilities, ineffective coordination, limited authority, financial constraints, private sector roles, and inadequate public awareness and consensus. The range of typical institutional problems confronting lake management are well illustrated through experiences from the state of Wisconsin, USA. Because lake management programs with institutional shortcomings rarely realize their goals, it is critical to assimilate, evaluate, and apply our experience to date with the institutional arrangements necessary to effectively manage lake resources.

  18. Sensory aspects of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Neepa; Jankovic, Joseph; Hallett, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders, which include disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia, Tourette’s syndrome, restless legs syndrome, and akathisia, have traditionally been considered to be disorders of impaired motor control resulting predominantly from dysfunction of the basal ganglia. This notion has been revised largely because of increasing recognition of associated behavioural, psychiatric, autonomic, and other non-motor symptoms. The sensory aspects of movement disorders include intrinsic sensory abnormalities and the effects of external sensory input on the underlying motor abnormality. The basal ganglia, cerebellum, thalamus, and their connections, coupled with altered sensory input, seem to play a key part in abnormal sensorimotor integration. However, more investigation into the phenomenology and physiological basis of sensory abnormalities, and about the role of the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and related structures in somatosensory processing, and its effect on motor control, is needed. PMID:24331796

  19. New aspects of injectable contraception.

    PubMed

    Phillips, O P

    2001-01-01

    Despite the availability of efficacious and safe contraceptive agents, not all women's contraceptive needs are being met. An injectable contraceptive method offers convenience and encourages compliance, both very important aspects for women seeking ideal contraception. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) is a long-acting injectable, and is highly effective; one injection provides 3 months of contraception. Drawbacks of DMPA include irregular bleeding and a slow return to fertility. A new monthly injectable contraceptive agent is medroxyprogesterone acetate/estradiol cypionate suspension (Lunelle). It provides menstrual regulation and a rapid return to fertility. The estrogen ensures a withdrawal bleed monthly; however, women with contraindications to estrogen-containing contraception are not candidates for Lunelle. PMID:11294618

  20. Epidemiological aspects of heart diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Tao, Ziqi; Wei, Peng; Zhao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the main cause of mortality in heart patients following stroke, rheumatic heart disease and myocardial infarctions. Approximately 80% of individuals succumb to CVDs, due to poor living conditions in low and middle income families and malnutrition. Infectious diseases, human immunodeficiency, tuberculosis, malaria, high blood pressure or hypertension, obesity and overweight, and nutritional disorders including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption, high salt and sugar intake, as well as other factors are responsible for CVDs and CHDs in young as well as elderly individuals. The focus of the present review are recent epidemiological aspects of CVD and CHD as well as the usefulness of a Mediterranean diet for heart patients and the prevention of heart diseases. PMID:27602082

  1. Ergonomical aspects of anaesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra Rao, R S

    2016-05-01

    Anaesthesiologist's service begins as a general physician, goes on as an investigator cum data analyser leading to the architectural planning of a forthcoming surgical event, but only after articulately convincing the subject along with his kith and kin. In the era of rapid developments in the field of medicine which includes relevant developments in anaesthetic care, an adequate work environment has to be provided to the anaesthesia team so that all anaesthetic procedures can be carried out safely and efficiently and an optimal workflow can be established in the operating room environment. Such ecological state demands an updated knowledge and ergonomics to aid him. Unfortunately, ergonomics is an area of anaesthesia that has received little attention and should be addressed through more education and training for workplace well-ness. Hence, an attempt is made to discuss few aspects on ergonomics for the interface between anaesthesiologist-machine-patient systems regarded as human-machine-system. PMID:27212716

  2. Global aspects of drug development.

    PubMed

    Hoppu, Kalle; Hogerzeil, Hans V

    2011-01-01

    About nine million children die every year before they reach the age of 5 years, of conditions largely amendable with existing medicines. Lack of medicines is not the single most important health problem of children, but work to provide children with better access to appropriate medicines is essential for achievement of the child health goals set. Taking into consideration the global aspect in the development of paediatric medicines the benefits of the regional paediatric initiatives can be spread worldwide. This chapter provides insights in the challenges and opportunities of developing paediatric medicines for health needs of children in the developing world. The Essential Medicines List for children first made available in 2008 serves as an example of the many tools available from WHO to improve children's access to the medicines they need. PMID:21882121

  3. Quantitative Proteome Mapping of Nitrotyrosines

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Qian, Weijun

    2008-02-10

    An essential first step in the understanding disease and environmental perturbations is the early and quantitative detection of the increased levels of the inflammatory marker nitrotyrosine, as compared with its endogenous levels within the tissue or cellular proteome. Thus, methods that successfully address a proteome-wide quantitation of nitrotyrosine and related oxidative modifications can provide early biomarkers of risk and progression of disease as well as effective strategies for therapy. Multidimensional separations LC coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has, in recent years, significantly expanded our knowledge of human (and mammalian model system) proteomes including some nascent work in identification of post-translational modifications. In the following review, we discuss the application of LC-MS/MS for quantitation and identification of nitrotyrosine-modified proteins within the context of complex protein mixtures presented in mammalian proteomes.

  4. Energy Education: The Quantitative Voice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfson, Richard

    2010-02-01

    A serious study of energy use and its consequences has to be quantitative. It makes little sense to push your favorite renewable energy source if it can't provide enough energy to make a dent in humankind's prodigious energy consumption. Conversely, it makes no sense to dismiss alternatives---solar in particular---that supply Earth with energy at some 10,000 times our human energy consumption rate. But being quantitative---especially with nonscience students or the general public---is a delicate business. This talk draws on the speaker's experience presenting energy issues to diverse audiences through single lectures, entire courses, and a textbook. The emphasis is on developing a quick, ``back-of-the-envelope'' approach to quantitative understanding of energy issues. )

  5. Quantitative nature of overexpression experiments

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression experiments are sometimes considered as qualitative experiments designed to identify novel proteins and study their function. However, in order to draw conclusions regarding protein overexpression through association analyses using large-scale biological data sets, we need to recognize the quantitative nature of overexpression experiments. Here I discuss the quantitative features of two different types of overexpression experiment: absolute and relative. I also introduce the four primary mechanisms involved in growth defects caused by protein overexpression: resource overload, stoichiometric imbalance, promiscuous interactions, and pathway modulation associated with the degree of overexpression. PMID:26543202

  6. Quantitative intracerebral brain hemorrhage analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Dhawan, Atam P.; Cosic, Dubravko; Kovacevic, Domagoj; Broderick, Joseph; Brott, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    In this paper a system for 3-D quantitative analysis of human spontaneous intracerebral brain hemorrhage (ICH) is described. The purpose of the developed system is to perform quantitative 3-D measurements of the parameters of ICH region and from computed tomography (CT) images. The measured parameter in this phase of the system development is volume of the hemorrhage region. The goal of the project is to measure parameters for a large number of patients having ICH and to correlate measured parameters to patient morbidity and mortality.

  7. Software for quantitative trait analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of software currently available for the genetic analysis of quantitative traits in humans. Programs that implement variance components, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), Haseman-Elston (H-E) and penetrance model-based linkage analyses are discussed, as are programs for measured genotype association analyses and quantitative trait transmission disequilibrium tests. The software compared includes LINKAGE, FASTLINK, PAP, SOLAR, SEGPATH, ACT, Mx, MERLIN, GENEHUNTER, Loki, Mendel, SAGE, QTDT and FBAT. Where possible, the paper provides URLs for acquiring these programs through the internet, details of the platforms for which the software is available and the types of analyses performed. PMID:16197737

  8. Plant Physiological Aspects of Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, E.; Fan, T.W-M.; Higashi, R.M.; Silk, W.K.

