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Sample records for macrauchenia patachonica owen

  1. The Owens Valley LWA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Gregg

    2014-04-01

    The Owens Valley LWA is a new array of 256 dual polarization antennas at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). It hosts the LEDA correlator, which provides full cross-correlation capability and enables instantaneous snapshot imaging of most of the viewable sky, as well as a dedicated back-end for transient searching. Developed in collaboration between Caltech, JPL and the LEDA and LWA consortia, the array targets the 28-88 MHz band with primary focus on high redshift HI (Dark Ages), radio transients (particularly radio exoplanets), solar dynamic imaging spectroscopy and measurement of coronal magnetic fields, and production of a full-Stokes, low frequency, all-sky catalog. The array comprises a 230m diameter dense core and outriggers at 365m capable of imaging with a resolution of 1 degree. Over the next 12 months, 32 additional antennas will be installed, powered by solar panels and serviced by optical fiber, with the goal of delivering instantaneous all-sky images with ~10' resolution. The associated data rate for the latter array will be extremely large, at 1.5 GB per integration, corresponding to 45,000 baselines x 4 polarizations x 2000 channels (60 MHz). Our collaboration is also working towards a much larger next generation array for study of HI and transients, sited at or near the Owens Valley observatory. I will briefly discuss some of the related ongoing technical development and data processing challenges.

  2. Braid My Hair - Randy Owen sings out for sick children

    MedlinePlus

    ... 25 years, Randy Owen led one of country music's most popular groups, Alabama. After selling more than ... a solo career. Owen is about more than music, however. In 1989, he helped start the Country ...

  3. Surface slip during large Owens Valley earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddon, E. K.; Amos, C. B.; Zielke, O.; Jayko, A. S.; Bürgmann, R.

    2016-06-01

    The 1872 Owens Valley earthquake is the third largest known historical earthquake in California. Relatively sparse field data and a complex rupture trace, however, inhibited attempts to fully resolve the slip distribution and reconcile the total moment release. We present a new, comprehensive record of surface slip based on lidar and field investigation, documenting 162 new measurements of laterally and vertically displaced landforms for 1872 and prehistoric Owens Valley earthquakes. Our lidar analysis uses a newly developed analytical tool to measure fault slip based on cross-correlation of sublinear topographic features and to produce a uniquely shaped probability density function (PDF) for each measurement. Stacking PDFs along strike to form cumulative offset probability distribution plots (COPDs) highlights common values corresponding to single and multiple-event displacements. Lateral offsets for 1872 vary systematically from ˜1.0 to 6.0 m and average 3.3 ± 1.1 m (2σ). Vertical offsets are predominantly east-down between ˜0.1 and 2.4 m, with a mean of 0.8 ± 0.5 m. The average lateral-to-vertical ratio compiled at specific sites is ˜6:1. Summing displacements across subparallel, overlapping rupture traces implies a maximum of 7-11 m and net average of 4.4 ± 1.5 m, corresponding to a geologic Mw ˜7.5 for the 1872 event. We attribute progressively higher-offset lateral COPD peaks at 7.1 ± 2.0 m, 12.8 ± 1.5 m, and 16.6 ± 1.4 m to three earlier large surface ruptures. Evaluating cumulative displacements in context with previously dated landforms in Owens Valley suggests relatively modest rates of fault slip, averaging between ˜0.6 and 1.6 mm/yr (1σ) over the late Quaternary.

  4. Mineral deficiencies in tule elk, Owens Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Heather E; Bleich, Vernon C; Krausman, Paul R

    2007-01-01

    Male tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) are susceptible to high rates of antler breakage in Owens Valley, California. We hypothesized that a mineral deficiency in the diet predisposed male elk to antler breakage. We analyzed elk antler, liver, and forage samples to identify mineral imbalances. We compared the mineral content of livers and antlers from elk in Owens Valley to samples taken from tule elk at Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, a population experiencing normal rates (<5%) of antler breakage. Antler and liver samples were collected from 1989 to 1993, and in 2002, and were tested for calcium (Ca), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), phosphorus (P), sulfur (S), and zinc (Zn). Mineral levels from antler and liver samples were compared to reference values established for elk and deer. We also compared the mineral content of elk forage in Owens Valley, collected in 2002-03, to dietary reference values established for cattle. In antlers, Ca, Fe, and Mg levels were higher in Owens Valley elk than in Grizzly Island elk, although all mineral levels were lower than reference values established for deer antlers. In liver samples, Cu levels from elk in Owens Valley were lower than those from Grizzly Island and lower than minimum reference values; liver Ca and Mo levels were higher in elk from Owens Valley than in those from Grizzly Island. Compared to reference values, elk forage in Owens Valley had high levels of Ca and Mo, and low levels of Cu, P, and Zn. Mineral analyses from antlers, livers, and forage suggest that tule elk in the Owens Valley are Cu and/or P deficient. High levels of Mo and Ca may exacerbate Cu and P deficiencies, respectively. Bone fragility is a symptom of both deficiencies, and an imbalance in Cu, P, or a combination of both, may predispose male tule elk in the Owens Valley to antler breakage. PMID:17347394

  5. Braid My Hair - Randy Owen sings out for sick children

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Braid My Hair - Randy Owen sings out for sick children Past ... debut performance of his latest song, "Braid My Hair," was the highlight during this year's Songwriter's Dinner ...

  6. 110. Photocopy of plate opposite page 19 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. Photocopy of plate opposite page 19 in Owen, Hints. CAMPANILE, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, FROM THE NORTH-EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 108. Photocopy of frontispiece in Owen, Hints. MAIN ENTRANCE, NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Photocopy of frontispiece in Owen, Hints. MAIN ENTRANCE, NORTH FRONT, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 107. Photocopy of plate opposite page 104 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    107. Photocopy of plate opposite page 104 in Owen, Hints. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION, FROM THE NORTH-EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. 112. Photocopy of plate opposite page 43 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. Photocopy of plate opposite page 43 in Owen, Hints. CENTRAL SOUTHERN TOWER, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION; FROM THE SOUTH-WEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. 113. Photocopy of illustration on page 109 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. Photocopy of illustration on page 109 in Owen, Hints. SOUTHERN GATEWAY, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 109. Photocopy of plate opposite page 75 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Photocopy of plate opposite page 75 in Owen, Hints. WEST WING, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION: FROM THE NORTH-EAST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 106. Photocopy of plate opposite pge 99 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Photocopy of plate opposite pge 99 in Owen, Hints. GOTHIC DESIGN FOR SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  13. 111. Photocopy of plate opposite page 108 in Owen, Hints. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Photocopy of plate opposite page 108 in Owen, Hints. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION FROM THE SOUTH WEST - Smithsonian Institution Building, 1000 Jefferson Drive, between Ninth & Twelfth Streets, Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. Richard Owen and the sea-serpent.

    PubMed

    Regal, Brian

    2012-06-01

    The well known naturalist, Richard Owen, had a career long engagement with monstrous creatures. In the 1830s he famously christened large fossil reptiles, Dinosauria. He investigated fossil marine reptiles as well as the giant moa. He also looked into the sea-serpents and sea monsters then drawing wide public attention. He actively collected letters and analyzed correspondence on the topic, consulted with the admiralty on reports of Royal Navy encounters and sightings, and commented in the public press. He concluded that such reports were based upon misidentifications of whales and other large marine mammals, and not run-ins with mythological creatures. His work on the sea-serpent shows that rather than discount the idea out of hand, a number of high profile naturalists were intrigued by monsters and attempted to understand what they were. His work is key to understanding the skepticism over monsters held by modern mainstream science. This skepticism opened the field to later amateur investigators. PMID:22305471

  15. Owen Martin Phillips (1930-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Owen Martin Phillips, a pioneer in geophysical fluid dynamics, died at home on 13 October 2010 in Chestertown, Md., at the age of 79. To his many friends and colleagues, Phillips was an inspirational and gracious person who combined a deep intellect, a lively spirit, and a generous heart that matched his passionate interest in the geophysical sciences. Phillips was born on 30 December 1930 in Parramatta, N. S. W., Australia. In 1948 he enrolled in the University of Sydney, where he earned a B.S. in applied mathematics in 1952. That same year, he joined the Cavendish Laboratory at Cambridge University as a research student, where he began to apply to the ocean concepts in turbulent flow recently developed by Andrei Kolmogorov, G. I. Taylor, and George Batchelor. While attending the 1956 celebration of Taylor's seventieth birthday, Phillips heard Fritz Ursell declare that “the process by which ocean waves are generated by the wind cannot be regarded as known.” In 1957 the Journal of Fluid Mechanics contained two remarkable papers offering contrasting theories for ocean wave generation. One paper, by the applied mathematician John Miles (J. Fluid Mech., 2(5), 417-445, 1957), proposed that energy transfer from the air to the sea occurs at a critical layer in the atmosphere boundary layer. The other paper, by Phillips, then 26 years old (J. Fluid Mech., 3(2), 185-204, 1957), proposed that turbulent pressure fluctuations in the wind resonate with propagating ocean waves, forcing them to grow. Together these became known as the Phillips-Miles process, and it was the opening salvo in Phillips's 50-year career of innovative contributions to geophysics through fluid mechanics.

  16. Late Pleistocene oscillations of Lake Owens, eastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, A.J. . Dept. of Geography); Orme, A.R. . Dept. of Geography)

    1993-04-01

    Just before diversion of the Owens River drainage to Los Angeles in 1912--13, Owens Lake had a maximum depth of 14m and covered 290 km[sup 2] at a water-surface elevation of 1,095m. Indeed throughout most of Holocene time, the lake formed the sump for the Owens River drainage, its level fluctuating in response to variable inflow and evaporation. In late Pleistocene time, however, Lake Owens' spilled south towards Lake Searles' on reaching an elevation of 1,145m, at which level the lake was 64m deep and covered 694 km[sup 2]. Aided by radiometric dating, stratigraphic and sedimentological analyses of beach ridges and associated deposits around its northeast margin reveal complex oscillations of Lake Owens between 13,000 and 9,000 years B.P.. Following an earlier high stand, lake level fell until around 13,000 B.P. it rose again to at least 1138m, probably linked to late Wisconsinan glacier melt in the Sierra Nevada. Across the Pleistocene/Holocene transition, lake level fell to around 1100m and then rose to about 1,120m around 9,600 B.P., before falling away during Holocene time. This pattern is consistent with fluctuations in glacier budgets and meltwater regimes, and with late Pleistocene-early Holocene climatic oscillations postulated elsewhere in the region. Correlation with lake-level fluctuations observed at other localities around Owens Lake is complicated by tectonism, but the above sequence invites comparison with the detailed record obtained from Searles Lake farther south.

  17. Next-Generation Bibliographic Manager: An Interview with Trevor Owens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, James L.; Owens, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    James Morrison's interview with Trevor Owens explores Zotero, a free, open-source bibliographic tool that works as a Firefox plug-in. Previous bibliographic software, such as EndNote or Refworks, worked either online or offline to collect references and citations. Zotero leverages the power of the browser to allow users to work either online or…

  18. MIDDLE GORGE POWER PLANT, OWENS RIVER STREAM FLOWING OVER TAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MIDDLE GORGE POWER PLANT, OWENS RIVER STREAM FLOWING OVER TAIL RACE OF POWER PLANT AND PENSTOCK HEADGATE TO LOWER GORGE CONTROL PLANT. A MINIMAL FLOW OF RIVER WATER IS REQUIRED TO MAINTAIN FISH LIFE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, Middle Gorge Power Plant, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Hippocampus minor, calcar avis, and the Huxley-Owen debate.

    PubMed

    Owen, Christopher M; Howard, Allyson; Binder, Devin K

    2009-12-01

    On the bicentennial of Darwin's birth, we describe the origin of the calcar avis and summarize the debate around this structure, which played a central role in the evolution debate in the mid-19th century. We performed a comprehensive review of relevant neuroanatomic literature, bibliographic sources, and 19th century primary sources. Once known as the hippocampus minor, the structure now known as the calcar avis is an involution of the ventricular wall produced by the calcarine fissure. A heated debate raged between 2 prominent scientific theorists, Sir Richard Owen and Thomas Henry Huxley, over the presence of the hippocampus minor in apes versus humans. Owen put forward the lack of an identifiable hippocampus minor in humans as part of an attempt to debunk evolution. A bitter personal and academic rivalry ensued, as Huxley conducted his own dissections to refute Owen's claims. Huxley ultimately dismantled Owen's premises, securing the epithet "Darwin's bulldog" for his defense of the theory of evolution. Thus, this relatively obscure neuroanatomic landmark served as a pivotal point of contention in the most popularized and acrimonious evolutionary debate of the 19th century. PMID:19934969

  20. Education and Utopia: Robert Owen and Charles Fourier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, David

    2011-01-01

    The aims of education, and the appropriate means of realising them, are a recurring preoccupation of utopian authors. The utopian socialists Robert Owen (1771-1858) and Charles Fourier (1772-1837) both place human nature at the core of their educational views, and both see education as central to their wider objective of social and political…

  1. 63. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, 395 AND AQUEDUCT GOING UP MIDDLE OF PICTURE SPACE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  2. 64. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. VIEW NORTH UP OWENS VALLEY, SOUTH OF HAIWEE COMPLEX, 935 AND AQUEDUCT GOING UP MIDDLE OF PICTURE SPACE - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  3. Astronaut Owen Garriott trims hair of Astronaut Alan Bean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, trims the hair of Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander, in this on-board photograph from the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS). Bean holds a vacuum hose to gather in loose hair.

  4. Owen Fracture Zone: The Arabia-India plate boundary unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Rodriguez, M.; Huchon, P.; Petit, C.; Beslier, M. O.; Zaragosi, S.

    2011-02-01

    We surveyed the Owen Fracture Zone at the boundary between the Arabia and India plates in the NW Indian Ocean using a high-resolution multibeam echo-sounder (Owen cruise, 2009) for search of active faults. Bathymetric data reveal a previously unrecognized submarine fault scarp system running for over 800 km between the Sheba Ridge in the Gulf of Aden and the Makran subduction zone. The primary plate boundary structure is not the bathymetrically high Owen Ridge, but is instead a series of clearly delineated strike-slip fault segments separated by several releasing and restraining bends. Despite an abundant sedimentary supply by the Indus River flowing from the Himalaya, fault scarps are not obscured by recent deposits and can be followed over hundreds of kilometres, pointing to very active tectonics. The total strike-slip displacement of the fault system is 10-12 km, indicating that it has been active for the past ~ 3 to 6 Ma if its current rate of motion of 3 ± 1 mm yr- 1 has remained stable. We describe the geometry of this recent fault system, including a major pull-apart basin at the latitude 20°N, and we show that it closely follows an arc of small circle centred on the Arabia-India pole of rotation, as expected for a transform plate boundary.

  5. Astronaut Owen Garriott lies in Lower Body Negative Pressure Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, lies in the Lower Body Negative Pressure Device (LBNPD) in the work and experiments area of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) crew quarters of the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. The LBNPD (M092) Experiment is to provide information concerning the time course of cardiovascular adaptation during flight and to provide inflight data for predicting the degress of orthostatic intolerance and impairment of physical capacity to be expected upon return to Earth environment. The bicycle ergometer is in the right foreground.

  6. Astronaut Owen Garriott reconstitutes pre-packaged container of food

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, reconstitutes a pre-packaged container of food at the crew quarters ward room table of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab space station cluster. This picture was taken with a hand-held 35mm Nikon camera. Note the knife and fork on the food tray and the utensil with which Garriott stirs the food mixed with water. Skylab is the first manned space program by NASA which affords the crewmen an opportunity to eat with the same type utensils used on Earth.

  7. Robert Owen: A Historiographic Study of a Pioneer of Human Resource Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatcher, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the ideals and activities of the nineteenth century Welsh industrialist and reformer Robert Owen (1771-1858), and how they informed modern human resource development (HRD) concepts and practices and provided evidence of Owen as a HRD pioneer. Design/methodology/approach: Historiography provided…

  8. Positive versus Negative Perfectionism in Psychopathology: A Comment on Slade and Owens's Dual Process Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flett, Gordon L.; Hewitt, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the concepts of positive and negative perfectionism and the dual process model of perfectionism outlined by Slade and Owens (1998). The authors acknowledge that the dual process model represents a conceptual advance in the study of perfectionism and that Slade and Owens should be commended for identifying testable hypotheses…

  9. Estimating soil matric potential in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Miller, R.F.; Welch, M.R.; Groeneveld, D.P.; Branson, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    Much of the floor of the Owens Valley, California, is covered with alkaline scrub and alkaline meadow plant communities, whose existence is dependent partly on precipitation and partly on water infiltrated into the rooting zone from the shallow water table. The extent to which these plant communities are capable of adapting to and surviving fluctuations in the water table depends on physiological adaptations of the plants and on the water content, matric potential characteristics of the soils. Two methods were used to estimate soil matric potential in test sites in Owens Valley. The first was the filter-paper method, which uses water content of filter papers equilibrated to water content of soil samples taken with a hand auger. The other method of estimating soil matric potential was a modeling approach based on data from this and previous investigations. These data indicate that the base 10 logarithm of soil matric potential is a linear function of gravimetric soil water content for a particular soil. Estimates of soil water characteristic curves were made at two sites by averaging the gravimetric soil water content and soil matric potential values from multiple samples at 0.1 m depths derived by using the hand auger and filter paper method and entering these values in the soil water model. The characteristic curves then were used to estimate soil matric potential from estimates of volumetric soil water content derived from neutron-probe readings. Evaluation of the modeling technique at two study sites indicated that estimates of soil matric potential within 0.5 pF units of the soil matric potential value derived by using the filter paper method could be obtained 90 to 95% of the time in soils where water content was less than field capacity. The greatest errors occurred at depths where there was a distinct transition between soils of different textures. (Lantz-PTT)

  10. Climatic and hydrologic oscillations in the Owens Lake basin and adjacent Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; Burdett, J.W.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Lund, S.P.; Phillips, F.M.; Rye, R.O.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen isotope and total inorganic carbon values of cored sediments from the Owens Lake basin, California, indicate that Owens Lake overflowed most of the time between 52,500 and 12,509 carbon-14 (14C) years before present (B.P.). Owens Lake desiccated during or after Heinrich event H1 and was hydrologically closed during Heinrich event H2. The magnetic susceptibility and organic carbon content of cored sediments indicate that about 19 Sierra Nevada glaciations occurred between 52,500 and 23,500 14C years B.P. Most of the glacial advances were accompanied by decreases in the amount of discharge reaching Owens Lake. Comparison of the timing of glaciation with the lithic record of North Atlantic core V23-81 indicates that the number of mountain glacial cycles and the number of North Atlantic lithic events were about equal between 39,000 and 23,500 14C years B.P.

  11. Matuyama/Brunhes Polarity Transition in Owens Lake, CA, Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liddicoat, Joseph; Kravchinsky, Vadim

    2014-05-01

    The complexity of the Matuyama/Brunhes (M/B) polarity transition is becoming better understood from investigations of volcanic rocks (Coe et al., 2004), loess (Jin et al., 2012; Evans et al., 2011; Kravchinsky, 2013), and marine (Clement and Opdyke, 1982; Hartl and Tauxe, 1996; Macri et al., 2010) and lacustrine (Valet et al., 1988; Sagnotti et al., 2013) sediments. The transition appears to include a brief interval of normal polarity prior to the entry into the Brunhes Normal Chron (Coe et al., 2004; Jin et al., 2012; Evans et al., 2011), and the transition has Virtual Geomagnetic Poles rapidly moving from the Southern Hemisphere to the Northern Hemisphere (Coe et al., 2004; Jin et al., 2012; Evans et al., 2011; Sagnotti et al., 2013). The M/B polarity transition is recorded in exposed Pleistocene lake sediments near Bishop, CA, where the brief interval of normal polarity noted above is present and the change from full reverse to full normal polarity occurs rapidly. The brief interval of normal polarity is recorded at two sites separated laterally by about 150 m and is in single hand samples measured at vertical spacing of 2.0-2.5 cm using six samples per measured level and alternating field demagnetization at 20 mT (Liddicoat, 1993, Table 1 and Fig. 8). The siltstone is unweathered glacial flour from the Sierra Nevada that borders the western side of Owens Valley where the sediments were deposited in Owens Lake. In the siltstone, the majority of the samples have a percentage of about 60 percent where the grain diameter is less than 63 micrometres, and in those samples there is about a five percent fraction when the diameter is two micrometres or less. The Total Inorganic Carbon in most samples is about 0.25 percent (Bergeron, 2013), and magnetite is the dominant carrier of the magnetization (Liddicoat, 1993). The palaeomagnetic directions recording the terminus of the full M/B transition, which occurs before the field intensity is completely recovered, spans no

  12. Estimating soil matric potential in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Stephen K.; Miller, Reuben F.; Welch, Michael R.; Groeneveld, David P.; Branson, Farrel A.

    1989-01-01

    Much of the floor of Owens Valley, California, is covered with alkaline scrub and alkaline meadow plant communities, whose existence is dependent partly on precipitation and partly on water infiltrated into the rooting zone from the shallow water table. The extent to which these plant communities are capable of adapting to and surviving fluctuations in the water table depends on physiological adaptations of the plants and on the water content, matric potential characteristics of the soils. Two methods were used to estimate soil matric potential in test sites in Owens Valley. The first, the filter-paper method, uses water content of filter papers equilibrated to water content of soil samples taken with a hand auger. The previously published calibration relations used to estimate soil matric potential from the water content of the filter papers were modified on the basis of current laboratory data. The other method of estimating soil matric potential was a modeling approach based on data from this and previous investigations. These data indicate that the base-10 logarithm of soil matric potential is a linear function of gravimetric soil water content for a particular soil. The slope and intercepts of this function vary with the texture and saturation capacity of the soil. Estimates of soil water characteristic curves were made at two sites by averaging the gravimetric soil water content and soil matric potential values from multiple samples at 0.1-m depth intervals derived by using the hand auger and filter-paper method and entering these values in the soil water model. The characteristic curves then were used to estimate soil matric potential from estimates of volumetric soil water content derived from neutron-probe readings. Evaluation of the modeling technique at two study sites indicated that estimates of soil matric potential within 0.5 pF units of the soil matric potential value derived by using the filter-paper method could be obtained 90 to 95 percent of the

  13. Anaerobic decomposition of cellulose by allcaliphilic microbial Community of Owens Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Itoh, Takashi; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The study of communities of microbial extremophiles from anaerobic sediments of Owens Lake and Mono Lake in California has established the presence of active microbial cellulolytic processes in both lakes. The prior study of the microbial diversity in Mono Lake showed that the trophic chain of organic decomposition includes secondary anaerobes that were found to be previously unknown species (Spirochaeta americana, Tindallia californiensis, and Desulfonatronum thiodismutans). And as we published earlier, the secondary anaerobes of Owens Lakes were morphologically very similar to those of Mono Lake. However, continuing comparison of the physiology and genetics has led to the conclusion that some links of organic decomposition in the trophic chain of Owens Lake are represented by different unknown species. A new isolate of a sugarlytic spirochete from Owens Lake, which was morphologically very similar to S. americana isolated from Mono Lake, was found to have different metabolic capacity such as the lack of capability to produce hydrogen during glucose fermentation. Furthermore, from the same bacterial community (from Owens Lake) another sugarlytic spore-forming alkaliphile (strain SCA) was isolated in pure culture. Here we discuss the geology and chemistry of Owens Lake as a unique ecosystem of Astrobiological significance. This paper also presents some of the characteristics for the novel isolates and describes their participation in the process of cellulose degradation.

