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Sample records for machine operators final

  1. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  2. Stirling machine operating experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Brad; Dudenhoefer, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that Stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and were not expected to operate for any lengthy period of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered.

  3. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy operating lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and are not expected to operate for lengthy periods of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered. The record in this paper is not complete, due to the reluctance of some organizations to release operational data and because several organizations were not contacted. The authors intend to repeat this assessment in three years, hoping for even greater participation.

  4. Machine tool evaluation and machining operation development

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, T.O.; Kegg, R.

    1997-03-15

    The purpose of this CRADA was to support Cincinnati Milacron`s needs in fabricating precision components, from difficult to machine materials, while maintaining and enhancing the precision manufacturing skills of the Oak Ridge Complex. Oak Ridge and Cincinnati Milacron personnel worked in a team relationship wherein each contributed equally to the success of the program. Process characterization, control technologies, machine tool capabilities, and environmental issues were the primary focus areas. In general, Oak Ridge contributed a wider range of expertise in machine tool testing and monitoring, and environmental testing on machining fluids to the defined tasks while Cincinnati Milacron personnel provided equipment, operations-specific knowledge and shop-floor services to each task. Cincinnati Milacron was very pleased with the results of all of the CRADA tasks. However, some of the environmental tasks were not carried through to a desired completion due to an expanding realization of need as the work progressed. This expansion of the desired goals then exceeded the time length of the CRADA. Discussions are underway on continuing these tasks under either a Work for Others agreement or some alternate funding.

  5. Machine and process characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.W.

    1992-12-01

    A study was conducted to statistically characterize 11 precision machining centers to determine their operating characteristics and process capabilities. Measurement probes and a ball plate were used for measurement analysis. A generic test part designed with geometric features that the department typically manufactures was machined using various machining processes. A better understanding of each machine`s characteristics and process capability was realized through repeating these methods on each machine.

  6. Machine Tool Operation, Course Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Walter E.; Anderson, Floyd L.

    Prepared by an instructor and curriculum specialists, this course of study was designed to meet the individual needs of the dropout and/or hard-core unemployed youth by providing them skill training, related information, and supportive services knowledge in machine tool operation. The achievement level of each student is determined at entry, and…

  7. TEACHING MACHINE STUDY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EVCO, Albuquerque, NM.

    IN AN INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL OF TEACHING MACHINES IN THE JOB CORPS MATHEMATICS PROGRAM, EXISTING JOB CORPS ARITHMETIC MATERIAL WAS PREPARED FOR INSTRUCTION BY MACHINE AND PROGRAMED TEXT, AND THEN FIELD TESTED. REVISIONS WERE MADE, AND A PROGRAMED MANUAL FOR INSTRUCTORS WRITTEN, AFTER WHICH A NEW FIELD TEST WAS RUN. IN THE INITIAL FIELD…

  8. Effect of Machining Velocity in Nanoscale Machining Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Sumaiya; Ibrahim, Raafat; Khondoker, Noman

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the generated forces and deformations of single crystal Cu with (100), (110) and (111) crystallographic orientations at nanoscale machining operation. A nanoindenter equipped with nanoscratching attachment was used for machining operations and in-situ observation of a nano scale groove. As a machining parameter, the machining velocity was varied to measure the normal and cutting forces. At a fixed machining velocity, different levels of normal and cutting forces were generated due to different crystallographic orientations of the specimens. Moreover, after machining operation percentage of elastic recovery was measured and it was found that both the elastic and plastic deformations were responsible for producing a nano scale groove within the range of machining velocities from 250-1000 nm/s.

  9. Operation of the TEMPO machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohwein, G. J.; Lawson, R. N.; Lancaster, K. T.

    The TEMPO machine is a repetitively pulsed, high-voltage driver for experimental microwave generating devices. Three units have been built. TEMPO has a transformer-charged, water-insulated Blumlein directly coupled to the vacuum diode. The Blumlein has a relatively high impedance (20-ohm) strip-type, pulse-forming transmission line (PFL) designed to minimize size. Stray capacitance and enhanced electric fields along the edges of the PFL are controlled by lining the tank in which the Blumlein is housed with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic sheet. During the initial stage of operation, problems with breakdowns in the plastic occurred that necessitated replacing the liner with either polyethylene or polypropylene. During the same period, problems with the power supplies and high voltage switch performance were addressed. These modifications and their results are discussed in the following sections.

  10. Operation of the TEMPO machine

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Lawson, R.N.; Lancaster, K.T.

    1987-01-01

    The TEMPO machine is a repetitively pulsed, high-voltage driver for experimental microwave generating devices. Three units have been built. TEMPO has a transformer-charged, water-insulated Blumlein directly coupled to the vacuum diode. The Blumlein has a relatively high impedance (20-..cap omega..) strip-type, pulse-forming transmission line (PFL) designed to minimize size. Stray capacitance and enhanced electric fields along the edges of the PFL are controlled by lining the tank in which the Blumlein is housed with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic sheet. During the initial stage of operation, problems with breakdowns in the plastic occurred that necessitated replacing the liner with either polyethylene or polypropylene. During the same period, problems with the power supplies and high voltage switch performance were addressed. These modifications and their results are discussed in the following sections.

  11. Standardized Curriculum for Machine Tool Operation/Machine Shop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized vocational education course titles and core contents for two courses in Mississippi are provided: machine tool operation/machine shop I and II. The first course contains the following units: (1) orientation; (2) shop safety; (3) shop math; (4) measuring tools and instruments; (5) hand and bench tools; (6) blueprint reading; (7)…

  12. Standardized Curriculum for Machine Tool Operation/Machine Shop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi State Dept. of Education, Jackson. Office of Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    Standardized vocational education course titles and core contents for two courses in Mississippi are provided: machine tool operation/machine shop I and II. The first course contains the following units: (1) orientation; (2) shop safety; (3) shop math; (4) measuring tools and instruments; (5) hand and bench tools; (6) blueprint reading; (7)

  13. Entering the operative correction machining processes CNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrasov, R. Yu; Starikov, A. I.; Lasukov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the solution to the problem of compensation of errors occurring during machining on CNC machines. We propose a method of mathematical modeling of processes diagnostics and control of technological equipment. The results of the diagnosis of the CNC machine, as well as the mathematical model describing the dependence of the positioning error of the executive bodies of operating component of cutting force PZ, in the range of movement OX.

  14. Clerical Machine Operator Work Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational-Technical High School, Billerica, MA.

    This manual contains a work sample intended to assess a handicapped student's interest in and potential to successfully pass a clerical business machine course (typing) in a comprehensive or vocational school. Section 1 describes the assessment, correlates the work performed and worker traits required for completing the work sample, and lists…

  15. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  16. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  17. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  18. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  19. 30 CFR 18.61 - Final inspection of complete machine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final inspection of complete machine. 18.61... and Tests § 18.61 Final inspection of complete machine. (a) A completely assembled new machine or a... with the requirements of this part it shall be corrected before an approval of the machine will...

  20. Machine vision for real time orbital operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinz, Frank L.

    1988-01-01

    Machine vision for automation and robotic operation of Space Station era systems has the potential for increasing the efficiency of orbital servicing, repair, assembly and docking tasks. A machine vision research project is described in which a TV camera is used for inputing visual data to a computer so that image processing may be achieved for real time control of these orbital operations. A technique has resulted from this research which reduces computer memory requirements and greatly increases typical computational speed such that it has the potential for development into a real time orbital machine vision system. This technique is called AI BOSS (Analysis of Images by Box Scan and Syntax).

  1. Light Machines Operator Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.

    1998-06-15

    The objective of this project was to create a multimedia operator performance support system (OPSS) shell that would provide a framework for delivering appropriate information to the student/novice machine tool user just when needed and in the most appropriate form. In addition, the program was designed so that it could be expanded and further developed by Light Machines personnel. The expertise of AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) in the areas of performance support system design and multimedia creation was employed to create the most user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) while providing access to key topical areas. Light Machines provided a subject matter expert from their technical services group in order to provide the needed information for structuring the OPSS shell. They also provided a Benchman VMC 4000 machine tool at the ASFM and T New Mexico location as well as specific instruction on the safe and effective use of that machine tool.

  2. Operating System For Numerically Controlled Milling Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    OPMILL program is operating system for Kearney and Trecker milling machine providing fast easy way to program manufacture of machine parts with IBM-compatible personal computer. Gives machinist "equation plotter" feature, which plots equations that define movements and converts equations to milling-machine-controlling program moving cutter along defined path. System includes tool-manager software handling up to 25 tools and automatically adjusts to account for each tool. Developed on IBM PS/2 computer running DOS 3.3 with 1 MB of random-access memory.

  3. Intelligent image processing for machine operator safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Dennis N.

    1994-09-01

    This paper describes the use of intelligent image processing as a machine tool operator safety technology. One or more color, linear array cameras are positioned to view the critical region(s) around a machine tool. The image data is processed to provide indicators of an operator danger condition via color content, shape content, and motion content. The data from these analyses is then sent to a threat evaluator. The purpose of the evaluator is to determine if a danger condition exists based on the analyses of color, shape, and motion, and on `knowledge' of the specific environment of the machine tool. The threat evaluator employs fuzzy logic as a means of dealing with uncertainty in the vision data.

  4. Machine Operator Training Program and Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Cyr, David; And Others

    This curriculum contains materials for use in duplicating the 11-week course for machine operators that was implemented at New Hampshire Vocational-Technical College in Nashua, New Hampshire. Addressed in the course, which is designed to prepare entry-level employees, are the following topics: basic math, blueprint reading, layout tools and…

  5. On-machine ultrasonic sensors for paper stiffness. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Maclin S.; Jackson, Theodore G.; Brown, Ernest

    2000-04-01

    This final report presents the results of a 5-year effort by the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) and its participating partners. The objective of this work was to develop and demonstrate sensors capable of measuring the velocity of ultrasound in the out-of-plane (ZD) and in-plane directions of paper as it is being produced on a commercial paper machine. On-machine ultrasonic measurements can be used to determine various mechanical properties of paper and to monitor process status and product quality. This report first presents a review of the background and potential benefits of on-machine ultrasonic measurements, then summarizes the results of previous work. The ZD measurement system involving the use of ultrasonic transducers in fluid-filled wheels is described in detail, including the method of measurement, the wheel mounting hardware, the on-machine operation, and an overview of the system software. Mill-trial results from two bump tests when producing 69{number_sign} and 55{number_sign} linearboard are presented. For the 69{number_sign} trial the correlation of ZD transit time with plybond and with ZDT (Z-direction tensile or internal bond strength) was greater than 0.8 (R squared). Also observed were ZD stiffness responses to refining and to calendering. ABB Industrial Systems Inc. was responsible for the in-plane sensor. A paper describing ABB's sensor and mill experience is appended.

  6. On-machine dimensional verification. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rendulic, W.

    1993-08-01

    General technology for automating in-process verification of machined products has been studied and implemented on a variety of machines and products at AlliedSignal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD). Tests have been performed to establish system accuracy and probe reliability on two numerically controlled machining centers. Commercial software has been revised, and new cycles such as skew check and skew machining, have been developed to enhance and expand probing capabilities. Probe benefits have been demonstrated in the area of setup, cycle time, part quality, tooling cost, and product sampling.

  7. Fault tolerant operation of switched reluctance machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    The energy crisis and environmental challenges have driven industry towards more energy efficient solutions. With nearly 60% of electricity consumed by various electric machines in industry sector, advancement in the efficiency of the electric drive system is of vital importance. Adjustable speed drive system (ASDS) provides excellent speed regulation and dynamic performance as well as dramatically improved system efficiency compared with conventional motors without electronics drives. Industry has witnessed tremendous grow in ASDS applications not only as a driving force but also as an electric auxiliary system for replacing bulky and low efficiency auxiliary hydraulic and mechanical systems. With the vast penetration of ASDS, its fault tolerant operation capability is more widely recognized as an important feature of drive performance especially for aerospace, automotive applications and other industrial drive applications demanding high reliability. The Switched Reluctance Machine (SRM), a low cost, highly reliable electric machine with fault tolerant operation capability, has drawn substantial attention in the past three decades. Nevertheless, SRM is not free of fault. Certain faults such as converter faults, sensor faults, winding shorts, eccentricity and position sensor faults are commonly shared among all ASDS. In this dissertation, a thorough understanding of various faults and their influence on transient and steady state performance of SRM is developed via simulation and experimental study, providing necessary knowledge for fault detection and post fault management. Lumped parameter models are established for fast real time simulation and drive control. Based on the behavior of the faults, a fault detection scheme is developed for the purpose of fast and reliable fault diagnosis. In order to improve the SRM power and torque capacity under faults, the maximum torque per ampere excitation are conceptualized and validated through theoretical analysis and experiments. With the proposed optimal waveform, torque production is greatly improved under the same Root Mean Square (RMS) current constraint. Additionally, position sensorless operation methods under phase faults are investigated to account for the combination of physical position sensor and phase winding faults. A comprehensive solution for position sensorless operation under single and multiple phases fault are proposed and validated through experiments. Continuous position sensorless operation with seamless transition between various numbers of phase fault is achieved.

  8. F-111 windscreen machining. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerth, H. L.; Brown, R. J.

    1980-09-22

    Studies were conducted to determine the feasibility of improving the optical image transmitted through a military aircraft windscreen by using single-point diamond turning. Reduced warpage (waviness) of the windscreen surfaces ensures that a more accurate optical image is presented to the aircraft pilot. Machining the acrylic surface was accomplished with slightly impared image transmissibility. The use of this technique as a potential production process is discussed.

  9. Food labeling; calorie labeling of articles of food in vending machines. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    To implement the vending machine food labeling provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is establishing requirements for providing calorie declarations for food sold from certain vending machines. This final rule will ensure that calorie information is available for certain food sold from a vending machine that does not permit a prospective purchaser to examine the Nutrition Facts Panel before purchasing the article, or does not otherwise provide visible nutrition information at the point of purchase. The declaration of accurate and clear calorie information for food sold from vending machines will make calorie information available to consumers in a direct and accessible manner to enable consumers to make informed and healthful dietary choices. This final rule applies to certain food from vending machines operated by a person engaged in the business of owning or operating 20 or more vending machines. Vending machine operators not subject to the rules may elect to be subject to the Federal requirements by registering with FDA. PMID:25507862

  10. Food labeling; calorie labeling of articles of food in vending machines. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-12-01

    To implement the vending machine food labeling provisions of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is establishing requirements for providing calorie declarations for food sold from certain vending machines. This final rule will ensure that calorie information is available for certain food sold from a vending machine that does not permit a prospective purchaser to examine the Nutrition Facts Panel before purchasing the article, or does not otherwise provide visible nutrition information at the point of purchase. The declaration of accurate and clear calorie information for food sold from vending machines will make calorie information available to consumers in a direct and accessible manner to enable consumers to make informed and healthful dietary choices. This final rule applies to certain food from vending machines operated by a person engaged in the business of owning or operating 20 or more vending machines. Vending machine operators not subject to the rules may elect to be subject to the Federal requirements by registering with FDA. PMID:25438345

  11. Job Grading Standard for Machine Tool Operator, WG-3431.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Bureau of Policies and Standards.

    The standard covers nonsupervisory work involved in the set up, adjustment, and operation of conventional machine tools to perform machining operations in the manufacture and repair of castings, forgings, or parts from raw stock made of various metals, metal alloys, and other materials. A general description of the job at both the WG-8 and WG-9…

  12. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Machine Tool Operation/Machine Shop (Program CIP: 48.0503--Machine Shop Assistant). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for machine tool operation/machine shop I and II. Presented first are a…

  13. Machine Shop Operations--2. Milling Machine, Heat Treatment of Metals, and Grinders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currao, Joseph; Usarzewicz, Louis

    This manual was prepared for the student who plans to enter the machine shop field. The 20 selected jobs provide the student with knowledge and step-by-step procedures for the operation of milling machines. The text is organized so that each job has an objective, tools needed, step-by-step instructions, a progress quiz, and space for reference,…

  14. HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HUNTER 20 MATCHPLATE MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATING THE SAME AS THE HUNTER 10 AND OTHER HUNTER 20 COMPRESSES BOTH MOLD HALVES OVER A DOUBLE-SIDED MATCH PLATE PATTERN. DENNIS GRAY TESTS A MOLD'S HARDNESS TO ENSURE SAND MIXTURE AND MACHINE COMPRESSIBILITY ARE CORRECT. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  15. A consideration of the operation of automatic production machines

    PubMed Central

    HOSHI, Toshiro; SUGIMOTO, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    At worksites, various automatic production machines are in use to release workers from muscular labor or labor in the detrimental environment. On the other hand, a large number of industrial accidents have been caused by automatic production machines. In view of this, this paper considers the operation of automatic production machines from the viewpoint of accident prevention, and points out two types of machine operationoperation for which quick performance is required (operation that is not permitted to be delayed) − and operation for which composed performance is required (operation that is not permitted to be performed in haste). These operations are distinguished by operation buttons of suitable colors and shapes. This paper shows that these characteristics are evaluated as “asymmetric on the time-axis”. Here, in order for workers to accept the risk of automatic production machines, it is preconditioned in general that harm should be sufficiently small or avoidance of harm is easy. In this connection, this paper shows the possibility of facilitating the acceptance of the risk of automatic production machines by enhancing the asymmetric on the time-axis. PMID:25739898

  16. Discomfort Analysis in Computerized Numeric Control Machine Operations

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanasamy, Krishnasamy; Ganguli, Anindya Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The introduction of computerized numeric control (CNC) technology in manufacturing industries has revolutionized the production process, but there are some health and safety problems associated with these machines. The present study aimed to investigate the extent of postural discomfort in CNC machine operators, and the relationship of this discomfort to the display and control panel height, with a view to validate the anthropometric recommendation for the location of the display and control panel in CNC machines. Methods The postural discomforts associated with CNC machines were studied in 122 male operators using Corlett and Bishop's body part discomfort mapping, subject information, and discomfort level at various time intervals from starting to end of a shift. This information was collected using a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was carried out using ANOVA. Results Neck discomfort due to the positioning of the machine displays, and shoulder and arm discomfort due to the positioning of controls were identified as common health issues in the operators of these machines. The study revealed that 45.9% of machine operators reported discomfort in the lower back, 41.8% in the neck, 22.1% in the upper-back, 53.3% in the shoulder and arm, and 21.3% of the operators reported discomfort in the leg. Conclusion Discomfort increased with the progress of the day and was highest at the end of a shift; subject age had no effect on patient tendency to experience discomfort levels. PMID:22993720

  17. INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW WITH CASTING MACHINE AND CASTING FOREMAN OBSERVING OPERATION TO ENSURE MAXIMUM PRODUCTION AND QUALITY. - McWane Cast Iron Pipe Company, Pipe Casting Area, 1201 Vanderbilt Road, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  18. DETAIL OF STANDARD INTERLOCKING MACHINE OPERATING LEVERS. LOCKING MECHANISM IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF STANDARD INTERLOCKING MACHINE OPERATING LEVERS. LOCKING MECHANISM IS BELOW FLOOR. BOXES BEHIND SOME LEVERS HOUSE ELECTRICAL CONTACTS FOR SIGNALS. - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Z Tower, State Route 46, Keyser, Mineral County, WV

  19. Light-operated machines based on threaded molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Credi, Alberto; Silvi, Serena; Venturi, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Rotaxanes and related species represent the most common implementation of the concept of artificial molecular machines, because the supramolecular nature of the interactions between the components and their interlocked architecture allow a precise control on the position and movement of the molecular units. The use of light to power artificial molecular machines is particularly valuable because it can play the dual role of "writing" and "reading" the system. Moreover, light-driven machines can operate without accumulation of waste products, and photons are the ideal inputs to enable autonomous operation mechanisms. In appropriately designed molecular machines, light can be used to control not only the stability of the system, which affects the relative position of the molecular components but also the kinetics of the mechanical processes, thereby enabling control on the direction of the movements. This step forward is necessary in order to make a leap from molecular machines to molecular motors. PMID:24531754

  20. Perspex machine III: continuity over the Turing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James A. D. W.

    2005-01-01

    The perspex machine is a continuous machine that performs perspective transformations. It is a super-Turing machine that contains the Turing machine at discrete locations in perspex space. We show that perspex spaces can be constructed so that all of the operations in a Turing program lie in a continuum of similar operations in the space, except for the Turing halt which is always a discontinuous operation. We then show how to convolve a Turing program to produce an isolinear program that it is robust to missing instructions and degrades gracefully when started incorrectly, sometimes even recovering in performance. We hypothesize that animal brains are similarly robust and graceful because animal neurons share the geometrical properties of the perspex machine. Furthermore, convolution of Turing programs makes possible the band-pass filtering and reconstruction of programs. Global processing can then be obtained by executing the broad bands before the finer ones. Hence, any existing computer program can be compiled on a perspex machine to make it global in operation, robust to damage, and degrade gracefully in the presence of error. The three "Holy Grails" of AI -- globality, robustness, and graceful degradation -- can be supplied by a compiler. They do not require specific programming in individual cases because they are geometrical properties of the perspex machine.

  1. Perspex machine III: continuity over the Turing operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James A. D. W.

    2004-12-01

    The perspex machine is a continuous machine that performs perspective transformations. It is a super-Turing machine that contains the Turing machine at discrete locations in perspex space. We show that perspex spaces can be constructed so that all of the operations in a Turing program lie in a continuum of similar operations in the space, except for the Turing halt which is always a discontinuous operation. We then show how to convolve a Turing program to produce an isolinear program that it is robust to missing instructions and degrades gracefully when started incorrectly, sometimes even recovering in performance. We hypothesize that animal brains are similarly robust and graceful because animal neurons share the geometrical properties of the perspex machine. Furthermore, convolution of Turing programs makes possible the band-pass filtering and reconstruction of programs. Global processing can then be obtained by executing the broad bands before the finer ones. Hence, any existing computer program can be compiled on a perspex machine to make it global in operation, robust to damage, and degrade gracefully in the presence of error. The three "Holy Grails" of AI -- globality, robustness, and graceful degradation -- can be supplied by a compiler. They do not require specific programming in individual cases because they are geometrical properties of the perspex machine.

  2. Laboratory directed research and development final report: Intelligent tools for on-machine acceptance of precision machined components

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, N.G.; Harwell, L.D.; Hazelton, A.

    1997-02-01

    On-Machine Acceptance (OMA) is an agile manufacturing concept being developed for machine tools at SNL. The concept behind OMA is the integration of product design, fabrication, and qualification processes by using the machining center as a fabrication and inspection tool. This report documents the final results of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development effort to qualify OMA.

  3. TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TRUFLO GONDOLA, USED WITH THE HUNTER 10 MOLDING MACHINE, OPERATES THE SAME AS THE TWO LARGER TRUFLOS USED IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE TWO HUNTER 20S. EACH GONDOLA IS CONNECTED TO THE NEXT AND RIDES ON A SINGLE TRACK RAIL FROM MOLDING MACHINES THROUGH POURING AREAS CARRYING A MOLD AROUND TWICE BEFORE THE MOLD IS PUSHED OFF ONTO A VIBRATING SHAKEOUT CONVEYOR. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Casting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Milling Machine Operator: Instructor's Guide for an Adult Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The instructor's guide is for a course expected to help meet the need for trained operators in metalworking. Students successfully completing the course will be qualified for an entry-level job as a milling machine operator. The course is suitable for use in adult education programs of school districts, or in manpower development and training…

  5. Milling Machine Operator: Instructor's Guide for an Adult Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The instructor's guide is for a course expected to help meet the need for trained operators in metalworking. Students successfully completing the course will be qualified for an entry-level job as a milling machine operator. The course is suitable for use in adult education programs of school districts, or in manpower development and training

  6. Operation Soft Boot. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molek, Carol

    Operation Soft Boot was a program designed to develop a computer literacy curriculum for use with adult basic education (ABE) students at their educational level. Computer literacy instruction included a review of the component parts of a personal computer system and their operation and a review of basic keyboarding skills. Instruction also…

  7. State Machine Operation of the MICE Cooling Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlet, Pierrick; Mice Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a demonstration experiment to prove the feasibility of cooling a beam of muons for use in a Neutrino Factory and/or Muon Collider. The MICE cooling channel is a section of a modified Study II cooling channel which will provide a 10% reduction in beam emittance. In order to ensure a reliable measurement, MICE will measure the beam emittance before and after the cooling channel at the level of 1%, a relative measurement of 0.001. This renders MICE a precision experiment which requires strict controls and monitoring of all experimental parameters in order to control systematic errors. The MICE Controls and Monitoring system is based on EPICS and integrates with the DAQ, Data monitoring systems, and a configuration database. The cooling channel for MICE has between 12 and 18 superconductnig solenoid coils in 3 to 7 magnets, depending on the staged development of the experiment. The magnets are coaxial and in close proximity which requires coordinated operation of the magnets when ramping, responding to quench conditions, and quench recovery. To reliably manage the operation of the magnets, MICE is implementing state machines for each magnet and an over-arching state machine for the magnets integrated in the cooling channel. The state machine transitions and operating parameters are stored/restored to/from the configuration database and coupled with MICE Run Control. Proper implementation of the state machines will not only ensure safe operation of the magnets, but will help ensure reliable data quality. A description of MICE, details of the state machines, and lessons learned from use of the state machines in recent magnet training tests will be discussed.

  8. Operation GREENHOUSE-1951. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berkhouse, L.; Davis, S.E.; Gladeck, F.R.; Hallowell, J.H.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-06-15

    GREENHOUSE was a four-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon's test series conducted in the Marshall Islands at Enewetak Atoll in April and May 1951. This is a report of DOD personnel in GREENHOUSE with an emphasis on operational radiological safety.

  9. Shaper and Milling Machine Operation, Machine Shop Work 2: 9555.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline has been prepared to assist the student in learning the basic skills and safety for shaper and milling operations. The course presents the various types of machines, work holding devices, cutting tools and feeds and speeds, and instruction designed to enable the student to obtain the manipulative skills and related knowledge…

  10. 100. ARAIII. Operations with drilling tool used in machining of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    100. ARA-III. Operations with drilling tool used in machining of ML-1 pressure vessel. Receptacle contains filings. July 12, 1963. Ineel photo no. 63-4456. Photographer: Benson. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. Math for Machine Operators. Workplace Education. Instructor's Guide. Project ALERT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gary; Copeland, Nancy; Baker, Catherine

    This instructor's guide contains materials for a 40-hour course designed to refresh math skills for current computer numerical control machine operators. The course uses two instructional methods: computer-based multimedia and traditional instruction. The course description lists target audience and general objective. The next section gives…

  12. A waterjet mining machine for use in room and pillar mining operations

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    A new mining machine is constructed for use in room and pillar mining operations. This machine uses the action of computer controlled, centrally located high pressure cutting lances to cut deep slots in a coal face. These slots stress relieve the coal ahead of the machine and outline blocks of coal. The movement forward of the machine then wedges up the lower block of coal. This wedging action is assisted by the gathering arms of the loader section of the machine, and by underlying oscillating waterjets which create a slot ahead of the loading wedge as it advances. Finally the top section of coal is brought down by the sequential advance of wedge faced roof support members, again assisted by the waterjet action from the central cutting arms. The machine is designed to overcome major disadvantages of existing room and pillar mining machines in regard to a reduction in respirable dust, the creation of an immediate roof support, and an increase in product size, with concomitant reduction in cleaning costs.

  13. Considerations for human-machine interfaces in tele-operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, Curt

    1991-01-01

    Numerous factors impact on the efficiency of tele-operative manipulative work. Generally, these are related to the physical environment of the tele-operator and how he interfaces with robotic control consoles. The capabilities of the operator can be influenced by considerations such as temperature, eye strain, body fatigue, and boredom created by repetitive work tasks. In addition, the successful combination of man and machine will, in part, be determined by the configuration of the visual and physical interfaces available to the teleoperator. The design and operation of system components such as full-scale and mini-master manipulator controllers, servo joysticks, and video monitors will have a direct impact on operational efficiency. As a result, the local environment and the interaction of the operator with the robotic control console have a substantial effect on mission productivity.

  14. Research in Chinese-English Machine Translation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, William S-Y.; And Others

    This report documents results of a two-year effort toward the study and investigation of the design of a prototype system for Chinese-English machine translation in the general area of physics. Previous work in Chinese-English machine translation is reviewed. Grammatical considerations in machine translation are discussed and detailed aspects of…

  15. 78 FR 21387 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Printer and Fax Machine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... and Fax Machine AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security. ACTION... Enterprise 500 Color Printer and Fax Machine M551. Based upon the facts presented, CBP has concluded in the... and Fax Machine M551, for purposes of U.S. Government procurement. DATES: The final determination...

  16. 76 FR 174 - International Business Machines (IBM), Global Sales Operations Organization, Sales and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 71460). The workers provide Relations Analyst and Band 8 Program Manager services. At the... Employment and Training Administration International Business Machines (IBM), Global Sales Operations...; International Business Machines (IBM), Global Sales Operations Organization, Sales and Distribution...

  17. Job Analysis Schedule--Offset Press Operator (Multilith 1250 W) or Offset Duplicating Machine Operator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feyock, Anthony J.

    This paper presents an analysis of the job performed by an offset press operator (alternate title is offset duplicating machine operator) of a Multilith 1250 W. First covered is work performed, as follows: prepares dampening unit for printing run, prepares inking unit for printing, readies printing plate for printing, sets up press for running,

  18. Fusing human and machine skills for remote robotic operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, Paul S.; Kim, Won S.; Venema, Steven C.; Bejczy, Antal K.

    1991-01-01

    The question of how computer assists can improve teleoperator trajectory tracking during both free and force-constrained motions is addressed. Computer graphics techniques which enable the human operator to both visualize and predict detailed 3D trajectories in real-time are reported. Man-machine interactive control procedures for better management of manipulator contact forces and positioning are also described. It is found that collectively, these novel advanced teleoperations techniques both enhance system performance and significantly reduce control problems long associated with teleoperations under time delay. Ongoing robotic simulations of the 1984 space shuttle Solar Maximum EVA Repair Mission are briefly described.

  19. 29 CFR 570.62 - Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines... Health or Well-Being § 570.62 Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11). (a... bakery machines are particularly hazardous for the employment of minors between 16 and 18 years of...

  20. 29 CFR 570.62 - Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines... Health or Well-Being § 570.62 Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11). (a... bakery machines are particularly hazardous for the employment of minors between 16 and 18 years of...

  1. 29 CFR 570.62 - Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines... Health or Well-Being § 570.62 Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11). (a... bakery machines are particularly hazardous for the employment of minors between 16 and 18 years of...

  2. The Kelastic variable wall mining machine. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-12

    This machine cuts coal along a longwall face extending up to 500 feet by a rotating auger with bits. The machine also transports the coal that is cut acting as screw conveyor. By virtue of an integral shroud comprising part of the conveyor the machine is also amenable to a separation of the zones where men work from air being contaminated by dust and methane gas by the cutting action. Beginning as single intake air courses, the air separates at the working section where one split provides fresh air to the Occupied Zone (OZ) for human needs and the other split purges and carries away dust and methane from face fragmentation in the Cutting Zone (CZ). The attractiveness of the Variable Wall Mining Machine is that it addresses the limitations of current longwall mining equipment: it can consistently out-produce continuous mining machines and most longwall shearing machines. It also is amenable to configuring an environment, the dual-duct system, where the air for human breathing is separated from dust-laden ventilating air with methane mixtures. The objective of the research was to perform a mathematical and experimental study of the interrelationships of the components of the system so that a computer model could demonstrate the workings of the system in an animation program. The analysis resulted in the compilation of the parameters for three different configurations of a dual aircourse system of ventilating underground mines. In addressing the goal of an inherently safe mining system the dual-duct adaptation to the Variable Wall Mining Machine appears to offer the path to solution. The respirable dust problem is solvable; the explosive dust problem is nearly solvable; and the explosive methane problem can be greatly reduced. If installed in a highly gassy mine, the dual duct models would also be considerably less costly.

  3. An Approach to Verbalization and Translation by Machine. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chafe, Wallace L.

    The report documents performance on a 24-month R&D effort oriented toward the development of a computerized model for machine translation of natural languages. The model is built around a set of procedures called verbalization, intended to stimulate the processes employed by a speaker or writer in turning stored information into words.…

  4. Wire-cut electrical discharge machinability of ceramics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, W.S.; Skeele, H.A.; Blumenthal, W.R.

    1987-09-01

    The wire-cut electrical discharge machinability of four ceramics was evaluated. Titanium diboride and silicon carbide workpieces were successfully cut in the monolithic state. Boron carbide could only be cut when a metallic sandwich structure was placed around the workpiece. Silicon nitride could not be successfully cut. Mechanisms of material removal as well as a minimum level of workpiece electrical conductance necessary for EDM are proposed. Characterization of the surface damage resulting from electrical-discharge machining is presented. Recast, partially melted, and heat-affected zones are identified. The effects of parametric processing variations on surface integrity are discussed. Flexure strength and residual stress data are compared for EDM cut and diamond-ground surfaces in titanium diboride. Certain limitations are proposed for the EDM fabrication of ceramic components where surface defects are strength limiting.

  5. Neuroplasticity subserving the operation of brain-machine interfaces.

    PubMed

    Oweiss, Karim G; Badreldin, Islam S

    2015-11-01

    Neuroplasticity is key to the operation of brain machine interfaces (BMIs)-a direct communication pathway between the brain and a man-made computing device. Whereas exogenous BMIs that associate volitional control of brain activity with neurofeedback have been shown to induce long lasting plasticity, endogenous BMIs that use prolonged activity-dependent stimulation--and thus may curtail the time scale that governs natural sensorimotor integration loops--have been shown to induce short lasting plasticity. Here we summarize recent findings from studies using both categories of BMIs, and discuss the fundamental principles that may underlie their operation and the longevity of the plasticity they induce. We draw comparison to plasticity mechanisms known to mediate natural sensorimotor skill learning and discuss principles of homeostatic regulation that may constrain endogenous BMI effects in the adult mammalian brain. We propose that BMIs could be designed to facilitate structural and functional plasticity for the purpose of re-organization of target brain regions and directed augmentation of sensorimotor maps, and suggest possible avenues for future work to maximize their efficacy and viability in clinical applications. PMID:25968934

  6. An Expert Machine Tools Selection System for Turning Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. F.; Khalil, S. N.; Karjanto, J.; Wahidin, L. S.; Chen, W.; Rauterberg, G. W. M.

    2015-09-01

    The turning machining process is an important process in the manufacturing industry. It is important to select the right tool for the turning process so that the manufacturing cost will be decreased. The main objective of this research is to select the most suitable machine tools with respect to user input requirement. The selection criteria are based on rule based expert system and multi-criteria weighted average method. The developed system consists of Knowledge Acquisition Module, Machine Tool Selection Module, User Interface Module and Help Module. The system capable of selecting the most suitable machine along with its full specification and ranks the machines based on criteria weighted. The main benefits from using the system is to reduce the complexity in the decision making for selecting the most appropriate machine tools to suit one requirement in the turning process for manufacturing industry.

  7. Surface Inspection Machine Infrared (SIMIR). Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G.L.; Neu, J.T.; Beecroft, M.

    1997-02-28

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement was a one year effort to make the surface inspection machine based on diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (Surface Inspection Machine-Infrared, SIMIR), being developed by Surface Optics Corporation, perform to its highest potential as a practical, portable surface inspection machine. The design function of the SIMIR is to inspect metal surfaces for cleanliness (stains). The system is also capable of evaluating graphite-resin systems for cure and heat damage, and for measuring the effects of moisture exposure on lithium hydride, corrosion on uranium metal, and the constituents of and contamination on wood, paper, and fabrics. Over the period of the CRADA, extensive experience with the use of the SIMIR for surface cleanliness measurements have been achieved through collaborations with NASA and the Army. The SIMIR was made available to the AMTEX CRADA for Finish on Yarn where it made a very significant contribution. The SIMIR was the foundation of a Forest Products CRADA that was developed over the time interval of this CRADA. Surface Optics Corporation and the SIMIR have been introduced to the chemical spectroscopy on-line analysis market and have made staffing additions and arrangements for international marketing of the SIMIR as an on-line surface inspection device. LMES has been introduced to a wide range of aerospace applications, the research and fabrication skills of Surface Optics Corporation, has gained extensive experience in the areas of surface cleanliness from collaborations with NASA and the Army, and an extensive introduction to the textile and forest products industries. The SIMIR, marketed as the SOC-400, has filled an important new technology need in the DOE-DP Enhanced Surveillance Program with instruments delivered to or on order by LMES, LANL, LLNL, and Pantex, where extensive collaborations are underway to implement and improve this technology.

  8. The REX-ISOLDE charge breeder as an operational machine

    SciTech Connect

    Wenander, F.; Delahaye, P.; Scrivens, R.; Savreux, R.

    2006-03-15

    The charge breeding system of radioactive beam experiment at ISOLDE (REX-ISOLDE), consisting of a large Penning trap in combination with an electron-beam ion source (EBIS), is now a mature concept after having delivered radioactive beams for postacceleration to a number of experiments for three years. The system, preparing ions prior to injection into a compact linear accelerator, has shown to be versatile in terms of the ion species and energies that can be delivered. During the experimental periods 2004 and 2005 a significant part of the ISOLDE beam time was dedicated to REX-ISOLDE experiments. Ion masses in the range between A=7 and 153 have been handled with record efficiencies. High-intensity as well as very-short-lived isotope beams were proven to be feasible. Continuous injection into the EBIS has also been successfully tested. Two means of suppressing unwanted beam contaminations were tested and are now in use. In addition, the experience gained from the trap-EBIS concept from a machine operational point of view will be discussed and the limitations described.

  9. Computer Programmed Milling Machine Operations. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Dennis

    This learning module for a high school metals and manufacturing course is designed to introduce the concept of computer-assisted machining (CAM). Through it, students learn how to set up and put data into the controller to machine a part. They also become familiar with computer-aided manufacturing and learn the advantages of computer numerical…

  10. Machinery Management. FMO: Fundamentals of Machine Operation. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Wendell

    This text is intended to provide a basic understanding of selecting, maintaining, and managing farm machinery. The following topics are covered in the individual chapters: dealing with typical problems in farm machinery management; measuring machine capacity; improving field efficiency; matching machine size and capacity; estimating power…

  11. Milling Machine Operator. Coordinator's Guide. Individualized Study Guide. General Metal Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, James W.

    This guide provides information to enable coordinators to direct learning activities for students using an individualized study guide on operating a milling machine. The study material is designed for students enrolled in cooperative part-time training and employed, or desiring to be employed, as milling machine operators. Contents include a…

  12. Milling Machine Operator. Coordinator's Guide. Individualized Study Guide. General Metal Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, James W.

    This guide provides information to enable coordinators to direct learning activities for students using an individualized study guide on operating a milling machine. The study material is designed for students enrolled in cooperative part-time training and employed, or desiring to be employed, as milling machine operators. Contents include a

  13. Quantification of uncertainty in machining operations for on-machine acceptance.

    SciTech Connect

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Su, Jiann-Chemg

    2008-09-01

    Manufactured parts are designed with acceptance tolerances, i.e. deviations from ideal design conditions, due to unavoidable errors in the manufacturing process. It is necessary to measure and evaluate the manufactured part, compared to the nominal design, to determine whether the part meets design specifications. The scope of this research project is dimensional acceptance of machined parts; specifically, parts machined using numerically controlled (NC, or also CNC for Computer Numerically Controlled) machines. In the design/build/accept cycle, the designer will specify both a nominal value, and an acceptable tolerance. As part of the typical design/build/accept business practice, it is required to verify that the part did meet acceptable values prior to acceptance. Manufacturing cost must include not only raw materials and added labor, but also the cost of ensuring conformance to specifications. Ensuring conformance is a substantial portion of the cost of manufacturing. In this project, the costs of measurements were approximately 50% of the cost of the machined part. In production, cost of measurement would be smaller, but still a substantial proportion of manufacturing cost. The results of this research project will point to a science-based approach to reducing the cost of ensuring conformance to specifications. The approach that we take is to determine, a priori, how well a CNC machine can manufacture a particular geometry from stock. Based on the knowledge of the manufacturing process, we are then able to decide features which need further measurements from features which can be accepted 'as is' from the CNC. By calibration of the machine tool, and establishing a machining accuracy ratio, we can validate the ability of CNC to fabricate to a particular level of tolerance. This will eliminate the costs of checking for conformance for relatively large tolerances.

  14. Preliminary design of atlas pulsed power machine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gribble, R.F.

    1996-04-03

    During the contract period from March 95 to March 96 I participated in the preliminary design of the Atlas pulsed power machine. As part of this task I performed of the order of 1000 circuit simulations for many different bank configurations, opening switches, and loads, and about 100 electrostatic field calculations. Results of the calculations were provided at regular Atlas design meetings or in the form of memorandums. I have almost completed the development of a 2D disk transmission line code to more accurately calculate asymmetric transient current and voltage caused by azimuthal variations, including switch timing jitter and local arc faults. This code is attached as a subroutine to the circuit simulation program. The purpose for most of the simulations was to provide information on bank damping requirements and load energy ranges for the different circuit configurations. A minimum transmission line insulation depth was determined from calculating the maximum expected dynamic load back voltage (I{times}{sup dL}/{sub dt}). Other simulations included fault effects, transmission line heating effects (including diffusion, melting, vaporization, ionization), and transmission line transients under various conditions. The line fault simulations using a lumped constant approximation to the 2D disk line provided useful information but even with about 600 elements, it has an upper limit on mode frequencies and tends to exaggerate some modes. Electrostatic (2D) field calculations were used to estimate fields of the transmission lines, insulators, and rail gap switches. Design of conductor surface contours to minimize the field near an insulator stack was one result of these calculations. Effects of biasing and insulator modifications of the rail gap switch was determined.