    2002-07-10

    The element silicon, Si, represents an anomaly in plant physiology (Epstein, 1994, 1999b). Plants contain the element in amounts comparable to those of such macronutrient elements as phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, viz. at tissue concentrations (dry weight basis) of about 0.1-10%, although both lower and higher values may be encountered. In some plants, such as rice and sugarcane, Si may be the mineral element present in largest amount. In much of plant physiological research, however, Si is considered a nonentity. Thus, not a single formulation of the widely used nutrient solutions includes Si. Experimental plants grown in these solutions are therefore abnormally low in their content of the element, being able to obtain only what Si is present as an unavoidable contaminant of the nutrient salts used, and from the experimental environment and their own seeds. The reason for the astonishing discrepancy between the prominence of Si in plants and its neglect in much of the enterprise of plant physiological research is that Si does not qualify as an ''essential'' element. Ever since the introduction of the solution culture method in the middle of the last century (Epstein, 1999a, b) it has been found that higher plants can grow in nutrient solutions in the formulation of which Si is not included. The only exceptions are the Equisitaceae (horsetails or scouring rushes), for which Si is a quantitatively major essential element.

  9. Quantitative Genomics of Male Reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the review was to establish the current status of quantitative genomics for male reproduction. Genetic variation exists for male reproduction traits. These traits are expensive and time consuming traits to evaluate through conventional breeding schemes. Genomics is an alternative to...

  10. Quantitative Reasoning in Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramful, Ajay; Ho, Siew Yin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Ajay Ramful and Siew Yin Ho explain the meaning of quantitative reasoning, describing how it is used in the to solve mathematical problems. They also describe a diagrammatic approach to represent relationships among quantities and provide examples of problems and their solutions.

  11. Equilibria in Quantitative Reachability Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brihaye, Thomas; Bruyère, Véronique; de Pril, Julie

    In this paper, we study turn-based quantitative multiplayer non zero-sum games played on finite graphs with reachability objectives. In this framework each player aims at reaching his own goal as soon as possible. We prove existence of finite-memory Nash (resp. secure) equilibria in multiplayer (resp. two-player) games.

  12. A Quantitative Infrared Spectroscopy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krahling, Mark D.; Eliason, Robert

    1985-01-01

    Although infrared spectroscopy is used primarily for qualitative identifications, it is possible to use it as a quantitative tool as well. The use of a standard curve to determine percent methanol in a 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol sample is described. Background information, experimental procedures, and results obtained are provided. (JN)

  13. Quantitative genomics of female reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous quantitative trait loci (QTL) for reproductive traits in domestic livestock have been described in the literature. In this chapter, the components needed for detection of reproductive trait QTL are described, including collection of phenotypes, genotypes, and the appropriate statistical ana...

  14. Quantitative Research in Written Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gebhard, Ann O.

    Offered as an introductory guide to teachers interested in approaching written English as a "second dialect" that students must master, this review covers quantitative investigations of written language. The first section deals with developmental studies, describing how a variety of researchers have related written structure to writer maturity.…

  15. Towards quantitative assessment of calciphylaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Thomas M.; Sárándi, István.; Jose, Abin; Haak, Daniel; Jonas, Stephan; Specht, Paula; Brandenburg, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare disease that has devastating conditions associated with high morbidity and mortality. Calciphylaxis is characterized by systemic medial calcification of the arteries yielding necrotic skin ulcerations. In this paper, we aim at supporting the installation of multi-center registries for calciphylaxis, which includes a photographic documentation of skin necrosis. However, photographs acquired in different centers under different conditions using different equipment and photographers cannot be compared quantitatively. For normalization, we use a simple color pad that is placed into the field of view, segmented from the image, and its color fields are analyzed. In total, 24 colors are printed on that scale. A least-squares approach is used to determine the affine color transform. Furthermore, the card allows scale normalization. We provide a case study for qualitative assessment. In addition, the method is evaluated quantitatively using 10 images of two sets of different captures of the same necrosis. The variability of quantitative measurements based on free hand photography is assessed regarding geometric and color distortions before and after our simple calibration procedure. Using automated image processing, the standard deviation of measurements is significantly reduced. The coefficients of variations yield 5-20% and 2-10% for geometry and color, respectively. Hence, quantitative assessment of calciphylaxis becomes practicable and will impact a better understanding of this rare but fatal disease.

  16. Quantitative Literacy for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiest, Lynda R.; Higgins, Heidi J.; Frost, Janet Hart

    2007-01-01

    In this article, we argue that many adults lack the "numeracy" needed to function in a maximally effective manner in their vocational, civic, and personal lives. We believe schools need to foster skills in quantitative literacy (QL), an inclination and ability to make reasoned decisions using general world knowledge and fundamental mathematics in…

  17. Quantitative assessment of scientific quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzl, Harald; Bloching, Philipp

    2012-09-01

    Scientific publications, authors, and journals are commonly evaluated with quantitative bibliometric measures. Frequently-used measures will be reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses will be highlighted. Reflections about conditions for a new, research paper-specific measure will be presented.

  18. Geometrical aspects of quantum spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.M.

    1996-05-11

    Various geometrical aspects of quantum spaces are presented showing the possibility of building physics on quantum spaces. In the first chapter the authors give the motivations for studying noncommutative geometry and also review the definition of a Hopf algebra and some general features of the differential geometry on quantum groups and quantum planes. In Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 the noncommutative version of differential calculus, integration and complex structure are established for the quantum sphere S{sub 1}{sup 2} and the quantum complex projective space CP{sub q}(N), on which there are quantum group symmetries that are represented nonlinearly, and are respected by all the aforementioned structures. The braiding of S{sub q}{sup 2} and CP{sub q}(N) is also described. In Chapter 4 the quantum projective geometry over the quantum projective space CP{sub q}(N) is developed. Collinearity conditions, coplanarity conditions, intersections and anharmonic ratios is described. In Chapter 5 an algebraic formulation of Reimannian geometry on quantum spaces is presented where Riemannian metric, distance, Laplacian, connection, and curvature have their quantum counterparts. This attempt is also extended to complex manifolds. Examples include the quantum sphere, the complex quantum projective space and the two-sheeted space. The quantum group of general coordinate transformations on some quantum spaces is also given.

  19. Metabolic aspects of bacterial persisters

    PubMed Central

    Prax, Marcel; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Persister cells form a multi-drug tolerant subpopulation within an isogenic culture of bacteria that are genetically susceptible to antibiotics. Studies with different Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria have identified a large number of genes associated with the persister state. In contrast, the revelation of persister metabolism has only been addressed recently. We here summarize metabolic aspects of persisters, which includes an overview about the bifunctional role of selected carbohydrates as both triggers for the exit from the drug tolerant state and metabolites which persisters feed on. Also alarmones as indicators for starvation have been shown to influence persister levels via different signaling cascades involving the activation of toxin-antitoxin systems and other regulatory factors. Finally, recent data obtained by 13C-isotopolog profiling demonstrated an active amino acid anabolism in Staphylococcus aureus cultures challenged with high drug concentrations. Understanding the metabolism of persister cells poses challenges but also paves the way for the development of anti-persister compounds. PMID:25374846

  20. [Economic aspects of integrated care].