  14. Early Observations with the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Dale E.

    2016-05-01

    The Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array (EOVSA) is a newly expanded and upgraded, solar-dedicated radio array consisting of 13 antennas of 2.1 m diameter equipped with receivers designed to cover the 1-18 GHz frequency range. Two large (27-m diameter) dishes are being outfitted with He-cooled receivers for use in calibration of the small dishes. During 2015, the array obtained observations from dozens of flares in total power mode on 8 antennas. Since February 2016, it has begun taking solar data on all 13 small antennas with full interferometric correlations, as well as calibration observations with the first of the two large antennas equipped with its He-cooled receiver. The second He-cooled receiver is nearly complete, and will be available around the time of the meeting. We briefly review the commissioning activities leading up to full operations, including polarization and gain measurements and calibration methods, and resulting measures of array performance. We then present some early imaging observations with the array, emphasizing the remarkable temporal and spectral resolution of the instrument, together with joint RHESSI hard X-ray and SDO EUV observations.

  15. Tectonic tilting of the northern Owens Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pinter, N.; Keller, E.A. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Tectonic rotation is characteristic of active deformation in many of the structural basins of the Basin and Range. The Owens Valley (OV) is the most western basin of the province. The structure, stratigraphy, and geomorphology of the northern OV suggest that there has been active eastward tilting of the valley throughout at least the late Quaternary. A series of analytical techniques are developed here which quantify the age, rate, and character of deformation. The geomorphic clock'' of the northern OV was reset 738,000 years ago by the unroofing of Long Valley Caldera, just to the north, and the emplacement of the Bishop Tuff ignimbrite sheet. Since that time, cooling joints in the tuff and channels cut into the surface of the sheet have been reoriented, and fluvial terraces and alluvial fans have been tilted. Each of these analyses have the same solution--a net down-to-the-east rotation of the valley block at a mean rate of 0.8--1.0[degree]/Ma. Other indicators of tilt support this solution: fluvial and lacustrine strata at the type-locality of the Glass Mountain ashes dip approximately 1[degree] to the east; and gravity measurements of basement geometry demonstrate a dip of 11.0--13.7[degree] eastward. Extrapolating a uniform rate of tilt, the dip of the basement suggest that sedimentation in the OV began in the late Miocene. The character of deformation across the study area is consistent with motion on the Coyote warp anticlinal trend, near the base of the Sierra Nevada. The author propose that the Coyote warp has acted as a tectonic hinge, accommodating westward rotation of the Sierra Nevada and eastward rotation of the northern OV.

  16. Robert Owen in the history of the social sciences: three presentist views.

    PubMed

    Pūras, Adomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues that the present-day disagreements over the right course for sociology and its public role are reflected and paralleled in contemporary historiography of Robert Owen, British social reformer and a self-described social scientist. Historical accounts, written from the perspectives of public sociology, "pure science" sociology, and anti-Marxism, interpret Owen's historical role in mutually antithetical and self-serving ways. Contrasting the three presentist accounts, I engage in an analysis of "techniques of presentism"-history-structuring concepts, such as "disciplinary founder" and "disciplinary prehistory," that allow presentist authors to get their effects. Along the way, I elaborate Peter Baehr's classification of sociology's founders. PMID:24272873

  17. Interview with Elizabeth Boling, aka Noel Wheeler, aka Skater Owens, aka EXB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsburger, Joe

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Elizabeth Boling, aka Noel Wheeler, aka Skater Owens, aka EXB, editor of "TechTrends" magazine. EXB has edited AECT's bi-monthly peer-reviewed magazine since January 2003. She is also an associate professor in the Instructional Systems Technology department at Indiana University Bloomington (IUB), and in her…

  18. Design data brochure for the Owens-Illinois Sunpak (TM) air-cooled solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Information necessary to evaluate the design and installation of the Owens-Illinois Sunpak TM Air-Cooled Solar Collector is presented. Information includes collector features, fluid flow, thermal performance, installation and system tips. The collector utilizes a highly selective wavelength coating in combination with vacuum insulation, which virtually eliminates conduction and convention losses.

  19. Mass Wasting Processes and Giant Landslides Along the Owen Fracture Zone (northwest Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Huchon, P.

    2010-12-01

    Several types of mass failures are observed along the Owen ridge (NW Indian ocean) using multibeam bathymetry, acoustic imagery and sediment echosounder. The Owen ridge is associated with the Owen fracture zone, a 800 km-long active fault system which accommodates the strike-slip motion between the Arabia and India plates. Mass failures mobilize a pelagic cover and display a large variety of features along the three parts of the Owen ridge, from cohesive to desintegrative flows. We present a complete morphometric analysis of submarine landslides, and provide a synthetic map of the different types of sediment destabilization along the ridge. Spectacular instability scars, which could have removed up to 45 km3 of material, were evidenced on the southern part of the ridge. Such volumes are unexpected in a sedimentary environment dominated by slow pelagic sedimentation rate. The spatial variation of failure morphology seems to be strongly related to the topography of the basement. The detailed re-analysis of seismic lines collected during the ODP Leg 117 reveals the recurrence and the sporadic repartition of mass wasting events along the southern fragment of the ridge since its uplift in the early Miocene. Earthquakes are more frequent than slides along the southern ridge, excluding seismicity as a unique triggering process. We propose that mass wasting frequency is mainly constrained by the slow pelagic sedimentation rates.

  20. Astronaut Owen Garriott participates in EVA to deploy twin pole solar shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, participates in the August 6, 1973 extravehicular activity (EVA) during which he and Astronaut Jack Lousma, Skylab pilot, deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop (OWS). Note the reflection of the solar shield in Garriett's helmet visor.

  1. Enhancing Student Services at Owens Community College: Early Results from the Opening Doors Demonstration in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scrivener, Susan; Pih, Michael

    2007-01-01

    MDRC launched Opening Doors in 2003 to study the effects of community college programs designed to help students persist in school and earn a credential. This report presents early results from the Opening Doors program at Owens Community College in Toledo, Ohio, which operated from 2004 through 2006. The two-semester program served students whose…

  2. Assessing and Analyzing Student Need at Owens Community College, Academic Year 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiger, Derick M.; And Others

    In fall 1993, Owens Community College (OCC), in Ohio, conducted a survey of 2,277 currently enrolled students to gather data on significant needs and characteristics to inform institutional effectiveness efforts. The survey instrument asked students to rate 76 items grouped into the categories of educational need, professional need,…

  3. Paleoclimatic reconstruction`s from Owens Lake core Ol-92, southeastern California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Menking, K.M.

    1995-09-01

    In 1992, the U.S. Geological Survey cored Owens Lake to obtain a continuous paleoclimate record for the Sierra Nevada region. Owens Lake heads a chain of closed-basin lakes which are separated by a series of bedrock sills, received their water primarily from Sierra Nevadan precipitation, and overflowed during wet periods. The core records the histories of cyclic glaciation of the Sierra Nevada and water-balance of Owens Lake over the past 800 kyrs. A variety of paleoclimatic proxies have been studied, details of which may be found elsewhere. In this thesis, the author reports the results and interpretations of (1) grain-size and clay-mineralogical analyses performed on 3.5-m-long channel samples (%7500 years of sedimentation per sample) and point samples, (2) grain size, carbonate content, and oxygen isotopic measurements on 70-cm-long channel samples (%1500 years), and (3) a water-balance model used to infer the magnitude of runoff and evaporation changes necessary to fill the lakes in the Owens Lake system, and to determine the response time of the lake chain to climatic perturbations.

  4. Last glacial maximum and Holocene lake levels of Owens Lake, eastern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, S.N.; Burke, R.M.; Pezzopane, S.K.; Jayko, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Stratigraphic investigations of fluvio-deltaic and lacustrine sediments exposed in stream cuts, quarry walls, and deep trenches east of the Sierra Nevada in Owens Valley near Lone Pine, California have enabled the reconstruction of pluvial Owens Lake level oscillations. Age control for these sediments is from 22 radiocarbon (14C) dates and the identification and stratigraphic correlation of a tephra, which when plotted as a function of age versus altitude, define numerous oscillations in the level of pluvial Owens Lake during the latest Pleistocene and early Holocene. We have constructed a lake-level altitude curve for the time interval ???27,000 cal yr BP to present that is based on the integration of this new stratigraphic analysis with published surface stratigraphic data and subsurface core data. Pluvial Owens Lake regressed from its latest Pleistocene highstands from ???27,000 to ???15,300 cal yr BP, as recorded by ???15 m of down cutting of the sill from the altitudes of ???1160 to 1145 m. By ???11,600 cal yr BP, the lake had dropped ???45 m from the 1145 m sill. This lowstand was followed by an early Holocene transgression that attained a highstand near 1135 m before dropping to 1120 m at 7860-7650 cal yr BP that had not been recognized in earlier studies. The lake then lowered another ???30 m to shallow and near desiccation levels between ???6850 and 4300 cal yr BP. Fluvial cut-and-fill relations north of Lone Pine and well-preserved shoreline features at ???1108 m indicate a minor lake-level rise after 4300 cal yr BP, followed by alkaline and shallow conditions during the latest Holocene. The new latest Quaternary lake-level record of pluvial Owens Lake offers insight to the hydrologic balance along the east side of the southern Sierra Nevada and will assist regional paleoclimatic models for the western Basin and Range. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the hydrologic system and selected water-management alternatives in the Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danskin, Wesley R.

    1998-01-01

    The Owens Valley, a long, narrow valley along the east side of the Sierra Nevada in eastcentral California, is the main source of water for the city of Los Angeles. The city diverts most of the surface water in the valley into the Owens River?Los Angeles Aqueduct system, which transports the water more than 200 miles south to areas of distribution and use. Additionally, ground water is pumped or flows from wells to supplement the surface-water diversions to the river? aqueduct system. Pumpage from wells needed to supplement water export has increased since 1970, when a second aqueduct was put into service, and local residents have expressed concerns that the increased pumping may have a detrimental effect on the environment and the native vegetation (indigenous alkaline scrub and meadow plant communities) in the valley. Native vegetation on the valley floor depends on soil moisture derived from precipitation and from the unconfined part of a multilayered ground-water system. This report, which describes the evaluation of the hydrologic system and selected water-management alternatives, is one in a series designed to identify the effects that ground-water pumping has on native vegetation and evaluate alternative strategies to mitigate any adverse effects caused by pumping. The hydrologic system of the Owens Valley can be conceptualized as having three parts: (1) an unsaturated zone affected by precipitation and evapotranspiration; (2) a surface-water system composed of the Owens River, the Los Angeles Aqueduct, tributary streams, canals, ditches, and ponds; and (3) a saturated ground-water system contained in the valley fill. Analysis of the hydrologic system was aided by development of a ground-water flow model of the ?aquifer system,? which is defined as the most active part of the ground-water system and which includes nearly all of the Owens Valley except for the area surrounding the Owens Lake. The model was calibrated and verified for water years 1963?88 and

  6. The Owen Ridge uplift in the Arabian Sea: Implications for the sedimentary record of Indian monsoon in Late Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Mathieu; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Huchon, Philippe; Fournier, Marc; Delescluse, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    The pelagic cover of the Owen Ridge in the Arabian Sea recorded the evolution of the Indian monsoon since the Middle Miocene. The uplift of the Owen Ridge resulted from tectonic processes along the previously unidentified Miocene India-Arabia plate boundary. Based on seismic reflection data tied with deep-sea drilling to track the Miocene India-Arabia plate boundary, we propose a new timing for the uplift of the Owen Ridge and highlight its impact on the record of climate changes in pelagic sediments. The new dataset reveals a fracture zone east of the Owen Ridge corresponding to the fossil plate boundary, and documents that the main uplift of the Owen Ridge occurred close to ˜8.5 Ma, and is coeval with a major uplift of the east Oman margin. Late Miocene deformation at the India-Arabia plate boundary is also coeval with the onset of intra-plate deformation in the Central Indian Ocean, suggesting a kinematic change of India and surrounding plates in the Late Miocene. The uplift of the Owen Ridge above the lysocline at ˜8.5 Ma accounts for a better preservation of Globigerina bulloides in the pelagic cover, previously misinterpreted as the result of a monsoon intensification event.

  7. Monitoring All the Sky All the Time with the Owens Valley Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallinan, Gregg; Bourke, Stephen; Anderson, Marin; Eastwood, Michael; Monroe, Ryan; Greenhill, Lincoln J.; Taylor, Gregory B.; Lazio, Joseph; Weinreb, Sander

    2015-01-01

    The Owens Valley LWA is a new array of 256 dual polarization antennas at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory that instantaneously images the entire viewable sky every second. It hosts the LEDA correlator, which enables 60 MHz instantaneous bandwidth, allowing us to correlate the 25-85 MHz band instantaneously. An upgrade to the array is currently underway, involving 32 additional antennas powered by solar panels and serviced by optical fiber, that will improve the resolution by a factor of 10, giving instantaneous all-sky images with ~10 arcminute resolution. The primary science goals are i) searching for low frequency radio transients, particularly the low frequency auroral radio emission from extrasolar planets, ii) probing the Cosmic Dawn era by constraining the sky-averaged HI signature at z~20 and iii) dynamic imaging spectroscopy of the Sun. I will present the first images and movies produced by this new array and discuss the science motivation for its construction, with particular focus on our efforts to continuously monitor the low frequency radio transient sky to search for radio emission from exoplanets. Finally, I will discuss plans to build a much larger array at or near the Owens Valley Radio Observatory, involving all-sky imaging with 2,000 antennas.

  8. An Algorithm for Critical Nodes Problem in Social Networks Based on Owen Value

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Discovering critical nodes in social networks has many important applications. For finding out the critical nodes and considering the widespread community structure in social networks, we obtain each node's marginal contribution by Owen value. And then we can give a method for the solution of the critical node problem. We validate the feasibility and effectiveness of our method on two synthetic datasets and six real datasets. At the same time, the result obtained by using our method to analyze the terrorist network is in line with the actual situation. PMID:25006592

  9. View of Astronaut Owen Garriott taking video of two Skylab spiders experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    View of Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, taking TV footage of Arabella and Anita, the two Skylab 3 common cross spiders 'aranous diadematus,' aboard the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. During the 59 day Skylab 3 mission the two spiders Arabella and Anita, were housed in an enclosure onto which a motion picture and still camera were attached to record the spiders' attempts to build a web in the weightless environment. Note the automatic data acquisition camera (DAC) about 3.5 feet to Garriott's right (about waist level).

  10. Characterization of alluvial sources in the Owens Valley of eastern California using Fourier shape analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wagoner, J.L.; Younker, J.L.

    1982-03-01

    Two-dimensional quartz grain shape was used to characterize sand grains from different source areas in the Owens Valley of eastern California. Combining a mathematical description of the grain outline and multivariate discriminant analysis, we have shown that quartz from clastic source rocks has a distinctive imprint when compared to samples from granitic, volcanic, or mixed fluvial source areas. Alternatively, quartz provided by a granitic source could equally well have been interpreted as if it were derived from any of the other sources considered. This study provides a standard of comparison for further analysis of sediment deposited in arid alluvial environments.

  11. Neotectonics of the Owen Fracture Zone (NW Indian Ocean): Structural evolution of an oceanic strike-slip plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Fournier, M.; Chamot-Rooke, N.; Huchon, P.; Bourget, J.; Sorbier, M.; Zaragosi, S.; Rabaute, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Owen Fracture Zone is a 800 km-long fault system that accommodates the dextral strike-slip motion between India and Arabia plates. Because of slow pelagic sedimentation rates that preserve the seafloor expression of the fault since the Early Pliocene, the fault is clearly observed on bathymetric data. It is made up of a series of fault segments separated by releasing and restraining bends, including a major pull-apart basin at latitude 20°N. Some distal turbiditic channels from the Indus deep-sea fan overlap the fault system and are disturbed by its activity, thus providing landmarks to date successive stages of fault activity and structural evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone from Pliocene to Present. We determine the durability of relay structures and the timing of their evolution along the principal displacement zone, from their inception to their extinction. We observe subsidence migration in the 20°N basin, and alternate activation of fault splays in the vicinity of the Qalhat seamount. The present-day Owen Fracture Zone is the latest stage of structural evolution of the 20-Myr-old strike-slip fault system buried under Indus turbiditic deposits whose activity started at the eastern foot of the Owen Ridge when the Gulf of Aden opened. The evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone since 3-6 Myr reflects a steady state plate motion between Arabia and India, such as inferred by kinematics for the last 20 Myr period. The structural evolution of the Owen Fracture Zone since 20 Myr, including fault segments propagation and migration, pull-apart basin opening and extinction, seems to be characterized by a progressive reorganization of the fault system, and does not require any major kinematics change.

  12. 21 cm Fluctuations of the Cosmic Dawn with the Owens Valley Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastwood, Michael; Hallinan, Gregg; Owens Valley LWA Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Owens Valley Long Wavelength Array (OVRO LWA) is a 288-antenna interferometer covering 30 to 80 MHz located at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) near Big Pine, California. I am leading the effort to detect spatial fluctuations of the 21 cm transition from the cosmic dawn (z~20) with the OVRO LWA. These spatial fluctuations are primarily sourced by inhomogeneous X-ray heating from early star formation. The spectral hardness of early X-ray sources, stellar feedback mechanisms, and baryon streaming therefore all play a role in shaping the power spectrum. I will present the application of m-mode analysis (Shaw et al. 2014, Shaw et al. 2015) to OVRO LWA data to: 1. compress the data set, 2. create maps of the northern sky that can be fed back into the calibration pipeline, and 3. filter foreground emission. Finally I will present the current status and future prospects of the OVRO LWA for detecting the 21 cm power spectrum at z~20.

  13. An apparent shear zone trending north-northwest across the Mojave Desert into Owens Valley, eastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, J.C.; Lisowski, M.; Prescott, W.H. )

    1990-11-01

    Strain rates measured at four geodetic networks in eastern California situated between northern Owens Valley and Transverse Ranges along a small circle drawn about the Pacific-North America pole of rotation are remarkably consistent. Each exhibits 0.14 {mu}rad/yr simple right-lateral engineering-shear-strain accumulation across the local vertical plane tangent to the small circle. Local faults (e.g., Owens Valley, Garlock, Helendale) traversing these networks are not as closely aligned with the vertical planes of maximum shear-strain accumulation as is the local tangent to the small circle. A fifth network slightly east of the small circle shows no significant strain accumulation. Thus, a shear zone trending N35{degree}W from near the eastern end of the big bend of the San Andreas fault to northern Owens Valley is indicated by these data. This corresponds to the Eastern California shear zone proposed on geological evidence by Dokka and Travis. The shear zone carries {approximately}8 mm/yr of the Pacific-North America relative plate motion from the San Andreas fault north-northwest across the Mojave Desert into Owens Valley and the northern Basin and Range province. The shear zone observed at the surface may be a manifestation of a through-going subcrustal fault.

  14. A COMBINED MODELING AND MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR ESTIMATING WIND-BLOWN DUST EMISSIONS AT OWENS (DRY) LAKE, CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A refined method of modeling atmospheric dust concentrations due to wind erosion was developed using real-time saltation flux measurements and ambient dust monitoring data at Owens Lake, California. This modeling method may have practical applications for modeling the atmospheric...

  15. Late Quaternary history of the Owens Valley fault zone, eastern California, and surface rupture associated with the 1872 earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Beanland, S. . Earth Deformation Section); Clark, M.M. )

    1993-04-01

    The right-lateral Owens Valley fault zone (OVFZ) in eastern California extends north about 100 km from near the northwest shore of Owens Lake to beyond Big Pine. It passes through Lone Pine near the eastern base of the Alabama Hills and follows the floor of Owens Valley northward to the Poverty Hills, where it steps 3 km to the left and continues northwest across Crater Mountain and through Big Pine. Data from one site suggest an average net slip rate for the OVFZ of 1.5 [+-] 1 mm/yr for the past 300 ky. Several other sites yield an average Holocene net slip rate of 2 [+-] 1 mm/yr. The OVFZ apparently has experienced three major Holocene earthquakes. The minimum average recurrence interval is 5,000 years at the subsidiary Lone Pine fault, whereas it is 3,300 to 5,000 years elsewhere along the OVFZ. The prehistoric earthquakes are not dated, so an average recurrence interval need not apply. However, roughly equal (characteristic) displacement apparently happened during each Holocene earthquake. The Owens Valley fault zone accommodates some of the relative motion (dextral shear) between the North American and Pacific plates along a discrete structure. This shear occurs in the Walker Lane belt of normal and strike-slip faults within the mainly extensional Basin and Range Province. In Owens Valley displacement is partitioned between the OVFZ and the nearby, subparallel, and purely normal range-front faults of the Sierra Nevada. Compared to the OVFZ, these range-front normal faults are very discontinuous and have smaller Holocene slip rates of 0.1 to 0.8 mm/yr, dip slip. Contemporary activity on adjacent faults of such contrasting styles suggests large temporal fluctuations in the relative magnitudes of the maximum and intermediate principal stresses while the extension direction remains consistently east-west.

  16. Horace Lamb and the circumstances of his appointment at Owens College

    PubMed Central

    Launder, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines a succession of incidents at a critical juncture in the life of Professor Horace Lamb FRS, a highly regarded classical fluid mechanicist, who, over a period of some 35 years at Manchester, made notable contributions in research, in education and in wise administration at both national and university levels. Drawing on archived documents from the universities of Manchester and Adelaide, the article presents the unusual sequence of events that led to his removing from Adelaide, South Australia, where he had served for nine years as the Elder Professor of Mathematics, to Manchester. In 1885 he was initially appointed to the vacant Chair of Pure Mathematics at Owens College and then, in 1888, as an outcome of his proposal for rearranging professorial responsibilities, to the Beyer Professorship of Pure and Applied Mathematics.

  17. Decomposition of Alternative Chirality Amino Acids by Alkaliphilic Anaerobe from Owens Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    The study of alkaliphilic microbial communities from anaerobic sediments of Owens and Mono Lakes in California led to the isolation of a bacterial strain capable of metabolizing amino acids with alternative chirality. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the anaerobic strain BK1 belongs to the genus Tindallia; however, despite the characteristics of other described species of this genus, the strain BK1 was able to grow on D-arginine and Dlysine. Cell morphology of this strain showed straight, motile, non-spore-forming rods with sizes 0.45 x 1.2-3 microns. Physiological characteristics of the strain showed that it is catalase negative, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, and obligately alkaliphilic. This isolate is unable to grow at pH 7 and requires CO3 (2-) ions for growth. The strain has chemo-heterotrophic metabolism and is able to ferment various proteolysis products and some sugars. It plays the role of a primary anaerobe within the trophic chain of an anaerobic microbial community by the degradation of complex protein molecules to smaller and less energetic molecules. The new isolate requires NaCl for growth, and can grow within the range of 0.5-13 %, with the optimum at 1 % NaCl (w/v). The temperature range for the growth of the new isolate is 12-40 C with optimum at 35 C. The pH range for the growth of strain BK1 occurs between 7.8 and 11.0 with optimum at 9.5. This paper presents detailed physiological characteristics of the novel isolate from Owens Lake, a unique relic ecosystem of Astrobiological significance, and makes an accent on the ability of this strain to utilize L-amino acids.