  15. Adaption of Machine Fluid Analysis for Manufacturing - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Pardini, Allan F.

    2005-08-16

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL: Operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the Department of Energy) is working with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop technology for the US mining industry. Filtration and lubricant suppliers to the pulp and paper industry had noted the recent accomplishments by PNNL and its industrial partners in the DOE OIT Mining Industry of the Future Program, and asked for assistance in adapting this DOE-funded technology to the pulp and paper industry.

  16. Control system for, and a method of, heating an operator station of a work machine

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Thomas M.; Hoff, Brian D.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2005-04-05

    There are situations in which an operator remains in an operator station of a work machine when an engine of the work machine is inactive. The present invention includes a control system for, and a method of, heating the operator station when the engine is inactive. A heating system of the work machine includes an electrically-powered coolant pump, a power source, and at least one piece of warmed machinery. An operator heat controller is moveable between a first and a second position, and is operable to connect the electrically-powered coolant pump to the power source when the engine is inactive and the operator heat controller is in the first position. Thus, by deactivating the engine and then moving the operator heat controller to the first position, the operator may supply electrical energy to the electrically-powered coolant pump, which is operably coupled to heat the operator station.

  17. Method and system for controlling a synchronous machine over full operating range

    DOEpatents

    Walters, James E.; Gunawan, Fani S.; Xue, Yanhong

    2002-01-01

    System and method for controlling a synchronous machine are provided. The method allows for calculating a stator voltage index. The method further allows for relating the magnitude of the stator voltage index against a threshold voltage value. An offset signal is generated based on the results of the relating step. A respective state of operation of the machine is determined. The offset signal is processed based on the respective state of the machine.

  18. Development and enhancement of man-machine interface on operating nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, J.M. Jr.; Cooper, K.F.

    1980-01-01

    The man-machine interface encompasses design, procedures, manning and training considerations incorporated within the discipline of human factors engineering. This paper addresses certain aspects of man-machine interface design features associated with on-site digital computer systems that provide information to assist the plant operator in the performance of his tasks. 2 refs.

  19. Machining operations and associated machining fluid exposures: issues for health and safety intervention in manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wegman, D H

    1996-04-01

    The outline for a workshop discussion of intervention research in manufacturing industry is presented. The example used is the control of machining fluid exposures, a widespread exposure that is associated with risk of cancer, pulmonary disease, dermatitis, and several types of accident-related injuries. Relevant technical considerations for conducting intervention research include the selection of machining fluid for different machining purposes, the management of fluids in use, and the selection and maintenance of environmental controls. Equally important are nontechnical considerations including the need for creating labor-management health and safety committees, the use of administrative rules on job performance for both workers and management, and training on the role of individuals from either group in exposure control. Clarity concerning the objectives for an intervention study and plans for clear means to evaluate study outcomes is critical. Important study variables will include site selection, plant size, plant demographics, the involvement of workers in the study, a willing management, and concern for susceptible workers. PMID:8728147

  20. Basic Operation of Cryocoolers and Related Thermal Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper deals with the basics of cryocoolers and related thermodynamic systems. The treatment is based on the first and second law of thermodynamics for inhomogeneous, open systems using enthalpy flow, entropy flow, and entropy production. Various types of machines, which use an oscillating gas flow, are discussed such as: Stirling refrigerators, GM coolers, pulse-tube refrigerators, and thermoacoustic coolers and engines. Furthermore the paper deals with Joule-Thomson and dilution refrigerators which use a constant flow of the working medium.

  1. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of two alternating current (AC) machines

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Nagashima, James M.; Perisic, Milun; Hiti, Silva

    2012-06-05

    A system is provided for controlling two alternating current (AC) machines via a five-phase PWM inverter module. The system comprises a first control loop, a second control loop, and a current command adjustment module. The current command adjustment module operates in conjunction with the first control loop and the second control loop to continuously adjust current command signals that control the first AC machine and the second AC machine such that they share the input voltage available to them without compromising the target mechanical output power of either machine. This way, even when the phase voltage available to either one of the machines decreases, that machine outputs its target mechanical output power.

  2. 49 CFR 214.355 - Training and qualification in on-track safety for operators of roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... operators of roadway maintenance machines. 214.355 Section 214.355 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... operators of roadway maintenance machines. (a) The training and qualification of roadway workers who operate roadway maintenance machines shall include, as a minimum: (1) Procedures to prevent a person from...

  3. 49 CFR 214.355 - Training and qualification in on-track safety for operators of roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... operators of roadway maintenance machines. 214.355 Section 214.355 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... operators of roadway maintenance machines. (a) The training and qualification of roadway workers who operate roadway maintenance machines shall include, as a minimum: (1) Procedures to prevent a person from...

  4. 49 CFR 214.355 - Training and qualification in on-track safety for operators of roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... operators of roadway maintenance machines. 214.355 Section 214.355 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... operators of roadway maintenance machines. (a) The training and qualification of roadway workers who operate roadway maintenance machines shall include, as a minimum: (1) Procedures to prevent a person from...

  5. 49 CFR 214.355 - Training and qualification in on-track safety for operators of roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... operators of roadway maintenance machines. 214.355 Section 214.355 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... operators of roadway maintenance machines. (a) The training and qualification of roadway workers who operate roadway maintenance machines shall include, as a minimum: (1) Procedures to prevent a person from...

  6. 49 CFR 214.355 - Training and qualification in on-track safety for operators of roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... operators of roadway maintenance machines. 214.355 Section 214.355 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... operators of roadway maintenance machines. (a) The training and qualification of roadway workers who operate roadway maintenance machines shall include, as a minimum: (1) Procedures to prevent a person from...

  7. Time cycle calculation procedure for the special crew during the mining mobile machine complex operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurygin, V.; Lukyanov, V.; Maslovsky, A.

    2015-02-01

    The relevance of the research is specified by the necessity to optimize the delft mobile tunneling equipment operation. Target of the research is tunneling time cycle justification for the special crew during the mining mobile machine complex operation. Methods of the research included the consideration of operation organization schemes in the drifting face and effective use of the mobile equipment during mine exploratory working operations. Time cycle calculation procedures for major processes have been considered. This has been done for the special crew during the mobile machine complex operations for several working faces and various organization schemes.

  8. Numerical Ergonomics Analysis in Operation Environment of CNC Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S. F.; Yang, Z. X.

    2010-05-01

    The performance of operator will be affected by different operation environments [1]. Moreover, poor operation environment may cause health problems of the operator [2]. Physical and psychological considerations are two main factors that will affect the performance of operator under different conditions of operation environment. In this paper, applying scientific and systematic methods find out the pivot elements in the field of physical and psychological factors. There are five main factors including light, temperature, noise, air flow and space that are analyzed. A numerical ergonomics model has been built up regarding the analysis results which can support to advance the design of operation environment. Moreover, the output of numerical ergonomic model can provide the safe, comfortable, more productive conditions for the operator.

  9. A human-machine interface for multireactor operation

    SciTech Connect

    Zizzo, D.; Dayal, Y.; Carroll, D. ); Hashimoto, S.; Ishida, T. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes interim results of an ongoing joint effort between G.E. Nuclear Energy and Hitachi, Ltd., to develop functional, performance, and anthropometric requirements for a unique nuclear reactor operating console that facilitates operation of three reactors and a steam turbine by a single licensed reactor operator. The human factors engineering (HFE) challenges associated with the operator console are discussed, a conceptual [open quotes]visualization[close quotes] of the console and control room is presented, and operator support concepts (e.g., alarm handling) are briefly described. The Advanced Reactor Programs group with G.E. Nuclear Energy is designing a modular, pool-type, sodium-cooled reactor with unique safety characteristics whereby no mitigative operator action is required in order to meet the plant's safety limits (radiation release criteria). A full-sized, 1440-MW(electric) plant includes nine such reactors configured as three physically separate, independently operated power blocks. One power block consists of three reactors, each with their individual steam generators headered to jointly deliver superheated steam to a turbine generator. All power blocks are operated from one control room. Furthermore, due to greatly reduced reliance on manual safety actions by the operator, control systems are automated to the extent that one power block is operated by one licensed reactor operator. The control room houses three operator consoles (one per power block) and a supervisor's workstation. This is the primary equipment used by the normal control room shift staffing of three licensed reactor operators, a shift supervisor, and an assistant shift supervisor. The operator and the automated control systems will, in principle, perform together as a single entity. However, one operator operating more than one nuclear reactor has no precedent.

  10. A Catalog of Performance Objectives, Performance Conditions, and Performance Guides for Machine Tool Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadt, Ronald; And Others

    This catalog provides performance objectives, tasks, standards, and performance guides associated with current occupational information relating to the job content of machinists, specifically tool grinder operators, production lathe operators, and production screw machine operators. The catalog is comprised of 262 performance objectives, tool and…

  11. The psychological certificate of the computer. [operator performance in man machine system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mileryan, Y. A.

    1975-01-01

    A systems structural approach is reported to study the operator for a computerized man machine system psychologically in order to obtain relative estimates for his performance in the particular system he serves. Considered are the reliability of sensorimotor control functions for the reconstructed system and its indices according to the level of effectiveness of the operator's accomplishment of intellectual operations.

  12. AN EIGHT WEEK SEMINAR IN AN INTRODUCTION TO NUMERICAL CONTROL ON TWO- AND THREE-AXIS MACHINE TOOLS FOR VOCATIONAL AND TECHNICAL MACHINE TOOL INSTRUCTORS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOLDT, MILTON; POKORNY, HARRY

    THIRTY-THREE MACHINE SHOP INSTRUCTORS FROM 17 STATES PARTICIPATED IN AN 8-WEEK SEMINAR TO DEVELOP THE SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE ESSENTIAL FOR TEACHING THE OPERATION OF NUMERICALLY CONTROLLED MACHINE TOOLS. THE SEMINAR WAS GIVEN FROM JUNE 20 TO AUGUST 12, 1966, WITH COLLEGE CREDIT AVAILABLE THROUGH STOUT STATE UNIVERSITY. THE PARTICIPANTS COMPLETED AN…

  13. Nature of Soviet operational art. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Soviet operational art today provides a framework for, studying, understanding, preparing for, and conducting war. Together with strategy and tactics, it makes the study of war an academic discipline requiring intense research and scholarship on the part of those who write about and who would have to conduct war. As such, operational art performs distinct tasks associated with the conduct of war.

  14. Machine-Vision Aids for Improved Flight Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, P. K.; Chatterji, Gano B.

    1996-01-01

    The development of machine vision based pilot aids to help reduce night approach and landing accidents is explored. The techniques developed are motivated by the desire to use the available information sources for navigation such as the airport lighting layout, attitude sensors and Global Positioning System to derive more precise aircraft position and orientation information. The fact that airport lighting geometry is known and that images of airport lighting can be acquired by the camera, has lead to the synthesis of machine vision based algorithms for runway relative aircraft position and orientation estimation. The main contribution of this research is the synthesis of seven navigation algorithms based on two broad families of solutions. The first family of solution methods consists of techniques that reconstruct the airport lighting layout from the camera image and then estimate the aircraft position components by comparing the reconstructed lighting layout geometry with the known model of the airport lighting layout geometry. The second family of methods comprises techniques that synthesize the image of the airport lighting layout using a camera model and estimate the aircraft position and orientation by comparing this image with the actual image of the airport lighting acquired by the camera. Algorithms 1 through 4 belong to the first family of solutions while Algorithms 5 through 7 belong to the second family of solutions. Algorithms 1 and 2 are parameter optimization methods, Algorithms 3 and 4 are feature correspondence methods and Algorithms 5 through 7 are Kalman filter centered algorithms. Results of computer simulation are presented to demonstrate the performance of all the seven algorithms developed.

  15. Agricultural Safety. FMO: Fundamentals of Machine Operation. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual is intended to provide students with basic information on the safe operation of farm machinery. The following topics are covered in the individual chapters: safe farm machinery operation (the importance of safety, the role of communication in safety, and types of farm accidents); human factors (human limitations and capabilities;…

  16. Agricultural Safety. FMO: Fundamentals of Machine Operation. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John Deere Co., Moline, IL.

    This manual is intended to provide students with basic information on the safe operation of farm machinery. The following topics are covered in the individual chapters: safe farm machinery operation (the importance of safety, the role of communication in safety, and types of farm accidents); human factors (human limitations and capabilities;

  17. Intelligent Machine Learning Analysis for Fuel Cell Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, R W; Hoyt, W A

    2000-06-30

    A performance computational model for a 100 kW nominal solid oxide fuel cell generator system is described. The calculational methods are based on the FORTRAN programming language. Comprehensive parameter input options are presented, and constraints are identified. Example reactant, electrical, and efficiency outputs are demonstrated over the relevant operating ranges. A sample calculated output display at nominal operating conditions is given.

  18. Method and machine for high strength undiffused brushless operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2003-06-03

    A brushless electric machine (30) having a stator (31) and a rotor (32) and a main air gap (34), the rotor (32) having pairs of rotor pole portions (22b, 22c, 32f, 32l) disposed at least partly around the axis of rotation (32p) and facing the main air gap (24b, 24c, 34), at least one stationary winding (20b, 20c, 33b) separated from the rotor (22b, 22c, 32) by a secondary air gap (23b, 23c, 35) so as to induce a rotor-side flux in the rotor (22b, 22c, 32) which controls a resultant flux in the main air gap (24b, 24c, 34). PM material (27b, 27c) is disposed in spaces between the rotor pole portions (22b, 22c, 32f, 32l) to inhibit the rotor-side flux from leaking from said pole portions (22b, 22c, 32f, 32l) prior to reaching the main air gap (24b, 24c, 34). By selecting the direction of current in the stationary winding (20b, 20c, 33b) both flux enhancement and flux weakening are provided for the main air gap (24b, 24c, 34). The stationary windings (31a, 33b) which are used for both primary and secondary excitation allow for easier adaptation to cooling systems as described. A method of non-diffused flux enhancement and flux weakening is also disclosed.

  19. Modeling human-machine interactions for operations room layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, Keith C.; Edwards, Jack L.; Beevis, David

    2000-11-01

    The LOCATE layout analysis tool was used to analyze three preliminary configurations for the Integrated Command Environment (ICE) of a future USN platform. LOCATE develops a cost function reflecting the quality of all human-human and human-machine communications within a workspace. This proof- of-concept study showed little difference between the efficacy of the preliminary designs selected for comparison. This was thought to be due to the limitations of the study, which included the assumption of similar size for each layout and a lack of accurate measurement data for various objects in the designs, due largely to their notional nature. Based on these results, the USN offered an opportunity to conduct a LOCATE analysis using more appropriate assumptions. A standard crew was assumed, and subject matter experts agreed on the communications patterns for the analysis. Eight layouts were evaluated with the concepts of coordination and command factored into the analysis. Clear differences between the layouts emerged. The most promising design was refined further by the USN, and a working mock-up built for human-in-the-loop evaluation. LOCATE was applied to this configuration for comparison with the earlier analyses.

  20. Study on Performance of Integration Control by Man and Machine in Stage of Final Approaching for Spaceship Rendezvous and Docking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qianxiang; Liu, Zhongqi

    With the development of manned space technology, space rendezvous and docking (RVD) technology will play a more and more important role. The astronauts participation in a final close period of man-machine combination control is an important way of RVD technology. Spacecraft RVD control involves control problem of a total of 12 degrees of freedom (location) and attitude which it relative to the inertial space the orbit. Therefore, in order to reduce the astronauts operation load and reduce the security requirements to the ground station and achieve an optimal performance of the whole man-machine system, it is need to study how to design the number of control parameters of astronaut or aircraft automatic control system. In this study, with the laboratory conditions on the ground, a method was put forward to develop an experimental system in which the performance evaluation of spaceship RVD integration control by man and machine could be completed. After the RVD precision requirements were determined, 26 male volunteers aged 20-40 took part in the performance evaluation experiments. The RVD integration control success rates and total thruster ignition time were chosen as evaluation indices. Results show that if less than three RVD parameters control tasks were finished by subject and the rest of parameters control task completed by automation, the RVD success rate would be larger than eighty-eight percent and the fuel consumption would be optimized. In addition, there were two subjects who finished the whole six RVD parameters control tasks by enough train. In conclusion, if the astronauts' role should be integrated into the RVD control, it was suitable for them to finish the heading, pitch and roll control in order to assure the man-machine system high performance. If astronauts were needed to finish all parameter control, two points should be taken into consideration, one was enough fuel and another was enough long operation time.

  1. Development of Prediction System for Environmental Burden for Machine Tool Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Hirohisa; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Norihisa, Takashi; Chen, Lian-Yi; Fujimoto, Hideo; Hasebe, Takao

    Recently, some activities for environmental protection have been attempted to reduce environmental burdens in many fields. The manufacturing field also requires such reduction. Hence, a prediction system for environmental burden for machining operation is proposed based on the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) policy for the future manufacturing system in this research. This system enables the calculation of environmental burden (equivalent CO2 emission) due to the electric consumption of machine tool components, cutting tool status, coolant quantity, lubricant oil quantity and metal chip quantity, and provides accurate information of environmental burden of the machining process by considering some activities related to machine tool operation. In this paper, the development of the prediction system is described. As a case study, two Numerical Control (NC) programs that manufacture a simple shape are evaluated to show the feasibility of the proposed system.

  2. Universal Tool Grinder Operator Instructor's Guide. Part of Single-Tool Skills Program Machine Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    The document is an instructor's guide for a course on universal tool grinder operation. The course is designed to train people in making complicated machine setups and precision in the grinding operations and, although intended primarily for adult learners, it can be adapted for high school use. The guide is divided into three parts: (1) the…

  3. Washing Machines--Components & Operations; Appliance Repair 2: #9025.03.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Designed to familiarize the student with the components and operations of automatic washing machines, this course outline offers instruction on the principles of washing and their relation to the automatic washer, the functions and operations of washer components, identification of various component malfunctions, washer installation, and the…

  4. ATD-1 Operational Integration Assessment Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzberger, Kevin E.; Sharma, Shivanjli; Martin, Lynn Hazel; Wynnyk, Mitch; McGarry, Katie

    2015-01-01

    The FAA and NASA conducted an Operational Integration Assessment (OIA) of a prototype Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (formerly TSS, now TSAS) system at the FAA's William J. Hughes Technical Center (WJHTC). The OIA took approximately one year to plan and execute, culminating in a formal data collection, referred to as the Run for Record, from May 12-21, 2015. This report presents quantitative and qualitative results from the Run for Record.

  5. Design of a Versatile, Teleoperable, Towable Lifting Machine with Robotic Capabilities for Use in Nasa's Lunar Base Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Elizabeth; Ogle, James; Schoppe, Dean

    1989-01-01

    The lifting machine will assist in lifting cargo off of landers sent to the Moon and in the construction of a lunar base. Three possible designs were considered for the overall configuration of the lifting machine: the variable angle crane, the tower crane, and the gantry crane. Alternate designs were developed for the major components of the lifting machine. A teleoperable, variable angle crane was chosen as its final design. The design consists of a telescoping boom mounted to a chassis that is supported by two conical wheels for towing and four outriggers for stability. Attached to the end of the boom is a seven degree of freedom robot arm for light, dexterous, lifting operations. A cable and hook suspends from the end of the boom for heavy, gross, lifting operations. Approximate structural sizes were determined for the lifter and its components. However, further analysis is needed to determine the optimum design dimensions. The design team also constructed a model of the design which demonstrates its features and operating principals.

  6. An extensible operating system design for large-scale parallel machines.

    SciTech Connect

    Riesen, Rolf E.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian

    2009-04-01

    Running untrusted user-level code inside an operating system kernel has been studied in the 1990's but has not really caught on. We believe the time has come to resurrect kernel extensions for operating systems that run on highly-parallel clusters and supercomputers. The reason is that the usage model for these machines differs significantly from a desktop machine or a server. In addition, vendors are starting to add features, such as floating-point accelerators, multicore processors, and reconfigurable compute elements. An operating system for such machines must be adaptable to the requirements of specific applications and provide abstractions to access next-generation hardware features, without sacrificing performance or scalability.

  7. Highway operation and plant damage. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Leiser, A.T.; Palaniyandi, R.; Paul, J.L.; Raabe, R.

    1980-04-01

    A five year study investigated the relationship between highway operation and plant damage in the Tahoe Basin and adjacent highways. These studies include field surveys, greenhouse studies, soil salt application trials, foliar salt application trials, an Armillaria root rot inoculation study, a seasonal fluctuation of salt study, the effect of temperature on salt uptake and a bark absorption of salt study. Highway deicing salt is a cause of damage on conifers, usually limited to 30 feet from the pavement edge. Drainage patterns and salt carried by aerosols may extend damage farther from the pavement. Of the four principal conifers in the study area, Jeffrey pine and lodgepole pine appeared the most tolerant of salt and incense cedar was the most susceptible.

  8. 76 FR 81518 - Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Laser-Based Multi-Function Office Machines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Notice of Issuance of Final Determination Concerning Laser... laser-based multi-function office machines. Based upon the facts presented, CBP has concluded in the... of the laser-based multi-function office machine, and it is at their assembly and programming...

  9. Commercialization of on-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this project is to develop sensors capable of measuring the velocity of ultrasound in the thickness and in-plane directions of a moving paper web as it is being produced on the paper machine. The velocity of ultrasound can be used to determine various mechanical properties of paper, e.g., the square of the velocity times the basis weight is a measure of the extensional stiffness. On-machine measurements would allow continuous monitoring of product quality as well as provide data for controlling the papermaking process. This report summarizes work supported by Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC05-93CE40006, USDOE, and by the member companies of the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST). The central purpose of this grant, effective from October 1, 1993 through June 30, 1994, was to establish a plan: to develop a commercially viable system for on-machine, out-of-plane, and in-plane measurements of ultrasonic velocities; install a working system on a paper machine in a host paper mill; demonstrate the system`s capabilities and benefits to the paper manufacturing industry; and have a vendor committed to providing and supporting the system. This report first presents a review of the background and potential benefits of on-line ultrasonic velocity measurements. Then the results of the work supported by the previous contract are summarized followed by additional measurements on moving webs in the laboratory. Out-of-plane (ZD) and in-plane ultrasonic velocity data for 26-lb medium and 42-lb liner samples are presented and discussed, illustrating the type of data that will be available from on-machine measurements. Finally, the status of the plans and support for continued work toward commercialization is reviewed.

  10. Implementing a Machine-Readable Records Program: The Final Report of the Wisconsin Machine-Readable Records Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Max J.

    The Wisconsin Machine-Readable Records Project was conducted by the State Historical Society of Wisconsin between August 1981 and July 1983 as a follow-up to the Wisconsin Survey of Machine-Readable Public Records. Both projects assessed the impact of computer technology on record keeping by state government agencies and addressed the implications…

  11. The reduction methods of operator's radiation dose for portable dental X-ray machines

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jeong-Yeon

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study was aimed to investigate the methods to reduce operator's radiation dose when taking intraoral radiographs with portable dental X-ray machines. Materials and Methods Two kinds of portable dental X-ray machines (DX3000, Dexcowin and Rextar, Posdion) were used. Operator's radiation dose was measured with an 1,800 cc ionization chamber (RadCal Corp.) at the hand level of X-ray tubehead and at the operator's chest and waist levels with and without the backscatter shield. The operator's radiation dose at the hand level was measured with and without lead gloves and with long and short cones. Results The backscatter shield reduced operator's radiation dose at the hand level of X-ray tubehead to 23 - 32%, the lead gloves to 26 - 31%, and long cone to 48 - 52%. And the backscatter shield reduced operator's radiation dose at the operator's chest and waist levels to 0.1 - 37%. Conclusions When portable dental X-ray systems are used, it is recommended to select X-ray machine attached with a backscatter shield and a long cone and to wear the lead gloves. PMID:23429415

  12. MACHINE TOOL OPERATOR--GENERAL, ENTRY, SUGGESTED GUIDE FOR A TRAINING COURSE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RONEY, MAURICE W.; AND OTHERS

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS CURRICULUM GUIDE IS TO ASSIST THE ADMINISTRATOR AND INSTRUCTOR IN PLANNING AND DEVELOPING MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS TO PREPARE MACHINE TOOL OPERATORS FOR ENTRY-LEVEL POSITIONS. THE COURSE OUTLINE PROVIDES UNITS IN -- (1) ORIENTATION, (2) BENCH WORK, (3) SHOP MATHEMATICS, (4) BLUEPRINT READING AND SKETCHING, (5)…

  13. Machine Repairers and Operators. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on machine repairers and operators, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include appliance repairers,…

  14. Technology and Jobs: Computer-Aided Design. Numerical-Control Machine-Tool Operators. Office Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanton, Michael; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Three reports on the effects of high technology on the nature of work include (1) Stanton on applications and implications of computer-aided design for engineers, drafters, and architects; (2) Nardone on the outlook and training of numerical-control machine tool operators; and (3) Austin and Drake on the future of clerical occupations in automated…

  15. Effectiveness of liquid crystal admixtures in the lubricating oil for a multi-operational machine

    SciTech Connect

    Vekteris, V.; Murachver, A.

    1995-10-01

    Reliable cyclic operation of modern multioperational, numerically controlled (N/C) machine tools strongly depends not only on the precision manufacturing of kinematic pairs, but also on the conditions of their maintenance and running-in periods. In the machine tool industry, the running-in of the most important newly assembled kinematic units and mechanisms of machines, i.e., spindle head units, gearboxes, ball screw paris, etc., is attained during a 2- to 36-hour period in the plant and subsequent long-term operational running-in of all units on the assembled machine. For the reduction of the running-in duration, low-viscosity oil, sulfurized lubricants and various additives are used. However, the usage of low viscosity oil may cause scoring and increase the wear due to squeezing-out of the oil and contact between mating surfaces. In other cases the low effectiveness of the additives in the running-in process is observed, as well as surface corrosion and the long duration of the run-in process itself. The influence of lubricants and their additives on the running-in process of gearboxes of metal-cutting machine tools is investigated. Theoretical and experimental analysis proved the expediency of adding liquid crystals (fatty acid esters of cholesterol) into the oil. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Operating Comfort Prediction Model of Human-Machine Interface Layout for Cabin Based on GEP

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In view of the evaluation and decision-making problem of human-machine interface layout design for cabin, the operating comfort prediction model is proposed based on GEP (Gene Expression Programming), using operating comfort to evaluate layout scheme. Through joint angles to describe operating posture of upper limb, the joint angles are taken as independent variables to establish the comfort model of operating posture. Factor analysis is adopted to decrease the variable dimension; the model's input variables are reduced from 16 joint angles to 4 comfort impact factors, and the output variable is operating comfort score. The Chinese virtual human body model is built by CATIA software, which will be used to simulate and evaluate the operators' operating comfort. With 22 groups of evaluation data as training sample and validation sample, GEP algorithm is used to obtain the best fitting function between the joint angles and the operating comfort; then, operating comfort can be predicted quantitatively. The operating comfort prediction result of human-machine interface layout of driller control room shows that operating comfort prediction model based on GEP is fast and efficient, it has good prediction effect, and it can improve the design efficiency. PMID:26448740

  17. Operating Comfort Prediction Model of Human-Machine Interface Layout for Cabin Based on GEP.

    PubMed

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Chen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In view of the evaluation and decision-making problem of human-machine interface layout design for cabin, the operating comfort prediction model is proposed based on GEP (Gene Expression Programming), using operating comfort to evaluate layout scheme. Through joint angles to describe operating posture of upper limb, the joint angles are taken as independent variables to establish the comfort model of operating posture. Factor analysis is adopted to decrease the variable dimension; the model's input variables are reduced from 16 joint angles to 4 comfort impact factors, and the output variable is operating comfort score. The Chinese virtual human body model is built by CATIA software, which will be used to simulate and evaluate the operators' operating comfort. With 22 groups of evaluation data as training sample and validation sample, GEP algorithm is used to obtain the best fitting function between the joint angles and the operating comfort; then, operating comfort can be predicted quantitatively. The operating comfort prediction result of human-machine interface layout of driller control room shows that operating comfort prediction model based on GEP is fast and efficient, it has good prediction effect, and it can improve the design efficiency. PMID:26448740

  18. Cold cleaning machine operations new source performnce standards. Background information/basis and purpose document

    SciTech Connect

    Almodovar, P.A.

    1994-08-01

    The Administrator has identified organic solvent degreasing, of which cold cleaning machine operations are a subset, as a source of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions that causes or contributes to air pollution that may reasonably be anticipated to endanger public health or welfare. The intent of the proposed standards is to require new, modified, and reconstructured immersion cold cleaning machines with surface areas greater than or equal to 1.8 square meters (19 square feet) to control emissions to the level achievable by the best demonstrated system of continuous emission reduction, taking into consideration cost of achieving such emission reduction and any nonair quality health and environmental impact and energy requirements.

  19. Visual feedback system to reduce errors while operating roof bolting machines

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Lisa J.; Burgess-Limerick, Robin; Eiter, Brianna; Porter, William; Matty, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Problem Operators of roof bolting machines in underground coal mines do so in confined spaces and in very close proximity to the moving equipment. Errors in the operation of these machines can have serious consequences, and the design of the equipment interface has a critical role in reducing the probability of such errors. Methods An experiment was conducted to explore coding and directional compatibility on actual roof bolting equipment and to determine the feasibility of a visual feedback system to alert operators of critical movements and to also alert other workers in close proximity to the equipment to the pending movement of the machine. The quantitative results of the study confirmed the potential for both selection errors and direction errors to be made, particularly during training. Results Subjective data confirmed a potential benefit of providing visual feedback of the intended operations and movements of the equipment. Impact This research may influence the design of these and other similar control systems to provide evidence for the use of warning systems to improve operator situational awareness. PMID:23398703

  20. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Machine Tool Operation/Machine Shop and Tool and Die Making Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 48.0507--Tool and Die Maker/Technologist) (Program CIP: 48.0503--Machine Shop Assistant). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the machine tool operation/machine tool and tool and die making technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of courses and programs, description of the…

  1. Volitional enhancement of firing synchrony and oscillation by neuronal operant conditioning: interaction with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Yoshio; Song, Kichan; Tachibana, Shota; Takahashi, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on neuronal operant conditioning in which increments in neuronal activities are directly rewarded without behaviors. We discuss the potential of this approach to elucidate neuronal plasticity for enhancing specific brain functions and its interaction with the progress in neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interfaces. The key to-be-conditioned activities that this paper emphasizes are synchronous and oscillatory firings of multiple neurons that reflect activities of cell assemblies. First, we introduce certain well-known studies on neuronal operant conditioning in which conditioned enhancements of neuronal firing were reported in animals and humans. These studies demonstrated the feasibility of volitional control over neuronal activity. Second, we refer to the recent studies on operant conditioning of synchrony and oscillation of neuronal activities. In particular, we introduce a recent study showing volitional enhancement of oscillatory activity in monkey motor cortex and our study showing selective enhancement of firing synchrony of neighboring neurons in rat hippocampus. Third, we discuss the reasons for emphasizing firing synchrony and oscillation in neuronal operant conditioning, the main reason being that they reflect the activities of cell assemblies, which have been suggested to be basic neuronal codes representing information in the brain. Finally, we discuss the interaction of neuronal operant conditioning with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface (BMI). We argue that synchrony and oscillation of neuronal firing are the key activities required for developing both reliable neurorehabilitation and high-performance BMI. Further, we conclude that research of neuronal operant conditioning, neurorehabilitation, BMI, and system neuroscience will produce findings applicable to these interrelated fields, and neuronal synchrony and oscillation can be a common important bridge among all of them. PMID:24567704

  2. On-machine sensors to measure paper mechanical properties. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1993-10-01

    The measurement of the velocity of ultrasound provides a nondestructive means to characterize the elastic stiffness properties of paper. The objective of this project is to develop sensors capable of measuring the velocity of ultrasound in the thickness and in-plane directions of moving paper webs. On-machine measurements would allow continuous monitoring of product quality as well as provide data for controlling the papermaking process. This final report first reviews the background and various technical approaches explored. Then the preferred configurations and examples of measurements on moving paper webs in the laboratory are presented and discussed. The report concludes with a summary of project results and recommendations for further developments. Transducers mounted in fluid-filled wheels are used to make thickness direction, ZD, ultrasound velocity measurements on paper webs moving in the nip between two such wheels. Comparisons of the arrival times of echo and transmitted pulses with and without the paper web in the nip provide a measure of the transit time and caliper. Bimorph transducers mounted in an aluminum cylinder are used for machine direction (MD) and cross direction (CD) in-plane measurements. These ZD and in-plane sensors are mounted on a web handler in the IPST laboratory.

  3. "Machine" consciousness and "artificial" thought: an operational architectonics model guided approach.

    PubMed

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A; Fingelkurts, Alexander A; Neves, Carlos F H

    2012-01-01

    Instead of using low-level neurophysiology mimicking and exploratory programming methods commonly used in the machine consciousness field, the hierarchical operational architectonics (OA) framework of brain and mind functioning proposes an alternative conceptual-theoretical framework as a new direction in the area of model-driven machine (robot) consciousness engineering. The unified brain-mind theoretical OA model explicitly captures (though in an informal way) the basic essence of brain functional architecture, which indeed constitutes a theory of consciousness. The OA describes the neurophysiological basis of the phenomenal level of brain organization. In this context the problem of producing man-made "machine" consciousness and "artificial" thought is a matter of duplicating all levels of the operational architectonics hierarchy (with its inherent rules and mechanisms) found in the brain electromagnetic field. We hope that the conceptual-theoretical framework described in this paper will stimulate the interest of mathematicians and/or computer scientists to abstract and formalize principles of hierarchy of brain operations which are the building blocks for phenomenal consciousness and thought. PMID:21130079

  4. Search for an optimal jigging machine operating regime. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works-USSR

    SciTech Connect

    Mamykin, Yu.S.; Rots, R.Yu.; Medvedev, A.V.; Zaplatkina, V.V.; Gulyanskii, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation of the operation of jigging machines for cleaning of fine coal was conducted under industrial conditions. Continuous monitoring was accomplished by the express analysis method in an aqueous solution of zinc chloride with the ash of the products determined. The capacity of the machines varied from 70 to 210 tons/h, the pulsator rotation speed from 41 to 97 rpm, and the air pressure from 12.7 to 13.7 kPa. The investigation was conducted by a passive experiment method. The tests showed that a change in the load from 170 to 190 tons/h with a simultaneous change in the content in the byproduct from 6.5 to 15% caused a decrease in the oscillation frequency from 80 to 65 rpm and a slight reduction in the cleaning efficiency (from 35 to 33.8%). With annual control the jigging efficiency averaged 23%.

  5. Machine learning algorithms to damage detection under operational and environmental variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Eloi; Park, Gyuhae; Farrar, Charles R.; Worden, Keith; Figueiras, Joaquim

    2010-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to detect structural damage in the presence of operational and environmental variations using vibration-based damage identification procedures. For this purpose, four machine learning algorithms are applied based on auto-associative neural networks, factor analysis, Mahalanobis distance, and singular value decomposition. A baseexcited three-story frame structure was tested in laboratory environment to obtain time series data from an array of sensors under several structural state conditions. Tests were performed with varying stiffness and mass conditions with the assumption that these sources of variability are representative of changing operational and environmental conditions. Damage was simulated through nonlinear effects introduced by a bumper mechanism that induces a repetitive, impacttype nonlinearity. This mechanism intends to simulate the cracks that open and close under dynamic loads or loose connections that rattle. The unique contribution of this study is a direct comparison of the four proposed machine learning algorithms that have been reported as reliable approaches to separate structural conditions with changes resulting from damage from changes caused by operational and environmental variations.

  6. [Elaboration of rational schedules of work and rest for excavation and drilling machine operators].

    PubMed

    Butkovskaia, Z M; Smirnov, V V

    1996-01-01

    Operators of excavators, boring machines could be considered as exposed to vibration at work. Methods preventing occupational diseases among those workers should include general medical and management procedures as well as rational work schedules. The authors suggest shift-related and changeable schedules of work and rest, based on timing and half-year analysis of work output. When put into practice, the schedule could lower the total vibration zone to the allowable one and relieve fatigue. Length of service in the occupations should be limited by 5-7 years. PMID:8768114

  7. Sensor guided control and navigation with intelligent machines. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Bijoy K.

    2001-03-26

    This item constitutes the final report on ''Visionics: An integrated approach to analysis and design of intelligent machines.'' The report discusses dynamical systems approach to problems in robust control of possibly time-varying linear systems, problems in vision and visually guided control, and, finally, applications of these control techniques to intelligent navigation with a mobile platform. Robust design of a controller for a time-varying system essentially deals with the problem of synthesizing a controller that can adapt to sudden changes in the parameters of the plant and can maintain stability. The approach presented is to design a compensator that simultaneously stabilizes each and every possible mode of the plant as the parameters undergo sudden and unexpected changes. Such changes can in fact be detected by a visual sensor and, hence, visually guided control problems are studied as a natural consequence. The problem here is to detect parameters of the plant and maintain st ability in the closed loop using a ccd camera as a sensor. The main result discussed in the report is the role of perspective systems theory that was developed in order to analyze such a detection and control problem. The robust control algorithms and the visually guided control algorithms are applied in the context of a PUMA 560 robot arm control where the goal is to visually locate a moving part on a mobile turntable. Such problems are of paramount importance in manufacturing with a certain lack of structure. Sensor guided control problems are extended to problems in robot navigation using a NOMADIC mobile platform with a ccd and a laser range finder as sensors. The localization and map building problems are studied with the objective of navigation in an unstructured terrain.

  8. Machine tool accuracy characterization workshops. Final report, May 5, 1992--November 5 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-06

    The ability to assess the accuracy of machine tools is required by both tool builders and users. Builders must have this ability in order to predict the accuracy capability of a machine tool for different part geometry`s, to provide verifiable accuracy information for sales purposes, and to locate error sources for maintenance, troubleshooting, and design enhancement. Users require the same ability in order to make intelligent choices in selecting or procuring machine tools, to predict component manufacturing accuracy, and to perform maintenance and troubleshooting. In both instances, the ability to fully evaluate the accuracy capabilities of a machine tool and the source of its limitations is essential for using the tool to its maximum accuracy and productivity potential. This project was designed to transfer expertise in modern machine tool accuracy testing methods from LLNL to US industry, and to educate users on the use and application of emerging standards for machine tool performance testing.

  9. Machine Tool Technology. Automatic Screw Machine Troubleshooting & Set-Up Training Outlines [and] Basic Operator's Skills Set List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka-Hennepin Technical Coll., Minneapolis, MN.

    This set of two training outlines and one basic skills set list are designed for a machine tool technology program developed during a project to retrain defense industry workers at risk of job loss or dislocation because of conversion of the defense industry. The first troubleshooting training outline lists the categories of problems that develop…

  10. An Approach to Realizing Process Control for Underground Mining Operations of Mobile Machines.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhen; Schunnesson, Håkan; Rinne, Mikael; Sturgul, John

    2015-01-01

    The excavation and production in underground mines are complicated processes which consist of many different operations. The process of underground mining is considerably constrained by the geometry and geology of the mine. The various mining operations are normally performed in series at each working face. The delay of a single operation will lead to a domino effect, thus delay the starting time for the next process and the completion time of the entire process. This paper presents a new approach to the process control for underground mining operations, e.g. drilling, bolting, mucking. This approach can estimate the working time and its probability for each operation more efficiently and objectively by improving the existing PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) and CPM (Critical Path Method). If the delay of the critical operation (which is on a critical path) inevitably affects the productivity of mined ore, the approach can rapidly assign mucking machines new jobs to increase this amount at a maximum level by using a new mucking algorithm under external constraints. PMID:26062092

  11. An Approach to Realizing Process Control for Underground Mining Operations of Mobile Machines

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhen; Schunnesson, Håkan; Rinne, Mikael; Sturgul, John

    2015-01-01

    The excavation and production in underground mines are complicated processes which consist of many different operations. The process of underground mining is considerably constrained by the geometry and geology of the mine. The various mining operations are normally performed in series at each working face. The delay of a single operation will lead to a domino effect, thus delay the starting time for the next process and the completion time of the entire process. This paper presents a new approach to the process control for underground mining operations, e.g. drilling, bolting, mucking. This approach can estimate the working time and its probability for each operation more efficiently and objectively by improving the existing PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) and CPM (Critical Path Method). If the delay of the critical operation (which is on a critical path) inevitably affects the productivity of mined ore, the approach can rapidly assign mucking machines new jobs to increase this amount at a maximum level by using a new mucking algorithm under external constraints. PMID:26062092

  12. Modulated Tool-Path Chip Breaking For Depleted Uranium Machining Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Barkman, W. E.; Babelay Jr., E. F.; Smith, K. S.; Assaid T. S.; McFarland, J. T.; Tursky, D. A.