    PubMed

    Lange, A; Braun, S; Greiner, W

    2012-05-01

    For more than 10 years integrated care has been an inherent part of the German healthcare system. The aims of selective contracts are to minimize interface problems between outpatient and inpatient sectors, generalist und specialist care as well as to intensify competition. Despite repeated efforts by the legislator, comprehensive integrated healthcare is still limited to a few flagship projects. This is mainly due to low incentives on the part of both suppliers and customers. Therefore, this article focuses on the economic aspects of integrated care. From a theoretical perspective, integrated care improves efficiency in the healthcare sector by reducing interface problems and asymmetric information as well as by intensifying competition. In practice, however, there are a number of obstacles to implementation. Particularly noteworthy are the financial difficulties in addition to problems regarding sectoral budgeting and the long-term nature of investments. However, the political environment and thus the financial arrangements within the statutory health insurance seem to be more important for further development of integrated care in Germany than the financing issues. PMID:22526852

  1. Breast Cancer 2012 - New Aspects.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, H-C; Lüftner, D; Lux, M P; Maass, N; Schütz, F; Fasching, P A; Fehm, T; Janni, W; Kümmel, S

    2012-07-01

    Treatment options as well as the characteristics for therapeutic decisions in patients with primary and advanced breast cancer are increasing in number and variety. New targeted therapies in combination with established chemotherapy schemes are broadening the spectrum, however potentially promising combinations do not always achieve a better result. New data from the field of pharmacogenomics point to prognostic and predictive factors that take not only the properties of the tumour but also inherited genetic properties of the patient into consideration. Current therapeutic decision-making is thus based on a combination of classical clinical and modern molecular biomarkers. Also health-economic aspects are more frequently being taken into consideration so that health-economic considerations may also play a part. This review is based on information from the recent annual congresses. The latest of these are the 34th San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium 2011 and the ASCO Annual Meeting 2012. Among their highlights are the clinically significant results from the CLEOPATRA, BOLERO-2, EMILIA and SWOG S0226 trials on the therapy for metastatic breast cancer as well as further state-of-the-art data on the adjuvant use of bisphosphonates within the framework of the ABCSG-12, ZO-FAST, NSABP-B34 and GAIN trials. PMID:25324576

  2. [Forensic medicine aspects of resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Bauer, G

    1987-12-15

    Nowadays, in almost all cases of clinical death, there is at least a remote chance of resuscitation, of restoring breathing and circulation by means of modern methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Statistically, there are more cases of cardiocirculatory arrest due to an internal cause than to a traumatic cause. Just as medical activity in general, resuscitation is increasingly discussed in its legal and ethical aspects. The duty to exercise due care and proper qualification require a very specific approach in the case of resuscitation, as the chain of persons potentially involved in life saving stretches from the medical layman to the specialist trained to deal with emergency situations. As opposed to conditions in other countries, in Austria the duty to render aid and assistance as statutory provision of the penal code can be of great importance in such cases. Criteria and definition, especially in the ad hoc establishment of death, assume a special significance in resuscitation. Over the past years, resuscitation measures within the complex of the procurement of death have repeatedly been put up for discussion. Examples from US judicature may help to define the problem more clearly and also to offer solutions for similar cases. Such decisions should essentially be guided by the consideration of the presumed will of the patient who no longer is in a position to exercise the right of self-determination. PMID:3326291

  3. Key aspects of coronal heating

    PubMed Central

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2015-01-01

    We highlight 10 key aspects of coronal heating that must be understood before we can consider the problem to be solved. (1) All coronal heating is impulsive. (2) The details of coronal heating matter. (3) The corona is filled with elemental magnetic stands. (4) The corona is densely populated with current sheets. (5) The strands must reconnect to prevent an infinite build-up of stress. (6) Nanoflares repeat with different frequencies. (7) What is the characteristic magnitude of energy release? (8) What causes the collective behaviour responsible for loops? (9) What are the onset conditions for energy release? (10) Chromospheric nanoflares are not a primary source of coronal plasma. Significant progress in solving the coronal heating problem will require coordination of approaches: observational studies, field-aligned hydrodynamic simulations, large-scale and localized three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and possibly also kinetic simulations. There is a unique value to each of these approaches, and the community must strive to coordinate better. PMID:25897094

  4. Cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scalar potentials, another is to compensate the baryon isocurvature with cold dark matter isocurvature by making the scalar survive until the present.

  5. Biological aspects of gender disorders.

    PubMed

    Corsello, S M; Di Donna, V; Senes, P; Luotto, V; Ricciato, M P; Paragliola, R M; Pontecorvi, A

    2011-12-01

    The scientific community is very interested in the biological aspects of gender disorders and sexual orientation. There are different levels to define an individual's sex: chromosomal, gonadic, and phenotypic sex. Concerning the psychological sex, men and women are different by virtue of their own gender identity, which means they recognize themselves as belonging to a determinate sex. They are different also as a result of their own role identity, a set of behaviors, tendencies, and cognitive and emotional attitudes, commonly defined as "male" and "female". Transsexuality is a disorder characterized by the development of a gender identity opposed to phenotypic sex, whereas homosexuality is not a disturbance of gender identity but only of sexual attraction, expressing sexual orientation towards people of the same sex. We started from a critical review of literature on genetic and hormonal mechanisms involved in sexual differentiation. We re-examined the neuro-anatomic and functional differences between men and women, with special reference to their role in psychosexual differentiation and to their possible implication in the genesis of homosexuality and identity gender disorders. Homosexuality and transsexuality are conditions without a well defined etiology. Although the influence of educational and environmental factors in humans is undeniable, it seems that organic neurohormonal prenatal and postnatal factors might contribute in a determinant way in the development of these two conditions. This "organicistic neurohormal theory" might find support in the study of particular situations in which the human fetus is exposed to an abnormal hormonal environment in utero. PMID:22322655

  6. Psychological aspects of peacekeeping operations.

    PubMed

    Raju, M S V K

    2014-01-01

    Peacekeeping operations are but one aspect of the systems of peace that have evolved over the past seven decades in a world that is riven with violence of all kinds. With the end of cold war in the late eighties of the last century we have come to see much intrastate violence, in addition to usual interstate hostilities and war, arising out of religious, political, ethnic and economic differences between people. In the changed scenario peacekeeping operations have become complex politico-military-humanitarian efforts. A soldier, trained for conventional military operations, is obliged to participate in the unconventional operations of waging peace in alien lands often in volatile and violent situations and in the process he stands to get exposed to widely variable demands for adjustment that have the potential to bring to the fore many maladaptive responses. Peacekeeping operations also have the potential to offer opportunities for growth and resilience. India is a major player in peacekeeping activities for well over sixty years all over the world. It is necessary for the commanders and mental health professionals to understand the multifarious factors that impinge on the peacekeeping soldier's mind and the emerging patterns of responses thereof for effective management trained manpower and fulfillment of mission objectives. PMID:25788805

  7. Psychological aspects of peacekeeping operations

    PubMed Central

    Raju, M. S. V. K.