  18. Relationship between surface roughness and age of deposits in debris flow fans, Eastern Owens Valley, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihir, Monika; Wasklewicz, Thad; Liu, Tanzhuo

    2015-04-01

    The episodic nature of debris flows result in deposits of variable ages on the debris flow fan surface. This study maps the variable ages of fan deposits (called geomorphic units here) of four debris flow fans of south-eastern Owens Valley, California, USA from aerial photographs and field surveys. It then assesses the relationships between the age of the deposits, and their surface roughness and particle sizes. The deposits of different ages have different characteristics and are distinguished on the basis of different soil development, varnish accumulation, desert pavement development and surficial topography. The four fans typically have 4 geomorphic units on their surface. Numerical dates of the geomorphic units were obtained with the aid of varnish microlamination dating techniques. High resolution digital elevation data (5 cm planimetric resolution), were generated from a terrestrial laser scanner for each geomorphic unit (16 geomorphic units in total). The elevation data was then used in quantifying surface roughness. Particle sizes were also measured at each geomorphic unit where 50 particles were measured within a rectangular box (1.24 m by 1.00 m). We find that (i) the age of the oldest deposits range from 11,100 to 12,350 years BP (before present), second oldest deposits are around 7300-9500 years BP, third oldest deposits are around 4000 to 6000 years BP and the active deposits are essentially modern to several hundred years old, (ii) the oldest deposits have maximum surface roughness while the youngest deposits have comparatively less surface roughness, (iii) the average particle sizes of the deposits range from 3.15 cm to 22.04 cm with high variability (standard deviation ranging from 2.75 to 10.50) observed in all geomorphic units. Study of relationships between the variables brings out (i) an insignificant relationship between the surface roughness and age of deposits, (ii) an insignificant relationship between particle size variability and age of

  19. Paleontology in parts: Richard Owen, William John Broderip, and the serialization of science in early Victorian Britain.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Gowan

    2012-12-01

    While a great deal of scholarly attention has been given to the publication of serialized novels in early Victorian Britain, there has been hardly any consideration of the no less widespread practice of issuing scientific works in parts and numbers. What scholarship there has been has insisted that scientific part-works operated on entirely different principles from the strategies for maintaining readerly interest that were being developed by serial novelists like Charles Dickens. Deploying the methods of book history, this essay examines the reporting of Richard Owen's celebrated paleontological reconstructions from the 1830s and 1840s in the serialized formats of the Proceedings of the Zoological Society, his own History of British Fossil Mammals, and, in particular, the Penny Cyclopaedia. It argues that Owen, along with his close friend William John Broderip, clearly recognized the affective possibilities of the serial format and that they exploited the Penny Cyclopaedia's sequential mode of publication to evoke suspense and expectation in their anonymous but collaboratively authored accounts of Owen's paleontological researches. PMID:23488235

  20. Assessment of AVIRIS data from vegetated sites in the Owens Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Elvidge, Christopher D.; Defeo, N. J.

    1988-01-01

    Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were acquired from the Bishop, CA area, located at the northern end of the Owens Valley, on July 30, 1987. Radiometrically-corrected AVIRIS data were flat-field corrected, and spectral curves produced and analyzed for pixels taken from both native and cultivated vegetation sites, using the JPS SPAM software program and PC-based spreadsheet programs. Analyses focussed on the chlorophyll well and red edge portions of the spectral curves. Results include the following: AVIRIS spectral data are acquired at sufficient spectral resolution to allow detection of blue shifts of both the chlorophyll well and red edge in moisture-stressed vegetation when compared with non-stressed vegetation; a normalization of selected parameters (chlorophyll well and near infrared shoulder) may be used to emphasize the shift in red edge position; and the presence of the red edge in AVIRIS spectral curves may be useful in detecting small amounts (20 to 30 pct cover) of semi-arid and arid vegetation ground cover. A discussion of possible causes of AVIRIS red edge shifts in respsonse to stress is presented.

  1. Siphateles (Gila) sp. and Catostomus sp. from the Pleistocene OIS-6 Lake Gale, Panamint Valley, Owens River system, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayko, A. S.; Forester, R. M.; Smith, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Panamint Valley lies within the Owens River system which linked southeastern Sierra Nevada basins between Mono Lake and Death Valley during glacial-pluvial times. Previous work indicates that late Pleistocene glacial-pluvial Lake Gale, Panamint Valley was an open system during OIS-6, a closed ground water supported shallow lake during OIS-4, and the terminal lake basin for the Owens River system during OIS-2. We here report the first occurrence of fossil fish from the Plio-Pleistocene Panamint basin. Fish remains are present in late Pleistocene OIS-6 nearshore deposits associated with a highstand that was spillway limited at Wingate Wash. The deposits contain small minnow-sized remains from both Siphateles or Gila sp. (chubs) and Catostomus sp. (suckers) from at least four locations widely dispersed in the basin. Siphateles or Gila sp. and Catostomus are indigenous to the Pleistocene and modern Owens River system, in particular to the historic Owens Lake area. Cyprinodon (pupfish) and Rhinichthys (dace) are known from the modern Amargosa River and from Plio-Pleistocene deposits in Death Valley to the east. The late Pleistocene OIS-6 to OIS-2 lacustrine and paleohydrologic record in Panamint basin is interpreted from ostracod assemblages, relative abundance of Artemia sp. pellets, shallow water indicators including tufa fragments, ruppia sp. fragments and the relative abundance of charophyte gyrogonites obtained from archived core, as well as faunal assemblages from paleoshoreline and nearshore deposits. The OIS-4 groundwater supported shallow saline lake had sufficiently low ratios of alkalinity to calcium (alk/Ca) to support the occurrence of exotic Elphidium sp. (?) foraminfera which are not observed in either OIS-2 or OIS-6 lacustrine deposits. The arrival of Owens River surface water into Panamint Basin during OIS-2 is recorded by the first appearance of the ostracod Limnocythere sappaensis at ~27 m depth in an ~100 m archived core (Smith and Pratt, 1957) which

  2. Lessons on Dust Emissions Derived from Experimentation and Development of a Model for Owens (dry) Lake, CA Dust Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, D. A.; Ono, D.; Richmond, K.

    2002-12-01

    Dust storm forecasting requires modeling of the vertical flux of wind erosion resuspension particles smaller than 10 micrometers (Fa) that is verified by measurement. Experiences in modeling and measurement of Fa over several years at Owens Lake, a large dust-source area in California, may be given in the form of lessons. The first of these lessons is the inhomogeneity of emissions over the lake surface. The inhomogeneity changes with time so that the positions of "hot spots" on the lake surface move in time even though the surface sediment texture and composition remains almost constant. A second lesson is that parts of the lake almost never produce dust. In fact, of the more than 200 square km surface of the lake, the potentially dust-emitting dry lake bed is almost always smaller than 130 square km. A third lesson is that although there were brief periods during which Fa was not coupled with sand movement (that is PM10 emissions were directly suspended without the mechanism of sandblasting) the overwhelming dominant dust production mechanism was sandblasting. That is, the vertical flux of dust Fa was proportional to the horizontal flux of sand q; ie. Fa = Kq. The K in this equation is a constant and is particular to a given location on the lake surface. A fourth lesson is that q is more variable over the lake surface than is K. Therefore, a practical method for estimating the emission of dust Fa was to measure q at many places and estimate K's as averages for the large active areas of the lake. Our model of dust emissions for Owens Lake required high quality measurements of PM10 at several locations near the shoreline of Owens Lake and use of a transport model for emitted dust from the lake surface. We estimated K (equal to Fa/q ) for the most active areas of dust emissions at Owens Lake as follows: (1) Sand fluxes (q) were measured in a grid of 130 sand flux samplers. The grid has a separation distances of 1 km. (2) Concentration of PM10 were measured at

  3. Osmotic potential and projected drought tolerance of four phreatophytic shrub species in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dileanis, Peter D.; Groeneveld, David P.

    1989-01-01

    A substantial quantity of the water used by plant communities growing on the floor of Owens Valley, California, is derived from a shallow unconfined aquifer. Fluctuations in the water table caused by ground-water withdrawal may result in periods when this water supply is not accessible to plants. The capacity of the plants to adapt to these periods of water loss depends on the availability of water stored in the soil and on physiological characteristics related to the ability of the plants to resist dehydration and wilting. Osmotic adjustment occurred in four phreatophytic shrub species at sites near Bishop, California, where the water table had been lowered by a system of pump-equipped wells installed in the vicinity of vegetation transects. The pressure-volume technique was used to determine osmotic potential and cell-wall elasticity between March 1985 and September 1986 for Atriplex torreyi, Chrysothamnus nauseosus , Sarcobatus verm iculatus , and Artemisia tridentata. Although not usually classified as a phreatophyte, Artemisia tridentata, where it grows on the valley floor, is apparently dependent on the depth to the water table. During late summer, osmotic potentials were 0.37 to 0.41 MPa (megapascal) lower in plants growing on the site where the water table had been lowered compared to an adjacent site where the water table remained at its natural levels. Measurements of soil matric potential at the two sites indicated that osmotic adjustment occurred in response to stress caused by lowering the water table. A theoretical lower limit of osmotic adjustment was determined by comparing initial cell osmotic potentials with initial xylem water potentials. These experimentally derived limits indicated that Atriplex torreyi and S. vermiculatus may maintain leaf cell turgor at significantly lower cell water potentials (about -4.5 MPa) than C. nauseosus or Artemisia tridentata (about -2.5 MPa), which allows them to function in drier soil environments.

  4. Osmotic potential and projected drought tolerance of four phreatophytic shrub species in Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dileanis, P.D.; Groeneveld, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    A large part of the water used by plant communities growing on the floor of Owens Valley, California, is derived from a shallow unconfined aquifer. Fluctuations in the water table caused by groundwater withdrawal may result in periods when this water supply is not accessible to plants. The capacity of the plants to adapt to these periods of water loss depend on the availability of water stored in the soil and on physiological characteristics related to the ability of the plants to resist dehydration and wilting. Osmotic adjustment occurred in four phreatophytic shrub species at sites near bishop, California, where the water table had been lowered by a system of pump-equipped wells installed in the vicinity of vegetation transects. The pressure-volume techniques was used to determine osmotic potential and cell-wall elasticity between March 1985 and September 1986 for Atriplex torreyi, Chrysothamnus nauseosus , Sarcobatus vermiculatus, and Artemisia tridentata. Although not usually classified as a phreatophyte, Artemisia tridentata, where it grows on the valley floor, is apparently dependent on the depth to the water table. During late summer, osmotic potentials were 0.37 to 0.41 megapascal lower in plants growing on the site where the water table had been lowered compared to an adjacent site where the water table remained at its natural levels. Measurements of soil matric potential at the two sites indicated that osmotic adjustment occurred in response to stress caused by lowering the water table. A theoretical lower limit of osmotic adjustment was determined by comparing initial cell osmotic potentials with initial xylem water potentials. These experimentally derived limits indicated that A. torreyi and S. vermiculatus may maintain leaf cell turgor at significantly lower cell water potentials (about -4.5 megapascals) than C. nauseosus or A. tridentata (about -2.5 megapascals) and allows them to function in dryer soil environments. (Author 's abstract)

  5. The Owens River as a tiltmeter for Long Valley caldera, California

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.B. Jr )

    1992-05-01

    In the lower 11 km of its course around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera, the Owens River displays two parallel meander belts, comparable in meander wavelength and amplitude but unequal in age, elevation, and discharge. It appears the two belts take turns carrying the river's flow depending on whether the dome is inflating or subsiding. The inboard belt, some 200-300 m closer to the dome and now 30-60 cm higher in elevation, contains an underfit stream and is now being abandoned. The outboard channel formed in a series of avulsions apparently induced by recent uplift of the dome. In the upper 4 km of the two-channel reach, avulsion occurred between 1856 and 1878 as inferred from the original US Coast and Geodetic Survey mapping the caldera. Avulsion had already occurred by 1856 in the lower 4 km of the river, suggesting a possible migration of the center of uplift through time. More ancient meander scars at the inboard and outboard limits of the floodplain imply additional earlier episodes of inflation and subsidence. Projection of surveyed topographic profiles across the river's floodplain to the center of the dome suggests that cumulative recent uplift is on the order of 15-35 m, or about 30-70 times greater than that measured for the caldera since 1979 (Castle et al. 1984). The duration of the era of subsidence can be estimated by comparing oxbow densities in the old and new meander belts in the upper two-channel reach; the data suggest that the dome may have been in subsidence for a period of at least 500 to 1,000 yr ending about 150 yr ago. No eruptions of the Long Valley volcanic system have accompanied these inflations and subsidings.

  6. Keeping the History in Historical Seismology: The 1872 Owens Valley, California Earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Hough, Susan E.

    2008-07-08

    The importance of historical earthquakes is being increasingly recognized. Careful investigations of key pre-instrumental earthquakes can provide critical information and insights for not only seismic hazard assessment but also for earthquake science. In recent years, with the explosive growth in computational sophistication in Earth sciences, researchers have developed increasingly sophisticated methods to analyze macroseismic data quantitatively. These methodological developments can be extremely useful to exploit fully the temporally and spatially rich information source that seismic intensities often represent. For example, the exhaustive and painstaking investigations done by Ambraseys and his colleagues of early Himalayan earthquakes provides information that can be used to map out site response in the Ganges basin. In any investigation of macroseismic data, however, one must stay mindful that intensity values are not data but rather interpretations. The results of any subsequent analysis, regardless of the degree of sophistication of the methodology, will be only as reliable as the interpretations of available accounts - and only as complete as the research done to ferret out, and in many cases translate, these accounts. When intensities are assigned without an appreciation of historical setting and context, seemingly careful subsequent analysis can yield grossly inaccurate results. As a case study, I report here on the results of a recent investigation of the 1872 Owen's Valley, California earthquake. Careful consideration of macroseismic observations reveals that this event was probably larger than the great San Francisco earthquake of 1906, and possibly the largest historical earthquake in California. The results suggest that some large earthquakes in California will generate significantly larger ground motions than San Andreas fault events of comparable magnitude.

  7. Climate Change Impacts to Water Quality in the Owens and Mono Lake Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Roy, S. B.; Mills, B.; Kurkjian, R.

    2011-12-01

    This study describes work to identify potential impacts of future climate changes on water quality in the Mono and Owens Lake basins that are sources of water supply to City of Los Angeles through the Los Angeles Aqueduct (LAA) System. A watershed hydrology and water quality model (the Hydrological Simulation Program Fortran-HSPF; Bicknell et al. 1996) was adapted to the basin to evaluate the potential impacts of climate change on water quality. The water quality parameters studied in this work include temperature, dissolved oxygen (DO), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total suspended solids (TSS), nutrients (nitrogen as nitrate and phosphorus as ortho-phosphate), chlorophyll a, total organic carbon (TOC), and arsenic. The model was calibrated to baseline water quality data observed for the period of 1994-2004 at six major locations, including streams and reservoirs. Statistically downscaled temperature and precipitation data from six climate models were used to make future projections of water quality impacts: GFDL CM2.1, CNRM CM3, NCAR PCM1.1, CCSM3, ECHAMS/MPI-OM, and MIROC3.2, and projections developed for 2005-2099. Results from this modeling exercise indicate that by the end of the 21st century, the following changes may occur in the watershed: increases in water temperature by 1-2 oC; decreases in DO, average TSS, and arsenic; increases in nutrients, both nitrogen and phosphorus species; and minimal changes in BOD and TOC. The recommended actions of the modeling analysis include more detailed monitoring for selected parameters to provide a foundation for evaluating long term trends and relationships of flow and concentrations of key constituents such as TSS, nutrients, and arsenic that are of interest from the standpoint of drinking water supply.

  8. Environmental change and fire in the Owen Stanley Ranges, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Geoffrey

    2009-11-01

    Kosipe, an upland valley at 2000 m altitude in the Owen Stanley Ranges of southeastern New Guinea, is known for the discovery of large stone waisted blades dated to 31 400 cal a BP. The purpose of these tools and the nature of occupation are unknown. The altitude is too high for most food crops today and may have stood close to the treeline during the last glaciation. Three pollen and charcoal diagrams from a large swamp in the Kosipe Valley provide a record of swamp and dryland changes for more than 50 000 years. There have been considerable fluctuations in vegetation on the slopes and on the swamp which reflect both environmental change and anthropogenic influences. A gymnosperm-rich forest at the base is replaced by mountain forest dominated by Nothofagus about 42 000 years ago. Fire first becomes apparent across the swamp around 40 000 years ago but is not common during the time when subalpine herbs reach their best representation. Tree fern-rich grasslands form a mosaic with montane forest in a near-treeline environment. The Pleistocene-Holocene boundary is marked by a decline in Nothofagus and increase in lower montane mixed forest taxa. Charcoal increases before this time and the swamp vegetation becomes more grass-rich. Charcoal is at its maximum through the last 3000 years possibly reflecting climate variability as well as sedentary occupation and agriculture on the swamp margin. Supplementary pollen diagrams from two higher altitude sites support the evidence from the Kosipe Swamp cores. Charcoal, local catchment erosion and increases in disturbance taxa become more widespread in the last 5000 years at these sites, suggesting that local settlement at Kosipe may have lagged behind general landscape use by populations from lower altitudes.

  9. The upper Paleozoic miospore genus Spelaeotriletes Neves and Owens, 1966, and constituent Gondwanan species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Playford, Geoffrey; Dino, Rodolfo; Marques-Toigo, Marleni

    2001-11-01

    The upper Paleozoic miospore genus Spelaeotriletes Neves and Owens, 1966 is reviewed as a morpho-taxonomic entity and vis-à-vis other similarly constructed (pseudosaccate) genera — Geminospora Balme, 1962, Grandispora Hoffmeister, Staplin, and Malloy, 1955, Rhabdosporites Richardson, 1960, and Retispora Staplin, 1960. Detailed studies of numerous, mainly topotype specimens of Spelaeotriletes ybertii (Marques-Toigo, 1970) Playford and Powis, 1979 from the Lower Permian of Uruguay result in its re-diagnosis, in conjunction with a survey of its exclusively Gondwanan occurrences, particularly in South American strata extending from the Upper Carboniferous (Westphalian) into the Lower Permian, and also in Australian strata of approximately equivalent age. The characteristics of other species of Spelaeotriletes reported from upper Paleozoic deposits of Gondwana are discussed, as are their temporal representations in various broad regions of the supercontinent (South America, North Africa, Australia). These species include two, perhaps three, that, like Spelaeotriletes triangulus/ arenaceus, are known also from Euramerica — S. balteatus (Playford, 1963) Higgs, 1996, S. pretiosus (Playford, 1964) Utting, 1987, and possibly S. owensii Loboziak and Alpern, 1978. Other species, such as S. benghaziensis Loboziak and Clayton, 1988, S. giganteus Loboziak and Clayton, 1988, and S. vibrissus Playford and Satterthwait, 1988, have, on present knowledge, exclusively Gondwanan occurrences. S. queenslandensis Jones and Truswell, 1992, known only from Upper Carboniferous strata of northeastern Australia, is formally reassigned on sculptural grounds to Grandispora. Not unexpectedly in a paleogeographic perspective, North Africa and South America are more closely allied with each other than with Australia in terms of shared species of Spelaeotriletes.

  10. A diatom record of climate and hydrology for the past 200 KA from Owens Lake, California with comparison to other Breat Basin records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradbury, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Diatoms from lake sediments beneath Owens Lake playa, Inyo County, California, document a nearly continuous paleolimnological record of climate and hydrologic change since the penultimate glacial-interglacial cycle based on a chronology established by radiocarbon, tephrochronology, and paleomagnetic control. Freshwater planktic diatoms (especially species of Stephanodiscus), plagioclase feldspar-rich sediments with high magnetic susceptibility, and Juniperus-type pollen characterized the penultimate glaciation at Owens Lake. Saline diatoms dominated in the following interglacial period, and there are several episodes during which freshwater planktic diatoms became abundant between 100 and 50 ka that may represent interstadial climatic conditions. Saline diatoms fell to low values after 50 ka, but warm-season Aulacoseira species indicate episodes of significant summer precipitation in the hydrologic balance of Owens Lake prior to the last glacial maximum. By 25 ka, glacial environments were again characterized by abundant Juniperus, plagioclase feldspar, and Stephanodiscus species. Generally and Holocene climates were recorded in Owens Lake by short-term fluctuations of saline and freshwater diatoms, desiccation, and oolitic sediments barren of diatoms. Comparison to paleoclimate records both north and south of Owens Lake suggest a southerly displacement of storm tracks originating from the Aleutian Low during glacial episodes.

  11. Long-term weathering effects on the thermal performance of the Libbey-Owens-Ford (liquid) solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Thermal performance tests were conducted on the Libbey-Owens-Ford liquid collector, following long term exposure to natural weathering conditions. Visual inspection of the collector, prior to the retest, indicated noticeable clouding of the inner cover glass, probably resulting from outgassing of the insulation. The absorber plate also showed some discoloration. The test results indicated that performance degradation had occurred at inlet temperatures significantly above ambient. The change in the slope of the efficiency curve, from the original data, is a direct indicator of an increase in the collector heat loss coefficient.

  12. Sulfur Biogeochemistry and Isotope Fractionation in Shallow Groundwater of Owens Dry Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, J.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Gao, S.

    2003-12-01

    The redox status of hypersaline, strongly alkaline groundwaters at Owens Dry Lake was investigated to help guide mitigation efforts for attenuating dust generated from the dry lakebed. Shallow (<1 m), anoxic groundwaters have been identified as a major limitation to vegetation establishment on the lakebed due to the inability of roots to growth in anoxic conditions. Previous work indicates that sulfate reduction is the dominant reaction regulating the redox status of shallow groundwaters. The purpose of this study was to evaluate sulfur biogeochemistry and formation of solid-phase sulfides in the shallow groundwater/sediments using selective sulfur speciation techniques coupled with isotopic measurements. In addition to groundwater and subsurface sediment samples (1-2 m depth) at sites representative of different groundwater pathways, selected sediment samples at 5 different depths (from oxic to anoxic layers) were collected. Sediment samples were examined for monosulfide, pyrite, sulfate, organic sulfur, and total sulfur. Organic sulfur was less than 0.01% of the total, and pyrite was the predominant sulfur-bearing phase below the groundwater capillary zone ( ˜20cm depth) where anoxic conditions were developed. The concentration of monosulfide and pyrite were less than detection limits above the capillary zone as these unsaturated layers were exposed to oxygen. High concentrations of dissolved sulfide (4.81 to 134.7 mg /L) and low concentrations of dissolved Fe (generally <0.5 mg/L) indicate that the availability of Fe limits pyrite formation. The high values ( ˜50‰ ) of isotopic fractionations between δ 34Spyrite and δ 34Ssulfate(Δ sulfate-pyrite) in anoxic zones suggest that bioavailability of organic carbon is a limiting factor for the reduction of sulfate. The values of Δ sulfate-pyrite along the hydrologic flowpath indicate that the isotopic fractionations were significantly correlated with dissolved sulfate concentration, which was strongly

  13. Improving Literature Searching in a Technical Information Center, an Internship and a Staff Improvement Course at the Owens-Illinois Technical Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terbille, Charles I.