    2010-04-15

    Turning operations involving depleted uranium frequently generate long, stringy chips that present a hazard to both the machinist and the machine tool. While a variety of chip-breaking techniques are available, they generally depend on a mechanism that increases the bending of the chip or the introduction of a one dimensional vibration that produces an interrupted cutting pattern. Unfortunately, neither of these approaches is particularly effective when making a 'light depth-of-cut' on a contoured workpiece. The historical solution to this problem has been for the machinist to use long-handled tweezers to 'pull the chip' and try to keep it submerged in the chip pan; however, this approach is not practical for all machining operations. This paper discusses a research project involving the Y-12 National Security Complex and the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in which unique, oscillatory part programs are used to continuously create an interrupted cut that generates pre-defined, user-selectable chip lengths.

  13. Electrical Integrity and its Protection for Reliable Operation of Superconducting Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafiniak, A.; Szwangruber, P.; Freisleben, W.; Floch, E.

    The SIS100 synchrotron is the core accelerator of the FAIR project (Darmstadt, Germany). The long term operation of such an advanced superconducting machine requires adequate Electrical Integrity. Issues related to EI shall be taken into account at the design, production and commissioning stage respectively. In order to assure the safe and reliable operation of the superconducting magnets at cryogenic conditions, the facility shall be equipped with active protection systems. When using superconducting technology, quench detection and magnet protection are the most essential systems. Their design has a strong influence on the coordination of electrical insulation systems. This paper focuses on the correlation between EI and active protection systems. The presented study provides the basis for the development of adequate electrical integrity tests (including acceptance criteria) that should be performed at both the production and test stage. In this work, the case of SIS100 synchrotron is considered as an example.

  14. Comparison of Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms for Operations Scheduling under Machine Availability Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Frutos, M.; Méndez, M.; Tohmé, F.; Broz, D.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the problems that arise in production systems can be handled with multiobjective techniques. One of those problems is that of scheduling operations subject to constraints on the availability of machines and buffer capacity. In this paper we analyze different Evolutionary multiobjective Algorithms (MOEAs) for this kind of problems. We consider an experimental framework in which we schedule production operations for four real world Job-Shop contexts using three algorithms, NSGAII, SPEA2, and IBEA. Using two performance indexes, Hypervolume and R2, we found that SPEA2 and IBEA are the most efficient for the tasks at hand. On the other hand IBEA seems to be a better choice of tool since it yields more solutions in the approximate Pareto frontier. PMID:24489502

  15. Machinability of clean thin-wall gray and ductile iron castings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, C.E.; Littleton, H.E.; Eleftheriou, E.; Griffin, R.D.; Dwyer, Z.B.; DelSorbo, C.; Sprague, J.

    1997-02-01

    First phase was to develop a laboratory technique for evaluating the machinability of gray and ductile iron; longer term goal is to learn how to modify the foundry process to produce castings meeting all specified mechanical properties while providing improved machining behavior. Microcarbides present in the irons were found to dominate the machinability of iron. Pearlitic irons with acceptable machinability contain 8.9 to 10.5 wt% microcarbides. The weight fraction microcarbides in the iron is influenced by carbide forming element concentrations, presence of elements that retard carbon diffusion, and cooling rate from the eutectic through the eutectoid temperature range. Tool wear rate increased at higher surface machining speeds and fraction microcarbides; all irons containing above 11.5% microcarbides had poor machinability. Graphite size, shape, distribution, etc. had a lesser effect on machinability. Reducing the addition of a foundry grade Ca and Al bearing 75% FeSi inoculant from 0.5 to 0.2% increased the tool life 100%. Inoculation test castings were also poured in a class 40 gray iron; laboratory analysis is currently underway. Exploratory studies were conducted to determine if tool force could be used to predict tool life: torque and feed forces were found to correlate with machinability.

  16. Study of Man-Machine Communications Systems for Disabled Persons (The Handicapped). Volume IV. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafafian, Haig

    The volume contains experimental instructional materials designed for teacher and handicapped student use with two man-machine communications systems, Cybertype and Cyber-Go-Round, developed as educational aids for the severely handicapped. Cybertype is a writing machine with various possible configurations of portable keyboards with a reduced…

  17. Machining and inspection of structural ceramic components. CRADA final report for CRADA number Y-1292-0078

    SciTech Connect

    Counts, R.W.; Albright, S.; Ritland, M.

    1996-09-30

    This document is the final report of the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Coors Ceramics Company (Coors). The purpose of this CRADA was to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting ceramic components. Specific CRADA objectives were accomplished through the completion of six projects at four separate Coors facilities. The projects included the development of an analytical model to simulate the mechanics of a powder rolling process, development and testing of a microwave-based system for measuring the density of conveyed ceramic material, and the development and testing of four machine vision inspection systems. This CRADA benefited the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with advanced heat engines, enhanced critical manufacturing skills within the DOE complex for fabricating precision, high quality workpieces from difficult-to-machine materials, and enabled U.S. industry to maintain a position of leadership in the structural ceramics field.

  18. [Evaluation of health risk in machine operators exposed to whole body vibration].

    PubMed

    Langauer-Lewowicka, H; Harazin, B; Brzozowska, I; Szłapa, P

    1996-01-01

    A total of 45 machine operators employed at the same power station were examined with special emphasis put on the musculoskeletal system. A group of 15 bulldozer operators, 19 engine operators and 11 tractor drives were exposed to the whole-body vibration with average vertical equivalent acceleration ranging from 0.2 mg-2 to 0.5 ms-2 r.m.s. The incidence of low back complaints over a period of 12 months was similar to that observed in the occupational study groups. However, back pains combined with other health disorders were most common in bulldozer operators (80%) while the lowest percentage (36%) of such cases was observed among tractor drivers. The analysis of lifetime exposure to the whole body vibration in both groups showed that bulldozer operators worked only 5 years longer, on average, but they spent twice as many hours at work as tractor drivers. The study indicates that individual lifetime exposure to the whole-body vibration may play an important part in the evaluation of health effects. PMID:8657008

  19. Site Operator technical report. Final report (1992--1996)

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Southern California Edison Company (SCE) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into cooperative agreement No. DE-FC07-91ID13077 on August 23, 1991, which expired on August 3, 1996. This cooperative agreement provided SCE with DOE cofunding for participation in the DOE`s Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Site Operator Program. In return, SCE provided the DOE with quarterly progress reports which include operating and maintenance data for the electric (EVs) vehicles in SCE`s fleet. Herein is SCE`s final report for the 1992 to 1996 agreement period. As of September 1, 1996 the SCE fleet had 65 electric vehicles in service. A total of 578,200 miles had been logged. During the agreement period, SCE sent the DOE a total of 19 technical reports (Appendix B). This report summarizes the technical achievements which took place during a long, productive and rewarding, relationship with the DOE.

  20. Incidence of MSDs and neck and back pain among logging machine operators in the southern U.S.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S M; Smidt, M F; Merrill, P D; Sesek, R F

    2014-07-01

    There are limited data about the incidence and prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among loggers in the southern U.S. despite the risk factors associated with these occupations. Risk factors are both personal (age, body mass index, etc.) and job-related (awkward postures, repetitive hand and foot movements, vibration, etc.). A survey was conducted to estimate the incidence of self-reported pain and diagnosed MSDs and to study the relationship with known risk factors. Respondents were loggers attending training and continuing education classes. Respondents were asked to identify personal attributes, machine use, awkward postures, repetitive movements, and recent incidence of pain and medical diagnoses. All were male with an average age of 44 (range of 19-67) and an average body mass index of 31.3. Most were machine operators (97%) who have worked in the logging industry for an average of 22.9 years. Most machines identified were manufactured within the past ten years (average machine age 6.7 years). For machine operators, 10.5% (16) reported an MSD diagnosis, 74.3% (113) reported at least mild back pain, and 71.7% (109) reported at least mild neck pain over the past year. Further analysis attempted to identify an association between personal attributes, machine use, posture, and pain. Risk factors related to machine use may be biased since most survey respondents had considerable choice or control in working conditions, as they were firm owners and/or supervisors. PMID:25174152

  1. A Final Approach Trajectory Model for Current Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Chester; Sadovsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Predicting accurate trajectories with limited intent information is a challenge faced by air traffic management decision support tools in operation today. One such tool is the FAA's Terminal Proximity Alert system which is intended to assist controllers in maintaining safe separation of arrival aircraft during final approach. In an effort to improve the performance of such tools, two final approach trajectory models are proposed; one based on polynomial interpolation, the other on the Fourier transform. These models were tested against actual traffic data and used to study effects of the key final approach trajectory modeling parameters of wind, aircraft type, and weight class, on trajectory prediction accuracy. Using only the limited intent data available to today's ATM system, both the polynomial interpolation and Fourier transform models showed improved trajectory prediction accuracy over a baseline dead reckoning model. Analysis of actual arrival traffic showed that this improved trajectory prediction accuracy leads to improved inter-arrival separation prediction accuracy for longer look ahead times. The difference in mean inter-arrival separation prediction error between the Fourier transform and dead reckoning models was 0.2 nmi for a look ahead time of 120 sec, a 33 percent improvement, with a corresponding 32 percent improvement in standard deviation.

  2. Control of Soft Machines using Actuators Operated by a Braille Display

    PubMed Central

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Mazzeo, Aaron D.; Shepherd, Robert F.; Morin, Stephen A.; Gupta, Unmukt; Sani, Idin Zhalehdoust; Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    One strategy for actuating soft machines (e.g., tentacles, grippers, and simple walkers) uses pneumatic inflation of networks of small channels in an elastomeric material. Although the management of a few pneumatic inputs and valves to control pressurized gas is straightforward, the fabrication and operation of manifolds containing many (>50) independent valves is an unsolved problem. Complex pneumatic manifoldsoften built for a single purposeare not easily reconfigured to accommodate the specific inputs (i.e., multiplexing of many fluids, ranges of pressures, and changes in flow rates) required by pneumatic systems. This paper describes a pneumatic manifold comprising a computer-controlled braille display and a micropneumatic device. The braille display provides a compact array of 64 piezoelectric actuators that actively close and open elastomeric valves of a micropneumatic device to route pressurized gas within the manifold. The positioning and geometries of the valves and channels in the micropneumatic device dictate the functionality of the pneumatic manifold, and the use of multi-layer soft lithography permits the fabrication of networks in a wide range of configurations with many possible functions. Simply exchanging micropneumatic devices of different designs enables rapid reconfiguration of the pneumatic manifold. As a proof of principle, a pneumatic manifold controlled a soft machine containing 32 independent actuators to move a ball above a flat surface. PMID:24196070

  3. Control of soft machines using actuators operated by a Braille display.

    PubMed

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Mazzeo, Aaron D; Shepherd, Robert F; Morin, Stephen A; Gupta, Unmukt; Sani, Idin Zhalehdoust; Lai, David; Takayama, Shuichi; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-01

    One strategy for actuating soft machines (e.g., tentacles, grippers, and simple walkers) uses pneumatic inflation of networks of small channels in an elastomeric material. Although the management of a few pneumatic inputs and valves to control pressurized gas is straightforward, the fabrication and operation of manifolds containing many (>50) independent valves is an unsolved problem. Complex pneumatic manifolds-often built for a single purpose-are not easily reconfigured to accommodate the specific inputs (i.e., multiplexing of many fluids, ranges of pressures, and changes in flow rates) required by pneumatic systems. This paper describes a pneumatic manifold comprising a computer-controlled Braille display and a micropneumatic device. The Braille display provides a compact array of 64 piezoelectric actuators that actively close and open elastomeric valves of a micropneumatic device to route pressurized gas within the manifold. The positioning and geometries of the valves and channels in the micropneumatic device dictate the functionality of the pneumatic manifold, and the use of multi-layer soft lithography permits the fabrication of networks in a wide range of configurations with many possible functions. Simply exchanging micropneumatic devices of different designs enables rapid reconfiguration of the pneumatic manifold. As a proof of principle, a pneumatic manifold controlled a soft machine containing 32 independent actuators to move a ball above a flat surface. PMID:24196070

  4. 29 CFR 570.61 - Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving slaughtering, meat and poultry packing, processing, or... to Their Health or Well-Being § 570.61 Occupations in the operation of power-driven...

  5. 29 CFR 570.61 - Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving slaughtering, meat and poultry packing, processing, or... to Their Health or Well-Being § 570.61 Occupations in the operation of power-driven...

  6. 29 CFR 570.61 - Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving slaughtering, meat and poultry packing, processing, or... to Their Health or Well-Being § 570.61 Occupations in the operation of power-driven...

  7. Motor Proteins and Molecular Motors: How to Operate Machines at Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-01-01

    Several classes of biological molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical work are known as motor proteins or molecular motors. These nanometer-sized machines operate in noisy stochastic isothermal environment, strongly supporting fundamental cellular processes such as transfer of genetic information, transport, organization and functioning. In last two decades motor proteins have become a subject of intense research efforts that were aimed to uncover fundamental principles and mechanisms of molecular motors dynamics. In this review, we critically discuss a recent progress in experimental and theoretical studies on motor proteins. Our focus is on analyzing fundamental concepts and ideas that have been utilized for explaining non-equilibrium nature and mechanisms of molecular motors. PMID:24100357

  8. 29 CFR 570.62 - Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dough mixer; batter mixer; bread dividing, rounding, or molding machine; dough brake; dough sheeter; combination bread slicing and wrapping machine; or cake cutting band saw. (2) The occupation of setting up...

  9. 29 CFR 570.62 - Occupations involved in the operation of bakery machines (Order 11).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... molding machine; dough brake; dough sheeter; combination bread slicing and wrapping machine; or cake..., oiling and cleaning, of lightweight, small capacity, portable counter-top power-driven food mixers...

  10. Characteristics and treatability of oil-bearing wastes from aluminum alloy machining operations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luke; Hsieh, Chueh-Chen; Wetherbee, John; Yang, Chen-Lu

    2008-04-15

    Enomoto Industry Co., exclusively uses water-based cutting fluids in its aluminum alloy machining operations. Since the cost of disposal can be much greater than the cost of purchase, the treatability of spent cutting fluids is becoming a major criterion for cutting fluid selection. Samples were collected from the machining lines at Enomoto's facility to determine their characteristics and evaluate their treatability with centrifugation, chemical coagulation and electrochemical coagulation. As expected, oil and grease (O&G) and total suspended solids (TSS) are the main reasons that spent cutting fluids are prohibited from being discharged into local swage systems. The average O&G found in the spent cutting fluids is 87,354 mg/L with TSS of more than 70,000 mg/L. Both O&G and TSS are the major contributors to the high turbidity of these waste effluents. A centrifuge with a relative centrifugal force of 1318 x g, was able to reduce 60% of the turbidity. By adding the coagulant aluminum chloride, the oil-water emulsion was destabilized, and the turbidity was reduced from 3249 Formazin Attenuation Units (FAU) to around 314 FAU. With freshly generated aluminum ions in the spent cutting fluid, the electrochemical process destabilized the oil-water emulsion system. The coalesced oil droplets were adsorbed onto the highly dispersed aluminum coagulant. The oil-rich sludge that was generated in the operation was then floated to the surface, forming a blanket that was removed by skimming. The electrochemical treatment was able to reduce the turbidity to less than 14 FAU, which is the detection limit of the Hach DR/4000 UV-vis spectrophotometer. PMID:17850956

  11. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling third harmonic voltage when operating a multi-space machine in an overmodulation region

    SciTech Connect

    Perisic, Milun; Kinoshita, Michael H; Ranson, Ray M; Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel

    2014-06-03

    Methods, system and apparatus are provided for controlling third harmonic voltages when operating a multi-phase machine in an overmodulation region. The multi-phase machine can be, for example, a five-phase machine in a vector controlled motor drive system that includes a five-phase PWM controlled inverter module that drives the five-phase machine. Techniques for overmodulating a reference voltage vector are provided. For example, when the reference voltage vector is determined to be within the overmodulation region, an angle of the reference voltage vector can be modified to generate a reference voltage overmodulation control angle, and a magnitude of the reference voltage vector can be modified, based on the reference voltage overmodulation control angle, to generate a modified magnitude of the reference voltage vector. By modifying the reference voltage vector, voltage command signals that control a five-phase inverter module can be optimized to increase output voltages generated by the five-phase inverter module.

  12. Factors Influencing the Microbial Composition of Metalworking Fluids and Potential Implications for Machine Operator's Lung

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Jean-Benjamin; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Penven, Emmanuelle; Batchili, Adam; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Thaon, Isabelle; Millon, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, also known as “machine operator's lung” (MOL), has been related to microorganisms growing in metalworking fluids (MWFs), especially Mycobacterium immunogenum. We aimed to (i) describe the microbiological contamination of MWFs and (ii) look for chemical, physical, and environmental parameters associated with variations in microbiological profiles. We microbiologically analyzed 180 MWF samples from nonautomotive plants (e.g., screw-machining or metal-cutting plants) in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France and 165 samples from three French automotive plants in which cases of MOL had been proven. Our results revealed two types of microbial biomes: the first was from the nonautomotive industry, showed predominantly Gram-negative rods (GNR), and was associated with a low risk of MOL, and the second came from the automotive industry that was affected by cases of MOL and showed predominantly Gram-positive rods (GPR). Traces of M. immunogenum were sporadically detected in the first type, while it was highly prevalent in the automotive sector, with up to 38% of samples testing positive. The use of chromium, nickel, or iron was associated with growth of Gram-negative rods; conversely, growth of Gram-positive rods was associated with the absence of these metals. Synthetic MWFs were more frequently sterile than emulsions. Vegetable oil-based emulsions were associated with GNR, while mineral ones were associated with GPR. Our results suggest that metal types and the nature of MWF play a part in MWF contamination, and this work shall be followed by further in vitro simulation experiments on the kinetics of microbial populations, focusing on the phenomena of inhibition and synergy. PMID:22057869

  13. Factors influencing the microbial composition of metalworking fluids and potential implications for machine operator's lung.

    PubMed

    Murat, Jean-Benjamin; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Reboux, Gabriel; Penven, Emmanuelle; Batchili, Adam; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Thaon, Isabelle; Millon, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, also known as "machine operator's lung" (MOL), has been related to microorganisms growing in metalworking fluids (MWFs), especially Mycobacterium immunogenum. We aimed to (i) describe the microbiological contamination of MWFs and (ii) look for chemical, physical, and environmental parameters associated with variations in microbiological profiles. We microbiologically analyzed 180 MWF samples from nonautomotive plants (e.g., screw-machining or metal-cutting plants) in the Franche-Comté region in eastern France and 165 samples from three French automotive plants in which cases of MOL had been proven. Our results revealed two types of microbial biomes: the first was from the nonautomotive industry, showed predominantly Gram-negative rods (GNR), and was associated with a low risk of MOL, and the second came from the automotive industry that was affected by cases of MOL and showed predominantly Gram-positive rods (GPR). Traces of M. immunogenum were sporadically detected in the first type, while it was highly prevalent in the automotive sector, with up to 38% of samples testing positive. The use of chromium, nickel, or iron was associated with growth of Gram-negative rods; conversely, growth of Gram-positive rods was associated with the absence of these metals. Synthetic MWFs were more frequently sterile than emulsions. Vegetable oil-based emulsions were associated with GNR, while mineral ones were associated with GPR. Our results suggest that metal types and the nature of MWF play a part in MWF contamination, and this work shall be followed by further in vitro simulation experiments on the kinetics of microbial populations, focusing on the phenomena of inhibition and synergy. PMID:22057869

  14. Prediction of Backbreak in Open-Pit Blasting Operations Using the Machine Learning Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, Manoj; Monjezi, M.

    2013-03-01

    Backbreak is an undesirable phenomenon in blasting operations. It can cause instability of mine walls, falling down of machinery, improper fragmentation, reduced efficiency of drilling, etc. The existence of various effective parameters and their unknown relationships are the main reasons for inaccuracy of the empirical models. Presently, the application of new approaches such as artificial intelligence is highly recommended. In this paper, an attempt has been made to predict backbreak in blasting operations of Soungun iron mine, Iran, incorporating rock properties and blast design parameters using the support vector machine (SVM) method. To investigate the suitability of this approach, the predictions by SVM have been compared with multivariate regression analysis (MVRA). The coefficient of determination (CoD) and the mean absolute error (MAE) were taken as performance measures. It was found that the CoD between measured and predicted backbreak was 0.987 and 0.89 by SVM and MVRA, respectively, whereas the MAE was 0.29 and 1.07 by SVM and MVRA, respectively.

  15. Develop a field grid system for yield mapping and machine control. Final report, Invention 544

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-15

    The objective of this project was to build and test the Field Grid Sense system for yield mapping and machine control during harvesting. Secondly, to use Field Grid Sense system with chemical application equipment to demonstrate a workable in-field system. This document contains summarized quarterly reports.

  16. Development of out-of-core fast Fourier transform software for the connection machine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, R.; Wilson, J.

    1995-10-01

    This report describes the algorithm and implementation of an out-of-core Fast Fourier Transform routine for the Thinking Machines Corp. CM-5 parallel computer. The software has the capability of transforming multi-dimensional arrays that are both real and complex.

  17. Stochastic optimal control as a theory of brain-machine interface operation.

    PubMed

    Lagang, Manuel; Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan

    2013-02-01

    The closed-loop operation of brain-machine interfaces (BMI) provides a framework to study the mechanisms behind neural control through a restricted output channel, with emerging clinical applications to stroke, degenerative disease, and trauma. Despite significant empirically driven improvements in closed-loop BMI systems, a fundamental, experimentally validated theory of closed-loop BMI operation is lacking. Here we propose a compact model based on stochastic optimal control to describe the brain in skillfully operating canonical decoding algorithms. The model produces goal-directed BMI movements with sensory feedback and intrinsically noisy neural output signals. Various experimentally validated phenomena emerge naturally from this model, including performance deterioration with bin width, compensation of biased decoders, and shifts in tuning curves between arm control and BMI control. Analysis of the model provides insight into possible mechanisms underlying these behaviors, with testable predictions. Spike binning may erode performance in part from intrinsic control-dependent constraints, regardless of decoding accuracy. In compensating decoder bias, the brain may incur an energetic cost associated with action potential production. Tuning curve shifts, seen after the mastery of a BMI-based skill, may reflect the brain's implementation of a new closed-loop control policy. The direction and magnitude of tuning curve shifts may be altered by decoder structure, ensemble size, and the costs of closed-loop control. Looking forward, the model provides a framework for the design and simulated testing of an emerging class of BMI algorithms that seek to directly exploit the presence of a human in the loop. PMID:23148413

  18. A Boltzmann machine for the organization of intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moed, Michael C.; Saridis, George N.

    1989-01-01

    In the present technological society, there is a major need to build machines that would execute intelligent tasks operating in uncertain environments with minimum interaction with a human operator. Although some designers have built smart robots, utilizing heuristic ideas, there is no systematic approach to design such machines in an engineering manner. Recently, cross-disciplinary research from the fields of computers, systems AI and information theory has served to set the foundations of the emerging area of the design of intelligent machines. Since 1977 Saridis has been developing an approach, defined as Hierarchical Intelligent Control, designed to organize, coordinate and execute anthropomorphic tasks by a machine with minimum interaction with a human operator. This approach utilizes analytical (probabilistic) models to describe and control the various functions of the intelligent machine structured by the intuitively defined principle of Increasing Precision with Decreasing Intelligence (IPDI) (Saridis 1979). This principle, even though resembles the managerial structure of organizational systems (Levis 1988), has been derived on an analytic basis by Saridis (1988). The purpose is to derive analytically a Boltzmann machine suitable for optimal connection of nodes in a neural net (Fahlman, Hinton, Sejnowski, 1985). Then this machine will serve to search for the optimal design of the organization level of an intelligent machine. In order to accomplish this, some mathematical theory of the intelligent machines will be first outlined. Then some definitions of the variables associated with the principle, like machine intelligence, machine knowledge, and precision will be made (Saridis, Valavanis 1988). Then a procedure to establish the Boltzmann machine on an analytic basis will be presented and illustrated by an example in designing the organization level of an Intelligent Machine. A new search technique, the Modified Genetic Algorithm, is presented and proved to converge to the minimum of a cost function. Finally, simulations will show the effectiveness of a variety of search techniques for the intelligent machine.

  19. 29 CFR 570.61 - Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving slaughtering, meat and poultry packing, processing, or rendering (Order 10). 570.61 Section 570.61 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS...

  20. 29 CFR 570.55 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5). 570.55 Section 570.55 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS OF INTERPRETATION Occupations...

  1. 29 CFR 570.55 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5). 570.55 Section 570.55 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS...

  2. 29 CFR 570.55 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5). 570.55 Section 570.55 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS...

  3. 29 CFR 570.55 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5). 570.55 Section 570.55 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS CHILD LABOR REGULATIONS, ORDERS AND STATEMENTS...

  4. Automated thermal treatment of metals with a mechanically fluidized vacuum machine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, W.E.

    1997-09-05

    The ERIP project {open_quotes}Automated Thermal Treatment of Metals with a Mechanically Fluidized Vacuum Machine{close_quotes} produced more benefits in unintended areas than in the original intent of the program. The first project was directed to heat treating of solid parts using a retort half filled with fine powder. The treatment of metal powders was not originally envisioned at the time of proposal preparation. This second application, where the powder itself is being treated, has turned out to be multi-billion dollar market in which the Mechanical Fluidized Vacuum machine can create revolutionary changes. Consequently most efforts in recent years have been dedicated to further growth of the powder markets. These efforts procured a second ERIP grant titled {open_quotes}Thermal Heat and Diffusion Treatment of Bulk Powders.{close_quotes}

  5. Autonomous proximity operations using machine vision for trajectory control and pose estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleghorn, Timothy F.; Sternberg, Stanley R.

    1991-01-01

    A machine vision algorithm was developed which permits guidance control to be maintained during autonomous proximity operations. At present this algorithm exists as a simulation, running upon an 80386 based personal computer, using a ModelMATE CAD package to render the target vehicle. However, the algorithm is sufficiently simple, so that following off-line training on a known target vehicle, it should run in real time with existing vision hardware. The basis of the algorithm is a sequence of single camera images of the target vehicle, upon which radial transforms were performed. Selected points of the resulting radial signatures are fed through a decision tree, to determine whether the signature matches that of the known reference signatures for a particular view of the target. Based upon recognized scenes, the position of the maneuvering vehicle with respect to the target vehicles can be calculated, and adjustments made in the former's trajectory. In addition, the pose and spin rates of the target satellite can be estimated using this method.

  6. Energetic optimization of a piezo-based touch-operated button for man-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hao; de Vries, Theo J. A.; de Vries, Rene; van Dalen, Harry

    2012-03-01

    This paper discusses the optimization of a touch-operated button for man-machine interfaces based on piezoelectric energy harvesting techniques. In the mechanical button, a common piezoelectric diaphragm, is assembled to harvest the ambient energy from the source, i.e. the operator’s touch. Under touch force load, the integrated diaphragm will have a bending deformation. Then, its mechanical strain is converted into the required electrical energy by means of the piezoelectric effect presented to the diaphragm. Structural design (i) makes the piezoceramic work under static compressive stress instead of static or dynamic tensile stress, (ii) achieves a satisfactory stress level and (iii) provides the diaphragm and the button with a fatigue lifetime in excess of millions of touch operations. To improve the button’s function, the effect of some key properties consisting of dimension, boundary condition and load condition on electrical behavior of the piezoelectric diaphragm are evaluated by electromechanical coupling analysis in ANSYS. The finite element analysis (FEA) results indicate that the modification of these properties could enhance the diaphragm significantly. Based on the key properties’ different contributions to the improvement of the diaphragm’s electrical energy output, they are incorporated into the piezoelectric diaphragm’s redesign or the structural design of the piezo-based button. The comparison of the original structure and the optimal result shows that electrical energy stored in the diaphragm and the voltage output are increased by 1576% and 120%, respectively, and the volume of the piezoceramic is reduced to 33.6%. These results will be adopted to update the design of the self-powered button, thus enabling a large decrease of energy consumption and lifetime cost of the MMI.

  7. A Framework for Final Drive Simultaneous Failure Diagnosis Based on Fuzzy Entropy and Sparse Bayesian Extreme Learning Machine

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Pan, Hao; Liu, Changhua

    2015-01-01

    This research proposes a novel framework of final drive simultaneous failure diagnosis containing feature extraction, training paired diagnostic models, generating decision threshold, and recognizing simultaneous failure modes. In feature extraction module, adopt wavelet package transform and fuzzy entropy to reduce noise interference and extract representative features of failure mode. Use single failure sample to construct probability classifiers based on paired sparse Bayesian extreme learning machine which is trained only by single failure modes and have high generalization and sparsity of sparse Bayesian learning approach. To generate optimal decision threshold which can convert probability output obtained from classifiers into final simultaneous failure modes, this research proposes using samples containing both single and simultaneous failure modes and Grid search method which is superior to traditional techniques in global optimization. Compared with other frequently used diagnostic approaches based on support vector machine and probability neural networks, experiment results based on F1-measure value verify that the diagnostic accuracy and efficiency of the proposed framework which are crucial for simultaneous failure diagnosis are superior to the existing approach. PMID:25722717

  8. The Body of Knowledge & Content Framework. Identifying the Important Knowledge Required for Productive Performance of a Plastics Machine Operator. Blow Molding, Extrusion, Injection Molding, Thermoforming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Designed to guide training and curriculum development to prepare machine operators for the national certification exam, this publication identifies the important knowledge required for productive performance by a plastics machine operator. Introductory material discusses the rationale for a national standard, uses of the Body of Knowledge,…

  9. Operational readiness review phase-1 final report for WRAP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-27

    This report documents the Operational Readiness Review for WRAP-1 Phase-1 operations. The report includes all criteria, lines of inquiry with resulting Findings and Observations. The review included assessing operational capability of the organization and the computer controlled process and facility systems.

  10. Stochastically driven single-level quantum dot: a nanoscale finite-time thermodynamic machine and its various operational modes.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Kumar, Niraj; Lindenberg, Katja; Van den Broeck, Christian

    2012-03-01

    We describe a single-level quantum dot in contact with two leads as a nanoscale finite-time thermodynamic machine. The dot is driven by an external stochastic force that switches its energy between two values. In the isothermal regime, it can operate as a rechargeable battery by generating an electric current against the applied bias in response to the stochastic driving and then redelivering work in the reverse cycle. This behavior is reminiscent of the Parrondo paradox. If there is a thermal gradient the device can function as a work-generating thermal engine or as a refrigerator that extracts heat from the cold reservoir via the work input of the stochastic driving. The efficiency of the machine at maximum power output is investigated for each mode of operation, and universal features are identified. PMID:22587048

  11. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of two alternating current (AC) machines

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Nagashima, James M.; Perisic, Milun; Hiti, Silva

    2012-02-14

    A system is provided for controlling two AC machines. The system comprises a DC input voltage source that provides a DC input voltage, a voltage boost command control module (VBCCM), a five-phase PWM inverter module coupled to the two AC machines, and a boost converter coupled to the inverter module and the DC input voltage source. The boost converter is designed to supply a new DC input voltage to the inverter module having a value that is greater than or equal to a value of the DC input voltage. The VBCCM generates a boost command signal (BCS) based on modulation indexes from the two AC machines. The BCS controls the boost converter such that the boost converter generates the new DC input voltage in response to the BCS. When the two AC machines require additional voltage that exceeds the DC input voltage required to meet a combined target mechanical power required by the two AC machines, the BCS controls the boost converter to drive the new DC input voltage generated by the boost converter to a value greater than the DC input voltage.

  12. Dynamic operating benefits of energy storage: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fancher, R.B.; Jabbour, S.J.; Spelman, J.R.

    1986-10-01

    The use of energy storage power plants to enhance power system operational flexibility (spinning reserve, load following, reduced minimum loading of power plants, etc.) yields substantive economic benefits due to reduced fuel use, lower operating and maintenance costs, and extended life of power plants. Inclusion of these benefits in generation expansion studies could increase the economic incentives of installing storage and fuel cell power plants. The objective of this project is to identify the benefits of energy storage due to the enhanced system operational flexibility, or simply called dynamic operating benefits (DOB). The results of an international symposium on DOB and three case studies in the US are reported. The results produce strong evidence of the reality and significance of dynamic operating benefits of energy storage and the importance of including that benefit in generation expansion studies.

  13. Alternative inhibitors for ammonia/water refrigeration machines. Final report, July 1990-June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, B.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1992-06-01

    The report presents the test results on two inorganic compounds chosen as environmentally safe alternatives to the sodium chromate corrosion inhibitors that is currently used to protect carbon steel surfaces in ammonia/water refrigeration machines. At the request of GRI, the identity of the alternative corrosion inhibitors is being withheld and are referred to as Type-A and Type-B throughout the report. These compounds were selected from a larger group of compounds for testing in standard, residential 3-ton ammonia water chillers after they had been screened for their effectiveness by electrochemical techniques and coupon immersion tests in autoclaves. The test results indicated that the Type-A corrosion inhibitor performed better than Type-B and produced no more non-condensables than the chromate inhibited chillers after 50 days of continuous testing. Cracks near welds that caused early failure of both test chillers were not related to the alternative inhibitors but was likely the result of the atypical chiller surface pretreatment used in these tests. Replacing the generator's heat exchanger coil with a more corrosive resistant alloy would also reduce the amount of corrosion and non-condensable gas generation.

  14. A knowledge based model of electric utility operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-11

    This report consists of an appendix to provide a documentation and help capability for an analyst using the developed expert system of electric utility operations running in CLIPS. This capability is provided through a separate package running under the WINDOWS Operating System and keyed to provide displays of text, graphics and mixed text and graphics that explain and elaborate on the specific decisions being made within the knowledge based expert system.

  15. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  16. Machine Shop. Module 4: Power Saw and Drill Press Operation. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walden, Charles H.; Daniel, Bill

    This document consists of materials for a six-unit course on the following topics: (1) power saw safety and maintenance; (2) cutting stock to length; (3) band machining and contouring; (4) drill press types and safety; (5) drill press work-holding devices; and (6) tools and tool holders. The instructor's guide begins with a list of competencies

  17. Machine Shop. Module 4: Power Saw and Drill Press Operation. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walden, Charles H.; Daniel, Bill

    This document consists of materials for a six-unit course on the following topics: (1) power saw safety and maintenance; (2) cutting stock to length; (3) band machining and contouring; (4) drill press types and safety; (5) drill press work-holding devices; and (6) tools and tool holders. The instructor's guide begins with a list of competencies…

  18. Operation MEDIHC (Military Experience Directed into Health Careers). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Hospital Association, Denver.

    This Region VIII Operation MEDIHC (Military Experience Directed into Health Careers) comprehensive report covers the program's efforts to provide a state focal point of advice and assistance to all health-trained veterans seeking entrance into the civilian health services field during the period of June 1, 1970, through December 31, 1978. The…

  19. Optimal use of human and machine resources for Space Station assembly operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper investigates the issues involved in determining the best mix of human and machine resources for assembly of the Space Station. It presents the current Station assembly sequence, along with descriptions of the available assembly resources. A number of methodologies for optimizing the human/machine tradeoff problem have been developed, but the Space Station assembly offers some unique issues that have not yet been addressed. These include a strong constraint on available EVA time for early flights and a phased deployment of assembly resources over time. A methodology for incorporating the previously developed decision methods to the special case of the Space Station is presented. This methodology emphasizes an application of multiple qualitative and quantitative techniques, including simulation and decision analysis, for producing an objective, robust solution to the tradeoff problem.

  20. Method and radial gap machine for high strength undiffused brushless operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-10-31

    A radial gap brushless electric machine (30) having a stator (31) and a rotor (32) and a main air gap (34) also has at least one stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) separated from the rotor (32) by a secondary air gap (35e, 35f, 36e, 36f) so as to induce a secondary flux in the rotor (32) which controls a resultant flux in the main air gap (34). Permanent magnetic (PM) material (38) is disposed in spaces between the rotor pole portions (39) to inhibit the second flux from leaking from the pole portions (39) prior to reaching the main air gap (34). By selecting the direction of current in the stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) both flux enhancement and flux weakening are provided for the main air gap (34). A method of non-diffused flux enhancement and flux weakening for a radial gap machine is also disclosed.

  1. CAISI Operational Assessment (OA) data collection results. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-31

    One of the lessons learned from Operation Desert Shield/Storm was the inability of deployed Combat Service Support (CSS) computers to exchange data effectively in a battlefield environment. The work-around solution to this previously identified problem has been to physically carry floppy disks between computers. A General Officer Steering Committee, directed by the Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, determined that immediate corrective action was necessary to ensure viability of the CSS Battlefield Mission Area. The study recommended that a three-phased system development plan address short-, mid- and long-term CSS automation communication interface requirements. In response to this study, Program Executive Office (PEO) Standard Army Management Information System (STAMIS) authorized the development of the CSS Automated Information System Interface (CAISI). Phase I (Near-Term) equipped the {open_quotes}first to fight{close_quotes} Contingency Corps units. Phase II (Mid-Term) is being fielded to the remainder of Force Package One units in the active force. Phase III (Long-Term) will equip the remaining units. CAISI is now in the early stages of Phase II fielding. Prior to full Phase II fielding, CAISI must be approved for production by a Milestone III decision authority. Part of the data that will be used in the Milestone III decision is a demonstration of the CAISI`s operational suitability, as assessed by the US Army Operational Test and Evaluation Command (OPTEC). This assessment will be performed through an Operational Assessment (OA) using data provided from previous technical testing, such as the CAISI Customer User Test (CUT), and a field training exercise conducted by units of the XVIII Airborne Corps. The field training exercise data collection took place during two events.

  2. Final Report on Control Algorithm to Improve the Partial-Load Efficiency of Surface PM Machines with Fractional-Slot Concentrated Windings

    SciTech Connect

    McKeever, John W; Reddy, Patel; Jahns, Thomas M

    2007-05-01

    Surface permanent magnet (SPM) synchronous machines using fractional-slot concentrated windings are being investigated as candidates for high-performance traction machines for automotive electric propulsion systems. It has been shown analytically and experimentally that such designs can achieve very wide constant-power speed ratios (CPSR) [1,2]. This work has shown that machines of this type are capable of achieving very low cogging torque amplitudes as well as significantly increasing the machine power density [3-5] compared to SPM machines using conventional distributed windings. High efficiency can be achieved in this class of SPM machine by making special efforts to suppress the eddy-current losses in the magnets [6-8], accompanied by efforts to minimize the iron losses in the rotor and stator cores. Considerable attention has traditionally been devoted to maximizing the full-load efficiency of traction machines at their rated operating points and along their maximum-power vs. speed envelopes for higher speeds [9,10]. For example, on-line control approaches have been presented for maximizing the full-load efficiency of PM synchronous machines, including the use of negative d-axis stator current to reduce the core losses [11,12]. However, another important performance specification for electric traction applications is the machine's efficiency at partial loads. Partial-load efficiency is particularly important if the target traction application requires long periods of cruising operation at light loads that are significantly lower than the maximum drive capabilities. While the design of the machine itself is clearly important, investigation has shown that this is a case where the choice of the control algorithm plays a critical role in determining the maximum partial-load efficiency that the machine actually achieves in the traction drive system. There is no evidence that this important topic has been addressed for this type of SPM machine by any other authors. This topic takes on even greater significance for fractional-slot concentrated-winding SPM machine designs. In particular, maximizing the torque/power density of this class of SPM machines typically leads to machine designs with high numbers of poles. The resulting high electrical frequencies can easily result in high stator core losses unless special care is taken during the machine design process. The purpose of this report is to discuss a modified vector control algorithm for a fractional-slot concentrated winding SPM machine that has been developed to maximize the machine's partial-load efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. For purposes of this discussion, a 55 kW (peak) SPM machine designed to meet requirements established in the US FreedomCar program [13] is used as the basis for demonstrating the proposed technique. A combination of closed-form analysis [14] and finite element analysis (FEA) is used during this investigation.

  3. FINAL REPORT ON CONTROL ALGORITHM TO IMPROVE THE PARTIAL-LOAD EFFICIENCY OFSURFACE PM MACHINES WITH FRACTIONAL-SLOT CONCENTRATED WINDINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, P.B.; Jahns, T.M.