    2014-01-01

    Peacekeeping operations are but one aspect of the systems of peace that have evolved over the past seven decades in a world that is riven with violence of all kinds. With the end of cold war in the late eighties of the last century we have come to see much intrastate violence, in addition to usual interstate hostilities and war, arising out of religious, political, ethnic and economic differences between people. In the changed scenario peacekeeping operations have become complex politico-military-humanitarian efforts. A soldier, trained for conventional military operations, is obliged to participate in the unconventional operations of waging peace in alien lands often in volatile and violent situations and in the process he stands to get exposed to widely variable demands for adjustment that have the potential to bring to the fore many maladaptive responses. Peacekeeping operations also have the potential to offer opportunities for growth and resilience. India is a major player in peacekeeping activities for well over sixty years all over the world. It is necessary for the commanders and mental health professionals to understand the multifarious factors that impinge on the peacekeeping soldier's mind and the emerging patterns of responses thereof for effective management trained manpower and fulfillment of mission objectives PMID:25788805

  8. Emerging therapeutic aspects in oncology

    PubMed Central

    MacEwan, David J

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a peculiarly stubborn disease to treat. Some forms of cancer have seen tremendous advances in the effectiveness of their treatments, whereas other forms have remained resistant to pharmacological control. This lack of hope for success is in part due to the types of drugs that are used in the clinic, and the targeted biological system being based purely on cellular growth rates. However, recent drugs designed to affect specific signalling pathways or proteins have been showing much success. Thanks to the ingenuity of pharmacologists in understanding and targeting these processes, there have been real improvements in treatment. Here we are presented with some of the research into such critical systems that have to be understood, so that they can be conquered. We will also look at the challenges facing cancer pharmacologists and what the field may present to us all in the future. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Emerging Therapeutic Aspects in Oncology. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.169.issue-8 PMID:23889318

  9. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  10. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. PMID:24889823

  11. Towards Quantitative Phosphotyrosine Profiling In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Hannah; White, Forest M.

    2012-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is a dynamic reversible post-translational modification that regulates many aspects of cell biology. To understand how this modification controls biological function, it is necessary to not only identify the specific sites of phosphorylation, but also to quantify how phosphorylation levels on these sites may be altered under specific physiological conditions. Due to its sensitivity and accuracy, mass spectrometry (MS) has widely been applied to the identification and characterization of phosphotyrosine signaling across biological systems. In this review we highlight the advances in both MS and phosphotyrosine enrichment methods that have been developed to enable the identification of low level tyrosine phosphorylation events. Computational and manual approaches to ensure confident identification of phosphopeptide sequence and determination of phosphorylation site localization are discussed along with methods that have been applied to the relative quantification of large numbers of phosphorylation sites. Finally, we provide an overview of the challenges ahead as we extend these technologies to the characterization of tyrosine phosphorylation signaling in vivo. With these latest developments in analytical and computational techniques, it is now possible to derive biological insight from quantitative MS-based analysis of signaling networks in vitro and in vivo. Application of these approaches to a wide variety of biological systems will define how signal transduction regulates cellular physiology in health and disease. PMID:22677333

  12. Quantitative nanoscale vortex imaging using a cryogenic quantum magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Thiel, L; Rohner, D; Ganzhorn, M; Appel, P; Neu, E; Müller, B; Kleiner, R; Koelle, D; Maletinsky, P

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic studies of superconductors and their vortices play a pivotal role in understanding the mechanisms underlying superconductivity. Local measurements of penetration depths or magnetic stray fields enable access to fundamental aspects such as nanoscale variations in superfluid densities or the order parameter symmetry of superconductors. However, experimental tools that offer quantitative, nanoscale magnetometry and operate over large ranges of temperature and magnetic fields are still lacking. Here, we demonstrate the first operation of a cryogenic scanning quantum sensor in the form of a single nitrogen-vacancy electronic spin in diamond, which is capable of overcoming these existing limitations. To demonstrate the power of our approach, we perform quantitative, nanoscale magnetic imaging of Pearl vortices in the cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ. With a sensor-to-sample distance of ∼10 nm, we observe striking deviations from the prevalent monopole approximation in our vortex stray-field images, and find excellent quantitative agreement with Pearl's analytic model. Our experiments provide a non-invasive and unambiguous determination of the system's local penetration depth and are readily extended to higher temperatures and magnetic fields. These results demonstrate the potential of quantitative quantum sensors in benchmarking microscopic models of complex electronic systems and open the door for further exploration of strongly correlated electron physics using scanning nitrogen-vacancy magnetometry. PMID:27136133

  13. Quantitative nanoscale vortex imaging using a cryogenic quantum magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, L.; Rohner, D.; Ganzhorn, M.; Appel, P.; Neu, E.; Müller, B.; Kleiner, R.; Koelle, D.; Maletinsky, P.

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic studies of superconductors and their vortices play a pivotal role in understanding the mechanisms underlying superconductivity. Local measurements of penetration depths or magnetic stray fields enable access to fundamental aspects such as nanoscale variations in superfluid densities or the order parameter symmetry of superconductors. However, experimental tools that offer quantitative, nanoscale magnetometry and operate over large ranges of temperature and magnetic fields are still lacking. Here, we demonstrate the first operation of a cryogenic scanning quantum sensor in the form of a single nitrogen–vacancy electronic spin in diamond, which is capable of overcoming these existing limitations. To demonstrate the power of our approach, we perform quantitative, nanoscale magnetic imaging of Pearl vortices in the cuprate superconductor YBa2Cu3O7–δ. With a sensor-to-sample distance of ∼10 nm, we observe striking deviations from the prevalent monopole approximation in our vortex stray-field images, and find excellent quantitative agreement with Pearl's analytic model. Our experiments provide a non-invasive and unambiguous determination of the system's local penetration depth and are readily extended to higher temperatures and magnetic fields. These results demonstrate the potential of quantitative quantum sensors in benchmarking microscopic models of complex electronic systems and open the door for further exploration of strongly correlated electron physics using scanning nitrogen–vacancy magnetometry.

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Lung Using Hyperpolarized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Emami, Kiarash; Stephen, Michael; Kadlecek, Stephen; Cadman, Robert V.; Ishii, Masaru; Rizi, Rahim R.

    2009-01-01

    Improvements in the quantitative assessment of structure, function, and metabolic activity in the lung, combined with improvements in the spatial resolution of those assessments, enhance the diagnosis and evaluation of pulmonary disorders. Radiologic methods are among the most attractive techniques for the comprehensive assessment of the lung, as they allow quantitative assessment of this organ through measurements of a number of structural, functional, and metabolic parameters. Hyperpolarized nuclei magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has opened up new territories for the quantitative assessment of lung function and structure with an unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity. This review article presents a survey of recent developments in the field of pulmonary imaging using hyperpolarized nuclei MRI for quantitative imaging of different aspects of the lung, as well as preclinical applications of these techniques to diagnose and evaluate specific pulmonary diseases. After presenting a brief overview of various hyperpolarization techniques, this survey divides the research activities of the field into four broad areas: lung microstructure, ventilation, oxygenation, and perfusion. Finally, it discusses the challenges currently faced by researchers in this field to translate this rich body of methodology into wider-scale clinical applications. PMID:19687215

  15. Electrical Aspects of Impinging Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Yu-Chien

    This dissertation examines the use of electric fields as one mechanism for controlling combustion as flames are partially extinguished when impinging on nearby surfaces. Electrical aspects of flames, specifically, the production of chemi-ions in hydrocarbon flames and the use of convective flows driven by these ions, have been investigated in a wide range of applications in prior work but despite this fairly comprehensive effort to study electrical aspects of combustion, relatively little research has focused on electrical phenomena near flame extinguishment, nor for flames near impingement surfaces. Electrical impinging flames have complex properties under global influences of ion-driven winds and flow field disturbances from the impingement surface. Challenges of measurements when an electric field is applied in the system have limited an understanding of changes to the flame behavior and species concentrations caused by the field. This research initially characterizes the ability of high voltage power supplies to respond on sufficiently short time scales to permit real time electrical flame actuation. The study then characterizes the influence of an electric field on the impinging flame shape, ion current and flow field of the thermal plume associated with the flame. The more significant further examinations can be separated into two parts: 1) the potential for using electric fields to control the release of carbon monoxide (CO) from surface-impinging flames, and 2) an investigation of controlling electrically the heat transfer to a plate on which the flame impinges. Carbon monoxide (CO) results from the incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels and, while CO can be desirable in some syngas processes, it is usually a dangerous emission from forest fires, gas heaters, gas stoves, or furnaces where insufficient oxygen in the core reaction does not fully oxidize the fuel to carbon dioxide and water. Determining how carbon monoxide is released and how heat transfer