    A staff improvement course was developed by an intern at the technical information center (TIC) at Owens-Illinois, Inc. (O-I). First an analysis was made of the information center itself--its goals, services, literature search procedures, information sources, and the function of the information representative-analysts. Next a comparison was made…

  14. The Unexpected Burden of Manhood in Owen Wister's "The Virginian": "Can't Yu' See How It Must Be about a Man?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donald C.

    Literary critics have frequently credited Owen Wister with the invention of the modern Western novel. Yet when compared to the modern cowboy stereotype, the supposedly prototypical text of "The Virginian" defies its author's apparent convictions of Western masculinity. This bestseller includes most of the now classic elements of a Western novel:…

  15. The Jesse Owens Youth Development Program: A Strategy for Serving Pre-College and College-Age Youth. NCCSCE Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stanli K.

    A description is provided of Cuyahoga Community College's (CCC's) Jesse Owens Youth Development Program, a comprehensive year-round combination of courses, programs, and activities for inner city young people between the ages of 11 and 21. Following introductory comments on the program, the beginnings of CCC's youth development program are…

  16. Owens Community College: A Case Study on the Effects of Politics, Economics, Social Factors, and Technological Factors on Future Educational Delivery Strategies, Space Needs, and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paskvan, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to explore the influence of four factors--politics, economics, society, and technology--on educational delivery strategies, space needs, and design at Owens Community College. The future effects of these factors on the college were predicted four to six years from the time the study was conducted. The researcher…

  17. Analysis of substrate and plant spectral features of semi-arid shrub communities in the Owens Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, S. L.; Rock, B. N.; Woodward, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data were analyzed to deduce plant density and species composition in three semi-arid shrub-dominated communities of Owens Valley, CA, occurring on either a sand, granite alluvium, or basalt substrate. The high-spectral resolution AIS data were related to spectra obtained with field portable spectrometers, which in turn were related to plant and soil characteristics of the communities. Many of the dominant species have unique spectral features which permit their identification in AIS pixel images. The canopy-induced shadow may be a major factor influencing substrate spectral properties during fall and winter, because of low sun angles. Moreover, changes in spectral signatures following dormancy and leaf senescence tend to decrease contrasts between the plant community and the geologic substrate, also suggesting that fall and winter are a difficult time of year for spectral analyses.

  18. In situ weathering vs eolian additions to soils: A proposed solution from lava tubes and cumulic soils, Owens Valley, Calif

    SciTech Connect

    Lafarge, D.W.; Burke, R.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Natural dust traps in the form of open conduits to lava tubes, collapsed lava tubes, cinder cone depressions, and range-front half grabens create favorable environments for the accumulation of eolian materials through extended periods of geologic time. The radiometrically dated basalt flows in the Big Pine Lava Field, CA provide minimum and maximum constraining dates for accumulation rates of such eolian materials, which are also added, at least partially, to regional soils developed on moraines and alluvial fans. 1.2 meters of well sorted silts to fine sands are located within a lava tube formed in a flow emanating from the northern cone of the Stooges Range along the range front of the Inyo Mountains. This non-basaltic material records a minimum eolian accumulation rate of 4.8 mm/ka, whereas a somewhat thicker section in the subaerially exposed collapsed portion of the tube system suggests an accumulation rate of 8.0 mm/ka. Across Owens Valley along the Sierra Nevada range front, a cumulic soil described to a depth of 363+ cm is formed in a geomorphically youthful half graben near Crater Mountain (CM). This site records a bimodal particle size distribution of eolian silts and coarse sands, with locally derived very coarse sands and fine pebble gravels from juxtaposed granitic bedrock. Two plausible explanations for the cumulic, bimodal nature of the soil, with accompanying clay bulges are: (1) episodic sources for eolian dust induced by desiccation of pluvial Owens Lake, which would be in phase with Pleistocene climatic changes; or (2) continual input of the eolian component with episodic additions of the coarse-grained granitic materials brought about by periods of tectonism along the Sierra Nevada range front fault, thus not related to paleoclimate. Prevailing southerly winds suggested for times of peak dust availability, and the model of soil forming intervals proposed by Chadwick and Davis (1990) favor the first of these two explanations for the CM.

  19. Structural controls on the spatial distribution and geochemical composition of volcanism in a continental rift zone; an example from Owens Valley, eastern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haproff, P. J.; Yin, A.

    2014-12-01

    Bimodal volcanism is common in continental rift zones. Structural controls to the emplacement and compositions of magmas, however, are not well understood. To address this issue, we examine the location, age, and geochemistry of active volcanic centers, and geometry and kinematics of rift-related faults across the active transtensional Owens Valley rift zone. Building on existing studies, we postulate that the spatial distribution and geochemical composition of volcanism are controlled by motion along rift-bounding fault systems. Along-strike variation in fault geometry and characteristics of active volcanism allow us to divide Owens Valley into three segments: southern, northern, and central. The southern segment of Owens Valley is a simple shear, asymmetric rift bounded to the west by the east-dipping Sierra Nevada frontal fault (SNFF). Active vents of Coso volcanic field are distributed along the eastern rift shoulder and characterized by the eruption of bimodal lavas. The SNFF within this segment is low-angle and penetrates through the lithosphere and into the ductile asthenosphere, allowing for mantle-derived magma to migrate across the weakest part of the fault zone beneath the eastern rift shoulder. Magma thermally weakens wall rocks and eventually stalls in the crust where the melt develops a greater felsic component prior to eruption. The northern segment of Owens Valley displays similar structural geometry, as the west-dipping White Mountains fault (WMF) is listric at depth and offsets the crust and mantle lithosphere, allowing for vertical transport of magma and reservoir emplacement within the crust. Bimodal lavas periodically erupted in the Long Valley Caldera region along the western rift shoulder. The central segment of Owens Valley is a pure shear, symmetric graben generated by motion along the SNFF and WMF. The subvertical, right-slip Owens Valley fault (OVF) strikes along the axis of the valley and penetrates through the lithosphere into the

  20. Zircon geochronology of the Webb Canyon Gneiss and the Mount Owen Quartz Monzonite, Teton Range, Wyoming: Significance to dating late Archean metamorphism in the Wyoming craton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zartman, R.E.; Reed, J.C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The Webb Canyon Gneiss is a strongly foliated and lineated orthogneiss intercalated with layered Archean gneisses in the northern part of the Teton Range in northwestern Wyoming. The Mount Owen Quartz Monzonite is a non-foliated or weakly flow foliated rock which forms a discordant pluton exposed in the central part of the range and that cuts the Webb Canyon Gneiss and the associated layered gneisses. U-Pb zircon geochronology reported here indicates that euhedral pink zircon grew in the Webb Canyon Gneiss at about 2680 Ma, probably during the peak of regional metamorphism and that the Mount Owen was emplaced at 2547??3 Ma. These dates provide the best constraints so far reported on the age of Late Archean regional metamorphism in the western part of the Wyoming craton.

  1. Understanding thermodynamic relationships and geochemical mass balances from catchment to coast: A tribute to the life and career of Owen P. Bricker III

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Suzanne B.; Mackenzie, Fred T.; Baron, Jill S.; Price, Jason

    2014-01-01

    This special volume of aquatic geochemistry is dedicated to the memory of Owen Peterson Bricker III (1936–2011) and serves as a tribute to his life and career. Owen had a distinguished and productive research career in both academics at Johns Hopkins University (Fig. 1) and as a public servant with the Maryland Geological Survey, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the US Geological Survey. He was a pioneer and leader in aqueous geochemistry, who applied a study approach that quantified mineral weathering reactions and equilibrium thermodynamic relations to better understand the chemical evolution of stream water in small watersheds. He will be especially remembered for his efforts to establish rigorous field studies in small catchments around the United States as a means of quantifying the sources of acid-neutralizing capacity that affect the chemical status and biological health of natural waters.

  2. Spatial Evolution of Neogene Normal Faults, Northern Owens Valley: Constraints on Oblique-slip Partioning Within the Eastern California Shear Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, T. P.; Dawers, N.

    2005-05-01

    Simple geometric constraints can be used to predict fault interaction at depth. Such interaction within crustal scale fault populations plays an important role in the tectonic evolution of extensional tectonic settings. Here we use a theoretical relationship between fault dip, horizontal fault spacing, and depth to the base of the seismogenic zone to explain the late Cenozoic temporal and spatial evolution of faulting within the Eastern California shear zone, including the northern extent of Owens Valley, California. Our results show that during its evolution, the east-dipping Sierra Nevada frontal fault in northern Owens Valley became inactive due to intersection with the larger west-dipping range-bounding fault of the White Mountains. The horizontal spacing of 10 km between these two conjugate faults is such that they intersect within the brittle seismic layer resulting in the locking of this segment of Sierra Nevada frontal fault. Continued accumulation of normal displacement along the White Mountains fault zone has since resulted in the present-day half-graben basement structure of northern Owens Valley. This down-dropping along the eastern margin of the valley imposes a flexural tension across the surface of the Coyote Warp, which can be considered a large relay zone between the Sierra Nevada frontal fault and the Round Valley fault further west. It is suggested that this tension is responsible for the formation of west-dipping antithetic normal faults that are distributed locally around the Coyote Warp. This extensional fault geometry has imposed a kinematic restraint on the development and distribution of right-lateral shear within this part of the Eastern California shear zone, including northeastward transfer of right-lateral slip from the Owens Valley fault to the White Mountains fault.

  3. Temperature and rainfall estimates for past 18 000 years in Owens Valley, California with a coupled catchment-lake model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.; Dong, W.; Jiang, P.

    2015-07-01

    Closed-basin lakes are intricately linked to the hydrological systems and are very sensitive recorders of local hydro-climatic fluctuations. Lake records in closed-basins are usually used to investigate the paleoclimate condition which is critical for understanding the past and predicting the future. In this study, a physically based catchment-lake model was developed to extract quantitative paleoclimate information including temperature and rainfall over the past 18 000 years (ka) from lake records in a hydrologically closed basin in the Owens River Valley, California, US. The initial model inputs were prepared based on current regional climate data, boundary conditions from the General Circulation Model, and fossil proxy data. The inputs subsequently were systematically varied in order to produce the observed lake levels. In this way, a large number of possible paleoclimatic combinations can quickly narrow the possible range of paleoclimatic combinations that could have produced the paleolake level and extension. Finally, a quantitative time-series of paleoclimate information for those key times was obtained.

  4. Using Landsat TM Imagery to Monitor Vegetation Change Following Flow Restoration to the Lower Owens River, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bross, Lesley Crandell

    Rehabilitating river corridors to restore valuable riparian habitat consumes significant resources from both governments and private companies. Given these considerable expenditures, it is important to monitor the progress of such projects. This study evaluated the utility of using Landsat Thematic Mapper remotely-sensed data from 2002 and 2009 to monitor vegetation change induced by instream flow restoration to the Lower Owens River in central California. This study compared the results of an unsupervised classification with an NDVI threshold classification to appraise the resources required and effectiveness of each analysis method. The results were inspected by creating standard remote sensing accuracy error matrices and by correlating landscape pattern metrics with bird indicator species. Both sets of classified maps show a noticeable increase in riparian vegetation in the study area following flow restoration in 2006, indicating an improvement of the quality of bird habitat. The study concluded that analyzing vegetation change using the unsupervised classification technique required more effort, expert knowledge, and supplementary data than using the NDVI threshold method. If these prerequisites are met, the output from the unsupervised classification process produces a more precise map of land cover change than the NDVI threshold method. However, if an analyst is lacking either resources or ground verification data, the NDVI threshold technique is capable of providing a generalized, but still valid evaluation of vegetation change. This conclusion is supported by higher correlations between indicator bird species under the unsupervised classification method than were found with the NDVI threshold method.

  5. Four new species of coccidia (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Owen Stanley Skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Sauria: Scincidae), from Papua New Guinea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McAllister, Chris T.; Duszynski, Donald W.; Fisher, Robert N.; Austin, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    Between September and November 1991, 12 Owen Stanley skinks, Papuascincus stanleyanus (Booulenger) were collected from various localities on Papua New Guinea and examined for coccidians. Six (50%) were found to harbour four eimerians that we describe here as new. Oocysts of Eimeria burseyi sp. n. were elongate to ellipsoidal with a bilayered wall and measured (length x width, L x W) 36.0 x 24.0 microm, with a L/W ratio of 1.5. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria goldbergi sp. n. were ellipsoidal, with a bilayered wall, and measured 21.4 x 16.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.3. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but a single or fragmented polar granule was present. Oocysts of Eimeria boulengeri sp. n. were spheroidal to slightly subspheroidal, with a thin, single-layered wall that readily collapses, and measured 16.0 microm, L/W ratio was 1.0. Both micropyle and oocyst residuum were absent, but usually one (sometimes two) polar granule(s) were present. Oocysts of Eimeria niuginiensis sp. n. were oblong to tapered with a bilayered wall, and measured 20.0 x 13.1 microm; L/W ratio was 1.5. A micropyle, oocyst residuum and polar granule were absent. To our knowledge, these represent the only coccidians ever described from P. stanleyanus.

  6. Coronal temperature, density, and magnetic field maps of a solar acitve region using the Owens Valley Solar Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first results of solar active region observations with the recently completed five-element Owens Valley Solar Array. On 1991 October 24, maps of Active Region AR 6891 were obtained at 22 frequencies from 1.2-7.0 GHz to provide brightness temperature spectra at each point. This is the first time that both high spatial and frequency-resolution brightness temperature spectra have been available over such a broad radio-frequency range. We find that over most of the region the spectra fall into one of the two well-defined categories: thermal free-free or thermal gyroresonance. In these cases, we use the spectra to deduce the spatial variation of physical parameters-electron temperature, column emission measure (intergral n(sup 2)(sub e) dl), and the coronal magnetic field strength-in and around the active region. Over a limited area of the region, the spectra resemble neither of the simple types, and alternative interpretations are required. The possibilties include the presence of fine structure that is unresolved at low frequencies; the presence of a small number of nonthermal electrons; or the presence of overlying, cooler 10(exp 6) K material which at low frequencies absorbs the hot (3 x 10(exp 6) K) thermal emission generated below.

  7. An efficient deterministic-probabilistic approach to modeling regional groundwater flow: 2. application to Owens Valley, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guymon, Gary L.; Yen, Chung-Cheng

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of a deterministic-probabilistic model for predicting water tables in southern Owens Valley, California, is evaluated. The model is based on a two-layer deterministic model that is cascaded with a two-point probability model. To reduce the potentially large number of uncertain variables in the deterministic model, lumping of uncertain variables was evaluated by sensitivity analysis to reduce the total number of uncertain variables to three variables: hydraulic conductivity, storage coefficient or specific yield, and source-sink function. Results demonstrate that lumping of uncertain parameters reduces computational effort while providing sufficient precision for the case studied. Simulated spatial coefficients of variation for water table temporal position in most of the basin is small, which suggests that deterministic models can predict water tables in these areas with good precision. However, in several important areas where pumping occurs or the geology is complex, the simulated spatial coefficients of variation are over estimated by the two-point probability method.

  8. Increased sialylation as a phenomenon in accommodation of the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis (Owen, 1835) in skeletal muscle fibres.

    PubMed

    Milcheva, Rositsa; Ivanov, Dimitar; Iliev, Ivan; Russev, Russy; Petkova, Svetlozara; Babal, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    The biology of sialic acids has been an object of interest in many models of acquired and inherited skeletal muscle pathology. The present study focuses on the sialylation changes in mouse skeletal muscle after invasion by the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis (Owen, 1835). Asynchronous infection with T. spiralis was induced in mice that were sacrificed at different time points of the muscle phase of the disease. The amounts of free sialic acid, sialylated glycoproteins and total sialyltransferase activity were quantified. Histochemistry with lectins specific for sialic acid was performed in order to localise distribution of sialylated glycoconjugates and to clarify the type of linkage of the sialic acid residues on the carbohydrate chains. Elevated intracellular accumulation of α-2,3- and α-2,6-sialylated glycoconjugates was found only within the affected sarcoplasm of muscle fibres invaded by the parasite. The levels of free and protein-bound sialic acid were increased and the total sialyltransferase activity was also elevated in the skeletal muscle tissue of animals with trichinellosis. We suggest that the biological significance of this phenomenon might be associated with securing integrity of the newly formed nurse cell within the surrounding healthy skeletal muscle tissue. The increased sialylation might inhibit the affected muscle cell contractility through decreased membrane ion gating, helping the parasite accommodation process. PMID:26373236

  9. Systematic biases in measured PM10 values with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved samplers at Owens Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Ono, D M; Hardebeck, E; Parker, J; Cox, B G

    2000-07-01

    From 1993 through 1998, Wedding or Graseby high-volume PM10 samplers were collocated with tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) samplers at three sites at Owens Lake, CA. The study area is heavily impacted by windblown dust from the dry Owens Lake bed, which was exposed as a result of water diversions to the city of Los Angeles. A dichotomous (dichot) sampler and three collocated Partisol samplers were added in 1995 and 1999, respectively. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) operating procedures were followed for all samplers, except for a Wedding sampler that was not cleaned for the purpose of this study. On average, the TEOM and Partisol samplers agreed to within 6%, and the dichot, Graseby, and Wedding samplers measured lower PM10 concentrations by about 10, 25, and 35%, respectively. Surprisingly, the "clean" Wedding sampler consistently measured the same concentration as the "dirty" Wedding sampler through 85 runs without cleaning. The finding that the Graseby and Wedding high-volume PM10 samplers read consistently lower than the TEOM, Partisol, and dichot samplers at Owens Lake is consistent with PM10 sampler comparisons done in other fugitive dust areas, and with wind tunnel tests showing that sampler cut points can be significantly lower than 10 microns under certain conditions. However, these results are opposite of the bias found for TEOM samplers in areas that have significant amounts of volatile particles, where the TEOM reads low due to the vaporization of particles on the TEOM's heated filter. Coarse particles like fugitive dust are relatively unaffected by the filter temperature. This study shows that in the absence of volatile particles and in the presence of fugitive dust, a different systematic bias of up to 35% exists between samplers using dichot inlets and high-volume samplers, which may cause the Graseby and Wedding PM10 samplers to undermeasure PM10 by up to 35% when the PM10 is predominantly from coarse particulate sources

  10. Water quality of Rob Roy Reservoir and Lake Owen, Albany County, and Granite Springs and Crystal Lake Reservoirs, Laramie County, Wyoming, 1997-98

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogle, Kathy Muller; Peterson, D.A.; Spillman, Bud; Padilla, Rosie

    1999-01-01

    The water quality of four reservoirs was assessed during 1997 and 1998 as a cooperative project between the Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities and the U. S. Geological Survey. The four reservoirs, Rob Roy, Lake Owen, Granite Springs, and Crystal Lake, provide approximately 75 percent of the public water supply for Cheyenne, Wyoming. Samples of water and bottom sediment were collected and analyzed for selected physical, chemical, and biological characteristics to provide data about the reservoirs. Water flows between the reservoirs through a series of pipelines and stream channels. The reservoirs differ in physical characteristics such as elevation, volume, and depth.Profiles of temperature, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and pH were examined. Three of the four reservoirs exhibited stratification during the summer. The profiles indicate that stratification develops in all reservoirs except Lake Owen. Stratification developed in Rob Roy, Granite Springs, and Crystal Lake Reservoirs by mid-July in 1998 and continued until September, with the thickness of the epilimnion increasing during that time. Secchi disk readings indicated Rob Roy Reservoir had the clearest water of the four reservoirs studied.The composition of the phytoplankton community was different in the upper two reservoirs from that in the lower two reservoirs. Many of the species found in Rob Roy Reservoir and Lake Owen are associated with oligotrophic, nutrient-poor conditions. In contrast, many of the species found in Granite Springs and Crystal Lake Reservoirs are associated with mesotrophic or eutrophic conditions. The total number of taxa identified also increased downstream.The chemical water type in the reservoirs was similar, but dissolved-solids concentrations were greater in the downstream reservoirs. Water in all four reservoirs was a calcium-bicarbonate type. In the fall of 1997, Rob Roy Reservoir had the lowest dissolved-solids concentration (19 milligrams per liter), whereas

  11. Climatic/Hydrologic Oscillations since 155,000 yr B.P. at Owens Lake, California, Reflected in Abundance and Stable Isotope Composition of Sediment Carbonate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Menking, K.M.; Bischoff, J.L.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.; Burdette, J.W.; Rye, R.O.

    1997-01-01

    Sediment grain size, carbonate content, and stable isotopes in 70-cm-long (???1500-yr) channel samples from Owens Lake core OL-92 record many oscillations representing climate change in the eastern Sierra Nevada region since 155,000 yr B.P. To first order, the records match well the marine ??18O record. At Owens Lake, however, the last interglaciation appears to span the entire period from 120,000 to 50,000 yr B.P., according to our chronology, and was punctuated by numerous short periods of wetter conditions during an otherwise dry climate. Sediment proxies reveal that the apparent timing of glacial-interglacial transitions, notably the penultimate one, is proxy-dependent. In the grain-size and carbonate-content records this transition is abrupt and occurs at ??? 120,000 yr B.P. In contrast, in the isotopic records the transition is gradual and occurs between 145,000 and 120,000 yr B. P. Differences in timing of the transition are attributed to variable responses by proxies to climate change. ?? 1997 University of Washington.

  12. Climate and hydrology of the last interglaciation (MIS 5) in Owens Basin, California: Isotopic and geochemical evidence from core OL-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, H.-C.; Bischoff, J.L.; Ku, T.-L.; Zhu, Z.-Y.

    2004-01-01

    ??18O, ??13C, total organic carbon, total inorganic carbon, and acid-leachable Li, Mg and Sr concentrations on 443 samples from 32 to 83 m depth in Owens Lake core OL-92 were analyzed to study the climatic and hydrological conditions between 60 and 155 ka with a resolution of ???200 a. The multi-proxy data show that Owens Lake overflowed during wet/cold conditions of marine isotope stages (MIS) 4, 5b and 6, and was closed during the dry/warm conditions of MIS 5a, c and e. The lake partially overflowed during MIS 5d. Our age model places the MIS 4/5 boundary at ca 72.5 ka and the MIS 5/6 boundary (Termination II) at ca 140 ka, agreeing with the Devils Hole chronology. The diametrical precipitation intensities between the Great Basin (cold/wet) and eastern China (cold/dry) on Milankovitch time scales imply a climatic teleconnection across the Pacific. It also probably reflects the effect of high-latitude ice sheets on the southward shifts of both the summer monsoon frontal zone in eastern Asia and the polar jet stream in western North America during glacial periods. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Owens Valley Epics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Donald

    2007-01-01

    One of the best-studied, least-discussed texts of Native American oral literature is a long Mojave "epic" taken down from a man named Inyo-kutavere by Alfred Kroeber in 1902 and published in 1951. The text was published in twenty-nine pages along with forty-eight pages of commentary and twenty-five pages of notes. In 1999, Arthur Hatto, an…

  14. Climate Change Impacts on the Los Angeles Aqueducts Water Sources: 21st Century Hydrologic Projections for Owens Valley and Mono Lake Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa-Cabral, M. C.; Roy, S. B.; Maurer, E. P.; Mills, W. B.; Chen, L.