    2007-04-30

    Surface permanent magnet (SPM) synchronous machines using fractional-slot concentrated windings are being investigated as candidates for high-performance traction machines for automotive electric propulsion systems. It has been shown analytically and experimentally that such designs can achieve very wide constant-power speed ratios (CPSR) [1,2]. This work has shown that machines of this type are capable of achieving very low cogging torque amplitudes as well as significantly increasing the machine power density [3-5] compared to SPM machines using conventional distributed windings. High efficiency can be achieved in this class of SPM machine by making special efforts to suppress the eddy-current losses in the magnets [6-8], accompanied by efforts to minimize the iron losses in the rotor and stator cores. Considerable attention has traditionally been devoted to maximizing the full-load efficiency of traction machines at their rated operating points and along their maximum-power vs. speed envelopes for higher speeds [9,10]. For example, on-line control approaches have been presented for maximizing the full-load efficiency of PM synchronous machines, including the use of negative d-axis stator current to reduce the core losses [11,12]. However, another important performance specification for electric traction applications is the machine's efficiency at partial loads. Partial-load efficiency is particularly important if the target traction application requires long periods of cruising operation at light loads that are significantly lower than the maximum drive capabilities. While the design of the machine itself is clearly important, investigation has shown that this is a case where the choice of the control algorithm plays a critical role in determining the maximum partial-load efficiency that the machine actually achieves in the traction drive system. There is no evidence that this important topic has been addressed for this type of SPM machine by any other authors. This topic takes on even greater significance for fractional-slot concentrated-winding SPM machine designs. In particular, maximizing the torque/power density of this class of SPM machines typically leads to machine designs with high numbers of poles. The resulting high electrical frequencies can easily result in high stator core losses unless special care is taken during the machine design process. The purpose of this report is to discuss a modified vector control algorithm for a fractional-slot concentrated winding SPM machine that has been developed to maximize the machine's partial-load efficiency over a wide range of operating conditions. For purposes of this discussion, a 55 kW (peak) SPM machine designed to meet requirements established in the US FreedomCar program [13] is used as the basis for demonstrating the proposed technique. A combination of closed-form analysis [14] and finite element analysis (FEA) is used during this investigation.

  4. LACIE performance predictor final operational capability program description, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The program EPHEMS computes the orbital parameters for up to two vehicles orbiting the earth for up to 549 days. The data represents a continuous swath about the earth, producing tables which can be used to determine when and if certain land segments will be covered. The program GRID processes NASA's climatology tape to obtain the weather indices along with associated latitudes and longitudes. The program LUMP takes substrata historical data and sample segment ID, crop window, crop window error and statistical data, checks for valid input parameters and generates the segment ID file, crop window file and the substrata historical file. Finally, the System Error Executive (SEE) Program checks YES error and truth data, CAMS error data, and signature extension data for validity and missing elements. A message is printed for each error found.

  5. Mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The Phase I effort was based on a robot called the Remote Work Vehicle (RWV) that was previously developed by CMU for use in D&D operations at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement. During Phase I of this program, the RWV was rehabilitated and upgraded with contemporary control and user interface technologies and used as a testbed for remote D&D operations. We established a close working relationship with the DOE Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). In the second phase, we designed and developed a next generation mobile worksystem, called Rosie, and a semi-automatic task space scene analysis system, called Artisan, using guidance from RTDP. Both systems are designed to work with and complement other RTDP D&D technologies to execute selective equipment removal scenarios in which some part of an apparatus is extricated while minimally disturbing the surrounding objects. RTDP has identified selective equipment removal as a timely D&D mission, one that is particularly relevant during the de-activation and de-inventory stages of facility transitioning as a means to reduce the costs and risks associated with subsequent surveillance and monitoring. In the third phase, we tested and demonstrated core capabilities of Rosie and Artisan; we also implemented modifications and enhancements that improve their relevance to DOE`s facility transitioning mission.

  6. Robotic concepts for operation in barren terrain. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, K.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a series of studies and configurations for robots that are capable of operating in rough barren terrains. The environments we are targeting are like those of the moon or other planets in the roughness and starkness of the terrains, the loose and hard materials that range from sandy slopes to boulder fields, and the extremes of temperature that are encountered in such places. We present a mission scenario, requirements and then present and evaluate a mechanism design. Additional subsystem issues of power, communication, sensing, and computing are all addressed with respect to these requirements.

  7. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrock, Steven J.

    2011-06-30

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA’s comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20ºC to 120ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA’s, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year R&D Plan. In the course of this four-year program we developed a new PEM with improved proton conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical stability. We incorporated this new membrane into MEAs and evaluated performance and durability.

  8. Operational testing of intelligent rail lubrication system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.

    1998-06-01

    This IDEA project designs, builds, and demonstrates an automated, computer-controlled onboard intelligent system for applying new environmentally safe and consumable lubricants for rail systems. The IDEA product is to be operationally tested in a commuter rail system (METRA) for providing controlled lubrication on rails and wheel in an environmentally safe way. The lubricant applied to the rail will reduce friction between the wheel and rail and is expected to provide significant benefits in maintenance, safety, and overall economic efficiency. Progressive development of a rail lubrication system for US railroads indicates potential major benefits including reduction in wheel wear, rail wear, and track maintenance costs. Significant benefits transferable to commuter rail and high-speed transit systems are expected as well.

  9. Hydro operational restrictions forum: Licensee workshop summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahim, S.; Monahan, C.K.; Pistor, B.; West, A.

    1998-08-01

    In spite of producing no atmospheric pollutants, hydroelectric power plants often go unrecognized as a unique provider of clean, efficient, low-cost energy. A concerted effort is needed to ensure that these attributes are fully accounted for when considering the uses and benefits of available water resources. Relicensing reviews and other regulatory activities associated with continued operation of hydro generation projects have drawn increased attention to hydro resources. This attention has typically resulted in imposition of conditions having a substantial cost impact without, necessarily, reflecting a full appreciation of the resource`s benefits and attributes. With the extensive countrywide effort in relicensing and regulation, there is an opportunity to collect and compile lessons learned. This is particularly true with respect to preferred practices, technologies, and techniques applicable to required studies and mitigation measures. Such compilation will enable the industry and related stakeholders to improve quality and effectiveness while reducing costs of relicensing and mitigation for continued hydro operations. As a technology leader for the industry, EPRI is in a unique position to identify and document these techniques and practices. This report comprises the proceedings of the hydro licensees workshop. Fifteen licensee representatives with recent or current involvement in the relicensing process gathered at this workshop and shared their experiences, both good and bad. Support was strong among attendees for EPRI`s effort to collect and compile these, along with the experiences of others, into a guidebook of accepted practices. Initial workshop findings were used in the second workshop to solicit buy-in from agencies and NGOs to the need for--as well as proposed scope of--a compendium of preferred practices.

  10. Lake Billy Shaw Operations and Maintenance, Final Annual Report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    Lake Billy Shaw is a newly constructed earthen dam reservoir with a surface area of 430 acres. Construction on the dam and structures was complete in November of 1998. The fish screen structures were complete in December of 1998, with initial filling in May 1999. Upon initial filling, dam structures, monitoring wells, fish screen structures, and lake level were monitored daily, with recordings being taken three times/week. During June 1999 the water to the lake was turned off in order to complete additional construction work on the lake. This work included installation of culverts around the perimeter road, installation of boat launches, finish work on the spillway structure, pumphouse and well protection and planting 4 trees along the entrance to the boat launch area. The water was turned on again in late September 1999 with all structures having been checked, fish screens greased and maintained and well levels being monitored. In 2000 the Operations and Maintenance portion of the project began with monitoring of piezometers, water levels, biological monitoring, riparian plantings, protection of shorelines, and maintenance of structures and appurtances.

  11. Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Siekmann, Adam; Capps, Gary J; Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth

    2011-06-01

    The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

  12. Data requirements and handshake for the CERN Antiproton transfer operations from the AA and PS to client machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chohan, V.

    1985-10-01

    The CERN Antiproton Accumulator (AA) fulfils its role as a p source for all the diverse needs at CERN ranging from a few 10Z p's in a single bunch for the Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR) every hour or so up to 10 p's in 3 bunches for the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) Collider operations every 24 hours. The geographically dispersed accelerators involve large distances and proper synchronisation is mandatory for successful transfer operations. While every transfer operation needs preparatory work on all the machines involved in the chain with and without verbal communication in-between operators and control centres, an essential element has been the data exchange over the computer network linking the various processors in the PS and SPS Collider complex. This paper attempts to show some of the specialised data requirements which arose for the p transfer operations and the essential software linking of various processes in different computers leading to a complete transfer operation from the AA, via the transfer lines and PS, to the SPS Collider or LEAR. For the Collider runs, the pre- and post-countdown data synchronisation and interchange involves up to a dozen computers in the PS and SPS computer networks.

  13. Extending an operational meteorological monitoring network through machine learning and classical geo-statistical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelhans, Tim; Mwangomo, Ephraim; Otte, Insa; Detsch, Florian; Nauss, Thomas; Hemp, Andreas; Ndyamkama, Jimmy

    2015-04-01

    This study introduces the set-up and characteristics of a meteorological station network on the southern slopes of Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. The set-up follows a hierarchical approach covering an elevational as well as a land-use disturbance gradient. The network consists of 52 basic stations measuring ambient air temperature and above ground air humidity and 11 precipitation measurement sites. We provide in depth descriptions of various machine learning and classical geo-statistical methods used to fill observation gaps and extend the spatial coverage of the network to a total of 60 research sites. Performance statistics for these methods indicate that the presented data sets provide reliable measurements of the meteorological reality at Mt. Kilimanjaro. These data provide an excellent basis for ecological studies and are also of great value for regional atmospheric numerical modelling studies for which such comprehensive in-situ validation observations are rare, especially in tropical regions of complex terrain.

  14. Attention and its role in the operator's work. [control stability in man machine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shvetsov, O. P.

    1975-01-01

    A complex attentiometer investigation of the distribution, redirection, and concentration of attention during an operator's work notes the following stages: (1) General attentiveness is still not adequately expressed in the beginning; and (2) operator self-control of actions develops and gradually decreases errors in redirecting and distributing attention. A definite relationship is found between the improvement of concentration, distribution and redirection of attention and automation of sensorimotor performance. Excercises prove less effective in redirection of attention.

  15. Acquisition of Elevator Operation Rules by Using Genetics-Based Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamoto, Tsutomu; Tamaki, Hisashi; Murao, Hajime

    In this paper, we show an approach to acquire a rule which is capable of achieving effective elevator services. The allocation of elevators to hall calls is taken as the decision variable and the Pitt approach of a Genetics-Based Machine Learning (GBML) method is designed according to the representation and the characteristics of the problem. We use a rule architecture in which a combination of some measures is directly encoded as a unit-rule and an elevator allocation procedure is represented as a rule set composed of some unit-rules. Five measures are developed based on the results of the preliminary experiment and it is shown that the rule as the weighted summation of the measures (called WS) is more effective than a conventional elevator allocation rule. In computational experiments, the up-peak, down-peak and two-way traffic patterns are considered and three rule sets are acquired by applying the GBML method. Based on the results, we can confirm that the GBML method can acquire some unit-rules appropriate for the targeting traffic patterns, and we can mention that, for some presumed traffic patterns, the possibility of constructing an effective rule set by combining some specific rule sets.

  16. A Brain-Machine Interface Operating with a Real-Time Spiking Neural Network Control Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Dethier, Julie; Nuyujukian, Paul; Eliasmith, Chris; Stewart, Terry; Elassaad, Shauki A; Shenoy, Krishna V; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Motor prostheses aim to restore function to disabled patients. Despite compelling proof of concept systems, barriers to clinical translation remain. One challenge is to develop a low-power, fully-implantable system that dissipates only minimal power so as not to damage tissue. To this end, we implemented a Kalman-filter based decoder via a spiking neural network (SNN) and tested it in brain-machine interface (BMI) experiments with a rhesus monkey. The Kalman filter was trained to predict the arm's velocity and mapped on to the SNN using the Neural Engineering Framework (NEF). A 2,000-neuron embedded Matlab SNN implementation runs in real-time and its closed-loop performance is quite comparable to that of the standard Kalman filter. The success of this closed-loop decoder holds promise for hardware SNN implementations of statistical signal processing algorithms on neuromorphic chips, which may offer power savings necessary to overcome a major obstacle to the successful clinical translation of neural motor prostheses. PMID:25309106

  17. Operation mechanism of a molecular machine revealed using time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Panman, Matthijs R; Bodis, Pavol; Shaw, Daniel J; Bakker, Bert H; Newton, Arthur C; Kay, Euan R; Brouwer, Albert M; Buma, Wybren Jan; Leigh, David A; Woutersen, Sander

    2010-06-01

    Rotaxanes comprise macrocycles that can shuttle between docking stations along an axle. We explored the nanosecond shuttling mechanism by reversing the relative binding affinities of two stations through ultraviolet-induced transient reduction. We monitored the ensuing changes in the CO-stretching bands of the two stations and the shuttling macrocycle by means of an infrared probing pulse. Because hydrogen-bond scission and formation at the initial and final stations led to well-resolved changes in the respective CO-stretch frequencies, the departure and arrival of the macrocycle could be observed separately. We found that the shuttling involves two steps: thermally driven escape from the initial station, followed by rapid motion along the track ending either at the initial or final station. By varying the track's length, we found that the rapid motion approximates a biased one-dimensional random walk. However, surprisingly, the direction of the overall motion is opposite that of the bias. PMID:20522770

  18. 78 FR 24734 - Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Construction and Operation of an Infantry Platoon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... Department of the Army Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Construction and Operation of an Infantry...-HI) propose to construct and operate a modern Infantry Platoon Battle Course (IPBC) and associated... indirect munitions fire, and the proposed action would reclaim portions of the impact area to construct...

  19. Engine Lathe Operator. Instructor's Guide. Part of Single-Tool Skills Program Series. Machine Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    Expected to help meet the need for trained operators in metalworking and suitable for use in the adult education programs of school districts, in manpower development and training programs, and in secondary schools, this guide consists of four sections: Introduction, General Job Content, Shop Projects, and Drawings for the Projects. General Job…

  20. AMBIENT PERCHLOROETHYLENE LEVELS INSIDE COIN-OPERATED LAUNDRIES WITH DRYCLEANING MACHINES ON THE PREMISES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, ambient perchloroethylene (PERC) levels were measured inside and in the vicinity of six self serve laundries containing coin-type dry cleaning operations. Inside two of the laundries, evaluations of organic vapor monitoring badges were performed in addition to the ...

  1. Development and Operation of a Database Machine for Online Access and Update of a Large Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, James E.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews the development of a fault tolerant database processor system which replaced OCLC's conventional file system. A general introduction to database management systems and the operating environment is followed by a description of the hardware selection, software processes, and system characteristics. (SW)

  2. Surface Grinder Operator. Instructor's Guide. Part of Single-Tool Skills Program. Machine Industries Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This course, the second one to be published in what is expected to be a series of instructor's guides in the Single-Tool Skills Program, is expected to help meet the need for trained operators in metalworking and is designed for use in the adult education programs of school districts, in Manpower Development and Training Programs, and in secondary…

  3. 29 CFR 570.55 - Occupations involved in the operation of power-driven woodworking machines (Order 5).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... feeding into a machine by another person; and the sorting, tying, bundling, or loading of materials. (c..., stacking, or arranging of materials for feeding into a machine by another person; and the sorting,...

  4. To investigate the influence of machine operating variables on formulations derived from lactose types in capsule filling: part 2.

    PubMed

    Moolchandani, Vikas; Augsburger, Larry L; Gupta, Abhay; Khan, Mansoor A; Langridge, John; Hoag, Stephen W

    2016-04-01

    This study is the second in a series that examines the characterizing and selection of suitable grades of lactose for capsule formulation development. Based upon the previous study, four grades were selected for further study. The effects of drug load and operational variables on formulations derived from these four lactose types were evaluated for physicochemical and mechanical attributes of plugs and their capsules on an instrumented dosing-disc capsule filling machine (H&H KFM/3) using acetaminophen as a model, highly soluble and poorly compressible drug. The results obtained were as follows: (1) flowability reduced upon increasing drug load; (2) powder bed height (PBH) and compression force (CF) had positive significant effect on plug weight (p < 0.05); (3) ejection force was positively and significantly correlated with increasing speed and CF (p < 0.05); (4) AL capsule plugs had the highest plug crushing force which was followed by DCL15; (5) the crushing strength of plugs made from DCL11 increased with increasing acetaminophen concentration; (6) higher CF had a significant negative impact on acetaminophen release at 15 min time point (p < 0.05); (7) at 10% and 40% drug load, formulations containing AL showed the quickest drug release; and (8) increased drug load had a significant negative impact on the release rate at 15 and 45 min time points (p < 0.05). Overall, the results from this study provides information on risk based assessment of filler selection based on drug load and the range of machine operating variables which will help in defining criteria for meeting key quality attributes for capsule formulation development. PMID:26165246

  5. Association of individual and work-related risk factors with musculoskeletal symptoms among Iranian sewing machine operators.

    PubMed

    Dianat, Iman; Kord, Madeh; Yahyazade, Parvin; Karimi, Mohammad Ali; Stedmon, Alex W

    2015-11-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated working conditions and the occurrence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms among 251 Iranian sewing machine operators. A questionnaire and direct observations of working postures using the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) method were used. A high prevalence of musculoskeletal symptoms, particularly in the neck/shoulders, back and hands/wrists were found. The mean RULA grand score of 5.7 highlighted a poor sewing workstation design and indicated that most operators (with posture assessed at action level 3) needed an investigation and changes in their working habits soon. Work-related factors (including number of years worked as an operator, prolonged working hours per shift, long duration of sitting work without a break, feeling pressure due to work and working postures) and individual factors (including age, gender, BMI and regular sport/physical activities) were associated with musculoskeletal symptoms in multiple logistic regression models. The findings add to the understanding of working conditions of those jobs involving sewing activities and emphasise the need for ergonomic interventions to reduce musculoskeletal symptoms in the future. PMID:26154216

  6. Machine and process characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Love, L.W.

    1992-12-01

    A study was conducted to statistically characterize 11 precision machining centers to determine their operating characteristics and process capabilities. Measurement probes and a ball plate were used for measurement analysis. A generic test part designed with geometric features that the department typically manufactures was machined using various machining processes. A better understanding of each machine's characteristics and process capability was realized through repeating these methods on each machine.

  7. Vibration absorber modeling for handheld machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Mohd Azman; Mustafa, Mohd Muhyiddin; Jamil, Jazli Firdaus; Salim, Mohd Azli; Ramli, Faiz Redza

    2015-05-01

    Handheld machine tools produce continuous vibration to the users during operation. This vibration causes harmful effects to the health of users for repeated operations in a long period of time. In this paper, a dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is designed and modeled to reduce the vibration generated by the handheld machine tool. Several designs and models of vibration absorbers with various stiffness properties are simulated, tested and optimized in order to diminish the vibration. Ordinary differential equation is used to derive and formulate the vibration phenomena in the machine tool with and without the DVA. The final transfer function of the DVA is later analyzed using commercial available mathematical software. The DVA with optimum properties of mass and stiffness is developed and applied on the actual handheld machine tool. The performance of the DVA is experimentally tested and validated by the final result of vibration reduction.

  8. Method and device for operating an internal-combustion machine with a flywheel coupled thereto

    SciTech Connect

    Kohlhage, E.H.

    1982-03-02

    Method of operating an internal-combustion engine which is stoppable in accordance with specific conditions and stratable by a fly wheel disengageable from the internal-combustion engine by a clutch and re-engageable thereby when power is required, which includes bringing a friction wheel of a starter motor into engagement with the flywheel, when the flywheel is uncoupled from the internal-combustion engine, so as to accelerate the flywheel to a predetermined speed for starting up the internal-combustion engine, and thereafter engaging the clutch.

  9. Women, Men, and Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Form, William; McMillen, David Byron

    1983-01-01

    Data from the first national study of technological change show that proportionately more women than men operate machines, are more exposed to machines that have alienating effects, and suffer more from the negative effects of technological change. (Author/SSH)

  10. Validating cognitive support for operators of complex human-machine systems

    SciTech Connect

    O`Hara, J.; Wachtel, J.

    1995-10-01

    Modem nuclear power plants (NPPs) are complex systems whose performance is the result of an intricate interaction of human and system control. A complex system may be defined as one which supports a dynamic process involving a large number of elements that interact in many different ways. Safety is addressed through defense-in-depth design and preplanning; i.e., designers consider the types of failures that are most likely to occur and those of high consequence, and design their solutions in advance. However, complex interactions and their failure modes cannot always be anticipated by the designer and may be unfamiliar to plant personnel. These situations may pose cognitive demands on plant personnel, both individually and as a crew. Other factors may contribute to the cognitive challenges of NPP operation as well, including hierarchal processes, dynamic pace, system redundancy and reliability, and conflicting objectives. These factors are discussed in this paper.

  11. Maintenance and operation of a small wind generator in the marine environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Heerlein, W.

    1986-07-01

    This report discusses the maintenance and operation of a wind-turbine generator that has been undergoing tests as a source of energy for remote Coast Guard lighthouses. The report documents both the effects of operating the wind machine in the marine environment and the maintenance that it required. Design parameters and performance records of the generator are also evaluated. The HR2 is a horizontal-axis, upwind-oriented, three-bladed wind machine. It is equipped with a direct-drive system that allows the kinetic force captured by the propeller to be converted directly into rotational force driving the main shaft. The HR2 alternator and blade/hub system are allowed to tilt out of a near-vertical plane about a shaft and bearing mechanism. The VARCS is a torsion spring- and hinge-mechanism that acts against the lifting dynamics of the spinning blades. As high winds or gusts tilt the alternator about the hinge, the VARCS's spring opposes this force and regulates the blades angle of attack into the wind; the propeller's RPM drop when tilted because of the feathering action. If the wind subsides, the force of the VARCS spring drives the alternator assembly down and presents the blades back into the wind.

  12. How To Teach Common Characteristics of Machine Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazanas, H. C.

    1970-01-01

    Organizes machine tools and machine operations into commonalities in order to help the student visualize and distinguish the common characteristics which exist between machine tools and operations. (GR)

  13. Final Report of the Catalog Code Revision Committee Subcommittee on Rules for Cataloging Machine-Readable Data Files.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Elizabeth, Ed.; Byrun, John, Ed.

    A committee on rules fur cataloging machine readable data files (MRDF) recommends areas for revision of the Anglo American Cataloging Rules to integrate collections of MRDF into the mainstream of bibliographic control. The 12 working papers which support and detail these recommendations are appended to this report. They include rationales for…

  14. Phase 5 storage (Project W-112) Central Waste Complex operational readiness review, final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wight, R.H.

    1997-05-30

    This document is the final report for the RFSH conducted, Contractor Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the Central Waste Complex (CWC) Project W-112 and Interim Safety Basis implementation. As appendices, all findings, observations, lines of inquiry and the implementation plan are included.

  15. Method for Virtual Prototyping of Cabins of Mining Machines Operators / Metoda Wirtualnego Prototypowania Kabin Operatorów Maszyn Górniczych

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokarczyk, Jarosław

    2015-03-01

    Method for virtual prototyping of cabins of mining machines operators is presented in the light of anthropotechnical assessment criteria. Anthropotechnical criteria and design of models of anthropometric features, which are used for assessment of design solutions in the aspect of safety criterion, are divided and discussed. Developed virtual prototyping method for assessment of cabin of underground locomotive operator was used. Initial simulation was made with use of Finite Element Method. W artykule przedstawiono metodę wirtualnego prototypowania kabin operatorów maszyn górniczych w świetle antropotechnicznych kryteriów oceny. Dokonano podziału i omówiono kryteria antropotechniczne. Przedstawiono definicję kryterium urazu głowy HIC (ang. Head Injury Criterion) oraz prawdopodobieństwo wystąpienia urazu głowy w funkcji wartości parametru HIC. Zaprezentowano budowę modeli cech antropometrycznych, dedykowanych do oceny rozwiązań konstrukcyjnych w aspekcie kryterium bezpieczeństwa wraz z opisem statycznych i dynamicznych cech antropometrycznych. Omówiono proces tworzenia wirtualnego odpowiednika manekina do testów zderzeniowych, tzw. modelu ATB (ang. Articulated Total Body). Podano odniesienia do norm dotyczących konstrukcji chroniących operatorów przed spadającymi przedmiotami. Przedstawiono schemat metody wirtualnego prototypowania kabin operatorów w aspekcie kryterium bezpieczeństwa. Zastosowano opracowaną metodę wirtualnego prototypowania do oceny kabiny operatora lokomotywy dołowej. Omówiono główne elementy składowe modelu obliczeniowego. Zadanie rozwiązano przy użyciu metody elementów skończonych. Przedstawiono wstępne wyniki symulacji, tj. obliczono parametr HIC dla zadanych warunków brzegowych. W podsumowaniu zaprezentowano główne cele wirtualnego prototypowania kabin operatorów dla kryterium bezpieczeństwa. Zwrócono uwagę na uniwersalność zastosowanej metody.

  16. 14 CFR 330.29 - What information must air taxi operators submit on Form 330 (Final) and Form 330-C?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What information must air taxi operators... COMPENSATION OF AIR CARRIERS Application Procedures § 330.29 What information must air taxi operators submit on Form 330 (Final) and Form 330-C? As an air taxi operator, you must complete Form 330 (Final)...

  17. State revolving fund: Final report to Congress. Financial status and operations of water pollution control revolving funds

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This is the final report to Congress. The SRF final report addresses the financial status and operations of water pollution control revolving funds established by the States under Title VI of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  18. Asphalt saturation of roofing felt on the felt machine. Final report. Progress report, January 1980-July 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, W.J.; Davis, D.A.; Smith, W.F

    1981-01-01

    The asphalt roofing industry manufactures approximately 10 million tons of product annually. This requires an estimated 40 trillion Btu's in process heat and 4 million tons of asphalt having a fuel value of 140 trillion Btu's. Pilot equipment was installed on a commercial felt machine to determine whether saturation on the felt machine was feasible and whether energy savings would result. A process was demonstrated by which adequate saturation levels can be achieved. Energy savings are estimated at 6.3 trillion Btu's per year on an industry-wide basis. An economic study with consideration of the rapid industry conversion from organic felt to the less energy-intensive glass mat-based roofing precluded further process scale-up and plans for commercialization.

  19. Ceramic-composite cutting tool insert for increased productivity, ultra high-speed machining. Final report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, J.C.

    1989-07-01

    Eleven different ceramic composites with different compositions were investigated. The thermodynamic compatibility, thermal shock factor, hardness, and mechanical properties of these composites were determined. Two composites, sol-gel derived A12O3-ZrO2-SiCw and pressureless sintered ZrO2-TiC composites, were determined to possess the optimum properties for cutting tool applications. The ZrO2-TiC composites, which were prepared and consolidated by novel processing, exhibited exceptional high temperature properties. Machining tests of high speed steel were performed with these composites. The SiC whisker reinforced composites and the ZrO2-TiC composites had a significantly improved volume of metal removal over the commercial cutting tools for machining steel. The developed ZrO2-TiC composites have the advantage, in addition to superior cutting performance, of being produced via a cost effective method (pressureless sintering).

  20. Whole-body Vibration Exposure of Drill Operators in Iron Ore Mines and Role of Machine-Related, Individual, and Rock-Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Dhanjee Kumar; Bhattacherjee, Ashis; Patra, Aditya Kumar; Chau, Nearkasen

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess the whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure among large blast hole drill machine operators with regard to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) recommended threshold values and its association with machine- and rock-related factors and workers' individual characteristics. Methods The study population included 28 drill machine operators who had worked in four opencast iron ore mines in eastern India. The study protocol comprised the following: measurements of WBV exposure [frequency weighted root mean square (RMS) acceleration (m/s2)], machine-related data (manufacturer of machine, age of machine, seat height, thickness, and rest height) collected from mine management offices, measurements of rock hardness, uniaxial compressive strength and density, and workers' characteristics via face-to-face interviews. Results More than 90% of the operators were exposed to a higher level WBV than the ISO upper limit and only 3.6% between the lower and upper limits, mainly in the vertical axis. Bivariate correlations revealed that potential predictors of total WBV exposure were: machine manufacturer (r = 0.453, p = 0.015), age of drill (r = 0.533, p = 0.003), and hardness of rock (r = 0.561, p = 0.002). The stepwise multiple regression model revealed that the potential predictors are age of operator (regression coefficient β = −0.052, standard error SE = 0.023), manufacturer (β = 1.093, SE = 0.227), rock hardness (β = 0.045, SE = 0.018), uniaxial compressive strength (β = 0.027, SE = 0.009), and density (β = –1.135, SE = 0.235). Conclusion Prevention should include using appropriate machines to handle rock hardness, rock uniaxial compressive strength and density, and seat improvement using ergonomic approaches such as including a suspension system. PMID:26929838

  1. The operational behavior of microprocessor-controlled and pulsed inverter-fed synchronous machines with permanent magnet excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlik, Bernd

    1987-05-01

    A mathematical model for synchronous machines excited with permanent magnets was developed for the investigation of the steady and dynamic behavior of inverter-fed three-phase drives. The characteristics of inverter-fed three-phase drives and their subsystems are depicted. A microprocessor-based vectorial pulse width modulation method was developed. The armature current control, speed control, field reduction in synchronous machines excited with permanent magnets, and feeding with nonsinusoidal currents of synchronous machines excited with permanent magnets were analyzed. The location of the poles was determined by the identification of the initial location. This results in controlled starting of the drive immediately after switching on the control.

  2. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Volume is a part of the Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Columbia River System. This volume contains technical exhibits of cultural resources and commentary on the (System Operation Review) SOR process. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation comment is the majority of the material in the volume, in the Consultation Plan, Identification of trust resources; Criteria for the selection of a System Operating Strategy; comment on rights protection and implementation of Federal Trust responsibility; analysis of the draft EIS. Comment by other Native American Tribes and groups is also included: Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation; Kootenai Tribe of Idaho; Spokane Tribe of Indians; Coeur d` Alene tribe.

  3. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Main Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review; United States. Bonneville Power Administration; United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. North Pacific Division; United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.

    1995-11-01

    The System Operation Review (SOR) Final EIS addresses four actions: (a) need to develop coordinated strategy for managing the multiple uses of the Federal Columbia River system (System Operating Strategy [SOS]); (b) need to provide interested parties other than management agencies with a long-term role in system planning (Forum); (c) need to renew or change current Canadian Entitlement Allocation Agreements (CEAA); and (d) need to renegotiate and renew the Pacific Northwest Coordination Agreement (PNCA). SOS alternatives analyzed are: (1) operation prior to Endangered Species Act listings of salmon stocks; (2) current operations (no action); (3) stable storage project operation; (4) natural river operation; (5) fixed drawdown; (6) operating strategies proposed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, State fisheries agencies, Native American tribes, and Federal operating agencies; and (7) Preferred Alternative. The seven Forum alternatives analyzed are: (1) decisionmaking by the SOR lead agencies (preferred alternative); (2) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by an existing regional entity; (3) decisionmaking by SOR lead agencies and recommendations by a new regional entity; (4) decisionmaking by a Federal consultation forum; (5) decisionmaking by a new entity; (6) decisionmaking by one Federal operating agency; (7) decisionmaking by a Federal agency other than an operating agency. PNCA alternatives analyzed are: (1) no replacement contract; (2) contract to maximize regional power benefits; (3) roll over existing PNCA; (4) current PNCA with modified operating procedures (preferred alternative); (5) current PNCA with nonpower modifications. CEAA alternatives include: (1) no action (no replacement of current allocation agreements); (2) entitlement allocation: 55 percent Federal; 45 percent non-Federal; (3) entitlement allocation: 70 percent Federal, 30 percent non-Federal (preferred alternative); (4) no agreement.

  4. Evaluation of a dual beam laser Doppler displacement meter retrofitted to a coordinate measuring machine. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsdale, S.J.; Hanshaw, R.A.

    1997-05-01

    A dual beam laser Doppler displacement measuring system was mounted to a fixed-table, cantilever-type coordinate measuring machine (CMM) to establish the feasibility of real time angular error correction for each CMM axis. The performance improvement was evaluated relative to the CMM`s standard scales. The dual beam system proved to have no advantage over a single beam laser due to an inability to measure the actual angular errors at the probe location, but showed potential for substantial accuracy improvement over the standard CMM scales when geometry errors were software corrected.

  5. Analysis of a display and control system man-machine interface concept. Volume 1: Final technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karl, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    An evaluation was made of the feasibility of utilizing a simplified man machine interface concept to manage and control a complex space system involving multiple redundant computers that control multiple redundant subsystems. The concept involves the use of a CRT for display and a simple keyboard for control, with a tree-type control logic for accessing and controlling mission, systems, and subsystem elements. The concept was evaluated in terms of the Phase B space shuttle orbiter, to utilize the wide scope of data management and subsystem control inherent in the central data management subsystem provided by the Phase B design philosophy. Results of these investigations are reported in four volumes.

  6. Evaluation of alternative corrosion inhibitors for gas-fired ammonia/water refrigeration machines. Final report, April 1993-April 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, B.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1995-04-01

    The report presents the test results on the use of silicate compounds chosen as environmentally safe alternatives to the sodium chromate corrosion inhibitors that are currently used to protect carbon steel surfaces in ammonia/water refrigeration machines. Silicates were selected from a larger group of compounds for testing in standard, residential 3-ton ammonia water chillers after they had been screened for their effectiveness by electrochemical techniques, coupon immersion tests in autoclaves, and tests in chillers. Various surface pretreatments using silicates were also tested in an attempt to avoid stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) that had occurred in previous studies using silicate-inhibited chillers that had been pretreated with sodium nitrate.

  7. Cost estimates of operating onsite spent fuel pools after final reactor shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Rod, S R

    1991-08-01

    This report presents estimates of the annual costs of operating spent fuel pools at nuclear power stations after the final shutdown of one or more onsite reactors. Its purpose is to provide basic spent fuel storage cost information for use in evaluating DOE's reference nuclear waste management system, as well as alternate systems. The basic model of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) used in this study was based on General Electric Corporation's Morris Operation and was modified to reflect mean storage capabilities at an unspecified, or generic,'' US reactor site. Cost data for the model came from several sources, including both operating and shutdown nuclear power stations and existing ISFSIs. Duke Power Company has estimated ISFSI costs based on existing spent fuel storage costs at its nuclear power stations. Similarly, nuclear material handling facilities such as the Morris Operation, the West Valley Demonstration Project, and the retired Humbolt Bay nuclear power station have compiled spent fuel storage cost data based on years of operating experience. Consideration was given to the following factors that would cause operating costs to vary among pools: (1) The number of spent fuel pools at a given reactor site; (2) the number of operating and shutdown reactors onsite; (3) geographic location; and (4) pool storage capacity. 10 ref., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0092

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, H.A.; Shelton, J.E.; LaMance, G.M.; Kennedy, C.R.

    1995-02-26

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) and the Lanxide Corporation (Lanxide) negotiated a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop advanced technology and manufacturing practices for machining and inspecting metal matrix composites (MMC). The objective of this CRADA was to develop machining parameters to allow manufacturing of automotive components from MMCs. These parts exhibit a range of shapes and dimensional tolerances and require a large number of machining operations. The common characteristic of the components is the use of the light weight MMC materials to replace heavier materials. This allows smaller and lighter moving parts and supporting structural components thereby increasing fuel mileage. The CRADA was divided into three areas: basic investigation of cutting parameters, establishment of a mock production line for components, and optimization of parameters in the mock facility. This report covers the manufacturing of MMCs and preliminary Phase I testing for silicon carbide having various loading percentages and extensive Phase I testing of cutting parameters on 30% alumina loaded aluminum. On January 26, 1995, a letter from the vice president, technology at Lanxide was issued terminating the CRADA due to changes in business. 9 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Performance evaluation of Automatic Extraction System. Volume IV. Recommended operating, maintenance, and training plans. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Frantz, R.L.; King, R.H.; Bartsch, D.L.

    1980-07-01

    Since the AES is a different and more sochisticated machine, it became apparent during the in-mine trial that more than on-the-job training (OJT) is desirable for the operators. The AES is unique in that it should remain in the face for long periods rather than be moved often from the face to face. In addition, the operator should learn to trust the ACS in order to be more aware of the hazards in the face area. More training is one way to help increase operator and machine efficiency and safety consciousness. The lack of formal, organized, scheduled, non-productive-mode training of the AES operators appeared to affect the performance of the AES during mining, tramming, maneuvering, and bolting. Therefore, before the operator and bolters do their jobs and the mechanics maintain the AES on a regular basis in a production-mode, they should attend classes, including: (1) formal above ground classroom training, (2) non-productive-mode underground training, and (3) productive-mode OJT. The training department should have the authority and resources to train workers beforehand, and also whenever subsequent instruction is needed. This plan includes only those areas peculiar to the AES. It is assumed that mature, competent individuals (operators and bolters) have already been trained to use similar machines. If this is not the case, the training will require significantly more time.

  10. Environmental and Organizational Factors Associated with Elbow/Forearm and Hand/Wrist Disorder among Sewing Machine Operators of Garment Industry in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kebede Deyyas, Wakjira; Tafese, Ararso

    2014-01-01

    Occupational health problems related to upper limp musculoskeletal disorders were the major issue among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Galan City, Oromia Regional State. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 1 to 30, 2012. A total of 422 study subjects were included in this study. Standard Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on musculoskeletal symptom, sociodemographic data, and factors associated with the problems through face to face interview. From a total of 422 sewing machine operators included in the study 370 (87.7%) were females and 306 (72.5%) were in the age group of <30 years. The prevalence of self-reported work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders was 40% and 37.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, those who had >16 years of service were about five times more likely to develop elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders than those who had short (1–5 years) year of services [AOR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.55–13.02], physical activities [AOR = 5.02, 95% CI: 1.57–16.00], and methods of payment [AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.23–3.28], factors significantly associated with this disorders. Work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders were high among sewing machine operators in selected garment industries. Moreover, personal and environmental factors were identified as the potential risk factors related to elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among the study group. Therefore, government and the owner of the garment industries should give special attention to prevent and control the problems through proper occupational health and safety policy implementation in the country. PMID:25298780

  11. Environmental and organizational factors associated with elbow/forearm and hand/wrist disorder among sewing machine operators of garment industry in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kebede Deyyas, Wakjira; Tafese, Ararso

    2014-01-01

    Occupational health problems related to upper limp musculoskeletal disorders were the major issue among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Ethiopia. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among sewing machine operators of garment industries in Galan City, Oromia Regional State. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April 1 to 30, 2012. A total of 422 study subjects were included in this study. Standard Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on musculoskeletal symptom, sociodemographic data, and factors associated with the problems through face to face interview. From a total of 422 sewing machine operators included in the study 370 (87.7%) were females and 306 (72.5%) were in the age group of <30 years. The prevalence of self-reported work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders was 40% and 37.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, those who had >16 years of service were about five times more likely to develop elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders than those who had short (1-5 years) year of services [AOR = 4.7, 95% CI: 1.55-13.02], physical activities [AOR = 5.02, 95% CI: 1.57-16.00], and methods of payment [AOR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.23-3.28], factors significantly associated with this disorders. Work related elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders were high among sewing machine operators in selected garment industries. Moreover, personal and environmental factors were identified as the potential risk factors related to elbow and wrist musculoskeletal disorders among the study group. Therefore, government and the owner of the garment industries should give special attention to prevent and control the problems through proper occupational health and safety policy implementation in the country. PMID:25298780

  12. Fullerene Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Saini, Subhash

    1998-01-01

    Recent computational efforts at NASA Ames Research Center and computation and experiment elsewhere suggest that a nanotechnology of machine phase functionalized fullerenes may be synthetically accessible and of great interest. We have computationally demonstrated that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes and benzyne teeth should operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. Preliminary results suggest that these gears can be cooled by a helium atmosphere and a laser motor can power fullerene gears if a positive and negative charge have been added to form a dipole. In addition, we have unproven concepts based on experimental and computational evidence for support structures, computer control, a system architecture, a variety of components, and manufacture. Combining fullerene machines with the remarkable mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes, there is some reason to believe that a focused effort to develop fullerene nanotechnology could yield materials with tremendous properties.

  13. Phase 3 Final Topical Report for the Remote Operated Vehicle with C02 Blasting (ROVCO2)

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-14

    This report documents the third and final phase of the Remote Operated Vehicle with CO2 Blasting (ROVCO2) Program. The Program=s goal is to develop and demonstrate a tool to improve the productivity of concrete floor decontamination. In Phase 3 of the ROVCO2 program, the workhead and the COYOTEE end-effector were redesigned, and effectiveness and productivity tests were performed. This report documents the development activities. The results show that the ROVCO2 system is an efficient decontamination tool, but with relatively slow production rates.

  14. 29 CFR 570.61 - Occupations in the operation of power-driven meat-processing machines and occupations involving...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dead animals, animal offal, animal fats, scrap meats, blood, and bones into stock feeds, tallow... cheese, etc.): Meat patty forming machines, meat and bone cutting saws, meat slicers, knives (except... dead animals, animal offal, animal fats, scrap meats, blood, and bones into stock feeds,...

  15. Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Achim; Mahidadia, Ashesh

    The purpose of this chapter is to present fundamental ideas and techniques of machine learning suitable for the field of this book, i.e., for automated scientific discovery. The chapter focuses on those symbolic machine learning methods, which produce results that are suitable to be interpreted and understood by humans. This is particularly important in the context of automated scientific discovery as the scientific theories to be produced by machines are usually meant to be interpreted by humans. This chapter contains some of the most influential ideas and concepts in machine learning research to give the reader a basic insight into the field. After the introduction in Sect. 1, general ideas of how learning problems can be framed are given in Sect. 2. The section provides useful perspectives to better understand what learning algorithms actually do. Section 3 presents the Version space model which is an early learning algorithm as well as a conceptual framework, that provides important insight into the general mechanisms behind most learning algorithms. In section 4, a family of learning algorithms, the AQ family for learning classification rules is presented. The AQ family belongs to the early approaches in machine learning. The next, Sect. 5 presents the basic principles of decision tree learners. Decision tree learners belong to the most influential class of inductive learning algorithms today. Finally, a more recent group of learning systems are presented in Sect. 6, which learn relational concepts within the framework of logic programming. This is a particularly interesting group of learning systems since the framework allows also to incorporate background knowledge which may assist in generalisation. Section 7 discusses Association Rules - a technique that comes from the related field of Data mining. Section 8 presents the basic idea of the Naive Bayesian Classifier. While this is a very popular learning technique, the learning result is not well suited for human comprehension as it is essentially a large collection of probability values. In Sect. 9, we present a generic method for improving accuracy of a given learner by generatingmultiple classifiers using variations of the training data. While this works well in most cases, the resulting classifiers have significantly increased complexity and, hence, tend to destroy the human readability of the learning result that a single learner may produce. Section 10 contains a summary, mentions briefly other techniques not discussed in this chapter and presents outlook on the potential of machine learning in the future.