  16. New Aspects of Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schukla, Padma K.; Stenflo, Lennart; Eliasson, Bengt

    2008-03-01

    Nonlinear collective processes in very dense plasmas / P. K. Shukla, B. Eliasson and D. Shaikh -- Quantum, spin and QED effects in plasmas / G. Brodin and M. Marklund -- Spin quantum plasmas - new aspects of collective dynamics / M. Marklund and G. Brodin -- Revised quantum electrodynamics with fundamental applications / B. Lehnert -- Quantum methodologies in beam, fluid and plasma physics / R. Fedele -- Plasma effects in cold atom physics / J. T. Mendonca ... [et al.] -- General properties of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in different plasma configurations: the plasma foil model / F. Pegoraro and S. V. Bulanov -- The Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a plasma foil accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra intense laser pulse / F. Pegoraro and S. V. Bulanov -- Generation of galactic seed magnetic fields / H. Saleem -- Nonlinear dynamics of mirror waves in non-Maxwellian plasmas / O. A. Pokhotelov et al. -- Formation of mirror structures near instability threshold / E. A. Kuznetsov, T. Passot and P. L. Sulem -- Nonlinear dispersive Alfvén waves in magnetoplasmas / P. K. Shukla ... [et al.] -- Properties of drift and Alfvén waves in collisional plasmas / J. Vranjes, S. Poedts and B. P. Pandey -- Current driven acoustic perturbations in partially ionized collisional plasmas / J. Vranjes ... [et al.] -- Multifluid theory of solitons / F. Verheest -- Nonlinear wavepackets in pair-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas / I. Kourakis et al. -- Electro-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas / A. A. Mamun and P. K. Shukla -- Physics of dust in magnetic fusion devices / Z. Wang et al. -- Short wavelength ballooning mode in Tokamaks / A. Hirose and N. Joiner -- Effects of perpendicular shear superposition and hybrid ions intruduction on parallel shear driven plasma instabilities / T. Kaneko and R. Hatakeyama.

  17. [Fundamental aspects of extreme aging].

    PubMed

    Tréton, J

    2002-07-01

    Major developments in molecular biology in invertebrates have recently shown the determining effect of genetics on aging. The first finding was that artificial selection can highlight the genetic aspect of the aging process, demonstrating the polygenetic property of longevity. Another finding showed that certain gene transfers can modulate the lifespan of an organism. Recent progress has been made in three fields: genetic markers of aging, biological basis of cell maintenance, and hereditary factors contributing to late onset genetic disease. These new developments open new avenues of research in clinical biology. In regard to genetic markers of aging, it has been demonstrated that the ends of the chromosomes, telomeres, play a role in cell senescence. Telomeres can be viewed as markers of aging. Shortened telomeres are associated with replicative senescence and antitumor action. DNA anomalies are also more frequent: simple or double breaks, additions and base substitutions. Data on the biological basis of cell maintenance obtained in invertebrates show the polygenetic property of aging involving four significant mechanisms, control of metabolism, resistance to stress, chromatin-dependent gene regulation of genetic homeostasis. Finally, recent studies have shown that late onset hereditary diseases would be linked with particular genes, some of which have been identified. Two non-exclusive mechanisms could be involved: an adaptive mechanism involving gene selection during the evolutionary process, for example in obesity; and non-adaptive accumulation of gene expression during the post-reproductive phase, for example in Alzheimer's disease. These findings open a new era for the biology of aging. PMID:12596689

  18. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the “tip of the iceberg” of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  19. Innovatory aspects of population education.

    PubMed

    Casassus, J

    1985-06-01

    The expansion of population education activities in the last 10 years has led some authors to consider it as 1 of the most rapidly growing educational innovations in the world. This paper considers some of the most significant innovative aspects that can be drawn from the experience of different countries in the implementation of population education in the formal school system. Educational innovations present 2 phases: 1) the conception phase when the need is identified and the contents are determined and 2) the conduct of the innovation, which is the process through which the innovation is developed, evaluated, expanded, and becomes institutionalized. In the process of construction of population contents, 3 related approaches are used in order to render them meaningful: 1) interdisciplinarity, 2) the systemic approach, and 3) the interrelation between the macro and the micro level. It is commonly accepted that educational contents should meet the following 3 imperatives: relevance, coherence, and balance. The pedagogical act is conditioned by 3 interrelated elements: 1) by goals of education as they are expressed through the curriculum design and the contents developed, 2) by the role assumed by the teacher and the learner in the learning process, and 3) the pedagogical technics used by the teacher in order to attain the desired goals. In several countries, the role of population education has been enlarged to cover areas which had been traditionally confined to the private or family realm. Population education, by the nature of its contents and by the learning methodologies required, can become and has become in some countries, a major source for the renewal of education. PMID:12268121

  20. [Nutritional health aspects of mycotoxins].

    PubMed

    Kovács, Melinda

    2004-08-22

    Mycotoxins produced by mould fungi can enter into the human food chain directly through foods of plant origin (cereal grains), consumer goods (coffee and bear) and indirectly through foods of animal origin (kidney, liver, milk and eggs). Mycotoxins occur in small amount in the foods; however their continuous intake even in microdoses can result in accumulation in the organism. Synergic effects of the mycotoxins as well as their possible additive multi-toxic effects seem to be especially dangerous. Mycotoxin problems are very important in Hungary because these natural toxins occur mainly in those cereals (e.g. wheat, maize) that amount to high proportion of the sowing area in Hungary and provide the main foods to the inhabitants. Public health risks of the toxins accumulating in the human and animal bodies during the long term consumption of the mycotoxins containing foods--even in small doses--have not been evaluated yet as thoroughly as their importance would require. However, there are more and more direct and indirect expressions of the danger resulting from the toxins. The most frequently observed human health effects are carcinogen effects (aflatoxin, ochratoxin A, fumonisins, patulin); effects causing developmental abnormalities (zearalenon, ochratoxin); effects harmful to the reproduction (zearalenon, and trichotecenes), effects decreasing the resistance; immunosuppressive effects (trichotecenes), and effects causing injury of the nervous system (ochratoxin A, fumonisins). Prevention of the injury of the health caused by mycotoxins can be completed by joint and integrated activity of the various disciplines only and requires a comprehensive interdisciplinary cooperation. This paper gives a discussion on health injuring effects of the most frequently occurring mycotoxins that are very important from human health aspects in Hungary; on their occurrence in the foods and on their human risk. PMID:15493122

  1. Regulatory aspects of clinical xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Henk-Jan

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation attracted interest from regulatory authorities, particularly after the demonstration of pig-to-human transmission of porcine endogenous retrovirus (1996). This added to the risk of a product, resulting in a Guidance of the US Food and Drug Administration (2003). This addresses the full flow chart in product manufacturing, starting with the designated pathogen-free status of the source animal; and special aspects regarding the recipient like informed consent and monitoring for infectious pathogens. Also archiving of records from the donor and recipient, as well as storage of samples is described. The European Medicines Agency issued a Guideline on xenogeneic cell therapy products (2009). Cell-based medicinal products are subject to specific regulations and directives, which apply also to xenogeneic products: the xenotransplant guidances/guidelines are an addition to these regulations. Noteworthy, acellular products like heart valves and decellularized cornea are not considered a cell therapy product, but rather a medical device with its own regulation. WHO issued relevant documents, especially about safety, and the International Xenotransplantation Association published consensus documents, a.o., addressing preclinical efficacy requirements before entering clinical trials. This manuscript presents an overview of the regulatory framework, with special focus on cell therapy products necause these are expected to reach the market first (i.e., pancreatic islets, hepatocytes and cellularized cornea); major illustrations are from the European situation. Albeit being complex, the regulation of xenotransplant products does not form a block in product development, but rather supports the introduction of efficacious and safe products to meet the medical need. PMID:26408947