    2011-12-01

    Precipitation from the Eastern Sierra Nevada watersheds of Owens Lake and Mono Lake is one of the main water sources, and the one of highest quality, for Los Angeles' more than 4 million people. Winter snow is stored in the large snowpack reservoir, and meltwater (~0.2-0.5 million acre-feet) is delivered annually to the city in the dry season by the 340-mile long Los Angeles Aqueduct system, operated by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. We identify plausible scenarios of future climate conditions in the Owens-Mono watersheds over the 21st century based on CMIP3 results for 16 global climate models (GCMs) statistically downscaled to 1/8° and greenhouse gas emission scenarios A2 and B1; and we evaluate the consequent hydrologic impacts using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model. Such climate scenarios have large and unquantifiable associated uncertainty and do not represent predictions, but are considered to be plausible under the current state of knowledge. We applied VIC to the Owens-Mono watersheds and calibrated the model using monthly streamflow records provided by LADWP. Of most interest to Los Angeles' water supply are the projections for the snowpack and the dry-season hydrograph that relies on snowmelt. Our results indicate future increases in the fraction of precipitation falling as rain rather than snow, from a historical value of about 20% to 20-30% by mid-century and 28-52% by end of century (depending on the GCM) for scenario A2. As a result, the snowpack's peak snow water equivalent (SWE) is projected to decline by most GCMs. The SWE peak is also projected to shift toward earlier dates (by a few days by mid-century and by a GCM-average of 2 weeks by end of century under emissions scenario A2). The diminished SWE, earlier SWE peak and earlier melt associated with rising temperatures result in earlier hydrograph peaks, a shift in the date marking the passage of half of the year's hydrograph volume (by more than one

  15. Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway glass containers. Quarterly report. Feb. 1, 1996--Apr. 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Objective is to demonstrate use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. Host furnace is an Owens- Brockway 6-port pair sideport furnace in Vernon CA producing 325- ton/d of amber container glass. Baseline NO{sub x} level is 4.0 lb/ton glass; an anticipated NO{sub x} reduction of 50% would lower this to below 2 lb/ton. With the OEAS operating on only one of the 6 ports, an overall NO{sub x} reduction of 8-10% was obtained, suggesting that an overall furnance NO{sub x} reduction of 50% can be achieved.

  16. Kinematics of the Eastern California shear zone: Evidence for slip transfer from Owens and Saline Valley fault zones to Fish Lake Valley fault zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Dixon, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    Late Quaternary slip rates and satellite-based geodetic data for the western Great Basin constrain regional fault-slip distribution and evolution. The geologic slip rate on the Fish Lake Valley fault zone (the northwest extension of the Furnace Creek fault zone) increases northward from about 3 to 5 mm/yr, in agreement with modeled geodetic data. The increase coincides with the intersections of the Deep Springs fault, connected to the Owens Valley fault zone, and of other faults connected to the Saline Valley fault. The combined geologic and geodetic data suggest that (1) the northwest-striking faults of the Eastern California shear zone north of the Garlock fault are connected by north- to northeast-striking normal faults that transfer slip in a series of right steps, and (2) the amount and distribution of slip among the many faults of this broad, complex plate boundary have changed through time.

  17. Determining the origin of enigmatic bedrock structures using apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology: Alabama and Poverty Hills, Owens Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, G. A.; Reiners, P. W.; Ducea, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Alabama and Poverty Hills are enigmatic, topographic highs of crystalline basement surrounded by Neogene sediments in Owens Valley, California. The 150-km long Owens Valley, the westernmost graben of the Basin and Range Province, initiated at about 3 Ma, creating ~2-4 km of vertical relief from the Sierra Nevada and White/Inyos crests to the valley floor. Along the valley, the active right-lateral Owens Valley Fault Zone (OVFZ) accommodates a significant portion of Pacific-North American plate motion, creating an oblique dextral fault zone, with localized transpression along minor left-stepovers. The dominantly granitic Mesozoic rocks of the Alabama Hills are bounded by the OVFZ to the east, and the granitic and metavolcanic Mesozoic rocks of the Poverty Hills are located along an apparent 3-km left stepover of the OVFZ. The tectonic origin and geodynamic significance of both these structures are not known, but previously published hypotheses include: 1) transpressional uplifts as OVFZ-related flower structures; 2) down-dropped normal fault blocks; and 3) giant landslides from adjacent ranges. We measured apatite (U-Th)/He ages on 15 samples from the Alabama and Poverty Hills to understand the history of shallow crustal exhumation of these structures, and to potentially correlate them to rocks from adjacent ranges. Apatite He dating typically yields cooling ages corresponding to closure temperatures of ~55-65 °C, corresponding roughly to depths of ~2-3 km in the crust. The majority of apatite He ages from the Alabama Hills ranged from 58-70 Ma, but the far eastern, and lowest elevation sample showed ages of 51-55 Ma. The Poverty Hills shows younger ages of 40-65 Ma and no recognizable spatial pattern. Although the data do not conclusively rule out a transpressional uplift origin of the Poverty Hills, the rocks within them could not have been exhumed from depths greater than ~2-3 km in Owens Valley. Data from both structures are most consistent with down

  18. Arabia-Somalia plate kinematics, evolution of the Aden-Owen-Carlsberg triple junction, and opening of the Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Marc; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Petit, Carole; Huchon, Philippe; Al-Kathiri, Ali; Audin, Laurence; Beslier, Marie-Odile; D'Acremont, Elia; Fabbri, Olivier; Fleury, Jean-Marc; Khanbari, Khaled; Lepvrier, Claude; Leroy, Sylvie; Maillot, Bertrand; Merkouriev, Serge

    2010-04-01

    New geophysical data collected at the Aden-Owen-Carlsberg (AOC) triple junction between the Arabia, India, and Somalia plates are combined with all available magnetic data across the Gulf of Aden to determine the detailed Arabia-Somalia plate kinematics over the past 20 Myr. We reconstruct the history of opening of the Gulf of Aden, including the penetration of the Sheba Ridge into the African continent and the evolution of the triple junction since its formation. Magnetic data evidence three stages of ridge propagation from east to west. Seafloor spreading initiated ˜20 Myr ago along a 200 km-long ridge portion located immediately west of the Owen fracture zone. A second 500 km-long ridge portion developed westward up to the Alula-Fartak transform fault before Chron 5D (17.5 Ma). Before Chron 5C (16.0 Ma), a third 700 km-long ridge portion was emplaced between the Alula-Fartak transform fault and the western end of the Gulf of Aden (45°E). Between 20 and 16 Ma, the Sheba Ridge propagated over a distance of 1400 km at an extremely fast average rate of 35 cm yr-1. The ridge propagation resulted from the Arabia-Somalia rigid plate rotation about a stationary pole. Since Chron 5C (16.0 Ma), the spreading rate of the Sheba Ridge decreased first rapidly until 10 Ma and then more slowly. The evolution of the AOC triple junction is marked by a change of configuration around 10 Ma, with the formation of a new Arabia-India plate boundary. Part of the Arabian plate was then transferred to the Indian plate.

  19. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility as a tool for recognizing core deformation: reevaluation of the paleomagnetic record of Pleistocene sediments from drill hole OL-92, Owens Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbaum, Joseph; Reynolds, Richard T.; Smoot, Joseph; Meyer, Robert

    2000-01-01

    At Owens Lake, California, paleomagnetic data document the Matuyama/Brunhes polarity boundary near the bottom of a 323-m core (OL-92) and display numerous directional fluctuations throughout the Brunhes chron. Many of the intervals of high directional dispersion were previously interpreted to record magnetic excursions. For the upper ~120 m, these interpretations were tested using the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), which typically defines a subhorizontal planar fabric for sediments deposited in quiet water. AMS data from intervals of deformed core, determined from detailed analysis of sedimentary structures, were compared to a reference AMS fabric derived from undisturbed sediment. This comparison shows that changes in the AMS fabric provide a means of screening core samples for deformation and the associated paleomagnetic record for the adverse effects of distortion. For that portion of core OL-92 studied here (about the upper 120 m), the combined analyses of sedimentary structures and AMS data demonstrate that most of the paleomagnetic features, previously interpreted as geomagnetic excursions, are likely the result of core deformation.

  20. Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway Glass Containers. Technical progress report, August 1, 1995--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.; Abbasi, H.

    1996-11-01

    The objective of the program is to demonstrate the use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO, emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. This technology, known as oxygen-enriched air staging (OEAS), has been demonstrated, and is now being commercialized, for endport container glass furnaces. A 17-month development program has been established with specific objectives to: (1) acquire baseline operating data on the host sideport furnace in Vernon, California, (2) evaluate secondary oxidant injection strategies based on earlier endport furnace results and through modeling of a single port pair, (3) retrofit and test one port pair (the test furnace has six port pairs) with a flexible OEAS system, and select the optimal system configuration, (4) use the results from tests with one port pair to design, retrofit, and test OEAS on the entire furnace (six port pairs), and (5) analyze test results, prepare report, and finalize the business plan to commercialize OEAS for sideport furnaces. The host furnace for testing in this program is an Owens-Brockway 6-port pair sideport furnace in Vernon, California producing 325-ton/d of amber container glass. The baseline NO{sub x} level of this optimized furnace is about 4.0 lb/ton of glass. An anticipated NO{sub x}, reduction of 50% will lower the NO{sub x} production level to below 2 lb/ton. Secondary oxidant staging techniques being considered include oxygen-enriched ambient air staging (OEAS) and oxygen staging (OS).

  1. Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway glass containers. Quarterly technical progress report, November 1, 1996--January 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.; Abbasi, H.

    1997-03-01

    The objective of the program is to demonstrate the use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO, emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. This technology, known as oxygen-enriched air staging (OEAS), has been demonstrated, and is now being commercialized, for endport container glass furnaces. A 17-month development program has been established with specific objectives to: (1) acquire baseline operating data on the host sideport furnace in Vernon, California, (2) evaluate secondary oxidant injection strategies based on earlier endport furnace results and through modeling of a single port pair, (3) retrofit and test one port pair (the test furnace has six port pairs) with a flexible OEAS system, and select the optimal system configuration, (4) use the results from tests with one port pair to design, retrofit, and test OEAS on the entire furnace (six port pairs), and (5) analyze test results, prepare report, and finalize the business plan to commercialize OEAS for sideport furnaces. The host furnace for testing in this program is an Owens-Brockway 6-port pair sideport furnace in Vernon, California producing 325-ton/d of amber container glass. The baseline NO{sub x} level of this optimized furnace is about 4.0 lb/ton of glass. An anticipated NO{sub x}, reduction of 50% will lower the NO{sub x} production level to below 2 lb/ton. Secondary oxidant staging techniques being considered include oxygen-enriched ambient air staging (OEAS) and oxygen staging (OS).

  2. Estimates of evapotranspiration in alkaline scrub and meadow communities of Owens Valley, California, using the Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and Penman-combination methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, L. F. W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    In Owens Valley, evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the largest components of outflow in the hydrologic budget and the least understood. ET estimates for December 1983 through October 1985 were made for seven representative locations selected on the basis of geohydrology and the characteristics of phreatophytic alkaline scrub and meadow communities. The Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and Penman-combination methods were used to estimate ET. The results of the analyses appear satisfactory when compared to other estimates of ET. Results by the eddy-correlation method are for a direct and a residual latent-heat flux that is based on sensible-heat flux and energy budget measurements. Penman-combination potential ET estimates were determined to be unusable because they overestimated actual ET. Modification in the psychrometer constant of this method to account for differences between heat-diffusion resistance and vapor-diffusion resistance permitted actual ET to be estimated. The methods may be used for studies in similar semiarid and arid rangeland areas in the Western United States. Meteorological data for three field sites are included in the appendix. Simple linear regression analysis indicates that ET estimates are correlated to air temperature, vapor-density deficit, and net radiation. Estimates of annual ET range from 300 mm at a low-density scrub site to 1,100 mm at a high-density meadow site. The monthly percentage of annual ET was determined to be similar for all sites studied. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Calibration of GOES-VISSR, visible-band satellite data and its application to the analysis of a dust storm at Owens Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacKinnon, D.J.; Chavez, P.S., Jr.; Fraser, R. S.; Niemeyer, T.C.; Gillette, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a joint Russian/American dust-storm experiment, GOES-VISSR (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Visible-Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer), data from a visible-band satellite image of a large dust storm emanating from Owens Lake, California were acquired on March 10 and 11, 1993. The satellite data were calibrated to targets of known ground reflectance factors and processed with radiative transfer techniques to yield aerosol (dust) optical depth at those stages of the dust storm when concurrent ground-based measurements of optical depth were made. Calibration of the satellite data is crucial for comparing surficial changes in remotely sensed data acquired over a period of time from the same area and for determining accurate concentrations of atmospheric aerosols using radiative transfer techniques. The calibration procedure forces the distribution of visible-band, DN (digital number) values, acquired on July 1, 1992, at 1731 GMT from the GOES-VISSR sensor over a large test area, to match the distribution of visible-band, DN values concurrently acquired from a Landsat MSS (Multispectral Scanner) sensor over the same test area; the Landsat MSS DN values were directly associated with reflectance factors measured from ground targets. The calibrated GOES-VISSR data for July 1, 1992, were then used to calibrate other GOES-VISSR data acquired on March 10 and 11, 1993, during the dust storm. Uncertainties in location of ground targets, bi-directional reflectance and atmospheric attenuation contribute an error of approximately ??0.02 in the satellite-inferred ground reflectance factors. On March 11 at 1031 PST the satellite-received radiances during the peak of the storm were 3 times larger than predicted by our radiative transfer model for a pure clay dust plume of infinite optical depth. This result supported ground-based measurements that the plume at that time was composed primarily of large salt grains, probably sodium sulfate, which could not be

  4. Mode of opening of an oceanic pull-apart: The 20°N Basin along the Owen Fracture Zone (NW Indian Ocean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Mathieu; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Fournier, Marc; Huchon, Philippe; Delescluse, Matthias

    2013-09-01

    basins are common features observed at releasing bends along major strike-slip faults. The formation and structural evolution of such basins have mostly been investigated in the continental domain and by sandbox laboratory experiments or numerical models. Here we present recently acquired multibeam bathymetry, 3.5 kHz echo sounder, and seismic profiles across the 20°N pull-apart Basin along the India-Arabia transform boundary, known as the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ). Using nearby oceanic drilling (Deep Sea Drilling Project 222), we constrain the structural evolution of the basin since opening some 3 Myr ago. The 20°N Basin is large (90 km long and 35 km wide) despite limited transcurrent motion (~10 km). The first stage involved the formation of a step over along the OFZ and the subsequent isolation of a subsiding half graben. Extension and subsidence were further partitioned over three distinct subbasins separated by complex sets of transverse faults. The size of the basin was enhanced by gravity-driven collapse. The 20°N Basin has been a catchment for Indus turbidites since its opening, which provide a good record of syn-sedimentary deformation. The deformation related to the subsidence of the half graben mimics rollover structures commonly encountered in salt tectonics, suggesting that subsidence was accommodated by one or several décollement layers at depth. Despite a different rheological context, the subsurface structure of the nascent oceanic 20°N Basin is very similar to the more mature continental Dead Sea Basin along the Levant Fault, which also displays subbasins separated by transverse faults.

  5. Estimates of evapotranspiration in alkaline scrub and meadow communities of Owens Valley, California, using the Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and penman-combination methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duell, Lowell F. W., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    In Owens Valley, evapotranspiration (ET) is one of the largest components of outflow in the hydrologic budget and the least understood. ET estimates for December 1983 through October 1985 were made for seven representative locations selected on the basis of geohydrology and the characteristics of phreatophytic alkaline scrub and meadow communities. The Bowen-ratio, eddy-correlation, and Penman-combination methods were used to estimate ET. The results of the analyses appear satisfactory when compared with other estimates of ET. Results by the eddy-correlation method are for a direct and a residual latent-heat flux that is based on sensible-heat flux and energy-budget measurements. Penman-combination potential-ET estimates were determined to be unusable because they overestimated actual ET. Modification of the psychrometer constant of this method to account for differences between heat-diffusion resistance and vapor-diffusion resistance permitted actual ET to be estimated. The methods described in this report may be used for studies in similar semiarid and arid rangeland areas in the Western United States. Meteorological data for three field sites are included in the appendix of this report. Simple linear regression analysis indicates that ET estimates are correlated to air temperature, vapor-density deficit, and net radiation. Estimates of annual ET range from 301 millimeters at a low-density scrub site to 1,137 millimeters at a high-density meadow site. The monthly percentage of annual ET was determined to be similar for all sites studied.

  6. Studies of Quaternary saline lakes - III. Mineral, chemical, and isotopic evidence of salt solution and crystallization processes in Owens Lake, California, 1969-1971

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, George I.; Friedman, Irving; McLaughlin, Robert J.

    1987-04-01

    As a consequence of the 1969-1970 flooding of normally dry Owens Lake, a 2.4-m-deep lake formed and 20% of the 2-m-thick salt bed dissolved in it. Its desiccation began August 1969, and salts started crystallizing September 1970, ending August 1971. Mineralogic, brine-composition, and stable-isotope data plus field observations showed that while the evolving brine composition established the general crystallization timetable and range of primary and secondary mineral assemblages, it was the daily, monthly, and seasonal temperature changes that controlled the details of timing and mineralogy during this depositional process. Deuterium analyses of lake brine, interstitial brine, and hydrated saline phases helped confirm the sequence of mineral crystallizations and transformations, and they documented the sources and temperatures of waters involved in the reactions. Salts first crystallized as floating rafts on the lake surface. Natron and mirabilite, salts whose solubilities decrease greatly with lowering temperatures, crystallized late at night in winter, when surface-water temperatures reached their minima; trona, nahcolite, burkeite, and halite, salts with solubilities less sensitive to temperature, crystallized during the afternoon in summer, when surface salinities reached their maxima. However, different temperatures were generally associated with crystallization (at the surface) and accumulation (on the lake floor) because short-term temperature changes were transmitted to surface and bottom waters at different rates. Consequently, even when solubilities were exceeded at the surface, salts were preserved or not as a function of bottom-water temperatures. Halite, a nearly temperature-insensitive salt, was always preserved. Monitoring the lake-brine chemistry and mineralogy of the accumulating salts shows: (1) An estimated 0.9 × 10 6 tons of CO 2 was released to the atmosphere or consumed by the lake's biomass prior to most salt crystallization. (2) After

  7. Studies of Quaternary saline lakes-III. Mineral, chemical, and isotopic evidence of salt solution and crystallization processes in Owens Lake, California, 1969-1971

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, G.I.; Friedman, I.; McLaughlin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    As a consequence of the 1969-1970 flooding of normally dry Owens Lake, a 2.4-m-deep lake formed and 20% of the 2-m-thick salt bed dissolved in it. Its desiccation began August 1969, and salts started crystallizing September 1970, ending August 1971. Mineralogic, brine-composition, and stable-isotope data plus field observations showed that while the evolving brine composition established the general crystallization timetable and range of primary and secondary mineral assemblages, it was the daily, monthly, and seasonal temperature changes that controlled the details of timing and mineralogy during this depositional process. Deuterium analyses of lake brine, interstitial brine, and hydrated saline phases helped confirm the sequence of mineral crystallizations and transformations, and they documented the sources and temperatures of waters involved in the reactions. Salts first crystallized as floating rafts on the lake surface. Natron and mirabilite, salts whose solubilities decrease greatly with lowering temperatures, crystallized late at night in winter, when surface-water temperatures reached their minima; trona, nahcolite, burkeite, and halite, salts with solubilities less sensitive to temperature, crystallized during the afternoon in summer, when surface salinities reached their maxima. However, different temperatures were generally associated with crystallization (at the surface) and accumulation (on the lake floor) because short-term temperature changes were transmitted to surface and bottom waters at different rates. Consequently, even when solubilities were exceeded at the surface, salts were preserved or not as a function of bottom-water temperatures. Halite, a nearly temperature-insensitive salt, was always preserved. Monitoring the lake-brine chemistry and mineralogy of the accumulating salts shows: (1) An estimated 0.9 ?? 106 tons of CO2 was released to the atmosphere or consumed by the lake's biomass prior to most salt crystallization. (2) After

  8. Ancient collagen reveals evolutionary history of the endemic South American 'ungulates'.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Since the late eighteenth century, fossils of bizarre extinct creatures have been described from the Americas, revealing a previously unimagined chapter in the history of mammals. The most bizarre of these are the 'native' South American ungulates thought to represent a group of mammals that evolved in relative isolation on South America, but with an uncertain affinity to any particular placental lineage. Many authors have considered them descended from Laurasian 'condylarths', which also includes the probable ancestors of perissodactyls and artiodactyls, whereas others have placed them either closer to the uniquely South American xenarthrans (anteaters, armadillos and sloths) or the basal afrotherians (e.g. elephants and hyraxes). These hypotheses have been debated owing to conflicting morphological characteristics and the hitherto inability to retrieve molecular information. Of the 'native' South American mammals, only the toxodonts and litopterns persisted until the Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene. Owing to known difficulties in retrieving ancient DNA (aDNA) from specimens from warm climates, this research presents a molecular phylogeny for both Macrauchenia patachonica (Litopterna) and Toxodon platensis (Notoungulata) recovered using proteomics-based (liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) sequencing analyses of bone collagen. The results place both taxa in a clade that is monophyletic with the perissodactyls, which today are represented by horses, rhinoceroses and tapirs. PMID:25833851

  9. Ancient collagen reveals evolutionary history of the endemic South American ‘ungulates’

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Since the late eighteenth century, fossils of bizarre extinct creatures have been described from the Americas, revealing a previously unimagined chapter in the history of mammals. The most bizarre of these are the ‘native’ South American ungulates thought to represent a group of mammals that evolved in relative isolation on South America, but with an uncertain affinity to any particular placental lineage. Many authors have considered them descended from Laurasian ‘condylarths’, which also includes the probable ancestors of perissodactyls and artiodactyls, whereas others have placed them either closer to the uniquely South American xenarthrans (anteaters, armadillos and sloths) or the basal afrotherians (e.g. elephants and hyraxes). These hypotheses have been debated owing to conflicting morphological characteristics and the hitherto inability to retrieve molecular information. Of the ‘native’ South American mammals, only the toxodonts and litopterns persisted until the Late Pleistocene–Early Holocene. Owing to known difficulties in retrieving ancient DNA (aDNA) from specimens from warm climates, this research presents a molecular phylogeny for both Macrauchenia patachonica (Litopterna) and Toxodon platensis (Notoungulata) recovered using proteomics-based (liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry) sequencing analyses of bone collagen. The results place both taxa in a clade that is monophyletic with the perissodactyls, which today are represented by horses, rhinoceroses and tapirs. PMID:25833851

  10. Large-scale variability of wind erosion mass flux rates at Owens Lake 1. Vertical profiles of horizontal mass fluxes of wind-eroded particles with diameter greater than 50 μm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillette, Dale A.; Fryrear, D.W.; Xiao, Jing Bing; Stockton, Paul; Ono, Duane; Helm, Paula J.; Gill, Thomas E; Ley, Trevor

    1997-01-01

    A field experiment at Owens (dry) Lake, California, tested whether and how the relative profiles of airborne horizontal mass fluxes for >50-μm wind-eroded particles changed with friction velocity. The horizontal mass flux at almost all measured heights increased proportionally to the cube of friction velocity above an apparent threshold friction velocity for all sediment tested and increased with height except at one coarse-sand site where the relative horizontal mass flux profile did not change with friction velocity. Size distributions for long-time-averaged horizontal mass flux samples showed a saltation layer from the surface to a height between 30 and 50 cm, above which suspended particles dominate. Measurements from a large dust source area on a line parallel to the wind showed that even though the saltation flux reached equilibrium ∼650 m downwind of the starting point of erosion, weakly suspended particles were still input into the atmosphere 1567 m downwind of the starting point; thus the saltating fraction of the total mass flux decreased after 650 m. The scale length difference and ratio of 70/30 suspended mass flux to saltation mass flux at the farthest down wind sampling site confirm that suspended particles are very important for mass budgets in large source areas and that saltation mass flux can be a variable fraction of total horizontal mass flux for soils with a substantial fraction of <100-μm particles.