  16. Implications for Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arduini, G.; Lamont, M.; Pieloni, T.; Rumolo, G.

    The HL-LHC will introduce a number of novel operational features and challenges including luminosity leveling. After a brief recap of the possible leveling techniques, the potential impact of the operational regime on overall efficiency is discussed. A breakdown of the operational cycle and the standard operational year, together with a discussion of fault time is presented. The potential performance is then explored and estimates of the required machine availability and efficiency for 250 fb-1 per year are given. Finally the e-cloud challenges, scrubbing runs requirements, and machine development potential are outlined.

  17. Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Report (NNR) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-19

    This report is a high level summary of the eight major projects funded by the Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Readiness (NNR) project (FY06.0422.3.04.R1). The largest project of the group is the Rapid Response project in which the six major sub categories are summarized. This project focused on the operations of the machining departments that will comprise Special Applications Machining (SAM) in the Kansas City Responsive Infrastructure Manufacturing & Sourcing (KCRIMS) project. This project was aimed at upgrading older machine tools, developing new inspection tools, eliminating Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM) in the handling of classified Numerical Control (NC) programs by installing the CRONOS network, and developing methods to automatically load Coordinated-Measuring Machine (CMM) inspection data into bomb books and product score cards. Finally, the project personnel leaned perations of some of the machine tool cells, and now have the model to continue this activity.

  18. Dictionary machine (for VLSI)

    SciTech Connect

    Ottmann, T.A.; Rosenberg, A.L.; Stockmeyer, L.J.

    1982-09-01

    The authors present the design of a dictionary machine that is suitable for VLSI implementation, and discusses how to realize this implementation efficiently. The machine supports the operations of search, insert, delete, and extractment on an arbitrary ordered set. Each of these operations takes time o(logn), where n is the number of entries present when the operation is performed. Moreover, arbitrary sequences of these instructions can be pipelined through the machine at a constant rate (i.e. independent of n and the capacity of the machine). The time o(logn) is an improvement over previous VLSI designs of dictionary machines which require time o(log n) per operation, where n is the maximum number of keys that can be stored. 10 references.

  19. Perspex machine II: visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James A. D. W.

    2005-01-01

    We review the perspex machine and improve it by reducing its halting conditions to one condition. We also introduce a data structure, called the "access column," that can accelerate a wide class of perspex programs. We show how the perspex can be visualised as a tetrahedron, artificial neuron, computer program, and as a geometrical transformation. We discuss the temporal properties of the perspex machine, dissolve the famous time travel paradox, and present a hypothetical time machine. Finally, we discuss some mental properties and show how the perspex machine solves the mind-body problem and, specifically, how it provides one physical explanation for the occurrence of paradigm shifts.

  20. Perspex machine II: visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James A. D. W.

    2004-12-01

    We review the perspex machine and improve it by reducing its halting conditions to one condition. We also introduce a data structure, called the "access column," that can accelerate a wide class of perspex programs. We show how the perspex can be visualised as a tetrahedron, artificial neuron, computer program, and as a geometrical transformation. We discuss the temporal properties of the perspex machine, dissolve the famous time travel paradox, and present a hypothetical time machine. Finally, we discuss some mental properties and show how the perspex machine solves the mind-body problem and, specifically, how it provides one physical explanation for the occurrence of paradigm shifts.

  1. TEMPO machine

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Lancaster, K.T.; Lawson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    TEMPO is a transformer powered megavolt pulse generator with an output pulse of 100 ns duration. The machine was designed for burst mode operation at pulse repetition rates up to 10 Hz with minimum pulse-to-pulse voltage variations. To meet the requirement for pulse duration a nd a 20-..omega.. output impedance within reasonable size constraints, the pulse forming transmission line was designed as two parallel water-insulated, strip-type Blumleins. Stray capacitance and electric fields along the edges of the line elements were controlled by lining the tank with plastic sheet.

  2. 8. VIEW OF THE MACHINE SHOP. BY 1966, THE MACHINE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF THE MACHINE SHOP. BY 1966, THE MACHINE SHOP HANDLED PRIMARILY STAINLESS STEEL COMPONENTS, WHICH WERE SENT TO THE MACHINE SHOP TO BE FORMED INTO THEIR FINAL SHAPES. (7/24/70) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  3. Hinged Shields for Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lallande, J. B.; Poland, W. W.; Tull, S.

    1985-01-01

    Flaps guard against flying chips, but fold away for tool setup. Clear plastic shield in position to intercept flying chips from machine tool and retracted to give operator access to workpiece. Machine shops readily make such shields for own use.

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix R: Pacific Northwest Coordination agreement (PNCA).

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    Currently, the Federal government coordinates the planning and operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) with projects owned and operated by the region`s non-Federal hydrogenerating utilities pursuant to the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement (PNCA). The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), the Corps of Engineers (Corps), and the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) are parties to the PNCA on behalf of the government of the United States. The PNCA is a complex agreement that provides an opportunity for the region`s power producers to maximize the power system`s reliability and economy while meeting their multiple-use objectives. The PNCA does not dictate the operation of the resources it coordinates. It is essentially an accounting mechanism that exchanges the power produced among the parties in order to improve the reliability of the system and reduce regional power costs. Project owners retain complete autonomy to operate as needed to meet their multiple-use requirements. The PNCA was executed in 1964 as an important component of regional plans to maximize the Northwest`s hydro resource capability. Maximization also included the development of storage projects on the Columbia River in Canada pursuant to the terms of the 1964 Columbia River Treaty. Because of the link between power coordination and Treaty issues, the current parties to the PNCA, currently are contemplating entering into a replacement or renewed power coordination agreement. Because the power coordination agreement is a consensual arrangement, its ultimate provisions must be acceptable to all of its signatories. This Appendix R to the Final Environmental Impact Statement of the Columbia River System is a presentation of the Pacific North-west Coordination Agreement.

  5. NEMO medium voltage converter factory acceptance, operational and final integration tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocimano, Rosanna; NEMO Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The NEMO Collaboration, as part of the KM3NeT EU-funded consortium, is developing technical solutions for the construction of a cubic-kilometer scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean sea several kilometers below the sea level and far from the shore. In this framework, after years of design, development, assembly and testing the Alcatel deep sea medium voltage power converter (MVC) is ready for deployment at 100 km from the Capo Passero shore station. The MVC converts the 10 kV to an instrument-friendly 375 V for a 10 kW power. The MVC will be presented with focus on the factory acceptance, operational and final integration tests that recently have been carried out.

  6. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix O: Economic and Social Impact.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix O of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System measures the economic and social effects of the alternative system operation strategies and includes both geographic and methodology components. Areas discussed in detail include the following: purpose, scope and process; an economic history of the Columbia River Basin and its use today including the Columbia River and Socio-economic development in the Northwest and Major uses of the River System; Analysis procedures and methodologies including national economic evaluation, the concepts, analysis of assumptions, analysis for specific river uses, water quality, Regional evaluation, analysis, and social impacts; alternatives and impacts including implementation costs, andromous fish, resident fish and wildlife, flood control, irrigation and municipal and industrial water supply, navigation impacts, power, recreation, annual costs, regional economic analysis. Extensive comparison of alternatives is included.

  7. Modeling of cumulative tool wear in machining metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.P.; Tan, V.K.; Oon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are notoriously known for their low machinability because of the abrasive and brittle reinforcement. Although a near-net-shape product could be produced, finish machining is still required for the final shape and dimension. The classical Taylor`s tool life equation that relates tool life and cutting conditions has been traditionally used to study machinability. The turning operation is commonly used to investigate the machinability of a material; tedious and costly milling experiments have to be performed separately; while a facing test is not applicable for the Taylor`s model since the facing speed varies as the tool moves radially. Collecting intensive machining data for MMCs is often difficult because of the constraints on size, cost of the material, and the availability of sophisticated machine tools. A more flexible model and machinability testing technique are, therefore, sought. This study presents and verifies new models for turning, facing, and milling operations. Different cutting conditions were utilized to assess the machinability of MMCs reinforced with silicon carbide or alumina particles. Experimental data show that tool wear does not depend on the order of different cutting speeds since abrasion is the main wear mechanism. Correlation between data for turning, milling, and facing is presented. It is more economical to rank machinability using data for facing and then to convert the data for turning and milling, if required. Subsurface damages such as work-hardened and cracked matrix alloy, and fractured and delaminated particles are discussed.

  8. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramics. CRADA final report for CRADA Number Y-1292-0088

    SciTech Connect

    Hensley, J.D.; Kalish, Y.

    1996-12-06

    This CRADA supports the objective of demonstrating feasibility and minimizing manufacturing costs associated with the use of ceramic components in a heavy duty diesel engine manufactured by Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC). Studies were conducted to evaluate existing, known data for ceramic material, and to identify additional data needed to better characterize a valve of ceramic composition. Tests were conducted to provide important information required for redesign of existing metal valves and other engine head components. A vendor was selected by DDC to produce the valve shapes for testing and Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (LMES) provided design modeling/analysis support. The effort also included the development of a bench-test apparatus to simulate the environment of a valve in operation that provided material data and confirmation of analytical results.

  9. National Ignition Facility final optics assembly thermal effects of maintenance operations

    SciTech Connect

    Parietti, L.; Martin, R.A.

    1998-04-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world`s most powerful laser system, is being built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study inertial fusion and high-energy-density science. This billion-dollar facility consists of 192 beams focusing 1.8 MJ on a fusion target. The Final Optics Assembly (FOA), the last mechanical apparatus before the target chamber, converts the light from an incoming frequency of 1 {omega} to ia target-ready 3 {omega}, and focuses the laser beam. The performance of the frequency conversion crystals is very sensitive to temperature changes; crystal temperature must be maintained within a 0.1 C of a nominal temperature prior to a laser shot. Maximizing system availability requires minimizing thermal recovery times after thermal disturbances occurring in both normal and maintenance operations. To guide the design, it is important to have estimates of those recovery times. This report presents Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) design calculations to evaluate thermal effects of maintenance operations.

  10. Human Factors Assessment: The Passive Final Approach Spacing Tool (pFAST) Operational Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine K.; Sanford, Beverly D.

    1998-01-01

    Automation to assist air traffic controllers in the current terminal and en route air traff ic environments is being developed at Ames Research Center in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration. This automation, known collectively as the Center-TRACON Automation System (CTAS), provides decision- making assistance to air traffic controllers through computer-generated advisories. One of the CTAS tools developed specifically to assist terminal area air traffic controllers is the Passive Final Approach Spacing Tool (pFAST). An operational evaluation of PFAST was conducted at the Dallas/Ft. Worth, Texas, Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) facility. Human factors data collected during the test describe the impact of the automation upon the air traffic controller in terms of perceived workload and acceptance. Results showed that controller self-reported workload was not significantly increased or reduced by the PFAST automation; rather, controllers reported that the levels of workload remained primarily the same. Controller coordination and communication data were analyzed, and significant differences in the nature of controller coordination were found. Controller acceptance ratings indicated that PFAST was acceptable. This report describes the human factors data and results from the 1996 Operational Field Evaluation of Passive FAST.

  11. Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) data book. Volume 5: OEPSS final briefing for first year study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, George S.; Waldrop, Glen S.

    1990-01-01

    This study was initiated to identify operations problems and cost drivers for current propulsion systems and to identify technology and design approaches to increase the operational efficiency and reduce operations costs for future propulsion systems. To provide readily usable data for the Advanced Launch System (ALS) Program, the results of the Operationally Efficient Propulsion System Study (OEPSS) were organized into a series of OEPSS Data Books. This volume contains the final briefing on the OEPSS first-year effort. This briefing was presented to MSFC as part of an effort to promote greater interaction between the design community and the launch site operator.

  12. Interaction with Machine Improvisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assayag, Gerard; Bloch, George; Cont, Arshia; Dubnov, Shlomo

    We describe two multi-agent architectures for an improvisation oriented musician-machine interaction systems that learn in real time from human performers. The improvisation kernel is based on sequence modeling and statistical learning. We present two frameworks of interaction with this kernel. In the first, the stylistic interaction is guided by a human operator in front of an interactive computer environment. In the second framework, the stylistic interaction is delegated to machine intelligence and therefore, knowledge propagation and decision are taken care of by the computer alone. The first framework involves a hybrid architecture using two popular composition/performance environments, Max and OpenMusic, that are put to work and communicate together, each one handling the process at a different time/memory scale. The second framework shares the same representational schemes with the first but uses an Active Learning architecture based on collaborative, competitive and memory-based learning to handle stylistic interactions. Both systems are capable of processing real-time audio/video as well as MIDI. After discussing the general cognitive background of improvisation practices, the statistical modelling tools and the concurrent agent architecture are presented. Then, an Active Learning scheme is described and considered in terms of using different improvisation regimes for improvisation planning. Finally, we provide more details about the different system implementations and describe several performances with the system.

  13. Permanent magnet machine and method with reluctance poles and non-identical PM poles for high density operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.

    2010-05-18

    A method and apparatus in which a stator (11) and a rotor (12) define a primary air gap (20) for receiving AC flux and at least one source (23, 40), and preferably two sources (23, 24, 40) of DC excitation are positioned for inducing DC flux at opposite ends of the rotor (12). Portions of PM material (17, 17a) are provided as boundaries separating PM rotor pole portions from each other and from reluctance poles. The PM poles (18) and the reluctance poles (19) can be formed with poles of one polarity having enlarged flux paths in relation to flux paths for pole portions of an opposite polarity, the enlarged flux paths communicating with a core of the rotor (12) so as to increase reluctance torque produced by the electric machine. Reluctance torque is increased by providing asymmetrical pole faces. The DC excitation can also use asymmetric poles and asymmetric excitation sources. Several embodiments are disclosed with additional variations.

  14. Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Debe, Mark K.

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF-ternary catalyst materials for higher performance, documents enhanced durability under multiple types of accelerated tests by factors of 10x to 50x over conventional catalysts, & demonstrates their performance & durability in large area MEA FC stack tests. The PEMFC ion exchange membrane is the other key functioning FC component on which work was completed. While improvements have been made to standard PFSA type membranes, they still require humidification to achieve adequate proton conductivity & so their use at elevated temperatures & drier operating conditions is limited. Membranes with increased durability & conductivity under hotter, drier conditions allow the use of FC's in many applications, particularly automotive. Towards this goal, 2 approaches were pursued in the work reported here. The first part was designed for immediate application at drier conditions & operating temperatures between 85C and 120C, focused on the development of a membrane based on a low equivalent weight (EW), perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer for good ionic conductivity at low humidification, & the use of stabilizing additives for improved oxidative stability. The ionomer used was developed at 3M & has a shorter acid containing side-chain than the Nafion™ ionomer. This ionomer also has a higher Tα & higher modulus than that of a Nafion™ membrane of the same EW, allowing lower EW ionomers to be prepared with very good mechanical properties. In addition, more than 50 stabilizing additives were evaluated in ex-situ, Fenton’s tests & more than 10 of these were incorporated into membranes & evaluated in accelerated FC tests. This work led to thin (25-30 micron) cast membranes with substantially improved conductivity & durability under simulated automotive conditions, compared to membranes currently available. The 2nd body of membrane work was focused on developing & characterizing 3 approaches for making new PEM's for operation under hot (>120C) & dry (dew point <80C) FC conditions: inorganic materials with enhanced proton conductivity, polymer matrices swollen with low molecular weight fluorinated acids & proton conducting ionic liquids. New materials developed show the promise of the development of new membranes with even better characteristics under demanding FC operating conditions, further improving the efficiency & viability of FC systems.

  15. Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS), Construction and Operation of the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    1999-04-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate an accelerator-based research facility called the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). This facility would provide the U. S. scientific community with a neutron source having greater intensity, power, and instrumentation than existing neutron sources. It would augment the research capabilities of current reactor-based neutron sources, satisfy current and future demand for research neutrons, lead to new scientific and technological discoveries, and meet international technological and economic challenges. DOE has identified four siting alternatives for the proposed SNS. These are as follows: (1) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Alternative (Preferred Alternative), Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Alternative, Los Alamos, New Mexico. (3) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Alternative, Argonne, Illinois. (4) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Alternative, Upton, New York. This summary provides a synopsis of the main text of the final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for construction and operation of the SNS. The EIS complies with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.); the President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508); and the DOE regulations for implementing the NEPA requirements (10 CFR 1021). The EIS presents the public and DOE decision-makers with a balanced and objective analysis of the potential environmental effects that would result from implementing the proposed action and alternative actions. The summary of the FEIS covers the following subjects: (1) purpose and need for agency action, (2) proposed action and alternatives, (3) descriptions of siting alternatives for the proposed action, (4) issues of public concern, and (5) environmental consequences.

  16. Phase 3 of a Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine System Development Program : Final Technical Report for Period January 1, 1992-June 30, 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Gerald C.; Spee, Rene; Wallace, Alan K.

    1993-12-31

    Since the inception of the BDFM development program in 1989, the value of BDFM technology has become apparent. The BDFM provides for adjustable speed, synchronous operation while keeping costs associated with the required power conversion equipment lower than in competing technologies. This provides for an advantage in initial as well as maintenance expenses over conventional drive system. Thus, the BDFM enables energy efficient, adjustable speed process control for applications where established drive technology has not been able to deliver satisfactory returns on investment. At the same time, the BDFM challenges conventional drive technologies in established markets by providing for improved performance at lower cost. BDFM converter rating is kept at a minimum, which significantly improves power quality at the utility interface over competing power conversion equipment. In summary, BDFM technology can be expected to provide significant benefits to utilities as well as their customers. This report discusses technical research and development activities related to Phase 3 of the Brushless Doubly-Fed Machine System Development Program, including work made possible by supplemental funds for laboratory improvement and prototype construction. Market research for the BDFM was provided by the College of Business at Oregon State University; market study results will be discussed in a separate report.

  17. Calibration of catalyst temperature in automotive engines over coldstart operation in the presence of different random noises and uncertainty: Implementation of generalized Gaussian process regression machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Nasser L.; Mozaffari, Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    The main scope of the current study is to develop a systematic stochastic model to capture the undesired uncertainty and random noises on the key parameters affecting the catalyst temperature over the coldstart operation of automotive engine systems. In the recent years, a number of articles have been published which aim at the modeling and analysis of automotive engines' behavior during coldstart operations by using regression modeling methods. Regarding highly nonlinear and uncertain nature of the coldstart operation, calibration of the engine system's variables, for instance the catalyst temperature, is deemed to be an intricate task, and it is unlikely to develop an exact physics-based nonlinear model. This encourages automotive engineers to take advantage of knowledge-based modeling tools and regression approaches. However, there exist rare reports which propose an efficient tool for coping with the uncertainty associated with the collected database. Here, the authors introduce a random noise to experimentally derived data and simulate an uncertain database as a representative of the engine system's behavior over coldstart operations. Then, by using a Gaussian process regression machine (GPRM), a reliable model is used for the sake of analysis of the engine's behavior. The simulation results attest the efficacy of GPRM for the considered case study. The research outcomes confirm that it is possible to develop a practical calibration tool which can be reliably used for modeling the catalyst temperature.

  18. Machine Protection with a 700 MJ Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, T.; Schmidt, R.; Wenninger, J.; Wollmann, D.; Zerlauth, M.

    After the high luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the stored energy per proton beam will increase by a factor of two as compared to the nominal LHC. Therefore, many damage studies need to be revisited to ensure a safe machine operation with the new beam parameters. Furthermore, new accelerator equipment like crab cavities might cause new failure modes, which are not sufficiently covered by the current machine protection system of the LHC. These failure modes have to be carefully studied and mitigated by new protection systems. Finally the ambitious goals for integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments during the era of HL-LHC require an increase of the machine availability without jeopardizing equipment protection.

  19. Automated long-term monitoring of parallel microfluidic operations applying a machine vision-assisted positioning method.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon Ming; Li, John C S; Xie, Kai; Cui, Xin; Prasad, Agrim; Gao, Qiannan; Leung, Chi Chiu; Lam, Raymond H W

    2014-01-01

    As microfluidics has been applied extensively in many cell and biochemical applications, monitoring the related processes is an important requirement. In this work, we design and fabricate a high-throughput microfluidic device which contains 32 microchambers to perform automated parallel microfluidic operations and monitoring on an automated stage of a microscope. Images are captured at multiple spots on the device during the operations for monitoring samples in microchambers in parallel; yet the device positions may vary at different time points throughout operations as the device moves back and forth on a motorized microscopic stage. Here, we report an image-based positioning strategy to realign the chamber position before every recording of microscopic image. We fabricate alignment marks at defined locations next to the chambers in the microfluidic device as reference positions. We also develop image processing algorithms to recognize the chamber positions in real-time, followed by realigning the chambers to their preset positions in the captured images. We perform experiments to validate and characterize the device functionality and the automated realignment operation. Together, this microfluidic realignment strategy can be a platform technology to achieve precise positioning of multiple chambers for general microfluidic applications requiring long-term parallel monitoring of cell and biochemical activities. PMID:25133248

  20. 29 CFR 570.63 - Occupations involved in the operation of paper-products machines, scrap paper balers, and paper...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... were approved by the Director of the Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part... Federal Register in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies of these standards are... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Occupations involved in the operation of...

  1. Automated Long-Term Monitoring of Parallel Microfluidic Operations Applying a Machine Vision-Assisted Positioning Method

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Hon Ming; Li, John C. S.; Cui, Xin; Gao, Qiannan; Leung, Chi Chiu

    2014-01-01

    As microfluidics has been applied extensively in many cell and biochemical applications, monitoring the related processes is an important requirement. In this work, we design and fabricate a high-throughput microfluidic device which contains 32 microchambers to perform automated parallel microfluidic operations and monitoring on an automated stage of a microscope. Images are captured at multiple spots on the device during the operations for monitoring samples in microchambers in parallel; yet the device positions may vary at different time points throughout operations as the device moves back and forth on a motorized microscopic stage. Here, we report an image-based positioning strategy to realign the chamber position before every recording of microscopic image. We fabricate alignment marks at defined locations next to the chambers in the microfluidic device as reference positions. We also develop image processing algorithms to recognize the chamber positions in real-time, followed by realigning the chambers to their preset positions in the captured images. We perform experiments to validate and characterize the device functionality and the automated realignment operation. Together, this microfluidic realignment strategy can be a platform technology to achieve precise positioning of multiple chambers for general microfluidic applications requiring long-term parallel monitoring of cell and biochemical activities. PMID:25133248

  2. 76 FR 70169 - Draft Supplement 2 to Final Environmental Statement Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is requesting comments on NUREG-0498, ``Final Environmental Statement, Supplement 2, Related to the Operation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant [WBN], Unit 2-- Draft Report for Comment'' (draft SFES). The NRC will hold a public meeting on the draft SFES on December 8,...

  3. Home Entrepreneurship: The Development of Instructional Materials in the Operation of a Small Business from the Home. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Susan F.; O'Brien, Kay S.

    The three chapters of this final report present material from a project to develop individualized instructional materials on operating a small business from the home for home economics related occupations. Chapter 1 includes a review of literature appropriate to the project and provides definitions from the literature (and from interviews) for…

  4. Research at and Operation of the Materials Science Beamline (X-11) at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, Dale E.

    2003-10-15

    This is the final report for DOE DE-FG02-89ER45384. An overview of the operational history and status of beamline X-11A at the end of the contract period, and a brief review of the core science program at NCSU and the scientific results of X-11A since the last progress report is also presented.

  5. Main-coolant-pump shaft-seal guidelines. Volume 2. Operational guidelines. Final report. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, C.E.; Greer, A.O.

    1983-03-01

    This report presents a set of guidelines and criteria for improving main coolant pump shaft seal operational reliability. The noted guidelines are developed from EPRI sponsored nuclear power plant seal operating experience studies. Usage procedures/practices and operational environment influence on seal life and reliability from the most recent such survey are summarized. The shaft seal and its auxiliary supporting systems are discussed both from technical and operational related viewpoints.

  6. Rise of The Machines: First Year Operations of The Robo-AO Visible-Light Laser-Adaptive-Optics Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, C.; Riddle, R.; Law, N.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Tendulkar, S.; Hogstrom, K.; Bui, K.; Burse, M.; Chordia, P.; Das, H.; Dekany, R.

    2013-09-01

    Robo-AO is the first autonomous laser adaptive optics system and science instrument operating on sky. With minimal human oversight, the system robotically executes large scale surveys, monitors long-term astrophysical dynamics and characterizes newly discovered transients, all at the visible diffraction limit. The average target-to-target operational overhead, including slew time, is a mere 86 s, enabling up to ~200 observations per night. The first of many envisioned systems went live in June 2012, and has since finished 51 nights of science observing at the Palomar Observatory 60-inch (1.5 m) telescope, with over 5,600 robotic observations executed as of March 2013. The system will be augmented in late 2013 with a low-noise wide field infrared camera, which will double as a tip-tilt sensor, to widen the spectral bandwidth of observations, increase available sky coverage as well as enable deeper visible imaging using adaptive-optics sharpened infrared tip-tilt guide sources.

  7. Control Room operations: an investigation of the task of the operator in a Colliery Control Room. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, G.C.; Best, C.F.; Ferguson, C.A.; Graveling, R.A.; Nicholl, A.G.M.

    1982-09-01

    A detailed study of the ergonomics aspects of four representative Colliery Control Rooms was carried out. Numerous ergonomics limitations, many common to each of the control rooms studied, were identified particularly in relation to workspace dimensions, console layout and lighting. In order to overcome these limitations in future designs, a report detailing the Ergonomics Principles of Colliery Control Room design and Layout was prepared on the basis of the information obtained. Task analysis carried out during the studies revealed that control room operators could have a direct effect on production and that ergonomics aspects were involved in these situations. Indications of potential ergonomics problems in the wider sphere of job design were also identified particularly in relation to information handling.

  8. Operational Readiness Review Final Report for K Basin Fuel Transfer System

    SciTech Connect

    DAVIES, T.H.

    2002-10-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for startup of the K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period November 6-18, 2002. The DOE ORR team concluded that the K Basin Fuel Transfer System is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action and the Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for K Basin Fuel Transfer System. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, and observations of normal facility operations, operational upset conditions, and an emergency drill. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR3 and the RL line management review. The team concurred with the findings and observations identified in these two reports. The DOE ORR for the FTS evaluated the contractor under single-shift operations. Of concern to the ORR Team was that SNF Project management intended to change from a single-shift FTS operation to a two-shift operation shortly after the completion of the DOE ORR. The ORR team did not assess two-shift FTS operations and the ability of the contractor to conduct a smooth transition from shift to shift. However, the DOE ORR team did observe an operational upset drill that was conducted during day shift and carried over into swing shift; during this drill, swing shift was staffed with fewer personnel as would be expected for two-shift operations. The facility was able to adequately respond to the event with the reduced level of staff. The ORR Team was also able to observe a Shift Manager turnover meeting when one shift manager had to be relieved during the middle of the day. The ORR Team did not have the opportunity to observe a shift turnover from one crew to another. The ORR Team has evaluated the risk of not observing this activity and considers the risk to be minimal based on the fact that operating staff are very familiar with the FTS equipment and its procedures, and because existing Conduct of Operations processes and procedures are adequate and implemented. Because the ORR Team has not observed two-shift FTS operations, we recommend that additional RL oversight be provided at the start of two-shift FTS operations to evaluate the adequacy of crew turnovers.

  9. A support vector machine-based state-of-health estimation method for lithium-ion batteries under electric vehicle operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klass, Verena; Behm, Mårten; Lindbergh, Göran

    2014-12-01

    Capacity and resistance are state-of-health (SOH) indicators that are essential to monitor during the application of batteries on board electric vehicles. For state-of-health determination in laboratory environment, standard battery performance tests are established and well-functioning. Since standard performance tests are not available on-board a vehicle, we are developing a method where those standard tests are applied virtually to a support vector machine-based battery model. This data-driven model is solely based on variables available during ordinary electric vehicle (EV) operation such as battery current, voltage and temperature. This article contributes with a thorough experimental validation of this method, as well as the introduction of new features - capacity estimation and temperature dependence. Typical EV battery usage data is generated and exposed to the suggested method in order to estimate capacity and resistance. These estimations are compared to direct measurements of the SOH indicators with standard tests. The obtained estimations of capacities and instantaneous resistances demonstrate good accuracy over a temperature and state-of-charge range typical for EV operating conditions and allow thus for online detection of battery degradation. The proposed method is also found to be suitable for on-board application in respect of processing power and memory restrictions.

  10. An Evaluation of the Ability of Amputees to Operate Highway Transport Equipment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarland, Ross A.; And Others

    To document the driving experience of amputees and to test whether amputees differ from non-amputees in the operation of a simulated motor vehicle, related literature was reviewed, a comprehensive study of private motor vehicle operation by amputees was carried out, and 100 persons (20 non-impaired, non-commercial drivers, 20 non-impaired,…

  11. Determining Performance Levels of Competencies for Job Entry Required of Beginning Farm Operators. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, John H.

    A sample of 145 people representing eighty farm operations and a statewide sample of 233 agricultural and agribusiness workers participated in a study to identify competencies, their importance (on a one to five rating scale), and the performance level required of a beginning farm operator in each of the following five cluster areas considered…

  12. Machine musicianship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Robert

    2002-05-01

    The training of musicians begins by teaching basic musical concepts, a collection of knowledge commonly known as musicianship. Computer programs designed to implement musical skills (e.g., to make sense of what they hear, perform music expressively, or compose convincing pieces) can similarly benefit from access to a fundamental level of musicianship. Recent research in music cognition, artificial intelligence, and music theory has produced a repertoire of techniques that can make the behavior of computer programs more musical. Many of these were presented in a recently published book/CD-ROM entitled Machine Musicianship. For use in interactive music systems, we are interested in those which are fast enough to run in real time and that need only make reference to the material as it appears in sequence. This talk will review several applications that are able to identify the tonal center of musical material during performance. Beyond this specific task, the design of real-time algorithmic listening through the concurrent operation of several connected analyzers is examined. The presentation includes discussion of a library of C++ objects that can be combined to perform interactive listening and a demonstration of their capability.

  13. Machine Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirrane, Diane E.

    1990-01-01

    As scientists seek to develop machines that can "learn," that is, solve problems by imitating the human brain, a gold mine of information on the processes of human learning is being discovered, expert systems are being improved, and human-machine interactions are being enhanced. (SK)

  14. Electric machine

    DOEpatents

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  15. Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The report contains the results of the NRC Staff`s evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements.

  16. Operational Experiences Tuning the ATF2 Final Focus Optics Towards Obtaining a 37nm Electron Beam IP Spot Size

    SciTech Connect

    White, Glen; Seryi, Andrei; Woodley, Mark; Bai, Sha; Bambade, Philip; Renier, Yves; Bolzon, Benoit; Kamiya, Yoshio; Komamiya, Sachio; Oroku, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Kuroda, Shigeru; Okugi, Toshiyuki; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Marin, Eduardo; /CERN

    2012-07-06

    The primary aim of the ATF2 research accelerator is to test a scaled version of the final focus optics planned for use in next-generation linear lepton colliders. ATF2 consists of a 1.3 GeV linac, damping ring providing low-emittance electron beams (< 12pm in the vertical plane), extraction line and final focus optics. The design details of the final focus optics and implementation at ATF2 are presented elsewhere. The ATF2 accelerator is currently being commissioned, with a staged approach to achieving the design IP spot size. It is expected that as we implement more demanding optics and reduce the vertical beta function at the IP, the tuning becomes more difficult and takes longer. We present here a description of the implementation of the tuning procedures and describe operational experiences and performances.

  17. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix J: Recreation.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix J of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on the recreational activities in the region. Major sections include the following: scope and processes; recreation in the Columbia River Basin today - by type, location, participation, user characteristics, factors which affect usage, and managing agencies; recreation analysis procedures and methodology; and alternatives and their impacts.

  18. Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG&G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report.

  19. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations : Final Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Voeller, Amy C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that will predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review Program. This study worked in conjunction with Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project which investigated the effectiveness of two kokanee salmon hatcheries. This report summarized the data collected from Lake Roosevelt from 1993 and includes limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, experimental trawling, and net-pen rainbow trout tagging data. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times.

  20. Evaluation of infrared sensors for oil spill response operations. Final report, October 1994-June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hover, G.L.; Plourde, J.V.

    1995-06-01

    During November 1994, the USCO conducted a field evaluation of several commercially available portable infrared (IR) sensors for their ability to detect oil on water at night. The evaluation was conducted over the natural oil seeps off the coast of Santa Barbara, CA. The portable sensors were operated from the open door of a Coast Guard HH-60J helicopter. Sensors evaluated included the Agema Thermovision 1000 and Texas Instruments LOCUSP operating in the long wave IR (LWIR) and the Cincinnati Electronics IRC-160ST and IRRIS-256ST operating in the medium wave IR (MWIR). The installed FLIR 2000 LWIR system provided a baseline reference of current CG IR capabilities.

  1. Final report on evaluation of cyclocraft support of oil and gas operations in wetland areas

    SciTech Connect

    Eggington, W.J.; Stevens, P.M.; John, C.J.; Harder, B.J.; Lindstedt, D.M.

    1994-10-01

    The cyclocraft is a proven hybrid aircraft, capable of VTOL, lifting heavy and bulky loads, highly controllable, having high safety characteristics and low operating costs. Mission Research Corporation (MRC), under Department of Energy sponsorship, is evaluating the potential use of cyclocraft in the transport of drill rigs, mud, pipes and other materials and equipment, in a cost effective and environmentally safe manner, to support oil and gas drilling, production, and transportation operations in wetland areas. Based upon the results of an earlier parametric study, a cyclocraft design, having a payload capacity of 45 tons and designated H.1 Cyclocraft, was selected for further study, including the preparation of a preliminary design and a development plan, and the determination of operating costs. This report contains all of the results derived from the program to evaluate the use of cyclocraft in the support of oil and gas drilling and production operations in wetland areas.

  2. 75 FR 29338 - Energy Efficiency of Natural Gas Infrastructure and Operations Conference; Final Notice of Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Efficiency of Natural Gas Infrastructure and Operations Conference... . Kimberly D. Bose, Secretary. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Energy Efficiency of Natural...

  3. Environmental assessment of the relocation of Neutron Tube Target Loading Operations. Final document

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-11

    Neutron Tube Target Loading (NTTL) is an operation that involves the transferring (i.e. loading) of radioactive tritium gas onto metal target disks under an inert nitrogen atmosphere using a glovebox operation. The relocation of NTTL operations from the Pinellas Plant to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico, was addressed in the Non-nuclear Consolidation Environmental Assessment (EA) of June 1993. This EA analyzes a Proposed Action to relocate the NTTL operations at LANL from Building 209 at TA-21 to Building 450 at TA-16. The Proposed Action would require the remodeling of Building 450 and some modifications to Buildings 205 and 205A, collectively referred to as the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) in TA-16. The construction of a change room addition would also be required to connect Building 450 and the WETF to take advantage of existing tritium control and confinement systems. Other construction activities and site modifications would include a new electrical substation, a new mechanical and electrical room, minor demolition work, two additional transportable buildings and a new parking area. An alternative to the Proposed Action includes keeping the NTTL operations at TA-21 (No Action). Alternatives considered but dismissed include the construction of a new NTTL laboratory at LANL, and the renovation of an alternative facility to Building 450 for conducting NTTL operations. None of the alternatives would enable the DOE to meet its mission responsibilities at LANL in a timely manner. The principle environmental issues associated with the Proposed Action include a minor amount of air emissions associated with construction activities and tritium operations and a small quantity of construction and low-level radioactive wastes. Human health and cumulative effects are expected to be negligible. On-site transportation of tritium between TA-21 and TA-16 to support NTTL operations would be eliminated.

  4. Site operator program final report for fiscal years 1992 through 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Francfort, J.E.; Bassett, R.R.; Birasco, S.

    1998-01-01

    The Site Operator Program was an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by US Department of Energy and managed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The Program`s goals included the field evaluation of electric vehicles in real-world applications and environments; the support of electric vehicle technology advancement; the development of infrastructure elements necessary to support significant electric vehicle use; and increasing the awareness and acceptance of electric vehicles. This report covers Program activities from 1992 to 1996. The Site Operator Program ended in September 1996, when it was superseded by the Field Operations Program. Electric vehicle testing included baseline performance testing, which was performed in conjunction with EV America. The baseline performance parameters included acceleration, braking, range, energy efficiency, and charging time. The Program collected fleet operations data on electric vehicles operated by the Program`s thirteen partners, comprising electric utilities, universities, and federal agencies. The Program`s partners had over 250 electric vehicles, from vehicle converters and original equipment manufacturers, in their operating fleets. Test results are available via the World Wide Web site at http://ev.inel.gov/sop.

  5. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

  6. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectonic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems.

  7. A VOLUNTARY PREKINDERGARTEN LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT AND READING PROGRAM FOR THE ENTIRE FOUR-YEAR-OLD POPULATION OF A CITY (AN INVESTIGATION OF MACHINE-TAUGHT READING). FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BENDER, MARTIN L.

    FOUR STUDIES CONDUCTED BY THE MOUNT VERNON PUBLIC SCHOOLS OVER A PERIOD OF FIVE SEMESTERS INVOLVED MACHINE-TEACHING READING TO 240 DISADVANTAGED PREKINDERGARTEN CHILDREN FROM THE CHILDREN'S CENTER AND THE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER TO PREPARE THEM FOR MORE SUCCESSFUL KINDERGARTEN LEARNING THROUGH ACADEMICALLY-ORIENTED READINESS ACTIVITIES IN AN

  8. Operational experience with optical matching in the SLC Final Focus System

    SciTech Connect

    Bambade, P.; Burchat, P.; Burke, D.; Ford, W.; Hawkes, C.; Koska, W.; Kozanecki, W.; Lohse, T.; Mattison, T.; Phinney, N.

    1989-01-01

    In the SLC Final Focus System, all components of transverse phase-space and the couplings between them must be controlled to minimize the beam size at the interaction point. After summarizing the experimental algorithm and the on-line tuning programs, we present a consistent set of measurements and describe our present understanding of the various contributions to this beam size. 17 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Shuttle Ground Operations Efficiencies/Technologies (SGOE/T) study. Volume 3: Final presentation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholz, A. L.; Hart, M. T.; Lowry, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Charts used in the Final Phase 1 Oral Briefing at Kennedy Space Center on April 6, 1987, and to the Space Transportation Architecture Study (SPAS) Interim Program Review (IPS-5) held at MSFC on April 8, 1987, are contained. Topics discussed include: identification of existing or new technologies to reduce cost; management approaches; recommendations for research or development of specific technology for future use; and identification of new management techniques.

  10. The effect of dynamic operating conditions on nano-particle emissions from a light-duty diesel engine applicable to prime and auxiliary machines on marine vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungmin; Jeong, Yeonhwan

    2012-12-01

    This study presents the nano-sized particle emission characteristics from a small turbocharged common rail diesel engine applicable to prime and auxiliary machines on marine vessels. The experiments were conducted under dynamic engine operating conditions, such as steady-state, cold start, and transient conditions. The particle number and size distributions were analyzed with a high resolution PM analyzer. The diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) had an insignificant effect on the reduction in particle number, but particle number emissions were drastically reduced by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude downstream of the diesel particulate filter (DPF) at various steady conditions. Under high speed and load conditions, the particle filtering efficiency was decreased by the partial combustion of trapped particles inside the DPF because of the high exhaust temperature caused by the increased particle number concentration. Retarded fuel injection timing and higher EGR rates led to increased particle number emissions. As the temperature inside the DPF increased from 25 °C to 300 °C, the peak particle number level was reduced by 70% compared to cold start conditions. High levels of nucleation mode particle generation were found in the deceleration phases during the transient tests.