  2. Psychiatric aspects of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Somaiya, Mansi; Kumar, Santhosh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is essentially characterized by the motor symptoms in the form of resting tremor, rigidity and bradykinesia. However, over the years it has been recognized that motor symptoms are just the "tip of the iceberg" of clinical manifestations of PD. Besides motor symptoms, PD characterized by many non-motor symptoms, which include cognitive decline, psychiatric disturbances (depression, psychosis and impulse control), sleep difficulties, autonomic failures (gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, urinary, thermoregulation) and pain syndrome. This review evaluates the various aspects of psychiatric disorders including cognitive decline and sleep disturbances in patients with PD. The prevalence rate of various psychiatric disorders is high in patients with PD. In terms of risk factors, various demographic, clinical and treatment-related variables have been shown to be associated with higher risk of development of psychiatric morbidity. Evidence also suggests that the presence of psychiatric morbidity is associated with poorer outcome. Randomized controlled trials, evaluating the various pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD are meager. Available evidence suggests that tricyclic antidepressants like desipramine and nortriptyline are efficacious for management of depression. Among the antipsychotics, clozapine is considered to be the best choice for management of psychosis in patients with PD. Among the various cognitive enhancers, evidence suggest efficacy of rivastigmine in management of dementia in patients with PD. To conclude, this review suggests that psychiatric morbidity is highly prevalent in patients with PD. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach must be followed to improve the overall outcome of PD. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy of various other measures for management of psychiatric morbidity in patients with PD. PMID:25552854

  3. Kinetic Analysis of Amylase Using Quantitative Benedict's and Iodine Starch Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Beverly; Lunday, Deborah; Miskevich, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of carbohydrates is a fundamental analytical tool used in many aspects of biology and chemistry. We have adapted a technique developed by Mathews et al. using an inexpensive scanner and open-source image analysis software to quantify amylase activity using both the breakdown of starch and the appearance of glucose. Breakdown…

  4. Quantitative Neuroimaging: What You can Say and What You can Believe About the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desco, M.

    For many years, medical images have been simple pictures examined by a doctor at the lightbox. With the introduction of modern image modalities (X-Ray Computed Tomography, Positron Emission Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging), imaging has turned into a measuring instrument able to provide quantitative information about many aspects of biological systems, including brain function.

  5. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy.

  6. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses. PMID:26850283

  7. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Kinner, Sonja; Reeder, Scott B; Yokoo, Takeshi

    2016-05-01

    Conventional imaging modalities, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by allowing noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. However, conventional imaging modalities are limited as biomarkers of NAFLD for various reasons. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI techniques overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional imaging and allow comprehensive and objective evaluation of NAFLD. MRI can provide unconfounded biomarkers of hepatic fat, iron, and fibrosis in a single examination-a virtual biopsy has become a clinical reality. In this article, we will review the utility and limitation of conventional US, CT, and MR imaging for the diagnosis NAFLD. Recent advances in imaging biomarkers of NAFLD are also discussed with an emphasis in multi-parametric quantitative MRI. PMID:26848588

  8. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  9. Image analysis and quantitative morphology.

    PubMed

    Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos Alberto; Fernandes-Santos, Caroline; Aguila, Marcia Barbosa

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative studies are increasingly found in the literature, particularly in the fields of development/evolution, pathology, and neurosciences. Image digitalization converts tissue images into a numeric form by dividing them into very small regions termed picture elements or pixels. Image analysis allows automatic morphometry of digitalized images, and stereology aims to understand the structural inner three-dimensional arrangement based on the analysis of slices showing two-dimensional information. To quantify morphological structures in an unbiased and reproducible manner, appropriate isotropic and uniform random sampling of sections, and updated stereological tools are needed. Through the correct use of stereology, a quantitative study can be performed with little effort; efficiency in stereology means as little counting as possible (little work), low cost (section preparation), but still good accuracy. This short text provides a background guide for non-expert morphologists. PMID:19960334

  10. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    Kinner, Sonja; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by allowing noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. However, conventional imaging modalities are limited as biomarkers of NAFLD for various reasons. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI techniques overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional imaging and allow comprehensive and objective evaluation of NAFLD. MRI can provide unconfounded biomarkers of hepatic fat, iron, and fibrosis in a single examination—a virtual biopsy has become a clinical reality. In this article, we will review the utility and limitation of conventional US, CT, and MR imaging for the diagnosis NAFLD. Recent advances in imaging biomarkers of NAFLD are also discussed with an emphasis in multi-parametric quantitative MRI. PMID:26848588

  11. Quantitative wave-particle duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Tabish

    2016-07-01

    The complementary wave and particle character of quantum objects (or quantons) was pointed out by Niels Bohr. This wave-particle duality, in the context of the two-slit experiment, is here described not just as two extreme cases of wave and particle characteristics, but in terms of quantitative measures of these characteristics, known to follow a duality relation. A very simple and intuitive derivation of a closely related duality relation is presented, which should be understandable to the introductory student.

  12. A quantitative ELISA for dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Morris, G E; Ellis, J M; Nguyen, T M

    1993-05-01

    A novel approach to the quantitation of the muscular dystrophy protein, dystrophin, in muscle extracts is described. The two-site ELISA uses two monoclonal antibodies against dystrophin epitopes which lie close together in the rod domain of the dystrophin molecule in order to minimize the effects of dystrophin degradation. Dystrophin is assayed in its native form by extracting with non-ionic detergents and avoiding the use of SDS. PMID:8486926

  13. Effect of particle aspect ratio in magnetorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Jose R.; Carreón-González, Elizabeth; de Vicente, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles in magnetorheology. Two systems are studied: conventional magnetorheological fluids prepared by dispersion of nickel nanowires, and inverse ferrofluids prepared by dispersion of glass fibers in a ferrofluid. In both cases the apparent yield stress is found to increase with aspect ratio in contradiction to available models in the literature. Experimental observations demonstrate that the particle volume fraction within the aggregates initially increases with increasing the aspect ratio of the dispersed particles. When the aspect ratio is further raised, a gel-like percolating structure forms inhibiting the formation of elongated clusters in the field direction.

  14. Understanding How Grammatical Aspect Influences Legal Judgment

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, Andrew M.; Eerland, Anita; Zwaan, Rolf A.; Magliano, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that grammatical aspect can bias how individuals perceive criminal intentionality during discourse comprehension. Given that criminal intentionality is a common criterion for legal definitions (e.g., first-degree murder), the present study explored whether grammatical aspect may also impact legal judgments. In a series of four experiments participants were provided with a legal definition and a description of a crime in which the grammatical aspect of provocation and murder events were manipulated. Participants were asked to make a decision (first- vs. second-degree murder) and then indicate factors that impacted their decision. Findings suggest that legal judgments can be affected by grammatical aspect but the most robust effects were limited to temporal dynamics (i.e., imperfective aspect results in more murder actions than perfective aspect), which may in turn influence other representational systems (i.e., number of murder actions positively predicts perceived intentionality). In addition, findings demonstrate that the influence of grammatical aspect on situation model construction and evaluation is dependent upon the larger linguistic and semantic context. Together, the results suggest grammatical aspect has indirect influences on legal judgments to the extent that variability in aspect changes the features of the situation model that align with criteria for making legal judgments. PMID:26496364

  15. Systemic lupus erythematosus: Clinical and experimental aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Smolen, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This text covers questions related to the history, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical aspects and therapy of systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Both animal models and human SLE are considered. With regard to basic science, concise information on cellular immunology, autoantibodies, viral aspects and molecular biology in SLE is provided. Clinical topics then deal with medical, dermatologic, neurologic, radiologic, pathologic, and therapeutic aspects. The book not only presents the most recent information on clinical and experimental insights, but also looks at future aspects related to the diagnosis and therapy of SLE.