  11. Reinstatement and redescription of Lebbeus armatus (Owen, 1839), long synonymized with L. groenlandicus (Fabricius, 1775), and description of one new species from the southwestern Sea of Okhotsk, Hokkaido, Japan (Crustacea: Decapoda: Caridea: Thoridae).

    PubMed

    Komai, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The caridean shrimp species Lebbeus armatus (Owen, 1839) (Thoridae), originally described from Kamchatka, is reinstated from the synonymy of L. groenlandicus (Fabricius, 1775) and redescribed. It is easily distinguished from L. groenlandicus by having dense covering of short setae on the carapace and lateral parts of the pleon (versus only sparse setae are present), the clearly delimited branchial ridge on the carapace (versus at most a trace of a branchial ridge being discernible), the postrostral dorsal teeth noticeably becoming stronger and higher anteriorly (versus the anteriormost postrostral tooth is not the strongest), the higher number of ventral teeth of the second pleuron (three to five versus one) and of the third and fourth pleura (three or four versus one or two), and the usual presence of one or two spines on the carpi of the third to fifth pereopods (versus unarmed). A new species, L. magnificus, is described and illustrated on the basis of five specimens from the Kitami-Yamato Bank, southwestern Sea of Okhotsk, Hokkaido, Japan. The new species appears closest to L. groenlandicus, but is easily distinguished from the latter by having five postrostral teeth in females (versus four), more numerous ventral teeth on the fifth pleuron (three or four versus two), the stouter inner flagellum of the antennule in males, and the more numerous meral spines on the third to fifth pereopods. Previous records of L. groenlandicus from East Asian waters are referred to L. armatus. Records of L. groenlandicus from the northeastern Pacific remain to be reassessed, because specimens reported from the area do not agree in some characters with any of the three species treated in this study.  PMID:25661224

  12. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF COMET C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) WITH THE BERKELEY-ILLINOIS-MARYLAND ASSOCIATION AND OWENS VALLEY RADIO OBSERVATORY INTERFEROMETERS: HCN AND CH{sub 3}OH

    SciTech Connect

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Qi Chunhua; De Pater, Imke; Wright, M. C. H.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Friedel, D. N.; Snyder, L. E.; Forster, J. R.; Palmer, Patrick; Remijan, Anthony J.

    2009-06-15

    We present observations of HCN J = 1-0 and CH{sub 3}OH J(K{sub a} , K{sub c} ) = 3(1, 3)-4(0, 4) A{sup +} emission from comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) obtained simultaneously with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) millimeter interferometers. We combined the data from both arrays to increase the (u, v) sampling and signal to noise of the detected line emission. We also report the detection of CH{sub 3}OH J(K{sub a} , K{sub c} ) = 8(0, 8)-7(1, 7) A{sup +} with OVRO data alone. Using a molecular excitation code that includes the effects of collisions with water and electrons, as well as pumping by the Solar infrared photons (for HCN alone), we find a production rate of HCN of 2.9 x 10{sup 26} s{sup -1} and for CH{sub 3}OH of 2.2 x 10{sup 27} s{sup -1}. Compared to the adopted water production rate of 3 x 10{sup 29} s{sup -1}, this corresponds to an HCN/H{sub 2}O ratio of 0.1% and a CH{sub 3}OH/H{sub 2}O ratio of 0.7%. We critically assess the uncertainty of these values due to the noise ({approx}10%), the uncertainties in the adopted comet model ({approx}50%), and the uncertainties in the adopted collisional excitation rates (up to a factor of 2). Pumping by Solar infrared photons is found to be a minor effect for HCN, because our 15'' synthesized beam is dominated by the region in the coma where collisions dominate. Since the uncertainties in the derived production rates are at least as large as one-third of the differences found between comets, we conclude that reliable collision rates and an accurate comet model are essential. Because the collisionally dominated region critically depends on the water production rate, using the same approximate method for different comets may introduce biases in the derived production rates. Multiline observations that directly constrain the molecular excitation provide much more reliable production rates.

  13. Na, K, Ca, Mg, and U-series in fossil bone and the proposal of a radial diffusion-adsorption model of uranium uptake.

    PubMed

    Cid, A S; Anjos, R M; Zamboni, C B; Cardoso, R; Muniz, M; Corona, A; Valladares, D L; Kovacs, L; Macario, K; Perea, D; Goso, C; Velasco, H

    2014-10-01

    Fossil bones are often the only materials available for chronological reconstruction of important archeological sites. However, since bone is an open system for uranium, it cannot be dated directly and therefore it is necessary to develop models for the U uptake. Hence, a radial diffusion-adsorption (RDA) model is described. Unlike the classic diffusion-adsorption (D-A) model, RDA uses a cylindrical geometry to describe the U uptake in fossil bones. The model was applied across a transverse section of a tibia of an extinct megamammal Macrauchenia patachonica from the La Paz Local Fauna, Montevideo State, Uruguay. Measurements of spatial distribution of Na, K, Ca, and Mg were also performed by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Gamma-ray spectrometric U-series dating was applied to determine the age of the bone sample. From U concentration profile, it was possible to observe the occurrence of a relatively slow and continuous uranium uptake under constant conditions that had not yet reached equilibrium, since the uranium distribution is a ∪-shaped closed-system. Predictions of the RDA model were obtained for a specific geochemical scenario, indicating that the effective diffusion coefficient D/R in this fossil bone is (2.4 ± 0.6)10(-12) cm(2)s(-1). Mean values of Na, K, Ca, and Mg contents along the radial line of the fossil tibia are consistent with the expected behavior for spatial distributions of these mineral elements across a modern bone section. This result indicates that the fossil tibia may have its mineral structure preserved. PMID:24953228

  14. Owens-Illinois liquid solar collector materials assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    From the beginning, it was noted that the baseline drawings for the liquid solar collector exhibited a distinct weakness concerning materials specification where elastomers, plastics, and foam insulation materials were utilized. A relatively small effort by a competent design organization would alleviate this deficiency. Based on results obtained from boilout and stagnation tests on the solar simulator, it was concluded that proof testing of the collector tubes prior to use helps to predict their performance for limited service life. Fracture mechanics data are desirable for predicting extended service life and establishing a minimum proof pressure level requirement. The temperature capability of this collector system was increased as the design matured and the coating efficiency improved. This higher temperature demands the use of higher temperature materials at critical locations in the collector.

  15. Patterns of vegetation in the Owens Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, S. L.; Rock, B. N.; Woodward, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of semi-arid shrub communities were examined using Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data collected in the tree mode on 23 May 1985. Mesic sites with relatively high vegetation density and distinct zonation patterns exhibited greater spectral signature variations than sites with more xeric shrub communities. Spectral signature patterns were not directly related to vegetation density or physiognomy, although spatial maps derived from an 8-channel maximum likelihood classification were supported by photo-interpreted surface features. In AIS data, the principal detected effect of shrub vegetation on the alluvial fans is to lower reflectance across the spectrum. These results are similar to those reported during a period of minimal physiological activity in autumn, indicating that shadows cast by vegetation canopies are an important element of soil-vegetation interaction under conditions of relatively low canopy cover.

  16. Jesse Owens Olympian Summer Youth Development Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuyahoga Community Coll., Cleveland, OH.

    An evaluation is given of an urban summer recreational program which was sponsored by a community college and designed to provide recreation, instruction, competition, and personal development for youth from 8 to 17 years. The program also offered inservice education to staff of community agencies working with youth. Activities included swimming,…

  17. Owen Bradford Butler: Corporate America's Evangelist for the Educationally Disadvantaged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Frank L.

    1989-01-01

    The retired Procter & Gamble corporate leader and member of the Committee for Economic Development (CED) discusses the crisis in the American education system and his efforts for reform. Subjects covered include implications for business and the nation, business and federal reform initiatives, and the mandate for community-wide involvement. (AF)

  18. Numerical Simulations of Narrow Angle Tailed Radio Sources : The Jones and Owen Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Michael L.; Balsara, Dinshaw; O'Dea, Chris

    1994-05-01

    In previous work, Balsara and Norman (1992), we had focussed on simulating narrow angle tailed radio sources as fluid beams that are bent by the ram pressure of a cross flowing ICM. This allowed a comparison with several observable attributes of NAT sources. In particular we were able to make estimates of bending rate, beam profile, radial evolution and formation and interspacing of knots. The previous work suffered from the fact that the ISM of the host galaxy was not represented. In this work we remove that restriction by representing the host galaxy's ISM self-consistently using the prescription given in Balsara, Livio and O'Dea (1994). We then run jets through it and compare with observations.

  19. Owens-Illinois subsystem design package for the SEC-601 air-cooled solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The subsystem design of the SEC-601 solar collector was evaluated. The collector is of modular design and is approximately 12 feet three inches wide and eight feet seven inches tall. It contains 72 collector tube elements and weighs approximately 300 pounds. Included in this report are the subsystem performance specifications and the assembly and installation drawings of the solar collectors and manifold.

  20. Preliminary Analysis of AIS Spectral Data Acquired from Semi-arid Shrub Communities in the Owens Valley, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, S. L.; Rock, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    Spectral characteristics of semic-arid plant communities using 128 channel airborne imaging spectrometer (AIS) data acquired on October 30, 1984. Both field and AIS spectra of vegetation were relatively featureless and differed from substrate spectra primarily in albedo. Unvegetated sand dunes were examined to assess spectral variation resulting from topographic irregularity. Although shrub cover as low as 10% could be detected on relatively flat surfaces, such differences were obscured in more heterogeneous terrain. Sagebrush-covered fans which had been scarred by fire were studied to determine the effect of changes in plant density on reflectance. Despite noise in the atmospherically corrected spectra, these provide better resolution of differences in plant density than spectra which are solar-corrected only. A high negative correlation was found between reflectance and plant cover in areas which had uniform substrates and vegetation types. A lower correlation was found where vegetation and substrates were more diverse.

  1. Indoor test for thermal performance evaluation of Libbey-Owens-Ford solar collector. [using a solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, K.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal performance of a flat plate solar collector that uses liquid as the heat transfer medium was investigated under simulated conditions. The test conditions and thermal performance data obtained during the tests are presented in tabular form, as well as in graphs. Data obtained from a time constant test and incident angle modifier test, conducted to determine transient effect and the incident angle effect on the collector, are included.

  2. Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., a Novel Spore-Forming, Alkaliphilic Anaerobe Isolated from Owens Lake, California, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Itoh, Takashi; Krader, Paul; Whitman, William B.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    A novel, alkaliphilic, obligately anaerobic bacterium, strain SCAT, was isolated from mud sediments of a soda lake in California, USA. The rod-shaped cells were motile, Gram-positive, formed spores and were 0.4-0.5x2.5-5.0 micrometers in size. Growth occurred within the pH range 6.7-10.0 and was optimal at pH 8.5. The temperature range for growth was 10-45 degrees C, with optimal growth at 35 degrees C. NaCl was required for growth. Growth occurred at 0.5-9.0% (w/v) NaCl and was optimal at 1-2% (w/v). The novel isolate was a catalase-negative chemo-organoheterotroph that fermented sugars, proteolysis products, some organic and amino acids, glycerol, d-cellobiose and cellulose. It was also capable of growth by the Stickland reaction. Strain SCAT was sensitive to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, rifampicin and gentamicin, but it was resistant to ampicillin and kanamycin. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 34.2 mol%. Major fatty acid components were C14:0, iso-C15:0, C16:1omega9c and C16:0. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strain SCAT showed a similarity of approximately 97% with the type strains of Clostridium formicaceticum and Clostridium aceticum in clostridial cluster XI and a similarity of less than 94.2% to any other recognized Clostridium species and those of related genera in this cluster. Strain SCAT was clearly differentiated from C. formicaceticum and C. aceticum based on comparison of their phenotypic properties and fatty acid profiles, as well as low levels of DNA-DNA relatedness between strain SCAT and the type strains of these two species. Therefore, strain SCAT is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus, Anaerovirgula multivorans gen. nov., sp. nov., in clostridial cluster XI. The type strain is SCAT (=ATCC BAA-1084T=JCM 12857T=DSM 17722T=CIP 107910T).

  3. 78 FR 977 - Public Availability of the Department of Transportation FY 2012 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... inventory should be directed to Ames Owens in the Senior Procurement Executive office at 202-366-9614 or ames.owens@dot.gov . Dated: December 31, 2012. Ames Owens, Associate Director of Commercial...

  4. A new species of the genus Demodex Owen, 1843 (Acari: Demodecidae) from the ear canals of the house mouse Mus musculus L. (Rodentia: Muridae).

    PubMed

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2015-06-01

    A new species Demodex conicus n. sp. is described based on adult and juvenile stages from the ear canals of the house mouse Mus musculus L. in Poland. The new species is most similar to D. auricularis Izdebska, Rolbiecki & Fryderyk, 2014 from the ear canals of the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus (L.), but differs in the following features: the gnathosoma is triangular, the supracoxal spines (setae elc.p) are conical, the spines on the terminal segment of palp are four, the striation on opisthosoma is fine but dense, the vulva is located at a distance of c.17 µm from posterior level of legs IV, and the male genital opening is located at the level of legs I. The differences also relate to body size and proportions, female D. conicus n. sp. being, on average slightly larger, and male significantly larger than D. auricularis. Males of the new species also have longer and more massive opisthosoma than males of D. auricularis. Demodex conicus n. sp. was found in 17.5% of the mice studied from different locations in Poland. PMID:25962464

  5. [Museum, library, and archives of the German Society of Urology as a corporate museum : A neglected, sizeable dimension of scientific collections owened by professional societies].

    PubMed

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2016-05-01

    Corporate museums make important contributions to science history and daily life. They are an essential part of the historical marketing of organizations, including scientific associations. The museum for the history of urology organized and housed by the German Society of Urology (DGU) can be compared to a corporate museum, because the institution serves two purposes: it represents the society to a wider public and it helps to reconstruct and analyze the history of urology and the history of the society. In a close collaboration with medical historians from all over the world the museum serves as a research institution for the history of urology. The institution is founded at the frontier between a commercial corporate museum similar to that of international companies and a classical scientific museum. The paper describes these aspects of the museum and discusses the inherent value of a museum for a scientific association. PMID:27138631

  6. Demonstration of oxygen-enriched air staging at Owens-Brockway glass containers. Final technical report for the period April 1, 1995--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Rue, D.; Abbasi, H.

    1997-10-01

    The overall objective of this program was to demonstrate the use of a previously developed combustion modification technology to reduce NO{sub x} emissions from sideport regenerative container glass melters. Specific objectives were to: acquire baseline operating data on the host sideport furnace, evaluate secondary oxidant injection strategies based on earlier endport furnace results and through modeling of a single port pair, retrofit and test one port pair (the test furnace has six port pairs) with a flexible OEAS system, and select the optimal system configuration, use the results from tests with one port pair to design, retrofit, and test OEAS on the entire furnace (six port pairs), and analyze test results, prepare report, and finalize the business plan to commercialize OEAS for sideport furnaces.

  7. Climatic Oscillations 10,000-155,000 yr B.P. at Owens Lake, California Reflected in Glacial Rock Flour Abundance and Lake Salinity in Core OL-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Menking, K.M.; Fitts, J.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical analyses of the acid-soluble and clay-size fractions of sediment samples (1500-yr resolution) reveal oscillations of lake salinity and of glacial advances in core OL-92 back to 155,000 yr B.P. Relatively saline conditions are indicated by the abundance of carbonate and smectite (both pedogenic and authigenic), reflected by Ca, Sr, and Mg in the acid-soluble suite, and by Cs2O, excess MgO, and LOI (loss on ignition) in the clay-size fraction. Rock flour produced during glacial advances is represented by the abundance of detrital plagioclase and biotite in the clay-size fraction, the ratio of which remains essentially constant over the entire time span. These phases are quantitatively represented by Na2O, TiO2, Ba, and Mn in the clay fraction. The rock-flour record indicates two major ice-advances during the penultimate glacial cycle corresponding to marine isotope stage (MIS) 6, no major advances during the last interglaciation (entire MIS 5), and three major advances during the last glacial cycle (MIS 2, 3, and 4). The ages of the latter three correspond rather well to 36Cl dates reported for Sierra Nevada moraines. The onset of the last interglaciation is shown by abrupt increases in authigenic CaCO3 and an abrupt decrease in rock flour, at about 118,000 yr B.P. according to our time scale. In contrast, the boundary appears to be gradual in the ??18O record in which the change from light to heavy values begins at about 140,000 yrs B.P. The exact position of the termination, therefore, may be proxy-dependent. Conditions of high carbonate and low rock flour prevailed during the entire period from 118,000 yr B.P. until the glacial advance at 53,000 yr B.P. signaled the end of this long interglaciation. ?? 1997 University of Washington.

  8. "If Michael Owen Drinks It, Why Can't I? "--9 and 10 Year Olds' Perceptions of Physical Activity and Healthy Eating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, Rachael; Stanistreet, Debbi; Swami, Viren

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the perceptions of physical activity and healthy eating among children from two north west of England primary schools, with the ultimate aim of improving healthy lifestyle choices. Design: A qualitative study in which each child participated in two focus groups. Setting: Two primary schools in a deprived ward of Warrington,…

  9. Anisakis species (Nematoda: Anisakidae) of Dwarf Sperm Whale Kogia sima (Owen, 1866) stranded off the Pacific coast of southern Philippine archipelago.

    PubMed

    Quiazon, Karl Marx A; Santos, Mudjekeewis D; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi

    2013-10-18

    Anisakid nematodes in the Pacific region of the Philippine archipelago still remain unexplored. This study was carried out to identify anisakid species from one of their final hosts, the Kogiid whale (Dwarf Sperm Whale, Kogia sima) stranded off the southern part (Davao Gulf) of the Philippine archipelago. Anisakid worms were initially identified morphologically using light and scanning electron microscopy, whereas identification to species level was carried out molecularly using PCR-RFLP and sequencing of the ITS (ITS1-5.8s rRNA-ITS2) and mtDNA cox2 regions. Parasitological study revealed new geographical records for the presence of two Anisakis species (A. brevispiculata and A. typica) and two unknown Anisakis species that are genetically close, at mtDNA cox2 region, to A. paggiae and A. ziphidarum. Based on the molecular data on both genes, the current findings suggest possible occurrence of local variations or sibling species of A. paggiae and A. ziphidarum in the region. Given that Anisakis species have not been reported in the Philippine archipelago, their presence in the Dwarf Sperm Whale inhabiting this region indicates high possibility of Anisakis infections in the marine fishes, cephalopods and other intermediate hosts within the Philippine waters. PMID:23786786

  10. 76 FR 6177 - Public Availability of the Department of Transportation FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... CONTACT: Questions regarding the service contract inventory should be directed to Ames Owens in the Senior Procurement Executive office at 202-366-9614 or ames.owens@dot.gov . Dated: January 28, 2011. Ames...

  11. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey E. W. Russell, Photographer, September 4, 1936 EAST END OF PORCH, OWEN FINNIGAN PLACE - 752 GOVERNMENT STREET - Captain Owen Finnigan House (Ironwork), 752 Government Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  12. A resolution celebrating the 100th anniversary of the birth of James Cleveland "Jesse" Owens and honoring him for his accomplishments and steadfast commitment to promoting the civil rights of all people.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Sen. Brown, Sherrod [D-OH

    2013-09-12

    12/16/2014 Resolution agreed to in Senate without amendment and an amended preamble by Unanimous Consent. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed SenateHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Co-existence of scimitar-toothed cats, lions and hominins in the European Pleistocene. Implications of the post-cranial anatomy of Homotherium latidens (Owen) for comparative palaeoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antón, Mauricio; Galobart, Angel; Turner, Alan

    2005-05-01

    Human occupants of Europe shared food resources with a number of larger Carnivora, and their coexistence with two lion-sized felids, the lion and the scimitar-toothed machairodont Homotherium latidens, poses intriguing paleoecological problems. We investigate the ecology of Homotherium latidens using an exceptional sample of postcrania from the Spanish Early Pleistocene site of Incarcal, making comparisons with modern cats and with other machairodont species. Evidence of cursorial adaptations in Homotherium suggests a hunting technique different from modern cats or smilodontine sabre-tooths. Some, like reduction of the claws, would have limited the ability of individual homotheres to bring down large prey, implying group action. Homotherium would also have been disadvantaged in direct confrontation with Pleistocene lions by smaller body mass, reduced forepaw muscle strength, smaller claws and more fragile dentition. Its hunting technique would have worked best in more open habitats, but competition from lions would have forced it to seek moderate cover. Among factors that could de-stabilise coexistence of the two big cat species in Pleistocene Europe we invoke a decrease in environmental mosaicism associated with stepped climatic change over the last million years, and the increased importance of humans within the larger predator guild.

  14. 77 FR 16316 - Kentucky Disaster Number KY-00044

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ...: Jefferson, Switzerland. Kentucky: Bourbon, Clark, Fleming, Gallatin, Henry, Lewis, Nicholas, Owen, Pike... unchanged. (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) Joseph P. Loddo,...

  15. Research in Mathematics Education in Australasia, 1996-1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Kay, Ed.; Mousley, Judy, Ed.

    This volume presents different issues and views on research in mathematics education in Australia. Chapters include: (1) "An Introduction to This Review" (Kay Owens); (2) "Recent Research Monographs" (Kay Owens and editors of the monographs); (3) "Language Factors in Mathematics Education" (Nerida Ellerton, Ken Clements, and Philip Clarkson); (4)…

  16. 76 FR 66972 - Linda Sue Cheek, M.D., Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ..., D.D.S., 74 FR 36751 (2009). In Owens, I explicitly declined to extend the holding of Pettigrew Rexall Drugs, 64 FR 8855, 8859-60 (1999), which cited evidence that a pharmacy was ``one of two..., to the case of a prescribing practitioner. 74 FR at 36757. As Owens explained, ``consideration of...

  17. 75 FR 14659 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... of 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within... Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third Street, A4-A, Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328, or judi.owens@bpd.treas.gov ....

  18. DEMONSTRATION OF A CLOSED LOOP REUSE SYSTEM IN A FIBERGLAS TEXTILE PLANT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes work done toward providing a totally recycled water system for Owens-Corning's textile fiber manufacturing plant at Anderson, SC. (The work was based on pre-1968 pilot plant work by Owens-Corning that resulted in development of totally recycled industrial was...

  19. 77 FR 47096 - Physicians Pharmacy, L.L.C.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-07

    ... granted. \\2\\ I do not, however, adopt footnote 20 of the ALJ's opinion. See Kwan Bo Jin, 77 FR 35021... D. Owens, 74 FR 36751, 36757 (2009). With respect to a practitioner (which includes a pharmacy), see..., 76 FR 66972, 66973 n.4 (2011) (quoting Owens, 74 FR at 36757) (```the ALJ's reasoning begs...