  11. Automated characterisation of ultrasound images of ovarian tumours: the diagnostic accuracy of a support vector machine and image processing with a local binary pattern operator

    PubMed Central

    Khazendar, S.; Sayasneh, A.; Al-Assam, H.; Du, H.; Kaijser, J.; Ferrara, L.; Timmerman, D.; Jassim, S.; Bourne, T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Preoperative characterisation of ovarian masses into benign or malignant is of paramount importance to optimise patient management. Objectives: In this study, we developed and validated a computerised model to characterise ovarian masses as benign or malignant. Materials and methods: Transvaginal 2D B mode static ultrasound images of 187 ovarian masses with known histological diagnosis were included. Images were first pre-processed and enhanced, and Local Binary Pattern Histograms were then extracted from 2 × 2 blocks of each image. A Support Vector Machine (SVM) was trained using stratified cross validation with randomised sampling. The process was repeated 15 times and in each round 100 images were randomly selected. Results: The SVM classified the original non-treated static images as benign or malignant masses with an average accuracy of 0.62 (95% CI: 0.59-0.65). This performance significantly improved to an average accuracy of 0.77 (95% CI: 0.75-0.79) when images were pre-processed, enhanced and treated with a Local Binary Pattern operator (mean difference 0.15: 95% 0.11-0.19, p < 0.0001, two-tailed t test). Conclusion: We have shown that an SVM can classify static 2D B mode ultrasound images of ovarian masses into benign and malignant categories. The accuracy improves if texture related LBP features extracted from the images are considered. PMID:25897367

  12. Regional nuclear proliferation and future conflict: Implications for the operational commander. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Swicker, C.C.

    1995-02-13

    The end of the Cold War is thought to signal a watershed in American military thought, allowing the practical application of operational art in conventional conflict, unshackled by the doctrine of the strategic defensive imposed by the nuclear stalemate of a bipolar world. This thesis is proven by the success of the U.S.-led coalition in Operation DESERT STORM. But what if Iraq had had a deliverable nuclear capability. The operational impact of a nuclear-capable regional predator on U.S. power projection capabilities is examined in the context of three assumptions: (1) Nuclear proliferation into the ranks of the regional powers is inevitable, given the present dynamics of power, politics and economics. (2) Given the concomitant inevitability of United States engagement in future regional conflicts throughout the world, American forces (either unilaterally or as part of a coalition) will eventually have to confront a regional nuclear power. (3) For a variety of reasons, the United States will not elect a nuclear response to such a challenge. Given these assumptions, the impact of a credible, localized nuclear threat on the operational commander is examined, concentrating on the extent to which such a threat might constrain his free exercise of classical operational art.

  13. Turbine Reliability and Operability Optimization through the use of Direct Detection Lidar Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, David K; Lewis, Matthew J; Pavlich, Jane C; Wright, Alan D; Johnson, Kathryn E; Pace, Andrew M

    2013-02-01

    The goal of this Department of Energy (DOE) project is to increase wind turbine efficiency and reliability with the use of a Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) system. The LIDAR provides wind speed and direction data that can be used to help mitigate the fatigue stress on the turbine blades and internal components caused by wind gusts, sub-optimal pointing and reactionary speed or RPM changes. This effort will have a significant impact on the operation and maintenance costs of turbines across the industry. During the course of the project, Michigan Aerospace Corporation (MAC) modified and tested a prototype direct detection wind LIDAR instrument; the resulting LIDAR design considered all aspects of wind turbine LIDAR operation from mounting, assembly, and environmental operating conditions to laser safety. Additionally, in co-operation with our partners, the National Renewable Energy Lab and the Colorado School of Mines, progress was made in LIDAR performance modeling as well as LIDAR feed forward control system modeling and simulation. The results of this investigation showed that using LIDAR measurements to change between baseline and extreme event controllers in a switching architecture can reduce damage equivalent loads on blades and tower, and produce higher mean power output due to fewer overspeed events. This DOE project has led to continued venture capital investment and engagement with leading turbine OEMs, wind farm developers, and wind farm owner/operators.

  14. Bookkeeping Machines, Business Education: 7718.04.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Jane

    Postings, accounts receivable and payable, and payroll entries made while using a bookkeeping machine make up the course content described in this pamphlet. The course seeks to prepare students to operate accounting machines as a prerequisite to the operation of more complex machines and adult, on-the-job training. Course guidelines, objectives,…

  15. Method and apparatus for monitoring machine performance

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Stephen F.; Castleberry, Kimberly N.

    1996-01-01

    Machine operating conditions can be monitored by analyzing, in either the time or frequency domain, the spectral components of the motor current. Changes in the electric background noise, induced by mechanical variations in the machine, are correlated to changes in the operating parameters of the machine.

  16. Analyses of operational times and technical aspects of the Salton Sea scientific drilling project: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The Deep Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (DSSSDP) was conducted in Imperial County of California at the Southeastern edge of the Salton Sea. Emphasis was on the acquisition of scientific data for the evaluation of the geological environment encountered during the drilling of the well. The scientific data acquisition activities consisted of coring, running of numerous downhole logs and tools in support of defining the geologic environment and conducting two full scale flow tests primarily to obtain pristine fluid samples. In addition, drill cuttings, gases and drilling fluid chemistry measurements were obtained from the drilling fluid returns concurrent with drilling and coring operations. The well was drilled to 10,564 feet. This report describes the field portions of the project and presents an analysis of the time spent on the various activities associated with the normal drilling operations, scientific data gathering operations and the three major downhole problem activities - lost circulation, directional control and fishing.

  17. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Title I operator dose calculations. Final report, LATA report No. 90

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P.S.; Rigdon, L.D.

    1980-02-01

    The radiation exposure dose was estimated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) operating personnel who do the unloading and transporting of the transuranic contact-handled waste. Estimates of the radiation source terms for typical TRU contact-handled waste were based on known composition and properties of the waste. The operations sequence for waste movement and storage in the repository was based upon the WIPP Title I data package. Previous calculations had been based on Conceptual Design Report data. A time and motion sequence was developed for personnel performing the waste handling operations both above and below ground. Radiation exposure calculations were then performed in several fixed geometries and folded with the time and motion studies for individual workers in order to determine worker exposure on an annual basis.

  18. Chemical warfare: Implications for Operation Desert Storm and beyond. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Trummer, F.G.; Twining, B.L.

    1991-02-11

    This paper presents the potential for use of lethal and incapacitating chemical agents in the Persian Gulf. Insight from past chemical warfare case studies, current international law, and U.S. and Soviet policy, strategy and tactics provide a basis for examination of Iraq's chemical warfare potential and operational strategy. In addition, a survey of Naval War College students assesses the current U.S. Armed Forces level of chemical warfare readiness. This analysis combined with the U.S. experience and current war with Iraq as well as proposing a more viable operational capability to meet stated national policy in response to chemical weapons.

  19. (Economics of using sawdust to provide process steam for sawmill operation. ) Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The activities involved the conversion of the power source of an operating small sawmill from a combination of fossil fuels and electricity to steam derived from the burning of sawmill wastes. Installation of low-level technologies, including a boiler and large amounts of basic plumbing, and the construction of a weather-proof enclosure to house the process, demonstrated that sawmill wastes could produce enough power to operate a sawmill at full capacity, without the use of other energy sources, with a short payback period.

  20. Paradigms for machine learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlimmer, Jeffrey C.; Langley, Pat

    1991-01-01

    Five paradigms are described for machine learning: connectionist (neural network) methods, genetic algorithms and classifier systems, empirical methods for inducing rules and decision trees, analytic learning methods, and case-based approaches. Some dimensions are considered along with these paradigms vary in their approach to learning, and the basic methods are reviewed that are used within each framework, together with open research issues. It is argued that the similarities among the paradigms are more important than their differences, and that future work should attempt to bridge the existing boundaries. Finally, some recent developments in the field of machine learning are discussed, and their impact on both research and applications is examined.

  1. Operational Readiness Review Final Report for Implementation of an Increased Facility Radioactive Source Inventory Limit & Shippingport Fuel 07/2002

    SciTech Connect

    RICHINS, C.R.

    2002-08-15

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for those activities associated with the removal of Shippingport fuel from the 271-T Facility (T Plant) as a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility and the readiness of T Plant to operate within the revised safety basis (SB) inventory limits. The DOE ORR was conducted in two parts in accordance with the T Plant Operational Readiness Review DOE-RL Plan of Action. The DOE team observed the dry run of the Shippingport fuel removal process, in conjunction with the contractor ORR of June 2002. Autonomously, the DOE Team completed the ORR in July 2002 by determining the adequacy of the contractor's final ORR (CORR); conducting a sampling of T Plant procedures and processes to validate the CORR; and, observation of a dry run that demonstrated the ability of T Plant to seal a Shippingport Spent Fuel Canister. The DOE ORR Team has concluded that T Plant has demonstrated an appropriate state of readiness and recommends the RL Manager authorize Fluor Hanford to implement the revised safety basis (SB) inventory limits and begin Shippingport fuel removal operations as a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility. The team further concludes that an adequate level of protection for the worker, public health and safety, and the environment is inherent in the T Plant operations. T Plant has demonstrated an enhanced safety culture. Although there is room for improvement in the T Plant operations as represented by the findings and observations annotated in the body of the report, the overall operation has demonstrated a high degree of professionalism and a discipline of operations that bodes well for the current efforts and future endeavors.

  2. Effectiveness of Local-Exhaust Ventilation for drum-filling operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.

    1988-05-13

    The effectiveness of Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV) in capturing vapors generated was evaluated using a drum-filling operation as an example. The experiment consisted of measuring the effectiveness of three LEV systems (a canopy hood, a slot hood, and a lay-on hood). It was found that when operated at the ACGIH design flow rates, the hoods were highly effective in capturing emissions from drum-filling operation. Capture efficiencies for canopy hoods ranged from 93 to 100% based on total emission from the drum; for the slot hood and the lay-on hood capture efficiencies were determined to be 95 to 100% and 100%, respectively. In general, it was found the efficiency of an LEV system for a drum-filling operation is independent of the concentration of emission leaving the drum. The drum-fill rate, which determines emission velocity at the drum bung hole, was shown to affect LEV efficiency for the slot hood used in the study.

  3. An Operational Blueprint for Health Career Education and Training Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Theresa W.; Thompson, Christopher W.

    An operational blueprint for health career education and training was designed to provide the District of Columbia public schools with a documented strategy for implementing a comprehensive, multifocal health careers program. The blueprint will establish a mechanism for interagency communication and cooperation at all levels, involving all aspects…

  4. Reduced gas pressure operation of sludge digesters: Expanded studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    Previous investigations strongly suggested that the municipal anaerobic sludge digestion process could be enhanced by reactor operation with subatmospheric headspace pressures. Enhanced solids destruction and methane production along with increased process stability were observed in these earlier studies. However, due to the small scale of the anaerobic reactors used ( {approx}1.5 L), definitive steady-state measurements could not be obtained. These expanded studies were undertaken to verify and define the magnitude of the benefits that might be obtained with vacuum operation of sludge digesters. Four reactors ({approx}15.0 L) were fed municipal sludge at three different organic loading rates while being maintained with a 15-day solids retention time. One reactor had a constant headspace pressure of 1.02 atm; a second was maintained at 0.75 atm; and the remaining two reactors were operated for the majority of the day at 1.02 atm, and for part of the day with a 0.75 atm headspace pressure. Additional small-scale, batch experiments were performed to help identify controlling digestion mechanisms. The results of these expanded studies indicate that vacuum operation did not yield significant advantages over the organic loading range investigated (0.088 to 0.352 lb VSS/ft{sup 3}{center_dot}d).

  5. Skills Conversion Project: Chapter 6, Forest Operations and Wood Products. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Society of Professional Engineers, Washington, DC.

    A study of the forest operations and wood products industries was conducted in Atlanta and Seattle by the National Society of Professional Engineers. Included among these industries are tree development, crop and land management, logging, material handling transportation, cutting, peeling, assembly, pulp and paper, mobile homes, construction,…

  6. Final Report for Organic Partitioning Resulting from Operation of an INTEC Double-needle Sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Michael B. Heiser

    2003-09-01

    The double needle sampler testing is a continuation of previous test series that investigated the fate of organic species in the Process Equipment Waste Evaporator (PEWE) system at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This test series was designed to investigate the effects of operation of the double needle sampling systems on volatile organic constituents in an acidic feed matrix.

  7. Flight Simulator: Use of SpaceGraph Display in an Instructor/Operator Station. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sher, Lawrence D.

    This report describes SpaceGraph, a new computer-driven display technology capable of showing space-filling images, i.e., true three dimensional displays, and discusses the advantages of this technology over flat displays for use with the instructor/operator station (IOS) of a flight simulator. Ideas resulting from 17 brainstorming sessions with…

  8. A Post Licensing Study of Community Effects at Two Operating Nuclear Power Plants. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Bruce J.; And Others

    In an effort to identify and assess the social, economic, and political effects of nuclear power plant construction and operation upon two host communities (Plymouth, Massachusetts and Waterford, Connecticut), a post-licensing review revealed that the primary impact of the nuclear power plants in both communities was an increase in the property

  9. Chemical Operations Technology Curriculum Development Project. PY95 Final Detailed Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Technical Coll., Marshall.

    A model curriculum for an associate of applied science degree in chemical operations technology (COT) was developed at Texas State Technical College in Marshall, Texas. First, a comprehensive analysis of the local and statewide labor market demand for trained personnel in the advanced field of COT was conducted. Next, a comprehensive task analysis…

  10. Operation of Glen Canyon Dam. Final environmental impact statement, summary, comments and responses

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    The Federal action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is the operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project (CRSP), Arizona. The purpose of the reevaluation is to determine specific options that could be implemented to minimize--consistent with law-adverse impacts on the downstream environmental and cultural resources, as well as Native American interests in Glen and Grand Canyons.

  11. Geological and operational summary, Kodiak Shelf stratigraphic test wells, western Gulf of Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.F.; Lynch, M.B.; Conner, T.A.; Hallin, P.J.; Hoose, P.J.

    1987-10-01

    Contents include: regional petroleum exploration history; operational summary of the Kodiak Shelf stratigraphic drilling program; lithologic summary; velocity analysis; seismic stratigraphy and tectonic evolution of the Kodiak Shelf; well-log interpretation; biostratigraphy; organic geochemistry; geothermal gradient; abnormal formation pressure; shallow geology and geologic hazards; and environmental considerations.

  12. Environmental assessment for device assembly facility operations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), (DOE/EA-0971), to evaluate the impacts of consolidating all nuclear explosive operations at the newly constructed Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. These operations generally include assembly, disassembly or modification, staging, transportation, testing, maintenance, repair, retrofit, and surveillance. Such operations have previously been conducted at the Nevada Test Site in older facilities located in Area 27. The DAF will provide enhanced capabilities in a state-of-the-art facility for the safe, secure, and efficient handling of high explosives in combination with special nuclear materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium). Based on the information and analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.). Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and DOE is issuing this finding of no significant impact.

  13. EOPS Operational Program Review: Qualitative Evaluations, 1983-1984. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin; White, Peter

    Focusing on the qualitative component of the 1983-84 Operational Program Reviews (OPRs) of Educational Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) in California's community colleges, this report presents the information collected by a qualitative evaluator at 14 EOPS projects in California and assesses program strengths and weaknesses. The first part…

  14. The Feasibility of Generalized Acoustic Sensor Operator Training. Final Report for Period February 1974-February 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Richard W.; Alden, David G.

    The feasibility of generalized approaches to training military personnel in the use of different types of sonar/acoustic warfare systems was explored. The initial phase of the project consisted of the analysis of representative sonar and acoustic equipment to identify training areas and operator performance requirements that could be subjected to…

  15. A Post Licensing Study of Community Effects at Two Operating Nuclear Power Plants. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Bruce J.; And Others

    In an effort to identify and assess the social, economic, and political effects of nuclear power plant construction and operation upon two host communities (Plymouth, Massachusetts and Waterford, Connecticut), a post-licensing review revealed that the primary impact of the nuclear power plants in both communities was an increase in the property…

  16. The Role of Prior Knowledge in Operating Equipment from Written Instructions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieras, David E.

    A series of experiments investigated the role of prior knowledge in tasks involving the operation of equipment from written instructions. The experiments covered two situations. In the first, the prior knowledge was already possessed by the subjects before the experiments. The studies involved comprehension and memory of technical prose, expertise…

  17. EVALUATION OF AN INDIVIDUALLY PACED COURSE FOR AIRBORNE RADIO CODE OPERATORS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BALDWIN, ROBERT O.; JOHNSON, KIRK A.

    IN THIS STUDY COMPARISONS WERE MADE BETWEEN AN INDIVIDUALLY PACED VERSION OF THE AIRBORNE RADIO CODE OPERATOR (ARCO) COURSE AND TWO VERSIONS OF THE COURSE IN WHICH THE STUDENTS PROGRESSED AT A FIXED PACE. THE ARCO COURSE IS A CLASS C SCHOOL IN WHICH THE STUDENT LEARNS TO SEND AND RECEIVE MILITARY MESSAGES USING THE INTERNATIONAL MORSE CODE. THE…

  18. Mining machine

    SciTech Connect

    Parrott, G.A.

    1985-05-07

    A haulage system for a mining machine comprises a mining machine mounted on and/or guided by a conveyor and reciprocable with respect thereto, the conveyor being provided with a rack having plural rows of teeth of identical pitch, with the teeth of one row staggered with respect to an adjacent row(s), and the machine being provided with at least one power driven haulage sprocket comprising plural sets of peripherally arranged teeth of identical pitch, one set being angularly staggered with respect to an adjacent set(s), whereby one set is engageable with each row of teeth of the rack. The invention also includes a mining machine provided with such a power driven haulage sprocket, and a rack as above described and provided with end fittings for securing in articulated manner to an adjacent rack.

  19. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Exhibits.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River and its tributaries are the primary water system in the Pacific Northwest, draining some 219,000 square miles in seven states and another 39,500 square miles in British Columbia. Beginning in the 1930`s, the Columbia River has been significantly modified by construction of 30 major dams on the river and its tributaries, along with dozens of non-Federal projects. Construction and subsequent operation of these water development projects have contributed to eight primary uses of the river system, including navigation, flood control, irrigation, electric power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and water supply and quality considerations. Increasing stress on the water development of the Columbia River and its tributaries has led primary Federal agencies to undertake intensive analysis and evaluation of the operation of these projects. These agencies are the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation, who operate the large Federal dams on the river, and the Bonneville Power Administration who sells the power generated at the dams. This review, termed the System Operation Review (SOR), has as its ultimate goal to define a strategy for future operation of the major Columbia River projects which effectively considers the needs of all river uses. This volume, Appendix D: Cultural resources appendix, Technical imput includes the following: Development of geomorphology based framework for cultural resources management, Dworshak Reservoir, Idaho; Impact profiles for SOR reservoirs; comments from the following Native American tribes: Burns Paiute Tribe; Coville Confederated Tribes; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation; Confederated Tribes and bands of the Yakama Indian Nation (comments); Nez Perce Tribe; Coeur D`Alene Tribe; Spokane Tribe of Indians; The confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

  20. Setup Aid for Electrical-Discharge Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lines, G.; Duca, J.

    1985-01-01

    Interlock assures that workpiece is correctly assembled in machining fixture. A Plunger in a Hollow Shaft actuates a switch, allowing a power supply to produce current for electrical-discharge machining. Plunger operates only when necessary parts are position.

  1. Monel Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Castle Industries, Inc. is a small machine shop manufacturing replacement plumbing repair parts, such as faucet, tub and ballcock seats. Therese Castley, president of Castle decided to introduce Monel because it offered a chance to improve competitiveness and expand the product line. Before expanding, Castley sought NERAC assistance on Monel technology. NERAC (New England Research Application Center) provided an information package which proved very helpful. The NASA database was included in NERAC's search and yielded a wealth of information on machining Monel.

  2. FINAL REPORT: Reduction in Energy Consumption and Variability in Steel Foundry Operations

    SciTech Connect

    F. Peters

    2005-05-24

    This project worked to improve the efficiency of the steel casting industry by reducing the variability that occurs because of process and product variation. The project focused on the post shakeout operations since roughly half of the production costs are in this area. These improvements will reduce the amount of variability, making it easier to manage the operation and improve the competitiveness. The reduction in variability will also reduce the need for many rework operations, which will result in a direct reduction of energy usage, particularly by the reduction of repeated heat treatment operations. Further energy savings will be realized from the reduction of scrap and reduced handling. Field studies were conducted at ten steel foundries that represented the U.S. steel casting industry, for a total of over 100 weeks of production observation. These studies quantified the amount of variability, and looked toward determining the source. A focus of the data collected was the grinding operations since this is a major effort in the cleaning room, and it represents the overall casting quality. The grinding was divided into two categories, expected and unexpected. Expected grinding is that in which the location of the effort is known prior to making the casting, such as smoothing parting lines, gates, and riser contacts. Unexpected grinding, which was approximately 80% of the effort, was done to improve the surfaces at weld repair locations, to rectify burnt on sand, and other surface anomalies at random locations. Unexpected grinding represents about 80% of the grinding effort. By quantifying this effort, the project raised awareness within the industry and the industry is continuing to make improvements. The field studies showed that the amount of variation of grinding operations (normalized because of the diverse set of parts studied) was very consistent across the industry. The field studies identified several specific sources that individually contributed to large process variation. This indicates the need for ongoing monitoring of the process and system to quantify the effort being expended. A system to measure the grinding effort was investigated but did not prove to be successful. A weld wire counting system was shown to be very successful in tracking casting quality by monitoring the quantity of weld wire being expended on a per casting basis. Further use of such systems is highly recommended. The field studies showed that the visual inspection process for the casting surface was a potentially large source of process variation. Measurement system analysis studies were conducted at three steel casting producers. The tests measured the consistency of the inspectors in identifying the same surface anomalies. The repeatability (variation of the same operator inspecting the same casting) was found to be relatively consistent across the companies at about 60-70%. However, this is still are very large amount of variation. Reproducibility (variation of different operators inspecting the same casting) was worse, ranging between 20 to 80% at the three locations. This large amount of variation shows that there is a great opportunity for improvement. Falsely identifying anomalies for reworking will cause increased expense and energy consumption. This is particularly true if a weld repair and repeated heat treatment is required. However, not identifying an anomaly could also result in future rework processing, a customer return, or scrap. To help alleviate this problem, casting surface comparator plates were developed and distributed to the industry. These plates are very inexpensive which enables them to be provided to all those involved with casting surface quality, such as operators, inspectors, sales, and management.

  3. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, William H.; Ganoe, Carl W.

    1999-01-01

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  4. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOEpatents

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  5. Machine Shop Milling Machines. Oklahoma Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, James

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials designed to equip students with basic knowledge and skills that will enable them to enter the machine trades at the machine-operator level. The curriculum is designed for use in full-time secondary and postsecondary classes and part-time adult classes. It can also be adapted to open-entry,…

  6. Machine Shop Milling Machines. Oklahoma Trade and Industrial Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, James

    This curriculum guide provides instructional materials designed to equip students with basic knowledge and skills that will enable them to enter the machine trades at the machine-operator level. The curriculum is designed for use in full-time secondary and postsecondary classes and part-time adult classes. It can also be adapted to open-entry,

  7. Hydro operational restrictions forum: Licensee and stakeholder workshop summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahim, S.; Pistor, B.; West, A.

    1998-12-01

    Relicensing review and other regulatory activities associated with continued operation of hydro generation projects have drawn increased attention to hydro resources. This attention has typically resulted in imposition of conditions having a substantial cost impact without necessarily reflecting a full appreciation of the resource`s benefits and attributes. With the extensive countrywide effort in relicensing and regulation underway, there is an opportunity to collect and compile lessons learned. This is particularly true with respect to preferred practices, technologies, and techniques applicable to required studies and mitigation measures. Such compilation will enable the industry and related stakeholders to improve quality and effectiveness while reducing costs of relicensing and mitigation for continued hydro operations. As a technology leader for the industry, EPRI is in a unique position to identify and document these techniques and practices. The objective was to determine and document preferred practices, technologies, and techniques for studies and mitigation measures required for hydropower facility licensing and compliance.

  8. Final Radiological Assessment of External Exposure for CLEAR-Line Americium Recovery Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Adam C.; Belooussova, Olga N.; Hetrick, Lucas Duane

    2014-11-12

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is currently planning to implement an americium recovery program. The americium, ordinarily isotopically pure 241Am, would be extracted from existing Pu materials, converted to an oxide and shipped to support fabrication of americium oxide-beryllium neutron sources. These operations would occur in the currently proposed Chloride Extraction and Actinide Recovery (CLEAR) line of glove boxes. This glove box line would be collocated with the currently-operational Experimental Chloride Extraction Line (EXCEL). The focus of this document is to provide an in-depth assessment of the currently planned radiation protection measures and to determine whether or not further design work is required to satisfy design-goal and ALARA requirements. Further, this document presents a history of americium recovery operations in the Department of Energy and high-level descriptions of the CLEAR line operations to provide a basis of comparison. Under the working assumptions adopted by this study, it was found that the evaluated design appears to mitigate doses to a level that satisfies the ALARA-in-design requirements of 10 CFR 835 as implemented by the Los Alamos National Laboratory procedure P121. The analyses indicate that extremity doses would also meet design requirements. Dose-rate calculations were performed using the radiation transport code MCNP5 and doses were estimated using a time-motion study developed in consort with the subject matter expert. A copy of this report and all supporting documentation are located on the Radiological Engineering server at Y:\\Rad Engineering\\2013 PROJECTS\\TA-55 Clear Line.

  9. Geological and operational summary, North Aleutian Shelf Coast No. 1 well, Bering Sea, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.F.

    1988-11-01

    Discusses the first continental offshore stratigraphic test well drilled in the North Aleutian Basin Planning Area, Bering Sea, Alaska. The well was drilled to determine the hydrocarbon potential of the area. The report covers drilling operations; lithology and core data; velocity analysis; geologic setting and tectonic framework; seismic stratigraphy; well-log interpretation and lithostratigraphy; paleontology and biostratigraphy; geothermal gradient; organic geochemistry; abnormal formation pressure; geologic hazards and shallow geology; and environmental considerations.

  10. Operational Readiness Review Final Report For F-Canyon Restart. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, A.F.; Spangler, J.B.

    1995-04-05

    An independent WSRC Operational Readiness Review was performed for the restart of Phase 1 processing in F-Canyon, Building 221-F. Readiness to restart the Second Plutonium Cycle process and solvent recovery was assessed. The ORR was conducted by an ORR board of ten members with the support of a subject matter expert. The chairman and four members were drawn from the Operational Safety Evaluation Department, ESH& QA Division; additional members were drawn from other WSRC divisions, independent of the F-Canyon operating division (NMPD). Based on the results of the readiness verification assessments performed according to the ORR plan and the validation of pre-restart corrective actions, the WSRC independent ORR Board has concluded that the facility has achieved the state of readiness committed to in the Restart Plan. Also, based on the scope of the ORR, it is the opinion of the board that F-Canyon Phase 1 processes can be restarted without undue risk to the safety of the public and onsite workers and without undue risk to the environment.

  11. Department of Energy Site Operator Program. Final report, October 1, 1991--September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    York Technical College is a two-year public institution accredited by the Commission of Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. York Technical College has been involved with electric vehicles since the late 1980`s. The four major objectives of the Site Operator Program were (1) field test and evaluate electric and hybrid vehicles and related components; (2) define and develop a national infrastructure system including electric charging systems, service/training education programs, utility system impacts and safety standards; (3) increase public awareness regarding environmental benefits, reduced dependency on foreign oil, technology development, and economic impacts; (4) assist local, state and federal agencies and fleet operators in developing electric and hybrid vehicle programs. The primary thrusts of the electric vehicle program at York Technical College, supporting the objectives of the Site Operator program were: (1) public awareness, (2) public education, (3) EV maintenance curriculum development and maintenance training, (4) field data collection, (5) vehicle modification and upgrade, (6) establish electric vehicle partnerships.

  12. Final Report on the Operation and Maintenance Improvement Program for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen Gilbert E.; Kearney, David W.; Kolb, Gregory J.

    1999-06-01

    This report describes the results of a six-year, $6.3 million project to reduce operation and maintenance (O&M) costs at power plants employing concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. Sandia National Laboratories teamed with KJC Operating Company to implement the O&M Improvement Program. O&M technologies developed during the course of the program were demonstrated at the 150-MW Kramer Junction solar power park located in Boron, California. Improvements were made in the following areas: (a) efficiency of solar energy collection, (b) O&M information management, (c) reliability of solar field flow loop hardware, (d) plant operating strategy, and (e) cost reduction associated with environmental issues. A 37% reduction in annual O&M costs was achieved. Based on the lessons learned, an optimum solar- field O&M plan for future CSP plants is presented. Parabolic trough solar technology is employed at Kramer Junction. However, many of the O&M improvements described in the report are also applicable to CSP plants based on solar power tower or dish/engine concepts.

  13. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramic components for advanced high temperature application. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0151

    SciTech Connect

    Abbatiello, L.A.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-11-29

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was a mutual research and development (R and D) effort among the participants to investigate a range of advanced manufacturing technologies for two silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic materials. The general objective was to identify the most cost-effective part manufacturing processes for the ceramic materials of interest. The focus was determining the relationship between material removal rates, surface quality, and the structural characteristics of each ceramic resulting from three innovative processes. These innovated machining processes were studied using silicon nitride advanced materials. The particular (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials of interest were sintered GS-44 from the Norton Company, and reaction-bonded Ceraloy 147-3. The processes studied included the following activities: (1) direct laser machining; (2) rotary ultrasonic machining; and (3) diamond abrasive grinding, including both resinoid and vitreous-bonded grinding wheels. Both friable and non-friable diamond types were included within the abrasive grinding study. The task also conducted a comprehensive survey of European experience in use of ceramic materials, principally aluminum oxide. Originally, the effort of this task was to extend through a prototype manufacturing demonstration of selected engine components. During the execution of this program, however changes were made to the scope of the project, altering the goals. The Program goal became only the development of assessment of their impacts on product strength and surface condition.

  14. Direct torque control of induction machine under square wave conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chapuis, Y.A.; Pelissou, C.; Roye, D.

    1995-12-31

    The authors of this paper present the direct torque control (DTC) under square wave conditions. After describing the principles of the control system at high speed, they propose a control structure under square wave operation to optimize power and losses in the inverter and the machine. A transition method allowing transient problems between the two control modes to be minimized, is presented. Finally, they estimate the structure of the proposal by simulating good results on torque control obtained during square wave passage and up to very high machine speeds. They validate the control system at high speed by DSP implementation and experimental results.

  15. Evaluation of application for approval of alternative methodology for compliance with the NESHAP for shipbuilding and ship repair and recommended requirements for compliance (application submitted by Metro Machine Corporation, Norfolk, Virginia). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Serageldin, M.A.

    1999-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency is providing background information that supports the use of Metro Machine Corporation`s (MMC) compliant all position enclosure (CAPE) plus air management system and regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) (CAPE + RTO System) as an alternative means of limiting the emissions of volatile organic hazardous air pollutants per volume of applied solids (nonvolatiles). This document also explains how the authors arrived at the operating, recordkeeping, and reporting conditions that MMC must meet for approval. The add-on control system they used consists of a pollution capture unit operation (CAPE) plus air management system and a destruction unit operation (RTO). When operated according to the specified procedures, it will control emissions to a level no greater than that from using coatings which comply with the limits in Table 2 of 40 CFR Part 63, Subpart II.

  16. Two color machining of composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, W.

    1996-12-31

    Quality cutting and drilling of 9 composite materials is possible using diode-pumped neodymium lasers. Machining at 1.06 {mu}m is improved by optimizing the pulse format of the diode-pumped neodymium lasers of the Precision Laser Machining (PLM) Consortium. Further improvements are obtained with the PLM lasers operating at 0.53 {mu}m.

  17. Machine Accounting. An Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, E. Noah, Ed.

    Designed to prepare students to operate the types of accounting machines used in many medium-sized businesses, this instructor's guide presents a full-year high school course in machine accounting covering 120 hours of instruction. An introduction for the instructor suggests how to adapt the guide to present a 60-hour module which would be…

  18. Molten salt coal gasification process development unit. Phase 1. Volume 1. PDU operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, A.L.

    1980-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a test program conducted on the Molten Salt Coal Gasification Process, which included the design, construction, and operation of a Process Development Unit. In this process, coal is gasified by contacting it with air in a turbulent pool of molten sodium carbonate. Sulfur and ash are retained in the melt, and a small stream is continuously removed from the gasifier for regeneration of sodium carbonate, removal of sulfur, and disposal of the ash. The process can handle a wide variety of feed materials, including highly caking coals, and produces a gas relatively free from tars and other impurities. The gasification step is carried out at approximately 1800/sup 0/F. The PDU was designed to process 1 ton per hour of coal at pressures up to 20 atm. It is a completely integrated facility including systems for feeding solids to the gasifier, regenerating sodium carbonate for reuse, and removing sulfur and ash in forms suitable for disposal. Five extended test runs were made. The observed product gas composition was quite close to that predicted on the basis of earlier small-scale tests and thermodynamic considerations. All plant systems were operated in an integrated manner during one of the runs. The principal problem encountered during the five test runs was maintaining a continuous flow of melt from the gasifier to the quench tank. Test data and discussions regarding plant equipment and process performance are presented. The program also included a commercial plant study which showed the process to be attractive for use in a combined-cycle, electric power plant. The report is presented in two volumes, Volume 1, PDU Operations, and Volume 2, Commercial Plant Study.

  19. Development of an operational tool for biomonitoring using constant pressure respirometry. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zachritz, W.H. II; Morrow, J.

    1992-06-29

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) policy statement (FR 49, 9016, 9 March 1984) for the development of water quality based permit limitations includes toxicity testing of effluents as an important part of a water quality approach to controlling toxics (Pickering, 1988). To assure that state waters are free of toxics, both chemical and biological methods were recommended for assessing effluent quality. The US EPA validated bioassay procedures for toxicity testing of wastewater discharges use three distinctive organisms groups: vertebrates, invertebrates, and algae (Weber, 1989). The specific species for these three groups are fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; water tea, Ceriodaphnia, dubia; and the green algae, Selenastrum capricornum, respectively. Definitive testing estimates the concentration atwhich a certain percentage of organisms exhibit a certain response. The definitive test exposes several replicate groups of organisms to the target substrate for a predetermined time period effluent concentration. The overall goal of this study is to develop an acceptable protocol for operational biomonitoring based on constant pressure respirometry for LANL. The specific objectives include: Development an appropriate toxicity testing protocol based on constant pressure respirometry for whole effluent toxicity testing, and evaluate the protocol based on factors such as sensitivity, response time, cost of analysis, and simplicity of operation.

  20. Operational implementation of ammonium perchlorate biodegradation. Final report, July 1997--June 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, E.N.; Rine, J.; Startzell, G.

    1998-06-19

    This technology is a low-cost biodegradation process that converts the perchlorate ion (ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) in process wastewater to chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}). Perchlorate can be reduced from a concentration greater than 1.0% to a concentration below detection limits (< 0.5 ppm). Effluents from this process can be discharged directly to conventional sewage treatment facilities. This process will: (1) Reduce environmental liability to DoD and its contractors by reducing the generation of hazardous wastes; (2) Minimize adverse impact of environmental compliance to DoD support operations; (3) Reduce cost for solid rocket propellant and large rocket motor disposal; (4) Facilitate component, propellant, and propellant ingredient recovery and reuse; and (5) Enable the continued use of AP, a critical defense material, in propulsion systems for the DoD. The objective of this demonstration was to provide a production-scale, operational validation of the ammonium perchlorate (AP) biodegradation process that was developed by the Air Force Research Laboratory. Components of an existing pilot-scale demonstration unit were modified and integrated into existing waste treatment facilities at Thiokol`s production plant near Brigham City, Utah.

  1. Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    J. Francfort; J. Argueta; M. Wehrey; D. Karner; L. Tyree

    1999-07-01

    This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

  2. Operations, Maintenance, and Replacement 10-Year Plan 1990-1999 : Environmental Strategy. Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-09-01

    In operating and maintaining its regional power transmission system, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) must address environmental concerns. Pollution sources and pathways for pollution migration, including potential contamination from hazardous or toxic materials, are present. BPA must develop and follow precautionary measures, respond to emergencies, minimize wastes, redress past problems, alert and train employees to problems and safety needs, constantly evaluate this effort and update the program for improvements and changes in regulations and technology. Part of BPA's mission is to conduct its operation, maintenance, and replacement programs in an environmentally sound manner. BPA recognizes its responsibility to be good stewards of the environment. BPA will meet its environmental obligations as set forth in environmental laws and regulations. BPA intends to make consistent and measurable progress toward meeting these responsibilities. The target for the 10-Year Plan is to achieve environmental compliance and meet the following goals: (1) protect human health and the environment; (2) avoid or limit liability (3) set up an effective internal management structure to maintain compliance; and (4) achieve cost-effective compliance. 6 figs.

  3. Hydro operational restrictions forum: Agency and NGO workshop summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahim, S.; Monahan, C.K.; Pistor, B.; West, A.

    1998-09-01

    Relicensing reviews and other regulatory activities associated with continued operation of hydro generation projects have drawn increased attention to hydro resources. This attention has typically resulted in imposition of conditions having a substantial cost impact without, necessarily, reflecting a full appreciation of the resource`s benefits and attributes. With the extensive countrywide effort in relicensing and regulation, there is an opportunity to collect and compile lessons learned. This is particularly true with respect to preferred practices, technologies, and techniques applicable to required studies and mitigation measures. Such compilation will enable the industry and related stakeholders to improve quality and effectiveness while reducing costs of relicensing and mitigation for continued hydro operations. As a technology leader for the industry, EPRI is in a unique position to identify and document these techniques and practices. The objectives were to determine and document preferred practices, technologies, and techniques for studies and mitigation measures required for hydropower facility licensing and compliance. This report comprises the proceedings of the agency and NGO workshop. Thirteen representatives from federal and state resource agencies and environmental interest groups participated in the workshop and discussed their experience with hydro relicensing process. Attendees identified areas of the process where buy-in could be achieved for preferred practices; they also noted certain other areas where it was highly unlikely this could be accomplished.

  4. Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

    1983-09-01

    This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

  5. 29 CFR 1910.212 - General requirements for all machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.212 General requirements for all machines. (a) Machine guarding—(1) Types of guarding. One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.212 - General requirements for all machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.212 General requirements for all machines. (a) Machine guarding—(1) Types of guarding. One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.212 - General requirements for all machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.212 General requirements for all machines. (a) Machine guarding—(1) Types of guarding. One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.212 - General requirements for all machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.212 General requirements for all machines. (a) Machine guarding—(1) Types of guarding. One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.212 - General requirements for all machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.212 General requirements for all machines. (a) Machine guarding—(1) Types of guarding. One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area...

  10. Organisms ≠ Machines.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    The machine conception of the organism (MCO) is one of the most pervasive notions in modern biology. However, it has not yet received much attention by philosophers of biology. The MCO has its origins in Cartesian natural philosophy, and it is based on the metaphorical redescription of the organism as a machine. In this paper I argue that although organisms and machines resemble each other in some basic respects, they are actually very different kinds of systems. I submit that the most significant difference between organisms and machines is that the former are intrinsically purposive whereas the latter are extrinsically purposive. Using this distinction as a starting point, I discuss a wide range of dissimilarities between organisms and machines that collectively lay bare the inadequacy of the MCO as a general theory of living systems. To account for the MCO's prevalence in biology, I distinguish between its theoretical, heuristic, and rhetorical functions. I explain why the MCO is valuable when it is employed heuristically but not theoretically, and finally I illustrate the serious problems that arise from the rhetorical appeal to the MCO. PMID:23810470

  11. Activation of the I-394 Laboratory for its operational testing. Final report for phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Reynhout, K.; Michalopoulos, P.; Sullivan, M.; Siagian, A.

    1999-07-01

    This and other related research have two primary objectives: To develop practical operational tools which can be deployed for use in traffic-management and transportation-planning activities; and To develop a laboratory infrastructure which will facilitate future advances in traffic modeling and other ITS initiatives. The objectives of this particular research project are as follows: A thorough examination and documentation of the I-394 system`s specifications; Diagnosis of the working condition of the I-394 system; Negotiation and implementation of a repair plan; Establishing a communications connection between the ITS Lab and the Traffic Management Center (TMC); Activation of the I-394 Lab, which will include a user`s guide that describes the steps a user should take to access video, make a connection to the TMC and the I-394 system, and configure the system for traffic detection and data collection.

  12. LDRD final report : a lightweight operating system for multi-core capability class supercomputers.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Hudson, Trammell B.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Bridges, Patrick G.; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian

    2010-09-01

    The two primary objectives of this LDRD project were to create a lightweight kernel (LWK) operating system(OS) designed to take maximum advantage of multi-core processors, and to leverage the virtualization capabilities in modern multi-core processors to create a more flexible and adaptable LWK environment. The most significant technical accomplishments of this project were the development of the Kitten lightweight kernel, the co-development of the SMARTMAP intra-node memory mapping technique, and the development and demonstration of a scalable virtualization environment for HPC. Each of these topics is presented in this report by the inclusion of a published or submitted research paper. The results of this project are being leveraged by several ongoing and new research projects.

  13. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix N: Wildlife.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    The Columbia River System is a vast and complex combination of Federal and non-Federal facilities used for many purposes including power production, irrigation, navigation, flood control, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat and municipal and industrial water supply. Each river use competes for the limited water resources in the Columbia River Basin. This technical appendix addresses only the effects of alternative system operating strategies for managing the Columbia River system. The environmental impact statement (EIS) itself and some of the other appendices present analyses of the alternative approaches to the other three decisions considered as part of the SOR. This document is the product of the Wildlife Work Group, focusing on wildlife impacts but not including fishes. Topics covered include the following: scope and process; existing and affected environment, including specific discussion of 18 projects in the Columbia river basin. Analysis, evaluation, and alternatives are presented for all projects. System wide impacts to wildlife are also included.