  16. Understanding How Grammatical Aspect Influences Legal Judgment.

    PubMed

    Sherrill, Andrew M; Eerland, Anita; Zwaan, Rolf A; Magliano, Joseph P

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that grammatical aspect can bias how individuals perceive criminal intentionality during discourse comprehension. Given that criminal intentionality is a common criterion for legal definitions (e.g., first-degree murder), the present study explored whether grammatical aspect may also impact legal judgments. In a series of four experiments participants were provided with a legal definition and a description of a crime in which the grammatical aspect of provocation and murder events were manipulated. Participants were asked to make a decision (first- vs. second-degree murder) and then indicate factors that impacted their decision. Findings suggest that legal judgments can be affected by grammatical aspect but the most robust effects were limited to temporal dynamics (i.e., imperfective aspect results in more murder actions than perfective aspect), which may in turn influence other representational systems (i.e., number of murder actions positively predicts perceived intentionality). In addition, findings demonstrate that the influence of grammatical aspect on situation model construction and evaluation is dependent upon the larger linguistic and semantic context. Together, the results suggest grammatical aspect has indirect influences on legal judgments to the extent that variability in aspect changes the features of the situation model that align with criteria for making legal judgments. PMID:26496364

  17. Quantitative measures for redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Ché S; Eagling, Beatrice D; Driscoll, Scott R E; Rohwer, Johann M

    2016-07-01

    Redox signaling is now recognized as an important regulatory mechanism for a number of cellular processes including the antioxidant response, phosphokinase signal transduction and redox metabolism. While there has been considerable progress in identifying the cellular machinery involved in redox signaling, quantitative measures of redox signals have been lacking, limiting efforts aimed at understanding and comparing redox signaling under normoxic and pathogenic conditions. Here we have outlined some of the accepted principles for redox signaling, including the description of hydrogen peroxide as a signaling molecule and the role of kinetics in conferring specificity to these signaling events. Based on these principles, we then develop a working definition for redox signaling and review a number of quantitative methods that have been employed to describe signaling in other systems. Using computational modeling and published data, we show how time- and concentration- dependent analyses, in particular, could be used to quantitatively describe redox signaling and therefore provide important insights into the functional organization of redox networks. Finally, we consider some of the key challenges with implementing these methods. PMID:27151506

  18. Quantitative computed tomography of bone.

    PubMed

    Rüegsegger, P; Stebler, B; Dambacher, M

    1982-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is well accepted as an imaging procedure, but comparatively little effort has been made to utilize the potential capability of CT to quantify tissue densities and composition. There are two reasons for this. First, precision and accuracy of quantification are limited by nonlinear effects. These effects are nonlocal and are object and scanner dependent. Second, intraindividual and interindividual variations of tissue compositions are considerable. Single energy measurements require restrictive assumptions on tissue compositions. The diagnosis and treatment monitoring of osteopenic bone diseases with low-dose CT is given as an example of a successful application of quantitative CT. With a special-purpose CT system and an analytic procedure for the quantification of bone at peripheral measuring sites, longitudinal examinations were performed. Low-dose quantitative CT permitted quantification, on an individual basis, of the bone loss of immobilization osteoporosis on a week-by-week basis. Changes due to postmenopausal osteoporosis are less drastic, and so measurement at intervals of months is adequate. In women after menopause, 3-month intervals were used in evaluating the natural course of osteoporosis and in quantifying the effects of sodium fluoride treatment on trabecular bone. Low-dose quantitative CT has proved to be a sensitive and highly reproducible procedure for the noninvasive evaluation of bone loss or bone accretion. During a disease or therapy, each patient can be evaluated individually. PMID:7121079

  19. Quantitative characterisation of sedimentary grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunwal, Mohit; Mulchrone, Kieran F.; Meere, Patrick A.

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of sedimentary texture helps in determining the formation, transportation and deposition processes of sedimentary rocks. Grain size analysis is traditionally quantitative, whereas grain shape analysis is largely qualitative. A semi-automated approach to quantitatively analyse shape and size of sand sized sedimentary grains is presented. Grain boundaries are manually traced from thin section microphotographs in the case of lithified samples and are automatically identified in the case of loose sediments. Shape and size paramters can then be estimated using a software package written on the Mathematica platform. While automated methodology already exists for loose sediment analysis, the available techniques for the case of lithified samples are limited to cases of high definition thin section microphotographs showing clear contrast between framework grains and matrix. Along with the size of grain, shape parameters such as roundness, angularity, circularity, irregularity and fractal dimension are measured. A new grain shape parameter developed using Fourier descriptors has also been developed. To test this new approach theoretical examples were analysed and produce high quality results supporting the accuracy of the algorithm. Furthermore sandstone samples from known aeolian and fluvial environments from the Dingle Basin, County Kerry, Ireland were collected and analysed. Modern loose sediments from glacial till from County Cork, Ireland and aeolian sediments from Rajasthan, India have also been collected and analysed. A graphical summary of the data is presented and allows for quantitative distinction between samples extracted from different sedimentary environments.

  20. Pharmacotherapeutic Aspects of Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    produced by any drug depend upon rates of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of the drug; space flight-induced changes in blood flow and the function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, liver, or kidneys may alter these processes. Another important aspect of clinical efficacy of medications in space is the stability of pharmaceuticals. As the U.S. space program is moving toward extended Space Shuttle flights and beyond, to space station missions and planetary explorations, understanding how space flight affects organ systems and clinical pharmacology is necessary to optimize pharmacotherapeutics in space and ensure adequate safety and health of crewmembers.

  1. Colloidal aspects of texture perception.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Ton; van Aken, George A; de Jongh, Harmen H J; Hamer, Rob J

    2009-08-30

    Recently, considerable attention has been given to the understanding of texture attributes that cannot directly be related to physical properties of food, such as creamy, crumbly and watery. The perception of these attributes is strongly related to the way the food is processed during food intake, mastication, swallowing of it and during the cleaning of the mouth after swallowing. Moreover, their perception is modulated by the interaction with other basic attributes, such as taste and aroma attributes (e.g. sourness and vanilla). To be able to link the composition and structure of food products to more complicated texture attributes, their initial physical/colloid chemical properties and the oral processing of these products must be well understood. Understanding of the processes in the mouth at colloidal length scales turned out to be essential to grasp the interplay between perception, oral physiology and food properties. In view of the huge differences in physical chemical properties between food products, it is practical to make a distinction between solid, semi-solid, and liquid food products. The latter ones are often liquid dispersions of emulsion droplets or particles in general. For liquid food products for instance flow behaviour and colloidal stability of dispersed particles play a main role in determining their textural properties. For most solid products stiffness and fracture behaviour in relation to water content are essential while for semi-solids a much larger range of mechanical properties will play a role. Examples of colloidal aspects of texture perception will be discussed for these three categories of products based on selected sensory attributes and/or relevant colloidal processes. For solid products some main factors determining crispness will be discussed. For crispiness of dry cellular solid products these are water content and the architecture of the product at mesoscopic length scales (20-1000 microm). In addition the distribution of