  20. Geochemical evidence for diversity of dust sources in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, M.C.; Budahn, J.R.; Lamothe, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Several potential dust sources, including generic sources of sparsely vegetated alluvium, playa deposits, and anthropogenic emissions, as well as the area around Owens Lake, California, affect the composition of modern dust in the southwestern United States. A comparison of geochemical analyses of modern and old (a few thousand years) dust with samples of potential local sources suggests that dusts reflect four primary sources: (1) alluvial sediments (represented by Hf, K, Rb, Zr, and rare-earth elements, (2) playas, most of which produce calcareous dust (Sr, associated with Ca), (3) the area of Owens (dry) Lake, a human-induced playa (As, Ba, Li, Pb, Sb, and Sr), and (4) anthropogenic and/or volcanic emissions (As, Cr, Ni, and Sb). A comparison of dust and source samples with previous analyses shows that Owens (dry) Lake and mining wastes from the adjacent Cerro Gordo mining district are the primary sources of As, Ba, Li, and Pb in dusts from Owens Valley. Decreases in dust contents of As, Ba, and Sb with distance from Owens Valley suggest that dust from southern Owens Valley is being transported at least 400 km to the east. Samples of old dust that accumulated before European settlement are distinctly lower in As, Ba, and Sb abundances relative to modern dust, likely due to modern transport of dust from Owens Valley. Thus, southern Owens Valley appears to be an important, geochemically distinct, point source for regional dust in the southwestern United States. Copyright ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  1. Ancient proteins resolve the evolutionary history of Darwin's South American ungulates.

    PubMed

    Welker, Frido; Collins, Matthew J; Thomas, Jessica A; Wadsley, Marc; Brace, Selina; Cappellini, Enrico; Turvey, Samuel T; Reguero, Marcelo; Gelfo, Javier N; Kramarz, Alejandro; Burger, Joachim; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Ashford, David A; Ashton, Peter D; Rowsell, Keri; Porter, Duncan M; Kessler, Benedikt; Fischer, Roman; Baessmann, Carsten; Kaspar, Stephanie; Olsen, Jesper V; Kiley, Patrick; Elliott, James A; Kelstrup, Christian D; Mullin, Victoria; Hofreiter, Michael; Willerslev, Eske; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Orlando, Ludovic; Barnes, Ian; MacPhee, Ross D E

    2015-06-01

    No large group of recently extinct placental mammals remains as evolutionarily cryptic as the approximately 280 genera grouped as 'South American native ungulates'. To Charles Darwin, who first collected their remains, they included perhaps the 'strangest animal[s] ever discovered'. Today, much like 180 years ago, it is no clearer whether they had one origin or several, arose before or after the Cretaceous/Palaeogene transition 66.2 million years ago, or are more likely to belong with the elephants and sirenians of superorder Afrotheria than with the euungulates (cattle, horses, and allies) of superorder Laurasiatheria. Morphology-based analyses have proved unconvincing because convergences are pervasive among unrelated ungulate-like placentals. Approaches using ancient DNA have also been unsuccessful, probably because of rapid DNA degradation in semitropical and temperate deposits. Here we apply proteomic analysis to screen bone samples of the Late Quaternary South American native ungulate taxa Toxodon (Notoungulata) and Macrauchenia (Litopterna) for phylogenetically informative protein sequences. For each ungulate, we obtain approximately 90% direct sequence coverage of type I collagen α1- and α2-chains, representing approximately 900 of 1,140 amino-acid residues for each subunit. A phylogeny is estimated from an alignment of these fossil sequences with collagen (I) gene transcripts from available mammalian genomes or mass spectrometrically derived sequence data obtained for this study. The resulting consensus tree agrees well with recent higher-level mammalian phylogenies. Toxodon and Macrauchenia form a monophyletic group whose sister taxon is not Afrotheria or any of its constituent clades as recently claimed, but instead crown Perissodactyla (horses, tapirs, and rhinoceroses). These results are consistent with the origin of at least some South American native ungulates from 'condylarths', a paraphyletic assembly of archaic placentals. With ongoing

  2. Geologic map of the Lone Pine 15' quadrangle, Inyo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Paul; Dunne, George C.; Moore, James G.; Smith, George I.

    2000-01-01

    Oblique aerial view west across Owens Valley in Lone Pine 15' quadrangle. In distance, Sierra Nevada, capped by Mount Whitney (elev. 14,494 ft; 4,418 m). In middle distance, Alabama Hills, town of Lone Pine, and Owens River. In foreground, Kern Knob, at base of Inyo Mountains. Movement along Owens Valley Fault Zone, at base of Alabama Hills, caused great Lone Pine earthquake of 1872 (estimated Richter magnitude about 8). From U.S. Geological Survey photograph GS–OAI–5–13, taken November 25, 1955.

  3. Review of “Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From Soil to Hman Health”

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a book review of "Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From Soil to Human Health," R. Naidu, E. Smith, G. Owens, P. Bhattacharya, and P. Nadebaum eds., CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, Australia, 656 pp.,

  4. In Praise of Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Public Leadership Award. U.S. Senator Tom Harkin Photo courtesy of NIH National Library of Medicine Director ... Library of Medicine Director Donald Lindberg, M.D. Photo courtesy of NIH Legendary country singer Randy Owen, ...

  5. 75 FR 75699 - Notice of Determinations Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-06

    ... Station, TX.. May 19, 2009. from Kelly Services. 74,286 Pearson Education, Glenview, IL......... June 8.... 74,779 Exel-Owens Corning, Chem/ Heath, OH. Industrial. Determinations Terminating Investigations...

  6. METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  7. 7. WALKWAY/ENTRANCE TO ADMINSITRATIVE SITE ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE ROAD AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. WALKWAY/ENTRANCE TO ADMINSITRATIVE SITE ADJACENT TO ENTRANCE ROAD AND INTERNAL POLICE POST, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Manzanar War Relocation Center, Owens Valley off U.S. Highway 395, 6 miles South of Independence, Independence, Inyo County, CA

  8. Preliminary design package for Sunair SEC-601 solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The preliminary design of the Owens-Illinois model Sunair SEC-601 tubular air solar collector is presented. Information in this package includes the subsystem design and development approaches, hazard analysis, and detailed drawings available as the preliminary design review.

  9. 2. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, SHOWING THE BRIDGE AND THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST, SHOWING THE BRIDGE AND THE ADJACENT BOAT LANDING ALONG THE NORTHWEST BANK. - Freedom Bridge, Spanning West Fork of White River at County Road 590 South, Freedom, Owen County, IN

  10. AGE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS INDUCED BY MMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Age-Related Gene Expression Changes In Human Skin Fibroblasts Induced By methyl methanesulfonate. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan H. Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Prote...

  11. 77 FR 27162 - Notice of Data Availability Supporting Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... Generating Station, Kodak Operations at Eastman Business Park, Oswego Harbor Power Owens Corning Delmar Plant... proposed on April 25, 2012 (77 FR 24794) to take action on a revision to the state implementation plan...

  12. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CUT STONE ABUTMENT FROM SOUTHWEST. Cataract ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CUT STONE ABUTMENT FROM SOUTHWEST. - Cataract Falls Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek, bypassed section of CR 279 (Cataract Falls Unit of Leiber State Recreation Area), Cataract, Owen County, IN

  13. Galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Simon R.; Owens, Mathew J.; Lockwood, Mike

    2014-10-01

    Simon R Thomas, Mathew J Owens and Mike Lockwood discuss how neutron monitor counts can help map space weather. This won the 2014 Rishbeth Prize for the best student talk at the Hot Spring MIST Meeting in Bath, April 2014.

  14. Mitogenomic Phylogenetics of Fin Whales (Balaenoptera physalus spp.): Genetic Evidence for Revision of Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Frederick I.; Morin, Phillip A.; Hancock-Hanser, Brittany L.; Robertson, Kelly M.; Leslie, Matthew S.; Bérubé, Martine; Panigada, Simone; Taylor, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    There are three described subspecies of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus): B. p. physalus Linnaeus, 1758 in the Northern Hemisphere, B. p. quoyi Fischer, 1829 in the Southern Hemisphere, and a recently described pygmy form, B. p. patachonica Burmeister, 1865. The discrete distribution in the North Pacific and North Atlantic raises the question of whether a single Northern Hemisphere subspecies is valid. We assess phylogenetic patterns using ∼16 K base pairs of the complete mitogenome for 154 fin whales from the North Pacific, North Atlantic - including the Mediterranean Sea - and Southern Hemisphere. A Bayesian tree of the resulting 136 haplotypes revealed several well-supported clades representing each ocean basin, with no haplotypes shared among ocean basins. The North Atlantic haplotypes (n = 12) form a sister clade to those from the Southern Hemisphere (n = 42). The estimated time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for this Atlantic/Southern Hemisphere clade and 81 of the 97 samples from the North Pacific was approximately 2 Ma. 14 of the remaining North Pacific samples formed a well-supported clade within the Southern Hemisphere. The TMRCA for this node suggests that at least one female from the Southern Hemisphere immigrated to the North Pacific approximately 0.37 Ma. These results provide strong evidence that North Pacific and North Atlantic fin whales should not be considered the same subspecies, and suggest the need for revision of the global taxonomy of the species. PMID:23691042

  15. New Polymer Electrolyte Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyrl, William H.; Owens, Boone B.; Mann, Kent; Pappenfus, T.; Henderson, W.

    2004-01-01

    PAPERS PUBLISHED: 1. Pappenfus, Ted M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Owens, Boone B.; Mann, Kent R.; Smyrl, William H. Complexes of Lithium Imide Salts with Tetraglyme and Their Polyelectrolyte Composite Materials. Journal of the Electrochemical Society (2004), 15 1 (2), A209-A2 15. 2. Pappenfus, Ted M.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Owens, Boone B.; Mann, Kent R.; Smyrl, William H. Ionic-liquidlpolymer electrolyte composite materials for electrochemical device applications. Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering (2003), 88 302. 3. Pappenfus, Ted R.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Owens, Boone B.; Mann, Kent R.; and Smyrl, William H. Ionic Conductivity of a poly(vinylpyridinium)/Silver Iodide Solid Polymer Electrolyte System. Solid State Ionics (in press 2004). 4. Pappenfus Ted M.; Mann, Kent R; Smyrl, William H. Polyelectrolyte Composite Materials with LiPFs and Tetraglyme. Electrochemical and Solid State Letters, (2004), 7(8), A254.

  16. 5.2% 777 semi-span model in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    5.2% 777 semi-span model mounted in the National Transonic Facility (NTF), building 1236. Group photo, from left to right: Pete Parker, Greg Gatlin, Bill Tomek, Chip Bobbitt (left kneeling), Lewis Owens, and William Milholen - all NASA employees.

  17. 5.2% 777 semi-span model in the NTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    5.2% 777 semi-span model mounted in the test section of the National Transonic Facility (NTF), building 1236. Group photo, from left to right: NTF contractor Andy Goldstein, Ron Stoner (Boeing), NASA employees Greg Gatlin and Lewis Owens.

  18. The Role of Developmental Levels in Examining the Effect of Subject Types on the Production of Auxiliary "Is" in Young English-Speaking Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Ling-Yu; Van Horne, Amanda J. Owen; Tomblin, J. Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Prior work (Guo, Owen, & Tomblin, 2010) has shown that at the group level, auxiliary "is" production by young English-speaking children was symmetrical across lexical noun and pronominal subjects. Individual data did not uniformly reflect these patterns. On the basis of the framework of the gradual morphosyntactic learning (GML)…

  19. Britain's Training Deficit. The Centre for Economic Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layard, Richard, Ed.; And Others

    This book contains 12 papers that were produced as a result of a seminar program on selected issues central to the debate over job training in Great Britain. The first paper, "Why We Need a Training Reform Act" (Richard Layard, Ken Mayhew, Geoffrey Owen), examines existing deficiencies in vocational education and training in Britain and proposes a…

  20. STS-9 crewmembers during brief moment of collective fun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Four of the STS-9 crewmembers enjoying a rare moment of collective fun inside the Spacelab module onboar the Columbia. Left to right are Owen K. Garriott, Robert A.R. Parker, Ulf Merbold and Byron K. Lichtenberg. The 'card table' here is the scientific airlock hatch, and the 'cards' are the targets used in the Awareness of Position experiment.

  1. School Improvement Research Series: Series X, 1995-96.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    This packet contains seven research briefs in the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory's (NWREL's) "School Improvement Research Series" for 1995-96. Topical Synthesis #8, "Community-Based Learning: A Foundation for Meaningful Educational Reform" (Thomas R. Owens and Changhua Wang) summarizes lessons that NREL has learned over the past 20…

  2. Collaboration, Community and Collective Intelligence Will Eclipse the Cartography of Collision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dellit, Jillian

    2003-01-01

    This article is a response to "Mapping educational research and its impact on Australian schools," Chapter 2 of The Impact of Educational Research, in which researchers Allyson Holbrook, John Ainley, Sid Bourke, John Owen, Philip McKenzie, Sebastian Mission and Trevor Johnson report on their Commonwealth Education Department commissioned study.…

  3. 77 FR 35021 - Kwan Bo Jin, M.D.; Decision and Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-12

    ..., at 14-16; \\1\\ which is contrary to agency precedent.\\2\\ See Linda Sue Cheek, 76 FR 66972, 66973 (2011); Mark De La Lama, 76 FR 20011, 20020 n.20 (2011); Bienvenido Tan, 76 FR 17673, 17694 n.58 (2011); Gregory D. Owens, 74 FR 36571, 36757 & n.22 (2009). Nonetheless, my rejection of the ALJ's discussion...

  4. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF THE RAT KIDNEY FOLLOWING CHRONIC EXPOSURE (100 WKS) TO THE WATER DISINFECTANT BYPRODUCT AND RENAL CARCINOGEN, POTASSIUM BROMATE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene expression profiling of the rat kidney following chronic exposure (100 wks) to the water
    disinfectant byproduct and renal carcinogen, potassium bromate.

    Don Delker, James Allen, Gail Nelson, Tanya Moore, Barbara Roop, Russell Owen, and Anthony DeAngelo. Environment...

  5. 77 FR 45656 - Decision and Order; Perry T. Dobyns, M.D.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-01

    ... David M. Headley, 61 FR 39469, 39471 (1996)). However, the Agency has since held in multiple cases that... explanation as to why. See Linda Sue Cheek, 76 FR 66972, 66973 (2011); Mark De La Lama, 76 FR 20011, 20020 n.20 (2011); Bienvenido Tan, 76 FR 17673, 17694 n.58 (2011); Gregory D. Owens, 74 FR 36571, 36757 &...

  6. Training Needs in Gerontology. Hearings, Special Committee on Aging, United States Senate. Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Special Committee on Aging.

    At the second day of hearings on training needs in gerontology the witnesses were Stephen Kurzman accompanied by Arthur S. Flemming, John Lapp, Gerald D. LaVeck; George Maddox; Elias Cohen; Wilma Donahue; Brin Hawkins with Lettie Graves and Yolanda Owens; and John B. Martin. (MS)

  7. Colorado and the Higher Education Voucher Experiment: Finance Revolution or "Hail Mary Pass?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reindl, Travis

    2005-01-01

    In May 2004, Colorado Governor Bill Owens signed Senate Bill 189 into law, essentially transforming how public higher education is funded in that state. The measure, the first of its kind in the nation, changes the flow of state appropriations from the traditional enrollment-based black grant to institutions into two more market-based streams: (1)…

  8. STS-9 crew egress from Columbia after landing of STS-9 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    STS-9 crew members egress from space shuttle Columbia after landing at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California. Descending the stairs are (from bottom) Astronauts John W. Young, Brewster H. Shaw, Jr., and Robert A. R. Parker; West German physicist Dr. Ulf Merbold; Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, and Dr. Byron K. Licktenberg.

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF MOLECULAR MARKERS OF RESPONSE TO ASSESS THE SENSITIVITY OF CHILDREN TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of Molecular Markers of Response to Assess the Sensitivity of Children to Environmental Chemicals

    J.Allen, C. Blackman, M. Blaze, D. Delker, D. DeMarini, C. Doerr, R. Grindstaff, S.
    Hester, C. Jones, A. Kligerman, G. Knapp, M. Kohan, C. Nelson, R. Owen, J. P...

  10. Proceedings of the Midwest Philosophy of Education Society, 1993-1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickel, George W., Ed.; Owen, David B., Ed.

    These proceedings are composed of papers presented at the 1993 and 1994 Annual Meetings of the Midwest Philosophy of Education Society. The collection is divided into four parts. Part 1 includes: "Failure, Philosophy of Education, and the Music of the Spheres" (David B. Owen); "What Has Philosophy of Education Come To?" (Lawrence J. Dennis). Part…

  11. TV and the Library: A Report on a Communications Plan Developed for the New Mexico State Library Commission, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Library, Santa Fe.

    Owen G. Leach & Associates, under professional contract to the New Mexico State Library, conducted an opinion research study of New Mexico citizens. This study determined that 52.5 percent of adults needed and wanted information available from library networks, but did not realize that this information could be obtained through libraries. A…

  12. Skylab 3 prime crew participate in water egress simulations at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The three members of the prime crew of the second manned Skylab mission participate in prelaunch training, specifically water egress simulations at JSC. They are, left to right, Astronaut Alan L. Bean, commander; Scientist-Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot; and Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, pilot. This training took place in JSC's bldg 220 on May 1, 1973.

  13. First-Year Student Perceptions Related to Leadership Awareness and Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shehane, Melissa R.; Sturtevant, Kathryn A.; Moore, Lori L.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to explore first-year college student perceptions related to when they first became aware of leadership and perceived influences on leadership. The study was rooted in the Leadership Identity Development Model (Komives, Owen, Longerbeam, Mainella, & Osteen, 2005). Five purposively selected individuals completing the first…

  14. The Writing Notebook: Creative Word Processing in the Classroom--November/December 1986, January/February 1987, and April/May 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Sharon, Ed.; Madian, Jon, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Produced using a Macintosh Plus and LaserWriter Printer, these journals present articles relating to word processing in the classroom. Articles and their authors for the November/December 1986 issue include: "Computer Assisted Instruction: Western Europe" (Owen and Irene Thomas); "FrEd Writing" (B. Fleury); "Writing Up a Storm: An Activity for…

  15. Papers and Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Midwest History of Education Society (10th, Chicago, Illinois, October 25-26, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Edward, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    The proceedings papers include topics on educational reform and intellectuals, religious education, immigrants, and the history of education as a discipline. The theme of an Editor's Supplement is utopianism and education, and the papers deal with Robert Owen. These three papers are reprinted from the 1973 meeting of the National History of…

  16. Restoring Confidence in Public Education: An Agenda for the 1980s--Conference Research Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban Coalition, Washington, DC.

    The papers presented in this document are the following: (1) "Historic Roles of Public Education" by Faustine C. Jones, (2) "The Social Costs and Benefits of Public Education" by Bernard C. Watson, (3) "School Inequality in the Emerging Welfare State: Does It Make Sense?" by John D. Owen, (4) "Investment and Disinvestment in Public Education" by…

  17. Climbing the Value Chain: A Case Study in Rethinking the Corporate Library Function and Developing High Performance Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemon, Nancy; Blinn, Carla K.

    1996-01-01

    In response to marketplace and organizational changes, Owens Corning Corporate Library developed a strategic plan to secure its function within the organization. Describes outsourcing transactional services, creating an Intranet/Internet tool for users, redefining the library as a knowledge resource center, and achieving team commitment. A sidebar…

  18. Effect of the wooden breast condition on shear force and texture profile analysis of raw and cooked broiler pectoralis major

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to characterize texture properties of raw and cooked broiler fillets (Pectoralis major) with the wooden breast condition (WBC) using the instrumental texture techniques of Meullenet-Owens Razor Shear (MORS) and Texture Profile Analysis (TPA). Deboned (3 h post-mortem) broiler fille...

  19. Linking the Leadership Identity Development Model to Collegiate Recreation and Athletics.

    PubMed

    Hall, Stacey L

    2015-09-01

    The Leadership Identity Development (LID) Model (Komives, Owen, Longerbeam, Mainella, & Osteen, ) provides a stage leadership development model for college students that can be applied to collegiate recreation student staff, volunteers, participants, and varsity student-athletes. This chapter provides guidance to implement the model in these settings and to create environments that support development. PMID:26895012

  20. Student Trust in Teachers and Its Relationship to Student Identification with School, Student Perceptions of Academic Press, and Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankole, Regina A.

    2011-01-01

    Research has documented a plethora of evidence that children's perceptions of their relationships with caregivers, specifically teachers, impacts learning outcomes, including academic engagement and achievement (Furrer & Skinner, 2003; Owens & Johnson, in press; Stipek, 2002; Wentzel, 1997), identification with school (Anderman, 2003; Bonich,…

  1. Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  2. Electroantennography of silk flies, a crucial step for semiochemical investigations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract Electroantennography of silk flies, a crucial step for semiochemical investigations D. Owens1, G. Nuessly1, P. E. Kendra2, D. Seal3, T. Colquhoun4, and D. Hahn4 1University of Florida, Belle Glade, FL 2USDA-ARS, Miami, FL 3University of Florida, Homestead, FL 4University of Florida, Gaines...

  3. The Relationship between Gifted and General Secondary School Students' Perceptions of the Classroom Quality and Their Mathematics Achievement in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Investigating students' perceptions of their classroom environment is one of the ways researchers and educators can effectively determine what factors may benefit students' learning. Student Perceptions of Classroom Quality (SPOCQ; Gentry & Owen, 2004) was used with a group of Chinese gifted and general secondary students in the…

  4. 75 FR 38868 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within the...: Direct all written comments to Bureau of the Public Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third Street, A4-A,...

  5. 75 FR 5372 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within the... of the Public Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third Street, A4-A, Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328, or...

  6. 75 FR 5373 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within the... consideration. ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to Bureau of the Public Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third...

  7. 75 FR 54226 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A)). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within the... written comments to Bureau of the Public Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third Street, A4-A, Parkersburg, WV...

  8. 75 FR 14660 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within the... Bureau of the Public Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third Street, A4-A, Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328, or...

  9. 75 FR 14659 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within the... to Bureau of the Public Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third Street, A4-A, Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328, or...

  10. 75 FR 5371 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Bureau of the Public Debt Proposed Collection: Comment Request ACTION: Notice and request for comments... of 1995, Public Law 104-13 (44 U.S.C. 3506(c)(2)(A). Currently the Bureau of the Public Debt within... comments to Bureau of the Public Debt, Judi Owens, 200 Third Street, A4-A, Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328,...

  11. Outer Solar System Nomenclature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Tobias C.; Grant, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This grant has supported work by T. Owen and B. A. Smith on planetary and satellite nomenclature, carried out under the general auspices of the International Astronomical Union (IAU). The IAU maintains a Working Group on Planetary and Satellite Nomenclature (WGPSN) whose current chair is Prof.Kaare Aksnes of the Rosseland Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Oslo, Norway. Both Owen and Smith are members of the WGPSN; Owen as chair of the Outer Solar System Task Group, and Smith as chair of the Mars Task Group. The major activity during the last grant period (2002) was the approval of several new names for features on Mars by Smith's group and features on Jovian satellites plus new names for satellites of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus by Owen's group. Much of this work was accomplished by e-mail exchanges, but the new nomenclature was formally discussed and approved at a meeting of the WGPSN held in conjunction with the Division for Planetary Sciences meeting in Birmingham, Alabama in October 2002.

  12. 77 FR 9231 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Project 56, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Project 56, LLC; Notice Announcing... and Owen County, Kentucky. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL for Project...