  14. High-frequency acoustic sensors for operation in a gaseous medium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, G.S.

    1990-12-31

    Photothermal microscopy is a technique for measuring thermal properties on a small scale by using focused laser beams as heat sources and as temperature probes. Typically used for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of materials, its main advantage is its ability to measure types of flaws that are not visible optically or acoustically. Because of the optical nature of photothermal microscopy, sub-micron resolutions can be obtained in many of these thermal measurements. The greatest limitation of these systems is their relatively poor signal-to-noise ratios and, consequently, slow imaging speeds. To circumvent this problem, a variety of approaches to the detection of thermal waves has been pursued in recent years. This thesis compares the relative merits of a common class of techniques that rely on direct observation of physical changes in the heated sample, including a novel approach to interferometric measurement of the thermal expansion. It is found that the optimum approach depends not only on the physical properties of the sample being studies, but also upon the resolution of the experiment and the damage threshold of the specimen. Finally, this dissertation describes the applications of photothermal microscopy to the study of the anisotropic thermal properties of the new high-{Tc} superconductors. By adding a high-vacuum cryostat to the microscope, the authors have been able to study the influence of the superconducting transition on the thermal conductivity. The measurements of the anisotropic thermal conductivity demonstrate that the heat flow along the superconducting planes is enhanced below the transition, and that no such enhancement exists in the non-superconducting direction. Material examined was Bi-Ca-Sr-Cu-O.

  15. Improvement of reliability of welding by in-process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardt, D.E.; Masubuchi, K.; Paynter, H.M.; Unkel, W.C.

    1983-04-01

    Closed-loop control of the welding variables represents a promising, cost-effective approach to improving weld quality and therefore reducing the total cost of producing welded structures. The ultimate goal is to place all significant weld variables under direct closed-loop control; this contrasts with preprogrammed machines which place the welding equipment under control. As the first step, an overall strategy has been formulated and an investigation of weld pool geometry control for gas tungsten arc process has been completed. The research activities were divided into the areas of arc phenomena, weld pool phenomena, sensing techniques and control activities.

  16. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3070)

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitoun, A.

    1994-08-01

    This two-volume Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Volume 1 contains the assessment of the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, by Louisiana Energy Services, LP. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are construction, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D)- of the site. Issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment. The FEIS supports issuance of a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility.

  17. Multiprocessor architecture for machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, K. W.; Batchelor, Bruce G.

    1992-11-01

    Machine vision algorithms are partitioned into three distinct levels: low level (image to image transformation), intermediate level (image to symbolic transformations) and high level (symbolic manipulation). Low level image processing requires a large amount of data manipulation which can be cost effectively processed using a linear processor array. When performing intermediate level operations, however, the linear processor array is liable to generate communications bottlenecks which reduce its efficiency. The aim of this work is to enhance the linear processor array architecture for intermediate level processing. An investigation of the matching of intermediate level algorithms to appropriate computer architectures is presented. Consequently an augmented tree-structured MIMD processor network is devised, tightly coupling the low, intermediate, and high level image processing stages. The network is realized using the Inmos Transputer. A representative selection of intermediate level algorithms are executed on the machine. The performance of the realized network is compared to several commercially available systems. As the network is increased in size, it is shown that the communications bottlenecks in the linear processor array are reduced to a negligible amount. Future enhancements to the system are finally considered, including automated object and feature recognition, and a tree structured hierarchy of Prolog processes.

  18. Workout Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Orbotron is a tri-axle exercise machine patterned after a NASA training simulator for astronaut orientation in the microgravity of space. It has three orbiting rings corresponding to roll, pitch and yaw. The user is in the middle of the inner ring with the stomach remaining in the center of all axes, eliminating dizziness. Human power starts the rings spinning, unlike the NASA air-powered system. Marketed by Fantasy Factory (formerly Orbotron, Inc.), the machine can improve aerobic capacity, strength and endurance in five to seven minute workouts.

  19. Nuclear reactor operator training for disadvantaged Americans. Final report, March 1, 1984--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, J.P.; Mulder, R.U.

    1992-12-01

    The Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Department of the University of Virginia was awarded a grant by the US Department of Energy in 1984 to establish and administer a reactor operator training program for disadvantaged Americans. Stipends were provided by the US DOE for five trainees with the anticipation that four other educational facilities would participate in the program. Sub-contracts were awarded to four other Universities: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The University of Missouri at Columbia, Oregon State University, and The State University of New York at Buffalo. The initial two year program was very successful and the grant was renewed in late 1986 for another two years. MIT declined to participate in the second program and was replaced by Ohio State University. U.VA. was notified in September, 1987 that new funding would no longer be provided for this program after December, 1987. U.VA. requested and was granted a no cost extention for the program through December, 1990, since sufficient funds remained in the initial grant to pursue the program further. DOE subsequently approved a no cost extension through November, 1992.

  20. A quiet operating I.C. engine with complete highly efficient expansion cycle. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-02

    A program for the development of a quiet operating internal combustion engine with complete highly efficient expansion cycle was administered by the Department of Energy on June 14, 1988 through December 13, 1989. An extension, modification M001 to the contract allowed up to June 12, 1991 to complete this work. The extension was granted in order for Engine Research Associates, Inc. (ERA) to continue the development of the engine on its own funds to a level of performance required for an independent testing facility to test and report on the engine`s performance. As it turned out, we were not able to complete all of the detailed development work under ERA, Inc. funding necessary to bring the engine up to a sufficient development status to allow an independent test lab to complete the full-up performance testing on the engine. However, we have incorporated enough refinements to be able to complete a somewhat restricted dynamometer test program on the engine using the ERA acquired dynamometer. A discussion of these refinements and how we were able to conduct a refined test is discussed under program accomplishments.

  1. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix D: Cultural Resources.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This study attempts to identify and analyze the impacts of the System Operating Strategy (SOS) alternatives on cultural resources. The impacts include effects on Native American traditional cultural values, properties and practices. They also include effects on archeological or historic properties meeting the criteria of the National Register of Historic Places. In addition to responding to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), this analysis addresses the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), the Archeological Resources Protection Act (ARPA), the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), the Native American Religious Freedom Act (NARFA), and other relevant legislation. To meet their legally mandated cultural resources requirements, the SOR agencies will develop agreements and Implementation Plans with the appropriate State Historic Preservation Officers (SHPOs), Tribes, and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) detailing the measures necessary to best manage the resource. The planning and implementation activities will be staged over a number of years in consultation with affected Tribes.

  2. Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuation Operations: Phase A Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzese, Oscar; Zhang, Li; Mahmoud, Anas M.; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Wen, Yi

    2010-05-01

    There are many instances in which it is possible to plan ahead for an emergency evacuation (e.g., an explosion at a chemical processing facility). For those cases, if an accident (or an attack) were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other cases (e.g., the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials), there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented and decisions must be made ad-hoc on how to proceed with an emergency evacuation. In both situations, the availability of real-time traffic information plays a critical role in the management of the evacuation operations. To improve public safety during a vehicular emergency evacuation it is necessary to detect losses of road capacity (due to incidents, for example) as early as possible. Once these bottlenecks are identified, re-routing strategies must be determined in real-time and deployed in the field to help dissipate the congestion and increase the efficiency of the evacuation. Due to cost constraints, only large urban areas have traffic sensor deployments that permit access to some sort of real-time traffic information; any evacuation taking place in any other areas of the country would have to proceed without real-time traffic information. The latter was the focus of this SERRI/DHS (Southeast Region Research Initiative/Department of Homeland Security) sponsored project. That is, the main objective on the project was to improve the operations during a vehicular emergency evacuation anywhere by using newly developed real-time traffic-information-gathering technologies to assess traffic conditions and therefore to potentially detect incidents on the main evacuation routes. Phase A of the project consisted in the development and testing of a prototype system composed of sensors that are engineered in such a way that they can be rapidly deployed in the field where and when they are needed. Each one of these sensors is also equipped with their own power supply and a GPS (Global Positioning System) device to auto-determine its spatial location on the transportation network under surveillance. The system is capable of assessing traffic parameters by identifying and re-identifying vehicles in the traffic stream as those vehicles pass over the sensors. The system of sensors transmits, through wireless communication, real-time traffic information (travel time and other parameters) to a command and control center via an NTCIP (National Transportation Communication for ITS Protocol) -compatible interface. As an alternative, an existing NTCIP-compatible system accepts the real-time traffic information mentioned and broadcasts the traffic information to emergency managers, the media and the public via the existing channels. A series of tests, both in a controlled environment and on the field, were conducted to study the feasibility of rapidly deploying the system of traffic sensors and to assess its ability to provide real-time traffic information during an emergency evacuation. The results of these tests indicated that the prototype sensors are reliable and accurate for the type of application that is the focus of this project.

  3. Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features

    SciTech Connect

    Toole, Gasper L.

    2009-01-01

    Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

  4. Wacky Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fendrich, Jean

    2002-01-01

    Collectors everywhere know that local antique shops and flea markets are treasure troves just waiting to be plundered. Science teachers might take a hint from these hobbyists, for the next community yard sale might be a repository of old, quirky items that are just the things to get students thinking about simple machines. By introducing some…

  5. Extreme ultraviolet lithography machine

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, Daniel A.; Kubiak, Glenn D.; Haney, Steven J.; Sweeney, Donald W.

    2000-01-01

    An extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) machine or system for producing integrated circuit (IC) components, such as transistors, formed on a substrate. The EUVL machine utilizes a laser plasma point source directed via an optical arrangement onto a mask or reticle which is reflected by a multiple mirror system onto the substrate or target. The EUVL machine operates in the 10-14 nm wavelength soft x-ray photon. Basically the EUV machine includes an evacuated source chamber, an evacuated main or project chamber interconnected by a transport tube arrangement, wherein a laser beam is directed into a plasma generator which produces an illumination beam which is directed by optics from the source chamber through the connecting tube, into the projection chamber, and onto the reticle or mask, from which a patterned beam is reflected by optics in a projection optics (PO) box mounted in the main or projection chamber onto the substrate. In one embodiment of a EUVL machine, nine optical components are utilized, with four of the optical components located in the PO box. The main or projection chamber includes vibration isolators for the PO box and a vibration isolator mounting for the substrate, with the main or projection chamber being mounted on a support structure and being isolated.

  6. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor... (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a...) Danger zones on machines and equipment used by employees shall be guarded. (2) Where chips and...

  7. 15 CFR 5.5 - Vending machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Vending machines. 5.5 Section 5.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce OPERATION OF VENDING STANDS § 5.5 Vending machines. (a) The income from any vending machines which are located within reasonable proximity to and...

  8. 15 CFR 5.5 - Vending machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Vending machines. 5.5 Section 5.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce OPERATION OF VENDING STANDS § 5.5 Vending machines. (a) The income from any vending machines which are located within reasonable proximity to and...

  9. 15 CFR 5.5 - Vending machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Vending machines. 5.5 Section 5.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce OPERATION OF VENDING STANDS § 5.5 Vending machines. (a) The income from any vending machines which are located within reasonable proximity to and...

  10. 15 CFR 5.5 - Vending machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Vending machines. 5.5 Section 5.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce OPERATION OF VENDING STANDS § 5.5 Vending machines. (a) The income from any vending machines which are located within reasonable proximity to and...

  11. 15 CFR 5.5 - Vending machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Vending machines. 5.5 Section 5.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce OPERATION OF VENDING STANDS § 5.5 Vending machines. (a) The income from any vending machines which are located within reasonable proximity to and...

  12. Administrative simplification: adoption of operating rules for health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transactions. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2012-08-10

    This interim final rule with comment period implements parts of section 1104 of the Affordable Care Act which requires the adoption of operating rules for the health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. PMID:22888504

  13. Artificial Molecular Machines.

    PubMed

    Balzani; Credi; Raymo; Stoddart

    2000-10-01

    The miniaturization of components used in the construction of working devices is being pursued currently by the large-downward (top-down) fabrication. This approach, however, which obliges solid-state physicists and electronic engineers to manipulate progressively smaller and smaller pieces of matter, has its intrinsic limitations. An alternative approach is a small-upward (bottom-up) one, starting from the smallest compositions of matter that have distinct shapes and unique properties-namely molecules. In the context of this particular challenge, chemists have been extending the concept of a macroscopic machine to the molecular level. A molecular-level machine can be defined as an assembly of a distinct number of molecular components that are designed to perform machinelike movements (output) as a result of an appropriate external stimulation (input). In common with their macroscopic counterparts, a molecular machine is characterized by 1) the kind of energy input supplied to make it work, 2) the nature of the movements of its component parts, 3) the way in which its operation can be monitored and controlled, 4) the ability to make it repeat its operation in a cyclic fashion, 5) the timescale needed to complete a full cycle of movements, and 6) the purpose of its operation. Undoubtedly, the best energy inputs to make molecular machines work are photons or electrons. Indeed, with appropriately chosen photochemically and electrochemically driven reactions, it is possible to design and synthesize molecular machines that do work. Moreover, the dramatic increase in our fundamental understanding of self-assembly and self-organizational processes in chemical synthesis has aided and abetted the construction of artificial molecular machines through the development of new methods of noncovalent synthesis and the emergence of supramolecular assistance to covalent synthesis as a uniquely powerful synthetic tool. The aim of this review is to present a unified view of the field of molecular machines by focusing on past achievements, present limitations, and future perspectives. After analyzing a few important examples of natural molecular machines, the most significant developments in the field of artificial molecular machines are highlighted. The systems reviewed include 1) chemical rotors, 2) photochemically and electrochemically induced molecular (conformational) rearrangements, and 3) chemically, photochemically, and electrochemically controllable (co-conformational) motions in interlocked molecules (catenanes and rotaxanes), as well as in coordination and supramolecular complexes, including pseudorotaxanes. Artificial molecular machines based on biomolecules and interfacing artificial molecular machines with surfaces and solid supports are amongst some of the cutting-edge topics featured in this review. The extension of the concept of a machine to the molecular level is of interest not only for the sake of basic research, but also for the growth of nanoscience and the subsequent development of nanotechnology. PMID:11091368

  14. LHCb experience with running jobs in virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment has been running production jobs in virtual machines since 2013 as part of its DIRAC-based infrastructure. We describe the architecture of these virtual machines and the steps taken to replicate the WLCG worker node environment expected by user and production jobs. This relies on the uCernVM system for providing root images for virtual machines. We use the CernVM-FS distributed filesystem to supply the root partition files, the LHCb software stack, and the bootstrapping scripts necessary to configure the virtual machines for us. Using this approach, we have been able to minimise the amount of contextualisation which must be provided by the virtual machine managers. We explain the process by which the virtual machine is able to receive payload jobs submitted to DIRAC by users and production managers, and how this differs from payloads executed within conventional DIRAC pilot jobs on batch queue based sites. We describe our operational experiences in running production on VM based sites managed using Vcycle/OpenStack, Vac, and HTCondor Vacuum. Finally we show how our use of these resources is monitored using Ganglia and DIRAC.

  15. 76 FR 77996 - Notice of Issuance of Final Air Permits for Eni US Operating Co., Inc. and Port Dolphin Energy, LLC.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ... AGENCY Notice of Issuance of Final Air Permits for Eni US Operating Co., Inc. and Port Dolphin Energy..., the EPA issued a final Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) air permit for Port Dolphin Energy, LLC (Port Dolphin), which was issued and became effective on December 1, 2011. The Eni...

  16. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of Six 300-FF-2 Operable Unit Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    J. D. Ludowise

    2006-12-12

    This report provides the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of six solid waste disposal sites (referred to as burial grounds) located in the 300-FF-2 Operable Unit (OU) on the Hanford Site. These six sites (618-1, 618-2, 618-3, 618-7, 618-8, and 618-13 Burial Grounds) were determined to have a total radionuclide inventory (WCH 2005a, WCH 2005d, WCH 2005e and WCH 2006b) that exceeds the DOE-STD-1027 Category 3 threshold quantity (DOE 1997) and are the subject of this analysis. This FHC document examines the hazards, identifies appropriate controls to manage the hazards, and documents the FHC and commitments for the 300-FF-2 Burial Grounds Remediation Project.

  17. Charging machine

    DOEpatents

    Medlin, John B.

    1976-05-25

    A charging machine for loading fuel slugs into the process tubes of a nuclear reactor includes a tubular housing connected to the process tube, a charging trough connected to the other end of the tubular housing, a device for loading the charging trough with a group of fuel slugs, means for equalizing the coolant pressure in the charging trough with the pressure in the process tubes, means for pushing the group of fuel slugs into the process tube and a latch and a seal engaging the last object in the group of fuel slugs to prevent the fuel slugs from being ejected from the process tube when the pusher is removed and to prevent pressure liquid from entering the charging machine.

  18. Induction machine

    DOEpatents

    Owen, Whitney H.

    1980-01-01

    A polyphase rotary induction machine for use as a motor or generator utilizing a single rotor assembly having two series connected sets of rotor windings, a first stator winding disposed around the first rotor winding and means for controlling the current induced in one set of the rotor windings compared to the current induced in the other set of the rotor windings. The rotor windings may be wound rotor windings or squirrel cage windings.

  19. Development of Curricula and Materials to Teach Performance Skills Essential to Accurate Computer Assisted Transcription from Machine Shorthand Notes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honsberger, Marion M.

    This project was conducted at Edmonds Community College to develop curriculum and materials for use in teaching hands-on, computer-assisted court reporting. The final product of the project was a course with support materials designed to teach court reporting students performance skills by which each can rapidly create perfect computer-aided…

  20. Development of Computer Aids for Tape-Control of Photocomposing Machines. Final Report, Section A. Mechanization of Mathematical Reviews Office Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Mathematical Society, Providence, RI.

    This document is the first of three sections of a final report on a project which included five phases: (1) developing systems and procedures for the use of computer-processed tape, (2) design of a system for the partial mechanization of Mathematical Reviews office procedures together with experiments on derived publications, (3) typographic…

  1. Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.; Norton, Anderson; Boyce, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has documented schemes and operations that undergird students' understanding of fractions. This prior research was based, in large part, on small-group teaching experiments. However, written assessments are needed in order for teachers and researchers to assess students' ways of operating on a whole-class scale. In this

  2. Machine tests slow-speed sliding friction in high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skyrus, J.; Wilkinson, C.

    1967-01-01

    Testing machine that operates without any lubrication of the machine elements within the vacuum chamber measures static friction and sliding friction at very low speeds. Moving parts are held to a minimum to simplify operation in the vacuum chamber.

  3. High-intensity drying processes -- Impulse drying: Report 15 (final report). Production of linerboard on a pilot paper machine, subsequent commercial converting trials and preliminary economic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1999-04-01

    In September 1998, 33{number_sign} liner was produced on the {number_sign}4 pilot machine under both single-felted wet pressing and impulse drying conditions. In October 1998, the pilot produced liner and commercial liner were converted to combined board and corrugated boxes at a commercial box plant. In January 1999, linerboard, medium, and combined board and box testing were completed. The pilot trials demonstrated that 33{number_sign} liner could be impulse dried at a reel speed of 380 m/min. Press dryness was improved by as much as 4 points, while CD STFI and CD ring crush were improved by more than 10%. Improvements to the smoothness of heated side of sheet were also realized. Commercial box plant converting trials demonstrated that impulse dried linerboard can be used to increase ECT and box compression strength by as much as 10%. As anticipated, print quality was found to be superior. A preliminary economic analysis was performed in which an impulse dryer would increase press dryness by 4 points and would allow the basis weight to be reduced by 10%. The economic model showed that the 4 points in dryness would translate to a 17% tonnage increase. Applying the 10% basis weight reduction resulted in an increase in productivity, on an area basis, of 30%. The pulp cost savings was found to outweigh any additional electric power costs.

  4. Stochastic flow shop scheduling of overlapping jobs on tandem machines in application to optimizing the US Army's deliberate nuclear, biological, and chemical decontamination process, (final report). Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V.

    1991-05-01

    The U.S. Army's detailed equipment decontamination process is a stochastic flow shop which has N independent non-identical jobs (vehicles) which have overlapping processing times. This flow shop consists of up to six non-identical machines (stations). With the exception of one station, the processing times of the jobs are random variables. Based on an analysis of the processing times, the jobs for the 56 Army heavy division companies were scheduled according to the best shortest expected processing time - longest expected processing time (SEPT-LEPT) sequence. To assist in this scheduling the Gap Comparison Heuristic was developed to select the best SEPT-LEPT schedule. This schedule was then used in balancing the detailed equipment decon line in order to find the best possible site configuration subject to several constraints. The detailed troop decon line, in which all jobs are independent and identically distributed, was then balanced. Lastly, an NBC decon optimization computer program was developed using the scheduling and line balancing results. This program serves as a prototype module for the ANBACIS automated NBC decision support system.... Decontamination, Stochastic flow shop, Scheduling, Stochastic scheduling, Minimization of the makespan, SEPT-LEPT Sequences, Flow shop line balancing, ANBACIS.

  5. Integration of Machining and Inspection in Aerospace Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, Bart; Dicken, Peter J.

    2011-12-01

    The main challenge for aerospace manufacturers today is to develop the ability to produce high-quality products on a consistent basis as quickly as possible and at the lowest-possible cost. At the same time, rising material prices are making the cost of scrap higher than ever so making it more important to minimise waste. Proper inspection and quality control methods are no longer a luxury; they are an essential part of every manufacturing operation that wants to grow and be successful. However, simply bolting on some quality control procedures to the existing manufacturing processes is not enough. Inspection must be fully-integrated with manufacturing for the investment to really produce significant improvements. The traditional relationship between manufacturing and inspection is that machining is completed first on the company's machine tools and the components are then transferred to dedicated inspection equipment to be approved or rejected. However, as machining techniques become more sophisticated, and as components become larger and more complex, there are a growing number of cases where closer integration is required to give the highest productivity and the biggest reductions in wastage. Instead of a simple linear progression from CAD to CAM to machining to inspection, a more complicated series of steps is needed, with extra data needed to fill any gaps in the information available at the various stages. These new processes can be grouped under the heading of "adaptive machining". The programming of most machining operations is based around knowing three things: the position of the workpiece on the machine, the starting shape of the material to be machined, and the final shape that needs to be achieved at the end of the operation. Adaptive machining techniques allow successful machining when at least one of those elements is unknown, by using in-process measurement to close the information gaps in the process chain. It also allows any errors to be spotted earlier in the manufacturing process, so helping the problems to be resolved more quickly and at lower cost.

  6. The Final Count Down: A Review of Three Decades of Flight Controller Training Methods for Space Shuttle Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittemore, Gary D.; Bertels, Christie

    2011-01-01

    Operations of human spaceflight systems is extremely complex, therefore the training and certification of operations personnel is a critical piece of ensuring mission success. Mission Control Center (MCC-H), at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, in Houston, Texas manages mission operations for the Space Shuttle Program, including the training and certification of the astronauts and flight control teams. As the space shuttle program ends in 2011, a review of how training for STS-1 was conducted compared to STS-134 will show multiple changes in training of shuttle flight controller over a thirty year period. This paper will additionally give an overview of a flight control team s makeup and responsibilities during a flight, and details on how those teams have been trained certified over the life span of the space shuttle. The training methods for developing flight controllers have evolved significantly over the last thirty years, while the core goals and competencies have remained the same. In addition, the facilities and tools used in the control center have evolved. These changes have been driven by many factors including lessons learned, technology, shuttle accidents, shifts in risk posture, and generational differences. A primary method used for training Space Shuttle flight control teams is by running mission simulations of the orbit, ascent, and entry phases, to truly "train like you fly." The reader will learn what it is like to perform a simulation as a shuttle flight controller. Finally, the paper will reflect on the lessons learned in training for the shuttle program, and how those could be applied to future human spaceflight endeavors.

  7. CESAR research in intelligent machines

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbin, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) was established in 1983 as a national center for multidisciplinary, long-range research and development in machine intelligence and advanced control theory for energy-related applications. Intelligent machines of interest here are artificially created operational systems that are capable of autonomous decision making and action. The initial emphasis for research is remote operations, with specific application to dexterous manipulation in unstructured dangerous environments where explosives, toxic chemicals, or radioactivity may be present, or in other environments with significant risk such as coal mining or oceanographic missions. Potential benefits include reduced risk to man in hazardous situations, machine replication of scarce expertise, minimization of human error due to fear or fatigue, and enhanced capability using high resolution sensors and powerful computers. A CESAR goal is to explore the interface between the advanced teleoperation capability of today, and the autonomous machines of the future.

  8. Integrated Inverter For Driving Multiple Electric Machines

    DOEpatents

    Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN; Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2006-04-04

    An electric machine drive (50) has a plurality of inverters (50a, 50b) for controlling respective electric machines (57, 62), which may include a three-phase main traction machine (57) and two-phase accessory machines (62) in a hybrid or electric vehicle. The drive (50) has a common control section (53, 54) for controlling the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b) with only one microelectronic processor (54) for controlling the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b), only one gate driver circuit (53) for controlling conduction of semiconductor switches (S1-S10) in the plurality of inverters (50a, 50b), and also includes a common dc bus (70), a common dc bus filtering capacitor (C1) and a common dc bus voltage sensor (67). The electric machines (57, 62) may be synchronous machines, induction machines, or PM machines and may be operated in a motoring mode or a generating mode.

  9. Parallel machines: Parallel machine languages

    SciTech Connect

    Iannucci, R.A. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a framework for understanding the tradeoffs between the conventional view and the dataflow view with the objective of discovering the critical hardware structures which must be present in any scalable, general-purpose parallel computer to effectively tolerate latency and synchronization costs. The author presents an approach to scalable general purpose parallel computation. Linguistic Concerns, Compiling Issues, Intermediate Language Issues, and hardware/technological constraints are presented as a combined approach to architectural Develoement. This book presents the notion of a parallel machine language.

  10. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204... General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from...

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Machine guarding. 50-204... General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from...

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Machine guarding. 50-204... General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from...

  13. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204... General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from...

  14. 41 CFR 50-204.5 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Machine guarding. 50-204... General Safety and Health Standards § 50-204.5 Machine guarding. (a) One or more methods of machine guarding shall be provided to protect the operator and other employees in the machine area from...

  15. 12 CFR 1005.16 - Disclosures at automated teller machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disclosures at automated teller machines. 1005... TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) § 1005.16 Disclosures at automated teller machines. (a) Definition. “Automated teller machine operator” means any person that operates an automated teller machine at which a...

  16. 12 CFR 1005.16 - Disclosures at automated teller machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disclosures at automated teller machines. 1005... TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) General § 1005.16 Disclosures at automated teller machines. (a) Definition. “Automated teller machine operator” means any person that operates an automated teller machine at which...

  17. 12 CFR 1005.16 - Disclosures at automated teller machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disclosures at automated teller machines. 1005... TRANSFERS (REGULATION E) General § 1005.16 Disclosures at automated teller machines. (a) Definition. “Automated teller machine operator” means any person that operates an automated teller machine at which...

  18. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  19. Final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-2, California

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Consultant under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2) in Kern County, California. The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study. Additional details are provided in the Addendum (the Phase I Property Description and Fact Finding Report). The key property elements that positively affect the estimated value of NPR-2 include the following: royalty income from producing oil and gas leases, rental income from non-producing oil and gas leases, income from grazing or leasing of grazing rights, potential income from oil and gas leasing on exploratory (or nonprospective) acreage, potential value of trading surface real estate as ranch land for sheep grazing (10,044 acres), and town lots for residential or commercial development (16.7 acres). Key elements that negatively impact the estimated value include: environmental assessment costs, operating budgets, and lease sale expenses.

  20. Introducing Machine Learning Concepts with WEKA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tony C; Frank, Eibe

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to data mining with machine learning. It gives an overview of various types of machine learning, along with some examples. It explains how to download, install, and run the WEKA data mining toolkit on a simple data set, then proceeds to explain how one might approach a bioinformatics problem. Finally, it includes a brief summary of machine learning algorithms for other types of data mining problems, and provides suggestions about where to find additional information. PMID:27008023

  1. Washing Machine Injuries of the Upper Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, S S

    2008-01-01

    Washing machines are part of every household and there are various reports of upper extremity injuries due to inadequate safety precautions while operating the machine. Most of the injuries occur when an attempt is made to remove the clothes from the machine and the hand gets caught in the spinning machine. The presentation can vary from minor soft tissue injuries to a mangled upper extremity. The chance of neurovascular damage resulting in compartment syndrome is very high. The author reports three cases of washing machine injuries to draw attention to this not so uncommon injury. The relevant literature is also considered. PMID:21654964

  2. Integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems.

    PubMed

    Boy, G A

    1992-07-01

    This paper presents an artificial intelligence approach to integrated human-machine intelligence in space systems. It discusses the motivations for Intelligent Assistant Systems in both nominal and abnormal situations. The problem of constructing procedures is shown to be a very critical issue. In particular, keeping procedural experience in both design and operation is critical. We suggest what artificial intelligence can offer in this direction. Some crucial problems induced by this approach are discussed in detail. Finally, we analyze the various roles that would be shared by both astronauts, ground operators, and the intelligent assistant system. PMID:11537584

  3. Reading Machines for Blind People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fender, Derek H.

    1983-01-01

    Ten stages of developing reading machines for blind people are analyzed: handling of text material; optics; electro-optics; pattern recognition; character recognition; storage; speech synthesizers; browsing and place finding; computer indexing; and other sources of input. Cost considerations of the final product are emphasized. (CL)

  4. EXPLAINING "TEACHING MACHINES" AND PROGRAMMING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CRAM, DAVID

    THIS IS A PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION BOOK ON THE SUBJECT OF PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION. IT DEFINES AND COMPARES LINEAR AND BRANCHING PROGRAMING, AND GIVES ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF EACH METHOD. SELF-ORGANIZING PROGRAMING IS ALSO DISCUSSED. FINALLY, THE AUTHOR SUGGESTS SEVERAL STEPS THAT SHOULD BE TAKEN BEFORE ANY TEACHING MACHINE IS SELECTED, AND…

  5. Cryogenic machining of Kevlar composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Allen, M. N.; Mander, S. J.

    Previous attempts to machine Kevlar aramid fibre reinforced plastics (KFRP) with coventional cutting tools have proven to be extremely difficult. This has somewhat restricted the material's usage, often negating the advantages of its high strength-to-weight ratio and fatigue tolerance. The present paper describes a novel technique of machining KFRP under cryogenic conditions with remarkable results compared to those obtained at ambient temperatures. The investigation carried out with turning operation shows dramatic improvement of the tool performance and surface quality. The effects of various machining parameters such as workpiece temperature, cutting speed, and tool geometry on the machinability of KFRP are presented and analyzed. It appears that care is necessary to judge the tool life as the typical tool wear growth and surface finish or cutting force may produce contradictory results. It is also suggested that, for KFRP, surface finish of the machined workpiece is a very good criterion to determine the tool life. To aid the understanding of the machining mechanics, a microscopic investigation of the cutting zone while actually machining a testpiece at ambient and cryogenic temperatures is also reported.

  6. Operation and Performance of a Biphase Turbine Power Plant at the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, Lance G.

    2000-09-01

    A full scale, wellhead Biphase turbine was manufactured and installed with the balance of plant at Well 103 of the Cerro Prieto geothermal resource in Baja, California. The Biphase turbine was first synchronized with the electrical grid of Comision Federal de Electricidad on August 20, 1997. The Biphase power plant was operated from that time until May 23, 2000, a period of 2 years and 9 months. A total of 77,549 kWh were delivered to the grid. The power plant was subsequently placed in a standby condition pending replacement of the rotor with a newly designed, higher power rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals. The maximum measured power output of the Biphase turbine, 808 kWe at 640 psig wellhead pressure, agreed closely with the predicted output, 840 kWe. When combined with the backpressure steam turbine the total output power from that flow would be increased by 40% above the power derived only from the flow by the present flash steam plant. The design relations used to predict performance and design the turbine were verified by these tests. The performance and durability of the Biphase turbine support the conclusion of the Economics and Application Report previously published, (Appendix A). The newly designed rotor (the Dual Pressure Rotor) was analyzed for the above power condition. The Dual Pressure Rotor would increase the power output to 2064 kWe by incorporating two pressure letdown stages in the Biphase rotor, eliminating the requirement for a backpressure steam turbine. The power plant availability was low due to deposition of solids from the well on the Biphase rotor and balance of plant problems. A great deal of plant down time resulted from the requirement to develop methods to handle the solids and from testing the apparatus in the Biphase turbine. Finally an online, washing method using the high pressure two-phase flow was developed which completely eliminated the solids problem. The availability of the Biphase turbine itself was 100% after implementations of this method in March 2000. However, failures of instrumentation and control system components led to additional plant down time and damage to the bearings and seals. The enthalpy and pressure of well 103 declined substantially from the inception of the project. When the project was started the wellhead pressure and enthalpy were 760 psig and 882 Btu/lb respectively. At the time the plant was placed in standby the corresponding values were only 525 psig and 658 Btu/lb. This reduced the available plant power to only 400 kWe making the project economically unfeasible. However, replacement of the existing rotor with the Dual Pressure Rotor and replacement of the bearings and seals will enable the existing Biphase turbine to produce 1190 kWe at the present well conditions without the backpressure steam turbine. Operation with the present staff can then be sustained by selling power under the existing Agreement with CFE. Implementation of this option is recommended with operation of the facility to continue as a demonstration plant. Biphase turbine theory, design and performance are reported herein. The construction of the Biphase turbine and power plant and operational experience are detailed. Improvements in the Biphase turbine are indicated and analyzed. The impact of Biphase techonology on geothermal power production is discussed and recommendations made.

  7. Diamond turning machine controller implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, K.P.; Taylor, L.W.; Knight, B.F.; Fornaro, R.J.

    1988-12-01

    The standard controller for a Pnuemo ASG 2500 Diamond Turning Machine, an Allen Bradley 8200, has been replaced with a custom high-performance design. This controller consists of four major components. Axis position feedback information is provided by a Zygo Axiom 2/20 laser interferometer with 0.1 micro-inch resolution. Hardware interface logic couples the computers digital and analog I/O channels to the diamond turning machine`s analog motor controllers, the laser interferometer, and other machine status and control information. It also provides front panel switches for operator override of the computer controller and implement the emergency stop sequence. The remaining two components, the control computer hardware and software, are discussed in detail below.

  8. DOE-energy related inventions program: [Develop method to treat industrial powders]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, W.E.

    1998-05-13

    In a Mechanical Fluidized Vacuum machine a horizontally disposed retort is two-thirds filled with material and rotated at a speed that keeps the material in a fluidized state. The objective of this project was to build and demonstrate a machine to thermally treat up to 600 kg lots of metal and cermet powders to temperatures of 940C with low energy cost and environmental impact. Quantification tests of many powders were conducted, design machine modification was done to expand the basic machine, a retort was constructed and prepared, and performance trials were made on the final machine. Final tests were conducted on a retort measuring 22 inches in diameter and 30 inches long. Operating cost data are presented.

  9. Machine wanting.

    PubMed

    McShea, Daniel W

    2013-12-01

    Wants, preferences, and cares are physical things or events, not ideas or propositions, and therefore no chain of pure logic can conclude with a want, preference, or care. It follows that no pure-logic machine will ever want, prefer, or care. And its behavior will never be driven in the way that deliberate human behavior is driven, in other words, it will not be motivated or goal directed. Therefore, if we want to simulate human-style interactions with the world, we will need to first understand the physical structure of goal-directed systems. I argue that all such systems share a common nested structure, consisting of a smaller entity that moves within and is driven by a larger field that contains it. In such systems, the smaller contained entity is directed by the field, but also moves to some degree independently of it, allowing the entity to deviate and return, to show the plasticity and persistence that is characteristic of goal direction. If all this is right, then human want-driven behavior probably involves a behavior-generating mechanism that is contained within a neural field of some kind. In principle, for goal directedness generally, the containment can be virtual, raising the possibility that want-driven behavior could be simulated in standard computational systems. But there are also reasons to believe that goal-direction works better when containment is also physical, suggesting that a new kind of hardware may be necessary. PMID:23792091

  10. 42 CFR 137.138 - Once the Indian Tribe's final offer has been accepted or deemed accepted by operation of law...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Once the Indian Tribe's final offer has been accepted or deemed accepted by operation of law, what is the next step? 137.138 Section 137.138 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  11. A Review of Experience: Establishing, Operating, Evaluating a Demonstration Nursery Center for the Daytime Care of Infants and Toddlers, 1967-1970. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keister, Mary Elizabeth

    This document is the final report of Phase One (1967-1970) of the Group Care of Infants Demonstration (Center) Project. This report devotes major attention to the problems of establishing, operating, and evaluating a group day care center for infant and toddler care. The Center project describes what is required to provide housing, equipment,…

  12. U.S. DOE/RL OPERATIONS OFFICE FINAL REPORT FOR THE OPERATIONAL READINESS REVIEW FOR STARTUP OF THE K BASIN SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, R.M.

    2004-06-15

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness has been achieved for startup of the K East Basin Sludge Water System (SWS) as applied to the North Loadout Pit (NLOP). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period of May 19-26, 2004. The DOE ORR Team has concluded that the K Basins SWS is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Sludge Water System (SWS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action, December 19, 2003, and the Implementation Plan for the Operational Readiness Review for Startup of the K Basins Sludge Wafer System North Loadout Pit, DOE/RL-2003-21, Rev. 1. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, observations of normal facility operations and operational drills and actual upset conditions that occurred during the ORR. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR and the RL Line Management Review. The ORR Team generally concurs with the findings and observations of these previous assessments. Detailed comments regarding these reviews are documented herein.

  13. Speed-Selector Guard For Machine Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakhshir, Roda J.; Valentine, Richard L.

    1992-01-01

    Simple guardplate prevents accidental reversal of direction of rotation or sudden change of speed of lathe, milling machine, or other machine tool. Custom-made for specific machine and control settings. Allows control lever to be placed at only one setting. Operator uses handle to slide guard to engage or disengage control lever. Protects personnel from injury and equipment from damage occurring if speed- or direction-control lever inadvertently placed in wrong position.

  14. Building and simulating protein machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katebi, Ataur Rahim

    Glycolysis is a central metabolic pathway, present in almost all organisms, that produces energy. The pathway has been extensively investigated by biochemists. There is a significant body of structural and biochemical information about this pathway. The complete pathway is a ten step process. At each step, a specific chemical reaction is catalyzed by a specific enzyme. Fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) and triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyze the fourth and the fifth steps on the pathway. This thesis investigates the possible substrate transfer mechanism between FBA and TIM. FBA cleaves its substrate, the six-carbon fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), into two three-carbon products -- glyceraldehydes 3-phosphate (GAP) and dihydroxy acetone phosphate (DHAP). One component of these two products, DHAP, is the substrate for TIM and the other component GAP goes directly to GAPDH, the subsequent enzyme on the pathway. TIM converts DHAP to GAP and delivers the product to GAPDH. I employ Elastic Network Models (ENM) to investigate the mechanistic and dynamic aspects of the functionality of FBA and TIM enzymes -- (1) the effects of the oligomerization of these two enzymes on their functional dynamics and the coordination of the individual protein's structural components along the functional region; and (2) the mechanistic synchrony of these two protein machines that may enable them to operate in a coordinated fashion as a conjugate machine -- transferring the product from FBA as substrate to TIM. A macromolecular machine comprised of FBA and TIM will facilitate the substrate catalysis mechanism and the product flow between FBA and TIM. Such a machine could be used as a functional unit in building a larger a machine for the structural modeling of the whole glycolysis pathway. Building such machines for the glycolysis pathway may reveal the interplay of the enzymes as a complete machine. Also the methods and insights developed from the efforts to build such large machines could be applied to build macromolecular structures for other biologically important clusters of interacting enzymes centered around individual metabolic pathways.

  15. UHF Low Density Radio Communications Link (LDRCL) Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) integration and OT&E operational final test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melillo, Michael R.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains the results of the Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) Integration and OT&E Operational Testing of the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Low Density Radio Communications Link's (LDRCL) Ultra-High Frequency (UHF) radio system. The OT&E testing was accomplished by first testing the LDRCL equipment against its equipment specification (FAA-E-2853A), and then performing OT&E testing at the key sites; Nina and Tonopah, Nevada. These tests prove that the UHF LDRCL equipment can fulfill its mission in the National Airspace System (NAS) and that it is suitable and effective. Based on the test results, it is concluded that the UHF LDRCL equipment is qualified for operational deployment.

  16. 1.8 gigahertz (GHz) digital Low Density Radio Communications Link (LDRCL) Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) integration and OT&E operational final test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melillo, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the results of the Operational Test and Evaluation (OT&E) Integration and OT&E Operational Testing of the Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Low Density Radio Communications Link's (LDRCL) 1.8-gigahertz (GHz) digital radio system. The OT&E testing was accomplished by first testing the LDRCL equipment against its equipment specification (FAA-E-2853) and then performing OT&E testing at the key site (Miami, Florida). These tests proved that the 1.8 GHz LDRCL equipment can fulfill its mission in the National Airspace System (NAS)l, and that, it is suitable and effective. Based on the test results, it is concluded that the 1.8 GHz LDRCL equipment is qualified for operational deployment.