  2. Geomorphic aspects of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Robert G.

    The many roles that groundwater plays in landscape evolution are becoming more widely appreciated. In this overview, three major categories of groundwater processes and resulting landforms are considered: (1) Dissolution creates various karst geometries, mainly in carbonate rocks, in response to conditions of recharge, geologic setting, lithology, and groundwater circulation. Denudation and cave formation rates can be estimated from kinetic and hydraulic parameters. (2) Groundwater weathering generates regoliths of residual alteration products at weathering fronts, and subsequent exhumation exposes corestones, flared slopes, balanced rocks, domed inselbergs, and etchplains of regional importance. Groundwater relocation of dissolved salts creates duricrusts of various compositions, which become landforms. (3) Soil and rock erosion by groundwater processes include piping, seepage erosion, and sapping, important agents in slope retreat and headward gully migration. Thresholds and limits are important in many chemical and mechanical groundwater actions. A quantitative, morphometric approach to groundwater landforms and processes is exemplified by selected studies in carbonate and clastic terrains of ancient and recent origins. Résumé Les rôles variés joués par les eaux souterraines dans l'évolution des paysages deviennent nettement mieux connus. La revue faite ici prend en considération trois grandes catégories de processus liés aux eaux souterraines et les formes associées: (1) La dissolution crée des formes karstiques variées, surtout dans les roches carbonatées, en fonction des conditions d'alimentation, du cadre géologique, de la lithologie et de la circulation des eaux souterraines. Les taux d'érosion et de formation des grottes peuvent être estimés à partir de paramètres cinétiques et hydrauliques. (2) L'érosion par les eaux souterraines donne naissance à des régolites, résidus d'altération sur des fronts d'altération, et l'exhumation r

  3. Geomorphic aspects of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaFleur, Robert G.

    The many roles that groundwater plays in landscape evolution are becoming more widely appreciated. In this overview, three major categories of groundwater processes and resulting landforms are considered: (1) Dissolution creates various karst geometries, mainly in carbonate rocks, in response to conditions of recharge, geologic setting, lithology, and groundwater circulation. Denudation and cave formation rates can be estimated from kinetic and hydraulic parameters. (2) Groundwater weathering generates regoliths of residual alteration products at weathering fronts, and subsequent exhumation exposes corestones, flared slopes, balanced rocks, domed inselbergs, and etchplains of regional importance. Groundwater relocation of dissolved salts creates duricrusts of various compositions, which become landforms. (3) Soil and rock erosion by groundwater processes include piping, seepage erosion, and sapping, important agents in slope retreat and headward gully migration. Thresholds and limits are important in many chemical and mechanical groundwater actions. A quantitative, morphometric approach to groundwater landforms and processes is exemplified by selected studies in carbonate and clastic terrains of ancient and recent origins. Résumé Les rôles variés joués par les eaux souterraines dans l'évolution des paysages deviennent nettement mieux connus. La revue faite ici prend en considération trois grandes catégories de processus liés aux eaux souterraines et les formes associées: (1) La dissolution crée des formes karstiques variées, surtout dans les roches carbonatées, en fonction des conditions d'alimentation, du cadre géologique, de la lithologie et de la circulation des eaux souterraines. Les taux d'érosion et de formation des grottes peuvent être estimés à partir de paramètres cinétiques et hydrauliques. (2) L'érosion par les eaux souterraines donne naissance à des régolites, résidus d'altération sur des fronts d'altération, et l'exhumation r

  4. Optodynamic aspect of a pulsed laser ablation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrovatin, Rok; Možina, Janez

    1995-02-01

    A study of a pulsed laser ablation process is presented from a novel, optodynamic aspect. By quantitative analysis of laser-induced bulk ultrasonic and blast waves in the air the ablation dynamics is characterized. In this way the influence of the laser pulse parameters and of the interacting material on the ablation process was assessed. By the analysis of the laser drilling process of thin layered samples the material influence was demonstrated. Besides the ultrasonic evaluation of the laser pulse power density the plasma shielding for 10 ns laser pulses was analyzed by the same method. All measurements were noncontact. Bulk waves in the solid and blast waves in the air were measured simultaneously, an interferometric and a probe beam deflection method were used, respectively.

  5. Salvia divinorum: toxicological aspects and analysis in human biological specimens.

    PubMed

    Margalho, Cláudia; Corte-Real, Francisco; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    The identification and quantitation of the main psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum (salvinorin A) in biological specimens are crucial in forensic and clinical toxicology. Despite all the efforts made, its uncontrolled abuse has increased quickly, exposing its users' health to serious risks both in the short and long term. The use of alternative biological matrices in toxicological analyzes can be advantageous as complementary postmortem samples, or in situations when neither blood nor urine can be collected; they may be useful tools in those determinations, providing important information about prior exposure. The aim of this article is to present a brief summary of legal aspects of Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A, including the methods used for the determination of the latter in biological matrices. PMID:27277872

  6. [Psychological aspects of induced abortion].

    PubMed

    Mouniq, C; Moron, P

    1982-06-01

    Results are presented of a literature review to identify social and psychological aspects of abortion. The literature does not provide a true profile of women requesting abortions, but some characteristics emerge. Reasons for requesting abortion include economic problems, difficult previous pregnancies, general medical contraindications to pregnancy, marital conflicts, feelings of loneliness, professional aspirations, problems with existing children, and feelings of insecurity about the future. However, the same feelings are found among women carrying their pregnancies to term. Unplanned pregnancies are more common during periods of depression. Most authors have found about 1/2 of women seeking abortions to be single and about 1/2 to be under 25 years old. Religion does not appear to be a determining factor. 1 study of psychological factors in abortion seekers found that a large number of single women seeking abortion had suffered traumatic experiences in childhood and were seeking security in inappropriate amorous relationships. Helene Deutsch stressed the destructive impulses latent in all pregnancies. Others have cited the ambivalence of the desire for pregnancy and feelings of loss after abortion. Studies published after legalization of abortion in the US and France however have stressed the nearly total absence of moderate or severe psychiatric symptoms after abortion. Responses immediately after the abortion may include feelings of relief, guilt, indifference, or ambivalence. Secondary affects appear minor to most authors. Psychological effects do not appear to be influenced by age, marital status, parity, intelligence, occupation, existence of a later pregnancy, or concommitant sterilization. "Premorbidity" and coercion by spouse or family were most closely associated with psychological symptoms. Numerous authors have found about twice as many negative reactions among women undergoing abortion for medical reasons. Most patients undergoing abortions for

  7. Normal Aspects of Speech, Hearing, and Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minifie, Fred. D., Ed.; And Others

    This book is written as a guide to the understanding of the processes involved in human speech communication. Ten authorities contributed material to provide an introduction to the physiological aspects of speech production and reception, the acoustical aspects of speech production and transmission, the psychophysics of sound reception, the nature…

  8. Some medical aspects of radionuclide intakes

    SciTech Connect

    Poda, G A

    1983-01-01

    In the field of medicine, particularly industrial medicine, the radiation aspect of the practice probably takes about 1/10 of 1% of our time. All the health physicist's tools of principles of internal dosimetry, lung models, mathematics, chemistry, etc. have little meaning until applied to an individual who has had an intake. This article discusses some of the medical aspects of internal dosimetry.

  9. 49 CFR 236.703 - Aspect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aspect. 236.703 Section 236.703 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.703 Aspect....

  10. 49 CFR 236.703 - Aspect.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Aspect. 236.703 Section 236.703 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.703 Aspect....