  13. 2012 Cliff Weiss Memorial Essay Contest Winners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the winners of the 2012 Cliff Weiss Memorial Essay Contest. They are Naim Owens from Washington, DC, and Colissa Menke from Warrensburg, Missouri. The 2012 essay topic is "How do you feel CTE prepares individuals, including yourself, for a future career?"

  14. Continuous lake-sediment records of glaciation in the Sierra Nevada between 52,600 and 12,500 14C yr B.P.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.V.; May, Howard M.; Antweiler, R.C.; Brinton, T.I.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Smoot, J.P.; Lund, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    The chemistry of the carbonate-free clay-size fraction of Owens Lake sediments supports the use of total organic carbon and magnetic susceptibility as indicators of stadial-interstadial oscillations. Owens Lake records of total organic carbon, magnetic susceptibility, and chemical composition of the carbonate-free, clay-size fraction indicate that Tioga glaciation began ~24,500 and ended by ~13,600 14C yr B.P. Many of the components of glacial rock flour (e.g., TiO2, MnO, BaO) found in Owens Lake sediments achieved maximum values during the Tioga glaciation when valley glaciers reached their greatest extent. Total organic carbon and SiO2 (amorphous) concentrations reached minimum values during Tioga glaciation, resulting from decreases in productivity that accompanied the introduction of rock flour into the surface waters of Owens Lake. At least 20 stadial-interstadial oscillations occurred in the Sierra Nevada between 52,600 and 14,000 14C yr B.P. Total organic carbon data from a Pyramid Lake sediment core also indicate oscillations in glacier activity between >39,500 and ~13,600 14C yr B.P. Alpine glacier oscillations occurred on a frequency of ???1900 yr in both basins, suggesting that millennial-scale oscillations occurred in California and Nevada during most of the past 52,600 yr.

  15. Protective Clothing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Beta Glass material, originating from the Apollo program is supplied to Fyrepel by Owens-Corning and incorporated into Fyrepel's Fyretex and Beta-Mex aluminized fabrics. Fabrics are used in fire entry suits, several other types of protective suits for wear in hot industrial environments and such accessory items as heat-reflecting curtains for industrial applications.

  16. Job Security, Technical Innovation and Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, E. Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Analyzes both the management practices of Robert Owen during the early 1800's and current examples of management practices to provide insight into the questions of what bars adoption of better technology and what is the key to greater organizational flexibility and productivity; concludes that ensuring job security at the management level would…

  17. What Do We Expect of Education? Selected Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australian College of Education (24th, Sydney, Australia, May 15-20, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philps, R., Ed.; Shannon, A. G., Ed.

    This book contains papers presented at a conference on educational promise, performance, and expectations. Papers included in this volume are: (1) "Education in Australia: We Get What We Deserve" (S. Ball); (2) "The Size and Scale: What is Expected" (J. G. Owen); (3) "The Search for Educational Quality and Equality: A U. S. View" (A. Harry…

  18. Day Care for Working Families Act of 1987. Hearing on S. 1271 To Provide Comprehensive Federal Assistance for Day Care, before the Subcommittee on Labor of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, One Hundredth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    Recognizing the importance of the need for quality day care for children of working mothers, handicapped children, and children of low income families, the U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Labor and Human Resources met to address this issue in the Child Care Center of Owens Technical College, in Toledo, Ohio. The Subcommittee interviewed or heard…

  19. The Importance of Literacy. Hearing before the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session (Washington, DC, September 26, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    A hearing was held on Tuesday, September 26, 2000, by the U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Education and the Workforce, Washington, DC, on the importance of literacy. The following U.S. Representatives were present: Goodling, Roukema, Schaffer, Hilleary, Ehlers, Fletcher, Isakson, Kildee, Owens, Payne, Scott, Hinojosa, McCarthy, Kind,…

  20. Radical Thinking in Adult Education. Occasional Paper No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Phyllis, Ed.; Ohliger, John, Ed.

    These five papers represent original research on various issues important to the field of adult education that draws on Syracuse University's collection of adult education materials. "Back to the Future with C. Wright Mills and the Center for the Study of Liberal Education for Adults" (Ollie Owen) provides background on Mills, the Center, and the…

  1. Snakes or Ladders? An Examination of the Experiences of Two Teacher Leaders Returning to Classroom Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munroe, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Teachers who have held leadership roles at the school, district, or provincial level have the potential to contribute to student and school success when they return to classroom teaching. The contrasting experiences of two teacher leaders who returned voluntarily to classroom teaching are analyzed using Owens's (2004) social constructivist…

  2. Topics on Distance Learning: Proceedings 2000 (Hammond, Indiana, June 6-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdue Univ., Hammond, IN. Calumet Campus.

    This proceedings of the 2000 Topics on Distance Learning conference contains summaries of the following presentations: "The ABC's of Distance Learning via Full Motion Video" (Liz Owens); "Assessing the Cost of Technology in Instruction Using an Economic Model" (Joseph Lovrinic); "Collaboration Lessons Learned from the Learning Cooperative" (Liz…

  3. 78 FR 44147 - Proposed Information Collection; National Capital Region Application for Public Gathering

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; National Capital Region Application for Public... additional information about this IC, contact Robbin Owen, National Capital Region, National Park Service... events and demonstrations) held on NPS property within the National Capital Region. Regulations at 36...

  4. Cross-Validation of a Recently Published Equation Predicting Energy Expenditure to Run or Walk a Mile in Normal-Weight and Overweight Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Cody E.; Owens, Scott G.; Waddell, Dwight E.; Bass, Martha A.; Bentley, John P.; Loftin, Mark

    2014-01-01

    An equation published by Loftin, Waddell, Robinson, and Owens (2010) was cross-validated using ten normal-weight walkers, ten overweight walkers, and ten distance runners. Energy expenditure was measured at preferred walking (normal-weight walker and overweight walkers) or running pace (distance runners) for 5 min and corrected to a mile. Energy…

  5. Effects of Estimation Bias on Multiple-Category Classification with an IRT-Based Adaptive Classification Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiangdong; Poggio, John C.; Glasnapp, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of five ability estimators, that is, maximum likelihood estimator, weighted likelihood estimator, maximum a posteriori, expected a posteriori, and Owen's sequential estimator, on the performances of the item response theory-based adaptive classification procedure on multiple categories were studied via simulations. The following…

  6. The alteration of rhyolite in CO2 charged water at 200 and 350°C: The unreactivity of CO2 at higher temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    These observations also offer a possible explanation for the change in chemical sediments from chloride-dominated to bicarbonate-dominated salts found in the stratigraphic section at Searles Lake, California, the terminus of the Owens River which derives its dissolved load from hot springs of the Long Valley caldera.

  7. A Downtown Denver Law Firm Leverages Tenant Improvement Funds to Cut Operating Expenses

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    Bryan Cave HRO (formerly Holme Roberts & Owen LLP, headquartered in Denver, Colorado), an international law firm, partnered with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce annual energy consumption by at least 30% versus pre-retrofit energy use as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  8. Sports or Athletics: A North American Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, J. Alex, Ed.

    This book reports on the 15th Annual Canadian American Seminar, the purpose of which was to explore the widening gulf between sports and athletics, and to examine and predict trends in the U.S. and Canada. The seminar presentations are divided into six sessions, plus the Frank Boland Memorial Lecture delivered by Jesse Owens. Each session includes…

  9. Creating a Literate Society: College-Business-Community Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiss, Tony, Ed.

    Brief descriptions are provided of 16 model literacy initiatives undertaken by community colleges in conjunction with local businesses or community groups. Following introductory comments by Barbara Bush, Tony Zeiss, H. James Owen, and Roy Romer, "Literacy: America's Great Deficit," by Earnestine Thomas-Wilson-Robertson and Tony Zeiss, reviews…

  10. How Early Child Care Affects Later Development. Science Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2007

    2007-01-01

    "Science Briefs" summarize the findings and implications of a recent study in basic science or clinical research. This brief reports on the study "Are there Long-Term Effects of Early Child Care?" (J. Belsky, D. L. Vandell, M. Burchinal, K. A. Clarke-Stewart, K. McCartney, M. T. Owen, M. T., and The NICHD Early Child Care Research Network).…

  11. Proceedings: Conference on the Community/Junior College (Knoxville, Tennessee, April 25-26, 1974).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullough, K. Owen, Ed.

    Presented at the 1974 Community/Junior College Conference, the papers in this monograph examine issues related to institutional, program, staff, and student evaluation. After K. Owen McCullough's and Earl M. Ramer's prefatory remarks, Laura Bornholdt presents a typology of negative staff attitudes toward program and institutional evaluations;…

  12. Conditions of Reception: The Strange Case of "Mons, Anzac, and Kut."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Russell A.

    This paper discusses an Owen Wister poem published in 1920 in "The Atlantic Monthly" and brought to the attention of a university class without any information as to its context or its references, and read in various ways by various individuals, as information about the poem's context was gradually discovered. The central issue explored in the…

  13. A Common Framework for Multiple Sources of Bacterial Annotation

    SciTech Connect

    White, Owen

    2009-05-29

    Owen White, professor of epidemiology and preventive medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a researcher at the University of Maryland Institute for Genome Sciences, gives the May 29, 2009 keynote speech at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  14. Responsibility and Culpability in Apologies: Distinctive Uses of "Sorry" versus "I'm Sorry" in Apologizing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatigante, Marilena; Biassoni, Federica; Marazzini, Francesca; Diadori, Pierangela

    2016-01-01

    People identify apologies as unique types of actions as compared with kin-related moves, which remedy troubles or offenses, such as excuses and justifications (Goffman, 1971; Owen, 1983; Olshtain & Cohen, 1983; Sbisa, 1999). A feature of these apologies is the speaker's acknowledgment of personal responsibility for having caused trouble or…

  15. The World of Daycare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Resource World Review, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Articles contained in this first issue of the journal "Child Resource World Review" present information from a worldwide network of day care professionals. Specifically, Alice Honig compares child care in different countries. Sherrie K. Akinsanya reports on stressful aspects of early schooling for children in Nigeria. Sue Owen discusses…

  16. Double Jeopardy in the Interrogation Room for Youths with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redlich, Allison D.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the article by J. Owen-Kostelnik, N. D. Reppucci, and J. R. Meyer (see record 2006-05893-002) which reviewed the issues surrounding the police interrogation of minors. This commentary expands on the review by addressing the mental health status of youths who come into contact with police. It stems from two immutable facts: (a) The…

  17. 5. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE ROAD SHOWING WALKWAY TO ADMINISTRATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW OF ENTRANCE ROAD SHOWING WALKWAY TO ADMINISTRATIVE SITE, INTERNAL POLICE POST AND MILITARY POLICE POST, LOOKING NORTHNORHTEAST. - Manzanar War Relocation Center, Owens Valley off U.S. Highway 395, 6 miles South of Independence, Independence, Inyo County, CA

  18. 6. GENERAL VIEW OF INTERNAL POLICE POST IN FOREGROUND AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. GENERAL VIEW OF INTERNAL POLICE POST IN FOREGROUND AND MILITARY POLICE POST IN BACKGROUND ALONG ENTRANCE ROAD, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Manzanar War Relocation Center, Owens Valley off U.S. Highway 395, 6 miles South of Independence, Independence, Inyo County, CA

  19. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  20. Perspectives on Innovative Delivery Systems to Meet School Staffing Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cady, Lillian; And Others

    An edited transcript of a symposium on inservice teacher education provides the viewpoints and experiences of six speakers. Dr. Emily Owens, Director of Teacher Education and Certification in the South Carolina Department of Education, discussed a South Carolina law (effective in July 1982) that has six minimum requirements for application for…

  1. Uncivil Speech: Invective and the Rhetorics of Democracy in the Early Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engels, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    Robert Owen's "Declaration of Mental Independence," declaimed on the Fourth of July, 1826, was one of the most ill-received speeches in the early Republic. The attendant controversy provides an opportunity to theorize invective's role in democratic culture. Invective was useful in the early Republic, and continues to be useful today, because it is…

  2. Information Technology in Education and Training (IT@EDU98). Proceedings of a Conference (Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, January 15-16, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Kiem, Ed.; Tran, Van Hao, Ed.; Luu, Tien Hiep, Ed.; Phan, Viet Hoang, Ed.; Owens, Thomas, Ed.; Nguyen, Son Thanh, Ed.; Vuong, Son Thanh, Ed.; Dong Thi, Bich Thuy, Ed.; Phan Thi, Tuoi, Ed.

    This proceedings volume includes the following 29 papers: Session 1--(1) "Technology for Learning: The Present and Future in the United States" (Thomas Owens, Carolyn Cohen); (2) "Computer Systems Technology Programs at the British Columbia Institute of Technology (Canada). A Technology-Based Model for Information Technology" (Ken Takagaki); (3)…

  3. 78 FR 26103 - Notice of Intent To Release Certain Properties From All Terms, Conditions, Reservations and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... District Office, 5950 Hazeltine National Drive, Suite 400, Orlando, FL 32822. Written comments on the Sponsor's request ] must be delivered or mailed to: Richard Owen, Program Manager, Orlando Airports District Office, 5950 Hazeltine National Drive, Suite 400, Orlando, FL 32822-5024. FOR FURTHER...

  4. Raising Critical Issues in the Analysis of Gender and Science in Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sonya N.; Siry, Christina A.

    2009-01-01

    Trevor Owens' paper provides a critique of the role of gender and authority in selected children's books that presented biographies of Albert Einstein and Marie Curie. In the context of discussing Trevor's (2009) article about children's literature, this forum explores issues related to the (a) representation and construction of gender, science,…

  5. 30th Arniversary Press Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Marking the occasion of the Apollo 11 30th Anniversary, members of the Apollo and Saturn astronaut programs attended festivities at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. A press conference was held at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center for the visiting astronauts. Pictured are (L/R): Edgar Mitchell, Walt Cunningham, Charlie Duke, Buzz Aldrin, Dick Gordon and Owen Garriott.

  6. Players and Thinkers and Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frye, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The stronghold that games have on our society has made it imperative that educators understand the impact that video games can have. Owens (2012) presented two frames for how the press discussed the popular game "Spore," which incorporates elements of science topics. One frame suggested that the game teaches children about intelligent design,…

  7. Co-Constructing Space for Literacy and Identity Work with LGBTQ Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, Mollie V.

    2005-01-01

    Young people who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT), or are perceived as such, often suffer from neglect and abuse in schools. School personnel typically ignore the issues of LGBT youth in the academic curriculum and in extracurricular activities (Gray, 1999; Owens, 1998). Youth perceived as LGBT are often called derogatory…

  8. Values and Work Environment: Mapping 32 Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knafo, Ariel; Sagiv, Lilach

    2004-01-01

    The study addresses the relationship between values and occupations. Israeli workers (N = 652; mean age = 47; 43% male) in 32 occupations reported their values using the Portrait Value Questionnaire (Schwartz, Melech, Lehmann, Burgess, Harris, & Owens, 2001), and value scores were aggregated within occupations. Occupations were classified…

  9. Astronaut Jack Lousma participates in EVA to deploy twin pole solar shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, participates in the August 6, 1973 extravehicular activity (EVA) during which he and Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop (OWS). Note the striking reflection of the Earth in Lousma's helmet visor.

  10. Astronaut Jack Lousma participates in EVA to deploy twin pole solar shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Jack R. Lousma, Skylab 3 pilot, participates in the August 6, 1973 extravehicular activity (EVA) during which he and Astronauts Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, deployed the twin pole solar shield to help shade the Orbital Workshop (OWS). Note the reflection of the Apollo Telescope Mount and the Earth in Lousma's helmet visor.

  11. Expanding Excellence: Teachers Cross District Lines to Learn with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Ben; Strahan, David

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a vignette which demonstrates some of the outcomes that occur when teachers collaborate across school district lines. The project began as an idea from Ben Owens, a 2014 Hope Street Group National Teacher Fellow. The basic notion was that good teaching doesn't happen in isolation. As someone who came into teaching after a…

  12. Predicting Work Activities with Divergent Thinking Tests: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapham, Maria M.; Cowdery, Edwina M.; King, Kelly E.; Montang, Melissa A.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined whether divergent thinking test scores obtained from engineering students during college predicted creative work activities fifteen years later. Results showed that a subscore of the "Owens Creativity Test", which assesses divergent thinking about mechanical objects, correlated significantly with self-ratings of creative work…

  13. 77 FR 9231 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund IV; FFP Project 55, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund IV; FFP Project 55, LLC; Notice Announcing... County and Owen County, Kentucky. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund IV for...

  14. 77 FR 12281 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund IV; FFP Project 55, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund IV; FFP Project 55, LLC; Notice Announcing... and Owen County, Kentucky. The applications were filed by Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund IV for Project...

  15. 13. CLOSE UP VIEW OF THE IRON COMMEMORATIVE LEGEND ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. CLOSE UP VIEW OF THE IRON COMMEMORATIVE LEGEND ON THE WEST PORTAL OF THE BRIDGE. NOTE: AN EXACT DUPLICATE OF THIS LEGEND CAN BE FOUND ON THE EAST PORTAL. - Freedom Bridge, Spanning West Fork of White River at County Road 590 South, Freedom, Owen County, IN

  16. 6. AN IMAGE OF THE WEST PORTAL OF THE BRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. AN IMAGE OF THE WEST PORTAL OF THE BRIDGE, TAKEN FROM AN ELEVATED POSITION, SHOWING THE RURAL QUALITY OF THE RIVER SCENE AND ITS BANKS. - Freedom Bridge, Spanning West Fork of White River at County Road 590 South, Freedom, Owen County, IN

  17. 10. VIEW OF PORTIONS OF THE CONCRETE CAUSEWAY, THE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW OF PORTIONS OF THE CONCRETE CAUSEWAY, THE IRON BRIDGE AND STONE ABUTMENTS, TAKEN ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE STRUCTURE. NOTE THE IRON BANDS PLACED ABOUT THE ABUTMENT CORNICE. - Freedom Bridge, Spanning West Fork of White River at County Road 590 South, Freedom, Owen County, IN

  18. 12. A CLOSE UP VIEW OF THE IRON SUPERSTRUCTURE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. A CLOSE UP VIEW OF THE IRON SUPERSTRUCTURE OF THIS CAMELBACK TRUSS BRIDGE. THIS PHOTO SHOWS A DETAIL OF THE LATTICE WORK, AND AN INTERESTING CURVED BRACE MEMBER. - Freedom Bridge, Spanning West Fork of White River at County Road 590 South, Freedom, Owen County, IN

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (85th, Miami, Florida, August 5-8, 2002). Minorities and Communication Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    The Minorities and Communication Division of the proceedings contains the following 7 papers: "The Race Card and Ethical Reasoning: The Importance of Race to Journalistic Decision Making" (Renita Coleman); "Jesse Owens, A Black Pearl Amidst an Ocean of Fury: A Case Study of Press Coverage on The 1936 Berlin Olympic Games" (Pamela C. Laucella); "A…

  20. The Journal of Suggestive-Accelerative Learning and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Donald, Ed.

    1978-01-01

    The following articles are included in these proceedings: (1) "Teaching Remedial Reading with SALT," by Jean Taylor; (2) "Commentary to the 'Cinematographic Report,'" by Joseph Goldin; (3) "Interpretations of the Lozanov Method," by W. Jane Bancroft; (4) "Is a Little SALT a Dangerous Thing?" by Owen L. Caskey; (5) "Problems Related to the…

  1. Spinning a Yarn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzer, Tom

    1997-01-01

    Owen Valley High School in Spencer, Indiana, uses a holistic approach to integrating its academic and vocational curricula. Publication of a book of student-written stories on local history was a collaboration of classes in creative writing, civics, child development, English, art, computer applications, print communications, manufacturing,…

  2. The Role of Various Curriculum Models on Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Dean O.; Tarr, Susan J.; Killion, Lorraine E.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that physical education curricula can be highly effective in increasing physical activity levels at school (Sallis & Owen, 1999). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of various curriculum models on physical activity. Total steps were measured on 1,111 subjects and three curriculum models were studied…

  3. EFFECT OF ARSENICALS ON THE EXPRESSION OF CELL CYCLE PROTEINS AND EARLY SIGNALING EVENTS IN PRIMARY HUMAN KERATINOCYTES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effect of Arsenicals on the Expression of Cell Cycle Proteins and Early Signaling Events in Primary Human Keratinocytes.

    Mudipalli, A, Owen R. D. and R. J. Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, USEPA, RTP, NC 27711.

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is a m...

  4. VCCA Journal: Journal of the Virginia Community Colleges Association, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Darrell, Ed.; Jobin, Robert, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Volume 5 of the "VCCA Journal" contains the following articles: (1) "Outcomes Assessment Weather Forecast: A Cold Wind Blowing from the North," by David C. Hanson; (2) "The National Endowment for the Humanities Grant at Piedmont Virginia Community College," by Evelyn Edson, Jane Kingston, William Owen, and Samuel Westbrook; (3) "Spring Break in…

  5. 7. A DETAIL, TAKEN FROM THE EAST END OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. A DETAIL, TAKEN FROM THE EAST END OF THE BRIDGE. THIS IMAGE SHOWS THE MODERN, EDGE-LAID 2" X 4" DIMENSIONED LUMBER AS DECKING. - Freedom Bridge, Spanning West Fork of White River at County Road 590 South, Freedom, Owen County, IN

  6. EXPRESSING SUPPLY LIMITATION IN SAND SALTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Saltation-driven sandblasting is the most effective producer of windblown dust. Modeling of wind-blown dust emissions requires an efficient parameterization of sand flux in the saltating mode. According to the theory of P. R. Owen the horizontal mass flux of saltating uniform p...

  7. Measuring Success: Using Assessments and Accountability To Raise Student Achievement. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education Reform of the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Seventh Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    The Subcommittee on Education Reform of the House Committee on Education and the Workforce met to hear testimony on using assessments and accountability to raise student achievement. Statements were given by: (1) Major Owens, Congressman from New York; (2) Michael Castle, Congressman from Delaware, Committee Chairman; (3) Edward B. Rust, Jr.,…

  8. Proceedings of the Annual Linguistics Conference (2nd, Irbid, Jordan, April 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Jonathan, Comp.; Abu-Salim, Issam, Comp.

    A collection of conference papers includes: "More on Arabic Vowel Harmony: A Metrical-Suprasegmental Approach" (Issam Abu-Salim); "The Phonological Assimilation of Borrowing" (Saleh Suleiman); "On Getting a Head: A Problem in Dependency Grammar" (Jonathan Owens); "Negation in Jordanian Arabic: A Developmental Study" (Oglah Smadi); "Problems in…

  9. Affirmative Action: The Answer to Discrimination? An AEI Round Table Held on May 28, 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Ralph K.; And Others

    The participants in this discussion in addition to Ralph Winter, the moderator, include Owen Fiss and Richard Posner, professors of law; Vera Glaser and William Raspberry, newspaper columnists; and Paul Seabury, professor of political science. These specialists address various legal, ethical and practical issues related to the elimination of…

  10. Integrating Best Practices in Language Intervention and Curriculum Design to Facilitate First Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lederer, Susan Hendler

    2014-01-01

    For children developing language typically, exposure to language through the natural, general language stimulation provided by families, siblings, and others is sufficient enough to facilitate language learning (Bloom & Lahey, 1978; Nelson, 1973; Owens, 2008). However, children with language delays (even those who are receptively and…