  17. TOKOPS: Tokamak Reactor Operations Study: The influence of reactor operations on the design and performance of tokamaks with solid-breeder blankets: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Firestone, M.A.

    1986-09-01

    Reactor system operation and procedures have a profound impact on the conception and design of power plants. These issues are studied here using a model tokamak system employing a solid-breeder blanket. The model blanket is one which has evolved from the STARFIRE and BCSS studies. The reactor parameters are similar to those characterizing near-term fusion engineering reactors such as INTOR or NET (Next European Tokamak). Plasma startup, burn analysis, and methods for operation at various levels of output power are studied. A critical, and complicating, element is found to be the self-consistent electromagnetic response of the system, including the presence of the blanket and the resulting forces and loadings. Fractional power operation, and the strategy for burn control, is found to vary depending on the scaling law for energy confinement, and an extensive study is reported. Full-power reactor operation is at a neutron wall loading pf 5 MW/m/sup 2/ and a surface heat flux of 1 MW/m/sup 2/. The blanket is a pressurized steel module with bare beryllium rods and low-activation HT-9-(9-C-) clad LiAlO/sub 2/ rods. The helium coolant pressure is 5 MPa, entering the module at 297/sup 0/C and exiting at 550/sup 0/C. The system power output is rated at 1000 MW(e). In this report, we present our findings on various operational scenarios and their impact on system design. We first start with the salient aspects of operational physics. Time-dependent analyses of the blanket and balance of plant are then presented. Separate abstracts are included for each chapter.

  18. Machine Tool Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This task list is intended for use in planning and/or evaluating a competency-based course to prepare machine tool, drill press, grinding machine, lathe, mill, and/or power saw operators. The listing is divided into six sections, with each one outlining the tasks required to perform the duties that have been identified for the given occupation.…

  19. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition. “Guarded” means shielded,...

  20. Dishwashing--By Hand and By Machine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutman, Carol

    The illustrated manual is designed for student use in learning home dishwashing and in preparing for a job as a dishwashing-machine operator. The six parts cover vocabulary, hand dishwashing, machine dishwashing, problems and checks, special treatment of various dishes, and safety tips. The vocabulary section presents an objective and defines 22

  1. 49 CFR 236.772 - Machine, interlocking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Machine, interlocking. 236.772 Section 236.772 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, interlocking. An assemblage of manually operated levers or other devices for the control...

  2. 49 CFR 236.771 - Machine, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Machine, control. 236.771 Section 236.771 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, control. An assemblage of manually operated devices for controlling the functions of a...

  3. 49 CFR 236.771 - Machine, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Machine, control. 236.771 Section 236.771 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, control. An assemblage of manually operated devices for controlling the functions of a...

  4. 49 CFR 236.772 - Machine, interlocking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machine, interlocking. 236.772 Section 236.772 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, interlocking. An assemblage of manually operated levers or other devices for the control...

  5. 49 CFR 236.772 - Machine, interlocking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Machine, interlocking. 236.772 Section 236.772 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, interlocking. An assemblage of manually operated levers or other devices for the control...

  6. 49 CFR 236.771 - Machine, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Machine, control. 236.771 Section 236.771 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, control. An assemblage of manually operated devices for controlling the functions of a...

  7. 49 CFR 236.772 - Machine, interlocking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Machine, interlocking. 236.772 Section 236.772 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, interlocking. An assemblage of manually operated levers or other devices for the control...

  8. 49 CFR 236.772 - Machine, interlocking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Machine, interlocking. 236.772 Section 236.772 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Machine, interlocking. An assemblage of manually operated levers or other devices for the control...

  9. 29 CFR 1917.151 - Machine guarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Machine guarding. 1917.151 Section 1917.151 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) MARINE TERMINALS Related Terminal Operations and Equipment § 1917.151 Machine guarding. (a) Definition. “Guarded” means shielded,...

  10. 49 CFR 236.771 - Machine, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Machine, control. 236.771 Section 236.771..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.771 Machine, control. An assemblage of manually operated devices for controlling the functions of a...

  11. Special Machines; Apparel Manufacturing: 9377.10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    This course allows students who are interested in careers in apparel manufacturing to learn the techniques for operating the various types of special machines used for finishing garments professionally and for specialty work. Course content includes goals, specific objectives, orientation, safety practices, special machines, assembling a child's…

  12. Machine Tool Series. Duty Task List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This task list is intended for use in planning and/or evaluating a competency-based course to prepare machine tool, drill press, grinding machine, lathe, mill, and/or power saw operators. The listing is divided into six sections, with each one outlining the tasks required to perform the duties that have been identified for the given occupation.

  13. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... inspection of guards and point of operation protection devices at frequent and regular intervals....

  14. 29 CFR 1910.218 - Forging machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Machinery and Machine Guarding § 1910.218 Forging machines. (a... inspection of guards and point of operation protection devices at frequent and regular intervals....

  15. 49 CFR 236.771 - Machine, control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Machine, control. 236.771 Section 236.771..., MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Definitions § 236.771 Machine, control. An assemblage of manually operated devices for controlling the functions of a...

  16. Machine Tests Optical Fibers In Flexure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darejeh, Hadi; Thomas, Henry; Delcher, Ray

    1993-01-01

    Machine repeatedly flexes single optical fiber or cable or bundle of optical fibers at low temperature. Liquid nitrogen surrounds specimen as it is bent back and forth by motion of piston. Machine inexpensive to build and operate. Tests under repeatable conditions so candidate fibers, cables, and bundles evaluated for general robustness before subjected to expensive shock and vibration tests.

  17. Improving design and operation of multiple-hearth and fluid bed sludge incinerators. Final report, June 1984-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    The purpose of the investigation is to document improvements in design, operation, and maintenance of multiple-hearth and fluid-bed furnace incineration for combustion of sludge in municipal wastewater-treatment plants. The information contained in the report is intended to supplement and qualify information available from incinerator manufacturers and published literature. The report addresses incinerator and support systems design deficiencies and solutions, operation and maintenance problems and solutions, fuel efficient operation, upgrading of existing incinerators, administration, and personnel training.

  18. Operations and maintenance report on Air Force oil/water separators. Final report, September 1985-August 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kilroy, M.D.

    1986-10-01

    This report is intended to provide general guidance for the routine operation and maintenance of oil/water separators. The report should help managers and operators to recognize and correct problems affecting the separation process of oil and water. The most common types of gravity separators used by the Air Force are discussed. Other topics include operation guidelines, flow measurements, maintenance service, waste disposal and regulations, sampling and testing, recordkeeping and spill-prevention measures.

  19. Connection between machines durability during operation and the complex of physic-mechanical properties, formed during the production of critical parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibakov, V. G.; Pankratov, D. L.; Shibakov, R. V.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the effect of the processing technological structure on the hardening of metals and alloys by choosing the rational parameters of thermomechanical forming components at various stages of processing. The dependencies that can predict the destruction of the product during operation, depending on the structure oi the resulting metal fabrication are shown.

  20. Trends and developments in industrial machine vision: 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niel, Kurt; Heinzl, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    When following current advancements and implementations in the field of machine vision there seems to be no borders for future developments: Calculating power constantly increases, and new ideas are spreading and previously challenging approaches are introduced in to mass market. Within the past decades these advances have had dramatic impacts on our lives. Consumer electronics, e.g. computers or telephones, which once occupied large volumes, now fit in the palm of a hand. To note just a few examples e.g. face recognition was adopted by the consumer market, 3D capturing became cheap, due to the huge community SW-coding got easier using sophisticated development platforms. However, still there is a remaining gap between consumer and industrial applications. While the first ones have to be entertaining, the second have to be reliable. Recent studies (e.g. VDMA [1], Germany) show a moderately increasing market for machine vision in industry. Asking industry regarding their needs the main challenges for industrial machine vision are simple usage and reliability for the process, quick support, full automation, self/easy adjustment at changing process parameters, "forget it in the line". Furthermore a big challenge is to support quality control: Nowadays the operator has to accurately define the tested features for checking the probes. There is an upcoming development also to let automated machine vision applications find out essential parameters in a more abstract level (top down). In this work we focus on three current and future topics for industrial machine vision: Metrology supporting automation, quality control (inline/atline/offline) as well as visualization and analysis of datasets with steadily growing sizes. Finally the general trend of the pixel orientated towards object orientated evaluation is addressed. We do not directly address the field of robotics taking advances from machine vision. This is actually a fast changing area which is worth an own contribution.

  1. An industrial sewing machine variable speed controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Youngner, Frank

    The apparel industry is attempting to move in a new direction in the coming decade. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from a sit down operation to a stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with the sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. This report details a new design for a treadle to operate an industrial sewing machine that has a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator, as well as the ergonomics involved. Procedures for testing the design are included along with possible uses for the treadle in other applications besides an industrial sewing machine.

  2. An industrial sewing machine variable speed controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Christa; Spiggle, Charles; Swift, Shannon; Vangeffen, Stephen; Youngner, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The apparel industry is attempting to move in a new direction in the coming decade. Since the invention of an electrically powered sewing machine, the operator has been seated. Today, companies are switching from a sit down operation to a stand up operation involving modular stations. The old treadle worked well with the sitting operator, but problems have been found when trying to use the same treadle with a standing operator. This report details a new design for a treadle to operate an industrial sewing machine that has a standing operator. Emphasis is placed on the ease of use by the operator, as well as the ergonomics involved. Procedures for testing the design are included along with possible uses for the treadle in other applications besides an industrial sewing machine.

  3. Survey of Human Operator Modeling Techniques for Measurement Applications. Final Report for Period April 1976-December 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Patricia A.

    The purpose of this study was to review existing human operator modeling techniques and evaluate their potential utility for performance measurement applications (e.g., to support the type of flight simulation research that entails accounting for the perception and utilization of various cues). The major human operator characteristics that ought…

  4. An Instructional Program on Operation of the Tektronix 545A Oscilloscope. Final Report, February 1964-December 1965.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Robert H.; And Others

    A 368-frame programed instruction course in the operation of the Tektronix 545A Oscilloscope, together with a response booklet and an administrator's manual, is contained in the report. The oscilloscope operations taught in the program are: preset and calibration, voltage measurement, frequency measurement, comparison of waveshape to waveshape,…

  5. Ozone production from photocopying machines.

    PubMed

    Selway, M D; Allen, R J; Wadden, R A

    1980-06-01

    Ten photocopying machines of different makes and models were tested for ozone emissions. All but one produced detectable amounts. Concentrations at operator's breathing zone varied from less than 4 to 300 micrograms/m3, which corresponded to emission rates of less than 1 to 54 micrograms/copy. Servicing reduced emissions to less than 1.4 micrograms/copy, but preservicing levels were retained after several weeks of operation. PMID:7395761

  6. Ground wave emergency network. Final operational capability. Environmental assessment for south central Montana relay node, site no. RN8C925MT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-02-01

    The Ground Wave Emergency Network (GWEN) is a radio communication system designed to relay emergency messages between strategic military areas in the continental United States. The proposed action covered by this Environmental Assessment (EA) includes construction and operation of a relay node of the GWEN in south central Montana. This relay node will provide essential connections with adjacent nodes in the network. The major features of a GWEN relay node and associated environmental impacts common to all sites are addressed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Final Operational Capability (FOC) phase of GWEN. This EA is tiered from that FEIS and addresses site-specific conditions at the candidate GWEN sites (CGS's) for this particular site search area.

  7. Dredging Operations Technical-Support Program. A framework for assessing the need for seasonal restrictions on dredging and disposal operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    LaSalle, M.W.; Clarke, D.G.; Homziak, J.; Lunz, J.D.; Fredette, T.J.

    1991-07-01

    Seasonal restrictions on dredging and/or disposal operations are based upon concerns about potential dredging- or disposal-induced negative impacts to biological resources. In many cases, however, information on the degree to which either naturally occurring or dredging-induced environmental alterations directly or indirectly affect organisms is poorly quantified, in which case restrictions are based upon a reason to believe notion. This report addresses the general acceptability of seasonal restrictions through a compilation of available information on physical-chemical environmental alterations associated with dredging and disposal operations, and critical information regarding the effects of these alterations on principal biological resources. Based on this information, a method for evaluating existing or proposed seasonal restrictions on dredging and/or disposal operations is presented. This framework reflects the present understanding of effects of dredging- or disposal-induced, as well as naturally occurring, environmental alterations upon biological resources. In many cases, the magnitude of dredging- or disposal-induced alterations falls well within the range of naturally occurring phenomena and imposes little or no additional stress upon resource populations. In some cases, however, the magnitude of alterations may exceed that which occurs naturally, whereby concerns about dredging- or disposal-induced alterations are justified and should be considered when planning a project.

  8. Chip breaking system for automated machine tool

    DOEpatents

    Arehart, Theodore A.; Carey, Donald O.

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a rotary selectively directional valve assembly for use in an automated turret lathe for directing a stream of high pressure liquid machining coolant to the interface of a machine tool and workpiece for breaking up ribbon-shaped chips during the formation thereof so as to inhibit scratching or other marring of the machined surfaces by these ribbon-shaped chips. The valve assembly is provided by a manifold arrangement having a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart ports each coupled to a machine tool. The manifold is rotatable with the turret when the turret is positioned for alignment of a machine tool in a machining relationship with the workpiece. The manifold is connected to a non-rotational header having a single passageway therethrough which conveys the high pressure coolant to only the port in the manifold which is in registry with the tool disposed in a working relationship with the workpiece. To position the machine tools the turret is rotated and one of the tools is placed in a material-removing relationship of the workpiece. The passageway in the header and one of the ports in the manifold arrangement are then automatically aligned to supply the machining coolant to the machine tool workpiece interface for breaking up of the chips as well as cooling the tool and workpiece during the machining operation.

  9. Scaling up: Distributed machine learning with cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Provost, F.J.; Hennessy, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    Machine-learning methods are becoming increasingly popular for automated data analysis. However, standard methods do not scale up to massive scientific and business data sets without expensive hardware. This paper investigates a practical alternative for scaling up: the use of distributed processing to take advantage of the often dormant PCs and workstations available on local networks. Each workstation runs a common rule-learning program on a subset of the data. We first show that for commonly used rule-evaluation criteria, a simple form of cooperation can guarantee that a rule will look good to the set of cooperating learners if and only if it would look good to a single learner operating with the entire data set. We then show how such a system can further capitalize on different perspectives by sharing learned knowledge for significant reduction in search effort. We demonstrate the power of the method by learning from a massive data set taken from the domain of cellular fraud detection. Finally, we provide an overview of other methods for scaling up machine learning.

  10. Face Recognition in Humans and Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, Alice; Tistarelli, Massimo

    The study of human face recognition by psychologists and neuroscientists has run parallel to the development of automatic face recognition technologies by computer scientists and engineers. In both cases, there are analogous steps of data acquisition, image processing, and the formation of representations that can support the complex and diverse tasks we accomplish with faces. These processes can be understood and compared in the context of their neural and computational implementations. In this chapter, we present the essential elements of face recognition by humans and machines, taking a perspective that spans psychological, neural, and computational approaches. From the human side, we overview the methods and techniques used in the neurobiology of face recognition, the underlying neural architecture of the system, the role of visual attention, and the nature of the representations that emerges. From the computational side, we discuss face recognition technologies and the strategies they use to overcome challenges to robust operation over viewing parameters. Finally, we conclude the chapter with a look at some recent studies that compare human and machine performances at face recognition.

  11. Alcohol production from cheese, whey and corn for a farm-size operation. Final report, July-December 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Helstad, S.

    1981-12-24

    The goal of this project was to construct a farm size alcohol distillery, capable of producing 200,000 gallons per year of equivalent 200 proof alcohol that is both labor and energy efficient. The distillery was completed in October and was operated on a weekly basis. It has taken until mid-November to work many of the bugs out. This operation is now capable of demonstrating the energy consumption and economics of producing alcohol on a small scale. The data and conclusions that can be made from results achieved so far are: (1) a batch process can be energy efficient if it operates at an optimum level; (2) the cost of producing alcohol in small batch operations is likely to be prohibitive; and (3) it is doubtful a farmer could construct a small, efficient distillery alone.

  12. Attaching Chuck Keys to Machine Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, V.

    1984-01-01

    Chuck keys attached to portable machine tools by retracting lanyards. Lanyard held taut by recoil caddy attached to tool base. Chuck key available for use when needed and safely secured during operation of tool.

  13. Mill profiler machines soft materials accurately

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    Mill profiler machines bevels, slots, and grooves in soft materials, such as styrofoam phenolic-filled cores, to any desired thickness. A single operator can accurately control cutting depths in contour or straight line work.

  14. Installation and evaluation of a nuclear power plant Operator Advisor based on artificial intelligence technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hajek, B.K.; Miller, D.W.

    1993-02-01

    The Artificial Intelligence Group in the Nuclear Engineering Program has designed and built an Operator Advisor (OA), an AI system to monitor nuclear power plant parameters, detect component and system malfunctions, dispose their causes, and provide the plant operators with the correct procedures for mitigating the consequences of the malfunctions. It then monitors performance of the procedures, and provides backup steps when specific operator actions fail. The OA has been implemented on Sun 4 workstations in Common Lisp, and has been interfaced to run in real time on the Perry Nuclear Power Plant full-function simulator in the plant training department. The eventual goal for a fully functioning Operator Advisor would be to have reactor operators receive direction for all plant operations. Such a goal requires considerable testing of the system within limited malfunction boundaries, an extensive Verification & Validation (V&V) effort, a large knowledge base development effort, and development of tools as part of the system to automate its maintenance. Clearly, these efforts are beyond the scope of the feasibility effort expended during this project period. However, as a result of this project, we have an AI based platform upon which a complete system can be built.

  15. Alpha Channeling in Mirror Machines

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch N.J.

    2005-10-19

    Because of their engineering simplicity, high-β, and steady-state operation, mirror machines and related open-trap machines such as gas dynamic traps, are an attractive concept for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. In these open-trap machines, the confinement occurs by means of magnetic mirroring, without the magnetic field lines closing upon themselves within the region of particle confinement. Unfortunately, these concepts have not achieved to date very spectacular laboratory results, and their reactor prospects are dimmed by the prospect of a low Q-factor, the ratio of fusion power produced to auxiliary power. Nonetheless, because of its engineering promise, over the years numerous improvements have been proposed to enhance the reactor prospects of mirror fusion, such as tandem designs, end-plugging, and electric potential barriers.

  16. Minimal universal quantum heat machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D.; Alicki, R.; Kurizki, G.

    2013-01-01

    In traditional thermodynamics the Carnot cycle yields the ideal performance bound of heat engines and refrigerators. We propose and analyze a minimal model of a heat machine that can play a similar role in quantum regimes. The minimal model consists of a single two-level system with periodically modulated energy splitting that is permanently, weakly, coupled to two spectrally separated heat baths at different temperatures. The equation of motion allows us to compute the stationary power and heat currents in the machine consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. This dual-purpose machine can act as either an engine or a refrigerator (heat pump) depending on the modulation rate. In both modes of operation, the maximal Carnot efficiency is reached at zero power. We study the conditions for finite-time optimal performance for several variants of the model. Possible realizations of the model are discussed.

  17. Minimal universal quantum heat machine.

    PubMed

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D; Alicki, R; Kurizki, G

    2013-01-01

    In traditional thermodynamics the Carnot cycle yields the ideal performance bound of heat engines and refrigerators. We propose and analyze a minimal model of a heat machine that can play a similar role in quantum regimes. The minimal model consists of a single two-level system with periodically modulated energy splitting that is permanently, weakly, coupled to two spectrally separated heat baths at different temperatures. The equation of motion allows us to compute the stationary power and heat currents in the machine consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. This dual-purpose machine can act as either an engine or a refrigerator (heat pump) depending on the modulation rate. In both modes of operation, the maximal Carnot efficiency is reached at zero power. We study the conditions for finite-time optimal performance for several variants of the model. Possible realizations of the model are discussed. PMID:23410316

  18. Participation in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Electric and Hybrid Vehicle Site Operator`s Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Center for Electrochemical Systems and Hydrogen Research (CESHR), a department of the Texas Engineering Station (TEES) at Texas A and M University (TAMU), has been involved in education, demonstration, research development, and testing of EVs and their components since 1988. CESHR`s participation in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Electric Vehicle and Site Operators` Programs (SOP) started in August 1991. The South Central Electric Vehicle Consortium (SCEVC), a CESHR-lead group of utilities and private companies in Texas and neighboring States, was organized at about the same time. The SCEVC has helped bring together electric vehicle (EV) fleet owners and operators in the south-central region of the country (Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana). The DOE, the SCEVC, TEES and the State of Texas Governor`s Energy Management Office supported the demonstration and field testing of EVs in the region. CESHR was, and continues to be, actively involved in the research in new materials for advanced batteries and in proton exchange membrane fuel cells for transportation applications. The above efforts at CESHR have been carried out by a dedicated team of engineering and electrochemical staff and graduate and undergraduate students in chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering. The projects were supported by a cost share of 40%. The laboratory facilities available at CESHR are fully equipped for testing EV batteries of different technologies on programmable load profiles and other EV components.

  19. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix C: Anadromous Fish and Juvenile Fish Transportation.

    SciTech Connect

    Columbia River System Operation Review

    1995-11-01

    This Appendix C of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Columbia River System discusses impacts on andromous fish and juvenile fish transportation. The principal andromous fish in the Columbia basin include salmonid species (Chinook, coho, and sockeye salmon, and steelhead) and nonsalmoinid andromous species (sturgeon, lamprey, and shad). Major sections in this document include the following: background, scope and process; affected environment for salmon and steelhead, shaded, lamprey, sturgeon; study methods; description of alternatives: qualitative and quantitative findings.

  20. Method of fabricating a micro machine

    SciTech Connect

    Stalford, Harold L

    2014-11-11

    A micro machine may be in or less than the micrometer domain. The micro machine may include a micro actuator and a micro shaft coupled to the micro actuator. The micro shaft is operable to be driven by the micro actuator. A tool is coupled to the micro shaft and is operable to perform work in response to at least motion of the micro shaft.

  1. Virtual Machine Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasso, Christopher; Page, Dennis; O'Reilly, Taifun; Fteichert, Ralph; Lock, Patricia; Lin, Imin; Naviaux, Keith; Sisino, John

    2005-01-01

    Virtual Machine Language (VML) is a mission-independent, reusable software system for programming for spacecraft operations. Features of VML include a rich set of data types, named functions, parameters, IF and WHILE control structures, polymorphism, and on-the-fly creation of spacecraft commands from calculated values. Spacecraft functions can be abstracted into named blocks that reside in files aboard the spacecraft. These named blocks accept parameters and execute in a repeatable fashion. The sizes of uplink products are minimized by the ability to call blocks that implement most of the command steps. This block approach also enables some autonomous operations aboard the spacecraft, such as aerobraking, telemetry conditional monitoring, and anomaly response, without developing autonomous flight software. Operators on the ground write blocks and command sequences in a concise, high-level, human-readable programming language (also called VML ). A compiler translates the human-readable blocks and command sequences into binary files (the operations products). The flight portion of VML interprets the uplinked binary files. The ground subsystem of VML also includes an interactive sequence- execution tool hosted on workstations, which runs sequences at several thousand times real-time speed, affords debugging, and generates reports. This tool enables iterative development of blocks and sequences within times of the order of seconds.

  2. Smart Test Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Vern Wedeven, president of Wedeven Associates, developed the WAM4, a computer-aided "smart" test machine for simulating stress on equipment, based on his bearing lubrication expertise gained while working for Lewis Research Center. During his NASA years from the 1970s into the early 1980s, Wedeven initiated an "Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Tribology," an effort that involved NASA, six universities, and several university professors. The NASA-sponsored work provided foundation for Wedeven in 1983 to form his own company. Several versions of the smart test machine, the WAM1, WAM2, and WAM3, have proceeded the current version, WAM4. This computer-controlled device can provide detailed glimpses at gear and bearing points of contact. WAM4 can yield a three-dimensional view of machinery as an operator adds "what-if" thermal and lubrication conditions, contact stress, and surface motion. Along with NASA, a number of firms, including Pratt & Whitney, Caterpillar Tractor, Exxon, and Chevron have approached Wedeven for help on resolving lubrication problems.

  3. The Final Count Down: A Review of Three Decades of Flight Controller Training Methods for Space Shuttle Mission Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittermore, Gary; Bertels, Christie

    2011-01-01

    Operations of human spaceflight systems is extremely complex; therefore, the training and certification of operations personnel is a critical piece of ensuring mission success. Mission Control Center (MCC-H), at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, manages mission operations for the Space Shuttle Program, including the training and certification of the astronauts and flight control teams. An overview of a flight control team s makeup and responsibilities during a flight, and details on how those teams are trained and certified, reveals that while the training methodology for developing flight controllers has evolved significantly over the last thirty years the core goals and competencies have remained the same. In addition, the facilities and tools used in the control center have evolved. Changes in methodology and tools have been driven by many factors, including lessons learned, technology, shuttle accidents, shifts in risk posture, and generational differences. Flight controllers share their experiences in training and operating the space shuttle. The primary training method throughout the program has been mission simulations of the orbit, ascent, and entry phases, to truly train like you fly. A review of lessons learned from flight controller training suggests how they could be applied to future human spaceflight endeavors, including missions to the moon or to Mars. The lessons learned from operating the space shuttle for over thirty years will help the space industry build the next human transport space vehicle.

  4. JBK-75 stainless steel machinability study

    SciTech Connect

    McManigle, A.P.; Simonis, A.W.

    1993-09-02

    The study on forgings characterized machinability of the material by varying cutting speeds and feedrates utilizing four tools for the roughing operation and four tools for the semi-finish operation. Tools tested were obtained from four manufacturers. Twelve parts were machined utilizing an experimental design to determine all possible interactions between cutting speeds and feedrates. To evaluate the machinability of the material, quantitative measures in tool life, tool wear, surface finish, chip control, and material removal rates were analyzed. Benefits gained from this study are: higher material removal rates, longer tool life, minimal tool wear, improved chip control and reliability, increased productivity, and cost minimization.

  5. Passively operated spool valve for drain-down freeze protection of thermosyphon water heaters. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1982-04-30

    The work done to extend the existing drain-down valve technology to provide passive drain-down freeze protection for thermosyphon-based solar water heaters is described. The basic design of the existing valve model is that of a spool valve, employing a cylindrical spool which moves axially in a mating cartridge to open and close o-rings at the two operating extremes (drain and operate) to perform the valving function. Three passive actuators to drive the basic valving mechanism were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two piping configurations used to integrate the spool valve with the thermosyphon system are described, as are the passive actuators. The three actuator designs are: photovoltaic driven, refrigerant-based bellows, and heat motor cable-drive designs. Costs are compared for the alternative actuator designs, and operating characteristics were examined for the thermosyphon system, including field tests. The market for the valve for thermosyphon systems is then assessed. (LEW)

  6. Hard Machinable Machining of Cobalt Super Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ?ep, Robert; Jansek, Adam; Petr?, Jana; ?epov, Lenka; Sadlek, Marek; Kratochvl, Ji?

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with difficult-to-machine cobalt super alloys. The main aim is to test the basic properties of cobalt super alloys and propose suitable cutting materials and machining parameters under the designation 188 when machining. Although the development of technology in chipless machining such as moulding, precision casting and other manufacturing methods continues to advance, machining is still the leading choice for piece production, typical for energy and chemical engineering. Nowadays, super alloys are commonly used in turbine engines in regions that are subject to high temperatures, which require high strength, high temperature resistance, phase stability, as well as corrosion or oxidation resistance.

  7. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  8. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  9. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  10. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  11. 40 CFR 63.462 - Batch cold cleaning machine standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Batch cold cleaning machine standards... National Emission Standards for Halogenated Solvent Cleaning § 63.462 Batch cold cleaning machine standards. (a) Each owner or operator of an immersion batch cold solvent cleaning machine shall comply with...

  12. 49 CFR 214.341 - Roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Roadway maintenance machines. 214.341 Section 214... Roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each employer shall include in its on-track safety program specific provisions for the safety of roadway workers who operate or work near roadway maintenance machines....

  13. 49 CFR 214.341 - Roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Roadway maintenance machines. 214.341 Section 214... Roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each employer shall include in its on-track safety program specific provisions for the safety of roadway workers who operate or work near roadway maintenance machines....

  14. 49 CFR 214.341 - Roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Roadway maintenance machines. 214.341 Section 214... Roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each employer shall include in its on-track safety program specific provisions for the safety of roadway workers who operate or work near roadway maintenance machines....

  15. 49 CFR 214.341 - Roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Roadway maintenance machines. 214.341 Section 214... Roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each employer shall include in its on-track safety program specific provisions for the safety of roadway workers who operate or work near roadway maintenance machines....

  16. 49 CFR 214.341 - Roadway maintenance machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Roadway maintenance machines. 214.341 Section 214... Roadway maintenance machines. (a) Each employer shall include in its on-track safety program specific provisions for the safety of roadway workers who operate or work near roadway maintenance machines....

  17. Fluctuation as a tool of biological molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism for biological molecular machines is different from that of man-made ones. Recently single molecule measurements and other experiments have revealed unique operations where biological molecular machines exploit thermal fluctuation in response to small inputs of energy or signals to achieve their function. Understanding and applying this mechanism to engineering offers new artificial machine designs. PMID:18583025

  18. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., movement, and timing to allow the tank vessel to pass the inspections under § 157.140. (c) Each COW machine... of the movement of the COW machine during COW operations. (h) Each multi-nozzle COW machine that is mounted to the deck must have a means located outside of the cargo tank that indicates the movement of...

  19. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., movement, and timing to allow the tank vessel to pass the inspections under § 157.140. (c) Each COW machine... of the movement of the COW machine during COW operations. (h) Each multi-nozzle COW machine that is mounted to the deck must have a means located outside of the cargo tank that indicates the movement of...

  20. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., movement, and timing to allow the tank vessel to pass the inspections under § 157.140. (c) Each COW machine... of the movement of the COW machine during COW operations. (h) Each multi-nozzle COW machine that is mounted to the deck must have a means located outside of the cargo tank that indicates the movement of...

  1. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., movement, and timing to allow the tank vessel to pass the inspections under § 157.140. (c) Each COW machine... of the movement of the COW machine during COW operations. (h) Each multi-nozzle COW machine that is mounted to the deck must have a means located outside of the cargo tank that indicates the movement of...

  2. 33 CFR 157.124 - COW tank washing machines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., movement, and timing to allow the tank vessel to pass the inspections under § 157.140. (c) Each COW machine... of the movement of the COW machine during COW operations. (h) Each multi-nozzle COW machine that is mounted to the deck must have a means located outside of the cargo tank that indicates the movement of...

  3. 4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF VERTICAL BORING MACHINE. (Bullard) Vertical turning lathe (VTL). Machining the fixture for GE Turboshroud. G.S. O'Brien, operator. - Juniata Shops, Machine Shop No. 1, East of Fourth Avenue at Third Street, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  4. Looking west at Machine Shop (Bldg. 163) south bay interior. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking west at Machine Shop (Bldg. 163) south bay interior. Note the Shaw 15-ton bridge crane. This portion of the building housed machine tools and locomotive component repair functions that supported the erecting shop operations - Atchison, Topeka, Santa Fe Railroad, Albuquerque Shops, Machine Shop, 908 Second Street, Southwest, Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, NM

  5. Design and Experimental Validation for Direct-Drive Fault-Tolerant Permanent-Magnet Vernier Machines

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guohai; Yang, Junqin; Chen, Ming; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    A fault-tolerant permanent-magnet vernier (FT-PMV) machine is designed for direct-drive applications, incorporating the merits of high torque density and high reliability. Based on the so-called magnetic gearing effect, PMV machines have the ability of high torque density by introducing the flux-modulation poles (FMPs). This paper investigates the fault-tolerant characteristic of PMV machines and provides a design method, which is able to not only meet the fault-tolerant requirements but also keep the ability of high torque density. The operation principle of the proposed machine has been analyzed. The design process and optimization are presented specifically, such as the combination of slots and poles, the winding distribution, and the dimensions of PMs and teeth. By using the time-stepping finite element method (TS-FEM), the machine performances are evaluated. Finally, the FT-PMV machine is manufactured, and the experimental results are presented to validate the theoretical analysis. PMID:25045729

  6. Design and experimental validation for direct-drive fault-tolerant permanent-magnet vernier machines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guohai; Yang, Junqin; Chen, Ming; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    A fault-tolerant permanent-magnet vernier (FT-PMV) machine is designed for direct-drive applications, incorporating the merits of high torque density and high reliability. Based on the so-called magnetic gearing effect, PMV machines have the ability of high torque density by introducing the flux-modulation poles (FMPs). This paper investigates the fault-tolerant characteristic of PMV machines and provides a design method, which is able to not only meet the fault-tolerant requirements but also keep the ability of high torque density. The operation principle of the proposed machine has been analyzed. The design process and optimization are presented specifically, such as the combination of slots and poles, the winding distribution, and the dimensions of PMs and teeth. By using the time-stepping finite element method (TS-FEM), the machine performances are evaluated. Finally, the FT-PMV machine is manufactured, and the experimental results are presented to validate the theoretical analysis. PMID:25045729

  7. ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE FINAL GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION, TEST AREA NORTH, OPERABLE UNIT 1-07B, FISCAL YEAR 2009

    SciTech Connect

    FORSYTHE, HOWARD S

    2010-04-14

    This Annual Report presents the data and evaluates the progress of the three-component remedy implemented for remediation of groundwater contamination at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Overall, each component is achieving progress toward the goal of total plume remediation. In situ bioremediation operations in the hot spot continue to operate as planned. Progress toward the remedy objectives is being made, as evidenced by continued reduction in the amount of accessible residual source and decreases in downgradient contaminant flux, with the exception of TAN-28. The injection strategy is maintaining effective anaerobic reductive dechlorination conditions, as evidenced by complete degradation of trichloroethene and ethene production in the biologically active wells. In the medial zone, the New Pump and Treat Facility operated in standby mode. Trichloroethene concentrations in the medial zone wells are significantly lower than the historically defined concentration range of 1,000 to 20,000 μg/L. The trichloroethene concentrations in TAN-33, TAN-36, and TAN-44 continue to be below 200 μg/L. Monitoring in the distal zone wells outside and downgradient of the plume boundary demonstrate that some plume expansion has occurred, but less than the amount allowed in the Record of Decision Amendment. Additional data need to be collected for wells in the monitored natural attenuation part of the plume to confirm that the monitored natural attenuation part of the remedy is proceeding as predicted in the modeling.

  8. A Fire Safety Certification System for Board and Care Operators and Staff. SBIR Phase I: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Bonnie L.

    This report describes the development and pilot testing of a fire safety certification system for board and care operators and staff who serve clients with developmental disabilities. During Phase 1, training materials were developed, including a trainer's manual, a participant's coursebook a videotape, an audiotape, and a pre-/post test which was…

  9. A Study of Operator and Mechanic Training Needs in the Transit Industry. Volume I, Findings and Conclusions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Harold L.; And Others

    Surveys of 188 transit properties and on-site visits were conducted to determine training needs of operators and mechanics in the urban mass transportation industry. Volume I presents findings and conclusions of the study with reference to survey methodology, site visit interviews and observations, questionnaire results, and specific…

  10. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  11. Capacity of Air Force Operational Units to Conduct On-the-Job Training. Development of Estimation Methodology. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueter, Fred H.; And Others

    This technical report documents the development and initial empirical testing of a practical method for estimating the capacity of Air Force operational units to conduct on-the-job training (OJT). The method is based on a conceptual model of OJT capacity that describes the complex interrelationships among the level and quality of mission…

  12. A Study of Operator and Mechnaic Training Needs in the Transit Industry. Volume II, Appendices. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Harold L.; And Others

    Surveys of 188 transit properties and on-site visits were conducted to determine the training needs of operators and mechanics in the urban mass transportation industry. The appendices include listings of respondents and sample copies of the survey questionnaires and visit reports. (NTIS)

  13. Final Report for LDRD Project 05-ERD-050: "Developing a Reactive Chemistry Capability for the NARAC Operational Model (LODI)"

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron-Smith, P; Grant, K; Connell, P

    2008-02-11

    In support of the National Security efforts of LLNL, this project addressed the existing imbalance between dispersion and chemical capabilities of LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator--the NARAC operational dispersion model). We have demonstrated potentially large effects of atmospheric chemistry on the impact of chemical releases (e.g., industrial chemicals and nerve agents). Prior to our work, LODI could only handle chains of first-order losses (exponential decays) that were independent of time and space, limiting NARAC's capability to respond when reactive chemistry is important. We significantly upgraded the chemistry and aerosol capability of LODI to handle (1) arbitrary networks of chemical reactions, (2) mixing and reactions with ambient species, (3) evaporation and condensation of aerosols, and (4) heat liberated from chemical reactions and aerosol condensation (which can cause a cold and dense plume hugging the ground to rise into the atmosphere, then descend to the ground again as droplets). When this is made operational, it will significantly improve NARAC's ability to respond to terrorist attacks and industrial accidents that involve reactive chemistry, including many chemical agents and toxic industrial chemicals (TICS). As a dual-use, the resulting model also has the potential to be a state-of-the-art air-quality model. Chemical releases are the most common type of airborne hazardous release and many operational applications involve such scenarios. The new capability we developed is therefore relevant to the needs of the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Department of Defense (DoD).

  14. Instructor/Operator Station Design Handbook for Aircrew Training Devices. Final Technical Report for Period March 1982-December 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, H. D.

    Human engineering guidelines for the design of instructor/operator stations (IOSs) for aircrew training devices are provided in this handbook. These guidelines specify the preferred configuration of IOS equipment across the range of the anticipated user sizes and performance capabilities. The guidelines are consolidated from various human…

  15. Functional Design of an Automated Instructional Support System for Operational Flight Trainers. Final Report, June 1976 through September 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semple, Clarence A.; And Others

    Functional requirements for a highly automated, flexible, instructional support system for aircrew training simulators are presented. Automated support modes and associated features and capabilities are described, along with hardware and software functional requirements for implementing a baseline system in an operational flight training context.…

  16. Design, construction, operation and evaluation of a prototype culm combustion boiler/heater unit. Final design of prototype unit

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    A final design of a prototype anthracite culm combustion boiler has been accomplished under Phase I of DOE Contract ET-78-C-01-3269. The prototype boiler has been designed to generate 20,000 pounds per hour of 150 psig saturated steam using low Btu (4000 Btu per pound) anthracite culm as a fuel. This boiler will be located at the industrial park of the Shamokin Area Industrial Corporation (SAIC). This program is directed at demonstrating the commercial viability of anthracite culm fueled FBC steam generation systems.

  17. Tube Alinement for Machining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, J.

    1984-01-01

    Tool with stepped shoulders alines tubes for machining in preparation for welding. Alinement with machine tool axis accurate to within 5 mils (0.13mm) and completed much faster than visual setup by machinist.

  18. Underwater milling machine system for core barrel repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, A.W.; Smith, E.H.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses an underwater machining system for the repair and maintenance of nuclear vessels. It comprises a platform with means for supporting the platform in a substantially horizontal plane; a machining device detachably connectable to the platform comprising a milling or boring machine and a spacial positioning means for locating the milling or boring machines in a precise working position. The spacial positioning means including adjustment means for movement of the milling or boring machine along its X Y and Z axes; a guide means for automatically aligning the machining device on the platform, so that when the detachable machining device is lowered from a detached position above the platform. The guide means automatically aligns the machining device to the platform; and a remote control means for operating the spacial positioning means and the milling or boring machine.

  19. Analytical design of intelligent machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saridis, George N.; Valavanis, Kimon P.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of designing 'intelligent machines' to operate in uncertain environments with minimum supervision or interaction with a human operator is examined. The structure of an 'intelligent machine' is defined to be the structure of a Hierarchically Intelligent Control System, composed of three levels hierarchically ordered according to the principle of 'increasing precision with decreasing intelligence', namely: the organizational level, performing general information processing tasks in association with a long-term memory; the coordination level, dealing with specific information processing tasks with a short-term memory; and the control level, which performs the execution of various tasks through hardware using feedback control methods. The behavior of such a machine may be managed by controls with special considerations and its 'intelligence' is directly related to the derivation of a compatible measure that associates the intelligence of the higher levels with the concept of entropy, which is a sufficient analytic measure that unifies the treatment of all the levels of an 'intelligent machine' as the mathematical problem of finding the right sequence of internal decisions and controls for a system structured in the order of intelligence and inverse order of precision such that it minimizes its total entropy. A case study on the automatic maintenance of a nuclear plant illustrates the proposed approach.

  20. Reverse vending machine update

    SciTech Connect

    Rypins, S.; Papke, C.

    1986-02-01

    The document discusses reverse vending machines. Placed outdoors in supermarket parking lots or indoors in the lobby of the grocery market, these hightech machines exchange aluminum cans (or other containers in more specialized machines) for cash, coupons or redeemable receipts. The placement of reverse venders (RV) in or near supermarkets has made recycling more visible and more convenient, although the machines have yet to fully reach industry goals.